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Sample records for fibrillation patients receiving

  1. Prognostic importance of natriuretic peptides and atrial fibrillation in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Marcelle D.; Maass, Alexander H.; Hillege, Hans L.; Wiesfeld, Ans C. P.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of natriuretic peptides and atrial fibrillation (AF) on response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and mortality. Methods and results This study included 338 consecutive CRT patients. Response to CRT was defined as a reduction in

  2. Use and Outcomes of Antiarrhythmic Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Receiving Oral Anticoagulation: Results from the ROCKET AF Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Breithardt, Günter; Passman, Rod; Hankey, Graeme J.; Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Hacke, Werner; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Califf, Robert M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) and anticoagulation are mainstays of atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment. Objective We aimed to study the use and outcomes of AAD therapy in anticoagulated AF patients. Methods Patients in the ROCKET AF trial (n=14,264) were grouped by AAD use at baseline: amiodarone, other AAD, or no AAD. Multivariable adjustment was performed to compare stroke, bleeding, and death across groups, as well as across treatment assignment (rivaroxaban or warfarin). Results Of 14,264 patients randomized, 1681 (11.8%) were treated with an AAD (1144 [8%] with amiodarone, 537 [3.8%] with other AADs). Amiodarone-treated patients were less-often female (38% vs. 48%), had more persistent AF (64% vs. 40%), and more concomitant heart failure (71% vs. 41%) than patients receiving other AADs. Patients receiving no AAD more closely-resembled amiodarone-treated patients. Time in therapeutic range was significantly lower in warfarin-treated patients receiving amiodarone versus no AAD (50% vs. 58%, p<0.0001). Compared with no AAD, neither amiodarone (adjusted HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.74–1.31, p=0.9) nor other AADs (adjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.37–1.17, p=0.15) were associated with increased mortality. Similar results were observed for embolic and bleeding outcomes. Rivaroxaban treatment effects in patients not on an AAD were consistent with the overall trial (primary endpoint adjusted HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68–0.98, pinteraction=0.06; safety endpoint adjusted HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.90–1.24, pinteraction=0.33). Conclusion Treatment with AADs was not associated with increased morbidity or mortality in anticoagulated patients with AF. The influence of amiodarone on outcomes in patients receiving rivaroxaban requires further study. PMID:24833235

  3. Percutaneous coronary intervention and antiplatelet therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation receiving apixaban or warfarin: Insights from the ARISTOTLE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopin, David; Jones, W Schuyler; Sherwood, Matthew W; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Wallentin, Lars; Lewis, Basil S; Verheugt, Freek W A; Vinereanu, Dragos; Bahit, M Cecilia; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Huber, Kurt; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Granger, Christopher B; Lopes, Renato D; Alexander, John H

    2018-03-01

    We assessed antiplatelet therapy use and outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) during the ARISTOTLE trial. Patients were categorized based on the occurrence of PCI during follow-up (median 1.8 years); PCI details and outcomes post-PCI are reported. Of the 18,201 trial participants, 316 (1.7%) underwent PCI (152 in apixaban group, 164 in warfarin group). At the time of PCI, 84% (267) were on study drug (either apixaban or warfarin). Of these, 19% did not stop study drug during PCI, 49% stopped and restarted 5 days post-PCI. At 30 days post-PCI, 35% of patients received dual -antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), 23% received aspirin only, and 13% received a P2Y 12 inhibitor only; 29% received no antiplatelet therapy. Triple therapy (DAPT + oral anticoagulant [OAC]) was used in 21% of patients, 23% received OAC only, 15% received OAC plus aspirin, and 9% received OAC plus a P2Y 12 inhibitor; 32% received antiplatelet agents without OAC. Post-PCI, patients assigned to apixaban versus warfarin had numerically similar rates of major bleeding (5.93 vs 6.73 events/100 patient-years; P = .95) and stroke (2.74 vs 1.84 events/100 patient-years; P = .62). PCI occurred infrequently during follow-up. Most patients on study drug at the time of PCI remained on study drug in the peri-PCI period; 19% continued the study drug without interruption. Antiplatelet therapy use post-PCI was variable, although most patients received DAPT. Additional data are needed to guide the use of antithrombotics in patients undergoing PCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Motion of left atrial appendage as a determinant of thrombus formation in patients with a low CHADS2 score receiving warfarin for persistent nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ono Koji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to define the independent determinants of left atrial appendage (LAA thrombus among various echocardiographic parameters measured by Velocity Vector Imaging (VVI in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF receiving warfarin, particularly in patients with a low CHADS2 score. Methods LAA emptying fraction (EF and LAA peak longitudinal strain were measured by VVI using transesophageal echocardiography in 260 consecutive patients with nonvalvular persistent AF receiving warfarin. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (n=43 or absence (n=217 of LAA thrombus. Moreover, the patients within each group were further divided into subgroups according to a CHADS2 score ≤1. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that LAAEF was an independent determinant of LAA thrombus in the subgroup of 140 with a low CHADS2 score. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed that an LAAEF of 21% was the optimal cutoff value for predicting LAA thrombus. Conclusions LAA thrombus formation depended on LAA contractility. AF patients with reduced LAA contractile fraction (LAAEF ≤21% require strong anticoagulant therapy to avoid thromboembolic events regardless of a low CHADS2 score (≤1.

  5. Major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation receiving apixaban or warfarin: The ARISTOTLE Trial (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation): Predictors, Characteristics, and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylek, Elaine M; Held, Claes; Alexander, John H; Lopes, Renato D; De Caterina, Raffaele; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Huber, Kurt; Jansky, Petr; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Hanna, Michael; Thomas, Laine; Wallentin, Lars; Granger, Christopher B

    2014-05-27

    This study sought to characterize major bleeding on the basis of the components of the major bleeding definition, to explore major bleeding by location, to define 30-day mortality after a major bleeding event, and to identify factors associated with major bleeding. Apixaban was shown to reduce the risk of major hemorrhage among patients with atrial fibrillation in the ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation) trial. All patients who received at least 1 dose of a study drug were included. Major bleeding was defined according to the criteria of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Factors associated with major hemorrhage were identified using a multivariable Cox model. The on-treatment safety population included 18,140 patients. The rate of major hemorrhage among patients in the apixaban group was 2.13% per year compared with 3.09% per year in the warfarin group (hazard ratio [HR] 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.60 to 0.80; p < 0.001). Compared with warfarin, major extracranial hemorrhage associated with apixaban led to reduced hospitalization, medical or surgical intervention, transfusion, or change in antithrombotic therapy. Major hemorrhage followed by mortality within 30 days occurred half as often in apixaban-treated patients than in those receiving warfarin (HR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33 to 0.74; p < 0.001). Older age, prior hemorrhage, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack, diabetes, lower creatinine clearance, decreased hematocrit, aspirin therapy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were independently associated with an increased risk. Apixaban, compared with warfarin, was associated with fewer intracranial hemorrhages, less adverse consequences following extracranial hemorrhage, and a 50% reduction in fatal consequences at 30 days in cases of major hemorrhage. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation in the diabetic patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is considerable, and prevalence rates are increasing. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation; however, diabetes also influences the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation. I...... and outcomes of heart failure and the success rates of both ablation and cardioversion in atrial fibrillation patients with diabetes. Finally, this article describes the association of HbA1c levels with the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation patients.......The global burden of atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is considerable, and prevalence rates are increasing. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation; however, diabetes also influences the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation....... In the following article, the authors describe the association between diabetes and atrial fibrillation; specifically, the significance of diabetes on the risk of atrial fibrillation, ischemic stroke and bleeding complications associated with anticoagulation. In addition, the authors evaluate the risks...

  7. Relation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to serious bleeding and thromboembolism risk in patients with atrial fibrillation receiving antithrombotic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, Morten; Lip, Gregory Y H; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2014-01-01

    and antithrombotic therapy, assessed by using Cox models. RESULTS: Of 150 900 patients with AF (median age, 75 years [interquartile range, 65 to 83 years]; 47% female), 53 732 (35.6%) were prescribed an NSAID during a median follow-up of 6.2 years (interquartile range, 2.1 to 14.0 years). There were 17 187 (11...

  8. Stroke prevention in hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Seema; Anderson, David; Putnam, Wayne; Flowerdew, Gordon; Gardner, Martin; Cox, Jafna

    2003-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants reduce the incidence of stroke by 68%, yet suboptimal use has been documented in surveys of patients with atrial fibrillation. The present study examined current patterns of anticoagulant use for patients hospitalized with atrial fibrillation across an entire health care system. Improving Cardiovascular Outcomes in Nova Scotia (ICONS) is a prospective cohort study involving all patients hospitalized in Nova Scotia with atrial fibrillation, among other conditions. Consecutive inpatients with atrial fibrillation from October 15, 1997 to October 14, 1998 were studied. Detailed demographic and clinical data were collected and the proportion of patients using antithrombotic therapy was tabulated by risk category. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship of various demographic and clinical factors with the use of antithrombotic agents. There were 2202 patients hospitalized with atrial fibrillation; 644 admitted specifically for this condition. Only 21% of patients admitted with atrial fibrillation were on warfarin sodium at admission and this increased by time of discharge. Diabetes was negatively correlated with warfarin sodium use. Histories of prosthetic valve replacement, stroke/transient ischemic attack, and heart failure were positively associated with anticoagulant use on admission. Patients with prosthetic valve replacement, heart failure, or hyperlipidemia were most likely to receive anticoagulants at discharge. Antithrombotic agents remain underused by patients with atrial fibrillation. While higher risk patients are generally targeted, this is not invariably the case; thus, diabetics remain under treated. Further work is needed to explain such anomalous practice and promote optimal antithrombotic therapy use.

  9. Atrial fibrillation in fracture patients treated with oral bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; Eiken, P; Brixen, K

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine if patients receiving oral bisphosphonates are at excess risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), stroke and myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Register-based restricted cohort study. SETTING: National Hospital Discharge Register and National Prescriptions Database (1995-2005). SUBJ......OBJECTIVES: To determine if patients receiving oral bisphosphonates are at excess risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), stroke and myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Register-based restricted cohort study. SETTING: National Hospital Discharge Register and National Prescriptions Database (1995......-2005). SUBJECTS: Fracture patients beginning bisphosphonates (n = 15 795) were matched with unexposed fracture patients of the same age, sex and fracture type (n = 31 590). RESULTS: Incidence rates of AF were 16.5/1000 person years in untreated fracture patients and 20.6/1000 person years in bisphosphonate users...... increased even in patients who stopped therapy after the first packet and (ii) risks were not increased by high adherence. Bisphosphonate-exposed patients were at increased risk of hospital-treated AF [adjusted HR: 1.13 (1.01-1.26)], but the risk amongst bisphosphonate users was inversely proportional...

  10. Effect of age on stroke prevention therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation: the atrial fibrillation investigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Walraven, Carl; Hart, Robert G; Connolly, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    . Outcomes included ischemic stroke, serious bleeding (intracranial hemorrhage or systemic bleeding requiring hospitalization, transfusion, or surgery), and cardiovascular events (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, systemic embolism, or vascular death). RESULTS: The analysis included 8932 patients......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke risk increases with age in patients who have nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. It is uncertain whether the efficacy of stroke prevention therapies in atrial fibrillation changes as patients age. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of age...... on the relative efficacy of oral anticoagulants (OAC) and antiplatelet (AP) therapy (including acetylsalicylic acid and triflusal) on ischemic stroke, serious bleeding, and vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation. METHODS: This is an analysis of the Atrial Fibrillation Investigators database, which...

  11. Left atrial appendage occlusion versus standard medical care in patients with atrial fibrillation and intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Wester, Per

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the prognosis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) having a left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) versus patients receiving standard medical therapy. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 151 patients from the Nord...

  12. Atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with heart failure and chronic atrial fibrillation : Role of duration of at atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, MP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Van Gelder, IC; De Kam, PJ; Lie, KI

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the determinants of atrial natriuretic peptide level in patients with congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation. In particular, the duration of atrial fibrillation was analyzed because atrial fibrillation per se might have a specific effect on atrial

  13. Stroke prevention strategies in North American patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntyre, William F; Conen, David; Olshansky, Brian

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antithrombotic prophylaxis with oral anticoagulation (OAC) substantially reduces stroke and mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). HYPOTHESIS: Analysis of data in GLORIA-AF, an international, observational registry of patients with newly-diagnosed AF, can identify factor...

  14. Different spontaneous breathing trials in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Tseng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Weaning from mechanical ventilation is one of the most important and challenging problems for most intensive care unit (ICU patients. Spontaneous breathing trial (SBT is the most common method used to evaluate patients’ ability to breathe by themselves and plays an important role in decision making for weaning. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of different methods of SBT in respiratory care unit (RCU patients with atrial fibrillation (AF on weaning outcome. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed different methods of SBT in patients with and without AF. We enrolled RCU patients who required mechanical ventilation and had undergone transthoracic echocardiography from January 2011 to January 2012. Results: There was a higher SBT passing rate among AF patients who received pressure support ventilation (PSV trial than in those who received T-piece trail (92.5% vs. 73.1%, p = 0.041. The weaning rates between these two groups were not significantly different (83.8% vs. 94.7%, p = 0.403. Total ventilator days were longer in T-piece group than in PSV group (median 40.0, IQR: 18.2–125.1 days vs. 33.0, IQR: 29.6–51.0 days respectively, p = 0.580, but this difference was not statistically significant. These results were not found in patients without AF. Conclusions: The use of PSV trial might be considered first instead of T-piece trial for SBT when AF patients were ready to wean. Keywords: Atrial fibrillation (AF, Intensive care unit (ICU, Mechanical ventilation, Spontaneous breathing trial (SBT, Ventilator weaning

  15. Effect of clopidogrel added to aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connolly, Stuart J.; Pogue, Janice; Hart, Robert G.; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Pfeffer, Marc; Chrolavicius, Susan; Yusuf, Salim; Connolly, S. J.; Yusuf, S.; Camm, J.; Chrolavicius, S.; Commerford, P.; Flather, M.; Hart, R. G.; Hohnloser, S. H.; Joyner, C.; Pfeffer, M.; Gaudin, C.; Blumenthal, M.; Marchese, C.; Pogue, J.; Hart, R.; Hohnloser, S.; Anand, I.; Arthur, H.; Avezum, A.; Budaj, A.; Ceremuzynski, L.; de Caterina, R.; Diaz, R.; Dorian, P.; Flaker, G.; Fox, K. A. A.; Franzosi, M. G.; Goldhaber, S.; Golitsyn, S.; Granger, C.; Halon, D.; Hermosillo, A.; Hunt, D.; Jansky, P.; Karatzas, N.; Keltai, M.; Kozan, O.; Lanas, F.; Lau, C. P.; Le Heuzey, J. Y.; Lewis, B. S.; Morais, J.; Morillo, C.; Paolasso, E.; Peters, R. J.; Pfisterer, M.; Piegas, L.; Pipilis, A.; Sitkei, E.; Swedberg, K.; Talajic, M.; Valentin, V.; van Mieghem, W.; Varigos, J.; Ameriso, S.; Atra, M.; Berwanger, O.; Bonilla, C.; Bornstein, N.; Chamiec, T.; Chan, Y. K.; Cottin, Y.; Csiba, L.; Cybulski, J.; Czepiel, A.; de Raedt, H.; Dvorakova, H.; Eikelboom, J.; Ergene, O.; Fodor, G.; Galli, M.; Gardinale, E.; Gross, B.; Goodfield, P.; Happola, O.; Healey, J.; Himbert, D.; Jacobsson, F.; Kalvach, P.; Kies, B.; Laine, M.; Lam, A.; Lewis, S.; Leys, D.; Maggioni, A. P.; Massaro, A.; Mayosi, B. M.; Norrving, B.; Okay, T.; Olah, L.; Osende, J. O.; Oto, A.; Peeters, A.; Penicka, M.; Perakis, A.; Pizzolato, G.; Rafti, F.; Renkin, J.; Siva, A.; Steg, P. G.; Stockins, B.; Strozynska, E.; Turazza, F.; Vanderhoven, L.; Vizel, S.; Widimsky, P.; Zaborski, J.; Albers, G.; Hankey, G.; Shuaib, A.; Silva, J.; Wyse, D. G.; Cairns, J. A.; Gent, M.; Hirsh, J.; Marler, J.; Pritchett, E.; Wittes, J.; Beresh, H.; Floyd, L.; Gasic, Z.; Holadyk-Gris, I.; Lawrence, M.; Moro, I.; Perry, S.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues, T.; Robinson, L.; Stevens, C.; Worthy, L.; Yuan, F.; Ahuad Guerrero, R. A.; Allall, O.; Amuchastegui, L. M.; Boskis, M.; Bustamante Labarta, M. H.; Castellanos, C. R.; Chiale, P.; Cuneo, C. A.; Czcczuo, A.; Gabito, A. J.; Garrido, M.; Guzmán, L. A.; Hasban, E. G.; Hershson, A. R.; Hominal, M. A.; Krauss, J. G.; Luciardi, H. L.; Marzetti, E. M.; Montaña, O. R.; Rabinovich, R. F.; Ramos, H. R.; Sanchez, A. S.; Schygiel, P. O.; Sumay, G. M.; Vogel, D. R.; Zaidman, C. J.; Aroney, G. M.; Ashby, D. T.; Barlow, M. A.; Cooke, P.; Cross, D. B.; Fitzpatrick, M. A.; Garrahy, P.; Karrasch, J.; Nelson, G. I.; Rees, D.; Roger, S. D.; Rogers, J.; Singh, B. B.; Stickland, J. F.; Waites, J. H.; Walsh, W. F.; Eichinger, J.; Huber, K.; Leisch, F.; Boland, J.; Conraads, V. M.; Cools, F. J. C.; de Roy, L.; El Allaf, D.; Mairesse, G. H.; Vankelecom, B.; Abrantes, J.; Armaganijan, D.; Atié, J.; Blacher, C.; Bodanese, L. C.; Braga, J. C. F.; Braile, M. V.; Chaves, H.; Coelho, O. R.; Cunha, C. L. P.; de Lima, G. G.; de Paola, A. A. V.; Esteves, J. P.; Francischetti, A.; Francischetti, A. E.; Lorga-Filho, A. M.; Maia, L. N.; Marcussi, D. M.; Marin-Neto, J. A.; Meneghelo, Z. M.; Rocha, R. Mourilhe; Nogueira, P. R.; Oigman, W.; Paiva, M.; Précoma, D. B.; Rabelo, W.; Rabelo, A.; Rassi, S.; Rassi, A.; Reis, G.; Rossi, P. R.; Rossi Neto, J. M.; Saraiva, J. K.; Sobral-Filho, D. C.; Zimmermann, S. L.; Ashton, T. A.; Bhargava, R.; Carroll, S.; Chehayeb, R.; Connors, S. P.; Constance, C.; Costi, P.; Coutu, B.; Crystal, E.; Douketis, J. D.; Fortin, C.; Fox, B. A.; Gupta, M. K.; Krahn, A. D.; Kuritzky, R.; Kwok, K.; Leader, R.; Ma, P.; Mangat, I.; Maranda, C. R.; Matangi, M. F.; Moddel, G.; Mukherjee, A.; Nawaz, S.; Palaic, M.; Pandey, A. S.; Rebane, T. M.; Ruel, M.; Sapp, J. L.; Senaratne, M. P.; St-Hilaire, R.; Talbot, P.; To, T. B.; Vakani, M.; Weigel, M. A.; Wulffhart, Z.; Yao, L.; Zaniol, D.; Conejeros, C. R.; Corbalán, R.; Dussaillant, G. R.; Escobar, E.; Hassi, M. E.; Parra, C. A.; Stockins, B. A.; Varleta, P. E.; Berka, L.; Dedek, V.; Florian, J.; Hejhal, O.; Herold, M.; Klimsa, Z.; Kotik, I.; Simon, J.; Smetana, K.; Spinar, J.; Spinarová, L.; Tousek, F.; Husted, S.; Nielsen, T.; Pehrson, S.; Tuxen, C.; Harjola, V. P.; Huikuri, H. V.; Kettunen, R. V. J.; Melin, J. H.; Peuhkurinen, K.; Carlioz, R.; Coisne, D.; Decoulx, E.; Defaye, P.; Demarcq, J. M.; Gacem, K.; Galley, D. L.; Lardoux, H. M.; Mabo, P.; Mansour, M.; Olive, T. G.; Poulard, J. E.; Pruvot, C. F.; Rey, J. L.; Bauer, W. R.; Baumann, G.; Berghöfer, G.; Boehm, G.; Borggrefe, M. M.; Brücker, G.; Darius, H.; Duray, G. Z.; Felix, S. B.; Fink, P.; Fritz, H.; Haberl, R.; Hoffmann, S.; Horacek, T.; Kalusche, D. W.; Kasper, W.; Katus, H. A.; Klepzig, H. H.; Loos, U.; Merher, R.; Munzel, T.; Neuzner, J.; Ochs, H. R.; Pieske, B.; Pollock, B. W.; Schmidt, A.; Schumacher, M.; Seidl, K.; Speier, U.; Spitzer, S. G.; Stenzel, G.; Volkmann, H.; Wunderlich, J.; Zacharzowsky, U.; Antonakoudis, H.; Georgakopoulos, N.; Goudevenos, J. A.; Iliopoulos, T. A.; Kallikazaros, I.; Pyrgakis, V. N.; Skoufas, P.; Chan, W. K.; Chan, H. W.; Fung, J. W. H.; Li, S. K.; Wong, K. S.; Forster, T.; Kárpáti, P.; Keltai, K.; Kovacs, A.; Kurta, G.; Laszlo, Z.; Rapi, J.; Regos, L.; Rostas, L.; Szakál, I.; Tomcsanyi, J.; Toth, C.; Bloch, L.; Khader, N.; Klainman, E.; Koukoui, D.; Lotan, C.; Marmor, A.; Omary, M. Z.; Reisin, L. H.; Vered, Z.; Zeltser, D.; Zimlichman, R.; Bianconi, L.; Bicego, D.; Cosmi, D.; Filigheddu, F.; Garini, A.; Lunati, M.; Moretti, L.; Mos, L.; Pontiroli, A. E.; Renda, G.; Ricci, S.; Rossi, P.; Santonastaso, M.; Scioli, G. A.; Stramba-Badiale, M.; Terrosu, P.; Omar, R.; Ong, T. K.; Ahmad, W. A. Wan; Alvarado, R.; Calvo, C.; Cordero-Cabra, J. A.; Hernández, I.; Jerjes-Sanchez, C.; Lara, S.; Lopez Rosas, E.; Molina, L.; Morales, E.; Petersen-Aranguren, F.; Picos Bovio, E. M.; Pozas, G.; Robles Torres, F. J.; Holwerda, K.; Lok, D. J. A.; Nierop, R.; Pieterse, M. G. C.; van der Heijden, R.; van Kempen, L.; Oie, B. K.; Omland, T. M.; Otterstad, J.; von Brandis, C.; Bronisz, M.; Chizynski, K.; Czerski, T.; Dluzniewski, M.; Gessek, J.; Gieroba, A.; Gniot, J. R.; Gorny, J.; Halaczuiewicz, H.; Janik, K.; Janion, M.; Jerzykowska, O.; Kawka-Urbanek, T.; Kincel, K.; Kocon, S.; Kopaczewski, J.; Krasowski, W.; Makuch, M.; Malinowski, S.; Miastkowski, Z.; Mickiewicz-Pawlowska, M.; Miekus, P.; Obrebska-Tabaczka, E.; Ogorek, M.; Piasecka-Krysiak, E.; Piepiorka, A. W.; Piotrowski, W.; Pluta, W.; Puzio, E.; Rekosz, J.; Sinkiewicz, W.; Stopinski, M.; Szelemej, R.; Tendera, M.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Wilkoszynski, M.; Zalska, B.; Antunes, E.; Carrageta, M. O.; de Sousa, J.; Martins, L.; Mendonca, M. I.; Silvestre, I.; Akatova, E. V.; Aleksandrov, V.; Antuch, E. A.; Arutyunov, G.; Bart, B.; Belousov, Y. B.; Chernichka, I. I.; Dovgalevsky, P.; Gratsiansky, N.; Ivleva, A. Y.; Kislyak, O. A.; Mareyev, V. Y.; Maykov, E. B.; Milyagin, V.; Novikova, T. N.; Panchenko, E. P.; Reshetko, O.; Semernin, E.; Sidorenko, B. A.; Sinopalnikov, A.; Skvortsova, V.; Solomatin, A.; Sukhinina, T. S.; Suslina, Z. A.; Titkov, Y.; Tsyrline, V.; Chan, B.; Foo, D.; Omar, A. R.; teo, W. S.; Brown, B. G.; Ebrahim, I. O.; Gibson, G. J.; Klug, E.; Marx, J. D.; Mntla, P. S.; Okreglicki, A.; Pretorius, M.; Roos, J. S.; Snyders, F.; van Zyl, L. J.; Cano, L.; Garcia-Puig, J.; Hernandez-Madrid, A.; Mostaza, J. M.; Orriach, M. D.; Sabate, X.; Viñolas, X.; Blomström, P.; Johansson, L.; Klintberg, L.; Lycksell, M.; Nilsson, O.; Rasmanis, G.; Nilehn, K. E. Saldeen; Ulvenstam, G.; Baumgartner, R. W.; François, M.; Gallino, A.; Moccetti, T.; Tettenborn, B. E.; Chou, H.-T.; Kuo, J.-Y.; Lai, W.-T.; Lin, J. L.; Lin, L.-J.; Ueng, K. C.; Yeih, D.-F.; Bakar, M.; Ilerigelen, B.; Kumral, E.; Nisanci, Y.; Savas, Z. I.; Adgey, Y.; Brack, M. J.; Cleland, J.; Davey, P. P.; Davies, J.; Glen, S. K.; Jennings, K.; Levy, T.; Lip, G. Y. H.; Moriarty, A. J.; Pearson, C.; Purvis, J. A.; Pye, M. P.; Savelieva, I.; Senior, R.; Trouton, T. G.; Ahmed, I. S.; Amin, M.; Anderson, J. L.; Bauernfeind, R. A.; Belew, K.; Bilazarian, S. D.; Black, R. A.; Burton, M. E.; Cebe, J. E.; Chandrashekhar, Y. S.; Chen, C.; Das, D.; Denny, D. M.; Desai, V.; Fahmy, R. N.; Fishbein, G. J.; Gelernt, M. D.; Gerber, J.; Goldberg, M. C.; Grena, P. G.; Honan, M. B.; Hunter, J. J.; Jacobson, J.; Jarmukli, N. F.; Klancke, K.; Kobayashi, J. F.; Lewis, S. J.; Little, T.; Mallis, I.; Marani, A. M.; Marshall, J. J.; Meltzer, P.; Menapace, F. J.; O'Neill, P. G.; Pearce, D. J.; Quick, A.; Ravipudi, S.; Rivera, E.; Sackett, M.; Salerno, D. M.; Schussheim, A.; Sheikh, K.; Shettigar, U. R.; Treasure, C. B.; Vidaillet, H.; Vijay, N.; Wagner, D.; Walker, J. L.; Winters, S. L.; Young, D. R.; Zoble, R. G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin K antagonists reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation but are considered unsuitable in many patients, who usually receive aspirin instead. We investigated the hypothesis that the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin would reduce the risk of vascular events in

  16. Atrial fibrillation patients do not benefit from acetylsalicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Själander, Sara; Själander, Anders; Svensson, Peter J; Friberg, Leif

    2014-05-01

    Oral anticoagulation is the recommended treatment for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Notwithstanding, many patients are treated with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as monotherapy. Our objective was to investigate if atrial fibrillation patients benefit from ASA as monotherapy for stroke prevention. Retrospective study of patients with a clinical diagnosis of atrial fibrillation between 1 July 2005 and 1 January 2009 in the National Swedish Patient register, matched with data from the National Prescribed Drugs register. Endpoints were ischaemic stroke, thrombo-embolic event, intracranial haemorrhage, and major bleeding. The study population consisted of 115 185 patients with atrial fibrillation, of whom 58 671 were treated with ASA as monotherapy and 56 514 were without any antithrombotic treatment at baseline. Mean follow-up was 1.5 years. Treatment with ASA was associated with higher risk of ischaemic stroke and thrombo-embolic events compared with no antithrombotic treatment. Acetylsalicylic acid as monotherapy in stroke prevention of atrial fibrillation has no discernable protective effect against stroke, and may even increase the risk of ischaemic stroke in elderly patients. Thus, our data support the new European guidelines recommendation that ASA as monotherapy should not be used as stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

  17. Increased amount of atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation secondary to mitral valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuzebroek, Guillaume S. C.; van Amersfoorth, Shirley C. M.; Hoogendijk, Mark G.; Kelder, Johannes C.; van Hemel, Norbert M.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Coronel, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Atrial fibrosis is related to atrial fibrillation but may differ in patients with mitral valve disease or lone atrial fibrillation. Therefore, we studied atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation + mitral valve disease or with lone atrial fibrillation and compared it with

  18. Non-major bleeding with apixaban versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahit, M.C.; Lopes, R.D.; Wojdyla, D.M.; Held, C.; Hanna, M.; Vinereanu, D.; Hylek, E.M.; Verheugt, F.W.; Goto, S.; Alexander, J.H.; Wallentin, L.; Granger, C.B.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We describe the incidence, location and management of non-major bleeding, and assess the association between non-major bleeding and clinical outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) receiving anticoagulation therapy enrolled in Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and other

  19. Women Sex Importance in Stroke Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemile Handan Mısırlı

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It was shown the differences in age, risk factors and treatment between women and men in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation METHODS: The stroke patients with atrial fibrillation who were hospitalized in our department at the last 2 years were seperated into 2 groups of aged above 75 and below 75, investigated with CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VASc scores and looked at the sex differences of women and men. RESULTS: Stroke ratio according to sex was statistically meaningful especially in women above the age of 75. Risc factors also were founded in elderly women and CHA2DS2VASc scores were higher in women than men so more anticoagulan treatment were begun. No differences were shown between sexes at lone atrial fibrillation and no treatment were begun. CONCLUSION: Women with atrial fibrillation had more risk factors, higher stroke rate and higher anticoagulation treatment.

  20. Dabigatran versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connolly, Stuart J.; Ezekowitz, Michael D.; Yusuf, Salim; Eikelboom, John; Oldgren, Jonas; Parekh, Amit; Pogue, Janice; Reilly, Paul A.; Themeles, Ellison; Varrone, Jeanne; Wang, Susan; Alings, Marco; Xavier, Denis; Zhu, Jun; Diaz, Rafael; Lewis, Basil S.; Darius, Harald; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Joyner, Campbell D.; Wallentin, Lars; Connolly, S. J.; Ezekowitz, M. D.; Yusuf, S.; Eikelboom, J.; Oldgren, J.; Parekh, A.; Reilly, P. A.; Themeles, E.; Varrone, J.; Wang, S.; Palmcrantz-Graf, E.; Haehl, M.; Wallentin, L.; Alings, A. M. W.; Amerena, J. V.; Avezum, A.; Baumgartner, I.; Brugada, J.; Budaj, A.; Caicedo, V.; Ceremuzynski, L.; Chen, J. H.; Commerford, P. J.; Dans, A. L.; Darius, H.; Di Pasquale, G.; Diaz, R.; Erol, C.; Ferreira, J.; Flaker, G. C.; Flather, M. D.; Franzosi, M. G.; Gamboa, R.; Golitsyn, S. P.; Gonzalez Hermosillo, J. A.; Halon, D.; Heidbuchel, H.; Hohnloser, S. H.; Hori, M.; Huber, K.; Jansky, P.; Kamensky, G.; Keltai, M.; Kim, S.; Lau, C. P.; Le Heuzey, J. Y. F.; Lewis, B. S.; Liu, L. S.; Nanas, J.; Razali, O.; Pais, P. S.; Parkhomenko, A. N.; Pedersen, K. E.; Piegas, L. S.; Raev, D.; Simmers, T. A.; Smith, P. J.; Talajic, M.; Tan, R. S.; Tanomsup, S.; Toivonen, L.; Vinereanu, D.; Xavier, D.; Zhu, J.; Diener, H. C.; Joyner, C. D.; Diehl, A.; Ford, G.; Robinson, M.; Silva, J.; Sleight, P.; Wyse, D. G.; Collier, J.; de Mets, D.; Hirsh, J.; Lesaffre, E.; Ryden, L.; Sandercock, P.; Anastasiou-Nana, M. I.; Andersen, G.; Annex, B. H.; Atra, M.; Bornstein, N. M.; Boysen, G.; Brouwers, P. J. A. M.; Buerke, M.; Burrell, L. M.; Chan, Y. K.; Chen, W. H.; Cheung, R. T. F.; Divakaramenon, S.; Donnan, G. A.; Duray, G. Z.; Dvorakova, H.; Fiedler, J.; Gardinale, E.; Gates, P. C.; Goshev, E. G.; Goto, S.; Gross, B.; Guimaraes, H. P.; Gulkevych, O.; Haberl, R. L.; Hankey, G.; Hartikainen, J.; Healey, J.; Iliesiu, A. M.; Irkin, O.; Jaxa-Chamiec, T.; Jolly, S.; Kaste, K. A. M.; Kies, B.; Kostov, K. D.; Kristensen, K. S.; Labovitz, A. J.; Lassila, R. P. T.; Lee, K. L. F.; Lutay, Y. M.; Magloire, P.; Mak, K. H.; Meijer, A.; Mihov, L.; Morillo, C. A.; Morillo, L. E.; Nair, G. M.; Norrving, B.; Ntalianis, A.; Ntsekhe, M.; Olah, L.; Pasco, P. M. D.; Peeters, A.; Perovic, V.; Petrov, I.; Pizzolato, G.; Rafti, F.; Rey, N. R.; Ribas, S.; Rokoss, M.; Sarembock, I. J.; Sheth, T.; Shuaib, A.; Sitkei, E.; Sorokin, E.; Srámek, M.; Strozynska, E.; Tanne, D.; Thijs, V. N. S.; Tomek, A.; Turazza, F.; Vanhooren, G.; Vizel, S. A.; Vos, J.; Wahlgren, N.; Weachter, R.; Zaborska, B.; Zaborski, J.; Zimlichman, R.; Cong, J.; Fendt, K.; Muldoon, S.; Bajkor, S.; Grinvalds, A.; Malvaso, M.; Pogue, J.; Simek, K.; Yang, S.; Alzogaray, M. F.; Bono, J. O.; Caccavo, A.; Cartasegna, L.; Casali, W. P.; Cuello, J. L.; Cuneo, C. A.; Elizari, M. V.; Fernandez, A. A.; Ferrari, A. E.; Gabito, A. J.; Goicoechea, R. F.; Gorosito, V. M.; Hirschson, A.; Hominal, M. A.; Hrabar, A. D.; Liberman, A.; Mackinnon, I. J.; Manzano, R. D.; Muratore, C. A.; Nemi, S. A.; Rodriguez, M. 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G.; Qi, S. Y.; Qian, F.; Sun, N. L.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, N. F.; Yang, Y. M.; Zeng, H.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, F. R.; Zhang, L.; Bohorquez, R.; Rosas, J. F.; Saent, L.; Vacca, M.; Velasco, V. M.; Belohlavek, J.; Cernohous, M.; Choura, M.; Dedek, V.; Filipensky, B.; Hemzsky, L.; Karel, I.; Kopeckova, I.; Kovarova, K.; Labrova, R.; Madr, T.; Poklopova, Z.; Rucka, D.; Simon, J.; Skalicka, H.; Smidova, M.; Spinar, J.; Dodt, K. K.; Egstrup, K.; Friberg, J.; Haar, D.; Husted, S.; Jensen, G. V.; Joensen, A. M.; Klarlund, K. K.; Lind Rasmussen, S.; Melchior, T. M.; Olsen, M. E.; Poulsen, M. K.; Ralfkiaer, N.; Rasmussen, L. H.; Skagen, K.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Huikuri, H. V.; Hussi, E. J.; Kettunen, P.; Mänttäri, M.; Melin, J. H.; Mikkelsson, J.; Peuhkurinen, K.; Virtanen, V. K.; Ylitalo, A.; Agraou, B.; Boucher, L.; Bouvier, J. M.; Boye, A.; Boye, B.; Decoulx, E. M.; Defaye, P.; Delay, M.; Desrues, H.; Gacem, K.; Igigabel, P.; Jacon, P.; Leparree, S.; Magnani, C.; Martelet, M.; Movallem, J.; Olive, T.; Poulard, J. E.; Tiam, B.; Appel, K. F.; Appel, S.; Bansemir, L.; Borggrefe, M.; Brachmann, J.; Bulut-Streich, N.; Busch, K.; Dempfle, C. E. H.; Desaga, M.; Desaga, V.; Dormann, A.; Fechner, I.; Genth-Zotz, S.; Haberbosch, W. G.; Harenberg, J.; Haverkamp, W. L.; Henzgen, R.; Heuer, H.; Horacek, T.; Huttner, H. B.; Janssens, U.; Jantke, H. J.; Klauss, V.; Koudonas, D.; Kreuzer, J.; Kuckuck, H.; Maselli, A.; Müegge, A.; Munzel, T. F.; Nitsche, K.; Nledegjen, A.; Parwani, A.; Pluemer-Schmidt, M.; Pollock, B. W.; Salbach, B. I.; Salbach, P. B.; Schaufele, T.; Schoels, W.; Schwab, S.; Siegmund, U.; Veltkamp, R.; Von Hodenberg, E.; Weber, R.; Zechmeister, M.; Anastasopoulous, A. A.; Foulidis, V. O.; Kaldara, E.; Karamitsos, K.; Karantzis, J.; Kirpizidis, H.; Kokkinakis, C.; Krommydas, A.; Lappas, C.; Lappas, G. I.; Manolis, A.; Manolis, A. 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P.; Suganthi, S.; Zainal Abidin, S.; Alvarado-Ruiz, R.; Carrillo, J.; Delgado, E.; Fernandez Bonetti, P. A.; Leiva, J. L.; Meaney, A.; Olvera, R.; Peralta-Heredia, R.; Rodriguez, I.; Ruiz Rabasa, C. M.; Solache, G.; Villeda Espinosa, E.; Ahmed, S.; Badings, E.; Bartels, G. L.; Beganovic, M.; Bruning, T. A.; Ciampricotti, R.; Cozijnsen, L.; Crijns, H. J.; Daniels, M. C. G.; de Waard, D. E. P.; den Hartog, F. R.; Dirkali, A.; Groenemeijer, B. E.; Heesen, W. F.; Heijmeriks, J. A.; Hoogslag, P. A.; Huizenga, A.; Idzerda, H. H.; Kragten, J. A.; Krasznai, K.; Lenderink, T.; Liem, A. H.; Linssen, G. C.; Lok, D. J.; Meeder, J. G.; Michels, H. R.; Plomp, J.; Pos, L.; Posma, J. L.; Postema, P. G.; Salomonsz, R.; Stoel, I.; Tans, J. G.; Thijssen, H. J.; Timmermans, A. J. M.; Tteleman, R. G.; van Bergen, P. F. M. M.; van de Klippe, H. A.; van der Zwaan, C.; van Eck, J. W. M.; van Es, A. J. J.; van Gelder, I. C.; van Kempen, L. H.; van Kesteren, H. A.; van Rossum, P.; Veldmeyer, S.; Wilde, A. A. M.; Arnesen, H.; Atar, D.; Breder, O.; Istad, H.; Radunovic, Z.; Rykke, D. E.; Sirnes, P. A.; Tveit, A.; Ulimoen, S. R.; Cabrera, W.; Duenas, R.; Heredia, J. M.; Horna, M. E.; Hurtado, Y.; Salazar, P. M.; Abola, M. T. B.; Anonuevo, J. C.; Arellano, R. S.; Dioquino, C.; Morales, D. D.; Reyes, E. B.; Rogelio, G. G.; Roxas, A. A.; Sulit, D. J. V.; Bacior, B.; Dulak, E.; Gniot, J.; Goncikowski, J.; Grodecki, J.; Kalarus, Z. F.; Kawecka-Jaszcz, K.; Miekus, P.; Monies, F.; Piepiorka, M.; Pilichowska, E.; Plizio, E.; Rekosz, J.; Rybicka-Musialik, A.; Streb, W. A.; Styczkiewicz, M.; Szpajer, M.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Wasilewska-Piepiorka, A.; Adragao, P.; Branco, V.; Canhão, P.; Cunha, L.; Falcão, F.; Lopes, G.; Machado, C.; Martinez-Marcos, J.; Monteiro, P. F.; Parreira, L.; Pinto, A. N.; Providencia, L. A.; Salgado, A. V.; Santos, J. F.; Timoteo, A. T.; Capalneanu, R.; Cinteza, M. A.; Margulesai, A. D.; Turdeanu, D. S.; Vintila, V. D.; Baranov, V. L.; Berngardt, E. R.; Dzhordzhikiya, T. R.; Gordeev, I. G.; Grigoryev, Y. V.; Isaeva, M. U.; Ivleva, A. Y.; Kokorin, V. A.; Komarov, A. L.; Maximenko, O. K.; Maykov, E. B.; Novikova, N.; Novikova, T. N.; Panchenko, E. P.; Poltavskaya, M. G.; Popova, Y. N.; Pronina, S. A.; Revishvili, A. Sh; Shlyakhto, E. V.; Shustov, S. B.; Sidorenko, B. A.; Sinopalnikov, A. I.; Sulimov, V.; Syrkin, A. L.; Titkov, A. Y.; Titkov, Y. S.; Zateyshchikov, D. A.; Zavaritskaya, O. P.; Chia, P. L.; Foo, D.; Sim, K. L.; Bugan, V.; Buganova, I.; Dúbrava, J.; Kaliska, G.; Masarovicova, M.; Mikes, P.; Mikes, Z.; Murin, J.; Pella, D.; Rybar, R.; Sedlák, J.; Skamla, M.; Spurný, P.; Strbova, J.; Uhliar, R.; Disler, L. J.; Engelbrecht, J. M.; Jankelow, D.; King, J.; Klug, E. Q.; Munnick, M.; Okreglicki, A. M.; Routier, R. J.; Snyders, F. A.; Theron, H. D.; Wittmer, H.; Cha, T. J.; Cho, J. G.; Choi, I. S.; Choi, J. I.; Choi, K. J.; Han, K. R.; Heo, J. H.; Jang, S. W.; Kang, T. S.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, S. S.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, Y. N.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, M. Y.; Nam, G. B.; Oh, D. J.; Park, H. W.; Park, J. S.; Rho, T. H.; Shin, D. G.; Shin, E. K.; Alonso, J. J.; Cano, L.; Castellano, N. P.; Criado-Millan, A. J.; Curcio, A.; Egea, P.; Escudier, J. M.; Grande, A.; Grande, J. M.; Gusi-Tragant, G.; Lozano, I. F.; Martin, A. M.; Martinez-Rubio, A.; Mont, L.; Perez-Villacastin, J.; Sosa, L.; Ali, M.; Andersson, T.; Bandh, S.; Blomstrom Lundqvist, C. M.; Cherfan, P.; Fengsrud, E.; Fluur, C.; Herlitz, J.; Hijazi, Z.; Hoglund, N.; Hojeberg, B.; Jabro, J.; Juhlin, T.; Kjellman, B.; Lonnberg, I.; Maru, F.; Morlid, L.; Nilsson, O. R.; Ronn, F.; Rosenqvist, M.; Walfridsson, H.; Engelter, S. T.; Gallino, A.; Lyrer, P. A.; Moccetti, T.; Petrova, I.; Chang, Y. J.; Chen, C. H.; Chen, M. Y. C.; Cheng, J. J.; Chiang, T. R.; Chung, W. T.; Hsia, C. H.; Hsu, C. Y.; Hu, H. H.; Jeng, J. S.; Lai, W. T.; Lien, L. M.; Lin, K. H.; Liu, C. H.; Lo, H. S.; Peng, G. S.; Po, H. L.; Ryu, S. J.; Tsai, C. D.; Tsai, L. M.; Tseng, C. D.; Wang, J. H.; Wang, S. F.; Yang, S. P.; Kiatchoosakun, S.; Krittayaphong, R.; Kuanprasert, S.; Ngarmukos, T.; Simtharakaew, T.; Sukanandachai, B.; Sukonthasam, A.; Suwanagool, A.; Tatsanavivat, P.; Atmaca, Y.; Baris, N.; Boyaci, B.; Demir, M.; Guneri, S.; Usal, A.; Yalcin, R.; Amosova, K. M.; Beregova, O. P.; Besaga, Y. E. M.; Ikorkin, M. R.; Karapetyan, K.; Karpenko, O. I.; Kononenko, L.; Kuryata, O.; Martynova, L.; Motylevska, T.; Okhryamkina, O.; Pavlyk, S. S.; Perepelytsya, M. V.; Rudenko, L. V.; Skarzhevsky, O. A.; Tkachenko, L. A.; Tseluyko, V.; Usan, N.; Voronkov, L. G.; Yshchenko, K. V.; Zharinov, O. J.; Bryson, V. G.; Butler, R.; Cargill, R. I.; Chahal, N. S.; Cleland, J. G.; Cohen, A. T.; Cruddas, E. M.; Davey, P.; Davies, J.; Ford, S. L.; Griffith, K.; Haynes, R.; Hill, S.; Javed, M.; Kadr, H. H.; Lip, G. H.; Machin, J.; McEneaney, D. J.; McInnes, G. T.; McNeill, A. J.; Moriarty, A. J.; Muir, S.; O'Callaghan, J.; Purvis, J. A.; Pye, M.; Senior, R.; Sutton, D. A.; Thomas, S. H. L.; Wilkinson, P. R.; Wilmott, R.; Wrigley, M. J.; Abadier, R.; Abbud, Z. A.; Adams, K. V.; Adler, S. W.; Agarwal, S.; Ahmed, A. M.; Ahmed, I. S.; Aiuto, M. A.; Albrittun, T. D.; Aliyar, P.; Allan, J. J.; Allen, D. P.; Allen, S. L.; Altschuller, A.; Amin, M.; Anand, I. S.; Antolick, A. B.; Arora, R.; Arouni, A. J.; Arslanian, C. L.; Asinger, R. W.; Aycock, G. R.; Bariciano, R. J.; Baron, S. B.; Barr, M. A.; Bartkowiak, A. J.; Baruch, L.; Basignani, C.; Bass, M. L.; Bean, B.; Bedwell, N. W.; Belber, A. D.; Belew, K.; Bell, Y. C.; Bellinger, R. L.; Bennett, W. T.; Bensimhon, D. R.; Benton, R.; Benton, R. E.; Ben-Yehuda, O.; Bertolet, B. D.; Betkowski, A. S.; Bilazarian, S. D.; Bissette, J. K.; Bobade, M. B.; Bolster, D. E.; Bomba, J.; Book, D. M.; Boscia, J. A.; Bouchard, A.; Bowman, L. M.; Bradley, A. J.; Brandt, H. D.; Bricker, C. R.; Brobyn, T. L.; Brock, R. I.; Broderick, T. M.; Broedlin, K.; Brown, A. M.; Browne, K. F.; Burke, S. W.; Burton, M. E.; Buser, G. A.; Capasso, M. K.; Caplan, W. E.; Cappelli, J.; Cardona, C.; Cardona, F.; Carlson, T.; Carr, K. W.; Casey, T.; Cashion, W. R.; Cass, D. T.; Chandrashekar, Y. S.; Changlani, M.; Chapla, P. G.; Chappell, J. H.; Chen, C.; Chen, Y.; Cho, N. R.; Cieszkowski, J. H.; Clark, D. M.; Clayton, R.; Clogston, C. W.; Cockrell, D. J.; Cohen, A. I.; Cohen, T. J.; Cole, J. F.; Conway, G.; Cook, V. R.; Cornish, A. L.; Cossu, S. F.; Costello, D. L.; Courtade, D. J.; Covelli, H. C.; Crenshaw, B. S.; Crews, L. A.; Crossley, G. H.; Culp, S. C.; Curtis, B. M.; Darrow, K.; de Raad, R. E.; DeGregorio, M.; DelNegro, A. A.; Denny, D. M.; Desai, V. S.; Deumite, N. J.; Dewey, L.; Dharawat, R. N.; Dobbs, B.; Donahue, S. M.; Downey, B.; Downing, J.; Drehobl, M. A.; Drewes, W. A.; Drucker, M. N.; Duff, R.; Duggal, M.; Dunlap, S. H.; Dunning, D. W.; DuThinh, V.; Dykstra, G. T.; East, C.; Eblaghie, M. C.; Edelstein, J.; Edmiston, W. A.; Eisen, H. J.; Eisenberg, S. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Ellison, H. S.; Ellsworth, S.; Elshahawy, M.; Emlein, G.; Entcheva, M.; Essandoh, L. K.; Estrada, A. Q.; Ewing, B.; Faillace, R. T.; Fanelli, A.; Farrell, P. W.; Farris, S. W.; Fattal, P. G.; Feigenblum, D. Y.; Feldman, G. J.; Fialkow, J. A.; Fiddler, K. M.; Fields, R. H.; Finkel, M. S.; Finn, C.; Fischell, T. A.; Fishbach, M.; Fishbein, G. J.; Fisher, M. M.; Fleischhauer, F. J.; Folk, T. G.; Folkerth, S. D.; Fortman, R. R.; Frais, M. A.; Friedman, D. C.; Fuchs, G.; Fuller, F.; Garibian, G.; Gee, F. H.; Gelernt, M. D.; Genovely, H. C.; Gerber, J. R.; Germano, J. J.; Giardina, J. J.; Gilbert, J. M.; Gillespie, E. L.; Gilman, E. M.; Gitler, B.; Givens, D. H.; Glover, R.; Gogia, H. S.; Gohn, D. C.; Goldberg, R. K.; Goldberger, J. J.; Goldscher, D. A.; Goldstein, M.; Goraya, T.; Gordon, D. F.; Gottlieb, D.; Grafner, H. L.; Graham, M.; Graves, M. W.; Graziano, M.; Greco, S. N.; Greenberg, M. L.; Greenspon, A. J.; Greer, G. S.; Griffin, D. D.; Grogan, E. W.; Groo, V. L.; Guarnieri, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, J.; Hack, T. C.; Hall, B.; Hallak, O.; Halpern, S. W.; Hamburg, C.; Hamroff, G. S.; Han, J.; Handel, F.; Hankins, S. R.; Hanovich, G. D.; Hanrahan, J. A.; Haque, I. U.; Hargrove, J. L.; Harnick, P. E.; Harris, J. L.; Hartley, P. A.; Haskel, E. J.; Hatch, D.; Haught, W. H.; Hearne, S.; Hearne, S. E.; Hemphill, J. A.; Henderson, D. A.; Henes, C. H.; Hengerer-Yates, T.; Hermany, P. R.; Herzog, W. R.; Hickey, K.; Hilton, T. C.; Hockstad, E. S.; Hodnett, P.; Hoffmeister, R.; Holland, J.; Hollenweger, L.; Honan, M. B.; Hoopes, D. A.; Hordes, A. R.; Hotchkiss, D. A.; Howard, M. A.; Howard, V. N.; Hulyalkar, A. R.; Hurst, P.; Hutchison, L. C.; Ingram, J.; Isakov, T.; Ison, R. K.; Israel, C. N.; Jackson, B. K.; Jackson, K. N.; Jacobson, A. K.; Jain, S.; Jarmukli, N. F.; Joffe, I.; Johnson, L. E.; Johnson, S. A.; Johnson, S. L.; Jones, A. A.; Joyce, D. B.; Judson, P. L.; Juk, S. S.; Kaatz, S.; Kaddaha, R. M.; Kaplan, K. J.; Karunaratne, H. B.; Kennett, J. D.; Kenton, D. M.; Kettunen, J. A.; Khan, M. A.; Khant, R. N.; Kirkwood, M. D.; Knight, B. P.; Knight, P. O.; Knutson, T. J.; Kobayashi, J. F.; Kogan, A.; Kogan, A. D.; Koren, M. J.; Kosinski, E. J.; Kosolcharoen, P.; Kostis, J. B.; Kramer, J. H.; Kramer, S. D.; Kron, J.; Kuchenrither, C. R.; Kulback, S. J.; Kumar, A.; Kushner, D.; Kutscher, A.; Lai, C. K.; Lam, J. B.; Landau, C.; Landzberg, J. S.; Lang, D. T.; Lang, J. M.; Lanzarotti, C. J.; Lascewski, D. L.; Lau, T. K.; Lee, J. K.; Lee, S.; Leimbach, W. N.; LePine, A. M.; Lesser, M. F.; Leuchak, S. H.; Levy, R. M.; Lewis, W. R.; Lincoln, T. L.; Lingerfelt, W. M.; Liston, M.; Liu, Z. G.; Lloret, R. L.; Lohrbauer, L.; Longoria, D. C.; Lott, B. M.; Louder, D. R.; Loukinen, K. L.; Lovell, J.; Lue, S.; Mackall, J. A.; Maletz, L.; Marlow, L.; Martin, R. C.; Matsumura, M.; McCartney, M. J.; McDuffie, D.; McGough, M. F.; McGrew, F. A.; McGuinn, Wm P.; McMillen, M. D.; McNeff, J.; McPherson, C. A.; Meengs, M. E.; Meengs, W. L.; Meholick, A. W.; Meisner, J. S.; Melucci, M. B.; Mercando, A.; Merlino, J. D.; Meymandi, S. K.; Miele, M. B.; Miller, R. H.; Miller, S. H.; Minor, S. T.; Mitchell, M. R.; Modi, M.; Mody, F. V.; Moeller, C. L.; Moloney, J. F.; Moran, J. E.; Morcos, N. C.; Morgan, A.; Mukherjee, S. K.; Mullinax, K.; Murphy, A. L.; Mustin, A. J.; Myers, G. I.; Naccarelli, G. V.; Nadar, V. K.; Nallasivan, M.; Navas, J. P.; Niazi, I. K.; Nsah, E. N.; Nunamaker, J. L.; Ochalek, T. B.; O'dea, D. J.; Ogilvie, P. D.; Olliff, B.; Omalley, A. K.; O'Neill, P. G.; Onufer, J. R.; Orchard, R. C.; Orihuela, L. A.; Ortiz, E. C.; O'Sullivan, M. T.; Padanilam, B. J.; Pandey, P.; Patel, D. V.; Patel, R. J.; Patel, V. B.; Patlola, R. R.; Pennock, G. D.; Perlman, R.; Peters, P. H.; Petrillo, A. V.; Pezzella, S.; Phillips, D.; Pierre-Louis, J. R.; Pilcher, G.; Pillai, C.; Pollock, S. G.; Pond, M. S.; Porterfield, J. K.; Presant, L.; Pressler, J.; Pribble, A. H.; Promisloff, S. D.; Pudi, K. K.; Putnam, D. L.; Quartner, J.; Quinn, J. C.; Quinnell, C. M.; Raad, G. L.; Rasmussen, L. A.; Ray, C.; Reiffel, J. A.; Reynertson, S.; Richardson, J. W.; Riley, C. P.; Rippy, J. S.; Rittelmeyer, J. T.; Roberts, D. M.; Robertson, R.; Robinson, V. J. B.; Rocco, T. A.; Rosenbaum, D.; Roth, E. M.; Rottman, J. N.; Rough, R. R.; Rubenstein, J. J.; Sakkal, A. M.; Saleem, T.; Salerno, D. M.; Samendinger, M. L.; Sandeno, S.; Santilli, T. M.; Santucci, P.; Sattar, P.; Saxman, K. A.; Schaefer, S.; Schmidt, J.; Schneider, R. M.; Schocken, D. D.; Schrader, M. K.; Schramm, B. A.; Schultz, R. W.; Schussheim, A. E.; Schwarz, E. F.; Seamon, M. C.; Sestero, J. D.; Shah, M. P.; Shah, R.; Shalaby, A.; Shanes, J. G.; Sheftel, G. L.; Sheikh, K. H.; Shein, A. B.; Shemonsky, N. K.; Shepler, A.; Sheridan, E.; Shipwash, T. M.; Shopnick, R. I.; Short, W. G.; Shoukfeh, M. F.; Sibia, R. S.; Siler, T. M.; Silva, J. A.; Simons, G. R.; Simpson, A. G.; Simpson, H. R.; Simpson, V. J.; Singh, B. N.; Singh, N.; Singh, V. N.; Sitz, C. J.; Skatrud, L.; Sklar, J.; Slotwiner, D. J.; Smith, P. F.; Smith, P. N.; Smith, R. H.; Smith, J. E.; Sodowick, B. C.; Solomon, A. J.; Soltero, E. A.; Sonel, A. F.; Sperling, R.; Spiller, C.; Spink, B. Z.; Sprinkle, L. W.; Spyropoulos, A. C.; Stamos, T. D.; Steljes, A. D.; Stillabower, M. E.; Stover, T.; Strain, J. E.; Strickland, T. L.; Suresh, D. P.; Takata, T. S.; Taylor, J. S.; Taylor, M.; Teague, S. M.; Teixeia, J. M.; Telfer, E. A.; Terry, P. S.; Terry, R. W.; Thai, H. M.; Thalin, M.; Thomas, V. N.; Thompson, C. A.; Thompson, M. A.; Thornton, J. W.; Tidman, R. E.; Toler, B. S.; Traina, M. I.; Trippi, J. A.; Ujiiye, D. L.; Usedom, J. E.; van de Graaff, E.; van de Wall, L. R.; Vaughn, J. W.; Ver Steeg, D.; Vicari, R. M.; Vijay, N.; Vitale, C. B.; Vlastaris, A. G.; Voda, J.; Vora, K. N.; Voyles, W. F.; Vranian, R. B.; Vrooman, P. S.; Waack, P.; Waldo, A. L.; Walker, J. L.; Wallace, M. A.; Walsh, E. A.; Walsh, R. L.; Walton, A.; Washam, M.; Wehner, P. S.; Wei, J. Y.; Weiner, S.; Weiss, R. J.; Wells, D. M.; Wera-Archakul, W.; Wertheimer, J. H.; West, S. A.; Whitaker, J. H.; White, M. L.; White, R. H.; Whitehill, J. N.; Wiegman, P. J.; Wiesel, J.; Williams, J.; Williams, L. E.; Williams, M. L.; Williamson, V. K.; Wilson, V. E.; Wilson, W. W.; Woodfield, S. L.; Wulff, C. W.; Yates, S. W.; Yousuf, K. A.; Zakhary, B. G.; Zambrano, R.; Zimetbaum, P.; Zoble, R.; Zopo, A. R.; Zwerner, P. L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin reduces the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation but increases the risk of hemorrhage and is difficult to use. Dabigatran is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor. METHODS: In this noninferiority trial, we randomly assigned 18,113 patients who had atrial

  1. Abnormal atrial activation in young patients with lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmqvist, Fredrik; Olesen, Morten S; Tveit, Arnljot

    2011-01-01

    Aims Patients with a history of atrial fibrillation (AF) have previously been shown to have altered atrial conduction, as seen non-invasively using signal-averaged P-wave analysis. However, little is known about the P-wave morphology in patients in the early phases of AF with structurally normal ...

  2. Overweight and obesity in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Laroche, Cécile; Diemberger, Igor

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of overweight and obesity on outcomes in "real world" patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is not fully defined. Second, sex differences in AF outcomes may also exist. METHODS AND RESULTS: The aim was to investigate outcomes at 1-year follow-up for AF patients enrolled in...

  3. Edoxaban versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giugliano, Robert P; Ruff, Christian T; Braunwald, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Edoxaban is a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor with proven antithrombotic effects. The long-term efficacy and safety of edoxaban as compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation is not known. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial comparing t...

  4. Edoxaban versus Warfarin in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giugliano, Robert P.; Ruff, Christian T.; Braunwald, Eugene; Murphy, Sabina A.; Wiviott, Stephen D.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Waldo, Albert L.; Ezekowitz, Michael D.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Špinar, Jindřich; Ruzyllo, Witold; Ruda, Mikhail; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Betcher, Joshua; Shi, Minggao; Grip, Laura T.; Patel, Shirali P.; Patel, Indravadan; Hanyok, James J.; Mercuri, Michele; Antman, Elliott M.; Braunwald, E.; Antman, E. M.; Giugliano, R. P.; Ruff, C. T.; Morin, S. E.; Hoffman, E. B.; Murphy, S. A.; Deenadayalu, N.; Grip, L.; Mercuri, M.; Lanz, H.; Patel, I.; Curt, V.; Duggal, A.; Hanyok, J.; Davé, J.; Morgan, D.; Choi, Y.; Shi, M.; Jin, J.; Xie, J.; Crerand, W.; Kappelhof, J.; Maxwell, W.; Skinner, M.; Patel, S.; Betcher, J.; Selicato, G.; Otto, C.; Reissner, C.; Smith, K.; Ostroske, J.; Ron, A.; Connolly, S.; Camm, J.; Ezekowitz, M.; Halperin, J.; Waldo, A.; Paolasso, E.; Aylward, P.; Heidbuchel, H.; Nicolau, J. C.; Goudev, A.; Roy, D.; Weitz, J.; Corbalán, R.; Yang, Y.; Botero, R.; Bergovec, M.; Ŝpinar, J.; Grande, P.; Hassager, C.; Voitk, J.; Huikuri, H.; Nieminen, M.; Blanc, J. J.; LeHeuzey, J. Y.; Mitrovic, V.; Alexopoulos, D.; Sotomora, G.; Kiss, R.; SomaRaju, B.; Lewis, B.; Merlini, P.; Metra, M.; Koretsune, Y.; Yamashita, T.; García-Castillo, A.; Oude Ophuis, T.; White, H.; Atar, D.; Horna, M.; Babilonia, N.; Ruzyllo, W.; Morais, J.; Dorobantu, M.; Ruda, M.; Ostojic, M.; Duris, T.; Dalby, A.; Chung, N.; Zamorano, J. L.; Juul-Möller, S.; Moccetti, T.; Chen, S. A.; Sritara, P.; Oto, A.; Parkhomenko, A.; Senior, R.; Verheugt, F.; Skene, A.; Anderson, J.; Bauer, K.; Easton, J. D.; Goto, S.; Wiviott, S.; Lowe, C.; Awtry, E.; Berger, C. J.; Croce, K.; Desai, A.; Gelfand, E.; Goessling, W.; Greenberger, N. J.; Ho, C.; Leeman, D. E.; Link, M. S.; Norden, A. D.; Pande, A.; Rost, N.; Ruberg, F.; Silverman, S.; Singhal, A.; Vita, J. A.; Vogelmann, O.; Gonzalez, C.; Ahuad Guerrero, R.; Rodriguez, M.; Albisu, J.; Rosales, E.; Allall, O.; Reguero, M.; Alvarez, C.; Garcia, M.; Ameriso, S.; Ameriso, P.; Amuchastegui, M.; Caceres, M.; Beloscar, J.; Petrucci, J.; Berli, M.; Budassi, N.; Valle, M.; Bustamante Labarta, G.; Saravia, M.; Caccavo, A.; Fracaro, V.; Cartasegna, L.; Novas, V.; Caruso, O.; Zarandon, R. Saa; Colombo, H.; Morandini, M.; Cuello, J.; Rosell, M.; Cuneo, C.; Bocanera, M.; D'Amico, A.; Cendali, G.; Dran, R.; Moreno, V.; Estol, C.; Davolos, M.; Facello, A.; Facello, M.; Falu, E.; Iriarte, M.; Femenia, F.; Arrieta, M.; Fuselli, J.; Zanotti, A.; Gant Lopez, J.; Meiller, F.; Garcia Duran, R.; Perlo, D.; Garrido, M.; Ceirano, C.; Giacomi, G.; Eden, M.; Giannaula, R.; Huerta, M.; Goicoechea, R.; von Wulffen, M.; Hominal, M.; Bianchini, M.; Jure, H.; Jure, D.; Kevorkian, R.; Monaco, F.; Lanternier, G.; Belcuore, M.; Liniado, G.; Iglesias, M.; Litvak, B.; Nigro, A.; Llanos, J.; Vignau, S.; Lorente, C.; Shatsky, K.; Lotti, J.; Raimondi, G.; Mackinnon, I.; Carne, M.; Manuale, O.; Calderon, M.; Marino, J.; Funes, I.; Muntaner, J.; Gandur, H.; Nul, D.; Verdini, E.; Piskorz, D.; Tommasi, A.; Povedano, G.; Casares, E.; Pozzer, D.; Fernandez, E.; Prado, A.; Venturini, C.; Ramos, H.; Navarrete, S.; Alvarez, M.; Sanchez, A.; Bowen, L.; Sanjurjo, M.; Codutti, O.; Saravia Toledo, S.; Formoso, I.; Schmidberg, J.; Goloboulicz, A.; Schygiel, P.; Buzzetti, C.; Severino, P.; Morara, P.; Sosa Liprandi, M.; Teves, M.; Vico, M.; Morell, Y.; Anderson, C.; Paraskevaidis, T.; Arstall, M.; Hoffmann, B.; Colquhoun, D.; Price-Smith, S.; Crimmins, D.; Slattery, A.; Dart, A.; Kay, S.; Davis, S.; Silver, G.; Flecknoe-Brown, S.; Roberts, J.; Gates, P.; Jones, S.; Lehman, R.; Morrison, H.; McKeirnan, M.; Li, J.; Paul, V.; Batta, C.; Purnell, P.; Perrett, L.; Szto, G.; O'Shea, V.; Capiau, L.; Banaeian, F.; de Bleecker, J.; de Koning, K.; de Tollenaere, M.; de Bruyne, L.; Desfontaines, P.; Tincani, G.; Meeusen, K.; Herzet, J.; Malmendier, D.; Mairesse, G.; Raepers, M.; Parqué, J.; Clinckemaille, N.; Scavée, C.; Huyberechts, D.; Stockman, D.; Jacobs, C.; Vandekerckhove, Y.; Derycker, K.; Vanwelden, J.; van Welden, J.; Vervoort, G.; Mestdagh, I.; Vrolix, M.; Beerts, C.; Wollaert, B.; Denie, D.; Amato Vincenzo de Paola, A.; Coutinho, E.; Andrade Lotufo, P.; de Melo, R. Ferreira; Atie, J.; Motta, C.; Augusto Alves da Costa, F.; Ferraz, R. Franchin; Bertolim Precoma, D.; Sehnem, E.; Botelho, R.; Cunha, S.; Brondani, R.; Fleck, N.; Chaves Junior, H.; Silva, J.; Costantini, C.; Barroso, D.; de Patta, M.; Pereira, V.; Duda, N.; Laimer, R.; Dutra, O.; Morgado, S.; Faustino Saporito, W.; Seroqui, M.; Ferreira, L.; Araújo, E.; Finimundi, H.; Daitz, C.; Gagliardi, R.; Pereira, G.; Gomes, M.; Gomes, A.; Guimarães, A.; Ninho, L.; Jaeger, C.; Pereira, L.; Jorge, J.; Cury, C.; Kaiser, S.; Almeida, A.; Kalil, C.; Radaelli, G.; Kunz Sebba Barroso de Souza, W.; Morales, K.; Leaes, P.; Luiz, R. Osorio; Pimenta Almeida, J.; Gozalo, A.; Reis, G.; Avellar, K.; Reis Katz Weiand, L.; Leipelt, J.; Rocha, J.; Barros, R.; Rodrigues, L.; Rocha, M. Rubia; Rodrigues, A.; Rodrigues, D.; Rossi dos Santos, F.; Pagnan, L. Goncalves; Sampaio, R.; do Val, R.; Saraiva, J.; Vicente, C.; Simoes, M.; Carraro, A.; Sobral Filho, D.; Lustosa, E.; Villas Boas, F.; Almeida, M.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, E. 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Retamal; Bugueño, C.; Mondaca, P. Mondaca; Cobos, J.; Obreque, C.; Corbalan, R.; Parada, A.; Florenzano, F.; Diaz, P. Arratia; Lopetegui, M.; Rebolledo, C.; Manriquez, L.; Silva, L. Manríquez; Martinez, D.; Llamas, R. Romero; Opazo, M.; Pérez, M. Carmona; Pincetti, C.; Carrasco, G. Torres; Potthoff, S.; Staub, J. Zapata; Campisto, Y.; Stockins, B.; Lara, C. Lara; Yovaniniz, P.; Azua, M. Grandon; Bai, F.; Xu, G. L.; Chen, J. Z.; Xie, X. D.; Chen, X. P.; Zhang, X.; Dong, Y. G.; Feng, C.; Fu, G. S.; Zhang, P.; Hong, K.; You, Z. G.; Hong, L.; Qiu, Y.; Jiang, X. J.; Qu, Z.; Li, L.; Liu, H.; Li, T. F.; Kong, Y. Q.; Li, W. M.; Liu, B.; Li, Z. Q.; Liu, Y.; Liao, D. N.; Gu, X. J.; Liu, L.; Lu, Z. H.; Ma, S. M.; Yang, Z. Y.; Wang, D. M.; Qi, S. Y.; Wang, G. P.; Shi, X. J.; Wei, M.; Huang, D.; Wu, S. L.; Li, Y. E.; Xu, J. H.; Gu, J. Y.; Xu, Y. M.; Liang, Y. Z.; Yang, K.; Li, A. Y.; Yang, Y. J.; Zheng, X.; Zheng, Y.; Gao, M.; Yin, Y. H.; Xu, Y. P.; Yu, B.; Li, L. L.; Yuan, Z. Y.; Qiang, H.; Zhang, H. Q.; Lin, Y. N.; Zhang, Z.; Kang, H.; Zhao, R. P.; Han, R. J.; Zhao, X. L.; Wang, J. Q.; Zheng, Z. Q.; Li, B. G.; Zhou, S. X.; Zhang, Y. L.; Accini, J.; Accini, M.; Cano, N.; Pineda, L. León; Delgado Restrepo, J.; Arroyave, C.; Fernández Ruiz, R.; Diaz, I. Aldana; Hernandez, H.; Delgado, P.; Jaramillo Muñoz, C.; Builes, A.; Manzur, F.; Rodriguez, E. Rivera; Moncada Corredor, M.; Giraldo, D. Lopez; Orozco Linares, L.; Fonseca, J.; Quintero, A.; Gonzales, C.; Sanchez Vallejo, G.; Mejia, I. Perdomo; Bagatin, J.; Carevic, V.; Car, S.; Jeric, M.; Ciglenecki, N.; Tusek, S.; Ferri Certic, J.; Romic, I.; Francetic, I.; Ausperger, K. Makar; Jelic, V.; Jurinjak, S. Jaksic; Knezevic, A.; Buksa, B.; Samardzic, P.; Lukenda, K. Cvitkusic; Steiner, R.; Kirner, D.; Sutalo, K.; Bakliza, Z.; Vrazic, H.; Lucijanic, T.; Bar, M.; Brodova, P.; Berka, L.; Kunkelova, V.; Brtko, M.; Burianova, H.; Cermak, O.; Elbl, L.; Ferkl, R.; Florian, J.; Francek, L.; Golan, L.; Gregor, P.; Honkova, M.; Hubac, J.; Jandik, J.; Jarkovsky, P.; Jelinek, Z.; Jerabek, O.; Jirmar, R.; Kobza, R.; Kochrt, M.; Kostkova, G.; Kosek, Z.; Kovar, P.; Kuchar, R.; Kvasnicka, J.; Ludka, O.; Machova, V.; Krocova, E.; Melichar, M.; Nechanicky, R.; Olsr, J.; Peterka, K.; Petrova, I.; Havlova, I.; Pisova, J.; Podrazil, P.; Jirsova, E.; Reichert, P.; Slaby, J.; Spacek, R.; Spinar, J.; Labrova, R.; Vodnansky, P.; Samkova, D.; Zidkova, E.; Dodt, K.; Christensen, H.; Christensen, L.; Loof, A.; Ibsen, H.; Madsen, H.; Iversen, H.; Veng-Olsen, T.; Nielsen, H.; Olsen, R.; Overgaard, K.; Petrovic, V.; Raymond, I.; Raae, D.; Sand, N.; Svenningsen, A.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Jakobsen, U.; Wiggers, H.; Serup-Hansen, K.; Kaik, J.; Stern, A.; Kolk, R.; Laane, E.; Rivis, L.; Paumets, M.; Laheäär, M.; Rosenthal, A.; Rajasalu, R.; Vahula, V.; Ratnik, E.; Kaarleenkaski, S.; Hussi, E.; Valpas, S.; Jäkälä, P.; Lappalainen, T.; Mäenpää, A.; Viitaniemi, J.; Nyman, K.; Sankari, T.; Rasi, H.; Salminen, O.; Virtanen, V.; Nappila, H.; Le Heuzey, J.; Agraou, B.; El Jarroudi, F.; Amarenco, P.; Boursin, P.; Babuty, D.; Boyer, M.; Belhassane, A.; Berbari, H.; Blanc, J.; Dias, P.; Coisne, D.; Berger, N.; Decoulx, E.; El Jarroudi, M.; Dinanian, S.; Arfaoui, M.; Hermida, J.; Deruche, E.; Kacet, S.; Corbut, S.; Poulard, J.; Leparree, S.; Roudaut, R.; Duprat, C.; Al-Zoebi, A.; Wurow, A.; Bernhardt, P.; Dichristin, U.; Berrouschot, J.; Vierbeck, S.; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Sehr, B.; Bouzo, M.; Schnelzer, P.; Braun, R.; Ladenburger, K.; Buhr, M.; Weihrauch, D.; Contzen, C.; Kara, M.; Daut, W.; Ayasse, D.; Degtyareva, E.; Kranz, P.; Drescher, T.; Herfurth, B.; Faghih, M.; Forck-Boedeker, K.; Schneider, K.; Fuchs, R.; Manuela, W.; Grigat, C.; Otto, A.; Hartmann, A.; Peitz, M.; Heuer, H.; Dieckheuer, U.; Hoffmann, U.; Dorn, S.; Hoffmann, S.; Schuppe, M.; Horacek, T.; Fink, P.; Junggeburth, J.; Schmid, S.; Jungmair, W.; Schoen, B.; Kleinecke-Pohl, U.; Meusel, P.; Koenig, H.; Bauch, F.; Lohrbaecher-Kozak, I.; Grosse, B.; Lueders, S.; Venneklaas, U.; Luttermann, M.; Wulf, M.; Maus, O.; Hoefer, K.; Meissner, G.; Braemer, U.; Meyer-Pannwitt, U.; Frahm, E.; Vogt, S.; Muegge, A.; Barbera, S.; Mueller-Glamann, M.; Raddatz, K.; Piechatzek, R.; Lewinsky, D.; Pohl, W.; Proskynitopoulos, N.; Kuhlmann, M.; Rack, K.; Pilipenko, H.; Rinke, A.; Kühlenborg, A.; Schaefer, A.; Szymanowski, N.; Schellong, S.; Frommhold, R.; Schenkenberger, I.; Finsterbusch, T.; Dreykluft, K.; Schiewe, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, M.; Schreckenberg, A.; Hellmers, J.; Seibert, H.; Gold, G.; Sohn, H.; Baylacher, M.; Spitzer, S.; Bonin, K.; Stoehring, R.; Taggeselle, J.; Zarpentin, C.; Veltkamp, R.; Ludwig, I.; Voehringer, N. N.; Buchholz, M.; Weyland, K.; Winkelmann, B.; Buelow-Johansen, B.; Wolde, C.; Winter, K.; Mavronasiou, E.; Bourlios, P.; Tziortziotis, A.; Karamitsos, C.; Exarchou, E.; Kifnidis, K.; Daskalaki, A.; Moschos, N.; Dimitra, K.; Olympios, C.; Kartsagkoulis, E.; Pyrgakis, V.; Korantanis, K.; Ayau Milla, O.; Ramirez, V. de Leon; Guzman Melgar, I.; Jimenez, T.; Ovando Lavagnino, A.; Guevara, S.; Rodas Estrada, M.; Sanchez, M.; Pozuelos, J. Mayen; Sanchez Samayoa, C.; Guerra, L.; Velasquez Camas, L.; Almaraz, S. Padilla; Dioszeghy, P.; Muskoczki, E.; Edes, I.; Szatmari, J.; Fiok, J.; Varga, A.; Kanakaridisz, N.; Kosztyu, M.; Kis, E.; Feil, J. Felfoldine; Jakal, A.; Koczka, M.; Kovacs, I.; Baranyai, M.; Kovacs, Z.; Lupkovics, G.; Karakai, H. Horvathne; Matoltsy, A.; Kiss, T.; Medvegy, M.; Kiss, K.; Merkely, B.; Kolumban, E.; Nagy, A.; Palinkas, A.; Toth, S. Rostasne; Sayour, A.; Bognar, A.; Simor, T.; Ruzsa, D.; Sipos, T.; Szakal, I.; Tomcsanyi, J.; Marosi, A.; Vertes, A.; Kincses, M.; Malhan, S.; Abdullakutty, J.; Agarwal, D.; Ranka, R.; Arneja, J.; Memon, A.; Arora, V.; Shree, R.; Avvaru, G.; Shaikh, A.; Babu, P.; Rao, B.; Babu, R.; Reddy, J.; Banker, D.; Sheth, T.; Benjarge, P.; Surushe, S.; Bharani, A.; Solanki, R.; Bhargava, V.; Rathi, A.; Biniwale, A.; Bhuti, M.; Calambur, N.; Karnwal, N.; Chopda, M.; Mali, N.; Goyal, N.; Saini, A.; Gupta, J.; Singh, P.; Hadan, S.; Savanth, P.; Hardas, S.; Thakor, G.; Hiremath, J.; Ghume, A.; Jain, R.; Pahuja, M.; Joseph, S.; Oommen, D.; Joseph, J.; Thomas, R.; Joshi, H.; Iby, N. N.; Kale, V.; Raut, N.; Kandekar, B.; Kandekar, S.; Kishore, R.; Krishnan, H.; Kotiwale, V.; Kulkarni, R.; Deokar, M.; Kulkarni, G.; Lawande, A.; Kumar, P.; Karpuram, M.; Kumar, A.; Francis, J.; Kumbla, M.; Anthony, A.; Lavhe, P.; Kale, M.; Mardikar, H.; Bhaskarwar, P.; Mathur, A.; Sharma, P.; Menon, J.; Francis, V.; Namjoshi, D.; Shelke, S.; Narendra, J.; Natarajan, S.; Oomaan, A.; Gurusamy, P.; Angel, J.; Purayil, M. Padinhare; Shams, S.; Pandurangi, U.; Sababathi, R.; Parekh, P.; Jasani, B.; Patki, N.; Babbar, A.; Pinto, B.; Kharalkar, H.; Premchand, R.; Jambula, H.; Rao, M.; Vuriya, A.; Ravi Shankar, A.; Reddy, R.; Bekal, S.; Barai, A.; Saha, D.; Gadepalli, R.; Sant, H.; Jadhav, D.; Sarna, M.; Arora, T.; Sawhney, J.; Singh, R.; Sethi, K.; Bansal, N.; Sethia, A.; Sethia, S.; Shetty, G.; Sudheer, R.; Singh, G.; Gupta, R.; Srinivas, A.; Thankaraj, L.; Varma, S.; Kaur, A.; Vinod, M. Vijan; Thakur, B.; Zanwar, I.; Dharmarao, A.; Atar, S.; Lasri, E.; Dicker, D.; Marcoviciu, D.; Elias, M.; Ron, G. Avraham; Francis, A.; Ghantous, R.; Goldhaber, A.; Goldhaber, M.; Gottlieb, S.; Rouwaida, S.; Grossman, E.; Dagan, T.; Hasin, Y.; Roshrosh, M.; Hayek, T.; Majdoub, A.; Klainman, E.; Genin, I.; Lahav, M.; Gilat, T.; Ben Ari, M.; Lishner, M.; Karny, M.; Ouzan, E.; Givoni, H.; Rozenman, Y.; Logvinenko, S.; Schiff, E.; Sterlin, J.; Shochat, M.; Aloni, I.; Swissa, M.; Belatsky, V.; Tsalihin, D.; Kisos, D.; Zeltser, D.; Platner, N.; Berni, A.; Giovannelli, F.; Boriani, G.; Cervi, E.; Comi, G.; Peruzzotti, L.; Cuccia, C.; Forgione, C.; de Caterina, R.; de Pace, D.; de Servi, S.; Mariani, M.; Di Lenarda, A.; Mazzone, C.; Di Pasquale, G.; Di Niro, M.; Fattore, L.; Bosco, B.; Grassia, V.; Murena, E.; Laffi, N. N.; Gaggioli, G.; Lo Pinto, G.; Raggi, F.; Marino, P.; Francalacci, G.; Babbolin, M.; Bulgari, M.; Penco, M.; Lioy, E.; Perrone Filardi, P.; Marciano, C.; Pirelli, S.; Paradiso, G.; Piseddu, G.; Fenu, L.; Raisaro, A.; Granzow, K.; Rasura, M.; Cannoni, S.; Severi, S.; Breschi, M.; Toschi, V.; Gagliano, M.; Zacà, V.; Furiozzi, F.; Hirahara, T.; Akihisa, U.; Masaki, W.; Ajioka, M.; Matsushita, C.; Anzai, T.; Mino, K.; Arakawa, S.; Tsukimine, A.; Endo, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Fujii, K.; Kozeni, S.; Fujii, E.; Kotera, M.; Fujimoto, S.; Omae, K.; Fujimoto, K.; Ichishita, Y.; Fujita, T.; Ito, Y.; Fukamizu, S.; Harada, J.; Fukuda, N.; Fujimoto, C.; Funazaki, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Furukawa, Y.; Kamitake, C.; Hagiwara, N.; Naganuma, M.; Hara, S.; Kumagai, S.; Harada, K.; Fuki, Y.; Haruna, T.; Nakahara, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Shimazu, Y.; Hiasa, Y.; Oga, Y.; Higashikata, T.; Nakagawa, Y.; Hirayama, A.; Kawaguchi, A.; Iesaka, Y.; Miyamoto, C.; Iijima, T.; Higuchi, K.; Ino, H.; Noguchi, H.; Inomata, T.; Nakamura, K.; Ishibashi, Y.; Nozaki, T.; Ishii, Y.; Tomita, H.; Ishimaru, S.; Ise, M.; Itamoto, K.; Ito, T.; Onishi, M.; Iwade, K.; Sakuma, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Nagatome, H.; Kakinoki, S.; Adachi, C.; Kamakura, S.; Nakahara, F.; Kamijo, M.; Iida, S.; Kamiyama, K.; Fujii, R.; Kato, K.; Ishida, A.; Kazatani, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kitazawa, H.; Igarashi, C.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kikuchi, R.; Kohno, M.; Tamura, S.; Yumoto, I.; Kurabayashi, M.; Koya, E.; Masuyama, T.; Kaneno, Y.; Matsuda, K.; Ebina, E.; Meno, H.; Satake, M.; Mita, T.; Takeda, M.; Miyamoto, N.; Kimizu, T.; Miyauchi, Y.; Sakamoto, S.; Munemasa, M.; Murata, J.; Nagai, Y.; Sakata, Y.; Naito, S.; Oyama, H.; Nishi, Y.; Nagase, T.; Ochiai, J.; Junko, H.; Ogawa, T.; Sugeno, M.; Oguro, H.; Tanabe, M.; Okada, K.; Moriyama, Y.; Okajima, K.; Nakashima, M.; Okazaki, O.; Wada, H.; Okishige, K.; Kitani, S.; Okumura, K.; Narita, Y.; Onaka, H.; Moriyama, H.; Ozaki, Y.; Tanikawa, I.; Sakagami, S.; Nakano, A.; Sakuragi, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sakurai, S.; Ooki, H.; Sasaki, T.; Oosawa, N.; Satoh, A.; Fujimoto, E.; Seino, Y.; Narumi, M.; Shirai, T.; Shigenari, M.; Shoji, Y.; Ueda, J.; Sugi, K.; Miyazaki, E.; Sumii, K.; Asakura, H.; Takagi, M.; Mohri, S.; Takahashi, W.; Yoshida, K.; Takahashi, A.; Kishi, N.; Takahashi, T.; Sakurai, Y.; Takeda, K.; Yahata, A.; Takenaka, T.; Yamagishi, K.; Takeuchi, S.; Watanabe, E.; Tanaka, K.; Uchida, M.; Tanouchi, J.; Nishiya, Y.; Tsuboi, H.; Tsuboi, N.; Terakura, K.; Uematsu, M.; Yasumoto, S.; Ueyama, Y.; Usuda, K.; Sakai, Y.; Yagi, M.; Sato, A.; Yagi, H.; Kuroda, T.; Yamabe, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; Yamada, T.; Yamano, R.; Yamagishi, T.; Sasaki, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashina, A.; Takiguchi, M.; Yonehara, T.; Yoshino, H.; Nomura, H.; Yoshioka, K.; Fujiwara, Y.; Bayram Llamas, E.; Hurtado, A.; Calvo Vargas, C.; Limon, M. Cedano; Cardona Muñoz, E.; Hernandez, S.; Carrillo, J.; Delgadillo, T.; Cásares Ramirez, M.; Valles, J. Franco; Garcia, N.; Colin, M. Alcantara; Garcia-Castillo, A.; Jaramillo, A.; Leiva-Pons, J.; de la Mora, S.; Llamas Esperón, G.; Grajales, A.; Mendez-Machado, G.; Avila, H.; Ruiz, L. Nevárez; Magallanes, G.; Sánchez Díaz, C.; Ortiz, A.; Sánchez, R. Velasco; Velazquez, E. Moran; Alhakim, M.; van Welsen, I.; Bruning, T.; Jones, A.; Buiks, C.; de Groot, J. [=Joris R.; Radder, I.; de Vos, R.; Hazeleger, R.; Daniels, R.; Kietselaer, B.; Muijs, L.; Mannaerts, H.; Kooiman, E.; Mevissen, H.; van der Heijden, D.; Hofmeyer, H.; Anscombe, R.; O'Meeghan, T.; Kjentjes, M.; Benatar, J.; Borthwick, L.; Doughty, R.; Copley, M.; Fisher, R.; Monkley, R.; Green, B.; Scott, D.; Hamer, A.; Tomlinson, J.; Hart, H.; Turner, A.; Cammell, R.; Troughton, R.; Skelton, L.; Young, C.; Kennett, K.; Claussen, H.; Hofsøy, K.; Melbue, R.; Sandvik, J.; Thunhaug, H.; Tveit, A.; Enger, S.; Bustamante, G.; Guillen, M. Tejada; Cabrera, J.; Mendoza, R. Esteves; Chavez, C.; Luna, C.; Lema, J.; Carrion, A.; Llerena, N.; Bedregal, S. Araoz; Medina Palomino, F.; Rodriguez, J.; Minchola, J.; Bautista, C.; Negron Miguel, S.; Armas, B. Honores; Rodriguez, A.; Romero, N.; Torres, P.; Rodriguez, K. Fernandez; Yanac Chavez, P.; Delgado, S.; Sambaz, C. M.; Barcinas, R.; Zapanta, M.; Coching, R.; Vallenas, M.; Matiga, G.; Enad, C.; Rogelio, G.; Joaquin, F.; Roxas, A.; Gilo, L.; To, R.; Aquino, M.; Villamor, L.; Nario, K.; Adamus, J.; Korzeniowska-Adamus, J.; Baszak, J.; Bronisz, M.; Cieslak, B.; Busz-Papiez, B.; Krzystolik, A.; Cymerman, K.; Dabrowska, M.; Ptak, A.; Derlaga, B.; Laskowska-Derlaga, E.; Domanska, E.; Guziewicz, M.; Gieroba, A.; Zajac, E.; Gniot, J.; Mroczkowski, P.; Januszewicz, A.; Makowiecka-Ciesla, M.; Jazwinska-Tarnawska, E.; Ciezak, P.; Jurowiecki, J.; Kaczmarek, B.; Pacholska, A.; Kaminski, L.; Kania, G.; Tymendorf, K.; Karczmarczyk, A.; Kaliszczak, R.; Konieczny, M.; Benicka, E.; Korzeniak, R.; Borowski, W.; Krzyzanowski, W.; Muzyk-Osikowicz, M.; Kus, W.; Lesnik, J.; Wierzykowski, T.; Lewczuk, J.; Stopyra-Poczatek, M.; Lubinski, A.; Szymanska, K.; Lysek, R.; Jaguszewska, G.; Matyszczak-Toniak, L.; Sznajder, R.; Wnetrzak-Michalska, R.; Kosmaczewska, A.; Mazur, S.; Chmielowski, A.; Miekus, P.; Kosmalska, K.; Mosiewicz, J.; Myslinski, W.; Napora, P.; Biniek, D.; Nessler, J.; Nessler, B.; Niezgoda, K.; Nej, A.; Nowak, J.; Olszewski, M.; Podjacka, D.; Janczewska, D.; Pogorzelska, H.; Polaszewska-Pulkownik, V.; Bojanowska, E.; Raczak, G.; Zienciuk-Krajka, A.; Rewinska, H.; Rozmyslowicz-Szerminska, W.; Ronkowski, R.; Norwa-Otto, B.; Sendrowski, D.; Spyra, J.; Szolkiewicz, M.; Malanska, A.; Turbak, R.; Wrobel, W.; Muzalewski, P.; Wysokinski, A.; Kudlicki, J.; Zarebinski, M.; Krauze, R.; Zielinski, M.; Nawrot, M.; Matias, F.; Correia, J.; Gil, V.; Lopes, S.; Madeira, J.; Maymone, D.; Martins, D.; Neves, E.; Monteiro, P.; Oliveira, D.; Marques, A. Leitao; Castro, C.; Salgado, A.; Gonçalves, A.; Sao Marcos, H.; Santos, O.; Nunes, L. 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Dachs; Villuendas, R.; Astier, L.; Appelros, P.; Åkerberg, A.; Blom, K. Berndtsson; Andersson, R.; Blomström, P.; Persson, L.; Carlsson, T.; Bengtsson, A. Stener; Dettmann, S.; Östberg, S.; Engdahl, J.; Karlsson, L.; Herlitz, J.; Winberg, L.; Jernhed, H.; Koskinen, P.; Håkansson, E.; Kozak, P.; Edlund, M.; Malmqvist, L.; Eriksson, G.; Randers, F.; Moodh, J.; Rautio, A.; Johansson, M.; Rönn, F.; Sundholm, C.; Stenberg, A.; Gunnarsson, A.; Thulin, J.; Broberg, M.; Slater, I. Petrova; Cheng, C. C.; Wu, W. S.; Chiang, C. E.; Yu, W. C.; Chiang, F. T.; Wu, Y. W.; Chiou, C. W.; Yeh, T. C.; Hsia, C. H.; Chen, Y. P.; Huang, J. L.; Chen, Y. F.; Kuo, C. T.; Wang, C. L.; Lai, W. T.; Lin, T. H.; Lee, J. T.; Pai, P. Y.; Lin, K. H.; Shyu, K. G.; Chiu, C. Z.; Tseng, W. K.; Pan, Y. F.; Ueng, K. C.; Lee, S. C.; Wang, J. H.; Tsai, W. C.; Yeh, H. I.; Kuo, J. 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Stagi; Landau, C.; Ferguson, D.; Lang, J.; Simmons, T.; Langevin, E.; Faucett, S.; Ledbetter, L.; Royse, H.; Lentz, M.; Smith, D.; Lesser, M.; Hartley, L.; Lewis, D.; Bonds, C.; Lillestol, M.; Miller, D.; Ling, L.; Murphy, R.; Littlefield, R.; Wofford, E.; Lomnitz, D.; Lone, B.; Davids, M.; Looby, R.; Ault, S.; Lui, H.; Wright, H.; Lurie, M.; Edelstein, J.; Macomber, J.; Bush, D.; Magee, A.; Doctor, A.; Mainigi, S.; Lisiecki, B.; Makam, S.; Casas, R.; Mandviwala, M.; Marar, I.; Rabadi-Marar, D.; Marenberg, M.; Bedenko, E.; Massin, E.; Hicks, T.; McCartney, M.; Stubbs, L.; McGarvey, J.; Schwarz, L.; McGuire, K.; McKenzie, M.; Rodkey, K.; McKnight, T.; Paul, J.; McLaurin, B.; Lack, A.; Mega, J.; Marti, J.; Meholick, A.; Skinner, J.; Mehrle, A.; Wall, J.; Mendelson, R.; Cervellione, K.; Mercado, A.; Cajulis, C.; Michlin, B.; Romero-Colon, J.; Milas, J.; Sanders, D.; Miller, R.; Sanchez, S.; Miller, S.; Gryczan, J.; Mody, F.; Strugatsky, S.; Moran, J.; Garner, S.; Morledge, J.; Bowman, B.; Mouhaffel, A.; Parrott, N.; Mounsey, P.; Schuler, C.; Mowdy, M.; Todd, S.; Mullen, P.; Raziano, S.; Murphy, A.; Oehmann, V.; Nadar, V.; Parker, A.; Naidu, J.; West, M.; Nallasivan, M.; Goza, J.; Nguyen, T.; Nomanee, S.; Nielsen, R.; Wilmot, M.; Oberoi, M.; Thakkar, N.; Oppenheimer, K.; McCormick, J.; Orchard, R.; Garcia, L.; Osborne, J.; Gonzalez, M.; Oza, S.; Joseph, L.; Patnam, S.; Dennison, K.; Pavon, H.; Gorry, N.; Pearlstein, R.; Montayne, S.; Pentz, W.; Duncan, D.; Peters, P.; Chacon, L.; Petruzziello, F.; Morlando, F.; Pettis, K.; Brown, F.; Pezzella, S.; Kirk, D.; Poulathas, A.; Cush, S.; Pratt, R.; Neeper, L.; Pribble, A.; Lowe, K.; Pudi, K.; Sham, L.; Pugeda, J.; Ebert, J.; Quadrel, M.; Rafla, E.; Quinlan, E.; Reed, C.; Quinn, J.; Hemmen, C.; Rama, P.; Domingo, D.; Redondo, V.; Wroblewski, J.; Renzi, M.; Stanley, E.; Richwine, R.; Pazier, P.; Riofrio, K.; Braun, D.; Robinson, J.; Cherrico, M.; Roehll, W.; Hollihan, P.; Rosado, N. N.; Barnhorst, M.; Rosado, J.; Bamhorst, M.; Rosen, R.; Martin, C.; Ross, S.; Freeman, R.; Ruoff, G.; Nelson, T.; Sacco, J.; Ball, E.; Samal, A.; Schomburg, J.; Sandberg, J.; Lafave, J.; Savin, V.; Clifton, R.; Schaefer, S.; Fekete, A.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schulman, D.; Mercer, S.; Seals, A.; Ullig, T.; Holt, A.; Seide, H.; Mather, N.; Shah, G.; Witt, P.; Shalaby, A.; Seese, M.; Shanes, J.; Fleets, J.; Shaoulian, E.; Hren, A.; Sheikh, K.; Hengerer, T.; Shih, H.; Browning, J.; Shoukfeh, M.; Stephenson, L.; Siler, T.; Champagne, M.; Simpson, P.; Meyer, R.; Singh, N.; Turner, K.; Singh, V.; Nelson, M.; Skierka, R.; Hughes, B.; Keene, R.; Smith, R.; Hodnett, P.; Spangenthal, S.; Thomason, L.; Sperling, M.; Vasquez, E.; Spivack, E.; McCartney, P.; Staniloae, C.; Liu, M.; Steljes, A.; Cox, C.; Struble, R.; Vittitow, T.; Suresh, D.; Frost, J.; Swerchowsky, V.; Freemyer, D.; Szulawski, I.; Herwehe, S.; Tahirkheli, N.; Springer, K.; Takata, T.; Bruton, T.; Talano, J.; Leo, L.; Tami, L.; Corchado, D.; Tatarko, M.; Swauger, M.; Tawney, K.; Dastoli, K.; Teague, S.; Young, K.; tee, H.; Mitchell, T.; Teixeira, J.; Southam, D.; Torres, M.; Tucker, P.; Salas, L.; Updegrove, J.; Hanna, K.; Val-Mejias, J.; Harrelson, K. Gonzalez; Vemireddy, D.; Cardoza, T.; Verma, S.; Parsons, T.; Vicari, R.; Warren, K.; Vijay, N.; Washam, M.; Vossler, M.; Kilcup, S.; Walsh, R.; Renaud, K.; Ward, S.; Locklear, T.; Waxman, F.; Sanchez, G.; Weiss, R.; St Laurent, B.; Westcott, J.; Williams, D.; Gibson, C.; Williams, R.; Dowling, C.; Willis, J.; VonGerichten, S.; Wood, K.; Capasso-Gulve, E.; Worley, S.; Pointer, S.; Yarows, S.; Sheehan, T.; Yasin, M.; Yi, J.; Dongas, B.; Yousuf, K.; Zakhary, B.; Curtis, S.; Zeig, S.; Mason, T.; Zellner, C.; Harden, M.; Roper, E.; Waseem, M.; Grammer, M.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundEdoxaban is a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor with proven antithrombotic effects. The long-term efficacy and safety of edoxaban as compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation is not known. MethodsWe conducted a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial comparing two

  5. Occlusion of left atrial appendage in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Н. Ганеева

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews a new method of prophylaxis of thromboembolitic complications, specifically occlusion of left atrial appendage, in patients with atrial fibrillation. Indications and contraindications for the procedure, as well as a step-by-step process of the intervention itself are described. Special emphasis is placed on the up-to-date evidence and the review of clinical trials.

  6. Temporal changes in patient characteristics and prior pharmacotherapy in patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karasoy, Deniz; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Hansen, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Trends in patient selection and pharmacotherapy before radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of atrial fibrillation are not well studied. We examined temporal trends in RFA utilization on a nationwide scale in Denmark.......Trends in patient selection and pharmacotherapy before radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of atrial fibrillation are not well studied. We examined temporal trends in RFA utilization on a nationwide scale in Denmark....

  7. ANTIARRHYTHMIC EFFICACY OF PROPAFENONE IN PATIENTS WITH PERSISTENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Kurbanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess propafenone antiarrhythmic efficacy and optimal timing of the drug administration for relief of persistent atrial fibrillation (PAF. Material and methods. 24 patients (19 men, 5 women, aged 53,8±13,3 with PAF (duration is more than 7 days were included in the study. PAF was confirmed clinically as well as by ECG and daily ECG monitoring. Indications for sinus rhythm recovery by propafenone were defined in according to the ACC/AHA/ESC recommendations (2006. 12-lead ECG was performed before the fist administration and 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 hours and some next days after propafenone therapy start. Echocardiography and thyroid hormone tests were also performed. Propafenone was administered additionally to standard treatment of the underlying disease and oral anticoagulants. The first dose of propafenone was 300 mg, after 4 hours patients received next dose of 300 mg if atrial fibrillation persisted and no side effects were observed, then doses of 300 mg were administered every 6-8 hours (but not more than 900-1200 mg per day during 5 days. Maintenance propafenone dose of 450-600 mg daily was used in case of sinus rhythm recovery. Results. Sinus rhythm was restored in 41,6% of patients taking propafenone, and time of sinus rhythm recovery was 53,1±28,9 hours after therapy start. Propafenone antiarrhythmic efficacy in the loading dose (300 mg was 4,2%. Propafenone efficacy during the first 24 hours (dose of 700±282,8 mg was 12,5%. The maximum rate of sinus rhythm recovery was observed during the first 2-3 days of propafenone receiving (60% of all patients with rhythm recovery. Patients with unrecovered sinus rhythm had longer duration of PAF in comparison with this in effectively treated patients, 105,8±89,0 vs 39,7±38,9 days (p<0,05, respectively, as well as the more prominent basal pulse deficit, 24,6±15,0 vs 13,56±5,7 beats per minute (p<0,05, respectively. Cardiac and transient noncardiac side effects were registered in 8,6 and 4

  8. Relevance of Electrical Remodeling in Human Atrial Fibrillation Results of the Asymptomatic Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Evaluation in Pacemaker Patients and the Atrial Fibrillation Reduction Atrial Pacing Trial Mechanisms of Atrial Fibrillation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Healey, Jeff S.; Israel, Carsten W.; Connolly, Stuart J.; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Nair, Girish M.; Divakaramenon, Syamkumar; Capucci, Alessandro; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Lau, Chu-Pak; Gold, Michael R.; Carlson, Mark; Themeles, Ellison; Morillo, Carlos A.

    Background-In animal models of atrial fibrillation (AF), changes in atrial electrophysiological properties are associated with the development of AF. Their relevance to human AF is unclear. Methods and Results-The Asymptomatic Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Evaluation in Pacemaker Patients and the

  9. CT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, A.; Sommer, T.; Leiss, A.; Naehle, P.; Schild, H.; Flacke, S.; Probst, C.; Welz, A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Reliable visualization of the coronary arteries with multislice spiral CT angiography (MSCTA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) remains a challenge despite retrospective ECG gating. A recently developed new algorithm automatically compensates dynamic changes in the heart rate during the scan, thus reducing misregistration and motion artifacts. The HeartBeat-RT algorithm combines a fixed percent delay determined from the first R wave and the fixed offset delay based on the second R wave in the ECG cycle. The purpose of this study was to find out the optimal reconstruction window in MSCTA in patients with AF for each of the three major coronary arteries during the cardiac cycle. Materials and methods: 20 patients with permanent AF were imaged on a 16-slice scanner (slice collimation: 16 x 0.75 mm; rotation time 0.42 s; 140 kV; 380 mAs; 120 ml Ultravist 370 registered i.v.). The patients had not received any previous drugs for heart frequency regulation. Acquisition was started after bolus tracking of a biphasic bolus of 120 ml Ultravist 370 injected intravenously. Each coronary segment was reconstructed at 0%-90% of the cardiac cycle in increments of 10%. For image analysis we used coronary segments as defined by the American Heart Association. Two blinded independent readers assessed the image quality in terms of visibility and artifacts (five-point rating scale 1=very poor, 2=poor, 3=fair, 4=good and 5=excellent) and the degree of stenosis (five-point rating scale 1=0%, 2=1%-49%, 3=50%-74%, 4=75%-99%, 5=100%) on axial slices, multiplanar reconstructions and three-dimensional volume-rendered images. (orig.)

  10. Stroke and recurrent haemorrhage associated with antithrombotic treatment after gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Lip, Gregory Y H; Olesen, Jonas B

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What are the risks of all cause mortality, thromboembolism, major bleeding, and recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding associated with restarting antithrombotic treatment after gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation? METHODS: This Danish cohort study (1996......-2012) included all patients with atrial fibrillation discharged from hospital after gastrointestinal bleeding while receiving antithrombotic treatment. Restarted treatment regimens were single or combined antithrombotic drugs with oral anticoagulation and antiplatelets. Follow-up started 90 days after discharge...... gastrointestinal bleeding. 27.1% (n=924) of patients did not resume antithrombotic treatment. Compared with non-resumption of treatment, a reduced risk of all cause mortality was found in association with restart of oral anticoagulation (hazard ratio 0.39, 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 0.46), an antiplatelet...

  11. Increasing rate of atrial fibrillation from 2003 to 2011 in patients with ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, S F; Christensen, L. M.; Christensen, A

    2015-01-01

    identified. Frequency analysis and linear regression were used to assess trends in atrial fibrillation diagnosis and oral anticoagulation therapy prescription. RESULTS: A total of 17.1% (n = 9482) of ischaemic stroke patients had atrial fibrillation. The relative frequency of atrial fibrillation increased...

  12. Predicting Major Bleeding in Ischemic Stroke Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkens, Nina A; Algra, Ale; Greving, Jacoba P

    2017-11-01

    Performance of risk scores for major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation and a previous transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke is not well established. We aimed to validate risk scores for major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with oral anticoagulants after cerebral ischemia and explore the net benefit of oral anticoagulants among bleeding risk categories. We analyzed 3623 patients with a history of transient ischemic attack or stroke included in the RE-LY trial (Randomized Evaluation of Long-Term Anticoagulation Therapy). We assessed performance of HEMORR 2 HAGES (hepatic or renal disease, ethanol abuse, malignancy, older age, reduced platelet count or function, hypertension [uncontrolled], anemia, genetic factors, excessive fall risk, and stroke), Shireman, HAS-BLED (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly), ATRIA (Anticoagulation and Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation), and ORBIT scores (older age, reduced haemoglobin/haematocrit/history of anaemia, bleeding history, insufficient kidney function, and treatment with antiplatelet) with C statistics and calibration plots. Net benefit of oral anticoagulants was explored by comparing risk reduction in ischemic stroke with risk increase in major bleedings on warfarin. During 6922 person-years of follow-up, 266 patients experienced a major bleed (3.8 per 100 person-years). C statistics ranged from 0.62 (Shireman) to 0.67 (ATRIA). Calibration was poor for ATRIA and moderate for other models. The reduction in recurrent ischemic strokes on warfarin was larger than the increase in major bleeding risk, irrespective of bleeding risk category. Performance of prediction models for major bleeding in patients with cerebral ischemia and atrial fibrillation is modest but comparable with performance in patients with only atrial fibrillation. Bleeding risk scores cannot

  13. Living with Atrial Fibrillation: An Analysis of Patients' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiok, Meral; Yilmaz, Mualla; Rencüsoğullari, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the perceptions of patients with atrial fibrillation regarding the disease, to reveal their feelings, thoughts and wishes, and to investigate their perspectives and coping behaviors towards their condition. Phenomenological methodology was used. The study population consisted of a total of 225 patients treated by the cardiology department of a university hospital, while the study sample consisted of 32 patients who met the inclusion criteria. A semistructured interview addressed perceptions of patients with atrial fibrillation regarding the disease. Data were collected by asking the participants the three questions on the In-depth Individual Interview Form. Data were analyzed using the continuous comparative method of Colaizzi. In the study sample, 50.0% of participants were female, 69.0% were married, and the mean age was 66.90 years (± 7.90 years). As a result of the content analysis, four main themes and 15 subthemes were identified: patient's mental status regarding the disease, patient's social status regarding the disease, patient's physical condition regarding the disease, and disease management and coping with the disease. The study found that individuals with atrial fibrillation faced major limitations in their daily living activities and social lives due to the disease symptoms and warfarin use. Patients need to be provided with relevant individual training and counselling so that they lead more satisfactory lives. In addition, appropriate health appointment and monitoring systems should be developed for patients to reduce the problems associated with frequent follow-up appointments. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Structural and functional characteristics of myocard in patients with different forms of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Vasilyeva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study structural and functional characteristics of myocard in patients with different forms of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is the most prevalent arrhythmia in clinical practice. Atrial fibrillation is a progressive disease: the duration of paroxysms increases over time and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation transforms to persistent, the last one becomes refractory to pharmacological and electrical cardioversion in time and transforms to permanent. So assessment of myocardial remodeling in patients with persistent and permanent atrial fibrillation is very actual. Methods and results. According to the aim of the study 133 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation and 100 patients with permanent atrial fibrillation were included into the study. Echocardiographic parameters of left and right atria function were studied. Conclusion. It was found that patients with persistent and permanent atrial fibrillation are characterized with both left and right atrias remodeling. Remodeling of the atrias is less pronounced in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation in comparison with persistent atrial fibrillation patients and arrhythmia recurrence.

  15. Increased use of oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadsbøll, Kasper; Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to examine temporal trends in the use oral anticoagulants (OAC) as stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and to examine factors associated with OAC initiation. Methods and results From Danish nationwide registries, we identified patients diagnosed...... initiation rates increased (P age > 75 years and high risk of stroke). The increased OAC...... initiation was accompanied by introduction and increased uptake of the NOACs. By the end of the study, NOACs accounted for 72.5% of all OACs prescribed in newly diagnosed AF patients. OAC initiation was associated with male gender, age 65-74 years, few comorbidities and increased risk of stroke. Conclusion...

  16. Effect of Early Direct Current Cardioversion on the Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmanagic, Armin; Möller, Sören; Osmanagic, Azra

    2015-01-01

    In patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the sinus rhythm (SR) can be restored by direct current cardioversion (DCC), although the recurrence of AF after successful DCC is common. We examined whether transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)-guided early DCC, compared with the conventio......In patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the sinus rhythm (SR) can be restored by direct current cardioversion (DCC), although the recurrence of AF after successful DCC is common. We examined whether transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)-guided early DCC, compared...... with persistent AF lasting >60 days. The recurrence-free survival probability at 28 days in patients with persistent AF

  17. Efficacy and safety of apixaban in patients after cardioversion for atrial fibrillation: insights from the ARISTOTLE Trial (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaker, Greg; Lopes, Renato D; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Hermosillo, Antonio G; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Tinga, Brian; Zhu, Jun; Mohan, Puneet; Garcia, David; Bartunek, Jozef; Vinereanu, Dragos; Husted, Steen; Harjola, Veli Pekka; Rosenqvist, Marten; Alexander, John H; Granger, Christopher B

    2014-03-25

    The aim of this study was to determine the risk of major clinical and thromboembolic events after cardioversion for atrial fibrillation in subjects treated with apixaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor, compared with warfarin. In patients with atrial fibrillation, thromboembolic events may occur after cardioversion. This risk is lowered with vitamin K antagonists and dabigatran. Using data from the ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation) trial, we conducted a post-hoc analysis of patients undergoing cardioversion. A total of 743 cardioversions were performed in 540 patients: 265 first cardioversions in patients assigned to apixaban and 275 in those assigned to warfarin. The mean time to the first cardioversion for patients assigned to warfarin and apixaban was 243 ± 231 days and 251 ± 248 days, respectively; 75% of the cardioversions occurred by 1 year. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. In patients undergoing cardioversion, no stroke or systemic emboli occurred in the 30-day follow-up period. Myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient (0.2%) receiving warfarin and 1 patient receiving apixaban (0.3%). Major bleeding occurred in 1 patient (0.2%) receiving warfarin and 1 patient receiving apixaban (0.3%). Death occurred in 2 patients (0.5%) receiving warfarin and 2 patients receiving apixaban (0.6%). Major cardiovascular events after cardioversion of atrial fibrillation are rare and comparable between warfarin and apixaban. (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation [ARISTOTLE]; NCT00412984). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dabigatran Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Without Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, Mahesh; Gioia, Laura; Buck, Brian; Sivakumar, Leka; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Butcher, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Acute ischemic stroke patients are at risk of early recurrence. We tested the feasibility and safety of initiating dabigatran in patients, within 24 hours of minor stroke in patients without atrial fibrillation. Minor stroke patients (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≤3) without atrial fibrillation and evidence of acute infarction on magnetic resonance imaging were treated with dabigatran. Treatment began within 24 hours of onset and was continued for 30 days. The primary end point was symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. A total of 53 patients with median (interquartile range) age of 68 (57-77) years and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 1 (0-2) were enrolled. Baseline diffusion-weighted imaging volume was 0.8 (0.3-2.4) mL. No patients experienced symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic petechial hemorrhagic transformation on day 7, which remained stable at day 30, while continuing dabigatran. Dabigatran treatment within 24 hours of minor stroke is feasible. A larger randomized trial is required to confirm the safety and efficacy of this treatment approach. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT 01769703. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. What patients want and need to know about atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCabe PJ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pamela J McCabe Saint Mary's Hospital, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Clinicians in a variety of settings are called upon to care for patients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AF, a common chronic condition that affects up to 3 million people in the USA. Evidence-based guidelines provide clinicians with direction for treatment of AF, but recommended content for educating patients and counseling about self-management of AF is not included in published guidelines. When patients believe they have a good understanding of AF they report fewer symptoms, perceive greater control over AF, and attribute less emotional distress to AF. Thus, providing patients with information about AF and how to manage it is important for promoting positive outcomes. The purpose of this article is to offer evidence-based recommendations for content to include in self-management education and counseling for patients with AF. Approaches for educating and counseling patients related to AF pathophysiology, the nature of AF (its cause, consequences, and trajectory, treatments, action plans, and symptom management, and managing the psychosocial challenges of living with AF, are discussed. Keywords: atrial fibrillation, patient education, self-management education, counseling

  20. APPROACHES TO ANTITHROMBOTIC THERAPY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Ushkalova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced age is the most important and independent risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation (AF. The proportion of patients with AF at the age of 65-85 years reaches 70%, and average age of patients with AF is 75 years. Antithrombotic therapy of AF in the elderly is challenging for several reasons. On the one hand, elderly patients are at an increased risk of systemic embolism and stroke and fatal outcomes of stroke are higher in the elderly compared with these in the younger patients. On the other hand, elderlies are at an increased risk of bleeding. In addition, they have important comorbidities and are treated with drugs that can interact with antithrombotic agents. The article discusses tools used to assess risks of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications and general approaches to antithrombotic treatment of elderly patients.

  1. Changes in plasma atrial natriuretic factor in patients with idiopathic atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Xia Xiaojie; Qu Wei; Wang Shukui; Sun Junjiang

    2002-01-01

    To observe the changes in plasma atrial natriuretic factor (AFN) in patients with idiopathic atrial fibrillation and investigate its mechanism, plasma ANF, platelet count and hematocrit were detected in 21 cases with transient idiopathic atrial fibrillation (group A, A1 representing attack, while A2 termination), 28 with persistent idiopathic atrial fibrillation (group B), 27 suffered from rheumatic heart disease with mitral stenosis and persistent atrial fibrillation (group C), 32 with transient supraventricular tachycardia (group D) and 20 normal controls (group E). It was found that the level of ANF was significantly higher in patients with attacking transient idiopathic atrial fibrillation than that in group A2, D and E (P 0.05), while there was significant difference in hematocrit in group A1 compared with group A2, D, E (P < 0.01). It suggested that ANF and hematocrit play an important role in the attack of idiopathic atrial fibrillation

  2. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study...... was observed. An explanation could be an increase in the prevalence of AF in the general population, leaving the proportion of patients admitted with ischemic stroke unchanged. Other risk factors have been sought reduced as well with the implementation of national guidelines regarding hypertension...... was set up to clarify whether this effort has resulted in a decreased proportion of patients with known AF experiencing an ischemic stroke. METHODS: Patients admitted to the Department of Neurology, Vejle Hospital, Denmark, with ischemic stroke from January 1997 to December 2012 were included in the study...

  3. Clinical Differences between Subtypes of Atrial Fibrillation and Flutter: Cross-Sectional Registry of 407 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Dytz Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter account for one third of hospitalizations due to arrhythmias, determining great social and economic impacts. In Brazil, data on hospital care of these patients is scarce. Objective: To investigate the arrhythmia subtype of atrial fibrillation and flutter patients in the emergency setting and compare the clinical profile, thromboembolic risk and anticoagulants use. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective study, with data collection from medical records of every patient treated for atrial fibrillation and flutter in the emergency department of Instituto de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul during the first trimester of 2012. Results: We included 407 patients (356 had atrial fibrillation and 51 had flutter. Patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were in average 5 years younger than those with persistent atrial fibrillation. Compared to paroxysmal atrial fibrillation patients, those with persistent atrial fibrillation and flutter had larger atrial diameter (48.6 ± 7.2 vs. 47.2 ± 6.2 vs. 42.3 ± 6.4; p < 0.01 and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (66.8 ± 11 vs. 53.9 ± 17 vs. 57.4 ± 16; p < 0.01. The prevalence of stroke and heart failure was higher in persistent atrial fibrillation and flutter patients. Those with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and flutter had higher prevalence of CHADS2 score of zero when compared to those with persistent atrial fibrillation (27.8% vs. 18% vs. 4.9%; p < 0.01. The prevalence of anticoagulation in patients with CHA2DS2-Vasc ≤ 2 was 40%. Conclusions: The population in our registry was similar in its comorbidities and demographic profile to those of North American and European registries. Despite the high thromboembolic risk, the use of anticoagulants was low, revealing difficulties for incorporating guideline recommendations. Public health strategies should be adopted in order to improve these rates.

  4. Nonrandom ventricular rhythm in horses with atrial fibrillation and its significance for patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Kroneman, J.; Tweel, I. van der; Herbschleb, J.N.; Heethaar, R.M.; Borst, C.

    RR interval sequences during spontaneous atrial fibrillation in eight horses were analyzed as in previous studies in patients and dogs using histograms and serial autocorrelograms. In patients and dogs with spontaneous atrial fibrillation, ventricular rhythms were always random. In the horses, the

  5. Systolic and Diastolic Function by Tissue Doppler Imaging Predicts Mortality in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dons, Maria; BieringSørensen, Tor; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) detects early signs of left ventricular dysfunction. The prognostic potential of TDI in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has, however, not yet been clarified. This study evaluates the prognostic value of TDI in patients with atrial fibrillation. METHODS...

  6. Warfarin for the prevention of systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L V; Vestergaard, P; Deichgraeber, P

    2008-01-01

    Warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is well documented. However, it has not been examined in the prevention of systemic embolism.......Warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is well documented. However, it has not been examined in the prevention of systemic embolism....

  7. Pacing for the Suppression of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in an 87-year-old Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel El-Bialy

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sinus node dysfunction, atrioventricular (AV block and atrial fibrillation (AF are associated with advanced age. Required therapy commonly includes pacemaker implantation. Methods: We report the course of therapy for an 87-year-old with symptomatic sinus node dysfunction and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who was intolerant of drug therapy. Results: The patient received a pacemaker for treatment of sick sinus syndrome. She continued to have symptomatic episodes of AF and was intolerant of pharmacologic therapy despite adequate rate support provided by the pacemaker. The AF suppression algorithm in the pacemaker was enabled, resulting in the elimination all AF episodes effectively eliminating the need for antiarrhythmic medication. If this continues to stabilize her atrium, withdrawal of anticoagulation therapy is anticipated. Conclusions: The clinical presentation of sinus node dysfunction and related conduction abnormalities is common in the elderly. Pharmacologic management is often a challenge in the presence of the advanced age and concomitant disease processes. In individuals who have paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or are likely to develop this and who need a pacemaker for standard indications, the availability of an AF Suppression™ algorithm may facilitate their management without needed to use medications or being able to utilize lower doses of those medications.

  8. Antithrombotic treatment in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Fernández, C; Camafort, M; Cepeda Rodrigo, J M; Díez-Manglano, J; Formiga, F; Pose Reino, A; Tiberio, G; Mostaza, J M

    2015-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) in the elderly is a complex condition due to the high number of frequently associated comorbidities, such as cardiovascular and kidney disease, cognitive disorders, falls and polypharmacy. Except when contraindicated, anticoagulation is necessary for preventing thromboembolic events in this population. Both vitamin K antagonists and direct oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) are indicated in this context. Renal function should be closely monitored for this age group when these drugs are used. In recent years, various clinical practice guidelines have been published on patients with AF. The majority of these guidelines make specific recommendations on the clinical characteristics and treatment of elderly patients. In this update, we review the specific comments on the recommendations concerning antithrombotic treatment in elderly patients with nonvalvular AF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  9. Digoxin use and risk of mortality in hypertensive patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okin, Peter M; Hille, Darcy A; Wachtell, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    patients with atrial fibrillation has not been examined. METHODS AND RESULTS: All-cause mortality was examined in relation to in-treatment digoxin use in 937 hypertensive patients with ECG left ventricular hypertrophy in atrial fibrillation at baseline (n = 134) or who developed atrial fibrillation during......BACKGROUND: Digoxin is widely used for rate control of atrial fibrillation. However, recent studies have reported conflicting results on the association of digoxin with mortality when used in patients with atrial fibrillation. Moreover, the relationship of digoxin use to mortality in hypertensive...... pressure, and Sokolow-Lyon voltage treated as time-varying covariates, digoxin use was no longer a significant predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.73-1.48, P = 0.839). CONCLUSION: In hypertensive patients with ECG left ventricular hypertrophy with existing or new atrial...

  10. Antiarrhythmic therapy and risk of death in patients with atrial fibrillation: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Skøtt; Hansen, Morten Lock; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the risk of death associated with antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) therapy in a nationwide unselected cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: All patients admitted with AF in Denmark from 1995 to 2004 and their subsequent use of AADs were identified...... by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazard models with time-dependent covariates were used to analyse the risk of death associated with AAD therapy. A total of 141,500 patients were included in the study; of these 3356 (2.4%) patients received treatment...... increased risk of death associated with any of the AADs. Hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for flecainide 0.38 (0.32-0.44), propafenone 0.65 (0.58-0.71), sotalol 0.65 (0.63-0.67), and amiodarone 0.94 (0.89-1.00). CONCLUSION: In an unselected cohort of patients with AF, antiarrhythmic treatment...

  11. Patient factors associated with quality of life in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Tiffany C; Simon, DaJuanicia N; Thomas, Laine; Allen, Larry A; Fonarow, Gregg C; Gersh, Bernard J; Kowey, Peter R; Reiffel, James A; Naccarelli, Gerald V; Chan, Paul S; Spertus, John A; Peterson, Eric D; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2016-12-01

    As treatment options for atrial fibrillation (AF) increase, more attention is focused on patients' experiences and quality of life (QoL). However, little is known about the factors associated with these outcomes. The Atrial Fibrillation Effect on QualiTy-of-life (AFEQT) is a disease-specific QoL tool for AF, with domain and summary scores ranging from 0 (the worst QoL) to 100. Using multivariable linear regression, we evaluated factors associated with baseline AFEQT Summary and Subscale Scores in ORBIT AF, a large, community-based AF registry. Independent associations were reported as coefficient estimates in scores and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Overall, AFEQT was assessed in 2007 AF outpatients from 99 sites. Median age (IQR) was 76 years (67-82) and 43% were female. The median AFEQT summary score was 82 (67-94). Female sex, younger age, new onset AF, higher heart rate, obstructive sleep apnea, symptomatic heart failure (HF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary artery disease were all independently associated with reduced QoL. Female sex [Estimate -7.03, 95% CI (-9.31, -4.75)] and new onset versus permanent AF [Estimate -7.44, 95% CI (-11.03, -3.84)] were independently associated with increased symptoms. NYHA Class III or IV HF [Estimate -14.44, 95% CI (-19.46, -8.76)] and female sex [Estimate -7.91, 95% CI (-9.95, -5.88)] were most independently associated with impaired daily activities. QoL in patients with AF varies widely and is associated with several patient factors. Understanding patient factors independently associated with worse QoL can be a foundation for tailoring treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of Febrile Neutropenia in Patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This may be difficult for a poor country. OBJECTIVE: To assess the management of cancer patients with febrile neutropenia in a low resource setting. METHODS: Records of 20 cancer patients with febrile neutropenia ... 0.0 to 0.6 x 109). Thirteen (65%) received. Cisplatin, five (25%) received Adriamycin, two (10%) received

  13. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients with left atrial myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Muslum; Tigen, Kursat; Dundar, Cihan; Ozben, Beste; Alici, Gokhan; Demir, Serdar; Kalkan, Mehmet Emin; Ozkan, Birol

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with left atrial (LA) myxoma. Thirty-six consecutive patients with LA myxoma (10 men, mean age: 49.3 ± 15.7 years), who were operated on between March 2010 and July 2012, were included in this retrospective study. Pre-operative electrocardiograms and echocardiographic examinations of each patient were reviewed. Postoperative AF developed in 10 patients, whereas there was no evidence of paroxysmal AF after resection of the LA myxoma in the remaining 26 patients. The patients who developed AF postoperatively were significantly older than those who did not develop AF (median: 61.5 vs 46 years; p = 0.009). Among the electrocardiographic parameters, only P-wave dispersion differed significantly between postoperative AF and non-AF patients (median: 57.6 vs 39.8 ms, p = 0.004). Logistic regression analysis revealed P- wave dispersion (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 1.003-1.224, p = 0.043) and age (OR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.001-1.278, p = 0.048) as independent predictors of postoperative AF in our cohort of patients. P-wave dispersion is a simple and useful parameter for the prediction of postoperative AF in patients with LA myxoma.

  14. Impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality in patients with chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; van Gelder, IC; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    2002-01-01

    Chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation often occur together. The aim of the study is to review the available literature on the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality in patients with heart failure. Using MEDLINE six full papers were identified. In the studies with severe heart failure

  15. Ventricular fibrillation and transient arrhythmias after defibrillation in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuze, R. H.; Koster, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) and transient arrhythmias after defibrillation were analyzed from the recordings of 28 patients containing at least one episode of ventricular fibrillation. An R-on-T extrasystole initiated VF in 60% of the episodes. Other initiating factors were a late premature beat

  16. Cardiovascular exercise and burden of arrhythmia in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skielboe, Ane Katrine; Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Hakmann, Stine

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity at moderate-high intensity is recommended to prevent lifestyle diseases. Patients with atrial fibrillation are at risk of a sedentary lifestyle due to fear of exercise-induced episodes of atrial fibrillation. The burden of arrhythmia can be reduced by physical exercise...

  17. The RecordAF study: design, baseline data, and profile of patients according to chosen treatment strategy for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, John

    2010-01-01

    in 21 countries across Europe, America, and Asia; recruitment was completed in April 2008. The primary objectives were to prospectively assess the therapeutic success and clinical outcomes in rhythm- and rate-control strategies. The study design and patient baseline data are reported. A total of 5......The REgistry on Cardiac rhythm disORDers assessing the control of Atrial Fibrillation (RecordAF) is the first worldwide, 1-year observational, longitudinal study of the management of paroxysmal/persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) in recently diagnosed patients. The study was conducted at 532 sites......,814 patients with AF were registered, and 5,604 were eligible for evaluation. Rhythm- and rate-control strategies were applied to 55% and 45% of patients, respectively, at study inclusion. Rhythm-control patients mainly received class III agents (45%) or beta blockers (51%), except for sotalol, and rate...

  18. Predicting Successful Pulmonary Vein Isolation In Patients With Atrial Fibrillation By Brain Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-In Shin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is a clinically established treatment by now while success rate varies between 60% and 85%. Interventional treatment of atrial fibrillation is still a challenging technique associated with a long procedure time and risk of major complications in up to 6 % of treated patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation concerning stable sinus rhythm after ablation.Methods: In 68 consecutive patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and normal left ventricular ejection fraction, BNP was measured at baseline before pulmonary vein isolation (PVI. All patients received a 7-days-holter monitoring 3 months after radiofrequency (RF ablation in order to detect recurrent AF episodes. Results: 48 patients with paroxysmal and 20 patients with persistent AF were enrolled. Baseline BNP was significantly higher in patients with persistent AF compared to patients with paroxysmal AF (145,5 pg/ml vs. 84,4 pg/ml; p<0,05. 3 months after PVI 38 patients (79,1% with paroxysmal AF had a stable sinus rhythm documented on 7-days-holter monitoring, where as in 10 patients (20,9% AF episodes were detected. Patients with a successful PVI showed significantly lower BNP plasma levels at baseline compared to patients with AF recurrrence (68,7 pg/ml vs. 144,1 pg/ml; p<0,05. In patients with persistent AF 55% (11 cases had no recurrence of AF at 3 months 7-days holter and in 9 patients (45% AF recurred. BNP plasma levels at baseline were lower in patients with stable sinusrhythm after 3 months compared to the group of recurrent AF (105,8 pg/ml vs. 193,3 pg/ml; p=0,11. Conclusion: Patients with AF and low preprocedural BNP plasma levels showed a better outcome after PVI. Thus BNP may be helpful in patient selection for a successful treatment of AF by PVI.

  19. Oral anticoagulant discontinuation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachroo, Sumesh; Hamilton, Melissa; Liu, Xianchen; Pan, Xianying; Brixner, Diana; Marrouche, Nassir; Biskupiak, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    To identify factors associated with all-cause discontinuation (patient discontinued on their own or physician discontinuation) of oral anticoagulants (OACs) among nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients. Retrospective cohort study. We analyzed the MarketScan claims database from October 2009 to July 2012. Adult patients were eligible if they newly initiated an OAC in the study period, had an atrial fibrillation diagnosis (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 427.31 or 472.32), and had at least 6 months of continuous enrollment after OAC initiation. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess factors associated with discontinuation. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were reported. Among 12,129 eligible patients, 8143 (67.1%) initiated warfarin and 3986 (32.9%) initiated direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Overall, 47.3% of patients independently discontinued during follow-up (mean number of days of follow-up = 416.6 [SD ± 141.7]) with mean time to discontinuation of 120 days (SD ± 114.7). Patients significantly less likely to discontinue included those taking DOACs versus warfarin (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.86-0.97), older patients (≥65 years vs 18 to 34 years) (HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.24-0.43), those with diabetes (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77-0.90), those with prior stroke/transient ischemic attack (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.56-0.75), those with prior pulmonary embolism (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.58-0.88), and those with congestive heart failure (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.74-0.87). Patients with prior bleeding events were significantly more likely to independently discontinue (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.08-1.34). The risk of independent discontinuation of OAC treatment among NVAF patients was high. Patients on DOACs compared with warfarin and those with several comorbid conditions had significantly lower risk of discontinuation, while those with prior bleeding were more likely to discontinue.

  20. Antithrombotic treatment and characteristics of elderly patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation hospitalized at Internal Medicine departments. NONAVASC registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullón, Alejandra; Suárez, Carmen; Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Formiga, Francesc; Cepeda, José María; Pose, Antonio; Camafort, Miguel; Castiella, Jesús; Rovira, Eduardo; Mostaza, José María

    2017-03-03

    The prevalence of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) increases with the patient's age and is associated with high morbi-mortality rates. The main goal of this study was to describe the characteristics of hospitalized elderly patients with NVAF and to identify the clinical and functional factors which determine the use of different antithrombotic strategies. Observational, prospective, multicentre study carried out on patients with NVAF over the age of 75, who had been admitted for any medical condition to Internal Medicine departments. We evaluated 804 patients with a mean age of 85 years (range 75-101), of which 53.9% were females. The prevalence of risk factors and cardiovascular disease was high: hypertension (87.6%), heart failure (65.4%), ischemic cardiomyopathy (24.4%), cerebrovascular disease (22.4%) and chronic kidney disease (45%). Among those cases with previous diagnoses of NVAF, antithrombotic treatment was prescribed in 86.2% of patients: anticoagulants (59.7%), antiplatelet medication (17.8%) and double therapy (8.7%). The factors associated with the use of antithrombotic treatment were history of acute coronary syndrome and atrial fibrillation progression longer than one year. Older age, atrial fibrillation for less than one year, higher HAS-BLED scores and severe cognitive impairment were associated with the use of anti-platelet drugs. Permanent atrial fibrillation favoured the use of anticoagulants. Hospitalized patients older than 75 years old with NVAF showed numerous comorbidities. The percentage of anticoagulation was small and 18% received only anti-platelet therapy. The patient's age, atrial fibrillation's progression time and the severity of the cognitive impairment influenced this therapy choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving Antithrombotic Management in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: Current Status and Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Marcel; Hobbs, F. D. Richard; Jacobson, Alan K.; Pisters, Ron; Prisco, Domenico; Bernardo, Artur; Haas, Markus; Heidrich, Jens; Rosenberg, Matt; Nielsen, Jørn Dalsgaard; Wuillemin, Walter A.

    2009-01-01

    Despite overwhelming evidence of the benefits of risk-adjusted oral anticoagulation on stroke reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), there is still considerable undertreatment. A multidisciplinary expert group was formed to discuss issues surrounding anticoagulant treatment of patients

  2. Sudden death in a young patient with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Tamargo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD in young patients without structural heart disease is frequently due to inherited channelopathies such as long QT syndrome (LQTS, Brugada syndrome or Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. Accordingly, the addition of genetic testing to clinical data may be useful to identify the cause of the sudden death in this population. Mutations in the KCNQ1 encoded Kv7.1 channel are related to type 1 LQTS, familial atrial fibrillation (AF, short QT syndrome, and SCD. We present a clinical case where the presence of AF after resuscitation in a young man with cardiac arrest was the key clinical data to suspect an inherited disorder and genetic testing was the main determinant for identifying the cause of the cardiac arrest. The KCNQ1 p.Arg231His mutation explained the combined phenotype of AF and susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. The case highlights the importance of continued research in genetics and molecular mechanisms of channelopathies.

  3. SECONDARY PREVENTION OF STROKE IN PATIENTS WITH NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: THE CLINICIANS’ VIEWPOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Drozdova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is one of the main risk factor of ischemic stroke. Current problems of the management of patients with stroke due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and secondary stroke prevention in these patients are considered. Data of own author’s observation for patients of this type during 6 months after discharge from the hospital are presented. The problems which patients faced with are analyzed. Comparative assessment of warfarin and dabigatran therapies is given.

  4. Fibrin Clot Permeability as a Predictor of Stroke and Bleeding in Anticoagulated Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabik, Leszek; Wołkow, Paweł; Undas, Anetta

    2017-10-01

    Formation of denser fiber networks has been reported in atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke. In this longitudinal cohort study, we evaluated whether fibrin clot density may predict thromboembolic and bleeding risk in patients with atrial fibrillation on vitamin K antagonists. In 236 patients with atrial fibrillation receiving vitamin K antagonists treatment, we measured ex vivo plasma clot permeability (K s ), a measure of the pore size in fibrin networks. During a median follow-up of 4.3 (interquartile range, 3.7-4.8) years, annual rates of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and major bleeds were 2.96% and 3.45%, respectively. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, patients with lower K s (stroke or transient ischemic attack (hazard ratio [HR], 6.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.17-19.82) and major bleeds (HR, 10.65; 95% CI, 3.52-32.22). Patients with elevated K s (≥6.8 cm 2 ×10 -9 ) had an increased rate of minor bleeding compared with the remainder (11.63% per year versus 3.55% per year; P stroke or transient ischemic attack were low K s (<6.8 cm 2 ×10 - 9 ; HR, 7.24; 95% CI, 2.53-20.76), age (HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10), and treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.08-4.77). Major bleeds were predicted by low K s (<6.8 cm 2 ×10 -9 ; HR, 8.48; 95% CI, 2.99-24.1) and HAS-BLED score ≥3 (HR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.12-4.38). This study is the first to show that unfavorable fibrin properties reflected by formation of denser fibrin networks determine, in part, the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists in patients with atrial fibrillation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. New technologies in treatment of atrial fibrillation in cardiosurgical patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Bykov, A. N.; Sergeev, V. S.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The article is devoted to the evaluation of the results of clinical application of penetrating radiofrequency ablation techniques on atrial myocardium. Total operated on 241 patients with valvular heart disease and coronary heart disease complicated with atrial fibrillation. All operations were performed under cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegia. The main group consists of 141 patients which were operated using penetrating technique radiofrequency exposure. The control group consisted of 100 patients who underwent surgery with the use of "classical" monopolar RF-ablation technique. Both groups were not significantly different on all counts before surgery. Patients with previous heart surgery were excluded during the selection of candidates for the procedure, due to the presence of adhesions in the pericardium, that do not allow good visualization of left atrium, sufficient to perform this procedure. Penetrating technique has significantly higher efficiency compared to the "classic" technique in the early and long-term postoperative periods. In the early postoperative period, its efficiency is 93%, and in the long term is 88%. The efficacy of "classical" monopolar procedure is below: 86% and 68% respectively.

  6. Anticoagulation Control in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Attended at Primary Care Centers in Spain: The PAULA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Vivencio; Escobar, Carlos; Prieto, Luis; Osorio, Genoveva; Polo, José; Lobos, José María; Vargas, Diego; García, Nicolás

    2015-09-01

    To determine the current status of anticoagulation control in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonists in the primary care setting in Spain. The PAULA study was a multicenter cross-sectional/retrospective observational study conducted throughout Spain. The study included patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who had been receiving vitamin K antagonist therapy during the past year and were attended at primary care centers. International normalized ratio (INR) values over the past 12 months were recorded. The degree of anticoagulation control was defined as the time the patient had remained within the therapeutic range and was determined by both the direct method (poor control < 60%) and by the Rosendaal method (poor control < 65%). The study assessed 1524 patients (mean age, 77.4 ± 8.7 years; 48.6% women; 64.2% in permanent atrial fibrillation; CHADS2 mean, 2.3 ± 1.2; CHA2DS2-VASc, 3.9 ± 1.5, and HAS-BLED, 1.6 ± 0.9). The mean number of INR readings recorded per patient was 14.4 ± 3.8. A total of 56.9% of patients had adequate INR control according to the direct method and 60.6% according to the Rosendaal method. The multivariate analysis identified the following predictors for poor INR control: female sex, dietary habits potentially affecting anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists, multidrug therapy, and a history of labile INR. Approximately 40% of patients (43.1% by the direct method and 39.4% by the Rosendaal method) with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who were receiving anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists in primary care in Spain had poor anticoagulation control during the previous 12 months. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical review : Treatment of new-onset atrial fibrillation in medical intensive care patients - a clinical framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleeswijk, Mengalvio E.; Van Noord, Trudeke; Tulleken, Jaap E.; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Zijlstra, Jan G.

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation occurs frequently in medical intensive care unit patients. Most intensivists tend to treat this rhythm disorder because they believe it is detrimental. Whether atrial fibrillation contributes to morbidity and/or mortality and whether atrial fibrillation is an epiphenomenon of

  8. Direct oral anticoagulants for secondary prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF, both permanent and paroxysmal, and history of previous transient ischemic attack (TIA or stroke represent a category of patients at high risk of new embolic events, independently of the presence of other risk factors. In these patients, national and international guidelines recommend oral anticoagulants as first choice for antithrombotic prevention. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs have been demonstrated to be not inferior to warfarin for many end points in NVAF patients in terms of efficacy and safety. The post hoc analysis in selected subgroups of patients enrolled in the three mega trials of phase III comparing DOACs (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF and ARISTOTLE with warfarin help to evaluate whether superiority and non-inferiority persist in these subgroups. Here, patients with NVAF and history of previous TIA/stroke receiving DOACs as secondary prevention are compared with patients with the same characteristics receiving warfarin. An analysis of these patients has been recently published (separately for each of three DOACs. This analysis shows that DOACs maintain their non-inferiority when compared with warfarin in secondary prevention, representing a real alternative in this context of patients at high risk for ischemic and bleeding events.

  9. Utilization and Predictors of Electrical Cardioversion in Patients Hospitalized for Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita M. Rochlani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a common arrhythmia in adults associated with thromboembolic complications. External electrical cardioversion (DCCV is a safe procedure used to convert AF to normal sinus rhythm. We sought to study factors that affect utilization of DCCV in hospitalized patients with AF. The study sample was drawn from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project in the United States. Patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of AF that received DCCV during hospitalization in the years 2000–2010 were included. An estimated 2,810,530 patients with a primary diagnosis of AF were hospitalized between 2001 and 2010, of which 1,19,840 (4.26% received DCCV. The likelihood of receiving DCCV was higher in patients who were males, whites, privately insured, and aged < 40 years and those with fewer comorbid conditions. Higher CHADS2 score was found to have an inverse association with DCCV use. In-hospital stroke, in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and cost for hospitalization were significantly lower for patients undergoing DCCV during AF related hospitalization. Further research is required to study the contribution of other disease and patient related factors affecting the use of this procedure as well as postprocedure outcomes.

  10. New Procedure for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Valvular Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Safaie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nPatients with valvular heart disease suffer from atrial fibrillation for more than 12 months after valve surgery and have a low probability of remaining in sinus rhythm. We performed an intra-operative procedure similar to surgical maze ІІІ procedure for conversion of this arrhythmia to sinus rhythm. We did this study to evaluate the efficacy of this procedure to restore the sinus rhythm in patients with valvular heart disease. 28 patients with valvular heart disease and chronic persistent atrial fibrillation underwent different combinations of valve surgery and concomitant reduction of left and right atrial size and resection of both atrial auricles in Shahid Madani cardiothoracic center from September 2004 to October 2008. The procedure for atrial fibrillation treatment was performed with cardiopulmonary bypass and after mitral valve replacement. There was one in-hospital death postoperatively because of respiratory failure, but no other complication till 6 months after the operation. Out of 28 patients, 23 were in sinus rhythm one week after the operation, one patient had junctional rhythm after the operation that restored to sinus rhythm and 4 patients had persistent atrial fibrillation. During the 12-month follow up, atrial fibrillation was corrected in 82.14%. Doppler echocardiography in these patients with sinus rhythm demonstrated good atrial contractility. This procedure on both atria is effective and less invasive than the original maze procedure to eliminate the atrial fibrillation, and can be performed in patients with valvular heart disease without increasing the risk of operation.

  11. Permanent atrial fibrillation ablation surgery in patients with advanced age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Geidel

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Even if permanent atrial fibrillation (pAF is a frequent concomitant problem in patients undergoing open heart surgery and particularly in those with advanced age, data of pAF ablation surgery in older aged patients are scarce. This study was performed to assess early and late results of combined open heart surgery and pAF ablation procedures in patients with advanced aged, compared to young patients. Material and Methods: A selective group of 126 patients (Group A: age ≥70 [76.4±4.8] years, n=70; Group B: age <70 [62.0±6.2] years: n=56 with pAF (≥6 months underwent either monopolar (Group A, B: n=51 vs. n=44 or bipolar (Group A, B: n=19 vs. n=12 radiofrequency (RF ablation procedures concomitant to open heart surgery. Regular follow-up was performed 3 to 36 months after surgery to assess survival, New York Heart Association (NYHA class and conversion rate to stable sinus rhythm (SR. Results: Early mortality (<30 days was 2.9% in Group A (Group B: 0%, cumulative survival at long-term follow up was 0.78 vs. 0.98 (p=0.03 and NYHA-class improved significantly in both groups, particularly in cases with stable SR. At 12-months follow-up 73% of Group A patients were in stable SR (Group B 78%. Conclusions: Concomitant mono- and bipolar RF ablation surgery represents a safe option to cure pAF during open heart surgery with a very low risk, even in patients with advanced age.

  12. Improving antithrombotic management in patients with atrial fibrillation: current status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Marcel; Hobbs, F D Richard; Jacobson, Alan K

    2009-01-01

    Despite overwhelming evidence of the benefits of risk-adjusted oral anticoagulation on stroke reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), there is still considerable undertreatment. A multidisciplinary expert group was formed to discuss issues surrounding anticoagulant treatment of patie...

  13. Gene expression of proteins influencing the calcium homeostasis in patients with persistent and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brundel, BJJM; Van Gelder, IC; Henning, RH; Tuinenburg, AE; Deelman, LE; Tieleman, RG; Crandjean, JG; Van GIlst, WH; Crijns, HJGM

    Objective: Persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) results in an impairment of atrial function. In order to elucidate the mechanism behind this phenomenon, we investigated the gene expression of proteins influencing calcium handling. Methods: Right atrial appendages were obtained from eight patients

  14. Ventricular fibrillation after bortezomib therapy in a patient with systemic amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yamasaki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old female was diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma. Bortezomib and dexamethasone-therapy was initiated; however, she developed lethal ventricular fibrillation (VF and cardiac arrest after 84 hours of therapy. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using direct current shocks with epinephrine and amiodarone was initiated but failed to receive cardiac function. Although her arterial pulsations recovered immediately after the injection of vasopressin, she died of heart failure 8 hours after the onset of VF. Cardiac amyloidosis was verified by autopsy. Although the direct association of bortezomib with lethal VF remained to be clarified in our patient, the current report emphasizes on bortezomib as a substantial risk factor for cardiomyocyte damage. The potential risk of lethal events associated with cardiac amyloidosis should be carefully considered during bortezomib treatment for patients with AL amyloidosis.

  15. ANALYSIS OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH PERSISTENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Fushtey

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The most common cardiac arrhythmia leading to disability is atrial fibrillation, it is associated with an increased risk of stroke and increased mortality. Currently, a large interest have studies of autonomic tone in patients with atrial fibrillation and clarify the pathogenetic mechanism of paroxysms by analysis of heart rate variability. Heart rate variability - is the variability of the duration of RR intervals of consecutive cycles of heart rate at regular intervals. The first studies of heart rate variability have been carried out in the late '50s under the guidance of RM Baevskiy, and were associated with pilot training for space flight. The main objective was to evaluate the functional state of healthy subjects. Nervous regulation of heart rate is pretty and the parasympathetic division of the ANS, has a complex hierarchical structure and consists of extracardiac and intracardiac systems. The parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems are in a particular interaction in the regulation of heart rate. There is a so-called vegetative homeostasis. The aim of the study was to assess heart rate variability in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation, changes in heart rate variability on the background of the therapy. We examined 124 people between the ages of 40 and 65. The first group included patients with primary with coronary heart disease combined with hypertension stage I-II with persistent atrial fibrillation, only 62 people. The second group consisted of 31 patients with ischemic heart disease and persistent atrial fibrillation without hypertension. The third group consisted of 31 practically healthy people. The study of HRV was performed at rest, by writing the 5-minute RR intervals. Conclusions: A role in the emergence and persistence of AF paroxysms play neuro effects on the heart. The analysis of HRV allows you to make a more precise choice of drug and find it more optimal dose. Given the lack of uniform standards of HRV in

  16. Lumbar Discectomy of a Patient of Mitral Stenosis with Chronic Atrial Fibrillation Under Epidural Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya R Kulkarni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old female patient posted for discectomy of lumbar region L 3 -L 4 was accidently diagnosed to have chronic atrial fibrillation of rheumatic aetiology.This is a case report of this patient of critical mitral stenosis with mild mitral regurgitation with chronic atrial fibrillation managed successfully under lower thoracic epidural anaesthesia,in prone position without any compli-cation.

  17. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING WARFARIN DOSE TITRATION IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION DEPENDING ON CLINICAL FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    E. L. Artanova; E. V. Saleeva; I. M. Sokolov; Y. G. Shvarts

    2011-01-01

    Aim. To study the relations of clinical characteristics and individual warfarin dose titration in patients with atrial fibrillation. Material and methods. Period of warfarin dose titration was analyzed in 68 patients with atrial fibrillation due to ischemic heart disease. Adjusted warfarin dose in milligram, duration of dose titration in days and maximal international normalized ratio (INR) were taken into account. Sex, age, history of myocardial infarction and stroke, concomitant diseases, a...

  18. [Patients suffering from atrial fibrillation in Germany. Characteristics, resource consumption and costs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, T; Rosenfeld, S; Müller-Riemenschneider, F; Willich, S N; Meinertz, T; Kirchhof, P; Brüggenjürgen, B

    2012-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (Afib) is considered to be the most frequent form of cardiac dysrhythmia and is well known as a key risk factor for arterial thromboembolism. The incidence of Afib will increase in the future due to demographic changes as well as improved treatment options for acute and chronic heart diseases. The primary objectives of this analysis were to describe patient characteristics, to assess the resource consumption associated with Afib and to measure costs of direct treatment as well as consequential costs. A secondary objective was to identify factors that influence the costs or the type of Afib. The analysis is based on the representative ATRIUM register (Ambulantes Register zur Morbidität des Vorhofflimmerns, Ambulatory register on morbidity of atrial fibrillation), a prospective, multicenter cohort study in which general practitioners and family doctors documented the characteristics and resource utilization of consecutively enrolled patients. The documented resource consumption use was subsequently valued with unit costs. The presented results are focused on the baseline documentation and refer to the period 12 months before enrollment. A total of 3,667 patients (mean age 72.1±9.2 years, 58% men) fulfilled all inclusion criteria and were included by a total of 730 doctors. The patients had an average of 2.4±1.0 risk factors and the most common was hypertension (84% of patients). The most commonly observed comorbidities were heart failure (43%) and coronary heart disease (CHD, 35%). Medicines for oral anticoagulation (86%) and beta blockers (75%) were the most frequently prescribed drugs. A total of 1/3 of all patients received a specific kind of Afib therapy (e. g. drug conversion, cardioversion) during the past 12 months. The disease-specific mean costs of the patients were 3,274±5,134 Euro, while the acute (inpatient) treatment represented the largest proportion of these total costs (1,639±3,623 Euro). Patients with high treatment costs

  19. Warfarin anticoagulation in hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation: comparison of nephrologist-led and anticoagulation clinic-led management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahbahani, Hamad; AlTurki, Ahmed; Dawas, Ahmed; Lipman, Mark L

    2018-01-08

    There is conflicting evidence of benefit versus harm for warfarin anticoagulation in hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation. This equipoise may be explained by suboptimal Time in Therapeutic Range (TTR), which correlates well with thromboembolic and bleeding complications. This study aimed to compare nephrologist-led management of warfarin therapy versus that led by specialized anticoagulation clinic. In a retrospective cohort of chronic hemodialysis patients from two institutions (Institution A: Nephrologist-led warfarin management, Institution B: Anticoagulation clinic-led warfarin management), we identified patients with atrial fibrillation who were receiving warfarin for thromboembolic prophylaxis. Mean TTRs, proportion of patients achieving TTR ≥ 60%, and frequency of INR testing were compared using a logistic regression model. In Institution A, 16.7% of hemodialysis patients had atrial fibrillation, of whom 36.8% were on warfarin. In Institution B, 18% of hemodialysis patients had atrial fibrillation, and 55.5% were on warfarin. The mean TTR was 61.8% (SD 14.5) in Institution A, and 60.5% (SD 15.8) in Institution B (p-value 0.95). However, the proportion of patients achieving TTR ≥ 60% was 65% versus 43.3% (Adjusted OR 2.22, CI 0.65-7.63) and mean frequency of INR testing was every 6 days versus every 13.9 days in Institutions A and B respectively. There was no statistical difference in mean TTR between nephrologist-led management of warfarin and that of clinic-led management. However, the former achieved a trend toward a higher proportion of patients with optimal TTR. This improved therapeutic results was associated with more frequent INR monitoring.

  20. Impact of a patient decision aid on care among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: a cluster randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, Finlay A.; Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Straus, Sharon E.; Ghali, William A.; Anderson, David; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Gibson, Paul; Cox, Jafna L.; Fradette, Miriam

    2005-01-01

    Background Too few patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) receive appropriate antithrombotic therapy. We tested the short-term (primary outcome) and long-term (secondary outcome) effect of a patient decision aid on the appropriateness of antithrombotic therapy among patients with NVAF. Methods We conducted a cluster randomized trial with blinded outcome assessment involving 434 NVAF patients from 102 community-based primary care practices. Patients in the intervention group received a self-administered booklet and audiotape decision aid tailored to their personal stroke risk profile. Patients in the control group received usual care. The primary outcome measure was change in antithrombotic therapy at 3 months. Appropriateness of therapy was defined using the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) recommendations. Results The mean patient age was 72 years, and the median duration of NVAF was 5 years. In the control group, there was a 3% decrease over 3 months in the number of patients receiving therapy appropriate to their risk of stroke (40% [85/215] at baseline v. 37% [79/215] at 3 months). In the intervention group, the number of patients receiving therapy appropriate to their stroke risk increased by 9% (32% [69/219] at baseline v. 41% [89/219] at 3 months). Although the proportion of patients whose therapy met the ACCP treatment recommendations did not differ between study arms at baseline (p = 0.11) or 3 months (p = 0.44), there was a 12% absolute improvement in the number of patients receiving appropriate care in the intervention group compared with the control group at 3 months (p = 0.03). The beneficial effect of the decision aid did not persist (p = 0.44 for differences between study arms after 12 months). Interpretation There was short-term improvement in the appropriateness of antithrombotic care among patients with NVAF who were exposed to a decision aid, but the improvement did not persist. PMID:16129870

  1. Clinical impact of atrial fibrillation in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Rottlaender

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary hypertension (PH is associated with progressive impairment of right ventricular function, reduced exercise capacity and a poor prognosis. Little is known about the prevalence, clinical manifestation and impact of atrial fibrillation (AF on cardiac function in PH. METHODS: In a four year single-centre retrospective analysis 225 patients with confirmed PH of various origins were enrolled to investigate the prevalence of AF, and to assess the clinical manifestation, 6-minute walk distance, NT-proBNP levels, echocardiographic parameters and hemodynamics obtained by right heart catheterization in PH with AF. RESULTS: AF was prevalent in 31.1%. In patients with PH and AF, parameters of clinical deterioration (NYHA/WHO functional class, 6-minute walk distance, NT-proBNP levels and renal function were significantly compromised compared to patients with PH and sinus rhythm (SR. In the total PH cohort and in PH not related to left heart disease occurrence of AF was associated with an increase of right atrial pressure (RAP and right atrial dilatation. While no direct association was found between pulmonary artery pressure (PAP and AF in these patients, right ventricular function was reduced in AF, indicating more advanced disease. In PH due to left heart failure the prevalence of AF was particularly high (57.7% vs. 23.1% in other forms of PH. In this subgroup, left atrial dilatation, increase of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, PAP and RAP were more pronounced in AF than in SR, suggesting that more marked backward failure led to AF in this setting. CONCLUSION: PH is associated with increased prevalence of AF. Occurrence of AF in PH indicates clinical deterioration and more advanced disease.

  2. Perioperative ascorbic acid supplementation does not reduce the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in on-pump coronary artery bypass graft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonic, Miha; Lipovec, Robert; Gregorcic, Franc; Juric, Peter; Kosir, Gorazd

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia following cardiac surgery. It is associated with increased hemodynamic instability, systemic embolization, and complications linked to anticoagulant therapy. Oxidative stress and consequent electrophysiological remodeling have been proposed as a cause of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Ascorbic acid supplementation was suggested as a novel and effective preventive agent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of ascorbic acid to reduce the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients. A prospective randomized single-center trial was conducted in patients scheduled for an elective on-pump CABG surgery. Subjects in the ascorbic acid group received 2g of ascorbic acid 24h and 2h before the surgery and 1g twice a day for five days after the surgery. Postoperatively, the patients were monitored for atrial fibrillation and other complications. The ascorbic acid group consisted of 52 patients and the control group included 53 patients. The groups were well matched for baseline demographics, preoperative medications, comorbidities, and had similar intraoperative characteristics. The incidence of atrial fibrillation in the ascorbic acid group was 13.5% and 18.9% in the control group (p=0.314). No difference was found between groups in the time of occurrence of atrial fibrillation (3.71±1.89 vs. 2.91±1.58 days after the surgery; p=0.342). There was also no difference in the other observed postoperative complications. The results of this study do not support the effectiveness of ascorbic acid supplementation in reducing the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in elective on-pump CABG patients. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ANALYSIS OF ANTITHROMBOTIC THERAPY IN IN-PATIENTS WITH PERMANENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY STUDY

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    V. I. Petrov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess prescribing structure, efficacy and safety of antithrombotic therapy in in-patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (AF.Material and methods. Simple non-comparative retrospective descriptive one stage pharmacoepidemiological study was performed on the basis of analysis of 263 case histories of patients with permanent AF admitted to cardiology department of a general hospital.Results. All patients were stratified into three groups depending on the value of the index CHA2DS2-VASc. Antithrombotic therapy was evaluated in each group. 1% patients (n=3 had minimal stroke probability, so there was no need for antithrombotic therapy. 6% (n=15 patients with AF had 1 point according to CHA2DS2-VASc scale. Acetylsalicylic acid was prescribed to 0.7% of cases (n=2, warfarin – to 5% (n=12. High risk of thromboembolic complications (CHA2DS2-VASc≥2 was revealed in 93% patients (n=245, 65% (n=172 of them received warfarin.Conclusions. Antithrombotic therapy was administered for the vast majority of patients with AF (97.7%. Antiplatelet drugs were used in 25.4% of cases, including for patients with high risk of thromboembolic complications. Warfarin was prescribed in 70.3%. However, target level of hypocoagulation has been achieved in 51% patients only.

  4. Efficacy and safety of oral amiodarone in controlling heart rate in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation who have undergone digitalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochiadakis, George E; Kanoupakis, Emmanuel M; Igoumenidis, Nikolaos E; Mavrakis, Hercules E; Kafarakis, Panagiotis K; Vardas, Panos E

    2005-01-01

    Oral amiodarone has been suggested by some authors for rate control in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. In this study we evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral amiodarone versus placebo for rate control during exercise and daily activities in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation who had undergone digitalisation. The study group consisted of 53 patients (35 men, mean age 65 +/- 9 years) with persistent atrial fibrillation (mean duration 17 +/- 7 months). All patients had therapeutic levels of digitalis and were under anticoagulation treatment with acenocoumarol. Twenty-eight of them were treated with amiodarone (200 mg per day orally) and 25 received placebo. All patients were assessed with 24-hour ECG monitoring, a maximal symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test and evaluation of adverse events. The mean exercise duration was similar in both groups. Amiodarone produced a lower heart rate than placebo at all exercise levels (p<0.0001 for all). VO2 was similar in both groups whereas O2 pulse was higher in the amiodarone group at all exercise levels. During daily life, heart rate showed a significant circadian pattern in both groups, with higher values during the day than at night (time effect for both p<0.001). The mean value of heart rate under amiodarone was lower than for placebo (75 +/- 10 vs. 86 +/- 12/min, p<0.001) but this difference was due to a significant difference during the day (p<0.001) that was not present during the night (p =0.48). Oral amiodarone is very effective when combined with digoxin for control of heart rate in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation and it should be considered as an alternative treatment when more traditional drugs, such as Ca(+2) inhibitors or b-blockers have proven ineffective or are contraindicated.

  5. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Is there a gap in care for ambulatory patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Wayne; Nicol, Kelly; Anderson, David; Brownell, Brenda; Chiasson, Meredith; Burge, Frederick I.; Flowerdew, Gordon; Cox, Jafna

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases risk of stroke. Evidence suggests that anticoagulation to reduce risk is underused (a "care gap"). Our objectives were to clarify measures of this gap in care by including data from family physicians and to determine why eligible patients were not receiving anticoagulation therapy. DESIGN: Telephone survey of family physicians regarding specific patients in their practices. SETTING: Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory AF patients not taking warfarin who had risk factors that made anticoagulation appropriate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of patients removed from the care gap; reasons given for not giving the remainder anticoagulants. RESULTS: Half the patients thought to be in the care gap had previously unknown contraindications to anticoagulation, lacked a clear indication for anticoagulation, or were taking warfarin. Patients' refusal and anticipated problems with compliance and monitoring were among the reasons for not giving patients anticoagulants. CONCLUSION: Adding data from primary care physicians significantly narrowed the care gap. Attention should focus on the remaining reasons for not giving eligible patients anticoagulants. PMID:15508374

  6. 8. Prevalence of Epistaxis among Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The aim of this study was thus to determine the prevalence, aetiology and treatment modalities of epistaxis among patients receiving otorhinolaryngology services at MNH and MOI. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, hospital based study was done to 427 patients at Muhimbili. National Hospital (MNH) and Muhimbili.

  7. Useful clinical features for the selection of ideal patients with strial fibrillation for mapping and catheter ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Niraj

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify useful clinical characteristics for selecting patients eligible for mapping and ablation of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: We studied 9 patients with atrial fibrillation, without structural heart disease, associated with: 1 antiarrhythmic drugs, 2 symptoms of low cardiac output, and 3 intention to treat. Seven patients had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 2 had recurrent atrial fibrillation. RESULTS: In the 6 patients who underwent mapping (all had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, catheter ablation was successfully carried out in superior pulmonary veins in 5 patients (the first 3 in the left superior pulmonary vein and the last 2 in the right superior pulmonary vein. One patient experienced a recurrence of atrial fibrillation after 10 days. We observed that patients who had short episodes of atrial fibrillation on 24-hour Holter monitoring before the procedure were those in whom mapping the focus of tachycardia was possible. Tachycardia was successfully suppressed in 4 of 6 patients. The cause of failure was due to the impossibility of maintaining sinus rhythm long enough for efficient mapping. CONCLUSION: Patients experiencing short episodes of atrial fibrillation during 24-hour Holter monitoring were the most eligible for mapping and ablation, with a final success rate of 66%, versus the global success rate of 44%. Patients with persistent atrial fibrillation were not good candidates for focal ablation.

  8. Fractality in electrocardiographic waveforms for healthy subjects and patients with ventricular fibrillation

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    Rodriguez, Eduardo [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: jjar@xanum.uam.mx; Echeverria, Juan C.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-02-15

    Detrending fluctuation analysis was used to look for fractality and to quantify time correlations in long-term (about 24 h) electrocardiographic (ECG) waveforms for presumably healthy subjects and patients with ventricular fibrillation. Our results show that ECG intrabeat dynamics of healthy subject displays a type of non-correlated behavior, perhaps reflecting diverse conduction pathways or certain degree of adaptability to changing conditions. On the other hand, ECG dynamics for ventricular fibrillation condition shows behavior similar to 1/f noise, and even large peaks around Brownian motion during a ventricular fibrillation crisis. In this way, the scaling exponents estimated with DFA can be used to discriminate electrophysiological abnormalities, and to monitoring the onset of ventricular fibrillation crises.

  9. Management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation in diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Said, Salah A; Laroche, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most important cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical correlates of DM, including management and outcomes, in the EURObservational Research Programme (EORP) - Atrial Fibrillation (AF) General Pilot (EORP-AF) Regi......Aims: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most important cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical correlates of DM, including management and outcomes, in the EURObservational Research Programme (EORP) - Atrial Fibrillation (AF) General Pilot (EORP...

  10. Amiodarone, anticoagulation, and clinical events in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the ARISTOTLE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaker, Greg; Lopes, Renato D; Hylek, Elaine; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Thomas, Laine; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Sullivan, Renee M; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Garcia, David; Hanna, Michael; Amerena, John; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Dorian, Paul; Avezum, Alvaro; Keltai, Matyas; Wallentin, Lars; Granger, Christopher B

    2014-10-14

    Amiodarone is an effective medication in preventing atrial fibrillation (AF), but it interferes with the metabolism of warfarin. This study sought to examine the association of major thrombotic clinical events and bleeding with the use of amiodarone in the ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation) trial. Baseline characteristics of patients who received amiodarone at randomization were compared with those who did not receive amiodarone. The interaction between randomized treatment and amiodarone was tested using a Cox model, with main effects for randomized treatment and amiodarone and their interaction. Matching on the basis of a propensity score was used to compare patients who received and who did not receive amiodarone at the time of randomization. In ARISTOTLE, 2,051 (11.4%) patients received amiodarone at randomization. Patients on warfarin and amiodarone had time in the therapeutic range that was lower than patients not on amiodarone (56.5% vs. 63.0%; p < 0.0001). More amiodarone-treated patients had a stroke or a systemic embolism (1.58%/year vs. 1.19%/year; adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03 to 2.10; p = 0.0322). Overall mortality and major bleeding rates were elevated, but were not significantly different in amiodarone-treated patients and patients not on amiodarone. When comparing apixaban with warfarin, patients who received amiodarone had a stroke or a systemic embolism rate of 1.24%/year versus 1.85%/year (HR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.40 to 1.15), death of 4.15%/year versus 5.65%/year (HR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55 to 0.98), and major bleeding of 1.86%/year versus 3.06%/year (HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.96). In patients who did not receive amiodarone, the stroke or systemic embolism rate was 1.29%/year versus 1.57%/year (HR: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.00), death was 3.43%/year versus 3.68%/year (HR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.05), and major bleeding was 2.18%/year versus 3.03%/year

  11. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogen, E.E.; Tmbul, T.; Yildirim, G.; Sayin, R.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  12. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogen, E.E.; Tombul, T.; Yildirim, G.; Odabas, F.O.; Sayin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+9-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  13. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING WARFARIN DOSE TITRATION IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION DEPENDING ON CLINICAL FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Artanova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the relations of clinical characteristics and individual warfarin dose titration in patients with atrial fibrillation. Material and methods. Period of warfarin dose titration was analyzed in 68 patients with atrial fibrillation due to ischemic heart disease. Adjusted warfarin dose in milligram, duration of dose titration in days and maximal international normalized ratio (INR were taken into account. Sex, age, history of myocardial infarction and stroke, concomitant diseases, amiodarone therapy were considered among clinical characteristics. Results. Adjusted warfarin dose was significantly higher in obesity , and it was lower in case of experienced myocardial infarction. The INR highest levels and maximal amplitudes of its fluctuations were observed in patients with thyroid gland nodes and smokers. Period of warfarin dose titration was longer in patients treated with amiodarone. Conclusion. Warfarin dose titration in patients with atrial fibrillation depends on the presence of myocardial infarction, obesity , thyroid nodular changes, smoking and amiodarone treatment.

  14. Nebivolol in preventing atrial fibrillation following coronary surgery in patients over 60 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Erdil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Postoperative atrial fibrillation is a common complication after cardiac surgery, with an incidence as high as 20-50%. Increased age is associated with a significant increase in postoperative atrial fibrillation risk. This common complication is associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of nebivolol in preventing atrial fibrillation following coronary artery bypass surgery in patients over 60 years of age. Methods: In this prospective randomized study, 200 patients who were candidates for elective coronary artery bypass surgery were divided into two groups. The first group was administered with nebivolol and the second group was administered with metoprolol. Treatment was initiated four days prior to surgery, and patients were monitored for atrial fibrillation until discharge. Forty-one patients recieved 50 mg metoprolol succinate daily, which was initiated minimum 4 days before surgery. Results: Demographic data were similar in both groups. The incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in both groups was similar, with no significant difference being identified [n=20 (20%; n=18 (18%, P=0.718; respectively]. There were not any mortality at both groups during study. Inotropic agent requirement at ICU was similar for both groups [n=12 (12%, n=18 (18%, P=0.32]. Conclusion: We compared the effectiveness of nebivolol and metoprolol in decreasing the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation, and determined that nebivolol was as effective as metoprolol in preventing postoperative atrial fibrillation at patients. Nebivolol may be the drug of choice due to its effects, especially after elective coronary artery bypass surgery.

  15. Echocardiographic Risk Factors for Stroke and Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Anticoagulated With Apixaban or Warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinereanu, Dragos; Lopes, Renato D; Mulder, Hillary; Gersh, Bernard J; Hanna, Michael; de Barros E Silva, Pedro G M; Atar, Dan; Wallentin, Lars; Granger, Christopher B; Alexander, John H

    2017-12-01

    Few data exist on the long-term outcomes of patients with spontaneous echo contrast (SEC), left atrial/left atrial appendage (LA/LAA) thrombus, and complex aortic plaque (CAP), in patients with atrial fibrillation receiving oral anticoagulation. We explored the relationship between these 3 echocardiographic findings and clinical outcomes, and the comparative efficacy and safety of apixaban and warfarin for each finding. Patients from the ARISTOTLE trial (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation) with SEC, LA/LAA thrombus, or CAP diagnosed by either transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography were compared with patients with none of these findings on transesophageal echocardiography. A total of 1251 patients were included: 217 had SEC, 127 had LA/LAA thrombus, 241 had CAP, and 746 had none. The rates of stroke/systemic embolism were not significantly different among patients with and without these echocardiographic findings (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-3.60 for SEC; hazard ratio, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-6.86 for LA/LAA thrombus; hazard ratio, 2.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6.85 for CAP). Rates of ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, cardiovascular death, and all-cause death were also not different between patients with and without these findings. For patients with either SEC or CAP, there was no evidence of a differential effect of apixaban over warfarin. For patients with LA/LAA thrombus, there was also no significant interaction, with the exception of all-cause death and any bleeding where there was a greater benefit of apixaban compared with warfarin among patients with no LA/LAA thrombus. In anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation and risk factors for stroke, echocardiographic findings do not seem to add to the risk of thromboembolic events. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00412984. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in acute stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizos, T.; Rasch, C.; Jenetzky, E.; Hametner, C.; Kathoefer, S.; Reinhardt, R.; Hepp, T.; Hacke, W.; Veltkamp, R.

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of stroke, but detecting paroxysmal AF (pAF) poses a challenge. We investigated whether continuous bedside ECG monitoring in a stroke unit detects pAF more sensitively than 24-hour Holter ECG, and tested whether examining RR interval dynamics on

  17. Time Course of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuwen, C.P.; Ramdjan, T.T.; Gotte, M.; Brundel, B.J.; Evertz, R.; Vriend, J.W.; Molhoek, S.G.; Dorman, H.G.; Opstal, J.M. van; Konings, T.C.; Voort, P. van der; Delacretaz, E.; Houck, C.; Yaksh, A.; Jansz, L.J.; Witsenburg, M.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Triedman, J.K.; Bogers, A.J.; Groot, N.M. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is rising in the aging patients with congenital heart defects (CHD). However, studies reporting on AF in patients with CHD are scarce. The aim of this multicenter study was to examine in a large cohort of patients with a variety of CHD: (1) the

  18. Time Course of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuwen, Christophe P.; Ramdjan, Tanwier T. T. K.; Gotte, Marco; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Evertz, Reinder; Vriend, Joris W. J.; Molhoek, Sander G.; Dorman, Henderikus G. R.; van Opstal, Jurren M.; Konings, Thelma C.; van der Voort, Pepijn; Delacretaz, Etienne; Houck, Charlotte; Yaksh, Ameeta; Jansz, Luca. J.; Witsenburg, Maarten; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Triedman, John K.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; de Groot, Natasja M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is rising in the aging patients with congenital heart defects (CHD). However, studies reporting on AF in patients with CHD are scarce. The aim of this multicenter study was to examine in a large cohort of patients with a variety of CHD: (1) the

  19. Long-term Thromboembolic Risk in Patients With Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery and Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Jawad H; Xian, Ying; Peterson, Eric D

    2018-01-01

    Importance: New-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a common complication of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. However, the long-term risk of thromboembolism in patients who develop POAF after CABG surgery remains unknown. In addition, information on stroke prophylaxis...... in this setting is lacking. Objective: To examine stroke prophylaxis and the long-term risk of thromboembolism in patients with new-onset POAF after first-time isolated CABG surgery compared with patients with nonsurgical, nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort...... with POAF (8.4%) and 3549 patients with NVAF (42.9%). The risk of thromboembolism was lower in the POAF group than in the NVAF group (18.3 vs 29.7 events per 1000 person-years; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% CI, 0.55-0.81; P follow-up was associated...

  20. Post-marketing surveillance on the long-term use of dabigatran in Japanese patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: Preliminary report of the J-dabigatran surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Atarashi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Ken; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Yasaka, Masahiro; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Makiko; Yagi, Nobutaka; Fukaya, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim: A post-marketing surveillance (PMS) study is being conducted to investigate the safety and effectiveness of the long-term use of dabigatran etexilate (dabigatran) in Japanese patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Results of an interim analysis of this prospective cohort study including patient characteristics and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) collected up to September 17, 2014 are reported here. Methods: Patients with NVAF who began to receive dabigatran for...

  1. Visualisation during ablation of atrial fibrillation - stimulating the patient's own resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Marianne W.; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Bjerrum, Merete

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Going through ablation of atrial fibrillation can be accompanied by pain and discomfort when a light, conscious sedation is used. Visualisation has been shown to reduce the patients' perception of pain and anxiety during invasive procedures, when it is used together with the usual pain...... management. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate patients' experiences with visualisation in relation to pain and anxiety during an intervention consisting of visualisation, when undergoing ablation of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 14 patients from...... of managing anxiety' and 'benefits of visualisation'. The transversal analyses revealed two overall themes which highlight the experiences of being guided in visualisation during ablation of atrial fibrillation: 'stimulation of the patients' own resources' and 'being satisfied without complete analgesia...

  2. The Complexity of the Patient Perspective of Living with Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Vibeke; Riahi, Sam; Delmar, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    The patients’ perspective is by nature complex. Investigating the patients’ perspective, which is important for the quality of care for patients living with atrial fibrillation, therefore calls for complex research processes. This article aims to illuminate the complexity of the patients......’ perspective of living with atrial fibrillation by combining qualitative and quantitative data sources and methods. Related to a one-year patient journey of living with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation it is here illustrated how scores from questionnaires can be explored by supporting the scores with qualitative...... and communication across organisational sectors in the healthcare system, the challenge of gaining the needed support for at patient living with AF, is further increased....

  3. Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Rheumatic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Ernesto Koehler; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Monteiro, Andrey José de Oliveira; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Weksler, Clara; Barbosa, Odilon Nogueira; Oliveira, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess heart rhythm and predictive factors associated with sinus rhythm after one year in patients with rheumatic valve disease undergoing concomitant surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation. Operative mortality, survival and occurrence of stroke after one year were also evaluated. Methods Retrospective longitudinal observational study of 103 patients undergoing rheumatic mitral valve surgery and ablation of atrial fibrillation using uni- or bipolar radiofrequency between January 2013 and December 2014. Age, gender, functional class (NYHA), type of atrial fibrillation, EuroSCORE, duration of atrial fibrillation, stroke, left atrial size, left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiopulmonary bypass time, myocardial ischemia time and type of radiofrequency were investigated. Results After one year, 66.3% of patients were in sinus rhythm. Sinus rhythm at hospital discharge, lower left atrial size in the preoperative period and bipolar radiofrequency were associated with a greater chance of sinus rhythm after one year. Operative mortality was 7.7%. Survival rate after one year was 92.3% and occurrence of stroke was 1%. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation ablation surgery with surgical approach of rheumatic mitral valve resulted in 63.1% patients in sinus rhythm after one year. Discharge from hospital in sinus rhythm was a predictor of maintenance of this rhythm. Increased left atrium and use of unipolar radiofrequency were associated with lower chance of sinus rhythm. Operative mortality rate of 7.7% and survival and stroke-free survival contribute to excellent care results for this approach. PMID:28832799

  4. Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Rheumatic Valve Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Koehler Chavez

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess heart rhythm and predictive factors associated with sinus rhythm after one year in patients with rheumatic valve disease undergoing concomitant surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation. Operative mortality, survival and occurrence of stroke after one year were also evaluated. Methods: Retrospective longitudinal observational study of 103 patients undergoing rheumatic mitral valve surgery and ablation of atrial fibrillation using uni- or bipolar radiofrequency between January 2013 and December 2014. Age, gender, functional class (NYHA, type of atrial fibrillation, EuroSCORE, duration of atrial fibrillation, stroke, left atrial size, left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiopulmonary bypass time, myocardial ischemia time and type of radiofrequency were investigated. Results: After one year, 66.3% of patients were in sinus rhythm. Sinus rhythm at hospital discharge, lower left atrial size in the preoperative period and bipolar radiofrequency were associated with a greater chance of sinus rhythm after one year. Operative mortality was 7.7%. Survival rate after one year was 92.3% and occurrence of stroke was 1%. Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation ablation surgery with surgical approach of rheumatic mitral valve resulted in 63.1% patients in sinus rhythm after one year. Discharge from hospital in sinus rhythm was a predictor of maintenance of this rhythm. Increased left atrium and use of unipolar radiofrequency were associated with lower chance of sinus rhythm. Operative mortality rate of 7.7% and survival and stroke-free survival contribute to excellent care results for this approach.

  5. Imatinib induces hypothyroidism in patients receiving levothyroxinc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, JWB; Zonnenberg, BA; Plukker, JTM; van Der Graaf, WTA; Links, TP

    2005-01-01

    Interactions of imatinib with other drugs have been scarcely reported. We report a previously unknown effect of imatinib on levothyroxine therapy. Eleven patients (1 with gastrointestinal stromal tumor and 10 with medullary thyroid carcinoma) received imatinib. Eight had undergone thyroidectomy and

  6. Perceived stigma among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived stigma among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment: A prospective randomised trial comparing an m-DOT strategy with standardof- care in Kenya. S Kaai, S Bullock, A Sarna, M Chersich, S Luchters, S Geibel, P Munyao, K Mandaliya, M Temmerman, N Rutenberg ...

  7. Impact of dronedarone on hospitalization burden in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Crijns, Harry J G M; Gaudin, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) hospitalization is a predictor of CV mortality and has a negative impact on patients' quality of life. The primary endpoint of A placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-arm Trial to assess the efficacy of dronedarone 400 mg bid for the prevention of cardiovascular...... Hospitalization or death from any cause in patiENTs with Atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter (ATHENA), a composite of first CV hospitalization or death from any cause, was significantly reduced by dronedarone. This post hoc analysis evaluated the secondary endpoint of CV hospitalization and the clinical benefit...... of dronedarone on the number and duration of CV hospitalizations in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF)....

  8. Anatomic relationship between left coronary artery and left atrium in patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmino, Matteo; Torri, Federica; Ferraris, Federico; Calò, Leonardo; Castagno, Davide; Gili, Sebastiano; Rovera, Chiara; Giustetto, Carla; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2017-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation transcatheter ablation (TCA) is, within available atrial fibrillation rhythm control strategies, one of the most effective. To potentially improve ablation outcome in case of recurrent atrial fibrillation after a first procedure or in presence of structural myocardial disease, isolation of the pulmonary veins may be associated with extensive lesions within the left atrium. To avoid rare, but potentially life-threatening, complications, thorough knowledge and assessment of left atrium anatomy and its relation to structures in close proximity are, therefore, mandatory. Aim of the present study is to describe, by cardiac computed tomography, the anatomic relationship between aortic root, left coronary artery and left atrium in patients undergoing atrial fibrillation TCA. The cardiac computed tomography scan of 21 patients affected by atrial fibrillation was elaborated to segment left atrium, aortic root and left coronary artery from the surrounding structures and the following distances measured: left atrium and aortic root; left atrium roof and aortic root; left main coronary artery and left atrium; circumflex artery and left atrium appendage; and circumflex artery and mitral valve annulus. Above all, the median distance between left atrium and aortic root (1.9, 1.5-2.1 mm), and between circumflex artery and left atrium appendage ostium (3.0, 2.1-3.4 mm) were minimal (≤3 mm). None of measured distances significantly varied between patients presenting paroxysmal versus persistent atrial fibrillation. The anatomic relationship between left atrium and coronary arteries is extremely relevant when performing atrial fibrillation TCA by extensive lesions. Therefore, at least in the latter case, preablation imaging should be recommended to avoid rare, but potentially life-threatening, complications with the aim of an as well tolerated as possible procedure.

  9. Efficacy of atorvastatin therapy in prevention of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rubanenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the efficacy of atorvastatin therapy in prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF development after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD with the assessment of inflammation, sheer stress and myocardial injury indicators. Material and methods. The study included 105 patients with IHD who were divided into two groups: patients of group 1 were treated with atorvastatin (59 patients, 81% males, mean age 62.1±7.5 years; patients of group 2 received no HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (46 patients, 89% males, and mean age 61.7±8.1 years. Results. Postoperative AF occurred more often in patients of group 2 (41.3% vs 16.9%; р=0.047. Laboratory analysis revealed the following: the levels of total leukocytes, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, superoxide dismutase and troponin did not different significantly among the patients of two groups. Interleukin-6 level in preand postoperative period was significantly higher in patients of group 2 (35.4±28.5 pg/ml vs 24.1±14.8 pg/ml, р=0.03; 63.7±54.8 pg/ml vs 50.7±40.8 pg/ml, р=0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Our study has shown that atorvastatin therapy contributed to the reduction of number of new cases of AF after CABG in patients with IHD. At that, the efficacy of atorvastatin therapy correlated with the size of left atrium and the severity of inflammatory response. Patients with atorvastatin therapy had significantly lower interleukin-6 level, as a proinflammatory marker, in preand postoperational period as compared with the patients without such treatment.

  10. Dementia and Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastori, Daniele; Miyazawa, Kazuo; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    The risk of developing dementia is increased in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), with the incidence of both conditions increasing with aging. Patients with dementia frequently do not receiving adequate thrombo-prophylaxis, because of the inability to monitor INR and/or to achieve...... in therapeutic range during VKAs therapy, the assessment of cognitive impairment may help identify those patients who may benefit from switching to NOACs. In conclusion, patients with AF and dementia benefit from anticoagulation and should not be denied receiving adequate stroke prevention. Cognitive function...

  11. Prognostic implication of early ventricular fibrillation among patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Rodríguez, Kristel E; Almendro-Delia, Manuel; García-Alcántara, Ángel; Arias-Garrido, José J; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Juan C; Alonso-Muñoz, Gemma; de la Chica-Ruiz-Ruano, Rafael; Reina-Toral, Antonio; Varela-López, Antonio; Arboleda-Sánchez, José A; Poullet-Brea, Ana M; Zaya-Ganfo, Benito; Butrón-Calderón, Michel; Cristo-Ropero, Maria J; Hidalgo-Urbano, Rafael; García-Rubira, Juan C

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prognosis of patients presenting early ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the setting of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Among patients included in the ARIAM (Análisis del Retraso en el Infarto Agudo de Miocardio) registry with the diagnosis of STEMI, those who received primary revascularization and were admitted in the first 12 h were analyzed retrospectively. From January 2007 to January 2012, 8340 patients were included in the STEMI cohort and 680 (8.2%) of them presented with VF before admission to the ICU (VF). This group comprised younger patients with fewer comorbidities. They received more often primary angioplasty (33.7 vs. 24.9%; P<0.001), had more prevalence of Killip class greater than or equal to 2 at admission (37.5 vs. 17.8%; P<0.001), and suffered more often cardiogenic shock (18.5 vs. 5.9%, P<0.001). By logistic regression analysis, VF was associated with a greater in-hospital mortality [odds rate (OR): 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57-2.81, P<0.001]. After a propensity score matching process, VF was associated with in-hospital mortality (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.05-2.25, P=0.028). However, when analyzing patients treated by primary angioplasty, the mortality was not significantly related to VF (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.45-1.61, P=0.628). Our results show that VF before ICU admission was an independent predictor of in-hospital outcome in a cohort of patients in whom fibrinolysis was the most used revascularization therapy. However, this prognostic value was not found in patients treated with primary angioplasty.

  12. Dementia correlates with anticoagulation underuse in older patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscogliosi, Giovanni; Ettorre, Evaristo; Chiriac, Iulia Maria

    2017-09-01

    Stroke prevention in older atrial fibrillation (AF) patients remains a challenge. This study aimed to investigate whether a dementia diagnosis is an independent correlate of lower prescription rate of oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) in a sample of older AF patients. Cross-sectional retrospective study. Consecutive older community-dwelling AF patients referred for a comprehensive geriatric assessment, were considered. Evaluation of physical, social and mental health, and administration of the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) and Barthel Index were performed. Dementia cases were ascertained by consensus of 2 experienced geriatricians. Dementia severity was assessed using the Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR). 316 AF patients (ages 74.7±7.0years, 55.7% women) with high stroke risk (77.5% had a CHA 2 DS 2 VASC score ≥3), low bleeding and falling risk, and no neuropsychiatric/behavioral symptoms, were included. 60.1% were prescribed with OAT. Among patients with dementia (n=86, 27.2%), 22.0% received inadequate antithrombotic prophylaxis (i.e. antiplatelet) and 38.5% no treatment. Proportion of those receiving inadequate or no prophylaxis increased at increasing CDR score. By multiple regression models, either dementia (yes vs no), OR=1.33, 95%CI=1.11-1.46, pdementia severity (CDR>1), OR=2.38, 95%CI=2.19-2.60, pDementia might be associated with underuse of OAT in older AF patients even in the absence of established contraindications. Future studies are needed to assess the real dimension of the problem and clinician's barriers to prescribing OAT in demented patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic stroke: A population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Kruchov Thygesen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sandra Kruchov Thygesen1, Lars Frost2, Kim A Eagle3, Søren Paaske Johnsen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; 2Silkeborg Hospital and Clinical Institute, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; 3The Michigan Cardiovascular Research and Reporting Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USABackground: Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, the prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation among patients with stroke is not fully clarified. We compared patient characteristics, including severity of stroke and comorbidity, quality of in-hospital care and outcomes in a cohort of first-time ischemic stroke patients with and without atrial fibrillation.Methods: Based on linkage of public medical databases, we did a population-based follow-up study among 3,849 stroke patients from the County of Aarhus, Denmark admitted in the period of 2003–2007 and prospectively registered in the Danish National Indicator Project.Results: Atrial fibrillation was associated with an adverse prognostic profile but not with an overall poorer quality of in-hospital care. Patients with atrial fibrillation had a longer total length of stay (median: 15 vs 9 days, and were at increased risk of in-hospital medical complications (adjusted relative risk = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.23–1.79 and recurrent stroke (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.30, 95% CI: 0.93–1.82 when compared with patients without atrial fibrillation. The adjusted hazard ratios for 30 days and one year mortality were 1.55 (95% CI: 1.20–2.01 and 1.55 (95% CI: 1.30–1.85, respectively. Patients not eligible to oral anticoagulant treatment had an increased risk of recurrent stroke (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.19–3.11.Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation is associated with a poor outcome among patients with ischemic stroke particularly among patients, who are not eligible to oral anticoagulant treatment. Keywords: atrial fibrillation, stroke

  14. Apixaban in patients with atrial fibrillation and prior coronary artery disease: insights from the ARISTOTLE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahit, Maria Cecilia; Lopes, Renato D; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Alexander, John H; Lewis, Basil S; Aylward, Philip E; Verheugt, Freek W A; Keltai, Matyas; Diaz, Rafael; Hanna, Michael; Granger, Christopher B; Wallentin, Lars

    2013-12-10

    A substantial portion of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) also have coronary artery disease (CAD) and are at risk for coronary events. Warfarin is known to reduce these events, but increase the risk of bleeding. We assessed the effects of apixaban compared with warfarin in AF patients with and without prior CAD. In ARISTOTLE, 18,201 patients with AF were randomized to apixaban or warfarin. History of CAD was defined as documented CAD, prior myocardial infarction, and/or history of coronary revascularization. We analyzed baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with and without prior CAD and compared outcomes by randomized treatment using Cox models. A total of 6639 (36.5%) patients had prior CAD. These patients were more often male, more likely to have prior stroke, diabetes, and hypertension, and more often received aspirin at baseline (42.2% vs. 24.5%). The effects of apixaban were similar among patients with and without prior CAD on reducing stroke or systemic embolism and death from any cause (hazard ratio [HR] 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71-1.27, P for interaction=0.12; HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.81-1.13, P for interaction=0.28). Rates of myocardial infarction were numerically lower with apixaban than warfarin among patients with and without prior CAD. The effect of apixaban on reducing major bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage was consistent in patients with and without CAD. In patients with AF, apixaban more often prevented stroke or systemic embolism and death and caused less bleeding than warfarin, regardless of the presence of prior CAD. Given the common occurrence of AF and CAD and the higher rates of cardiovascular events and death, our results indicate that apixaban may be a better treatment option than warfarin for these high-risk patients. © 2013.

  15. Preoperative Electrocardiogram Score for Predicting New-Onset Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiwei; Andreasen, Jan J; Melgaard, Jacob; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Hansen, John; Schmidt, Erik B; Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Graff, Claus

    2017-02-01

    To investigate if electrocardiogram (ECG) markers from routine preoperative ECGs can be used in combination with clinical data to predict new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) following cardiac surgery. Retrospective observational case-control study. Single-center university hospital. One hundred consecutive adult patients (50 POAF, 50 without POAF) who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, valve surgery, or combinations. Retrospective review of medical records and registration of POAF. Clinical data and demographics were retrieved from the Western Denmark Heart Registry and patient records. Paper tracings of preoperative ECGs were collected from patient records, and ECG measurements were read by two independent readers blinded to outcome. A subset of four clinical variables (age, gender, body mass index, and type of surgery) were selected to form a multivariate clinical prediction model for POAF and five ECG variables (QRS duration, PR interval, P-wave duration, left atrial enlargement, and left ventricular hypertrophy) were used in a multivariate ECG model. Adding ECG variables to the clinical prediction model significantly improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.54 to 0.67 (with cross-validation). The best predictive model for POAF was a combined clinical and ECG model with the following four variables: age, PR-interval, QRS duration, and left atrial enlargement. ECG markers obtained from a routine preoperative ECG may be helpful in predicting new-onset POAF in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolving antithrombotic treatment patterns for patients with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camm, A.J.; Accetta, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Atar, D.; Bassand, J.P.; Berge, E. van de; Cools, F.; Fitzmaurice, D.A.; Goldhaber, S.Z.; Goto, S.; Haas, S.; Kayani, G.; Koretsune, Y.; Mantovani, L.G.; Misselwitz, F.; Oh, S.; Turpie, A.G.G.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Kakkar, A.K.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We studied evolving antithrombotic therapy patterns in patients with newly diagnosed non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) and >/=1 additional stroke risk factor between 2010 and 2015. METHODS: 39 670 patients were prospectively enrolled in four sequential cohorts in the Global

  17. Risk of thromboembolism and bleeding after general surgery in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, R; Rienstra, Michel; van Dongen, CJJ; Levi, M; Buller, HR; Crijns, HJ; van Gelder, IC

    2005-01-01

    We provide insight into the risk of perioperative thromboembolism and bleeding in patients who have atrial fibrillation, use anticoagulants, and undergo a surgical procedure. Ninety-four patients underwent 121 noncardiac operations during a mean follow-up of 29 months. There was a 3.6-fold increased

  18. Apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Easton, J Donald; Lopes, Renato D; Bahit, M Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In the ARISTOTLE trial, the rate of stroke or systemic embolism was reduced by apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Patients with AF and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) have a high risk of stroke. We therefore aimed to assess the efficacy...

  19. Apixaban vs. warfarin with concomitant aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the ARISTOTLE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, J.H.; Lopes, R.D.; Thomas, L.; Alings, M.; Atar, D.; Aylward, P.; Goto, S.; Hanna, M.; Huber, K.; Husted, S.; Lewis, B.S.; McMurray, J.J.; Pais, P.; Pouleur, H.; Steg, P.G.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Wojdyla, D.M.; Granger, C.B.; Wallentin, L.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: We assessed the effect of concomitant aspirin use on the efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: In ARISTOTLE, 18 201 patients were randomized to apixaban 5 mg twice daily or warfarin. Concomitant aspirin use was

  20. Rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Patel, Manesh R; Stevens, Susanna R

    2012-01-01

    In ROCKET AF, rivaroxaban was non-inferior to adjusted-dose warfarin in preventing stroke or systemic embolism among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to investigate whether the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin is consistent among the subgroups of patients ...

  1. Ejection fraction and outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Amitava; Taillandier, Sophie; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of stroke and thrombo-embolism (TE) in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), and is incorporated in stroke risk stratification scores. We aimed to establish the role of ejection fraction (EF) in risk prediction in patients with NVAF and HF.......Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of stroke and thrombo-embolism (TE) in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), and is incorporated in stroke risk stratification scores. We aimed to establish the role of ejection fraction (EF) in risk prediction in patients with NVAF and HF....

  2. Prevalence and prognostic relevance of atrial fibrillation in patients with Takotsubo syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiermaier, Thomas; Santoro, Francesco; Eitel, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    was evaluated in median 2.9years after the acute event. RESULTS: Atrial fibrillation was found in 97 TTS patients (25.1%) and was associated with older age (pventricular ejection fraction (p... fibrillation (35.2% versus 15.3%; hazard ratio 3.02, 95% confidence interval 1.90-4.78; pfibrillation was identified as an independent determinant of outcome even after adjustment for clinical variables, left ventricular functional parameters (ballooning......BACKGROUND: Takotsubo syndrome (TTS) is associated with a considerable risk of complications during the acute phase and substantial long-term mortality rates. Concomitant atrial fibrillation may have an impact on outcome in these patients. Aim of this study was to assess the prevalence...

  3. Study protocol: the DESPATCH study: Delivering stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation - a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwar Nicholas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compelling evidence shows that appropriate use of anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation reduces the risk of ischaemic stroke by 67% and all-cause mortality by 26%. Despite this evidence, anticoagulation is substantially underused, resulting in avoidable fatal and disabling strokes. Methods DESPATCH is a cluster randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and blinded outcome assessment designed to evaluate a multifaceted and tailored implementation strategy for improving the uptake of anticoagulation in primary care. We have recruited general practices in South Western Sydney, Australia, and randomly allocated practices to receive the DESPATCH intervention or evidence-based guidelines (control. The intervention comprises specialist decisional support via written feedback about patient-specific cases, three academic detailing sessions (delivered via telephone, practice resources, and evidence-based information. Data for outcome assessment will be obtained from a blinded, independent medical record audit. Our primary endpoint is the proportion of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients, over 65 years of age, receiving oral anticoagulation at any time during the 12-month posttest period. Discussion Successful translation of evidence into clinical practice can reduce avoidable stroke, death, and disability due to nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. If successful, DESPATCH will inform public policy, providing quality evidence for an effective implementation strategy to improve management of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, to close an important evidence-practice gap. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12608000074392

  4. INTRAOPERATIVE RADIOFREQUENCY AND CRYOABLATION FOR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION IN PATIENTS WITH VALVULAR HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Maghamipour N. Safaie

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with valvular heart disease and suffering atrial fibrillation of more than 12 months duration have a low probability of remaining in sinus rhythm after valve surgery alone. We performed intra-operative radiofrequency ablation or cryoablation as an alternative to surgical maze ІІІ procedure to create linear lesion lines for conversion of this arrhythmia to sinus rhythm. A total of 30 patients with valvular heart disease and chronic persistent atrial fibrillation underwent different combinations of valve surgery and concomitant maze procedure with radiofrequency or cryo probes. These patients aged 48.10 ± 9.84 years in radiofrequency ablation group and 51.10 ± 13.93 years in cryoablation group. Both atrial ablation with radiofrequency probes, needed 26.15 ± 3.67 min extra ischemic time and ablation by mean of cryo-probes needed an extra ischemic time of 29.62 ± 4.27 min. There was one in hospital death postoperatively because of respiratory failure but no other complication. 6 months after the operation, among 30 patients with both atrial ablations, 25 patients were in sinus rhythm, no patient had junctional rhythm and 5 patients had persistent atrial fibrillation. At 12 months follow up, freedom from atrial fibrillation was 85% in radiofrequency group and 80% in cryo group. Doppler echocardiography in these patients demonstrated atrial contractility in 70% of the patients. Intraoperative radiofrequency or cryo-ablation of both atriums are effective and less invasive alternatives for the original maze procedure to eliminate the atrial fibrillation, and can be done in patients with valvular heart disease without increasing the risk of operation.

  5. Risk factors for stroke and thromboembolism in relation to age among patients with atrial fibrillation: the loire valley atrial fibrillation project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Fauchier, Laurent; Lane, Deirdre A

    2012-01-01

    According to the latest European guidelines on the management of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), all patients aged ≥ 65 years should be treated with oral anticoagulation (if not contraindicated). Therefore, stroke risk factors should be investigated exclusively in patients with NVAF aged...

  6. Ischaemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pak-Hei; Huang, Duo; Yip, Pok-Siu; Hai, Jojo; Tse, Hung-Fat; Chan, Tak-Mao; Lip, Gregory Y H; Lo, Wai-Kei; Siu, Chung-Wah

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the ischaemic stroke risk and benefit of warfarin therapy for stroke prevention in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) with concomitant atrial fibrillation (AF). Our objective was to determine the risk of ischaemic stroke in a 'real-world' cohort of PD patients with AF, and clinical benefit or harm of aspirin and warfarin. This is a single-centred observational study of Chinese patients with non-valvular AF. Hospitalizations with ischaemic stroke and intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) were recorded. Of 9810 patients from a hospital-based AF registry, 271 CKD patients on PD with AF (76.8 ± 12.5 years, CHA2DS2-VASc: 3.69 ± 1.83, and HAS-BLED: 2.07 ± 0.97) were identified. Amongst these PD patients, 24.7% received warfarin; 31.7% received aspirin; and 43.5% received no antithrombotic therapy. Amongst patients with no antithrombotic therapy, annual incidence of ischaemic stroke in PD patients was comparable with those non-CKD counterparts (9.32 vs. 9.30%/year). Similar to non-CKD patients, annual incidence of ischaemic stroke increased with increasing CHA2DS2-VASc score (CHA2DS2-VASc = 0-1: 5.76 vs. 5.70%/year, P = 1.00; and CHA2DS2-VASc ≥ 2: 10.80 vs. 9.94%/year, P = 0.78). Amongst PD patients, warfarin therapy was associated with lower risk of ischaemic stroke compared with aspirin [Hazard ratio (HR): 0.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.04-0.66, P = 0.01] and no therapy (HR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.06-0.65, P = 0.01), but not associated with a higher risk of ICH. In CKD patients on PD with AF, who had similar ischaemic stroke risk as non-CKD counterparts, warfarin therapy is associated with reduction in risk of ischaemic stroke without a higher risk of ICH. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Cardiac Arrest in Pediatric Patients Receiving Azithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Santiago O; Kim, Jeffrey J; Niu, Mary C; de la Uz, Caridad M; Miyake, Christina Y; Moffett, Brady S

    2017-03-01

    To compare outcomes of pediatric patients treated with azithromycin compared with penicillin or cephalosporin. We hypothesized that azithromycin use would not be associated with increased cardiac mortality in the pediatric population. Retrospective cohort study from the Pediatric Health Information System database between 2008 and 2012. Patients Azithromycin was used in 5039 (6.1%); penicillin or cephalosporin was used in 77 943 (93.9%). Overall prevalence of antibiotic-associated CPR was 0.14%. Patients receiving a macrolide antibiotic had a lower prevalence of CPR compared with patients receiving a penicillin or cephalosporin (0.04% vs 0.14%, P = .04), and there was no difference in mortality. Multivariable analysis did not find an association between macrolide use and CPR. In contrast to recent adult studies, among children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia, azithromycin use was not associated with a greater prevalence of cardiac arrest compared with penicillin or cephalosporin use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Safety and efficacy of landiolol hydrochloride for prevention of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery in patients with left ventricular dysfunction: Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation After Cardiac Surgery With Landiolol Hydrochloride for Left Ventricular Dysfunction (PLATON) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezai, Akira; Osaka, Shunji; Yaoita, Hiroko; Ishii, Yusuke; Arimoto, Munehito; Hata, Hiroaki; Shiono, Motomi

    2015-10-01

    We previously conducted a prospective study of landiolol hydrochloride (INN landiolol), an ultrashort-acting β-blocker, and reported that it could prevent atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery. This trial was performed to investigate the safety and efficacy of landiolol hydrochloride in patients with left ventricular dysfunction undergoing cardiac surgery. Sixty patients with a preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 35% were randomly assigned to 2 groups before cardiac surgery and then received intravenous infusion with landiolol hydrochloride (landiolol group) or without landiolol (control group). The primary end point was occurrence of atrial fibrillation as much as 1 week postoperatively. The secondary end points were blood pressure, heart rate, intensive care unit and hospital stays, ventilation time, ejection fraction, biomarkers of ischemia, and brain natriuretic peptide. Atrial fibrillation occurred in 3 patients (10%) in the landiolol group versus 12 (40%) in the control group, and its frequency was significantly lower in the landiolol group (P = .002). During the early postoperative period, levels of brain natriuretic peptide and ischemic biomarkers were significantly lower in the landiolol group than the control group. The landiolol group also had a significantly shorter hospital stay (P = .019). Intravenous infusion was not discontinued for hypotension or bradycardia in either group. Low-dose infusion of landiolol hydrochloride prevented atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery in patients with cardiac dysfunction and was safe, with no effect on blood pressure. This intravenous β-blocker seems useful for perioperative management of cardiac surgical patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Age-related mortality, clinical heart failure, and ventricular fibrillation in 4259 Danish patients after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask-Madsen, C; Jensen, G; Køber, L

    1997-01-01

    % for patients less than or = 80 years old. Two thirds of patients > or = 80 years old had heart failure, and cardiogenic shock was twice as common in this age group than in patients 60-69 years. Heart failure was a strong independent risk......AIMS: To evaluate the prognosis of patients > or = 80 years old, we analysed a large, community-based population with acute myocardial infarction who received intensive observation and similar pharmacotherapy regardless of age. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a 12-year period, before the introduction......, factor for post-discharge mortality, particularly in the oldest age groups. Four out of eight patients > or = 80 years survived one year if discharged alive after experiencing in-hospital ventricular fibrillation. CONCLUSION: The life-saving potential of preventing or treating heart failure seems...

  10. Dyslipidemia and Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Treated With Oral Anticoagulation Therapy: Insights From the ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Tymon; Held, Claes; Westerbergh, Johan; Lindbäck, Johan; Alexander, John H; Alings, Marco; Erol, Cetin; Goto, Shinya; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Huber, Kurt; Hanna, Michael; Lopes, Renato D; Ruzyllo, Witold; Granger, Christopher B; Hijazi, Ziad

    2018-02-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular events. The prognostic importance of lipoproteins in patients with atrial fibrillation is not well understood. We aimed to explore the association between apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and B (ApoB) and cardiovascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation receiving oral anticoagulation. Using data from the ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation) trial, ApoA1 and ApoB plasma levels were measured at baseline in 14 884 atrial fibrillation patients. Median length of follow-up was 1.9 years. Relationships between continuous levels of ApoA1 and ApoB and clinical outcomes were evaluated using Cox models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, medication including statins, and cardiovascular biomarkers. A composite ischemic outcome (ischemic stroke, systemic embolism, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular death) was used as the primary end point. Median (25th, 75th) ApoA1 and ApoB levels were 1.10 (0.93, 1.30) and 0.70 g/L (0.55, 0.85), respectively. In adjusted analyses, higher levels of ApoA1 were independently associated with a lower risk of the composite ischemic outcome (hazard ratio, 0.81; P <0.0001). Similar results were observed for the individual components of the composite outcome. ApoB was not significantly associated with the composite ischemic outcome ( P =0.8240). Neither apolipoprotein was significantly associated with major bleeding. There was no interaction between lipoproteins and randomized treatment for the primary outcome (both P values ≥0.2448). In patients with atrial fibrillation on oral anticoagulation, higher levels of ApoA1 were independently associated with lower risk of ischemic cardiovascular outcomes. Investigating therapies targeting dyslipidemia may thus be useful to improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00412984. © 2018 The

  11. Type of Atrial Fibrillation and Outcomes in Patients With Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Ulrik M.; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Abraham, William T.

    2017-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is common in heart failure (HF), but the outcome by type of AF is largely unknown. Objectives This study investigated outcomes related to type of AF (paroxysmal, persistent or permanent, or new onset) in 2 recent large trials in patients with HF with reduced ej...

  12. Choice and Outcomes of Rate Control versus Rhythm Control in Elderly Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paciullo, Francesco; Proietti, Marco; Bianconi, Vanessa

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among rate-control or rhythm-control strategies, there is conflicting evidence as to which is the best management approach for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) in elderly patients. DESIGN: We performed an ancillary analysis from the 'Registro Politerapie SIMI' study, enrolling el...

  13. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L-H; Sandset, E C; Sandset, P M

    2011-01-01

    Krarup L-H, Sandset EC, Sandset PM, Berge E. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. Acta Neurol Scand: 2011: 124: 40-44. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Background -  Patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation are at in......Krarup L-H, Sandset EC, Sandset PM, Berge E. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. Acta Neurol Scand: 2011: 124: 40-44. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Background -  Patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation.......96), and the combined endpoint of stroke progression, recurrent stroke, and death (D-dimer: 991 ng/ml vs 970 ng/ml, P = 0.91). Multivariable analyses did not alter the results. Conclusion -  D-dimer and other markers of hemostatic activation were not associated with stroke progression, recurrent stroke, or death...

  14. Safety and efficacy of anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation patients: The AMADEUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, D.A.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Minini, P.; Buller, H.R.; Lip, G.Y.H.

    2010-01-01

    ackground: Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and previous ischemic stroke are at high risk of recurrent stroke, but are also perceived to be at increased bleeding risk while treated with anticoagulants. Methods: Post-hoc analyses examined the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation of 4576 AF

  15. Predictors of non-pharmacological intervention in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation : Value of neuroticism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemels, Martin E. W.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; van Sonderen, Eric L. P.; van Gelder, Isabelle C.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Non-pharmacological intervention is gaining increasing popularity in the treatment of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. We sought to investigate which factors play a role in the choice for non-pharmacological intervention with a particular focus on neuroticism. Methods: The

  16. Quality of life in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and its predictors : importance of the autonomic nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M.P; Hassink, R.J; Tuinenburg, A.E; van Sonderen, E.; Lefrandt, J.D; Kam, P.J; van Gelder, Isabelle; Smit, A.J; Sanderman, R.; Crijns, H.J G M

    Aims To determine the impact of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation on quality of life and to determine the predictors of quality of life, particularly the role of symptomatology and autonomic function. Methods and Results The study group comprised 73 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (mean

  17. The RecordAF study: design, baseline data, and profile of patients according to chosen treatment strategy for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, John

    2010-01-01

    The REgistry on Cardiac rhythm disORDers assessing the control of Atrial Fibrillation (RecordAF) is the first worldwide, 1-year observational, longitudinal study of the management of paroxysmal/persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) in recently diagnosed patients. The study was conducted at 532 sites...

  18. Apixaban: Effective and Safe in Preventing Thromboembolic Events in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Francesca; Scicchitano, Pietro; Gesualdo, Michele; Ricci, Gabriella; Carbonara, Santa; Franchini, Carlo; Pia Schiavone, Brigida Immacolata; Corbo, Filomena; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2017-11-17

    Thromboembolic events, principally stroke, represent one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among subjects with atrial fibrillation. Chronic kidney disease determines a further increase of thromboembolic events, bleeding and mortality and complicates the pharmacological management of patients with atrial fibrillation, mainly due to the side effects of antiarrhythmic and anticoagulant drugs with renal excretion. Apixaban is a new oral anticoagulant characterized by good bioavailability and renal elimination accounting for only 25%, showing a safety profile and effectiveness in patients with renal impairment. In this manuscript, we reviewed literature data on the use of apixaban in the management of non-valvular atrial fibrillation in patients with renal failure, in order to clarify an often-debated topic in clinical practice. A PubMed search was performed on the terms atrial fibrillation, apixaban and renal failure with the aim of identifying relevant manuscripts, large randomized clinical trials, meta-analyses, and current guidelines. Literature data show that apixaban could represent an interesting alternative to warfarin and other selective antagonists of coagulation factors in patients with impaired renal function. About the risk of major bleeding, apixaban appears to be safer than warfarin in the presence of any degree of renal failure. Apixaban show to be an effective anticoagulant in patients with atrial fibrillation, even superior to warfarin in reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism regardless of the presence of renal insufficiency. Moreover, Food and Drug Administration allows the use of apixaban in patients with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Balancing stroke and bleeding risks in patients with atrial fibrillation and renal failure: the Swedish Atrial Fibrillation Cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Leif; Benson, Lina; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-02-01

    Patients who have both atrial fibrillation (AF) and renal failure have an increased risk of thrombo-embolism. Renal failure is also a risk factor for bleeding, which makes decisions regarding thromboprophylaxis complicated. Our aim was to determine risks for ischaemic stroke and bleeding in patients with AF and renal failure in relation to anticoagulant strategies. This is retrospective non-randomized study of Swedish health registers comprising 307 351 patients with AF, of whom 13 435 had a previous diagnosis of renal failure. Ischaemic stroke occurred more often in AF patients with renal failure (annual rate, 3.9% vs. no renal failure, 2.9%), but this was related to concomitant comorbidities [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-1.10]. Adding renal failure to the established stroke risk stratification schemes (CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc) did not improve their predictive value. Renal failure was an independent risk factor for intracranial bleeding [adjusted HR: 1.27 (1.09-1.49)]. Most patients with renal failure benefited from warfarin treatment, despite their high bleeding risk. The incidence of the combined endpoint ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke or death was lower among those who used warfarin than among those who did not use warfarin (adjusted HR: 0.76, CI 0.72-0.80). Patients with both AF and renal failure will probably benefit most from having the same treatment as is recommended for other patients with AF, without setting a higher or lower threshold for treatment. Adding additional points for renal failure to the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores did not improve their predictive value. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Risk profiles and antithrombotic treatment of patients newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: perspectives from the international, observational, prospective GARFIELD registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay K Kakkar

    Full Text Available Limited data are available on the characteristics, clinical management, and outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke, from a worldwide perspective. The aim of this study was to describe the baseline characteristics and initial therapeutic management of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation across the spectrum of sites at which these patients are treated.The Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD is an observational study of patients newly diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Enrollment into Cohort 1 (of 5 took place between December 2009 and October 2011 at 540 sites in 19 countries in Europe, Asia-Pacific, Central/South America, and Canada. Investigator sites are representative of the distribution of atrial fibrillation care settings in each country. Cohort 1 comprised 10,614 adults (≥18 years diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation within the previous 6 weeks, with ≥1 investigator-defined stroke risk factor (not limited to those in existing risk-stratification schemes, and regardless of therapy. Data collected at baseline included demographics, medical history, care setting, nature of atrial fibrillation, and treatments initiated at diagnosis. The mean (SD age of the population was 70.2 (11.2 years; 43.2% were women. Mean±SD CHADS2 score was 1.9±1.2, and 57.2% had a score ≥2. Mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 3.2±1.6, and 8,957 (84.4% had a score ≥2. Overall, 38.0% of patients with a CHADS2 score ≥2 did not receive anticoagulant therapy, whereas 42.5% of those at low risk (score 0 received anticoagulant therapy.These contemporary observational worldwide data on non-valvular atrial fibrillation, collected at the end of the vitamin K antagonist-only era, indicate that these drugs are frequently not being used according to stroke risk scores and guidelines, with overuse in patients at low risk and underuse in those at high risk of stroke.ClinicalTrials.gov TRI08888.

  1. Ischaemic stroke, haemorrhage, and mortality in older patients with chronic kidney disease newly started on anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation: a population based study from UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shankar; de Lusignan, Simon; McGovern, Andrew; Correa, Ana; Hriskova, Mariya; Gatenby, Piers; Jones, Simon; Goldsmith, David; Camm, A John

    2018-02-14

    To assess the association between anticoagulation, ischaemic stroke, gastrointestinal and cerebral haemorrhage, and all cause mortality in older people with atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease. Propensity matched, population based, retrospective cohort analysis from January 2006 through December 2016. The Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre database population of almost 2.73 million patients from 110 general practices across England and Wales. Patients aged 65 years and over with a new diagnosis of atrial fibrillation and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of disease epidemiology collaboration creatinine equation. Patients with a previous diagnosis of atrial fibrillation or receiving anticoagulation in the preceding 120 days were excluded, as were patients requiring dialysis and recipients of renal transplants. Receipt of an anticoagulant prescription within 60 days of atrial fibrillation diagnosis. Ischaemic stroke, cerebral or gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and all cause mortality. 6977 patients with chronic kidney disease and newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation were identified, of whom 2434 were on anticoagulants within 60 days of diagnosis and 4543 were not. 2434 pairs were matched using propensity scores by exposure to anticoagulant or none and followed for a median of 506 days. The crude rates for ischaemic stroke and haemorrhage were 4.6 and 1.2 after taking anticoagulants and 1.5 and 0.4 in patients who were not taking anticoagulant per 100 person years, respectively. The hazard ratios for ischaemic stroke, haemorrhage, and all cause mortality for those on anticoagulants were 2.60 (95% confidence interval 2.00 to 3.38), 2.42 (1.44 to 4.05), and 0.82 (0.74 to 0.91) compared with those who received no anticoagulation. Giving anticoagulants to older people with concomitant atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease was associated with an increased rate of ischaemic stroke and haemorrhage but a

  2. Risk Profiles and Antithrombotic Treatment of Patients Newly Diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation at Risk of Stroke: Perspectives from the International, Observational, Prospective GARFIELD Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Ajay K.; Mueller, Iris; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Fitzmaurice, David A.; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Goto, Shinya; Haas, Sylvia; Hacke, Werner; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Mantovani, Lorenzo G.; Turpie, Alexander G. G.; van Eickels, Martin; Misselwitz, Frank; Rushton-Smith, Sophie; Kayani, Gloria; Wilkinson, Peter; Verheugt, Freek W. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited data are available on the characteristics, clinical management, and outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke, from a worldwide perspective. The aim of this study was to describe the baseline characteristics and initial therapeutic management of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation across the spectrum of sites at which these patients are treated. Methods and Findings The Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD) is an observational study of patients newly diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Enrollment into Cohort 1 (of 5) took place between December 2009 and October 2011 at 540 sites in 19 countries in Europe, Asia-Pacific, Central/South America, and Canada. Investigator sites are representative of the distribution of atrial fibrillation care settings in each country. Cohort 1 comprised 10,614 adults (≥18 years) diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation within the previous 6 weeks, with ≥1 investigator-defined stroke risk factor (not limited to those in existing risk-stratification schemes), and regardless of therapy. Data collected at baseline included demographics, medical history, care setting, nature of atrial fibrillation, and treatments initiated at diagnosis. The mean (SD) age of the population was 70.2 (11.2) years; 43.2% were women. Mean±SD CHADS2 score was 1.9±1.2, and 57.2% had a score ≥2. Mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 3.2±1.6, and 8,957 (84.4%) had a score ≥2. Overall, 38.0% of patients with a CHADS2 score ≥2 did not receive anticoagulant therapy, whereas 42.5% of those at low risk (score 0) received anticoagulant therapy. Conclusions These contemporary observational worldwide data on non-valvular atrial fibrillation, collected at the end of the vitamin K antagonist-only era, indicate that these drugs are frequently not being used according to stroke risk scores and guidelines, with overuse in patients at low risk and underuse in those at high risk of stroke

  3. Electrocardiography-controlled central venous catheter tip positioning in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen, Folkert; Kanthak, Maximilian; Kukuk, Guido; Bode, Christian; Hoeft, Andreas; Weber, Stefan; Kim, Se-Chan

    2018-02-01

    A significant increase of the p-wave of a real-time intracavitary electrocardiography is a reliable and safe method to confirm the central venous catheter tip position close to the atrium. However, conflicting data about the feasibility of electrocardiography exist in patients with atrial fibrillation. An observational prospective case-control cohort study was set up to study the feasibility and accuracy of the electrocardiography-controlled central venous catheter tip placement in 13 patients with atrial fibrillation versus 10 patients with sinus rhythm scheduled for elective surgery. Each intervention was crosschecked with ultrasound-guided positioning via right supraclavicular fossa view and chest radiography. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular venipuncture of the right subclavian vein and guidewire advancement were performed. A B-mode view of the superior vena cava and the right pulmonary artery was obtained to visualize the J-tip of the guidewire. The central venous catheter was advanced over the guidewire and the electrocardiography was derived from the J-tip of the guidewire protruding from the central venous catheter tip. Electrocardiography was read for increased p- and atrial fibrillation waves, respectively, and insertion depth was compared with the ultrasound method. Electrocardiography indicated significantly increasing fibrillation and p-waves, respectively, in all patients and ultrasound-guided central venous catheter positioning confirmed a tip position within the lower third of the superior vena cava. Electrocardiography-guided central venous catheter tip positioning is a feasible real-time method for patients with atrial fibrillation. Combined with ultrasound, the electrocardiography-controlled central venous catheter placement may eliminate the need for postinterventional radiation exposure.

  4. NEW APPROACHES TO INDIVIDUALIZED CHOICE OF ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ju. P. Skirdenko; N. A. Nikolayev

    2018-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate adherence to treatment, mutations of the hemostatic system and food preferences as predictors of choice of optimal anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).Material and methods. 142 patients with AF were quantitatively evaluated in terms of their adherence to treatment, polymorphism of genes CYP2C9 and VKORC1 and the structure of food preferences.Results. Persons with insufficient adherence to treatment prevailed among AF patients, at that the leading n...

  5. Clinical implications of hypothermic ventricular fibrillation versus beating-heart technique during cardiopulmonary bypass for pulmonary valve replacement in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Eun; Shin, Jungho; Song, In-Kyung; Kim, Hee-Soo; Kim, Chong-Sung; Kim, Woong-Han; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of hypothermic ventricular fibrillation and beating-heart techniques during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on postoperative outcomes after simple pulmonary valve replacement in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). We retrospectively reviewed the data of 47 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot at a single institution, who received pulmonary valve replacement under the ventricular fibrillation or beating-heart technique without cardioplegic cardiac arrest during CPB between January 2005 and April 2015. The patients were divided into fibrillation (n = 32) and beating-heart (n = 15) groups. On comparing these groups, the fibrillation group had a larger sinotubular junction (27.1 ± 4.6 vs 22.1 ± 2.4 mm), had a longer operation duration (396 ± 108 vs 345 ± 57 min), required more postoperative transfusions (2.1 ± 2.6 vs 5.0 ± 6.3 units) and had a higher vasoactive-inotropic score at intensive care unit admission (8.0 vs 10, all P tetralogy of Fallot. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient satisfaction after receiving dental treatment among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patient satisfaction is one of the indicators of the quality of care. Therefore it is one of the tools for evaluating the quality of care. Aim: To determine patient satisfaction after receiving dental treatment among patients attending public dental clinics in Dar-Es-Salaam. Material and methods: Five public dental clinics ...

  7. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and N-terminal probrain sodium-uretic peptid level in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzyak G.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In our study 100 consecutive non-valvular permanent atrial fibrillation patients with NYHA I – III heart failure, 43 - 86 years old (65 men and 35 women were examined. Control group consisted of 30 patients with arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease matched by age, sex with basic group. Relationship of NT-proBNP with echocardiographic parameters of left heart were studied. Transthoracic echocardiography with tissue doppler measurements were performed on echocardiograph “SONOS 7500”. For left ventricular filling pressure assessment ratio Em/Ea was used due to its diagnostic value in atrial fibrillation (regardless of left ventricular ejection fraction. Mean left ventricular filling pressure was increased in patients with heart failure: in atrial fibrillation group and controls as well. In comparison with controls atrial fibrillation group was more likely to have higher both systolic and diastolic left atrial square and volume. According to Em/Ea in 95% of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation high left ventricular filling pressure was observed, this testifies to diastolic dysfunction. This parameter correlated well with left atrial square and volume during systole and diastole. Correlation between NT pro-BNP level and NYHA class of heart failure, left ventricular filling pressure was determined in patients with atrial fibrillation. Tissue doppler echocardiography makes it possible to diagnose left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in atrial fibrillation patients.

  8. Trandolapril reduces the incidence of atrial fibrillation after acute myocardial infarction in patients with left ventricular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, O D; Bagger, H; Køber, Lars Valeur

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have suggested that ACE inhibitors have an antiarrhythmic effect on ventricular arrhythmias. Whether they have an effect on atrial fibrillation is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: We investigated the effect of ACE inhibition with trandolapril on the incidence of atrial fibrillation...... of atrial fibrillation in patients with left ventricular dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction....... in patients with reduced left ventricular function secondary to acute myocardial infarction. The patients in this study were those who qualified for inclusion into the TRAndolapril Cardiac Evaluation (TRACE) study, a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study and who had sinus rhythm on the ECG obtained...

  9. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Treated With Rivaroxaban or Warfarin: ROCKET AF Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Matthew W; Nessel, Christopher C; Hellkamp, Anne S; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Piccini, Jonathan P; Suh, Eun-Young; Becker, Richard C; Singer, Daniel E; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hankey, Graeme J; Berkowitz, Scott D; Fox, Keith A A; Patel, Manesh R

    2015-12-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common complication of oral anticoagulation. This study evaluated GI bleeding in patients who received at least 1 dose of the study drug in the on-treatment arm of the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation) trial. The primary outcome was adjudicated GI bleeding reported from first to last drug dose + 2 days. Multivariable modeling was performed with pre-specified candidate predictors. Of 14,236 patients, 684 experienced GI bleeding during follow-up. These patients were older (median age 75 years vs. 73 years) and less often female. GI bleeding events occurred in the upper GI tract (48%), lower GI tract (23%), and rectum (29%) without differences between treatment arms. There was a significantly higher rate of major or nonmajor clinical GI bleeding in rivaroxaban- versus warfarin-treated patients (3.61 events/100 patient-years vs. 2.60 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.42; 95% confidence interval: 1.22 to 1.66). Severe GI bleeding rates were similar between treatment arms (0.47 events/100 patient-years vs. 0.41 events/100 patient-years; p = 0.39; 0.01 events/100 patient-years vs. 0.04 events/100 patient-years; p = 0.15, respectively), and fatal GI bleeding events were rare (0.01 events/100 patient-years vs. 0.04 events/100 patient-years; 1 fatal events vs. 5 fatal events total). Independent clinical factors most strongly associated with GI bleeding were baseline anemia, history of GI bleeding, and long-term aspirin use. In the ROCKET AF trial, rivaroxaban increased GI bleeding compared with warfarin. The absolute fatality rate from GI bleeding was low and similar in both treatment arms. Our results further illustrate the need for minimizing modifiable risk factors for GI bleeding in patients on oral anticoagulation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  10. A prospective study of estimated glomerular filtration rate and outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation: the Loire Valley Atrial Fibrillation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amitava; Fauchier, Laurent; Vourc'h, Patrick; Andres, Christian R; Taillandier, Sophie; Halimi, Jean Michel; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is more likely to develop in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) than in individuals with normal renal function, and patients with CKD are more likely to suffer ischemic stroke (IS)/thromboembolism (TE). To our knowledge, no prior study has considered the impact of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) on bleeding. We investigated the relationship of eGFR to IS/TE, mortality, and bleeding in an AF population unrestricted by age or comorbidity. Patients with nonvalvular AF (NVAF) were stratified into five categories according to eGFR (≥ 90, 60-89, 30-59, 15-29, and < 15 mL/min/1.73 m2), analyzing risk factors, all-cause mortality, bleeding, and IS/TE. Of 8,962 eligible individuals, 5,912 had NVAF and available serum creatinine data, with 14,499 patient-years of follow-up. The incidence rates of IS/TE were 7.4 and 7.2 per 1,000 person-years in individuals not receiving and receiving anticoagulation therapy, respectively. Rates of all-cause mortality were 13.4 and 9.4 per 1,000 person-years, respectively, and of major bleeding, 6.2 and 9.0 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. Rates increased with decreasing eGFR, with IS/TE rates being lower in individuals receiving oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy. eGFR was not an independent predictor of IS/TE on multivariate analyses. When the benefit of IS reduction is balanced against the increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, the net clinical benefit (NCB) was clearly positive in favor of OAC use. Incidence rates of IS/TE, mortality, and bleeding increased with reducing eGFR across the whole range of renal function. OAC use was associated with a lower incidence of IS/TE and mortality at 1 year compared with individuals not receiving anticoagulants in all categories of renal function as measured by eGFR. The NCB balancing IS against serious bleeding was positive in favor of OAC use among patients with renal impairment.

  11. The predictive role of E/e' on ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation in Japanese patients without atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Riku; Suzuki, Shinya; Semba, Hiroaki; Arita, Takuto; Yagi, Naoharu; Otsuka, Takayuki; Sagara, Koichi; Sasaki, Kenichi; Kano, Hiroto; Matsuno, Shunsuke; Kato, Yuko; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Oikawa, Yuji; Kunihara, Takashi; Yajima, Junji; Yamashita, Takeshi

    2018-02-13

    The predictive role of E/e' on ischemic stroke (IS) and atrial fibrillation (AF) in Japanese patients without AF are unclear. Shinken database includes all the new patients visiting the Cardiovascular Institute Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. E/e' has been routinely measured since 2007. Patients without AF for whom E/e' was measured at the initial visit between 2007 and 2014 (n=11 477, mean age 57.2 years old, men 59.5%) were divided into E/e' tertiles (11.00). During the mean follow-up period of 1.8 years, 58 IS and 140 new appearances of AF were observed. High E/e' tertile was associated with more prevalence of atherothrombotic risks. The cumulative incidence of IS events and new appearance of AF at 6 years in low, middle, and high E/e' tertiles were 0.5%, 1.4%, and 3.0%/year (log-rank test, pE/e' tertile was independently associated with IS (HR, 2.857, 95%CI 1.257-6.495, p=0.012). Although high E/e' tertile was independently associated with new appearance of AF when adjusted for coexistence of atherothrombotic risk factors (HR, 1.694, 95%CI, 1.097-2.616, p=0.017), the association was attenuated after adjustment for left atrial dimension. E/e' was significantly associated with incidence of IS and new appearance of AF in non-AF patients. Copyright © 2018 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. CT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation; CT-Koronarangiographie bei Patienten mit Vorhofflimmern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, A.; Sommer, T.; Leiss, A.; Naehle, P.; Schild, H.; Flacke, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Radiologische Klinik (Germany); Probst, C.; Welz, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Klinik fuer Herzchirurgie (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: Reliable visualization of the coronary arteries with multislice spiral CT angiography (MSCTA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) remains a challenge despite retrospective ECG gating. A recently developed new algorithm automatically compensates dynamic changes in the heart rate during the scan, thus reducing misregistration and motion artifacts. The HeartBeat-RT algorithm combines a fixed percent delay determined from the first R wave and the fixed offset delay based on the second R wave in the ECG cycle. The purpose of this study was to find out the optimal reconstruction window in MSCTA in patients with AF for each of the three major coronary arteries during the cardiac cycle. Materials and methods: 20 patients with permanent AF were imaged on a 16-slice scanner (slice collimation: 16 x 0.75 mm; rotation time 0.42 s; 140 kV; 380 mAs; 120 ml Ultravist 370 {sup registered} i.v.). The patients had not received any previous drugs for heart frequency regulation. Acquisition was started after bolus tracking of a biphasic bolus of 120 ml Ultravist 370 injected intravenously. Each coronary segment was reconstructed at 0%-90% of the cardiac cycle in increments of 10%. For image analysis we used coronary segments as defined by the American Heart Association. Two blinded independent readers assessed the image quality in terms of visibility and artifacts (five-point rating scale 1=very poor, 2=poor, 3=fair, 4=good and 5=excellent) and the degree of stenosis (five-point rating scale 1=0%, 2=1%-49%, 3=50%-74%, 4=75%-99%, 5=100%) on axial slices, multiplanar reconstructions and three-dimensional volume-rendered images. (orig.)

  13. Lysophosphatidic Acid Level and the Incidence of Silent Brain Infarction in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, which is proposed to play an important role in normal physiological situations such as wound healing, vascular tone, vascular integrity and reproduction, may be involved in the etiology of some diseases such as atherosclerosis, cancer, obesity or myocardial infarction. Abnormal findings, including silent brain infarction (SBI, are frequently observed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF. However, whether there is a relationship between LPA level and the prevalence of SBI has not been extensively studied. In the present study, the association between them was investigated. 235 patients with NVAF, 116 cases of SBI without NVAF and 120 cases of healthy volunteers (control group, who did not receive any antithrombotic therapy, were enrolled in this study. Plasma LPA levels in the NVAF with SBI group were significantly higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01, NVAF without SBI group (p < 0.01 and SBI without NVAF group (p < 0.01. The LPA levels are lower in the control group than in the NVAF without SBI and SBI without NVAF groups (p < 0.01, however, the latter two groups did not significantly differ from each other for LPA levels (p > 0.05 There were significant differences in the positive rate of platelet activation between each of the groups (p < 0.01. The positive rate of platelet activation was significantly higher in the NVAF with SBI group. We suggest that LPA might be a novel marker for estimation of the status of platelet activation and the risk factor for SBI onset in NVAF patients. We expected that plasma LPA levels could predict the occurrence of SBI in NVAF patients.

  14. Development of a Decision Aid for Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Who Are Considering Antithrombotic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Laupacis, Andreas; O'Connor, Annette M; Hart, Robert G; Feldman, George; Blackshear, Joseph L; Anderson, David C

    2000-01-01

    With patients demanding a greater role in the clinical decision-making process, many researchers are developing and disseminating decision aids for various medical conditions. In this article, we outline the essential elements in the development and evaluation of a decision aid to help patients with atrial fibrillation choose, in consultation with their physicians, appropriate antithrombotic therapy (warfarin, aspirin, or no therapy) to prevent stroke. We also outline possible future directio...

  15. Age-related mortality, clinical heart failure, and ventricular fibrillation in 4259 Danish patients after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask-Madsen, C; Jensen, G; Køber, L

    1997-01-01

    , factor for post-discharge mortality, particularly in the oldest age groups. Four out of eight patients > or = 80 years survived one year if discharged alive after experiencing in-hospital ventricular fibrillation. CONCLUSION: The life-saving potential of preventing or treating heart failure seems...... considerable even in the oldest patient groups. Patients > or = 80 years old who survive in-hospital ventricular fibrillation have an acceptable prognosis 1 year post-discharge....

  16. [German Competence Network on Atrial Fibrillation (AFNET). A nationwide cooperation for better research and patient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leute, Angelika; Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Goette, Andreas; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meinertz, Thomas; Oeff, Michael; Ravens, Ursula; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Weiss, Thomas

    2006-08-15

    The Atrial Fibrillation Competence Network is an interdisciplinary national research network funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The aim of the network--founded in 2003--is to improve the treatment of atrial fibrillation, the most common clinically important arrhythmia of the heart. A decentralized patient registry has been established. This registry, which comprises the manifestation, diagnostics and therapy of atrial fibrillation in Germany, is being used as a data basis for epidemiologic clinical studies. Epidemiologic projects are being conducted to study, e.g., the prevalence of atrial fibrillation as well as the occurrence of complications. Four multicenter clinical trials have been started to optimize pharmacological treatments (ANTIPAF trial, Flec-SL trial), preventive pacing (BACE-PACE trial) and catheter-based ablation (GAP-AF trial). Other clinical projects are being conducted to study the risk of neurologic complications and to develop new diagnostic imaging techniques. Experimental basic research projects are focusing on different aspects of atrial remodeling in order to find out in which way the molecular mechanisms can be manipulated by new methods of treatment. First results are presented.

  17. Risk Factors of Ischemic Stroke and Subsequent Outcome in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Mark D; Thomson, Peter C; Fulton, Rachael L; Solbu, Marit D; Jardine, Alan G; Patel, Rajan K; Stevens, Kathryn K; Geddes, Colin C; Dawson, Jesse; Mark, Patrick B

    2015-09-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis carries up to a 10-fold greater risk of stroke than normal renal function. Knowledge on risk factors and management strategies derived from the general population may not be applicable to those with ESRD. We studied a large ESRD population to identify risk factors and outcomes for stroke. All adult patients receiving hemodialysis for ESRD from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2012, were extracted from the electronic patient record. Variables associated with stroke were identified by survival analysis; demographic, clinical, imaging, and dialysis-related variables were assessed, and case-fatality was determined. Follow-up was until December 31, 2013. A total of 1382 patients were identified (mean age, 60.5 years; 58.5% men). The prevalence of atrial fibrillation was 21.2%, and 59.4% were incident hemodialysis patients. One hundred and sixty patients (11.6%) experienced a stroke during 3471 patient-years of follow-up (95% ischemic). Stroke incidence was 41.5/1000 patient-years in prevalent and 50.1/1000 patient-years in incident hemodialysis patients. Factors associated with stroke on regression analysis were prior stroke, diabetes mellitus, and age at starting renal replacement therapy. Atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with stroke, and warfarin did not affect stroke risk in warfarin-treated patients. Fatality was 18.8% at 7 days, 26.9% at 28 days, and 56.3% at 365 days after stroke. Incidence of stroke is high in patients with ESRD on hemodialysis with high case-fatality. Incident hemodialysis patients had the highest stroke incidence. Many, but not all, important risk factors commonly associated with stroke in the general population were not associated with stroke in patients receiving hemodialysis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Screening of KCNN3 in patients with early-onset lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten Sig; Jabbari, Javad; Holst, Anders G

    2011-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to screen KCNN3 encoding the small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel (SK3) in lone atrial fibrillation patients. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. A genome-wide association study has recently associated an intronic single......-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in KCNN3 with lone AF. Methods and results We sequenced the coding region and splice junctions of KCNN3 in 209 early-onset lone AF patients, screening for variations. A group of 208 healthy blood donors with normal ECGs and without cardiac symptoms were used as controls. All patients...... and controls were of Danish ethnicity. No mutations were found in the coding regions or splice sites of KCNN3. We found one known exonic synonymous SNP (rs1131820) in KCNN3 that was associated with AF. Both the genotype distribution and allele frequencies of SNP rs1131820 were significantly different between...

  19. The left atrium, atrial fibrillation, and the risk of stroke in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, K.; Devereux, R.B.; Lyle, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) study provided extensive data on predisposing factors, consequences, and prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with hypertension and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Randomized losartan-based treatment...

  20. Atrial fibrillation in heart failure is associated with an increased risk of death only in patients with ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raunsø, Jakob; Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Dominguez, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in heart failure (HF) populations is controversial and may depend on patient selection. In the present study, we investigated the prognostic impact of AF in a large population with HF of various aetiologies....

  1. Hypercoagulability in patients with atrial fibrillation and associated obesity: a way to hemorrhage or thromboembolia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Kovbasniuk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increased hypercoagulability of the blood plasma in patients with AF, the study of the processes of plasma hemostasis has still received insufficient attention, especially in patients with comorbid obesity or with excessive body weight. Purpose of the study. To establish the specific features of the effect of concomitant obesity on the indices of plasma hemostasis in patients with AF, on the basis of which to identify prognostically significant risk factors for adverse arrhythmia. Materials and methods. 75 patients with permanent AF were examined. For deducing prognostically significant risk factors, we conducted a retrospective analysis of the case histories of 421 inpatients. Results. The presence of concomitant obesity in patients with AF is accompanied by an acceleration of the prothrombinase-forming stage both in the internal and external hemocoagulation pathways. At the same time, the increase in procoagulant properties of blood is associated with a significant increase in fibrinogen and soluble fibrin-monomer complexes against the background of depletion of fibrinolytic and anticoagulant blood activity, which is a reflection of changes at the level of all links of hemocoagulation. Most diagnostically significant coagulation factors in the risk of thrombotic complications in patients with atrial fibrillation and concomitant obesity can be considered a measure of INR 30 minutes. Prognostically significant risk factors for small bleeding in patients with AF and associated obesity when taking warfarin are a BMI> 40kg/m2, level of AT III ≥40 % and ≥130 %, and in patients with AF and normal body weight, the amount of small bleeding increases if variability of INR beyond 2.0–3.0 and levels of AT III ≥130 %, as well as in the spring period of the year. Conclusions. Patients with AF are characterized by a moderate increase in the thrombogenic potential of the blood, which is accompanied by a significant inhibition of

  2. Psoriasis is associated with subsequent atrial fibrillation in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Okin, Peter M; Køber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of psoriasis as well as atrial fibrillation. The impact of psoriasis and its association with new-onset atrial fibrillation was assessed in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). METHODS: The predictive value...... or developed psoriasis and new-onset atrial fibrillation occurred in 506 patients (7.1%) during a mean follow-up of 4.7 ± 1.1 years. At baseline, the psoriasis patients were younger (65 ± 7 vs. 67 ± 7 years) and had less left ventricle hypertrophy by ECG Sokolow-Lyon voltage (27.6 ± 9.7 vs. 30.1 ± 10.4 mm......); higher hemoglobin (6.3 ± 2.2 vs. 6.0 ± 2.7 mmol/l) and prevalence of diabetes (20.6 vs. 12.8%, P ≤ 0.004) than patients without psoriasis. In multivariable Cox analysis, adjusting for age, sex, hemoglobin, diabetes, time-varying SBP, heart rate, study treatment and Sokolow-Lyon hypertrophy, psoriasis...

  3. Left atrial size and function as predictors of new-onset of atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper Niels Furbo; Dalsgaard, Morten; Greve, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size and function change with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressures. It remains unclear whether these variations in LA parameters can predict new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).......Left atrial (LA) size and function change with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressures. It remains unclear whether these variations in LA parameters can predict new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  4. Serum Potassium Levels Inversely Correlate with D-Dimer In Patients with Acute-Onset Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Bonfanti, Laura; Picanza, Alessandra; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background: D-dimer values are frequently increased in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared to subjects in sinus rhythm. Hypokalemia plays a role in several cardiovascular diseases, but little is known about the association with AF. Objective: D-dimer values are frequently increased in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with subjects in sinus rhythm. Hypokalemia plays a role in several cardiovascular diseases, but little is known about the association with AF. The aim ...

  5. Risk of Ischemic Stroke after Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Lerario

    Full Text Available We aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke after intracranial hemorrhage in patients with atrial fibrillation.Using discharge data from all nonfederal acute care hospitals and emergency departments in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2012, we identified patients at the time of a first-recorded encounter with a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. Ischemic stroke and intracranial hemorrhage were identified using validated diagnosis codes. Kaplan-Meier survival statistics and Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to evaluate cumulative rates of ischemic stroke and the relationship between incident intracranial hemorrhage and subsequent stroke.Among 2,084,735 patients with atrial fibrillation, 50,468 (2.4% developed intracranial hemorrhage and 89,594 (4.3% developed ischemic stroke during a mean follow-up period of 3.2 years. The 1-year cumulative rate of stroke was 8.1% (95% CI, 7.5-8.7% after intracerebral hemorrhage, 3.9% (95% CI, 3.5-4.3% after subdural hemorrhage, and 2.0% (95% CI, 2.0-2.1% in those without intracranial hemorrhage. After adjustment for the CHA2DS2-VASc score, stroke risk was elevated after both intracerebral hemorrhage (hazard ratio [HR], 2.8; 95% CI, 2.6-2.9 and subdural hemorrhage (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.5-1.7. Cumulative 1-year rates of stroke ranged from 0.9% in those with subdural hemorrhage and a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 0, to 33.3% in those with intracerebral hemorrhage and a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 9.In a large, heterogeneous cohort, patients with atrial fibrillation faced a substantially heightened risk of ischemic stroke after intracranial hemorrhage. The risk was most marked in those with intracerebral hemorrhage and high CHA2DS2-VASc scores.

  6. Aspirin versus warfarin in atrial fibrillation: decision analysis may help patients' choice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romero-Ortuno, Roman

    2012-03-01

    the primary prevention of ischaemic stroke in chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) typically involves consideration of aspirin or warfarin. CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc estimates annual stroke rates for untreated AF patients, which are reduced by 60% with warfarin and by 20% with aspirin. HAS-BLED estimates annual rates of major bleeding on warfarin. The latter risk with aspirin is 0.5-1.2% per year.

  7. Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment and clinical outcome among patients hospitalized with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2014-01-01

    Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) has been linked with less severe stroke and a better outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, the existing studies have methodological limitations and have, with one exception, not included hemorrhagic strokes. We performed a nationwide...... historic follow-up study using data from population-based healthcare registries to assess the effect of preadmission OAT on stroke outcomes further....

  8. Assessment of left atrial volume and function in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, Bue F Ross; Kühl, Jørgen Tobias; Linde, Jesper James

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia that is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. AF is associated with enlargement of the left atrium (LA), and the LA volume has important prognostic implications for the disease. The objective of the study was to determine how ...... measurements of LA volume and function obtained by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and 320-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) correlate in patients with permanent AF....

  9. Atrial fibrillation, ischaemic heart disease, and the risk of death in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Søndergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Tonny

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for death in patients with a myocardial infarction, but highly variable results are reported in patients with heart failure. We studied the prognostic impact of AF in heart failure patients with and without ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS...... and without ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.88-1.16) and P=0.88. CONCLUSION: AF is associated with increased risk of death only in patients with ischaemic heart disease. This finding may explain the variable results of studies of the prognosis associated with AF in heart failure....

  10. ROCKET AF adds more concerns about Digoxin safety in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMaghawry, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    In a recent article in the Journal, we have reviewed the adverse cardiovascular outcomes observed with digoxin use in the PALLAS study.1 The PALLAS study was designed to determine if dronedarone would reduce major vascular events in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (AF).2 However the study was stopped early because of safety reasons, as a significant number of patients on the dronedarone arm reached the co-primary end point composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, systemic embolism, or cardiovascular death. Data sub-analyses suggested that digoxin-dronedarone interaction was responsible for the higher arrhythmic death rate observed in the trial. These observations are consistent with several other studies that demonstrate the potential hazard of the use of digoxin in heart failure and/or atrial fibrillation. A more recent article published in the Lancet studied the use and outcomes of digoxin in the Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF) trial.3 The investigators concluded that digoxin treatment was associated with a significant increase in all-cause mortality, vascular death, and sudden death in patients with AF. PMID:26779514

  11. Assessment of anticoagulation treatments in non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients diagnosed in a basic health area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera Alcaraz, Beatriz M; Abellán Huerta, José; Carbayo Herencia, Julio Antonio; Ariza Copado, Consuelo; Hernández Menárguez, Fernando; Abellán Alemán, José

    2017-12-12

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. To assess the need for anticoagulation is essential for its management. Our objective was to investigate whether the indication of anticoagulation was adequate in patients diagnosed with non-valvular AF, given the CHA2-DS2-VASc scale, measuring the International Normalizad Ratio range (INR) in patients treated with anti-vitamin K drugs. This is an observational and cross sectional study. 232 patients with atrial fibrillation were included. We analyzed demographic, the CHA2-DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED variables, the treatment and INR values for 6 consequentive months. The confrontation of variables was performed using chi-square and Mantel-Haenzel test. The prevalence of AF was 1.05%. The 88.4% had CHA2-DS2-VASc ≥ 2. The 71.1% were taking anticoagulants, of which 58.2% were under antivitamin k. The 46.7% of patients taking antivitamin K, presented inadequate range of INR. There was a greater prescription of antivitamin k in patients with persistent or permanent AF compared to the paroxysmal form (62.8 vs. 37.2% p<.001). The use of drugs that increase bleeding was associated with a worse control of INR after adjustment for the main variables of clinical relevance (odds ratio 2.17 [1.02-4.59], p=.043). The level of anticoagulation with antivitamin K was inadequate in our sample, despite a proper follow up and adherence to treatment. Patients with paroxysmal AF received less antivitamin K than those with persistent/permanent AF. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Outcomes and History of Fall in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Treated with Oral Anticoagulation: Insights From the ARISTOTLE Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Meena P; Vinereanu, Dragos; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Alexander, John H; Atar, Dan; Hylek, Elaine M; Hanna, Michael; Wallentin, Lars; Lopes, Renato D; Gersh, Bernard J; Granger, Christopher B

    2018-03-01

    We assessed outcomes among anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation and a history of falling, and whether the benefits of apixaban vs warfarin are consistent in this population. Of the 18,201 patients in the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) study, 16,491 had information about history of falling-753 with history of falling and 15,738 without history of falling. The primary efficacy outcome was stroke or systemic embolism; the primary safety outcome was major bleeding. When compared with patients without a history of falling, patients with a history of falling were older, more likely to be female and to have dementia, cerebrovascular disease, depression, diabetes, heart failure, osteoporosis, fractures, and higher CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc (Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 years, Diabetes mellitus, prior Stroke or TIA or thromboembolism, Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, Sex category female) and HAS-BLED (Hypertension, Abnormal renal and liver function, Stroke, Bleeding, Labile international normalized ratio, Elderly, Drugs or alcohol) scores. Patients with a history of falling had higher rates of major bleeding (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.84; P = .020), including intracranial bleeding (adjusted HR 1.87; 95% CI, 1.02-3.43; P = .044) and death (adjusted HR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.36-2.14; P < .0001), but similar rates of stroke or systemic embolism and hemorrhagic stroke. There was no evidence of a differential effect of apixaban compared with warfarin on any outcome, regardless of history of falling. Among those with a history of falling, subdural bleeding occurred in 5 of 367 patients treated with warfarin and 0 of 386 treated with apixaban. Patients with atrial fibrillation and a history of falling receiving anticoagulation have a higher risk of major bleeding, including intracranial, and death. The efficacy and safety of apixaban compared

  13. Outcomes of a contemporary sample of patients with atrial fibrillation taking digoxin: results from the AFBAR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Otero-Raviña, Fernando; García-Seara, Javier; Zugaza-Gurruchaga, Lucrecia; Rodríguez-García, José M; Blanco-Rodríguez, Rubén; Turrado Turrado, Victorino; Fernández-Villaverde, José M; Vidal-Pérez, Rafael C; González-Juanatey, José R

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to assess and compare the effect of digoxin on clinical outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation vs those under beta-blockers or none of these drugs. AFBAR is a prospective registry study carried out by a team of primary care physicians (n=777 patients). Primary endpoints were survival, survival free of admission due to any cause, and survival free of admission due to cardiovascular causes. The mean follow up was 2.9 years. Four groups were analyzed: patients receiving digoxin, beta-blockers, or digoxin plus beta-blockers, and patients receiving none of these drugs. Overall, 212 patients (27.28%) received digoxin as the only heart control strategy, 184 received beta-blockers (23.68%), 58 (7.46%) were administered both, and 323 (41.57%) received none of these drugs. Digoxin was not associated with all-cause mortality (estimated hazard ratio=1.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-2.60; P=.2), admission due to any cause (estimated hazard ratio=1.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.710-1.498; P=.8), or admission due to cardiovascular causes (estimated hazard ratio=1.193; 95% confidence interval, 0.725-1.965; P=.4). No association was found between digoxin use and all-cause mortality, admission due to any cause, or admission due to cardiovascular causes in patients without heart failure. There was no interaction between digoxin use and sex in all-cause mortality or in survival free of admission due to any cause. However, an association was found between sex and admission due to cardiovascular causes. Digoxin was not associated with increased all-cause mortality, survival free of admission due to any cause, or admission due to cardiovascular causes, regardless of underlying heart failure. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Decrease in mortality in patients with a hospital diagnosis of atrial fibrillation in Denmark during the period 1980-1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, L; Engholm, G; Møller, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is associated with increased mortality. We hypothesized that the death rate in atrial fibrillation patients in Denmark has diminished during the period 1980-1993. METHODS: In a random sample of half of the Danish population, 30 330 patients were found to have...... a diagnosis of incident atrial fibrillation in the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register 1980-1993. Information on previous and concomitant cardiovascular and metabolic diseases during the period 1977-1993 was sought in the register. The temporal trend in total and cardiovascular mortality in the cohort...... in the relative risk of total mortality of 8-13% with time was seen for the atrial fibrillation cohort, compared with the population risk, while no reduction in the relative risk of cardiovascular death was seen. CONCLUSION: A significant decrease in mortality with calendar period occurred in the cohort of atrial...

  15. Bare-metal vs. drug-eluting stents in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Tuomas; Puurunen, Marja; Schlitt, Axel; Rubboli, Andrea; Karjalainen, Pasi; Nammas, Wail; Kirchhof, Paulus; Biancari, Fausto; Lip, Gregory Yh; Airaksinen, Ke Juhani

    2014-01-01

    We explored 12-month clinical outcomes of 929 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with bare-metal stents (BMS) vs. drug-eluting stents (DES) from the prospective multicenter AFCAS (Atrial Fibrillation undergoing Coronary Artery Stenting) registry. METHODS AND RESULTS: Endpoints included the first occurrence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE), defined as a composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction (MI), target vessel revascularization, definite/probable stent thrombosis (ST), transient ischemic attack or stroke. Bleeding events were defined according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium criteria. Altogether, 673 (72.4%) patients received BMS and 220 (23.7%) at least one DES. Patients treated with DES more often had diabetes and prior ischemic events, and a longer stent length (Pheart failure and were more likely to present with acute ST-elevation MI (P<0.05 for both). At 12-month follow-up, rates and risks of MACCE and total bleeding events were comparable between the groups (22.0% with BMS vs. 19.5% with DES, P=0.51, hazard ratio (HR) 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-1.25 for DES) and (19.5% vs. 15.0%, respectively, P=0.16, HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.51-1.09 for DES). Definite/probable ST was more frequent in the BMS group (1.9% vs. 0%, respectively, P=0.046). In real-world patients with AF undergoing PCI, DES use was associated with outcomes comparable to those with BMS without excess bleeding complications. More ST was seen in BMS-treated patients.

  16. Traumatic events involving elderly patients treated with anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: the downside of stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Riccardi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of oral anticoagulant-treated patients affected by permanent atrial fibrillation was evaluated after their access to the emergency room as a result of a traumatic accident. In these patients, the re-evaluation of their risk of thromboembolism and bleeding was performed together with the evaluation of their risk of falling and institutionalization. Results show that the emergency department identifies a cohort of very elderly frail patients, who should be carefully reconsidered for anticoagulant therapy after a traumatic event.

  17. Temporal trends in the prescription of vitamin K antagonists in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, J; Gislason, G H; Gadsbøll, N

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Anticoagulation therapy is recommended in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and risk factors for stroke. We studied the temporal trends in the prescription of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in patients with a first hospital diagnosis of AF in Denmark, 1995-2002. DESIGN: The Danish......-99 years with a diagnosis of AF who survived 3 months following discharge, 24 991 (36%) patients claimed a prescription of VKA within 3 months. In both men and women a gradual increase in the use of VKA with time was observed, the relative increase being largest amongst the 80- to 99-year olds. In all age...

  18. Development of a Decision Aid for Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Who Are Considering Antithrombotic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Laupacis, Andreas; O'Connor, Annette M; Hart, Robert G; Feldman, George; Blackshear, Joseph L; Anderson, David C

    2000-01-01

    With patients demanding a greater role in the clinical decision-making process, many researchers are developing and disseminating decision aids for various medical conditions. In this article, we outline the essential elements in the development and evaluation of a decision aid to help patients with atrial fibrillation choose, in consultation with their physicians, appropriate antithrombotic therapy (warfarin, aspirin, or no therapy) to prevent stroke. We also outline possible future directions regarding the implementation and evaluation of this decision aid. This information should enable clinicians to better understand the role that decision aids may have in their interactions with patients. PMID:11089716

  19. Patient satisfaction after switching from warfarin to apixaban in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: AGAIN study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koretsune Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yukihiro Koretsune,1 Takanori Ikeda,2 Ken Kozuma,3 Teruyuki Hirano,4 Masahiro Yasaka,5 Makoto Kida,6 Motohiko Chachin,7 Miki Imura7 1National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka, 2Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Toho University Graduate School of Medicine, Toho University, Tokyo, 3Division of Cardiology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Tokyo, 4Department of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Medicine, Kyorin University, Tokyo, 5Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine and Neurology, National Hospital Organization, Kyushu Medical Center, Fukuoka, 6Medical & Development, Bristol-Myers Squibb K.K., Tokyo, 7Pfizer Innovative Health Medical Affairs, Pfizer Japan Inc., Tokyo, Japan Purpose: Patients treated with warfarin must adhere to frequent monitoring, dietary restrictions, and complicated dose adjustments. Apixaban, a direct factor Xa inhibitor, is an alternative to warfarin that may reduce patient burdens associated with warfarin therapy. However, there is limited evidence pertaining to patient satisfaction with anticoagulant therapies in Japanese patients. The purpose of this observational study was to investigate changes in patient satisfaction after switching from warfarin to apixaban.Patients and methods: Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF patients who were scheduled to switch anticoagulants from warfarin to apixaban were enrolled and treated with apixaban for 12 weeks. Patient satisfaction was assessed before the change in medication and after 12 weeks of treatment with apixaban using the Anti-Clot Treatment Scale (ACTS, a patient-reported instrument for measuring satisfaction with anticoagulation treatment. The ACTS includes a 12-item burden scale (maximum 60 points and a 3-item benefit scale (maximum 15 points.Results: Among 732 NVAF patients enrolled, the full analysis set consisted of 697 patients who completed two ACTS assessments (one before the medication change and one 12 weeks after the

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atrial fibrillation: Insights from the ARISTOTLE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durheim, Michael T; Cyr, Derek D; Lopes, Renato D; Thomas, Laine E; Tsuang, Wayne M; Gersh, Bernard J; Held, Claes; Wallentin, Lars; Granger, Christopher B; Palmer, Scott M; Al-Khatib, Sana M

    2016-01-01

    Comorbid chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with poor outcomes among patients with cardiovascular disease. The risks of stroke and mortality associated with COPD among patients with atrial fibrillation are not well understood. We analyzed patients from ARISTOTLE, a randomized trial of 18,201 patients with atrial fibrillation comparing the effects of apixaban versus warfarin on the risk of stroke or systemic embolism. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we assessed the associations between comorbid COPD and risk of stroke or systemic embolism and of mortality, adjusting for treatment allocation, smoking history and other risk factors. COPD was present in 1950 (10.8%) of 18,134 patients with data on pulmonary disease history. After multivariable adjustment, COPD was not associated with risk of stroke or systemic embolism (adjusted HR 0.85 [95% CI 0.60, 1.21], p=0.356). However, COPD was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 1.60 [95% CI 1.36, 1.88], p<0.001) and both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality. The benefit of apixaban over warfarin on stroke or systemic embolism was consistent among patients with and without COPD (HR 0.92 [95% CI 0.52, 1.63] versus 0.78 [95% CI 0.65, 0.95], interaction p=0.617). COPD was independently associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality among patients with atrial fibrillation, but was not associated with risk of stroke or systemic embolism. The effect of apixaban on stroke or systemic embolism in COPD patients was consistent with its effect in the overall trial population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preoperative serum soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and osteoprotegerin predict postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hailong; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Yanhu; Li, Qingguo; Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Chen, Yijiang; Wu, Zhong; Wang, Dongjin

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF), a frequent complication after cardiac surgery, causes morbidity and prolongs hospitalization. A significant association between circulating osteoprotegerin concentration and atrial fibrillation incidence had been identified. Osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) axis may also contribute to the development and progression of AF. Herein we sought to determine whether preoperative serum soluble RANKL and osteoprotegerin and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio are associated with the incidence of POAF in cardiac surgery patients. We enrolled 154 patients with preoperative sinus rhythm undergoing isolated cardiac valve surgery. Preoperative venous blood samples were obtained for measurement of serum soluble RANKL and osteoprotegerin. The POAF was defined as the characteristic arrhythmia lasting for at least 30 seconds before discharge. Comparison was made between patients without episode of POAF (sinus rhythm group, n=93) and patients experiencing POAF (atrial fibrillation group, n=61). Serum levels of soluble RANKL and osteoprotegerin and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio were significantly higher in the atrial fibrillation group than the sinus rhythm group. In multivariate survival regression, C-reactive protein, ejection fraction, left and right atrial diameters, preoperative use of beta-blocker, duration of ventilation, particularly serum soluble RANKL level, and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio independently predicted POAF. According to receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the best threshold values of serum soluble RANKL level and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio for predicting POAF were 3.62 pmol/L and 0.51, respectively. Elevated preoperative serum soluble RANKL level and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio are independent predictors for POAF in patients undergoing cardiac valve surgery. These findings have important

  2. Atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Munger, Thomas M.; Wu, Li-Qun; Shen, Win K.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia affecting patients today. Disease prevalence is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, and is associated with often catastrophic and costly consequences, including heart failure, syncope, dementia, and stroke. Therapies including anticoagulants, anti-arrhythmic medications, devices, and non-pharmacologic procedures in the last 30 years have improved patients' functionality with the disease. Nonetheless, it remains imperative that further re...

  3. Left atrial size in patients with cryptogenic stroke as a predictor of occurrence of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cruz Culebras

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether the left atrial size can predict the development of atrial fibrillation (AF in patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke were included prospectively (January 2015-July 2015 when ESUS was suspected. Clinical and cardiac imaging data were recorded. Patients with cardiac failure were excluded. Results: a total of 55 patients were included. Medium age was 71 years. The proportion of patients who developed AF during the follow-up (1 year was 23, 63%. 10 % of patients did not have any vascular risk factor. Basal ECG was normal in 98% of cases. The left atrial size volume was 36, 08 ml in patients who developed AF and 27, 14 ml in patients who did not. Conclusions: In patients with ESUS, left atrial size dimensions do not predict the occurrence of AF.

  4. THE USE OF ATORVASTATIN FOR THE PREVENTION OF RECURRENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AFTER ELECTRICAL CARDIOVERSION IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tereshchenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of atorvastatin on the rate of atrial fibrillation (AF recurrence after electrical cardioversion in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD and paroxysmal AF.Material and Methods. Sixty outpatients and inpatients (aged 30-70 y.o. with IHD and paroxysmal AF were included into the open controlled randomized study immediately after the restoration of sinus rhythm by electrical cardioversion. Patients were randomized into 2 groups. Patients in Group 1 (n=30 received standard therapy recommended for maintenance of sinus rhythm in paroxysmal AF and atorvastatin (average dose 23.5±3.7 mg/day, and patients in Group 2 (n=30 had only the standard therapy. Routine blood analysis, blood chemistry (transaminases, creatine phosphokinase, creatinine, bilirubin, glucose, lipid profile, daily ECG monitoring, treatment safety evaluation were performed. AF relapse was considered as a primary endpoint.Results. Significant reduction in the rate of AF recurrence in was revealed in patients treated with atorvastatin. According to daily ECG monitoring AF relapse was recorded in 8.3 and 48% of patients in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively (p<0.001. Episodes of sinus tachycardia decreased on 52.3% (p<0.001 and 48,5% (p<0.01 in patients of the 1st and the 2 nd group, respectively.Conclusion. The addition of atorvastatin to the standard therapy for maintenance of sinus rhythm reduces effectively the rate of AF recurrence in patients with IHD and paroxysmal AF.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of therapies for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, M H; Falk, R H; Pauker, S G

    The most appropriate treatment(s) for patients with atrial fibrillation remains uncertain. To examine the cost-effectiveness of anti-thrombotic and antiarrhythmic treatment strategies for atrial fibrillation. We performed decision and cost-effectiveness analyses using a Markov state transition model. We gathered data from the English-language literature using MEDLINE searches and bibliographies from selected articles. We obtained financial data from nationwide physician-fee references, a medical center's cost accounting system, and one of New England's larger managed care organizations. We examined strategies that included combinations of cardioversion, antiarrhythmic therapy with quinidine, sotalol hydrochloride, or amiodarone, and anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy. For a 65-year-old man with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, any intervention results in a significant gain in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) compared with no specific therapy. Use of aspirin results in the largest incremental gain (1.2 QALYs). Cardioversion followed by the use of amiodarone and warfarin together is the most effective strategy, yielding a gain of 2.3 QALYs compared with no specific therapy. The marginal cost-effectiveness ratios of cardioversion followed by aspirin, with or without amiodarone, are $33800 per QALY and $10800 per QALY, respectively. Cardioversion followed by amiodarone and warfarin has a marginal cost-effectiveness ratio of $92400 per QALY compared with amiodarone and aspirin. Strategies that include cardioversion followed by either quinidine or sotalol are both more expensive and less effective than competing strategies. Cardioversion of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation followed by the use of aspirin alone or with amiodarone has a reasonable marginal cost-effectiveness ratio. While cardioversion followed by the use of amiodarone and warfarin results in the greatest gain in quality-adjusted life expectancy, it is expensive (ie, has a high marginal

  6. Non-valvular atrial fibrillation: impact of apixaban on patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannou A

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Adam Ioannou,1 Irene Tsappa,2 Sofia Metaxa,3 Constantinos G Missouris2,3 1Cardiology Department, Royal Free NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 2Cardiology Department, Medical School, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus; 3Cardiology Department, Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia worldwide, and carries a significantly increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. Initially, vitamin K antagonists were used as stroke prophylaxis; but more recently, a group of drugs known as novel oral anticoagulants have been developed. Apixaban belongs to this group of drugs, and is a factor Xa inhibitor that has emerged as a popular pharmacological agent worldwide. In this review, we will provide an overview of the pivotal trials in the development of apixaban, while also critically evaluating the new emerging real-world data, and discussing the effectiveness, safety, economic viability and future prospects of apixaban and how it impacts on patient outcomes in those with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Keywords: apixaban, atrial fibrillation, warfarin, stroke, bleeding

  7. Educational and behavioural interventions for anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkesmith, Danielle E; Pattison, Helen M; Khaing, Phyo H; Lane, Deirdre A

    2017-04-05

    Current guidelines recommend oral anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) with one or more risk factors for stroke; however, anticoagulation control (time in therapeutic range (TTR)) with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) is dependent on many factors. Educational and behavioural interventions may impact patients' ability to maintain their international normalised ratio (INR) control. This is an updated version of the original review first published in 2013. To evaluate the effects of educational and behavioural interventions for oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) on TTR in patients with AF. We updated searches from the previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) in The Cochrane Library (January 2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE Ovid (1949 to February week 1 2016), EMBASE Classic + EMBASE Ovid (1980 to Week 7 2016), PsycINFO Ovid (1806 to Week 1 February 2016) and CINAHL Plus with Full Text EBSCO (1937 to 16/02/2016). We applied no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of any educational and behavioural intervention compared with usual care, no intervention, or intervention in combination with other self-management techniques among adults with AF who were eligible for, or currently receiving, OAT. Two of the review authors independently selected studies and extracted data. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool. We included outcome data on TTR, decision conflict (patient's uncertainty in making health-related decisions), percentage of INRs in the therapeutic range, major bleeding, stroke and thromboembolic events, patient knowledge, patient satisfaction, quality of life (QoL), beliefs about medication, illness perceptions, and anxiety and depression. We pooled data for three outcomes - TTR, anxiety and depression, and decision conflict - and reported mean differences (MD). Where

  8. Dabigatran use in Danish atrial fibrillation patients in 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Gislason, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias

    2013-01-01

    patients with an in-hospital or outpatient-clinic AF diagnosis who claimed a prescription of dabigatran 110 or 150 mg, or vitamin K antagonist (VKA), between 22 August and 31 December 2011. HRs of thromboembolic events (ischaemic stroke, transitory ischaemic attack and peripheral artery embolism...... did not fulfil the recommendations by EMA, were >80 years, patients with liver or kidney disease, patients with previous bleeding. Compared with VKA, the thromboembolic risk associated with dabigatran 110 and 150 mg was HR 3.52 (1.40 to 8.84) and 5.79 (1.81 to 18.56) in previous VKA users, and HR 0...

  9. Increased left atrial pressure in non-heart failure patients with subclinical hypothyroidism and atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Sairaku

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The impact of subclinical hypothyroidism on the cardiovascular risk is still debated. We aimed to measure the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and the left atrial (LA pressure. Methods The LA pressures and thyroid function were measured in consecutive patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF ablation, who did not have any known heart failure, structural heart disease, or overt thyroid disease. Results Subclinical hypothyroidism (4.5≤ thyroid-stimulating hormone 18 mmHg (odds ratio 3.94, 95% CI 1.28 11.2; P = 0.02. Conclusions Subclinical hypothyroidism may increase the LA pressure in AF patients.

  10. Influenza vaccination reduces hemorrhagic stroke risk in patients with atrial fibrillation: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Wang, Ta-Jung; Sung, Li-Chin; Kao, Pai-Feng; Yang, Tsung-Yeh; Hao, Wen-Rui; Chen, Chun-Chao; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    The risk of hemorrhagic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is low but the consequences of its occurrence are extremely severe. In this study, we investigated the association of influenza vaccination with the risk of hemorrhagic stroke to develop an efficient strategy for reducing this risk in patients with AF. In this study, data were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised all patients who received a diagnosis of AF (n=14,454) before January 1, 2005 (index date) and were followed until December 31, 2012. Propensity scores were calculated using a logistic regression model to determine the effects of vaccination by accounting for covariates that predict receiving the intervention (vaccine). A time-dependent Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) for hemorrhagic stroke in vaccinated and unvaccinated patients with AF. The study population comprised 6570 patients who did (2547 [38.77%]) and did not receive (4023 [61.23%]) influenza vaccination. The adjusted HRs (aHRs) for hemorrhagic stroke were lower in the vaccinated patients than in the unvaccinated patients (influenza season, noninfluenza season, and all seasons: aHRs=0.97 [0.59-1.60], 0.51 [0.30-0.87], and 0.72 [0.50-1.03], respectively). Influenza vaccination exerts dose-response and synergistic protective effects against hemorrhagic stroke in patients with AF who have a high risk of hemorrhagic stroke (i.e., male sex, age≥75years, Charlson comorbidity index ≥3, and hypertension) and reduces the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with previous amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylov, Evgeny N; Orshanskaya, Viktorya S; Lebedev, Alexander D; Szili-Torok, Tamas; Lebedev, Dmitry S

    2013-08-01

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) receive amiodarone. Amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism (AIH) may develop as a complication. We hypothesized that pulmonary vein (PV) isolation in patients with paroxysmal AF and history of AIH may yield a lower success rate. Among 704 patients who underwent AF ablation in our center between 2007 and 2010, we identified 20 patients (mean age 58.3 ± 5.0 years; 11 males) with paroxysmal AF and overt AIH in the past. The control group consisted of 40 patients with amiodarone-refractory AF and no thyroid dysfunction. All patients underwent circumferential PV isolation. During redo procedures all tachycardias were targeted for ablation. During a 12-month follow-up, in the AIH group 6 (30%) patients were arrhythmia free after a single procedure, in comparison to 25 (62.5%) controls (P = 0.01). Atrial tachycardia (AT) was registered in 7 (35%) AIH patients and in 1 (2.5%) control patient (P = 0.001). AF recurred in 10 (50%) AIH versus 15 (37.5%) control patients (P = 0.2). Redo ablation was performed in 7 (35%) AIH patients and in 3 (7.5%) non-AIH patients (P = 0.01). During a redo procedure a PV-unrelated tachycardia was diagnosed in 5 (25%) AIH patients (vs 0 in the controls, P = 0.003). After the last performed ablation, 12 (60%) AIH patients and 28 (70%) controls had no recurrence, P = 0.56. AIH was an independent predictor of ATs. PV isolation alone has a lower efficacy for preventing recurrence in paroxysmal AF in AIH patients. After repeat ablations, overall freedom from tachyarrhythmias is similar to patients with no history of thyroid dysfunction. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The HAS-BLED, ATRIA, and ORBIT Bleeding Scores in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Using Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Skjøth, Flemming; Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Kjældgaard, Jette Nordstrøm; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    2017-12-21

    Various bleeding risk scores have been proposed to assess the risk of bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation taking oral anticoagulants. Limited data are available with these scores, in users of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants. Using the Danish registries, we evaluated and compared the risk classification properties of the Hypertension, Age, Stroke, Bleeding tendency/predisposition, Labile international normalized ratios, Elderly age/frailty, Drugs such as concomitant aspirin/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or alcohol excess (HAS-BLED), Anticoagulation and Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation (ATRIA), and Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT) scores for predicting major bleeding in 57,930 atrial fibrillation patients (44.6% female; mean age 73.5 years, standard deviation 11.4 years; mean CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score 3.2, standard deviation 1.8). At 1-year follow-up, C-statistics for ATRIA, HAS-BLED, and ORBIT were approximately 0.59, with only minor differences between scores. Both ATRIA and ORBIT categorized more patients as "low risk" (both >83%, when compared with HAS-BLED, only 53%), and qualitatively, the receiver operating characteristic curves revealed higher sensitivity (62.8%) for HAS-BLED compared with ATRIA (29.7%) and ORBIT (37.1%). The clinical usefulness of scores was evaluated using decision curve analyses at a 1-year perspective. If the intervention threshold is low (statistics. The scores represent different risk thresholds, with HAS-BLED classifying least patients at low risk and achieving the highest benefit if applying a major bleeding intervention threshold of approximately 2%, whereas benefit from using either ATRIA score or ORBIT score was only evident using higher intervention thresholds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the predictive performance of bleeding risk scores in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation on oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshir, S A; Aziz, Z; Yap, L B; Chee, K H; Lo, Y L

    2018-04-01

    Bleeding risk scores (BRSs) aid in the assessment of oral anticoagulant-related bleeding risk in patients with atrial fibrillation. Ideally, the applicability of a BRS needs to be assessed, prior to its routine use in a population other than the original derivation cohort. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of 6 established BRSs to predict major or clinically relevant bleeding (CRB) events associated with the use of oral anticoagulant (OAC) among Malaysian patients. The pharmacy supply database and the medical records of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) receiving warfarin, dabigatran or rivaroxaban at two tertiary hospitals were reviewed. Patients who experienced an OAC-associated major or CRB event within 12 months of follow-up, or who have received OAC therapy for at least 1 year, were identified. The BRSs were fitted separately into patient data. The discrimination and the calibration of these BRSs as well as the factors associated with bleeding events were then assessed. A total of 1017 patients with at least 1-year follow-up period, or those who developed a bleeding event within 1 year of OAC use, were recruited. Of which, 23 patients experienced a first major bleeding event, whereas 76 patients, a first CRB event. Multivariate logistic regression results show that age of 75 or older, prior bleeding and male gender are associated with major bleeding events. On the other hand, prior gastrointestinal bleeding, a haematocrit value of less than 30% and renal impairment are independent predictors of CRB events. All the BRSs show a satisfactory calibration for major and CRB events. Among these BRSs, only HEMORR 2 HAGES (C-statistic = 0.71, 95% CI 0.60-0.82, P performance for major bleeding events. All the 6 BRSs, however, lack acceptable predictive performance for CRB events. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evaluation study of the predictive performance of these 6 BRSs on clinically relevant bleeding events applied to

  14. Sequence Alterations of I(Ks Potassium Channel Genes in Kazakhstani Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainur Akilzhanova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia, and it results in significant morbidity and mortality. However, the pathogenesis of AF remains unclear to date. Recently, more pieces of evidence indicated that AF is a multifactorial disease resulting from the interaction between environmental factors and genetics. Recent studies suggest that genetic mutation of the slow delayed rectifier potassium channel (I(Ks may underlie AF.Objective. To investigate sequence alterations of I(Ks potassium channel genes KCNQ1, KCNE1 and KCNE2 in Kazakhstani patients with atrial fibrillation.Methods. Genomic DNA of 69 cases with atrial fibrillation and 27 relatives were analyzed for mutations in all protein-coding exons and their flanking splice site regions of the genes KCNQ1 (NM_000218.2 and NM_181798.1, KCNE1 (NM_000219.2, and KCNE2 (NM_172201.1 using bidirectional sequencing on the ABI 3730xL DNA Analyzer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA.Results. In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 39 of the 69 (56.5% index cases. Of these, altered sequence variants in the KCNQ1 gene accounted for 14.5% of the mutations, whereas a KCNE1 mutation accounted for 43.5% of the mutations and KCNE2 mutation accounted for 1.4% of the mutations. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. We found two sequence variants in KCNQ1 exon 13 (S546S G1638A and exon 16 (Y662Y, C1986T in ten patients (14.5%. In KCNE1 gene in exon 3 mutation, S59G A280G was observed in 30 of 69 patients (43.5% and KCNE2 exon 2 T10K C29A in 1 patient (1.4%. Genetic cascade screening of 27 relatives to the 69 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 26.9% mutation carriers  who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death.Conclusion. In this cohort of Kazakhstani index cases with AF, a disease-causing mutation was identified in

  15. Clinical profile and therapeutic management of patients with atrial fibrillation in Greece: results from the Registry of Atrial Fibrillation to Investigate New Guidelines (RAFTING).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Pipilis, Athanasios; Antoniou, Anna; Kaliambakos, Sotirios; Goudevenos, John; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria; Pyrgakis, Vlassios; Parcharidis, Georgios; Lekakis, John

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia with significant morbidity, including a 5-fold increase in stroke risk. The management of AF, including antithrombotic therapy (AT), varies considerably among countries. Representative data concerning AF features and management in Greece are generally lacking. The Registry of Atrial Fibrillation To Investigate New Guidelines (RAFTING) is a country-wide prospective observational study of AF in Greece that enrolled consecutive patients with a diagnosis of AF in emergency departments of 31 hospitals of different types according to the population's geographical distribution. RAFTING enrolled 1127 patients, 51% females, aged 71 ± 12 years. Paroxysmal AF was present in 54% of patients and newly diagnosed AF in 28%; 68% of patients with a previous AF history had undergone a median of 4 cardioversions. A high rate of comorbidities was present, including arterial hypertension in 75% and heart failure in 40%. The median CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VASc scores were 2 and 3, respectively; AT had been prescribed in 87% of non-newly diagnosed patients, with warfarin being prescribed in 56% of them. Among all patients on warfarin, INR values were within therapeutic range in 34% of cases during inhospital measurement. Hospital admission occurred in 82% of cases, with in-hospital mortality 0.8%. RAFTING provides updated insights into the current features and management of AF in Greece. The majority of patients have a sufficiently high risk to warrant oral anticoagulation and further attempts to comply with the existing guidelines are warranted.

  16. Foreign patients in ER: receiving, understanding, treating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Dal Molin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years the presence of foreign patients inside Emergency Departments is increased, this means many problems, like misunderstanding, communication difficulties and more problematic situations when, our work or our expectations meet the values sideboards and life style of our patients. This article purpose is to describe this phenomenon inside Biella Emergency Departments, because if you know a situation you can solve it better.

  17. Treatment Outcomes in Patients Receiving Combination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    196) was 20.3 deaths per 100 patient-months; 31.6 % occurred in < 30 days while 52.6 % occurred post-120 days of treatment. ... The level of adherence reported after 18 months on ART was 73.8 %. Conclusion: In this setting, patients ..... taking one to three pills per day while 36.2 % were taking at least five pills per day.

  18. Benefits of Permanent His Bundle Pacing Combined With Atrioventricular Node Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation Patients With Heart Failure With Both Preserved and Reduced Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijian; Su, Lan; Wu, Shengjie; Xu, Lei; Xiao, Fangyi; Zhou, Xiaohong; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2017-04-01

    Clinical benefits from His bundle pacing (HBP) in heart failure patients with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction are still inconclusive. This study evaluated clinical outcomes of permanent HBP in atrial fibrillation patients with narrow QRS who underwent atrioventricular node ablation for heart failure symptoms despite rate control by medication. The study enrolled 52 consecutive heart failure patients who underwent attempted atrioventricular node ablation and HBP for symptomatic atrial fibrillation. Echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, New York Heart Association classification and use of diuretics for heart failure were assessed during follow-up visits after permanent HBP. Of 52 patients, 42 patients (80.8%) received permanent HBP and atrioventricular node ablation with a median 20-month follow-up. There was no significant change between native and paced QRS duration (107.1±25.8 versus 105.3±23.9 milliseconds, P =0.07). Left ventricular end-diastolic dimension decreased from the baseline ( P heart failure with reduced ejection fraction patients (N=20) than in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction patients (N=22). New York Heart Association classification improved from a baseline 2.9±0.6 to 1.4±0.4 after HBP in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction patients and from a baseline 2.7±0.6 to 1.4±0.5 after HBP in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction patients. After 1 year of HBP, the numbers of patients who used diuretics for heart failure decreased significantly ( P Heart Association classification and reduced diuretics use for heart failure management in atrial fibrillation patients with narrow QRS who suffered from heart failure with preserved or reduced ejection fraction. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  19. Sequential changes in renal function and the risk of stroke and death in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yutao; Wang, Haijun; Zhao, Xiaoning; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Dexian; Ma, Jingling; Wang, Yutang; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2013-10-12

    Renal dysfunction has been proposed for the risk factor for stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation (AF). The impact of changes in renal dysfunction over time and the relationship to stroke and bleeding risk in these patients remain unknown. We investigated sequential change in renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) and the risk for clinical events (ischaemic stroke, death and major bleeding) over time in a cohort of 617 AF patients followed up for 2 years. eGFR was estimated at baseline, 6 months and 12 months using three formulas (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation, MDRD, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, CKD-EPI, and Cockcroft-Gault equation). Changes in eGFR and the risk for clinical events were analysed by Cox models, receiver operating curves (ROC), and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. When patients with eGFR≤60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) were compared to patients with eGFR>60 ml/min/1.73 m(2), there was an increase over time in stroke or death, or death, with impaired renal function (all pstroke or death, death, and ischaemic stroke at 6 months (all pstroke or death in patients with AF (c-indexes: 0.57 to 0.61, pstroke or death', 'death' or (at 6 months) ischaemic stroke. Deteriorating renal function increases the risk of death in AF patients. © 2013.

  20. Prevalence and predictors of low voltage zones in the left atrium in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huo, Yan; Gaspar, Thomas; Pohl, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To describe the extent and distribution of low voltage zones (LVZ) in a large cohort of patients undergoing ablation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), and to explore baseline predictors of LVZ in these patients. Methods and results: Consecutive patients who underwent...... was present in 58 out of 292 patients with paroxysmal and 134 out of 247 persistent AF (P paroxysmal AF, 5 cm2 (IQR 3-18.6) vs. 12.1 cm2 (IQR 3.6-28.5), P = 0.026, respectively. In the multivariate analysis age (OR 1.07, 95%CI 1...... of LVZ. Conclusion: In a large cohort of patients undergoing ablation for AF, the prevalence of LVZ was higher and LVZ areas larger in patients with persistent as compared with paroxysmal AF. The most frequent localization of LVZ was anterior wall, septum and posterior wall. Presence of LVZ...

  1. Anemia predicts thromboembolic events, bleeding complications and mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation : insights from the RE-LY trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. D.; Alings, M.; Connolly, S. J.; Eikelboom, J.; Ezekowitz, M. D.; Oldgren, J.; Yang, S.; Pongue, J.; Yusuf, S.; Wallentin, L.; van Gilst, W. H.

    BackgroundAnemia may predispose to thromboembolic events or bleeding in anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). ObjectivesTo investigate whether anemia is associated with thromboembolic events and bleeding in patients with AF. Patients and methodsWe retrospectively analyzed the RE-LY

  2. Should patients with schizophrenia receive antidepressants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Stenberg, Jan-Henry; Joffe, Grigori

    Antipsychotics play a key role in the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia, and monotherapy is effective for most patients. Achieving an optimal treatment response is, however, often difficult. Combining an antidepressant drug to the antipsychotic regimen could potentially improve treatment outcomes, although the evidence supporting the use of such combinations is limited and contradictory. Positive evidence has mostly been obtained from the efficacy of antidepressants acting on monoamine receptors on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. These receptor-active drugs may also improve cognition in schizophrenic patients. In the light of current knowledge, antidepressants do not appear to potentiate the psychotic symptoms of schizophrenic patients. However, there is no robust evidence of the efficacy of antidepressants in the treatment of schizophrenia-related depression, and thus monotherapy with an antipsychotic drug is recommended for treating it. If using antidepressants in addition to antipsychotics is deemed necessary, the risk of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions should be kept in mind.

  3. Predictors for trismus in patients receiving radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geer, S Joyce; Kamstra, Jolanda I; Roodenburg, Jan L N; van Leeuwen, Marianne; Reintsema, Harry; Langendijk, Johannes A; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2016-11-01

    Trismus, a restricted mouth opening in head and neck cancer patients may be caused by tumor infiltration in masticatory muscles, radiation-induced fibrosis or scarring after surgery. It may impede oral functioning severely. The aims of our study were to determine: (1) the incidence of trismus at various time points; and (2) the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics that predict the development of trismus after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients using a large database (n = 641). Maximal mouth opening was measured prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 months after radiotherapy. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed as potential predictors for trismus using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. At six months after radiotherapy, 28.1% of the patients without trismus prior to radiotherapy developed trismus for the first time. At subsequent time points the incidence declined. Over a total period of 48 months after radiotherapy, the incidence of trismus was 3.6 per 10 person years at risk. Patients who had tumors located in the oral cavity, oropharynx or nasopharynx, and the salivary glands or ear, and who had a longer overall treatment time of radiotherapy, were more likely to develop trismus in the first six months after radiotherapy. Maximal mouth opening was a predictor for developing trismus at all time points. Incidence of trismus is 3.6 per 10 person years at risk. Tumor localization and overall treatment time of radiotherapy are predictors for developing trismus the first six months after radiotherapy. Maximal mouth opening is a significant predictor for developing trismus at all time points. Regular measurements of maximal mouth opening are needed to predict trismus.

  4. Incidence and Risk Factors of Ventricular Fibrillation Before Primary Angioplasty in Patients With First ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Reza; Engstrøm, Thomas; Glinge, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate the incidence and risk factors for ventricular fibrillation (VF) before primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) among patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in a prospective nationwide setting. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this case...... analysis identified novel associations between atrial fibrillation and alcohol consumption with VF. Patients with a history of atrial fibrillation had a 2.80-fold odds of experiencing VF before PPCI (95% CI 1.10 to 7.30). Compared with nondrinkers, patients who consumed 1 to 7 units, 8 to 14 units, or >15...... associated with VF occurring out-of-hospital or on arrival at the emergency room before PPCI in STEMI patients, thus providing potential avenues for investigation regarding improved identification and prevention of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias....

  5. The expression levels of plasma micoRNAs in atrial fibrillation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Yuzhou; Wang, Sihua; Ye, Ping; Miao, Xiaoping; Xia, Jiahong

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) has been found in human blood. It has been increasingly suggested that miRNAs may serve as biomarkers for diseases. We examined the potential of circulating miRNA to serve as predictors of atrial fibrillation (AF). During the discovery stage of this project, we used massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) to carry out an in-depth analysis of the miRNA expression profile (miRNome) in 5 healthy controls, 5 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) alone, and 5 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (PersAF) alone. Twenty-two specific miRNAs were found to be dysregulated in each PAF group, PersAF group, or control group. Four candidate microRNAs (miRNA-146a, miRNA-150, miRNA-19a, and miRNA-375) met our selection criteria and were evaluated in an independent cohort of 90 plasma samples using TaqMan miRNA quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We found miRNA-150 levels to be reduced by a factor of approximately 17 in PAF relative to controls and a factor of approximately 20 in PersAF relative to controls (Pexpression levels (odds ratio [OR] 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 3.57, Pgenes related to AF were part of the inflammatory response system. We found that plasma levels of CRP were negatively correlated with the plasma levels of miRNA-150. In summary, we firstly found that plasma miRNA-150 levels in from AF patients were substantially lower than that from healthy people. Circulating reduced miRNA-150 was significantly associated with AF.

  6. Anticoagulant use for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: findings from a multi-payer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kathleen; Bozkaya, Duygu; Patel, Aarti A; Macomson, Brian; Nelson, Winnie; Owens, Gary; Mody, Samir; Schein, Jeff; Menzin, Joseph

    2014-07-28

    Oral anticoagulation is recommended for stroke prevention in intermediate/high stroke risk atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of analytic software tools for descriptive analyses of disease management in atrial AF; a secondary objective is to demonstrate patterns of potential anticoagulant undertreatment in AF. Retrospective data analyses were performed using the Anticoagulant Quality Improvement Analyzer (AQuIA), a software tool designed to analyze health plan data. Two-year data from five databases were analyzed: IMS LifeLink (IMS), MarketScan Commercial (MarketScanCommercial), MarketScan Medicare Supplemental (MarketScanMedicare), Clinformatics™ DataMart, a product of OptumInsight Life Sciences (Optum), and a Medicaid Database (Medicaid). Included patients were ≥ 18 years old with a new or existing diagnosis of AF. The first observed AF diagnosis constituted the index date, with patient outcomes assessed over a one year period. Key study measures included stroke risk level, anticoagulant use, and frequency of International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring. High stroke risk (CHADS2 ≥ 2 points) was estimated in 54% (IMS), 22% (MarketScanCommercial), 64% (MarketscanMedicare), 42% (Optum) and 62% (Medicaid) of the total eligible population. Overall, 35%, 29%, 38%, 39% and 16% of all AF patients received an anticoagulant medication in IMS, MarketScanCommercial, MarketScanMedicare, Optum and Medicaid, respectively. Among patients at high risk for stroke, 19% to 51% received any anticoagulant. The AQuIA provided a consistent platform for analysis across multiple AF populations with varying baseline characteristics. Analyzer results show that many high-risk AF patients in selected commercial, Medicare-eligible, and Medicaid populations do not receive appropriate thromboprophylaxis, as recommended by treatment guidelines.

  7. Predictors for trismus in patients receiving radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, S. Joyce; Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; van Leeuwen, Marianne; Reintsema, Harry; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trismus, a restricted mouth opening in head and neck cancer patients may be caused by tumor infiltration in masticatory muscles, radiation-induced fibrosis or scarring after surgery. It may impede oral functioning severely. The aims of our study were to determine: (1) the incidence of

  8. Which oral anticoagulant for which atrial fibrillation patient: recent clinical trials and evidence-based choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, John A

    2013-10-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend oral anticoagulant therapy for most patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation with more than a low risk of stroke. Although warfarin is very effective and the risk of major bleeding is acceptable, the use of the drug is challenging for patients and physicians. The 3 novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, have been shown to be either noninferior or superior to warfarin for the prevention of stroke and/or systemic embolism and their rates of major bleeding are no greater than warfarin. They are much easier for patients to use and for physicians to manage. Except for certain situations in which the NOACs have not been evaluated or some feature of warfarin is preferable, clinical guidelines generally recommend a preference for a NOAC over warfarin when oral anticoagulation is indicated. Although the NOACs have many similarities in their advantageous pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, there are a number of difference between them with regard to particular patient characteristics (eg, age ≥ 75 years, renal dysfunction, coronary artery disease, venous thromboembolism, risk of bleeding, prior stroke and/or transient ischemic attack, side effects, dose regimens, and cost-effectiveness). These differences are outlined and discussed in terms of their potential relevance in deciding among the 3 available NOACs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients treated with catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt

    2016-01-01

    ) versus 20.7mL kg(-1) min(-1), p of main effect=0.003, p of interaction between time and intervention=0.020). No significant difference between groups on Short Form-36 was found (53.8 versus 51.9 points, P=.20). Two serious adverse events (atrial fibrillation in relation to physical exercise and death...... unrelated to rehabilitation) occurred in the cardiac rehabilitation group versus one in the usual care group (death unrelated to intervention) (P=.56). In the cardiac rehabilitation group 16 patients versus 7 in the usual care group reported non-serious adverse events (P=.047). CONCLUSION: Comprehensive...

  10. Prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation – new anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Holthausen Campos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors present alternatives for the treatment of cardiacarrhythmias. Its detection is based on the use of different methods that record the cardiac electrical activity. The treatment involves intervening in the underlying disorder, antiarrhythmic drugs, stimulation and cardiac defibrillation devices, and, less often, surgery. The technological advances in the last two decades have provided greater efficiency in diagnoses and therapy. Atrial fibrilation patients will benefit from a new set of anticoagulant drugs tested in the past three years. The potential advantages include greater safety and efficacy, as well as conveniencefor not requiring frequent laboratory controls.

  11. Successful Catheter Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in a Patient with Double-chambered Right Ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioji, Keisuke; Kurita, Takashi; Kawai, Takafumi; Uegaito, Takashi; Motoki, Koichiro; Matsuda, Mitsuo; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe an adult case of double-chambered right ventricle (DCRV) with symptomatic drug-intolerant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAf). The woman was referred to undergo radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and mapping of the pulmonary veins (PVs) demonstrated that a spontaneous spike potential originating from the left inferior PV (LIPV) induced sustained Af in the second procedure. Accordingly, the LIPV was regarded as the arrhythmogenic PV. Since complete isolation of the PVs, the sinus rhythm has been maintained for at least two years. This is the first report to describe that RFA for drug-intolerant PAf was useful in a patient with DCRV.

  12. Tachycardia-Induced J-Wave Changes in Patients With and Without Idiopathic Ventricular Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Takatsuki, Seiji; Nishiyama, Takahiko; Kimura, Takehiro; Kohsaka, Shun; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Inden, Yasuya; Takahashi, Naohiko; Nagase, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Fukuda, Keichi

    2017-07-01

    To know the underlying mechanisms of J waves, the response to atrial pacing was studied in patients with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) and patients with non-IVF. In 8 patients with IVF, the J-wave amplitude was measured before, during, and after atrial pacing. All patients had episodes of ventricular fibrillation without structural heart disease. The responses of J waves were compared with those of the 17 non-IVF control subjects who revealed J waves but no history of cardiac arrest and underwent electrophysiological study. The IVF patients were younger than the non-IVF patients (28±10 versus 52±14 years, respectively; P =0.002) and had larger J waves with more extensive distribution. J waves decreased from 0.35±0.26 to 0.22±0.23 mV ( P =0.025) when the RR intervals were shortened from 782±88 to 573±162 ms ( P =0.001). A decrease (≥0.05 mV) in the J-wave amplitude was observed in 6 of the 8 patients. In addition, 1 patient showed a distinct reduction of J waves in the unipolar epicardial leads. In contrast, J waves were augmented in the 17 non-IVF subjects from 0.27±0.09 to 0.38±0.10 mV ( P J waves to rapid pacing suggest different mechanisms: early repolarization in IVF patients and conduction delay in non-IVF patients. The response to atrial pacing was different between the IVF and non-IVF patients, which suggests the presence of different mechanisms for the genesis of J waves. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. High Incidence of De Novo and Subclinical Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Cardiac Rhythm Management Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Iris; Witzel, Katrin; Münch, Julia; Pecha, Simon; Blankenberg, Stephan; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Willems, Stephan; Patten, Monica; Aydin, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important prognostic parameter in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Though cardiac rhythm management (CRM) devices (e.g., ICD, pacemaker or implantable loop recorder) can detect subclinical AF, data describing the incidence of AF are rare. We therefore investigated the incidence and clinical impact of de novo and subclinical AF detected by CRM devices in patients with HCM. In our retrospective single-center study, we included patients with HCM and need for CRM devices. The primary endpoint of the study was the incidence of clinical and subclinical de novo AF. During follow-up, patients were screened for adverse events like stroke, ventricular arrhythmia, heart failure, or death. From 192 HCM patients, 44 patients received a CRM device (38 ICDs, 5 pacemakers, 1 implantable loop recorder). In 14 of these patients (32%), AF had been documented before device implantation. Thirty (68%) patients were free from AF at the time of implantation. During a median follow-up of 595 days (interquartile range, 367-890 days), de novo AF was recorded in 16 of these 30 patients (53%). Fourteen (88%) of the 16 patients with de novo AF were free from any clinical symptoms, so these patients were classified to have subclinical AF. In logistic regression analysis, age was the only significant predictor for an increased risk of AF. AF is common in patients with HCM who need a CRM device. More than 50% of these patients develop de novo AF that was predominantly subclinical in our cohort. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Opportunistic screening for atrial fibrillation versus detecting symptomatic patients aged 65 years and older: A cluster-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Blanco, Virginia; Pérula de Torres, Luis Ángel; Martín Rioboó, Enrique; Martínez Adell, Miguel Ángel; Parras Rejano, Juan Manuel; González Lama, Jesús; Ruiz Moruno, Javier; Martín Alvarez, Remedios; Fernández García, José Ángel; Ruiz de Castroviejo, Joaquin; Roldán Villalobos, Ana; Ruiz Moral, Roger

    2017-01-06

    The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of opportunistic screening through pulse palpation in the early detection of atrial fibrillation in subjects aged≥65 years versus detection through an active search for patients with symptoms and/or complications and sequelae associated. This was a cluster randomized controlled trial performed in 48 primary care centers of the Spanish National Healthcare System. A total of 368 physicians and nurses were randomized. The researchers in the experimental group (EG) performed opportunistic screening for auricular fibrillation, whereas the researchers in the control group (CG) actively searched for symptomatic patients. An ECG was performed on patients found to have an irregular heartbeat to confirm the diagnosis of auricular fibrillation. A total of 5,465 patients with a mean age of 75.61 years were recruited for the EG, and 1,525 patients with a mean age of 74.07 years were recruited for the CG. Of these, 58.6% were female, without significant differences between groups. Pulse was irregular in 4.3 and 15.0% of the patients in the EG and the CG, respectively (P<.001). A total of 164 new cases of atrial fibrillation were detected (2.3%), 1.1% in the EG and 6.7% in the CG (adjusted OR: 0.29; 95% CI 0.18-0.45). Case finding for atrial fibrillation in patients aged≥65 years with symptoms or signs suggestive of atrial fibrillation is a more effective strategy than opportunistic screening through pulse palpation in asymptomatic patients. The trial is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01291953; February 8, 2011). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order...

  16. Alterations in gene expression of proteins involved in the calcium handling in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gelder, IC; Brundel, BJJM; Henning, RH; Tuinenburg, AE; Tieleman, RG; Deelman, L; Grandjean, JG; De Kam, PJ; Van Gilst, WH; Crijns, HJGM

    Gene Expression in Human Atrial Fibrillation, Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF) leads to a loss of atrial contraction within hours to days. During persistence of AF, cellular dedifferentiation and hypertrophy occur, eventually resulting in degenerative changes and cell death, Abnormalities in

  17. A randomized study of the effects of exercise training on patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip Samuel; Mourier, Malene; Kjaer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Exercise training is beneficial in ischemic and congestive heart disease. However, the effect on atrial fibrillation (AF) is unknown.......Exercise training is beneficial in ischemic and congestive heart disease. However, the effect on atrial fibrillation (AF) is unknown....

  18. Rivaroxaban vs. warfarin in Japanese patients with atrial fibrillation – the J-ROCKET AF study –.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Masatsugu; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Tanahashi, Norio; Momomura, Shin-ichi; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Goto, Shinya; Izumi, Tohru; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Kajikawa, Mariko; Kato, Masaharu; Ueda, Hitoshi; Iwamoto, Kazuya; Tajiri, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    The global ROCKET AF study evaluated once-daily rivaroxaban vs. warfarin for stroke and systemic embolism prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). A separate trial, J-ROCKET AF, compared the safety of a Japan-specific rivaroxaban dose with warfarin administered according to Japanese guidelines in Japanese patients with AF. J-ROCKET AF was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, phase III trial. Patients (n=1,280) with non-valvular AF at increased risk for stroke were randomized to receive 15 mg once-daily rivaroxaban or warfarin dose-adjusted according to Japanese guidelines. The primary objective was to determine non-inferiority of rivaroxaban against warfarin for the principal safety outcome of major and non-major clinically relevant bleeding, in the on-treatment safety population. The primary efficacy endpoint was the composite of stroke and systemic embolism. Non-inferiority of rivaroxaban to warfarin was confirmed; the rate of the principal safety outcome was 18.04% per year in rivaroxaban-treated patients and 16.42% per year in warfarin-treated patients (hazard ratio [HR] 1.11; 95% confidence interval 0.87-1.42; PROCKET AF demonstrated the safety of a Japan-specific rivaroxaban dose and supports bridging the global ROCKET AF results into Japanese clinical practice.

  19. Coronary surgery in patients with preexisting chronic atrial fibrillation: early and midterm clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Chris A; Angelini, Gianni D; Culliford, Lucy A; Capoun, Radek; Ascione, Raimondo

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of preexisting atrial fibrillation on early and midterm clinical outcome in patients undergoing coronary surgery. All elective patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgery between April 1996 and September 2002 were investigated. Patients were grouped according to their preoperative cardiac rhythm: sinus rhythm (SR) or preexisting atrial fibrillation (AF). In-hospital clinical outcomes and 5-year patient survival and cardiac-related event-free survival were compared using regression methods to adjust for differences between the groups. In all, 5,092 patients were identified, 175 (3.4%) with a history of preexisting AF. These patients were older (median, 64 versus 68 years) and had higher Parsonnet scores (median, 4 versus 8) than the SR group. Previous myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, peripheral vascular disease, ejection fraction less than 50%, previous surgery, congestive heart failure, and use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were also more common in the AF group. There were 60 in-hospital deaths (1.2%), with no difference between the two groups (odds ratio 1.02, 95% CI: 0.35 to 2.94). Atrial fibrillation patients were more likely to need intraoperative inotropes (p = 0.044), postoperative intra-aortic balloon pump (p = 0.038), and were less likely to be discharged within 6 days (p = 0.017). The risk of death in the 5 years after surgery was higher in the AF group (relative risk 1.49, 95% CI: 1.06 to 2.08, p = 0.020). In the AF group, 109 (62.2%) patients were cardioverted spontaneously by surgery, but only 69 (39.4%) remained in SR until discharge. Longer-term rhythm follow-up data were available for 48 of these 69 patients, and only 36 remained in SR at a median follow-up of 1,483 days (interquartile range, 1,120 to 2,209). Spontaneous conversion to SR after surgery did not confer a midterm survival benefit (p = 0

  20. Sexual function in hypertensive patients receiving treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Reffelmann

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Thorsten Reffelmann, Robert A KlonerUniversity of Southern California, The Heart Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: In many forms of erectile dysfunction (ED, cardiovascular risk factors, in particular arterial hypertension, seem to be extremely common. While causes for ED are related to a broad spectrum of diseases, a generalized vascular process seems to be the underlying mechanism in many patients, which in a large portion of clinical cases involves endothelial dysfunction, ie, inadequate vasodilation in response to endothelium-dependent stimuli, both in the systemic vasculature and the penile arteries. Due to this close association of cardiovascular disease and ED, patients with ED should be evaluated as to whether they may suffer from cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, cardiovascular disease or silent myocardial ischemia. On the other hand, cardiovascular patients, seeking treatment of ED, must be evaluated in order to decide whether treatment of ED or sexual activity can be recommended without significantly increased cardiac risk. The guideline from the first and second Princeton Consensus Conference may be applied in this context. While consequent treatment of cardiovascular risk factors should be accomplished in these patients, many antihypertensive drugs may worsen sexual function as a drug specific side-effect. Importantly, effective treatment for arterial hypertension should not be discontinued as hypertension itself may contribute to altered sexual functioning; to the contrary, alternative antihypertensive regimes should be administered with individually tailored drug regimes with minimal side-effects on sexual function. When phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, such as sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil, are prescribed to hypertensive patients on antihypertensive drugs, these combinations of antihypertensive drugs and

  1. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation usage according to age among patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Gadsbøll, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, Danish nationwide registries (2011-2015) were used to examine temporal trends of initiation patterns of oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment according to age. Overall, 43,299 AF patients initiating vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (42%), dabigatran (29......%), rivaroxaban (13%), or apixaban (16%) were included with mean age (SD) 72.1 (11.3), 71.5 (11.0), 74.3 (11.1), and 75.3 (11.1) years, respectively. Patients aged ≥85 years comprised 15%. Trend tests showed increase in patients ≥85 years initiating OAC (p ....0001). This decrease was independent of age. Dabigatran was the most common non-VKA OAC (NOAC) (40% users), but usage decreased from 2014 until study end (6%) (p aged

  2. Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation in a patient with cor triatriatum sinister demonstrating a total common trunk of the pulmonary vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Michifumi; Yamane, Teiichi; Tokutake, Kenichi; Yokoyama, Kenichi; Hioki, Mika; Narui, Ryohsuke; Tanigawa, Shin-Ichi; Yamashita, Seigo; Inada, Keiichi; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2016-02-01

    A 57-year-old male with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) was referred for catheter ablation. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) revealed that a membrane divided the left atrium into two chambers, thus indicating the presence of cor triatriatum sinister. A 3D image reconstructed by MDCT showed that the accessory atrium received the left common and the right side PVs, as if it were a total common trunk, and this then flowed into the main atrium. After isolation of the pulmonary vein and posterior wall from the left atrium, AF could not be induced by any programmed pacing. The patient has remained free from AF during the 1 year of follow-up.

  3. Antithrombotic therapy use and clinical outcomes following thrombo-embolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from ARISTOTLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shinya; Merrill, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Hanna, Michael; Avezum, Alvaro; Easton, J Donald; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Huber, Kurt; Lewis, Basil S; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Zhu, Jun; Granger, Christopher B; Lopes, Renato D; Alexander, John H

    2018-04-01

    We investigated baseline characteristics, antithrombotic use, and clinical outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a thrombo-embolic event in the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) study to better inform the care of these high-risk patients. Thrombo-embolic events were defined as stroke (ischaemic or unknown cause) or systemic embolism (SE). Clinical outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. All-cause mortality and International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) major bleeding after events were analysed using a Cox proportional hazards model with time-dependent covariates. Of 18 201 patients in ARISTOTLE, 365 experienced a thrombo-embolic event [337 strokes (ischaemic or unknown cause), 28 SE]; 46 (12.6%) of which were fatal. In the 30 days before and after a thrombo-embolic event, 11% and 37% of patients, respectively, were not taking an oral anticoagulant. During follow-up (median 1.8 years), 22 patients (7.1%/year) had a recurrent stroke, 97 (30.1%/year) died, and 10 (6.7%/year) had major bleeding. Compared with patients without a thrombo-embolic event, the short- and long-term adjusted hazards of death in patients with a thrombo-embolic event were high [≤30 days: hazard ratio (HR) 54.3%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 41.4-71.3; >30 days: HR 3.5, 95% CI 2.5-4.8; both P < 0.001]. The adjusted hazards of major bleeding were also high short-term (HR 10.37, 95% CI 3.87-27.78; P < 0.001) but not long-term (HR 1.7, 95% CI: 0.77-3.88; P = 0.18). Thrombo-embolic events were rare but associated with high short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. Substantial numbers of patients are not receiving oral anticoagulattherapy before and, despite this risk, after a first thrombo-embolic event. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00412984).

  4. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application.

  5. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  6. Prognostic impact of hs-CRP and IL-6 in patients undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Kristoffer Mads Aaris; Nilsson, Brian; Bruunsgaard, Helle

    2008-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of inflammatory markers in patients with paroxysmal/ persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) treated with radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation. Methods. Forty-six consecutive patients, mean age 55 years (range 31 - 81 yrs), with paroxysmal...

  7. Effect of nebivolol on outcome in elderly patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation : insights from SENIORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Bart A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Boehm, Michael; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Babalis, Daphne; Roughton, Michael; Flather, Marcus D.; Coats, Andrew J. S.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial effects of beta-blockade remain unclear in heart failure patients who have atrial fibrillation (AF), especially in the elderly. We evaluated the effect of nebivolol on cardiovascular outcomes in elderly patients with heart failure and AF. The SENIORS trial showed an overall benefit of

  8. International longitudinal registry of patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kakkar, A.K.; Mueller, I.; Bassand, J.P.; Fitzmaurice, D.A.; Goldhaber, S.Z.; Goto, S.; Haas, S.; Hacke, W.; Lip, G.Y.; Mantovani, L.G.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Jamal, W.; Misselwitz, F.; Rushton-Smith, S.; Turpie, A.G.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Patients with AF carry a fivefold increased risk of stroke and the risk of death from AF-related stroke is doubled. Current management is often inadequate, leaving patients at risk for a potentially fatal

  9. The incidence and prognostic significance of new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with acute myocardial infarction and left ventricular systolic dysfunction: a CARISMA substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jons, Christian; Jacobsen, Uffe G; Joergensen, Rikke Moerch

    2011-01-01

    The incidence and risk associated with new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) occurring after discharge in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) remains unknown.......The incidence and risk associated with new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) occurring after discharge in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) remains unknown....

  10. Temporal changes of new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients randomized to surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Tarp, Julie Bjerre

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporal development of new-onset atrial fibrillation (NOAF) after aortic valve replacement is unclear, and opportunistic screening has limited diagnostic accuracy. This is the first study to investigate the incidence and temporal development of NOAF detected by implantable loop...... recorder (ILR) in patients with aortic stenosis, randomized to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). METHOD: An ILR was implanted in a subgroup of patients without pre-procedural atrial fibrillation (AF), randomized to SAVR or TAVR in the NOTION trial...

  11. Left atrial appendage closure devices for cardiovascular risk reduction in atrial fibrillation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Gonzalez I

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Cruz-Gonzalez,* Juan Carlos Rama-Merchan,* Javier Rodriguez-Collado, Javier Martin-Moreiras, Alejandro Diego-Nieto, Antonio Arribas-Jimenez, Pedro Luís SanchezDepartment of Cardiology, University Hospital of Cardiology and IBSAL, Salamanca, Spain *Ignacio Cruz-Gonzalez and Juan Carlos Rama-Merchan have contributed equally to this work and should be considered co-first authors Abstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia in clinical practice. AF is associated with a 4–5-fold increased risk of stroke and systemic embolism. Oral anticoagulant is the first-line therapy for this purpose, but it has various limitations and is often contraindicated or underutilized. Autopsy and surgical data have suggested that 90% of atrial thrombi in nonvalvular AF patients originate from the left atrial appendage, leading to the development of percutaneous closure for thromboembolic prevention. This paper examines the current evidence on left atrial appendage closure devices for cardiovascular risk reduction in AF patients. Keywords: atrial fibrillation, left atrial appendage, stroke, oral anticoagulant, percutaneous closure, thromboembolic prevention

  12. External electrical cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation in a patient with a Micra™ Transcatheter Pacing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, K; Bellmann, B; Lüker, J; Steven, D; Sultan, A

    We report a case of a 85-year old woman with a preexisting Transcatheter Pacing System (TPS) (Micra™ VR, Fa. Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) undergoing several external electrical cardioversions (CV) for symptomatic persistent atrial fibrillation (persAF). Due to bradycardia in the setting of atrial fibrillation a right apical TPS implantation was performed earlier. Four weeks prior to presentation at our facility an unsuccessful CV with a maximum biphasic energy level of 360J was performed, after which amiodarone was initiated. At the time of presentation three shocks with 100 J, 200 J and 360 J were delivered without sustained restoration of a stable sinus rhythm. Patches were in an anterior-posterior position. No complications and no significant changes in device parameters in comparison to the pre-acquired values were observed. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of an external CV in a patient with a TPS. External CV in patients with a preexisting TPS seems to be safe and feasible. Copyright © 2017 Indian Heart Rhythm Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Personalized Remote Monitoring of the Atrial Fibrillation Patients with Electronic Implant Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce B. Laleci

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIED are gaining popularity in treating patients with heart disease. Remote monitoring through care management systems enables continuous surveillance of such patients by checking device functions and clinical events. These care management systems include decision support capabilities based on clinical guidelines. Data input to such systems are from different information sources including medical devices and Electronic Health Records (EHRs. Although evidence-based clinical guidelines provides numerous benefits such as standardized care, reduced costs, efficient and effective care management, they are currently underutilized in clinical practice due to interoperability problems among different healthcare data sources. In this paper, we introduce the iCARDEA care management system for atrial fibrillation patients with implant devices and describe how the iCARDEA care plan engine executes the clinical guidelines by seamlessly accessing the EHR systems and the CIED data through standard interfaces.

  14. Stroke rehabilitation therapy in a patient with a cardiac pacemaker for chronic atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hikaru; Koike, Kimiko

    2003-12-01

    A 65-year-old man was implanted with an artificial pacemaker for chronic bradycardic atrial fibrillation associated with hypertensive heart disease. Five years after the pacemaker implantation, he suffered from a cerebral embolism. Approximately 4.5 months after the ictus, he was transferred to the rehabilitation ward. He had flaccid left hemiplegia and severe disuse syndrome. He could not sit and could tilt his head up for only two minutes because of severe orthostatic hypotension. By modulating the rate-responsive mode of the pacemaker every 2-4 weeks, we were able to rehabilitate the patient. Thus, the patient could sit in a wheelchair for more than three hours. This case emphasizes the importance of examining the mode and function of a previously implanted artificial pacemaker. In accord with varying rehabilitation programs and gradual improvement in a patient's physical activities, periodic modulation of a programmable pacemaker can lead to a better functional outcome during rehabilitation therapy.

  15. Atrial fibrillation management in older heart failure patients: a complex clinical problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pulignano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAtrial fibrillation (AF and heart failure (HF, two problems of growing prevalence as a consequence of the ageing population, are associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. AF and HF also share common risk factors and pathophysiologic processes such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, and valvular heart disease often occur together. Although elderly patients with both HF and AF are affected by worse symptoms and poorer prognosis, there is a paucity of data on appropriate management of these patients.MethodsPubMed was searched for studies on AF and older patients using the terms atrial fibrillation, elderly, heart failure, cognitive impairment, frailty, stroke, and anticoagulants.ResultsThe clinical picture of HF patients with AF is complex and heterogeneous with a higher prevalence of frailty, cognitive impairment, and disability. Because of the association of mental and physical impairment to non-administration of oral anticoagulants (OACs, screening for these simple variables in clinical practice may allow better strategies for intervention in this high-risk population. Since novel direct OACs (NOACs have a more favorable risk-benefit profile, they may be preferable to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs in many frail elderly patients, especially those at higher risk of falls. Moreover, NOACs are simple to administer and monitor and may be associated with better adherence and safety in patients with cognitive deficits and mobility impairments.ConclusionsLarge multicenter longitudinal studies are needed to examine the effects of VKAs and NOACs on long-term cognitive function and frailty; future studies should include geriatric conditions.

  16. [Analysis on long-term compliance of anticoagulation treatment and demands of disease management in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hui-juan; Su, Jiang-lian; Lin, Yun; Zeng, Zhe-chun; Wang, Jin-wen

    2010-08-24

    To analyze the long-term compliance of oral anticoagulant therapy and the demands of disease management in patient with atrial fibrillation (AF). Inpatients with AF taking warfarin were collected from Department of Internal Medicine from January 1 to December 31, 2008. Inpatients from departments of surgery, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dermatology and pediatrics and those on a previous warfarin therapy were excluded. The data of patient profiles, medical history and anticoagulant treatment were collected from electronic medical record. And the status of anticoagulant treatment one year later and demands of disease management were inquired by telephone. A total of 268 AF patients received a telephone survey. Among them, 145 patients (54.1%) continued taking warfarin. Gender, age, type of AF, duration of AF and history of ischemic stroke was not significantly associated with the compliance of anticoagulant treatment. The odds ratio was 1.74 (95%CI: 0.67-4.47), 0.87 (95%CI: 0.30-2.53), 1.59 (95%CI: 0.35-1.09), 1.09 (95%CI: 0.61-1.93) and 0.44 (95%CI: 0.12-1.60) respectively. Among patients on warfarin, INR was monitored monthly in 88 patients (60.7%) and 70 patients (48.3%) had an INR value of 2.0-3.0. Among 123 withdrawal patients, 88 patients (71.5%) terminated treatment within 6 month. The common reasons included patient ignorance about long-term anticoagulant treatment (35.0%) and switching to aspirin because of a poor effect (24.4%). About 80% of patients wished to obtain instructions about INR monitoring and adjustment of drug dosage. Among them, 196/268 patients (73.1%) wished for a regular follow-up. And 176/196 patients (89.8%) opted for a telephone follow-up and 150/176 patients (85.2%) wanted to receive monthly instructions. The compliance of anticoagulation treatment and the target-meeting proportion of INR value are relative low. And the common reasons of withdrawal are patient ignorance about long-term anticoagulant treatment and switching to

  17. Progression of atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with paroxysmal AF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Симонян

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This prospective randomized study was aimed to assess the progression of atrial fibrillation (AF after ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD in patients with paroxysmal AF by means of implantable cardiac monitors (ICM. Methods. The study enrolled 92 patients with paroxysmal AF, who were eligible either for catheter ablation or AAD. The patients were randomized into two groups: 1 AAD + ICM implantation (group I; n=46, and 2 AF catheter ablation (CA + ICM implantation (group II; n=46, and 2. The primary endpoint was AF progression according to ICM data. The AF progression was defined as AF burden > 30%. A complication rate after ablation procedure and side effects of AAD were determined as the secondary endpoints. The follow up of this study was 24 months. Results. By the end of the follow-up period, AF progression was observed in 27 (58.7% patients in the AAD group and 10 (21.7% patients in the CA group (р=0.0003; HR 0.37, 95% CI [0.17-0.76], р=0.007, Cox regression. 13 (28,3% patients in the AAD group and 2 (4.3% in the CA group (р=0.002 developed persistent AF. The complication rate in the AAD group was 24% (11 patients and 6.5 % (3 patients in the CA group (р=0.02.Conclusion. Radiofrequency ablation of AF leads to a significant decrease in AF progression when compared with antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with paroxysmal AF, which was confirmed by implantable cardiac monitors data.Received 12 July 2016. Accepted 22 August 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  18. Asymptomatic versus symptomatic episodes in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation via long-term monitoring with implantable loop recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simantirakis, E N; Papakonstantinou, P E; Chlouverakis, G I; Kanoupakis, E M; Mavrakis, H E; Kallergis, E M; Arkolaki, E G; Vardas, P E

    2017-03-15

    The presentation of atrial fibrillation (AF) varies remarkably, from totally asymptomatic to symptomatic patients, while the same individual may present symptomatic and asymptomatic episodes. We aimed to identify electrocardiographic differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic episodes and to find parameters related to the appearance of symptoms. Thirty consecutive patients (age 66.9±10years) with paroxysmal AF received an implantable loop recorder. Three types of episodes were defined: asymptomatic (ASx), symptomatic (Sx), and mixed asymptomatic-symptomatic (AS-Sx). The heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded during the first 2min of each ASx or Sx episode, and during the first 2min of both the symptomatic and asymptomatic periods in AS-Sx. Eighty-two episodes from twenty-five patients were evaluated. Mean HR was 142.48±25.84bpm for Sx and 95.71±19.29bpm for ASx (pASx (pASx were characterized by a lower HR and higher HRV compared to Sx. In As-Sx, the asymptomatic period was characterized by a lower HR and higher HRV compared to the symptomatic. These findings suggest a possible contribution of variations in the autonomic nervous system activity to the perception of the arrhythmia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of the Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin vs. Unfractionated Heparin as Bridging Therapy in Patients with Embolic Stroke due to Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiz, Farnia; Sedghi, Reyhane; Salehi, Alireza; Hatam, Nahid; Bahmei, Jamshid; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin

    2016-06-01

    Anticoagulation with adjusted dose warfarin is a well-accepted treatment for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Meanwhile, using bridging therapy with heparin or heparinoids before warfarin for initiation of anticoagulation is a matter of debate. We compared safety, efficacy, and tolerability of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin (UFH) as a bridging method in patients with recent ischemic stroke due to atrial fibrillation. This study was a randomized single-blind controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic stroke due to atrial fibrillation who were eligible for receiving warfarin and were randomly treated with 60 milligrams (mg) of LMWH (enoxaparin) subcutaneously every 12 h, or 1000 units/h of continuous intravenous heparin. The primary efficacy endpoints were recurrence of new ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction and/or death. The primary safety endpoint was central nervous system and/or systemic bleeding. Seventy-four subjects were recruited. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of two groups were matched. Composite endpoint outcome of new ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, and/or death in follow-up period was seen in 10 subjects (27.03%) in UFH group and in four subjects (10.81%) in LMWH group (p value: 0.136). All hemorrhages and symptomatic central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhages in follow-up period were in 7 (18.9%) and 4 (10.8%) patients in UFH group, in 5 (13.5%), and 3 (8.1%) patients in LMWH group (p values: 0.754 and 0.751), respectively. Drop out and major adverse-effects such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and drug hypersensitivity were not seen in any patient. Enoxaparin can be a safe and efficient alternative for UFH as bridging therapy.

  20. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with atrial fibrillation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeren, Melih; Demir, Rengin; Yigit, Zerrin; Gurses, Hulya N

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training on pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with atrial fibrillation. Prospective randomized controlled single-blind study. Cardiology department of a university hospital. A total of 38 patients with permanent atrial fibrillation were randomly allocated to either a treatment group (n = 19; age 66.2 years (8.8)) or a control group (n = 19; age 67.1 years (6.4)). The training group received inspiratory muscle training at 30% of maximal inspiratory pressure for 15 minutes twice a day, 7 days a week, for 12 weeks alongside the standard medical treatment. The control group received standard medical treatment only. Spirometry, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures and 6-minute walking distance was measured at the beginning and end of the study. There was a significant increase in maximal inspiratory pressure (27.94 cmH 2 O (8.90)), maximal expiratory pressure (24.53 cmH 2 O (10.34)), forced vital capacity (10.29% (8.18) predicted), forced expiratory volume in one second (13.88% (13.42) predicted), forced expiratory flow 25%-75% (14.82% (12.44) predicted), peak expiratory flow (19.82% (15.62) predicted) and 6-minute walking distance (55.53 m (14.13)) in the training group (p  0.05). Inspiratory muscle training can improve pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with atrial fibrillation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Patient values and preferences for antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation. A Narrative Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter S; Ji, Angela Tianshu; Kapanen, Anita; McClean, Alison

    2017-06-02

    Guidelines recommend that patients' values and preferences should be considered when selecting stroke prevention therapy for atrial fibrillation (SPAF). However, doing so is difficult, and tools to assist clinicians are sparse. We performed a narrative systematic review to provide clinicians with insights into the values and preferences of AF patients for SPAF antithrombotic therapy. Narrative systematic review of published literature from database inception. 1) What are patients' AF and SPAF therapy values and preferences? 2) How are SPAF therapy values and preferences affected by patient factors? 3) How does conveying risk information affect SPAF therapy preferences? and 4) What is known about patient values and preferences regarding novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for SPAF? Twenty-five studies were included. Overall study quality was moderate. Severe stroke was associated with the greatest disutility among AF outcomes and most patients value the stroke prevention efficacy of therapy more than other attributes. Utilities, values, and preferences about other outcomes and attributes of therapy are heterogeneous and unpredictable. Patients' therapy preferences usually align with their values when individualised risk information is presented, although divergence from this is common. Patients value the attributes of NOACs but frequently do not prefer NOACs over warfarin when all therapy-related attributes are considered. In conclusion, patients' values and preferences for SPAF antithrombotic therapy are heterogeneous and there is no substitute for directly clarifying patients' individual values and preferences. Research using choice modelling and tools to help clinicians and patients clarify their SPAF therapy values and preferences are needed.

  2. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: On-treatment analysis of the randomized controlled MANTRA-PAF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Johannessen, Arne; Hindricks, Gerhard; Walfridsson, Håkan; Pehrson, Steen; Englund, Anders; Hartikainen, Juha; Kongstad, Ole; Mortensen, Leif Spange; Hansen, Peter Steen

    2015-11-01

    The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order to eliminate the clouding effect of crossover we performed an on-treatment analysis of the data. Patients (n=294) were divided into three groups: those receiving only the assigned therapy (RFA and AAD groups) and those receiving both therapies (crossover group). The primary end points were AF burden in 7-day Holter recordings at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months and cumulative AF burden in all recordings. At 24 months, AF burden was significantly lower in the RFA (n=110) than in the AAD (n=92) and the crossover (n=84) groups (90th percentile 1% vs. 10% vs. 16%, P=0.007), and more patients were free from any AF (89% vs. 73% vs. 74%, P=0.006). In the RFA, AAD and the crossover groups 63%, 59% and 21% (PPAF long-term efficacy of RFA was superior to AAD therapy. Thus, it is reasonable to offer RFA as first-line treatment for highly symptomatic patients who accept the risks of the procedure and are aware of frequent need for reablation(s). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Recurrent right atrial thrombus in a patient with atrial fibrillation and heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elikowski, Waldemar; Wróblewski, Dariusz; Małek-Elikowska, Małgorzata; Mazurek, Andrzej; Foremska-Iciek, Joanna; Łazowski, Stanisław

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation and heart failure are factors predisposing to locally formed intracardiac thrombosis, which is usually localized in left-sided chambers. A case report. The authors present a case of a 50-year-old male with permanent atrial fibrillation and dilated cardiomyopathy in whom recurrent right atrial thrombus was observed. Initially, the lesion was detected in echocardiography while he was hospitalized due to extensive right-sided pneumonia. The thrombus was successfully treated with heparin, followed by warfarin. Even though the patient continued warfarin use properly, there was recurrence of the thrombus two years later during a new episode of heart failure exacerbation. Because the thrombus was resistant to intensified anticoagulation, cardiac surgery was needed. A large (30 x 25 mm) pedunculated thrombus, as well as two smaller ones (each of 10 x 10 mm) attached closely to the atrial wall and previously not detected either by echocardiography or by magnetic resonance imaging, were excited. A partially organized pattern of the thrombi in histological examination can explain lack of anticoagulation effectiveness. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  4. Anemia predicts thromboembolic events, bleeding complications and mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the RE-LY trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenbrink, B D; Alings, M; Connolly, S J; Eikelboom, J; Ezekowitz, M D; Oldgren, J; Yang, S; Pongue, J; Yusuf, S; Wallentin, L; van Gilst, W H

    2015-05-01

    Anemia may predispose to thromboembolic events or bleeding in anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). To investigate whether anemia is associated with thromboembolic events and bleeding in patients with AF. We retrospectively analyzed the RE-LY trial database, which randomized 18 113 patients with AF and a risk of stroke to receive dabigatran or warfarin for a median follow-up of 2 years. Cox regression analysis was used to determine whether anemia predicted cardiovascular events and bleeding complications in these patients. Anemia was present in 12% of the population at baseline, and the presence of anemia was associated with a higher risk of thromboembolic cardiovascular events, including the composite endpoint of all-cause mortality or myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32-1.71) and the primary RE-LY outcome of stroke or systemic embolism (adjusted HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.12-1.78). Anemia was also associated with a higher risk of major bleeding complications (adjusted HR 2.14, 95% CI 1.87-2.46) and discontinuation of anticoagulants (adjusted HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.28-1.79). The association between anemia and outcome was similar irrespective of cardiovascular comorbidities, randomized treatment allocation, or prior use of warfarin. The incidence of events was lower in patients with transient anemia than in patients in whom anemia was sustained (adjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.49-0.91). Anemia is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic events, bleeding complications and mortality in anticoagulated patients with AF. These findings suggest that patients with anemia should be monitored closely during all types of anticoagulant treatment. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  5. Preventing bleeding and thromboembolic complications in atrial fibrillation patients undergoing surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles André

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurologists feel uneasy when asked about temporary anticoagulant interruption for surgery in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. Rational decisions can be made based on current scientific evidence. Method Critical review of international guidelines and selected references pertaining to bleeding and thromboembolism during periods of oral anticoagulant interruption. Results Withholding oral anticoagulants leads to an increased risk of perioperative thromboembolism, depending on factors such as age, renal and liver function, previous ischemic events, heart failure etc. Surgeries are associated with a variable risk of bleeding - from minimal to very high. Individualized decisions about preoperative drug suspension, bridging therapy with heparin and time to restart oral anticoagulants after hemostasis can significantly reduce these opposing risks. Conclusion Rational decisions can be made after discussion with all Health care team professionals involved and consideration of patient fears and expectations. Formal written protocols should help managing antithrombotic treatment during this delicate period.

  6. Contemporary stroke prevention strategies in 11 096 European patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Proietti, Marco; Laroche, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    % of patients, while no antithrombotic treatment was prescribed in 6.4%. On multivariable analysis, age, hypertension, previous ischaemic stroke, symptomatic AF and planned cardioversion or ablation were independent predictors of OAC use, whereas lone AF, previous haemorrhagic events, chronic kidney disease......Aims: Contemporary data regarding atrial fibrillation (AF) management and current use of oral anticoagulants (OACs) for stroke prevention are needed. Methods and results: The EURObservational Research Programme on AF (EORP-AF) Long-Term General Registry analysed consecutive AF patients presenting...... and admission for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or non-cardiovascular causes independently predicted OAC non-use. Regarding the OAC type, coronary artery disease, history of heart failure, or valvular heart disease, planned cardioversion and non-AF reasons for admission independently predicted the use...

  7. Coronary Artery Spasm during Cryoballoon Ablation in a Patient with Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Kazuhiro; Yamase, Yuichiro; Oishi, Hideo; Ikehara, Noriyuki; Asai, Yasushi

    2018-03-15

    The patient was a 63-year-old man with drug-resistant atrial fibrillation who developed coronary spasm during cryoballoon ablation (CBA). CBA was started from the left inferior pulmonary vein. ST elevations in II, III, and aVf, with reciprocal ST depressions in V2-5, occurred in association with chest pain just after balloon rewarming and deflation, and the patient's blood pressure fell to 50 mmHg. Coronary angiography revealed 90% diffuse stenosis from the orifice of segment 1 to segment 4 in the right coronary artery. The stenosis and ST elevations improved after the intracoronary injection of nitroglycerine. Using continuous peripheral intravenous coronary vasodilation, we electrically isolated the other pulmonary veins with CBA without incident.

  8. Sex differences in health status and rehabilitation outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Mette Kirstine; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Risom, Signe Stelling

    2018-01-01

    of a physical exercise program and psycho-educational consultations versus usual care. Sex disparities in health status were tested using Chi-square and t-tests. RESULTS: Included were: 151 men (median age 59.25 years) and 59 women (median age 62.5 years). At hospital discharge, women reported lower physical......BACKGROUND: Increased physical capacity after comprehensive rehabilitation in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing ablation has been found in the CopenHeartRFA trial. The purpose of this study was to investigate: (a) sex differences in health status, psychological distress and quality...... of life, (b) sex differences in rehabilitation outcomes and (c) predictors of effect of rehabilitation. METHODS: We conducted an exploratory analysis of data from the randomized CopenHeartRFA trial, where patients treated with ablation were randomized with 1:1 to comprehensive rehabilitation consisting...

  9. Validation of risk stratification schemes for predicting stroke and thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y H; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the individual risk factors composing the CHADS2 (Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age=75 years, Diabetes, previous Stroke) score and the CHA2DS2-VASc (CHA2DS2-Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, Sex category) score and to calculate the capability of the schemes...... and thromboembolism. Results Of 121 280 patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, 73 538 (60.6%) fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. In patients at “low risk” (score=0), the rate of thromboembolism per 100 person years was 1.67 (95% confidence interval 1.47 to 1.89) with CHADS2 and 0.78 (0.58 to 1...

  10. Risk factors responsible for atrial fibrillation development between symptomatic patients with concealed or manifest atrioventricular accessory pathways ?

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mu; Feng, Xiangfei; Sun, Jian; Wang, Qunshan; Zhang, Pengpai; Wang, Jun; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with manifest atrioventricular accessory pathways (mAPs) have a greater tendency to develop atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with patients with concealed atrioventricular accessory pathways (cAPs). However, the risk factors of developing AF in patients with various atrioventricular accessory pathways (APs) are not clear. Methods: This retrospective study included 460 symptomatic patients with either cAPs (n = 246) or mAPs (n = 214) who underwent electrophysiological s...

  11. The representativeness of direct oral anticoagulant clinical trials to hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Laura; Ilomäki, Jenni; Bell, J Simon; Dārziņš, Pēteris

    2017-11-01

    Trials of the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban provide the basis for prescribing for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective of this study was to assess the representativeness of the three pivotal DOAC randomized controlled trials of dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban for unselected hospitalized patients with AF. A cross-sectional study was undertaken. All patients discharged with AF between 2012 and 2015 from a large public hospital network in Melbourne, Australia, were identified. Inclusion and exclusion criteria from the DOAC trials were applied. The proportions of hospitalized patients with AF who would have been eligible for the dabigatran (RE-LY), rivaroxaban (ROCKET-AF) and apixaban (ARISTOTLE) trials were estimated, as was pooled eligibility for all three trials. Characteristics of eligible and ineligible patients were compared. For the 4734 patients, application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria resulted in 60.5, 52.6 and 35.8% eligibility for the trials of apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, respectively. Pooled eligibility across all three trials demonstrated that 33.4% of the patients would have been eligible for all three trials but 36.7% ineligible for any trial. Ineligible patients who met exclusion criteria were older and experienced more comorbidities. The apixaban and dabigatran trials may be the most representative of hospitalized patients with AF. The DOAC trial results can readily be extrapolated to, and guide prescribing for, at least two thirds of patients discharged from a large metropolitan health service in Australia.

  12. External validity of the ARISTOTLE trial in real-life atrial fibrillation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Lovisa; Johansson, Cecilia; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Johansson, Lars

    2014-10-01

    Our primary objective was to determine the proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) eligible for enrollment in a randomized controlled trial for a novel oral anticoagulant, the ARISTOTLE trial. A secondary objective was to describe the reasons for trial ineligibility. We performed a cross-sectional study of an unselected population including 2274 patients in Skellefteå, Sweden with at least one verified episode of AF on or before December 31, 2010. Patients were classified as suitable or unsuitable for anticoagulant treatment according to current guidelines. The enrollment criteria from the ARISTOTLE trial were extracted from the original publication and applied to the population. Among all patients with AF, 1579 were classified as suitable for anticoagulant treatment. Of these, only 658 patients (42%) were eligible for participation in the ARISTOTLE trial. Among the 921 patients ineligible for participation, 498 did not meet the ECG criteria, 272 had psychosocial problems, and in addition, 78 patients were excluded due to both of these criteria. Our study shows that a majority of the patients in an unselected population with AF suitable for anticoagulant treatment were ineligible for participation in the ARISTOTLE trial. The applicability of the ARISTOTLE trial is therefore unknown for a considerable proportion of patients with AF in real life. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Patients' time in therapeutic range on warfarin among US patients with atrial fibrillation: Results from ORBIT-AF registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorney, Sean D; Simon, DaJuanicia N; Thomas, Laine; Fonarow, Gregg C; Kowey, Peter R; Chang, Paul; Singer, Daniel E; Ansell, Jack; Blanco, Rosalia G; Gersh, Bernard; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Hylek, Elaine M; Go, Alan S; Piccini, Jonathan P; Peterson, Eric D

    2015-07-01

    Time in therapeutic range (TTR) of international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.0 to 3.0 is important for the safety and effectiveness of warfarin anticoagulation. There are few data on TTR among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in community-based clinical practice. Using the US Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF), we examined TTR (using a modified Rosendaal method) among 5,210 patients with AF on warfarin and treated at 155 sites. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on TTR data. Multivariable logistic regression modeling with generalized estimating equations was used to determine patient and provider factors associated with the lowest (worst) TTR. Overall, 59% of the measured INR values were between 2.0 and 3.0, with an overall mean and median TTR of 65% ± 20% and 68% (interquartile range [IQR] 53%-79%). The median times below and above the therapeutic range were 17% (IQR 8%-29%) and 10% (IQR 3%-19%), respectively. Patients with renal dysfunction, advanced heart failure, frailty, prior valve surgery, and higher risk for bleeding (ATRIA score) or stroke (CHA2DS2-VASc score) had significantly lower TTR (P range. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Higher risk of death and stroke in patients with persistent vs. paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: results from the ROCKET-AF Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Patel, Manesh R.; Breithardt, Günter; Hankey, Graeme J.; Becker, Richard C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Nessel, Christopher C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Califf, Robert M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Anticoagulation prophylaxis for stroke is recommended for at-risk patients with either persistent or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). We compared outcomes in patients with persistent vs. paroxysmal AF receiving oral anticoagulation. Methods and results Patients randomized in the Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared With Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET-AF) trial (n = 14 264) were grouped by baseline AF category: paroxysmal or persistent. Multivariable adjustment was performed to compare thrombo-embolic events, bleeding, and death between groups, in high-risk subgroups, and across treatment assignment (rivaroxaban or warfarin). Of 14 062 patients, 11 548 (82%) had persistent AF and 2514 (18%) had paroxysmal AF. Patients with persistent AF were marginally older (73 vs. 72, P = 0.03), less likely female (39 vs. 45%, P < 0.0001), and more likely to have previously used vitamin K antagonists (64 vs. 56%, P < 0.0001) compared with patients with paroxysmal AF. In patients randomized to warfarin, time in therapeutic range was similar (58 vs. 57%, P = 0.94). Patients with persistent AF had higher adjusted rates of stroke or systemic embolism (2.18 vs. 1.73 events per 100-patient-years, P = 0.048) and all-cause mortality (4.78 vs. 3.52, P = 0.006). Rates of major bleeding were similar (3.55 vs. 3.31, P = 0.77). Rates of stroke or systemic embolism in both types of AF did not differ by treatment assignment (rivaroxaban vs. warfarin, Pinteraction = 0.6). Conclusion In patients with AF at moderate-to-high risk of stroke receiving anticoagulation, those with persistent AF have a higher risk of thrombo-embolic events and worse survival compared with paroxysmal AF. PMID:25209598

  15. Higher risk of death and stroke in patients with persistent vs. paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: results from the ROCKET-AF Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Hellkamp, Anne S; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Patel, Manesh R; Breithardt, Günter; Hankey, Graeme J; Becker, Richard C; Singer, Daniel E; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hacke, Werner; Nessel, Christopher C; Berkowitz, Scott D; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Fox, Keith A A; Califf, Robert M; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2015-02-01

    Anticoagulation prophylaxis for stroke is recommended for at-risk patients with either persistent or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). We compared outcomes in patients with persistent vs. paroxysmal AF receiving oral anticoagulation. Patients randomized in the Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared With Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET-AF) trial (n = 14 264) were grouped by baseline AF category: paroxysmal or persistent. Multivariable adjustment was performed to compare thrombo-embolic events, bleeding, and death between groups, in high-risk subgroups, and across treatment assignment (rivaroxaban or warfarin). Of 14 062 patients, 11 548 (82%) had persistent AF and 2514 (18%) had paroxysmal AF. Patients with persistent AF were marginally older (73 vs. 72, P = 0.03), less likely female (39 vs. 45%, P < 0.0001), and more likely to have previously used vitamin K antagonists (64 vs. 56%, P < 0.0001) compared with patients with paroxysmal AF. In patients randomized to warfarin, time in therapeutic range was similar (58 vs. 57%, P = 0.94). Patients with persistent AF had higher adjusted rates of stroke or systemic embolism (2.18 vs. 1.73 events per 100-patient-years, P = 0.048) and all-cause mortality (4.78 vs. 3.52, P = 0.006). Rates of major bleeding were similar (3.55 vs. 3.31, P = 0.77). Rates of stroke or systemic embolism in both types of AF did not differ by treatment assignment (rivaroxaban vs. warfarin, Pinteraction = 0.6). In patients with AF at moderate-to-high risk of stroke receiving anticoagulation, those with persistent AF have a higher risk of thrombo-embolic events and worse survival compared with paroxysmal AF. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  16. The expression levels of plasma micoRNAs in atrial fibrillation patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNA (miRNA has been found in human blood. It has been increasingly suggested that miRNAs may serve as biomarkers for diseases. We examined the potential of circulating miRNA to serve as predictors of atrial fibrillation (AF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the discovery stage of this project, we used massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS to carry out an in-depth analysis of the miRNA expression profile (miRNome in 5 healthy controls, 5 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF alone, and 5 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (PersAF alone. Twenty-two specific miRNAs were found to be dysregulated in each PAF group, PersAF group, or control group. Four candidate microRNAs (miRNA-146a, miRNA-150, miRNA-19a, and miRNA-375 met our selection criteria and were evaluated in an independent cohort of 90 plasma samples using TaqMan miRNA quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. We found miRNA-150 levels to be reduced by a factor of approximately 17 in PAF relative to controls and a factor of approximately 20 in PersAF relative to controls (P<.0001. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to evaluate the reduced miRNA-150 expression levels (odds ratio [OR] 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 3.57, P<0.001, age (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.36 to 2.73, P<0.001, and Left atrial diameter (LAD (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.36 to 1.8, P<0.001. Each was independently associated with AF. Much of the identified target genes related to AF were part of the inflammatory response system. We found that plasma levels of CRP were negatively correlated with the plasma levels of miRNA-150. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we firstly found that plasma miRNA-150 levels in from AF patients were substantially lower than that from healthy people. Circulating reduced miRNA-150 was significantly associated with AF.

  17. Age dependence of risk factors for stroke and death in young patients with atrial fibrillation: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgaard, Line; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Skjøth, Flemming; Lip, Gregory Y H; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    2014-05-01

    The risk of stroke and death in patients with atrial fibrillation is strongly associated with age and concomitant comorbidities. The aim of this study was to examine the age dependence of risk factors for stroke and mortality in young patients with atrial fibrillation. This study is a population-based cohort study of 30- to 65-year-old patients with atrial fibrillation and diagnosed during 2000 to 2011, identified by record linkage between nationwide Danish registries. Cox regression models were used to estimate the risk of stroke and mortality according to risk factors within age groups: 30 to 50, 50 to 65, and 65 to 75 years. We identified 73,799 nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients, of which 37,782 (51.2%) were stroke (doubled), vascular disease, age 65-74 and sex category (female) score (CHA2DS2-VASc score) was associated with decreased survival probability in all age groups. The overall incidence of stroke per year for 1 year (5 years) follow-up was 1.2% (0.6%), 3.5% (1.6%), and 5.6% (2.8%), respectively, for the age groups of 30 to 50, 50 to 65, and 65 to 75. Overall, risk factors such as previous stroke, heart failure, vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension remained independent predictors of stroke and death in patientsrisk factors apply.

  18. Incidence of atrial fibrillation in relation to changing heart rate over time in hypertensive patients: the LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okin, Peter M; Wachtell, Kristian; Kjeldsen, Sverre E

    2008-01-01

    Onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been linked to changes in autonomic tone, with increasing heart rate (HR) immediately before AF onset in some patients suggesting a possible role of acute increases in sympathetic activity in AF onset. Although losartan therapy and decreasing ECG left ventric...

  19. Bleeding risk in 'real world' patients with atrial fibrillation: comparison of two established bleeding prediction schemes in a nationwide cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J B; Lip, G Y H; Hansen, P R

    2011-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is a double-edged sword, because it decreases the risk of stroke at the cost of an increased risk of bleeding. We compared the performance of a new bleeding prediction scheme, HAS-BLED, with an older bleeding prediction scheme...

  20. Comparison of Outcome After Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair With the MitraClip in Patients With Versus Without Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velu, Juliëtte F.; Kortlandt, Friso A.; Hendriks, Tom; Schurer, Remco A. J.; van Boven, Ad J.; Koch, Karel T.; Vis, M. Marije; Henriques, Jose P.; Piek, Jan J.; van den Branden, Ben J. L.; Schaap, Jeroen; Rensing, Benno J.; Swaans, Martin J.; Bouma, Berto J.; van der Heyden, Jan A. S.; Baan, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous mitral valve repair with the MitraClip is an established treatment for patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) who are inoperable or at high risk for surgery. Atrial Fibrillation (AF) frequently coincides with MR, but only scarce data of the influence of AF on outcome after MitraClip is

  1. Antiplatelet Therapy for Stable Coronary Artery Disease in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Taking an Oral Anticoagulant A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, M.; Gislason, G. H.; Lip, G. Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal long-term antithrombotic treatment of patients with coexisting atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease is unresolved, and commonly, a single antiplatelet agent is added to oral anticoagulation. We investigated the effectiveness and safety of adding antiplatelet...

  2. Adherence and Coagulation Assays in Dabigatran-treated Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Atrial Fibrillation; Medication Adherence; Blood Coagulation Tests; Anticoagulants; Circulating, Hemorrhagic Disorder; Drug Effect; Drug Use; Drug Toxicity; Drug Intolerance; Blood Clot; Blood Coagulation Disorder; Laboratory Problem; Bleeding; Thrombosis

  3. Clinical outcomes of patients with diabetes and atrial fibrillation treated with apixaban: results from the ARISTOTLE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekowitz, Justin A; Lewis, Basil S; Lopes, Renato D; Wojdyla, Daniel M; McMurray, John J V; Hanna, Michael; Atar, Dan; Cecilia Bahit, M; Keltai, Matyas; Lopez-Sendon, Jose L; Pais, Prem; Ruzyllo, Witold; Wallentin, Lars; Granger, Christopher B; Alexander, John H

    2015-04-01

    We compared clinical outcomes in patients with AF with and without diabetes in the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation trial. The main efficacy endpoints were SSE and mortality; safety endpoints were major and major/clinically relevant non-major bleeding. A total of 4547/18 201 (24.9%) patients had diabetes who were younger (69 vs. 70 years), more had coronary artery disease (39 vs. 31%), and higher mean CHADS2 (2.9 vs. 1.9) and HAS-BLED scores (1.9 vs. 1.7) (all P < 0.0001) than patients without diabetes. Patients with diabetes receiving apixaban had lower rates of SSE [hazard ratio (HR) 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-1.05), all-cause mortality (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.67-1.02), cardiovascular mortality (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.66-1.20), intra-cranial haemorrhage (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25-0.95), and a similar rate of myocardial infarction (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.62-1.67) compared with warfarin. For major bleeding, a quantitative interaction was seen (P-interaction = 0.003) with a greater reduction in major bleeding in patients without diabetes even after multivariable adjustment. Other measures of bleeding showed a consistent reduction with apixaban compared with warfarin without a significant interaction based on diabetes status. Apixaban has similar benefits on reducing stroke, decreasing mortality, and causing less intra-cranial bleeding than warfarin in patients with and without diabetes. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Identifying postoperative atrial fibrillation in cardiac surgical patients posthospital discharge, using iPhone ECG: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowres, Nicole; Freedman, S Ben; Gallagher, Robyn; Kirkness, Ann; Marshman, David; Orchard, Jessica; Neubeck, Lis

    2015-01-13

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs in 30-40% of patients after cardiac surgery. Identification of recurrent postoperative AF is required to initiate evidence-based management to reduce the risk of subsequent stroke. However, as AF is often asymptomatic, recurrences may not be detected after discharge. This study determines feasibility and impact of a self-surveillance programme to identify recurrence of postoperative AF in the month of posthospital discharge. This is a feasibility study, using a cross-sectional study design, of self-screening for AF using a hand-held single-lead iPhone electrocardiograph device (iECG). Participants will be recruited from the cardiothoracic surgery wards of the Royal North Shore Hospital and North Shore Private Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Cardiac surgery patients admitted in sinus rhythm and experiencing a transient episode of postoperative AF will be eligible for recruitment. Participants will be taught to take daily ECG recordings for 1 month posthospital discharge using the iECG and will be provided education regarding AF, including symptoms and health risks. The primary outcome is the feasibility of patient self-monitoring for AF recurrence using an iECG. Secondary outcomes include proportion of patients identified with recurrent AF; estimation of stroke risk and patient knowledge. Process outcomes and qualitative data related to acceptability of patient's use of the iECG and sustainability of the screening programme beyond the trial setting will also be collected. Primary ethics approval was received on 25 February 2014 from Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Resource Ethics Committee, and on 17 July 2014 from North Shore Private Hospital Ethics Committee. Results will be disseminated via forums including, but not limited to, peer-reviewed publications and presentation at national and international conferences. ACTRN12614000383662. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  5. Stroke Risk Perception in Atrial Fibrillation Patients is not Associated with Clinical Stroke Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournaise, Anders; Skov, Jane; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Leppin, Anja

    2015-11-01

    Clinical risk stratification models, such as the CHA2DS2-VASc, are used to assess stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. No study has yet investigated whether and to which extent these patients have a realistic perception of their personal stroke risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the association between AF patients' stroke risk perception and clinical stroke risk. In an observational cross-sectional study design, we surveyed 178 AF patients with a mean age of 70.6 years (SD 8.3) in stable anticoagulant treatment (65% treatment duration >12 months). Clinical stroke risk was scored through the CHA2DS2-VASc, and patients rated their perceived personal stroke risk on a 7-point Likert scale. There was no significant association between clinical stroke risk assessment and patients' stroke risk perception (rho = .025; P = .741). Approximately 60% of the high-risk patients had an unrealistic perception of their own stroke risk, and there was no significant increase in risk perception from those with a lower compared with a higher risk factor load (χ(2) = .010; P = .522). Considering possible negative implications in terms of lack of motivation for lifestyle behavior change and adequate adherence to the treatment and monitoring of vitamin K antagonist, the apparent underestimation of risk by large subgroups warrants attention and needs further investigation with regard to possible behavioral consequences. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Healthcare resources and needs in anticoagulant therapy for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. SAMOA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Egocheaga-Cabello, M I; Gállego-Culleré, J; Ignacio-García, E; Manzano-Espinosa, L; Martín-Martínez, A; Mateo-Arranz, J; Polo-García, J; Vargas-Ortega, D

    2017-05-01

    To determine, in the various medical specialties, the healthcare process for anticoagulated patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, to determine the available and necessary resources and to identify potential areas of improvement in the care of these patients. We performed a cross-sectional survey of primary care and specialised physicians involved in the care of anticoagulated patients. The questionnaires referred to the healthcare process, the indication and prescription of anticoagulant therapy and the barriers and deficiencies present for these patients. A total of 893 physicians participated in the study, 437 of whom worked in primary care and 456 of whom were specialists (mostly cardiologists). Forty-two percent of the family doctors indicated that they assessed and prescribed anticoagulant therapy, and 66% performed the regular follow-up of these patients. In both healthcare settings, the physicians noted the lack of standardised protocols. There was also a lack of quality control in the treatment. The role of primary care in managing anticoagulated patients has grown compared with previous reports. The responses of the participating physicians suggest marked gaps in the standardisation of the healthcare process and several areas for improvement in these patients' follow-up. The promotion of training in direct-acting anticoagulant drugs remains pivotal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  7. Ethnicity and anticoagulation management of hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation in northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinchun; Zhou, Xianhui; Song, Shifei; Wu, Min; Baolatejiang, Roza; Lu, Yanmei; Li, Yaodong; Zhang, Wenhui; Lv, Wenkui; Ye, Yuanzheng; Zhou, Qina; Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Jianghua; Xing, Qiang; Tang, Baopeng

    2017-04-10

    The therapeutic management and health challenges caused by atrial fibrillation (AF) differ between different groups. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical features of patients hospitalized with AF and to explore the use of anticoagulation treatments in Han and Uygur patients in Xinjiang, northwest China. Data were collected from a retrospective descriptive study involving patients hospitalized at 13 hospitals in Xinjiang, China from Jul 1, 2014 to Jun 31, 2015. Anticoagulation management was measured according to guideline-recommended risk scores. A total of 4,181 patients with AF were included (mean age 69.5 ± 11.7 years, 41.4% females; 71.5% Han, 28.5% Uygur). The prevalence of AF in Uygur individuals may occur earlier than in Han individuals (mean age 64.9 vs 71.3, P < 0.001). Most of the hospitalized patients with AF had a high risk of stroke (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score ≥2; 80.6% Han vs 73.7% Uygur, P < 0.05); this risk was especially high in elderly patients. In AF patients, the application of anticoagulants according to the guidelines is far from expected, and the underutilization of anticoagulants exists in both ethnic groups.

  8. Blood Products Provided to Patients Receiving Futile Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Thanh H; Ziman, Alyssa; Wenger, Neil S

    2017-09-01

    The number of hospitalized patients receiving treatment perceived to be futile is not insignificant. Blood products are valuable resources that are donated to help others in need. We aimed to quantify the amount of blood transfused into patients who were receiving treatment that the critical care physician treating them perceived to be futile. During a 3-month period, critical care physicians in 5 adult intensive care units completed a daily questionnaire to identify patients perceived as receiving futile treatment. Of 1136 critically ill patients, physicians assessed 123 patients (11%) as receiving futile treatment. Fifty-nine (48%) of the 123 patients received blood products after they were assessed to be receiving futile treatment: 242 units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) (7.6% of all PRBC units transfused into critical care patients during the 3-month study period); 161 (9.9%) units of plasma, 137 (12.1%) units of platelets, and 21 (10.5%) units of cryoprecipitate. Explicit guidelines on the use of blood products should be developed to ensure that the use of this precious resource achieves meaningful goals. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  9. Which risk factors are more associated with ischemic stroke than intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with atrial fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Emer R; Kapral, Moira K; Fang, Jiming; Eikelboom, John W; ó Conghaile, Aengus; Canavan, Michelle; O'Donnell, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    The decision to prescribe oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation is based on an assessment of the competing risks of ischemic stroke and major bleeding, of which intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most important type. We sought to determine the comparative importance of risk factors for ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation with particular emphasis on risk factors common to both stroke types. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke or ICH and atrial fibrillation included in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network constituted the cohort. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between baseline risk factors and presentation with ICH versus ischemic stroke. Risk factors included: (1) those previously reported to be risk factors for both ischemic stroke and major bleeding (particularly ICH) ("shared" risk factors, including age, alcohol, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, prior stroke/transient ischemic attack and preadmission dementia); and (2) other risk factors associated with either stroke subtype alone. A total of 3197 patients presented with atrial fibrillation and acute stroke, of which 12.2% presented with ICH. Of the "shared" risk factors, age (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06-1.34 per decade) and prior stroke/transient ischemic attack (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.12-1.87) were more associated with ischemic stroke than ICH, whereas a history of hypertension (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.68-1.17), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.23; 95% CI, 0.92-1.64), renal impairment (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.95-1.71), and alcohol intake were not more strongly associated with either stroke subtype. Of the risk factors known to be associated with both ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with atrial fibrillation, we found that none had a stronger association with ICH. Older age was more strongly associated with ischemic stroke than ICH.

  10. Value of trans-oesophageal echocardiography as a method of encouraging patients with chronic atrial fibrillation to use anticoagulation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalli, Aurora; Kamberi, Lulzim; Dragusha, Gani; Zeqiri, Nexhmi; Gashi, Fitim; Prekpalaj, Lazer

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the indisputable role of anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at risk for stroke, anticoagulants remain under-used in everyday clinical practice. We assumed that by performing trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on patients with AF who were not on anticoagulation treatment prior to the procedure, and by explaining to them the TEE images obtained, as well as the possible consequences of these findings, we could convince patients to start anticoa...

  11. Acquired colour vision deficiency in patients receiving digoxin maintenance therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrenson, J G; Kelly, C; Lawrenson, A L; Birch, J

    2002-01-01

    Background/aims: Disturbances of colour vision are a frequently reported sign of digoxin toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of acquired colour vision deficiency in elderly hospitalised patients receiving maintenance digoxin therapy.

  12. Incidence and risk factors of atrial fibrillation in Asian COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao KM

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Kuang-Ming Liao,1 Chung-Yu Chen2,3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center Chiali, Tainan, 2Master Program in Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, 3Department of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China Objective: To investigate the incidence and risk factors of atrial fibrillation (AF in Asian chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. Patients and methods: We selected a study population older than 40 years with a COPD diagnosis and who had used at least one inhaled bronchodilator medication between 1998 and 2012. The date of the index COPD diagnosis was defined as the index date. We excluded patients with a history of AF, significant mitral valve disease, disorders of the thyroid gland, or ischemic heart disease before the index date. We followed all patients from the index date to the day of AF occurrence, the day of death, or the date of December 31, 2013. The baseline of comorbidities was identified before the index date. Comorbidities included hypertension, diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease, congenital heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, and malignancy. Results: We included 6,208 COPD patients and 12,409 patients without COPD. The incidence of AF was higher in COPD patients than in those without COPD. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR for AF among those with COPD was 2.23 with a 95% confidence interval (CI of 1.98–2.51 compared to those without COPD. After multiple analyses, patients with hypertension (HR 1.43 [95% CI =1.26–1.62] or heart failure (HR 2.36 [95% CI =1.81–3.08] were found to have a significantly higher incidence of AF than those without these conditions. Conclusion: It is important for physicians to monitor, prevent, and provide early intervention for AF in COPD patients with hypertension or heart failure. Keywords: atrial fibrillation, COPD, incidence

  13. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Heidel, Eric [Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Macy, Sallie [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Kennel, Stephen J. [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Wall, Jonathan S., E-mail: jwall@utmck.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  14. [GISE/AIAC position paper on percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: recommendations for patient selection, facilities, competences, organizing and training requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Sergio; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Santoro, Gennaro; De Ponti, Roberto; Danna, Paolo; Zecchin, Massimo; Bedogni, Francesco; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    Thromboembolism from the left atrial appendage is the most feared complication in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The cornerstone for the management of chronic nonvalvular AF is stroke reduction with oral anticoagulation (OAC). However, poor compliance, maintaining a narrow therapeutic window, and major side effects such as bleeding have severely limited its use, creating a therapeutic dilemma. About 20% of AF patients do not receive OAC due to contraindications and less than half of AF patients are not on OAC due to reluctance of the prescribing physician and/or patient non-compliance. Fortunately, over the past decade, the introduction of percutaneous approaches for left atrial appendage occlusion has offered a viable alternative to the management of nonvalvular AF in patients with OAC contraindication. Occlusion devices such as the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug and Watch man device have shown their noninferiority to OAC for stroke prophylaxis with less bleeding complications, while more recently some new devices have been introduced. The aim of this position paper is to review the most relevant clinical aspects of left atrial appendage occlusion from patient selection to periprocedural and follow-up management. In addition, the importance of a medical team and an organizational environment adequate to optimize all the steps of this procedure is discussed.

  15. Educational inequalities in mortality of patients with atrial fibrillation in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerkar, Rupali; Ebbing, Marta; Sulo, Gerhard; Ariansen, Inger; Igland, Jannicke; Tell, Grethe S; Egeland, Grace M

    2017-04-01

    We explored the educational gradient in mortality in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. We prospectively followed patients hospitalized with AF as primary discharge diagnosis in the Cardiovascular Disease in Norway 2008-2012 project. The average length of follow-up was 2.4 years. Mortality by educational level was assessed by Cox proportional hazard models. Population attributable fractions (PAF) were calculated. Analyses stratified by age (≤75 and >75 years of age), and adjusted for age, gender, medical intervention, and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Of 42,138 AF patients, 16% died by end of 2012. Among younger patients, those with low education (≤10 years) had a HR of 2.3 (95% confidence interval 2.0, 2.6) for all-cause mortality relative to those with any college or university education. Similar results were observed for cardiovascular mortality. Disparities in mortality were greater among younger than older patients. A PAF of 35.9% (95% confidence interval 27.9, 43.1) was observed for an educational level of high school/vocational school or less versus higher education in younger patients. Increasing educational level associated with better prognosis suggesting underlying education-related behavioral and medical determinants of mortality. A considerable proportion of mortality within 5 years following hospital discharge could be prevented.

  16. Anxiety and depression in patients receiving radiotherapy. Prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Chandra, P.S.; Channabasavanna, S.M.; Anantha, N.; Reddy, B.K.M.; Sharma, S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) prospectively in patients receiving Radiotherapy (RT) during and after treatment. 140 consecutive cancer patients referred for radiotherapy and their care givers were included. All patients were administered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) conducted at intake, just before starting RT, after finishing the course of RT, and at 3-4 months follow-up. Anxiety and depression are detected frequently in patients receiving RT both prior to treatment and later during follow-up

  17. Dofetilide in patients with congestive heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction: safety aspects and effect on atrial fibrillation. The Danish Investigators of Arrhythmia and Mortality on Dofetilide (DIAMOND) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Torp-Pedersen, C T; Køber, L

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Atrial fibrillation is a frequent cause of worsening of symptoms in patients with congestive heart failure. The drugs currently available for maintenance of sinus rhythm all have major side effects. METHODS. In 34 Danish coronary care units, 1518 patients with congestive heart failure...... and reduced left ventricular systolic function were randomized to receive either placebo or a new class III antiarrhythmic drug, dofetilide. The dose of dofetilide was adjusted according to the presence of atrial fibrillation, the length of the QT interval, and renal function. Patients were continuously...... monitored electrocardiographically for the first 3 days of the study. The primary end point was all-cause mortality and follow-up was for at least 1 year. RESULTS. In the dofetilide/placebo groups, 311/317 patients died (41%/42%). The hazard ratio for dofetilide treatment was 0.95 (95% confidence interval...

  18. Time Course of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuwen, Christophe P; Ramdjan, Tanwier T T K; Götte, Marco; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Evertz, Reinder; Vriend, Joris W J; Molhoek, Sander G; Dorman, Henderikus G R; van Opstal, Jurren M; Konings, Thelma C; van der Voort, Pepijn; Delacretaz, Etienne; Houck, Charlotte; Yaksh, Ameeta; Jansz, Luca J; Witsenburg, Maarten; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Triedman, John K; Bogers, Ad J J C; de Groot, Natasja M S

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is rising in the aging patients with congenital heart defects (CHD). However, studies reporting on AF in patients with CHD are scarce. The aim of this multicenter study was to examine in a large cohort of patients with a variety of CHD: (1) the age of onset and initial treatment of AF, coexistence of atrial tachyarrhythmia and (2) progression of paroxysmal to (long-standing) persistent/permanent AF during long-term follow-up. Patients (n=199) with 15 different CHD and documented AF episodes were studied. AF developed at 49±17 years. Regular atrial tachycardia (AT) coexisting with AF occurred in 65 (33%) patients; 65% initially presented with regular AT. At the end of a follow-up period of 5 (0-24) years, the ECG showed AF in 81 patients (41%). In a subgroup of 114 patients, deterioration from paroxysm of AF to (long-standing) persistent/permanent AF was observed in 29 patients (26%) after only 3 (0-18) years of the first AF episode. Cerebrovascular accidents/transient ischemic attacks occurred in 26 patients (13%), although a substantial number (n=16) occurred before the first documented AF episode. Age at development of AF in patients with CHD is relatively young compared with the patients without CHD. Coexistence of episodes of AF and regular AT occurred in a considerable number of patients; most of them initially presented with regular AT. The fast and frequent progression from paroxysmal to (long-standing) persistent or permanent AF episodes justifies close follow-up and early, aggressive therapy of both AT and AF. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. The Mid-Term Results of Patients who Underwent Radiofrequency Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Together with Mitral Valve Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahim Çolak

    Full Text Available Abstract Objetive: Saline-irrigated radiofrequency ablation, which has been widely used for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in recent years, is 80-90% successful in achieving sinus rhythm. In our study, our surgical experience and mid-term results in patients who underwent mitral valve surgery and left atrial radiofrequency ablation were analyzed. Methods: Forty patients (15 males, 25 females; mean age 52.05±9.9 years; range 32-74 underwent surgery for atrial fibrillation associated with mitral valvular disease. All patients manifested atrial fibrillation, which started at least six months before the surgical intervention. The majority of patients (36 patients, 90% were in NYHA class III; 34 (85% patients had rheumatic heart disease. In addition to mitral valve surgery and radiofrequency ablation, coronary artery bypass, DeVega tricuspid annuloplasty, left ventricular aneurysm repair, and left atrial thrombus excision were performed. Following discharge from the hospital, patients' follow-up was performed as outpatient clinic examinations and the average follow-up period of patients was 18±3 months. Results: While the incidence of sinus rhythm was 85.3% on the first postoperative day, it was 80% during discharge and 71% in the 1st year follow-up examination. Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation is an effective method when it is performed by appropriate surgical technique. Its rate for returning to sinus rhythm is as high as the rate of conventional surgical procedure.

  20. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, M.F. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia); Probert, J.C. [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Zwi, L.J. [Auckland Univ. (New Zealand). Dept. of Medicine and Surgery

    1995-02-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  1. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, M.F.; Probert, J.C.; Zwi, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  2. Left atrial thrombus predicts transient ischemic attack in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Marcus F; Singh, Pradeep; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Longaker, Rita A

    2003-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is widely accepted as a direct cause of cardioembolic stroke from left atrial (LA) thrombus formation. However, the relationship between LA thrombus and transient ischemic attack (TIA) in patients with AF is less well established. Two hundred sixty-one adult patients (mean age 66 +/- 11 years, 220 men and 41 women) with AF undergoing transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) were prospectively followed up for TIA (mean duration 30.3 +/- 20.6 months). LA thrombus was present in 18% (n = 46) and LA spontaneous echocardiographic contrast in 50% (n = 131) of the group. Nineteen of 261 patients had TIA during follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression showed congestive heart failure (CHF) as the only predictor of TIA when a model of clinical variables was constructed (odds ratio [OR] 2.7, P =.04). Age, sex, hypertension, and use of warfarin or aspirin were not predictors. When TEE variables were added to the model, LA thrombus became the only predictor of TIA (OR 7.7, P =.0001). Survival free of TIA (Kaplan-Meier) was significantly less (P =.0001) in patients with LA thrombus compared with those without, and the annual TIA event rate was 9.2% per year versus 1.9% per year (P likely thromboembolic mechanism for TIA from LA thrombus in patients with AF.

  3. Diagnostic performance of 320-detector CT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lei; Yang, Lin; Fan, Zhanming; Yu, Wei; Lv, Biao; Zhang, Zhaoqi [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2011-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and radiation dose of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) using 320-detector CT. Thirty-seven patients with persistent AF and suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) were enrolled. All patients underwent both 320-detector CTCA and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). CT image quality and the presence of significant ({>=}50%) stenosis were evaluated by two radiologists blinded to the results of CCA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated using CCA as the reference standard. Differences in detection of coronary artery stenosis between 320-detector CTCA and CCA were evaluated with McNemar's test. Patient radiation dose was calculated by multiplying dose length product by conversion coefficient of 0.017. In total 474 evaluated coronary segments, 459 (96.8%) segments were diagnostically evaluable. On per-segment analysis, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 90.0% (18 of 20), 99.3% (436 of 439), 85.7% (18 of 21) and 99.5% (436 of 438). No significant difference was found between 320-detector CTCA and CCA on the detection of significant stenosis (P = 1.000). Effective doses of 320-detector CTCA was 13.0 {+-} 4.7 mSv. 320-detector CTCA is feasible and accurate in excluding CAD in patients with AF. (orig.)

  4. Unnecessary overuse. Study of "inadvisable practices" for patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, M M; Llamas, P; Sanmartín, M; Egido, J A; Del Toro, J; Egocheaga, M I; Estévez, M S; Navarro, I M; Mira, J J

    2017-05-01

    To identify overuse (diagnostic, therapeutic and self-care practices that represent risks that outweigh the potential benefits) in patients with atrial fibrillation. The study was based on qualitative research techniques. Using the "Metaplan" technique, we identified and ordered potentially inappropriate, ineffective and inefficient practices. By means of a consensus conference, we then established a number of "inadvisable practice" measures (relatively common practices that should be eliminated based on the scientific evidence or clinical experience). Professionals from the specialties of cardiology, haematology, neurology, internal medicine, family medicine and nursing participated in the consensus. We developed a catalogue of 19 "inadvisable practices" related to the diagnosis, treatment and care of anticoagulated patients that were inappropriate, had questionable effectiveness or were ineffective, as well as 13 beliefs or behaviours for anticoagulated patients that could result in injury or were useless or inefficient. The "inadvisable practices" approach helps identify practices that represent greater risks than benefits for patients. It seems appropriate to include algorithms in the clinical decision-making support systems that consider this information for the diagnosis, treatment and for home care. For this last case, recommendations have also been prepared that define specific contents for the healthcare education of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  5. [Prevalence of atrial fibrillation and predictors of its occurrence in patients with dual-chamber pacemakers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Germán; Maid, Gustavo Fabián; Arias, Aníbal Martín; Maldonado, Sebastián; Pizarro, Rodolfo; Belziti, Cesar Antonio

    2016-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with dual-chamber pacemakers (DP), determine the variables associated with development of AF and evaluate the changes in AF's management by physicians. Five hundred patients with DP were prospectively included and interrogated. When AF was detected physicians in charge of the patient were warned. Changes in AF's management were evaluated. Mean age of the study population was 77 years, with 51% of men. AF was detected in 13.2% of patients. These findings led treatment changes in 64.7%. The variables analyzed by logistic regression model which were associated with the occurrence of AF were: arterial hypertension (OR=2.62; CI 95% 1.01-6.8; P<.048), history of AF (OR=4.30; CI 95% 2.26-8.32; P<.001), sick sinus syndrome as cause of device implantation (OR=2.09; CI 95% 1.09-3.97; P<.025) and burden of supraventricular extrasystoles series(OR= 1.000033 per serie; CI 95% 0.000011-0.000055; P<.003.). We have detected a high prevalence of AF in patients with DP. The diagnose of AF led to change in treatment. Four clinical variables increase the likelihood of developing this arrhythmia. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Restoring Sinus Rhythm Improves Baroreflex Function in Patients With Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Michael E; Wasmund, Stephen L; Page, Richard L; Hamdan, Mohamed H

    2016-02-23

    Studies have suggested that patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have impairment in the baroreflex. It is not clear whether these findings are the result of the associated comorbid conditions or the arrhythmia itself. We hypothesized that AF is associated with impairment in baroreflex function and that the arrhythmia itself is a contributing factor. Twenty-four patients with persistent AF referred for cardioversion were enrolled. A second group of patients with no history of AF matched for age and left ventricular ejection fraction was identified and served as the control group. In the AF group, baroreflex gain (BRG) was measured on the day of cardioversion (Day 1) and again at 30 days post-cardioversion (Day 30) in patients who remained in sinus rhythm (SR). The clinical characteristics of patients with AF were not different than those of the control group. The mean BRG in the AF group on Day 1 was significantly lower than the mean BRG of the control group (5.2±3.6 versus 10.8±5.5 ms/mm Hg, Pbaroreflex and that restoration of SR improves BRG. Our data suggest that AF might be a contributing factor to the observed impairment in BRG and that restoring SR might help improve baroreflex function. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Prognostic value of myocardial damage markers in patients with chronic heart failure with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Yoichiro; Arimoto, Takanori; Takahashi, Hiroki; Kadowaki, Shinpei; Ishigaki, Daisuke; Narumi, Taro; Honda, Yuki; Iwayama, Tadateru; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Shishido, Tetsuro; Miyashita, Takehiko; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between myocardial damage caused by atrial fibrillation (AF) and subsequent cardiovascular events in AF patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We measured the serum levels of heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) and high-sensitivity troponin T in 402 consecutive CHF patients with chronic AF (CHF-AF, n=201) or sinus rhythm (CHF-SR, n=201). The patients with CHF-AF had higher H-FABP and troponin T levels than those with CHF-SR. In order to examine the prognostic value of myocardial damage markers in CHF-AF and CHF-SR patients, we followed the above patients and analyzed their clinical outcomes. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that both the serum H-FABP and troponin T levels independently predicted subsequent cardiovascular events. A Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the rate of cardiovascular events was higher in the patients with elevated H-FABP and troponin T levels. The optimal cut-off values for the myocardial damage markers of cardiovascular events were higher in the CHF-AF patients than in the CHF-SR patients (H-FABP, 5.4 vs. 4.6 ng/mL and troponin T, 0.030 vs. 0.013 ng/mL). Myocardial damage advances in association with the presence of AF and is associated with subsequent cardiovascular events in both CHF-AF and CHF-SR patients. In this study, the cut-off values for the myocardial damage markers were higher in the CHF-AF patients than in the CHF-SR patients.

  8. Updated European Heart Rhythm Association practical guide on the use of non-vitamin-K antagonist anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: Executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Verhamme, Peter; Alings, Marco; Antz, Matthias; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Oldgren, Jonas; Sinnaeve, Peter; Camm, A John; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2017-07-14

    In 2013, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) published a Practical Guide on the use of non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) (Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M, Antz M, Hacke W, Oldgren J, Sinnaeve P, Camm AJ, Kirchhof P, European Heart Rhythm A. European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Europace 2013;15:625-651; Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M, Antz M, Hacke W, Oldgren J, Sinnaeve P, Camm AJ, Kirchhof P. EHRA practical guide on the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: executive summary. Eur Heart J 2013;34:2094-2106). The document received widespread interest, not only from cardiologists but also from neurologists, geriatricians, and general practitioners, as became evident from the distribution of >350 000 copies of its pocket version (the EHRA Key Message Booklet) world-wide. Since 2013, numerous new studies have appeared on different aspects of NOAC therapy in AF patients. Therefore, EHRA updated the Practical Guide, including new information but also providing balanced guiding in the many areas where prospective data are still lacking. The outline of the original guide that addressed 15 clinical scenarios has been preserved, but all chapters have been rewritten. Main changes in the Update comprise a discussion on the definition of 'non-valvular AF' and eligibility for NOAC therapy, inclusion of finalized information on the recently approved edoxaban, tailored dosing information dependent on concomitant drugs, and/or clinical characteristics, an expanded chapter on neurologic scenarios (ischaemic stroke or intracranial haemorrhage under NOAC), an updated anticoagulation card and more specifics on start-up and follow-up issues. There are also many new flow charts, like on appropriate switching between anticoagulants (VKA to NOAC or vice versa), default scenarios for

  9. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-01-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS

  10. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  11. Satisfaction with Quality of Care Received by Patients without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: The increasing importance of the concept of patients' satisfaction as a valuable tool for assessing quality of care is a current global healthcare concerns as regards consumer‑oriented health services. Aim: This study assessed satisfaction with quality of care received by patients without national health ...

  12. Diabetes mellitus in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There is little in the literature on HIV and diabetes mellitus (DM) in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To assess the characteristics of HIV and DM in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Botswana. Methods. A retrospective case-control study was conducted at 4 sites. Each HIV-infected patient with DM ...

  13. Post-operative neuromuscular function of patients receiving non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the number of patients whose non-depolarising muscle relaxation is adequately reversed. To define factors that contribute to reversal. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: Universitas Hospital recovery room over a 2 month period. Subjects: Patients that received non-depolarising muscle ...

  14. Atrial Septal Aneurysm in Young and Middle Age Patients with A New Paroxysm of Atrial Fibrillation in Babylon Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oday Jasim Alsalihi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available  Background and Objectives:  Atrial fibrillation is one of the  most common atrial arrhythmia , it may be associated with alote of structural and  functional cardiac causes . The Aim of this study was to evaluate a possible causal relationship between ASA ( atrial septal aneurysm and the occurrence of paroxysmal AF in young and middle age patients , and reporting of  some other structural and pathological abnormality diagnosed by standard transthoracic echocardiography.   Design and Methods: This study was involved  young and middle age groups (20-55 years, itincluded 339 patients with new paroxysmal atrial fibrillation , but 37 of them was excluded from the study, (male 250 and female 52 with additional 300 control group. All patients were examined By standard transthoracic echocardiographic  protochol that involve two dimension ( 2D , M-Mood and dopplar , looking for possible cardiac structural causes for the  new onset  paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and special attention was made to the inter atrial septum.   The Results: The paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is more with 41-55 years age group that represents 65.56% of patients , while the age group  20-40 years which give 34.44%. The paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is  more in male group (82.78%, than  female group ( 17.22% . The paroxysmal atrial fibrillation patients show many associated heart abnormalities (acquired and congenital diseases by echocardiographic results, and specifically, the ASA is 17.21% in AF patients. The highest percentage of  ASA are 21.2% in the age group 41-55 years old, and 18.4% in male group, with significant relationship between them(P value < 0.05, odds ratio is 12.3, chi-square is 42.64 , 95% confidence interval 4.8-31.19.   Conclusion: Echocardiography has a significant  role  in the  diagnosis of  causes of AF. There is a strong association of ASA and the onset of new paroxysmal AF, More for those patients older than 41 years old , more in

  15. [Economic evaluation of dabigatran for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Miguel, Luís; Rocha, Evangelista; Ferreira, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of dabigatran in the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation in Portugal. A Markov model was used to simulate patients' clinical course, estimating the occurrence of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, transient ischemic attack, systemic embolism, myocardial infarction, and intra- and extracranial hemorrhage. The clinical parameters are based on the results of the RE-LY trial, which compared dabigatran with warfarin, and on a meta-analysis that estimated the risk of each event in patients treated with aspirin or with no antithrombotic therapy. Dabigatran provides an increase of 0.331 life years and 0.354 quality-adjusted life years for each patient. From a societal perspective, these clinical gains entail an additional expenditure of 2978 euros. Thus, the incremental cost is 9006 euros per life year gained and 8409 euros per quality-adjusted life year. The results show that dabigatran reduces the number of events, especially the most severe such as ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, as well as their long-term sequelae. The expense of dabigatran is partially offset by lower event-related costs and by the fact that INR monitoring is unnecessary. It can thus be concluded that the use of dabigatran in clinical practice in Portugal is cost-effective. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical significance of nutritional status in patients with atrial fibrillation: An overview of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaszewicz, Marzena; Budzyński, Jacek

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a well-known atherosclerosis risk factor; however, its role and the importance of undernutrition in atrial fibrillation (AF) pathogenesis are still not well understood. The aim of this study was to present the current state of knowledge on this issue in different groups of patients. Systematic review of papers published between 1980 and 2016. The literature shows contradicting views regarding the impact of nutritional status on the risk, course, and complications of AF. On the one hand, it has been revealed that overweight, obesity, and high birth mass increase the risk of AF, and that their reduction is linked to an improved course of AF and reduced all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. On the other hand, a so-called obesity paradox has been found, which shows lower all-cause mortality in overweight patients with AF compared to those of normal weight or who are underweight. It has also been shown, although based on a small number of studies, that the relationship between nutritional status and risk of AF and its complication may be U-shaped, which means that not only patients with obesity, but also individuals with underweight, cachexia, and low birth weight may have an increased risk and poor outcome of AF. The relationship between patients' nutritional status and the course of AF has become clearer but it requires further studies examining the importance of weight reduction on AF course. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rivaroxaban in patients with atrial fibrillation: from ROCKET AF to everyday practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Marín, Francisco; Sanmartín Fernandez, Marcelo

    2017-05-01

    Registries and non-interventional studies offer relevant and complementary information to clinical trials, since they have a high external validity. Areas covered: The information regarding the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin, or rivaroxaban alone in clinical practice was reviewed in this manuscript. For this purpose, a search on MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed. The MEDLINE and EMBASE search included both medical subject headings (MeSH) and keywords including: atrial fibrillation (AF) OR warfarin OR clinical practice OR ROCKET AF AND rivaroxaban. Case reports were not considered. Expert commentary: In ROCKET AF, rivaroxaban was at least as effective as warfarin for the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular AF at high risk of stroke, but, importantly, with a lesser risk of intracranial, critical and fatal bleedings. A number of observational comparative and non-comparative studies, with more than 60,000 patients included treated with rivaroxaban, have analyzed the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in real-life patients with AF in different clinical settings. These studies have shown that in clinical practice, rates of stroke and major bleeding were consistently lower than those reported in ROCKET AF, likely due to the lower thromboembolic and bleeding risk observed in these patients.

  18. Factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication among patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Berith; Malm, Dan; Karlsson, Jan-Erik; Årestedt, Kristofer; Broström, Anders

    2017-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a prevalent cardiac arrhythmia. Effective communication of risks (e.g. stroke risk) and benefits of treatment (e.g. oral anticoagulants) is crucial for the process of shared decision making. The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication after a follow-up visit among patients who three months earlier had visited an emergency room for atrial fibrillation related symptoms. A cross-sectional design was used and 322 patients (34% women), mean age 66.1 years (SD 10.5 years) with atrial fibrillation were included in the south of Sweden. Clinical examinations were done post an atrial fibrillation episode. Self-rating scales for communication (Combined Outcome Measure for Risk Communication and Treatment Decision Making Effectiveness), uncertainty in illness (Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Community), mastery of daily life (Mastery Scale), depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and vitality, physical health and mental health (36-item Short Form Health Survey) were used to collect data. Decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, were independently associated with lower confidence in decision making. Absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness were independently associated with lower satisfaction with risk communication. Clinical atrial fibrillation variables or depressive symptoms were not associated with satisfaction with confidence in decision making or satisfaction with risk communication. The final models explained 29.1% and 29.5% of the variance in confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication. Confidence in decision making is associated with decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, while absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness are associated with risk communication satisfaction.

  19. Assessment of psychological responses in patients about to receive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kumiko; Horikawa, Naoshi; Kawase, Eri

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy is considered to be associated with psychological distress. We assessed the mental status, anxiety, and the factors associated with these in cancer patients about to receive radiotherapy. Hospitalized patients about to receive radiotherapy participated. Psychological status was assessed by a psychiatrist, based on interview about the type of anxiety related to cancer or radiotherapy as well as self-rating questionnaires. Eligible data were collected from 94 patients. The incidence of mental disorders was 20%. The total mood disturbance scores were significantly higher in patients with poor performance status. The most common type of anxiety regarding radiotherapy was acute adverse effect, and the predictors were palliative treatment and living alone. Mental disorders, mood disturbance, and anxiety in patients cannot be neglected in radiation oncology practice. Especially careful attention should be paid to patients with these predictive factors. (author)

  20. Atrial fibrillation in patients with sick sinus syndrome: the association with PQ-interval and percentage of ventricular pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Thomsen, Poul Erik B; Højberg, Søren

    2012-01-01

    AimsIn the recently published DANPACE trial, incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) was significantly higher with single-lead atrial (AAIR) pacing than with dual-chamber (DDDR) pacing. The present analysis aimed to evaluate the importance of baseline PQ-interval and percentage of ventricular pacing...... (VP) on AF.Methods and resultsWe analysed data on AF during follow-up in 1415 patients included in the DANPACE trial. In a subgroup of 650 patients with DDDR pacemaker, we studied whether %VP, baseline PQ-interval, and programmed atrio-ventricular interval (AVI) was associated with AF burden measured...... between minimal-paced programmed AVI = 100 and >100 ms (median value), respectively (P= 0.60).ConclusionsThe present study indicates that a longer baseline PQ-interval is associated with an increased risk of AF in patients with sick sinus syndrome. Atrial fibrillation burden is not associated...

  1. Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Transient Ischemic Attack in Accordance with the Tissue-Based Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheef, Björn; Al-Khaled, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) management requires a cardiac evaluation with a Holter electrocardiogram (ECG), preferably a long-term (24 h) electrocardiogram (LT-ECG), to detect atrial fibrillation (AF), which places patients at higher risk of cerebrovascular events. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of AF using ECG and LT-ECG in patients with tissue-based TIA. During a three-year period (starting in 2011), all consecutive patients with tissue-based TIA (no evidence of infarction by brain imaging) were included and prospectively evaluated. Of 861 patients (mean age, 70 ± 13 years; 49.7% women), 854 patients (99.2%) had an ECG at admission, and 338 patients (39.3%) underwent 24-h LT-ECG monitoring during hospitalization. Patients who underwent LT-ECG monitoring were significantly younger (68 vs. 71 years; P=0.001) and experienced longer symptom duration (143 vs. 79 minutes; P=0.024) compared with those who did not. Furthermore, they had lower rates of unilateral weakness (32% vs. 39%; P=0.034) and previous strokes (18% vs. 26%; P=0.007). The LT-ECG investigation was also associated with longer hospitalization (7.9 vs. 5.7 days; Phypertension (OR, 3.1; 95% CI: 1-8.9; P=0.041) and increased glucose level >6.05 mmol/L) on admission (OR, 1.9; 95% CI: 1-3.5; P=0.036). Cardiac evaluation with LT-ECG appears to increase the rate of detected AF and may lead to a change in secondary prophylaxis in patients with tissue-based TIA.

  2. Statin Adherence Is Associated With Reduced Recurrent Stroke Risk in Patients With or Without Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Alexander C; Conell, Carol; Ren, Xiushui; Kamel, Hooman; Chan, Sheila L; Rao, Vivek A; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2017-07-01

    Outpatient statin use reduces the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke among patients with stroke of atherothrombotic cause. It is not known whether statins have similar effects in ischemic stroke caused by atrial fibrillation (AFib). We studied outpatient statin adherence, measured by percentage of days covered, and the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with or without AFib in a 21-hospital integrated healthcare delivery system. Among 6116 patients with ischemic stroke discharged on a statin over a 5-year period, 1446 (23.6%) had a diagnosis of AFib at discharge. The mean statin adherence rate (percentage of days covered) was 85, and higher levels of percentage of days covered correlated with greater degrees of low-density lipoprotein suppression. In multivariable survival models of recurrent ischemic stroke over 3 years, after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, medical comorbidities, and hospital center, higher statin adherence predicted reduced stroke risk both in patients without AFib (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.97) and in patients with AFib (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.81). This association was robust to adjustment for the time in the therapeutic range for international normalized ratio among AFib subjects taking warfarin (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.89). The relationship between statin adherence and reduced recurrent stroke risk is as strong among patients with AFib as it is among patients without AFib, suggesting that AFib status should not be a reason to exclude patients from secondary stroke prevention with a statin. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Thromboembolic and bleeding risks in patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation: oral anticoagulation perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, David F; Madan, Nidhi; Romero, Jorge; Londoño, Alejandra; Villablanca, Pedro A; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2017-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Catheter ablation for AF (CAAF) has emerged as an effective treatment option of rhythm control for patients with symptomatic AF. However, the risk of thromboembolism and bleeding in the periprocedural period represent a worrisome complication of this therapy. The reported incidence of thromboembolic and bleeding events associated with CAAF varies from 0.9% to 5% depending on the CAAF strategy and the anticoagulation regimen used in the periprocedural period. Areas covered: The different anticoagulation regimens used prior to, during, and after CAAF to minimize the risk of thromboembolic and bleeding events are reviewed. The use of uninterrupted oral anticoagulation and appropriate heparin dosing to achieve safe activated clotting time levels are also detailed. A comprehensive approach with assessment of individual risk for thromboembolic and bleeding complications, and understanding the pharmacokinetics of the anticoagulant agents available is also reviewed. Expert opinion: The key advances done in the periprocedural anticoagulation field include the use of uninterrupted anticoagulation strategies in patients undergoing AF ablation and efforts to simplify the selection of patients who need LAA thrombus screening prior to ablation.

  4. Left lateral decubitus position on patients with atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Ramasamy, Mouli

    2017-04-01

    Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) is a cardiovascular disease that affects about 5.7 million people in the US. The most prevalent comorbidity to CHF is Atrial Fibrillation (AF). These two pathologies present in a mutually worsening manner in that patients diagnosed with CHF are more likely to develop AF and patients who are diagnosed with AF are more likely to develop CHF. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been studied for several years and the most recent efforts are in the cellular and molecular basis. In this paper, we focus on manifestation of CHF and AF symptoms as influenced by the posture assumed by a patient. We consider three postures - Left lateral decubitus, right lateral decubitus and supine. We review the clinical evidence gathered thus far relating enhanced sympathetic activity to the left lateral decubitus and supine positions with equivalent evidence on the enhanced vagal activity when the right lateral decubitus posture is assumed. We conclude with a compilation of all the hypotheses on the mechanism by which the right lateral decubitus posture alleviates the symptoms of CHF and AF, and future avenues for investigation.

  5. Osteoporosis prophylaxis in patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Mir Sadat; AlElq, Abdulmohsen H.; AlShafei, Badar A.; AbuJubarac, Mohammed A.; AlTurki, Haifa A.

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis, yet few patients receive proper measures to prevent its development. We retrospectively searched prescription records to determine if patients receiving oral prednisolone were receiving prophylaxis or treatment for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Patients who were prescribed greater or equal to 7.5 milligrams of prednisolone for 6 months or longer during a 6- month period were identified through the prescription monitoring system. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from the patient records, and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were retrieved, when available. Use of oral calcium, vitamin D and anti-resorptives was recorded. One hundred males and 65 females were receiving oral prednisolone for a mean (SD) duration of 40.4 (29.9) months in males and 41.2 (36.4) months in females. Twenty-one females (12.7%) and 5 (3%) males had bone mineral density measured by DEXA. Of those, 10 (47.6%) females and 3 (50%) males were osteoporotic and 11(52.4%) females and 2 (40%) males were osteopenic. Calcium and vitamin D were prescribed to the majority of patients (60% to 80%), but none were prescribed antiresorptive/anabolic therapy. Patients in this study were neither investigated properly nor treated according to the minimum recommendations for the management of GIOP. Physician awareness about the prevention and treatment of GIOP should be a priority for the local health care system. (author)

  6. Features of Modern Anticoagulant Therapy in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Daabul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF in population is very high and continues to grow. According to the existing statistics its prevalence reaches about 2% so it is twice more, than it was considered in the last decade. Prevalence of AF among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD varies from 11 to 22% (according to other data – from 15 to 20% and increases with age, considerably surpassing that in the general population among all age groups. Vast majority of patients with AF need in treatment with anticoagulants to prevent an ischemic stroke and systemic thromboembolisms. However, in case of combination AF and CKD, in addition to increase in frequency of strokes and the thromboembolic events, also the frequency of major bleedings significantly increases that considerably complicates the choice of adequate anticoagulant therapy in such situation. Many years the vitamin K antagonists were the only representatives of a class of anticoagulants for long-term therapy in patients with AF. Their well-known deficiencies (a narrow therapeutic window, need of frequent laboratory control, numerous drug-drug and dietary interactions, unpredictability of a pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics at certain patients promoted search of new medicines, more convenient in use. Direct oral anticoagulants were easier to use, and by results of the main studies didn't yield or exceeded warfarin concerning balance of efficiency and safety. However, they were not specially studied in patients with the reduced kidney function. Features of modern anticoagulant therapy in patients with the nonvalvular AF and CKD are considered in the review. The possibility of the safest use of anticoagulants for patients with decreased creatinine clearance is analyzed.

  7. Renal Impairment and Prognosis of Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Coronary Intervention - The AFCAS Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli M Lahtela

    Full Text Available Renal impairment is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular complications, but the effect of different stages of renal impairment on thrombotic/thromboembolic and bleeding complications in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI remains largely unknown. We sought to evaluate the incidence and clinical impact of four stages of renal impairment in patients with AF undergoing PCI.We assessed renal function by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and outcomes in 781 AF patients undergoing PCI by using the data from a prospective European multicenter registry. End-points included all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE and bleeding events at 12 months.A total of 195 (25% patients had normal renal function (eGFR ≥90 mL/min, 290 (37% mild renal impairment (eGFR 60-89, 263 (34% moderate renal impairment (eGFR 30-59 and 33 (4% severe renal impairment (eGFR <30. Degree of renal impairment remained an independent predictor of mortality and MACCE in an adjusted a Cox regression model. Even patients with mild renal impairment had a higher risk of all-cause mortality (HR 2.25, 95%CI 1.02-4.98, p=0.04 and borderline risk for MACCE (HR 1.56, 95%CI 0.98- 2.50, p=0.06 compared to those with normal renal function.Renal impairment is common in patients with AF undergoing PCI and even mild renal impairment has an adverse prognostic effect in these patients requiring multiple antithrombotic medications.

  8. What Is the Appropriate Lesion Set for Ablation in Patients with Persistent Atrial Fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2017-05-01

    Special attention must be paid to detect, diagnose, and optimize management of reversible or treatable causes of long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LSPAF) such as obesity, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), hypertension, hypo or hyperthyroidism, inflammatory and infectious diseases, and stress. Though, we strongly believe that the role of the pulmonary veins (PVs) is more pronounced in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) than in persistent AF, performing an adequate pulmonary vein isolation is still key in LSPAF. Patients with LSPAF will frequently require a more aggressive mapping and ablative approach. We do not encourage the use of empiric lines or complex fractionated atrial electrograms. Ablation of sites associated with non-PV triggers such as the entire posterior wall, the roof, the anterior part of the left atrium septum, left atrial appendage (LAA), the CS and SVC has been shown to improve the freedom from AF at follow-up when combined with PVs isolation. During the isoproterenol challenge, non-PV triggers are detected in most patients with AF. Mapping non-PV triggers is guided by multiple catheters positioned along both the right and left atriums: a 10-pole circular mapping catheter in the left superior PV recording the far-field LAA activity, the ablation catheter in the right superior PV that records the far-field interatrial septum and a 20-pole catheter with electrodes spanning from the SVC to the CS. With this simple catheter setup, when focal ectopic atrial activity is observed (a single ectopic beat is enough) their activation sequence is compared to that of sinus rhythm, allowing to quickly identify their area of origin. For significant non-PV triggers (repetitive isolated beats, focal atrial tachycardias or beats triggering AF/atrial flutter, a more detailed activation mapping is performed in the area of origin. They are subsequently targeted with focal ablation, exception being the triggers originating from the SVC, LAA or CS, in which

  9. Prophylactic implantable defibrillator in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia and no prior ventricular fibrillation or sustained ventricular tachycardia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corrado, Domenico

    2010-09-21

    The role of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy\\/dysplasia and no prior ventricular fibrillation (VF) or sustained ventricular tachycardia is an unsolved issue.

  10. Digoxin Use and Subsequent Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation With or Without Heart Failure in the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisen, Alon; Ruff, Christian T; Braunwald, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Digoxin is widely used in patients with atrial fibrillation despite the lack of randomized controlled trials. Observational studies report conflicting results regarding its association with mortality, perhaps because of residual confounding by the presence of heart failure (HF). METHO...

  11. Japanese cancer patients' communication style preferences when receiving bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Maiko; Parker, Patricia A; Akechi, Tatsuo; Sakano, Yuji; Baile, Walter F; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2007-07-01

    This study describes the communication style preferences of Japanese patients when receiving bad news, examines the factor structure of the measure for patients' preferences (MPP) in a Japanese population, and explores variables that may be associated with patients' communication style preferences. Five hundred twenty-nine cancer outpatients completed several psychosocial measures including the Japanese version of the MPP (MPP-J), the Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale (MAC), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The patients desired detailed information and a supportive environment when receiving bad news. The MPP-J demonstrated a 5-factor structure: support, facilitation, medical information, clear explanation, and encouraging question-asking. Regression analyses indicated that a female gender, the fighting spirit and anxious preoccupation dimensions of the MAC were positively associated with all 5 MPP-J factors. In conclusion, Japanese cancer patients' preferences for communication when receiving bad news differ somewhat from those of American patients. Japanese physicians should encourage patients to ask questions and should consider the demographic (e.g. gender), medical (disease status) and psychosocial characteristics (fighting spirit and anxious preoccupation) of patients when delivering bad news. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban versus warfarin in patients from mainland China with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: A subgroup analysis from the ROCKET AF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yihong; Hu, Dayi; Stevens, Susanna; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Becker, Richard C; Berkowitz, Scott D; Breithardt, Günter; Hacke, Werner; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hankey, Graeme J; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Nessel, Christopher C; Piccini, Jonathan P; Singer, Daniel E; Fox, Keith A A; Patel, Manesh R

    2017-08-01

    The ROCKET AF study evaluated once-daily rivaroxaban versus dose-adjusted warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In this analysis, we compared rivaroxaban with warfarin in patients with AF from China, East Asia, and the rest of the world (ROW). We assessed baseline demographics and interaction of treatment effects of rivaroxaban versus warfarin among patients from mainland China, other East Asian countries, and ROW. Of the 14,236 patients enrolled in the per-protocol population, 495 were from mainland China, 433 from other East-Asian regions, and 13,308 from the rest of the world (ROW). At baseline, patients from China had significantly higher rates of previous stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) compared with patients from other East Asian regions and ROW (79.6%, 44.6%, 51.6% respectively; p0.12). Numerically higher rates of intracranial bleeding were seen in patients from China receiving warfarin versus rivaroxaban. In patients from China, rates of intracranial hemorrhage were numerically lower among those receiving rivaroxaban and consistent with the overall trial. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT00403767. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Newly diagnosed breast cancer in a patient receiving imatinib mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaygusuz-Atagunduz, Isik; Toptas, Tayfur; Yumuk, Fulden; Firatli-Tuglular, Tulin; Bayik, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is the standard treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Despite imatinib is being used in the treatment of other malignancies as well, its potential role on de novo tumor growth is not known. Secondary malignancies are rarely seen in patients with CML and particularly in those receiving imatinib. Here, we present a CML patient taking imatinib therapy that was diagnosed to have breast cancer and received adjuvant chemo-and radiotherapy with imatinib. We tried to explain co-occurrence of these rare events by probable pathogenetic mechanisms.

  14. Persistent atrial fibrillation worsens heart rate variability, activity and heart rate, as shown by a continuous monitoring by implantable biventricular pacemakers in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Andrea; Gasparini, Maurizio; Lunati, Maurizio; Sassara, Massimo; Padeletti, Luigi; Landolina, Maurizio; Botto, Giovanni Luca; Vincenti, Antonio; Bianchi, Stefano; Denaro, Alessandra; Grammatico, Andrea; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) induces loss of atrial contribution, heart rate irregularity, and fast ventricular rate. The objectives of the study were to accurately measure AF incidence and to investigate the mutual temporal patterns of AF and heart failure (HF) in patients indicated to cardiac resynchronization therapy. Four hundred ten consecutive patients (70% male, age 69 +/- 11) with advanced HF (NYHA = 3.0 +/- 0.6), low ejection fraction (EF = 27 +/- 9%), and ventricular conduction delay (QRS = 165 +/- 29 ms) received a biventricular pacemaker. Enrolled patients were divided into two groups: G1 = 249 patients with no AF history, G2 = 161 patients with history of paroxysmal/persistent AF. In a median follow-up of 13 months, AF episodes longer than 5 minutes occurred in 105 of 249 (42.2%) G1 patients and 76 of 161 (47.2%) G2 patients, while AF episodes longer than one day occurred in 14 of 249 (5.6%) G1 patients and in 36 of 161 (22.4%) G2 patients. Device diagnostics monitored daily values of patient activity, night heart rate (NHR), and heart rate variability (HRV). Comparing 30-day periods before AF onset and during persistent AF, significant (P R(2)= 0.73) with activity, with a significant lower activity associated with NHR >or= 88 bpm. AF is frequent in HF patients. Persistent AF is associated with statistically significant decrease in patient activity and HRV and NHR increase.

  15. Validity and reliability of a new, short symptom rating scale in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härdén, Marie; Nyström, Britta; Kulich, Károly; Carlsson, Jonas; Bengtson, Ann; Edvardsson, Nils

    2009-07-15

    Symptoms related to atrial fibrillation and their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are often evaluated in clinical trials. However, there remains a need for a properly validated instrument. We aimed to develop and validate a short symptoms scale for patients with AF. One hundred and eleven patients with a variety of symptoms related to AF were scheduled for DC cardioversion. The mean age was 67.1 +/- 12.1 years, and 80% were men. The patients completed the new symptoms scale, the Toronto Symptoms Check List (SCL) and the generic Short Form 36 (SF-36) the day before the planned DC cardioversion. Compliance was excellent, with only 1 of 666 answers missing. One item, 'limitations in working capability', was deleted because of a low numerical response rate, as many of the patients were retired. The internal consistency reliability of the remaining six items was 0.81 (Cronbach's alpha). Patients scored highest in the items of 'dyspnoea on exertion', 'limitations in daily life due to AF' and 'fatigue due to AF', with scores of 4.5, 3.3 and 4.5, respectively. There was a good correlation to all relevant SF-36 domains and to the relevant questions of the SCL. The Rasch analyses showed that the items are unidimensional and that they are clearly separated and cover an adequate range. Test-retest reliability was performed in patients who failed DC and was adequate for three of six items, > 0.70. The psychometric characteristics of the new short symptoms scale were found to have satisfactory reliability and validity.

  16. Validity and reliability of a new, short symptom rating scale in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtson Ann

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptoms related to atrial fibrillation and their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL are often evaluated in clinical trials. However, there remains a need for a properly validated instrument. We aimed to develop and validate a short symptoms scale for patients with AF. Methods One hundred and eleven patients with a variety of symptoms related to AF were scheduled for DC cardioversion. The mean age was 67.1 ± 12.1 years, and 80% were men. The patients completed the new symptoms scale, the Toronto Symptoms Check List (SCL and the generic Short Form 36 (SF-36 the day before the planned DC cardioversion. Compliance was excellent, with only 1 of 666 answers missing. Results One item, 'limitations in working capability', was deleted because of a low numerical response rate, as many of the patients were retired. The internal consistency reliability of the remaining six items was 0.81 (Cronbach's α. Patients scored highest in the items of 'dyspnoea on exertion', 'limitations in daily life due to AF' and 'fatigue due to AF', with scores of 4.5, 3.3 and 4.5, respectively. There was a good correlation to all relevant SF-36 domains and to the relevant questions of the SCL. The Rasch analyses showed that the items are unidimensional and that they are clearly separated and cover an adequate range. Test-retest reliability was performed in patients who failed DC and was adequate for three of six items, >0.70. Conclusion The psychometric characteristics of the new short symptoms scale were found to have satisfactory reliability and validity.

  17. Hospitalizations in patients with atrial fibrillation: an analysis from ROCKET AF

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Adam D.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Becker, Richard C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Breithardt, Guenter; Hacke, Werner; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Patel, Manesh R.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims The high costs associated with treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) are primarily due to hospital care, but there are limited data to understand the reasons for and predictors of hospitalization in patients with AF. Methods and results The ROCKET AF trial compared rivaroxaban with warfarin for stroke prophylaxis in AF. We described the frequency of and reasons for hospitalization during study follow-up and utilized Cox proportional hazards models to assess for baseline characteristics associated with all-cause hospitalization. Of 14 171 patients, 14% were hospitalized at least once. Of 2614 total hospitalizations, 41% were cardiovascular including 4% for AF; of the remaining, 12% were for bleeding. Compared with patients not hospitalized, hospitalized patients were older (74 vs. 72 years), and more frequently had diabetes (46 vs. 39%), prior MI (23 vs. 16%), and paroxysmal AF (19 vs. 17%), but less frequently had prior transient ischaemic attack/stroke (49 vs. 56%). After multivariable adjustment, lung disease [hazard ratio (HR) 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29–1.66], diabetes [1.22, (1.11–1.34)], prior MI [1.27, (1.13–1.42)], and renal dysfunction [HR 1.07 per 5 unit GFR < 65 mL/min, (1.04–1.10)] were associated with increased hospitalization risk. Treatment assignment was not associated with differential rates of hospitalization. Conclusion Nearly 1 in 7 of the moderate-to-high-risk patients with AF enrolled in this trial was hospitalized within 2 years, and both AF and bleeding were rare causes of hospitalization. Further research is needed to determine whether care pathways directed at comorbid conditions among AF patients could reduce the need for and costs associated with hospitalization. PMID:27174904

  18. NEW APPROACHES TO INDIVIDUALIZED CHOICE OF ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju. P. Skirdenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate adherence to treatment, mutations of the hemostatic system and food preferences as predictors of choice of optimal anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF.Material and methods. 142 patients with AF were quantitatively evaluated in terms of their adherence to treatment, polymorphism of genes CYP2C9 and VKORC1 and the structure of food preferences.Results. Persons with insufficient adherence to treatment prevailed among AF patients, at that the leading negative factor was the low adherence to medical support, which directly related with the frequency of complications and ineffectiveness of anticoagulant therapy. The very high prevalence of gene mutations CYP2C9 and VKORC1 (more than 2.3 per 1 respondent was detected in the study sample, which makes screening pharmacogenetic testing ineffective and is an independent risk factor for the Omsk region. Consumption by the population of food products that can affect anticoagulant therapy with warfarin does not have special regional characteristics and does not differ significantly among respondents both without AF and with AF (99.2±41.9 vs 100.8±38.6 points; р=0.82 as well as among patients with AF both taking and not taking warfarin (85.4±47.0 vs 107.3±42.1 points, p=0.9.Conclusion. Individualized choice of anticoagulant in patients with AF should be based on a structured quantitative assessment of adherence to treatment. In low adherence to treatment and choice of warfarin as an anticoagulant, its safety should be confirmed by the assessment of pharmacogenetic status and/or dietary preferences of the patient.

  19. Left atrial appendage: morphology and function in patients with paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwan-Cheol; Shin, Jinho; Ban, Ji-Eun; Choi, Jong-Il; Park, Sang-Weon; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2013-04-01

    The anatomical and functional characteristics of the left atrial appendage (LAA) and its relationships with anatomical remodeling and ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been clearly established. The purpose of this study was to determine whether functional and morphological features of the LAA independently predict clinical outcome and stroke in patients with AF who underwent catheter ablation (CA). Two hundred sixty-four patients with AF, including 176 with paroxysmal AF (PAF, 54.0 ± 11.4 years old, M:F = 138:38) and 88 with persistent AF (PeAF, 56.4 ± 9.6 years old, M:F = 74:14) were studied. Of these patients, 31 (11.7 %) had a history of stroke/TIA (transient ischemic attack). The LA and LAA volumes were 124.0 ± 42.4 and 24.9 ± 4.3 ml in PeAF, these values were greater than those in PAF (81.2 ± 24.8 ml and 21.2 ± 5.1 ml, P stroke, stroke patients had larger LA volume (106.9 ± 23.0 vs. 94.0 ± 38.9 ml, P = 0.004) and had lower LAA EF (50.0 ± 11.0 vs. 65.7 ± 13.4 %, P stroke were age (P = 0.002) and LAA EF (P stroke/TIA and recurrence of AF after CA in paroxysmal AF patients. Further large scaled prospective study is required for validation.

  20. Analysis of immune cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with atrial fibrillation or sinus rhythm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Smorodinova

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common arrhythmia and despite obvious clinical importance remains its pathogenesis only partially explained. A relation between inflammation and AF has been suggested by findings of increased inflammatory markers in AF patients.The goal of this study was to characterize morphologically and functionally CD45-positive inflammatory cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with AF as compared to sinus rhythm (SR.We examined 46 subjects (19 with AF, and 27 in SR undergoing coronary bypass or valve surgery. Peroperative bioptic samples of the left and the right atrial tissue were examined using immunohistochemistry.The number of CD3+ T-lymphocytes and CD68-KP1+ cells were elevated in the left atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR. Immune cell infiltration of LA was related to the rhythm, but not to age, body size, LA size, mitral regurgitation grade, type of surgery, systemic markers of inflammation or presence of diabetes or hypertension. Most of CD68-KP1+ cells corresponded to dendritic cell population based on their morphology and immunoreactivity for DC-SIGN. The numbers of mast cells and CD20+ B-lymphocytes did not differ between AF and SR patients. No foci of inflammation were detected in any sample.An immunohistochemical analysis of samples from patients undergoing open heart surgery showed moderate and site-specific increase of inflammatory cells in the atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR, with prevailing population of monocyte-macrophage lineage. These cells and their cytokine products may play a role in atrial remodeling and AF persistence.

  1. SCN5A mutations and polymorphisms in patients with ventricular fibrillation during acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Tim; Bugert, Peter; Borggrefe, Martin; Elmas, Elif

    2014-10-01

    Mutations in the SCN5A gene encoding the Nav1.5 channel α-subunit are known to be risk factors of arrhythmia, including Brugada Syndrome and Long QT syndrome subtype 3. The present study focused on the role of SCN5A variants in the development of ventricular fibrillation (VF) during acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Since VF during AMI is the major cause of sudden death in the Western world, SCN5A mutations represent genetic risk factors for sudden death. By exon re-sequencing, the entire coding region and flanking intron regions were sequenced in 46 AMI/VF+ patients. In total, nine single nucleotide variants were identified of which four represented common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 87G>A, 1673A>G, IVS16‑6C>T and 5457T>A). Only five rare variants were identified, each in only one patient. Only two of the rare variants represented missense mutations (3578G>A and 4786T>A). The common SNPs and the missense mutations were also genotyped using polymerase chain reaction methods in 79 AMI/VF‑ patients and 480 healthy controls. The SNPs did not demonstrate significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies between the study groups. The 3578G>A mutation was identified in one out of the 480 controls, whereas the 4786T>A mutation was not present in AMI/VF- patients and controls. In conclusion, the majority of AMI/VF+ patients demonstrated a wild type sequence or common SNPs in SCN5A. Only two out of 46 (4.3%) AMI/VF+ patients revealed mutations that may be involved in Nav1.5 dysfunction and VF. However, this requires further functional validation.

  2. [The altered endothelial function in patients with arterial hypertension and different forms of atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podzolkov, V I; Tarzimanova, A I; Mokhammadi, L N

    2014-01-01

    The role of endothelial function in the development of cardiovascular diseases has recently attracted attention of many researchers due to increasingly more data suggesting the relationship between endothelial dysfunction (ED) and disturbed cardiac rhythms including atrial fibrillation (AF). ED is known to precede lesions in target organs related to arterial hypertension (AH) which makes the study of endothelial function as an early marker of vascular lesions in AH and AF a topical issue. To study changes of endothelial function in patients with AH and AF. Group 1 included 84 patients with AH (inclusion criteria: essential AH and confirmed paroxysm of AF), group 2 contained 20 patients with AH and permanent AF, control group was comprised of 30 AH patients without AF. The vasomotor function of endothelium was evaluated from reactive hyperemia determined by the ultrasonic method, blood samples for biochemical analysis and determination of Willebrand factor (WF) were taken during fasting. Patients of group 2 showed significant changes of endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the brachial artery. Its diameter within 60 sec after decompression increased by 5.8 +/- 0.9% and 12.3 +/- 1.2% in groups 1 and 3 respectively (p < 0.05). In group 2, collagen-binding activity of WF increased significantly to 1500 +/-140 U/100 ml compared with 1060 +/- 120 and 840 +/- 110 in groups 2 and 3 (p < 0.05). Patients with AH and persistent AF had altered endothelial function in the form of significant decrease of endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the brachial artery and increase of collagen-binding activity of WF.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: Meta analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Gang, E-mail: cjr.sungang@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Li, Min [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Jiang, Zhi-wei [Department of Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 169, Changle West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Xu, Lin [Department of Medical Cardiology, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Peng, Zhao-hui; Ding, Juan; Li, Li [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, No. 25, Shifan Road, Jinan, Shandong Province 250031 (China); Jin, Zhi-tao [Department of Cardiology, General Hospital of the Second Artillery, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Rationale and objective: To synthesize the available data to underscore the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and methods: We searched in the electronic databases of PubMed for all published studies that examined patients with AF using DSCT. We used an exact binomial rendition of the bivariate mixed-effects regression model to synthesize the diagnostic data. Results: The positive and negative likelihood ratios (LRs) at the patient level were 6.0 (CI, 3.6–10.1) and 0.03(CI, 0.004–0.2), respectively. The negative predictive values higher than 90% were available for a CAD prevalence <78%. The pooled vessel- and segment-level estimates showed higher positive and negative LRs than the patient-level estimates (15.3 [CI, 9.8–23.9] and 0.1 [CI, 0.07–0.3]; 25.1 [CI, 10.8–58.5] and 0.2 [CI, 0.2–0.3], respectively). No statistically significant heterogeneity between studies and publication bias were found at the patient level estimate. A sensitivity analysis showed that no study influenced the pooled results larger than 0.02. Conclusions: Cardiac angiography with DSCT can be applied as an imaging test for ruling out CAD in patient with AF. However, DSCT angiography may be not an effective tool for risk stratification for the high negative LR at the artery and segment levels.

  4. Diastolic dysfunction predicts new-onset atrial fibrillation and cardiovascular events in patients with acute myocardial infarction and depressed left ventricular systolic function: a CARISMA substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jons, Christian; Joergensen, Rikke Moerch; Hassager, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between diastolic dysfunction and long-term occurrence of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) and cardiac events in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction.......The aim of this study was to investigate the association between diastolic dysfunction and long-term occurrence of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) and cardiac events in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction....

  5. Updated European Heart Rhythm Association practical guide on the use of non-vitamin-K antagonist anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: Executive summary

    OpenAIRE

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Verhamme, Peter; Alings, Marco; Antz, Matthias; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Oldgren, Jonas; Sinnaeve, Peter; Camm, A. John; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) published a Practical Guide on the use of non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) (Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M, Antz M, Hacke W, Oldgren J, Sinnaeve P, Camm AJ, Kirchhof P, European Heart Rhythm A. European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Europace 2013;15:625-651; Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M,...

  6. Association rules to identify complications of cerebral infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sun-Ju; Son, Chang-Sik; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Dae-Joon; Park, Hyoung-Seob; Kim, Yoon-Nyun

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to find risk factors that are associated with complications of cerebral infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and to discover useful association rules among these factors. The risk factors with respect to cerebral infarction were selected using logistic regression analysis with the Wald's forward selection approach. The rules to identify the complications of cerebral infarction were obtained by using the association rule mining (ARM) approach. We observed that 4 independent factors, namely, age, hypertension, initial electrocardiographic rhythm, and initial echocardiographic left atrial dimension (LAD), were strong predictors of cerebral infarction in patients with AF. After the application of ARM, we obtained 4 useful rules to identify complications of cerebral infarction: age (>63 years) and hypertension (Yes) and initial ECG rhythm (AF) and initial Echo LAD (>4.06 cm); age (>63 years) and hypertension (Yes) and initial Echo LAD (>4.06 cm); hypertension (Yes) and initial ECG rhythm (AF) and initial Echo LAD (>4.06 cm); age (>63 years) and hypertension (Yes) and initial ECG rhythm (AF). Among the induced rules, 3 factors (the initial ECG rhythm [i.e., AF], initial Echo LAD, and age) were strongly associated with each other.

  7. Comparison of benefit between dabigatran and warfarin among patients with atrial fibrillation: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal K Sulieman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Warfarin is recognized as the standard antithrombotic agent for stroke prevention. However, new oral anticoagulant such as dabigatran constitutes huge improvement to compensate for the limitation of warfarin. A literature review was performed to compare and contrast the overall benefit of dabigatran and warfarin among patients with atrial fibrillation. We utilized HighWire as the data source for randomized controlled trials based on inclusion and exclusion criteria (from January 2007 to September 2013. Descriptive and quantitative information related to stroke and major bleeding were extracted from each trial. After a comprehensive screening of 298 search results, 17 studies which enrolled a total of 127,594 patients were included. Warfarin was found to have higher mean event rates for incidence of stroke, major bleeding, and net clinical benefit compared to dabigatran 110 mg and dabigatran 150 mg. Dabigatran 110 mg has higher rate of stroke and net clinical benefit than dabigatran 150 mg with less major hemorrhage. Overall, dabigatran had higher efficacy and safety profile than warfarin. Further research is required to determine the clinical feasibility of dabigatran in real-life practice.

  8. Assessment of Web-based education resources informing patients about stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, E; Bajorek, B V

    2016-12-01

    The importance of 'shared decision-making' is much emphasized in recent clinical guidelines regarding stroke management in atrial fibrillation (AF), more so following the inclusion of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) among the treatment options. It is important that patients are navigated through balanced and unbiased information about the available treatment options, so as to understand the risk and benefits associated with the therapies, and to enable them to accordingly communicate their concerns and views with their clinicians prior to therapy selection. Given the increasing popularity of the Internet as a source of health information, the specific objectives of this study were to identify what aspects of thromboprophylaxis (antithrombotic treatment options) were most commonly described in these resources, both in terms of content, that is to report the information provided (quantitative) and the underlying themes underpinning this content, and in terms of how this information might guide patient preferences (qualitative). Resources for patients were identified via online search engines (Google, Yahoo, Ask, Bing), using the terms 'atrial fibrillation' and 'stroke' combined with patient/consumer information, patient/consumer resources and patient/consumer education. The researchers employed pragmatic (mix-method) approach to analyse the information presented within the resources using manual inductive coding, at two levels of analysis: manifest (reported surface theme or codes that are obvious and are countable) and latent (thematic, interpretative presentation of the content in the data set). In total, 33 resources were reviewed. The 'manifest-level' analysis found that warfarin was the most frequently mentioned thromboprophylactic option among the anticoagulants, being cited in all resources, followed by the NOACs - dabigatran (82·3% of resources), rivaroxaban (73·5%) and apixaban (67·6%). Only one-third of resources discussed the role of stroke

  9. Factors predicting hyperkalemia in patients with cirrhosis receiving spironolactone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Z.; Mumtaz, K.; Salam, A.; Jafri, W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the factors leading to hyperkalemia in patients with cirrhosis receiving spironolactone. Results: Patients with hyperkalemia (K>5 mmol/l) had higher blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and bilirubin levels (p=0.004, 0.001 and 0.044 respectively). Their serum sodium and albumin levels were lower (p=0.000 and 0.017 respectively). They had advanced cirrhosis with high Pugh score (p=0.003). These patients were on higher dose of spironolactone (p=0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that dose of spironolactone > 100 mg/day, serum creatinine >1.3 mg/dl, persistence of ascites and edema, and female gender were important predictors of development of hyperkalemia. Conclusion: Patients with cirrhosis receiving high dose of the diuretic, having edema, ascites and high serum creatinine are at the greater risk of developing hyperkalemia during spironolactone therapy. (author)

  10. Incidence of atrial fibrillation in relation to changing heart rate over time in hypertensive patients: the LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okin, Peter M; Wachtell, Kristian; Kjeldsen, Sverre E

    2008-01-01

    Onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been linked to changes in autonomic tone, with increasing heart rate (HR) immediately before AF onset in some patients suggesting a possible role of acute increases in sympathetic activity in AF onset. Although losartan therapy and decreasing ECG left...... ventricular hypertrophy are associated with decreased AF incidence, the relationship of HR changes over time to development of AF has not been examined....

  11. Which risk score best predicts perioperative outcomes in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients undergoing noncardiac surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Sean; Youngson, Erik; Ezekowitz, Justin A; McAlister, Finlay A

    2014-07-01

    Patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) are at increased risk for adverse events after noncardiac surgery. The Revised Cardiac Index (RCI) is commonly used to predict perioperative events; however, the prognostic utility of NVAF risk scores (CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and R2CHADS2) has not been evaluated in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. Using a population-based data set of NVAF patients (n = 32,160) who underwent major or minor noncardiac surgery between April 1, 1999, and November 30, 2009, in Alberta, Canada, we examined the incremental prognostic value of the CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and R2CHADS2 scores over the RCI using continuous net reclassification improvement (NRI). The primary composite outcome was 30-day mortality, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or systemic embolism. The median age was 73 years, 55.1% were male, 6.6% had a previous thromboembolism, 17% of patients underwent major surgery, and the median risk scores were as follows: RCI = 1, CHADS2 = 1, CHA2DS2-VASc = 3, and R2CHADS2 = 2. The incidence of our 30-day composite was 4.2% (mortality 3.3%; stroke, transient ischemic attack, or systemic embolism 1.2%); and c indices were 0.65 for the RCI, 0.67 for the CHADS2 (NRI 14.3%, P NRI 10.7%, P NRI 11.4%, P NRI 12.3%, 8.4%, and 13.3%, respectively; all Ps < .01). In NVAF patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, the CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and R2CHADS2 scores all improved the prediction of major perioperative events including mortality compared to the RCI. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anxiety, depression in patients receiving chemotherapy for solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, S.; Jehangir, S.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of anxiety and depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumors using Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS). Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Out-patient department of Armed Forces Institute of Mental Health, Rawalpindi from June 2011 to December 2011. Methodology: Consecutive non probability sampling technique was used to select patients of age (25-70 years), male or female, who had received atleast 03 cycles of chemotherapy for solid tumors. Those with history of prior psychiatric illness, current use of psychotropic medication or psychoactive substance use, and any major bereavement in past one year were excluded from the study. After taking informed consent, relevant socio- demographic data was collected and HADS was administered. HADS-A cut off score of 7 was taken as significant anxiety while a HADS-D cut off score of 7 was taken as significant depression. Results: The total number of participants was 209. The mean age of patients was 42.9 years, with 55.5% males and 44.5% females. Overall 33/209 (15.8%) patients had anxiety while 56/209 (26.8%) were found to have depression. There was a higher frequency of anxiety and depression in younger patients (less than age 40 years), females, patients who were single or divorced, and patients receiving chemotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chemotherapy suffer from considerable levels of anxiety and depression, thus highlighting the need for specialized interventions. (author)

  13. Patients With Brain Tumors: Who Receives Postacute Occupational Therapy Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincy; Xiong, Chen; Colantonio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data on the utilization of occupational therapy among patients with brain tumors have been limited to those with malignant tumors and small samples of patients outside North America in specialized palliative care settings. We built on this research by examining the characteristics of patients with brain tumors who received postacute occupational therapy services in Ontario, Canada, using health care administrative data. Between fiscal years 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, 3,199 patients with brain tumors received occupational therapy services in the home care setting after hospital discharge; 12.4% had benign brain tumors, 78.2% had malignant brain tumors, and 9.4% had unspecified brain tumors. However, patients with benign brain tumors were older (mean age=63.3 yr), and a higher percentage were female (65.2%). More than 90% of patients received in-home occupational therapy services. Additional research is needed to examine the significance of these differences and to identify factors that influence access to occupational therapy services in the home care setting. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  14. Thromboembolic risk in 16 274 atrial fibrillation patients undergoing direct current cardioversion with and without oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Lock; Jepsen, Rikke Malene H G; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To study the risk of thromboembolism in a nationwide cohort of atrial fibrillation patients undergoing direct current (DC) cardioversion with or without oral anticoagulant coverage. METHODS AND RESULTS: A retrospective study of 16 274 patients in Denmark discharged from hospital after a first...... and by multivariable adjusted Cox proportional-hazard models. During the initial 30 days following discharge, the thromboembolic incidence rate was 10.33 per 100 patient-years for the no prior oral anticoagulant therapy group [n = 5084 (31.2%)], as compared with 4.00 per 100 patient-years for the prior oral...

  15. Atrial fibrillation and female sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmino, Matteo; Battaglia, Alberto; Gallo, Cristina; Gili, Sebastiano; Matta, Mario; Castagno, Davide; Ferraris, Federico; Giustetto, Carla; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia. Its prevalence increases with age and preferentially affects male patients. Over 75 years of age, however, female patients being more prevalent, the absolute number of patients affected is similar between sexes. Despite this, few data are available in the literature concerning sex-related differences in atrial fibrillation patients. The present systematic review therefore considers comorbidities, referring symptoms, quality of life, pharmacological approaches and trans-catheter ablation in female rather than in male atrial fibrillation patients in search of parameters that may have an impact on the treatment outcome. In brief, female atrial fibrillation patients more commonly present comorbidities, leading to a higher prevalence of persistent atrial fibrillation; moreover, they refer to hospital care later and with a longer disease history. Atrial fibrillation symptoms relate to low quality of life in female patients; in fact, atrial fibrillation paroxysm usually presents higher heart rate, leading to preferentially adopt a rate rather than a rhythm-control strategy. Female atrial fibrillation patients present an increased risk of stroke, worsened by the lower oral anticoagulant prescription rate related to the concomitant higher haemorrhagic risk profile. Trans-catheter ablation is under-used in female patients and, on the contrary, they are more commonly affected by anti-arrhythmic drug side effects.

  16. Use of an interdisciplinary, participatory design approach to develop a usable patient self-assessment tool in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacCallum L

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lori MacCallum,1,2 Heather McGaw,1 Nazanin Meshkat,3 Alissia Valentinis,4 Leslie Beard Ashley,5 Rajan Sacha Bhatia,3,6,7 Kaye Benson,7 Noah Ivers,6,8 Kori Leblanc,2,7 Dante Morra3,5,7 1Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, 2Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 3Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, 4Taddle Creek Family Health Team, Toronto, 5Trillium Health Partners, Mississauga, 6Women's College Hospital, Toronto, 7Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, University Health Network, Toronto, 8Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: After identifying that significant care gaps exist within the management of atrial fibrillation (AF, a patient-focused tool was developed to help patients better assess and manage their AF. This tool aims to provide education and awareness regarding the management of symptoms and stroke risk associated with AF, while engaging patients to identify if their condition is optimally managed and to become involved in their own care. An interdisciplinary group of health care providers and designers worked together in a participatory design approach to develop the tool with input from patients. Usability testing was completed with 22 patients of varying demographics to represent the characteristics of the patient population. The findings from usability testing interviews were used to further improve and develop the tool to improve ease of use. A physician-facing tool was also developed to help to explain the tool and provide a brief summary of the 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines. By incorporating patient input and human-centered design with the knowledge, experience, and medical expertise of health care providers, we have used an approach in developing the tool that tries to more effectively meet patients' needs. Keywords: patient education, atrial fibrillation, care gaps

  17. Caregiver Burden in Patients Receiving Ranibizumab Therapy for Neovascular Age Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Angus; Burton, Ben; Hykin, Phil; Sivaprasad, Sobha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the caregiver burden and factors determining the burden in patients receiving ranibizumab therapy for neovascular AMD (nAMD). Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of 250 matched patient caregiver dyads across three large ophthalmic treatment centres in United Kingdom. The primary outcome was the subjective caregiver burden measured using caregiver reaction assessment scale (CRA). Objective caregiver burden was determined by the caregiver tasks and level of care provided. The factors that may predict the caregiver burden such as the patient’s visual acuity of the better eye and vision related quality of life, demographics, satisfaction and support provided by the healthcare and the health status of the dyads were also collected and assessed in a hierarchical regression model. Results The mean CRA score was 3.2±0.5, similar to the score reported by caregivers for atrial fibrillation who require regular hospital appointments for monitoring their thromboprophylaxis. Caregiver tasks including accompanying for hospital appointments for eye treatment and patient’s visual acuity in the better eye were the biggest contributors to the caregiver burden hierarchical model explaining 18% and 11% of the variance respectively. Conclusion Ranibizumab therapy for nAMD is associated with significant caregiver burden. Both disease impact and treatment frequency contributed to the overall burden. PMID:26056840

  18. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation : emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options-a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Bax, Jeroen; Hylek, Elaine; Kaab, Stefan; Schotten, Ulrich; Wegscheider, Karl; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Ezekowitz, Michael; Diener, Hans; Haegeli, Laurent; Heidbuchel, Hein; Lane, Deirdre; Mont, Luis; Willems, Stephan; Dorian, Paul; Aunes-Jansson, Maria; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Borentain, Maria; Breitenstein, Stefanie; Brueckmann, Martina; Cater, Nilo; Clemens, Andreas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Dubner, Sergio; Edvardsson, Nils G.; Friberg, Leif; Goette, Andreas; Gulizia, Michele; Hatala, Robert; Horwood, Jenny; Szumowski, Lukas; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Josef; Leute, Angelika; Lobban, Trudie; Meyer, Ralf; Millerhagen, Jay; Morgan, John; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Baertels, Christoph; Oeff, Michael; Paar, Dieter; Polifka, Juergen; Ravens, Ursula; Rosin, Ludger; Stegink, W.; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Vardas, Panos; Vincent, Alphons; Walter, Maureen; Breithardt, Guenter; Camm, A. John

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes the

  19. Effectiveness and Safety of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Asian Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Myung-Jin; Choi, Eue-Keun; Han, Kyung-Do; Lee, So-Ryoung; Lim, Woo-Hyun; Oh, Seil; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-11-01

    There are limited real-world data comparing the effectiveness and safety of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and warfarin in Asians with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety between NOACs and warfarin users in the Korean atrial fibrillation population, with particular focus on high-risk patients. Using the Korean National Health Insurance Service database, we analyzed the risk of ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) events, and all-cause death in NOAC users (n=11 611 total, n=5681 taking rivaroxaban, n=3741 taking dabigatran, and n=2189 taking apixaban) compared with propensity score-matched warfarin users (n=23 222) among patients with high-risk atrial fibrillation (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score ≥2) between 2014 and 2015. NOAC treatment was associated with similar risk of ischemic stroke and lower risk of ICH and all-cause mortality compared with warfarin. All 3 NOACs were associated with a similar risk of ischemic stroke and a lower risk of ICH compared with warfarin. Dabigatran and apixaban were associated with a lower risk of total mortality and the composite net clinical outcome (ischemic stroke, ICH, and all-cause death) compared with warfarin, whereas this was nonsignificant for rivaroxaban. Among previously oral anticoagulant-naive patients (n=23 262), dabigatran and apixaban were superior to warfarin for ICH prevention, whereas rivaroxaban and warfarin were associated with similar risk of ICH. In real-world practice among a high-risk Asian atrial fibrillation population, all 3 NOACs demonstrated similar risk of ischemic stroke and lower risk of ICH compared with warfarin. All-cause mortality was significantly lower only with dabigatran and apixaban. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Effect of race on outcomes (stroke and death) in patients >65 years with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabra, Rajesh; Cram, Peter; Girotra, Saket; Vaughan Sarrazin, Mary

    2015-07-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with stroke and death. We sought to determine whether there are any racial differences in the outcomes of death and stroke in patients with AF. We used Medicare administrative data from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2011, to identify 517,941 patients with newly diagnosed AF. Of these, 452,986 patients (87%) were non-Hispanic white, 36,425 (7%) were black, and 28,530 (6%) were Hispanic. The association between race and outcomes of death and stroke were measured using Cox proportional hazard models. Over a median follow-up period of 20.3 months, blacks had a significantly higher hazard of death (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43 to 1.48; p HR = 1.66; 95% CI 1.57 to 1.75; p controlling for pre-existing co-morbidities, the higher hazard of death in blacks was eliminated (HR 0.95; 95% CI 0.93 to 0.96; p HR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.38 to 1.55; p HR = 1.11; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.14; p HR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.29; p HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.80 to 0.84; p controlling for pre-existing co-morbidities, and the relative hazard of stroke was also attenuated (HR = 1.11; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.18; p 65 years with newly diagnosed AF, the risks of death and stroke are higher in blacks and Hispanics compared with whites. The increased risk was eliminated or significantly reduced after adjusting for pre-existing co-morbidities. AF may be a marker for underlying co-morbidities in black and Hispanic patients who may be at a higher mortality risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Apixaban vs. warfarin with concomitant aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the ARISTOTLE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, John H; Lopes, Renato D; Thomas, Laine; Alings, Marco; Atar, Dan; Aylward, Philip; Goto, Shinya; Hanna, Michael; Huber, Kurt; Husted, Steen; Lewis, Basil S; McMurray, John J V; Pais, Prem; Pouleur, Hubert; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Verheugt, Freek W A; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Granger, Christopher B; Wallentin, Lars

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the effect of concomitant aspirin use on the efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In ARISTOTLE, 18 201 patients were randomized to apixaban 5 mg twice daily or warfarin. Concomitant aspirin use was left to the discretion of the treating physician. In this predefined analysis, simple and marginal structured models were used to adjust for baseline and time-dependent confounders associated with aspirin use. Outcome measures included stroke or systemic embolism, ischaemic stroke, myocardial infarction, mortality, major bleeding, haemorrhagic stroke, major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding, and any bleeding. On Day 1, 4434 (24%) patients were taking aspirin. Irrespective of concomitant aspirin use, apixaban reduced stroke or systemic embolism [with aspirin: apixaban 1.12% vs. warfarin 1.91%, hazard ratio (HR) 0.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39-0.85 vs. without aspirin: apixaban 1.11% vs. warfarin 1.32%, HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.66-1.07; P interaction = 0.10] and caused less major bleeding than warfarin (with aspirin: apixaban 3.10% vs. warfarin 3.92%, HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.60-0.99 vs. without aspirin: apixaban 1.82% vs. warfarin 2.78%, HR without aspirin 0.65, 95% CI 0.55-0.78; P interaction = 0.29). Similar results were seen in the subgroups of patients with and without arterial vascular disease. Apixaban had similar beneficial effects on stroke or systemic embolism and major bleeding compared with warfarin, irrespective of concomitant aspirin use.

  2. Inferior J waves in patients with vasospastic angina might be a risk factor for ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumimoto, Tomoko; Ueyama, Takeshi; Shimizu, Akihiko; Yoshiga, Yasuhiro; Ono, Makoto; Kato, Takayoshi; Ishiguchi, Hironori; Okamura, Takayuki; Yamada, Jutaro; Yano, Masafumi

    2017-09-01

    There is little information about the relationship between J waves and the occurrence of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in patients with vasospastic angina (VSA). The present study aimed to assess the incidence of J waves and the occurrence of VF in patients with VSA. The subjects consisted of 62 patients with VSA diagnosed by acetylcholine provocation tests in our institution from 2002 to 2014. We investigated the VF events, prevalence of J waves, and relationship between the VF events and J waves. J waves were observed in 16 patients (26%) and VF events were documented in 11 (18%). The incidence of VF in the patients with J waves was significantly higher than that in those without J waves (38% vs 11%, p=0.026). J waves were observed in the inferior leads in 14 patients, lateral leads in 5, and anterior leads in 3. A univariate analysis indicated that the incidence of VF in the inferior leads of J wave positive patients (46%=6/14) was significantly (p=0.01) higher than that in the inferior leads of J wave negative patients (10%=5/48). The J waves in the anterior and/or lateral leads were not related to the incidence of VF. Notched type and slurred type J waves were not associated with VF. A multivariate analysis revealed that J waves in VSA patients were associated with VF [odds ratio (OR) 6.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-29.93, p=0.02] and organic stenosis (OR 6.98, 95% CI 1.39-35.08, p=0.02). Further, J waves in the inferior leads were strongly correlated with VF (OR 11.85, 95% CI 2.05-68.42, p=0.006). The results suggest that the existence of J waves, especially in the inferior leads, might be a risk factor for VF in VSA patients. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Atrial Fibrillation Identified During Echocardiography in a Patient with Recurrent Cardioembolic Events: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christia, Panagiota; Katsa, Ioanna; Ocava, Lenore; Faillace, Robert

    2016-03-02

    Stroke is the major cause of disability and the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. In 30-40% of strokes the etiology remains uncertain or unknown. Identifying the cause of a cerebrovascular event offers the opportunity for an intervention that may decrease the risk of future stroke and thus prevent the resultant impairment. We report the case of an 80-year-old African American woman with a prior right middle cerebral artery stroke, who presented to the hospital with new left-sided weakness and was found to have a new right-sided frontal lobe infarct. Twenty-four hour Holter monitoring performed during this hospitalization and prior 24-h electrocardiogram (ECG) recording did not reveal an arrhythmia. However, the patient was found to have an isolated episode of atrial fibrillation (AF) during an echocardiogram as part of the evaluation for stroke etiology. AF is an important and treatable cause of recurrent stroke and needs to be ruled out by thorough evaluation before the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke is assigned. Despite meticulous diagnostic work-up, many strokes caused by paroxysmal AF remain undetected and longer ECG monitoring (>24 h) may be required.

  4. Atrioventricular nodal ablation in patients with resynchronization therapy and atrial fibrillation - long term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, Arleen; Færestrand, Svein; Hoff, Per Ivar; Schuster, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Atrioventricular nodal ablation (AVNA) is recommended for patients (pts) with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) having atrial fibrillation (AF) and incomplete ventricular capture (Class IIa, level B). AVNA reduces mortality and improves the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class during intermediate term follow-up. The objectives were to study the long-term outcome regarding quality of life (QoL) and survival of our CRT pts after AVNA. 37 CRT-pts undergoing AVNA due to inadequate biventricular pacing were included in the study. Data were retrospectively obtained from clinical records and through telephone interviews. Twenty pts died during the follow-up period of average 30.6 ± 24 months. After AVNA the ventricular capture improved significantly from 68.4 ± 23% to 98.5 ± 2% (p < 0.001). A significant and sustained improvement of average 0.3 ± 0.5 (p = 0.001) in NYHA functional class was found. Additionally a large percentage of pts discontinued taking rate reducing drugs with potential severe side effects. AVNA in CRT pts was safe and effective. The treatment resulted in a sustained improvement in QoL, including long-term improvement in NYHA functional class.

  5. Identification of a KCNE2 gain-of-function mutation in patients with familial atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yiqing; Xia, Min; Jin, Qingfeng

    2004-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. We first reported an S140G mutation of KCNQ1, an alpha subunit of potassium channels, in one Chinese kindred with AF. However, the molecular defects and cellular mechanisms in most patients with AF...... remain to be identified. We evaluated 28 unrelated Chinese kindreds with AF and sequenced eight genes of potassium channels (KCNQ1, HERG, KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNE3, KCNE4, KCNE5, and KCNJ2). An arginine-to-cysteine mutation at position 27 (R27C) of KCNE2, the beta subunit of the KCNQ1-KCNE2 channel responsible...... for a background potassium current, was found in 2 of the 28 probands. The mutation was present in all affected members in the two kindreds and was absent in 462 healthy unrelated Chinese subjects. Similar to KCNQ1 S140G, the mutation had a gain-of-function effect on the KCNQ1-KCNE2 channel; unlike long QT...

  6. [Urinary lithiasis secondary to medication in HIV+ patients receiving Indinavir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Escudero, Joaquín Ulises; López Alcina, Emilio; Ordoño Domínguez, Felipe; Fabuel Deltoro, Milagros; Serrano de la Cruz Torrijos, Francisco; Montoliu García, Ana; Ramada Benlloch, Francisco; Marqués Vidal, Emilio

    2008-01-01

    Therapy with protease inhibitors is commonly used in patients infected by human inmunodeficency virus (HIV). 20% of the administered dose is excreted by the kidney, and when alkaline urine is present, indinavir may crystallize forming stones and patients may experience renal colic due to this fact. Between January 1998 and June 2005, 26 patients receiving antiretroviral treatment with protease inhibitors received care at our hospital because of renal colic or flank pain. All of them underwent physical examination, echography and urography as well as blood and urine analysis. Patients were treated ambulatory excepting those in whom oral analgesics were insufficient to control the pain. All patients had been treated with indinavir for longer than 12 months. They represented 4% of all patients treated with the recommended dose of Crivixan. Most of them presented flank pain, associated in most cases to microhaematuria. Five of them required hospitalization because of persistent pain in spite of endovenous analgesia. Imaging tests (echography and urography) showed functional delay of the kidney (2 cases), ureteral stasis (4 cases) and little lithiasic concretions of mild radiologic density (5 cases). Urinalysis revealed suggestive christaluria and alkaline pH. All patients required hidratation and analgesic treatment. In 3 patients indinavir dose was reduced, it was retired in another one, and 100 mg of rito-navir were added in another one. Unsuccesfuly ureteral cateterization was tried in one patient. All of them presented symptomatic improvement. We ought to know the capability of indinavir to form urolithiasis in HIV patients treated with protease inhibitors, although its use is decreasing along time. Prevalence of urolithiasis in these patients seems to be higher as length of treatment becomes longer. Metabolic alterations in urine have been proved in these patients, contributing to a higher incidence of lithiasis than in general population.

  7. Expressive writing in patients receiving palliative care: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, Eduardo; Willey, Jie; Cohen, Marlene; Palmer, J Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care often experience severe physical and psychosocial symptoms. However, there are limited resources for psychological and emotional support. Expressive writing has shown decreased anxiety level in young and healthy people suffering from a number of stressors. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of expressive writing in patients receiving palliative care and the most suitable outcomes of expressive writing in this patient population. In this pilot study, patients were randomly assigned to either the expressive writing group (EW) or the neutral writing group (NW). Anxiety level before and after the writing session was compared between the two groups. Writing materials were content analyzed using standard qualitative research methods. A total of 24 patients (12 in EW and 12 in NW) were enrolled in the study between October 2006 and January 2007. Although the majority of patients (83%-100%) were able to complete all baseline assessments, poor adherence was observed during the follow-ups. Only 8% of patients completed the 2-week study. There was no significant difference in the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) State-Anxiety scores at baseline, before and after each writing session between the EW and NW groups. Our rapid accrual suggests that palliative care patients are interested in participating in studies such as expressive writing. The high level of adherence to the baseline assessments indicates that these assessments were not particularly difficult for our patients to complete. Future studies may need to include patients with better performance status, better patient education, means of emotional expression (i.e., audio recording, telephone interview) and improved adherence. We conclude that clinical trials of expressive writing in the palliative care setting are not feasible unless they undergo major modification in methods compared to those previous reported in other patient

  8. Drivers of hospitalization for patients with atrial fibrillation: Results from the Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Kim, Sunghee; Fonarow, Gregg C; Thomas, Laine; Ansell, Jack; Kowey, Peter R; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Gersh, Bernard J; Hylek, Elaine; Naccarelli, Gerald; Go, Alan S; Reiffel, James; Chang, Paul; Peterson, Eric D; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia and contributes significantly to health care expenditures. We sought to assess the frequency and predictors of hospitalization in patients with AF. The ORBIT-AF registry is a prospective, observational study of outpatients with AF enrolled from June 29, 2010, to August 9, 2011. The current analysis included 9,484 participants with 1-year follow-up. Multivariable, logistic regression was used to identify baseline characteristics that were associated with first cause-specific hospitalization. Overall, 31% of patients with AF studied (n = 2,963) had 1 or more hospitalizations per year and 10% (n = 983) had 2 or more. The most common hospitalization cause was cardiovascular (20 per 100 patient-years vs 3.3 bleeding vs 17 noncardiovascular, nonbleeding). Compared with those not hospitalized, hospitalized patients were more likely to have concomitant heart failure (42% vs 28%, P heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75, or diabetes; 2 points for prior stroke or transient ischemic attack) scores (2.5 vs 2.2, P Heart Rhythm Association class severe symptoms 18% vs 13%, P heart failure (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.57 for New York Heart Association III/IV vs none, P heart rate at baseline (adjusted HR 1.11 per 10-beats/min increase >66, P Heart Rhythm Association severe vs none, P heart failure and AF symptoms. Improved symptom control, rate control, and comorbid condition management should be evaluated as strategies to reduce health care use in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamics of Endo- and Epicardial Focal Fibrillation Waves at the Right Atrium in a Patient With Advanced Atrial Remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Does, Lisette J M E; Kik, Charles; Bogers, Ad J J C; Allessie, Maurits A; de Groot, Natasja M S

    2016-10-01

    Focal waves appear frequently at the epicardium during persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), however, the origin of these waves is under debate. We performed simultaneous endo-epicardial mapping of the right atrial wall during longstanding persistent AF in a patient undergoing cardiac surgery. During 10 seconds 53 and 59 focal waves appeared at random at respectively the endocardium and epicardium. Repetitive focal activity did not last longer than 3 cycles. Transmural asynchrony and conduction might be the origin of focal waves. Asynchronous propagation of fibrillation waves in 3 dimensions would stabilize the arrhythmia and could explain the limited success of persistent AF ablation. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiofrequency Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Technique in Patients with Mitral Valve Surgery and Left Atrial Reduction Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouya Nezafati1

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: About half of all patients who undergo mitral valve surgery suffer from atrial fibrillation (AF. Cox described the surgical cut-and-sew Maze procedure, which is an effective surgical method but has some complications. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a substitution method of radiofrequency ablation (RFA for patients undergoing mitral valve surgery with AF.Methods: We evaluated 50 patients, comprising 40 men and 10 women at a mean age of 61.8 ± 7.5 years, who underwent mitral valve surgery with RFA between March 2010 and August 2013. All the patients had permanent AF with an enlarged left atrium (LA. The first indication for surgery was underlying organic lesions. Mitral valve replacement or repair was performed in the patients as a single procedure or in combination with aortic valve replacement or coronary artery bypass grafting. Radiofrequency energy was used to create continuous endocardial lesions mimicking most incisions and sutures. We evaluated the pre- and postoperative LA size, duration of aortic cross-clamping, cardiopulmonary bypass time, intensive care unit stay, and total hospital stay.Results: The mean preoperative and postoperative LA sizes were 7.5 ± 1.4 cm and 4.3 ± 0.7 cm (p value = 0.0001, respectively. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time and the aortic cross-clamping time were 134.3 ± 33.7 minand 109.0 ± 28.4 min, respectively. The average stay at the intensive care unit was 2.1 ± 1.2 days, and the total hospital stay was 8.3 ± 2.4 days. Rebleeding was the only complication, found in one patient. There was no early or late mortality. Eighty-two percent of the patients were discharged in normal sinus rhythm. Five other patients had normal sinus rhythm at 6months' follow-up, and the remaining 4 patients did not have a normal sinus rhythm after 6 months.Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation, combined with LA reduction, is an effective option for the treatment of permanent AF concomitant with

  11. Prevalence and characteristics of OSAFED syndrome in atrial fibrillation primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jacek; Dereziński, Tadeusz; Szyndler, Anna; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) constitutes the most prevalent arrhythmia, affecting up-to 2% of the general population. Apart from well-established risk factors that increase the odds for the development of AF, e.g. age or arterial hypertension, recent analyses indicate that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) may independently, negatively modify the arrhythmia occur-rence profile. Concurrently, erectile dysfunction (ED) is a commonly neglected, potent marker of cardiovascular risk, which considerably worsens men's psychological state. Unrecognised or untreated ED results in substantial deterioration of the patient's therapeutic programme adherence. Because AF, OSA, and ED share multiple risk factors and clinical consequences, in 2013 the concept of their frequent concurrence - OSAFED syndrome - was proposed. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of OSAFED patients with AF in primary care practice. Retrospective analysis was carried out of data from primary care physician charts (NZOZ Esculap Gniewkowo, central Poland) including 1372 men aged 40-65 years. The primary goal was to determine the diagnosis of paroxysmal and/or perma-nent AF, which was followed by sleep apnoea screening (polygraphy) and erectile function evaluation (IIED-5 questionnaire). Twenty-one (1.5%) patients with documented AF were identified. Based on the sleep-polygraphic studies, 14 (67%) of them had confirmation of OSA with mean apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) equal to 27.5 ± 17.1. Furthermore, 11 (52%) patients met the OSAFED syndrome criteria. Patients with OSAFED syndrome had a mean score in IIEF-5 of 11.6 ± 3.5. The OSAFED-patients who were not diagnosed with all the of the syndrome components prior to the study-enrolment were characterised by substantially lower fat excess compared to their counterparts with already established OSAFED (body mass index: 30.1 ± 4.9 vs. 37.7 ± 3.9 kg/m², respectively, p = 0.03). Frequently coexisting OSAFED syndrome components in all AF patients from

  12. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning.

  13. Two-year outcomes of patients with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation: results from GARFIELD-AF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Accetta, Gabriele; Camm, Alan John; Cools, Frank; Fitzmaurice, David A.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Goto, Shinya; Haas, Sylvia; Hacke, Werner; Kayani, Gloria; Mantovani, Lorenzo G.; Misselwitz, Frank; ten Cate, Hugo; Turpie, Alexander G.G.; Verheugt, Freek W.A.; Kakkar, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims The relationship between outcomes and time after diagnosis for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is poorly defined, especially beyond the first year. Methods and results GARFIELD-AF is an ongoing, global observational study of adults with newly diagnosed NVAF. Two-year outcomes of 17 162 patients prospectively enrolled in GARFIELD-AF were analysed in light of baseline characteristics, risk profiles for stroke/systemic embolism (SE), and antithrombotic therapy. The mean (standard deviation) age was 69.8 (11.4) years, 43.8% were women, and the mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 3.3 (1.6); 60.8% of patients were prescribed anticoagulant therapy with/without antiplatelet (AP) therapy, 27.4% AP monotherapy, and 11.8% no antithrombotic therapy. At 2-year follow-up, all-cause mortality, stroke/SE, and major bleeding had occurred at a rate (95% confidence interval) of 3.83 (3.62; 4.05), 1.25 (1.13; 1.38), and 0.70 (0.62; 0.81) per 100 person-years, respectively. Rates for all three major events were highest during the first 4 months. Congestive heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, sudden/unwitnessed death, malignancy, respiratory failure, and infection/sepsis accounted for 65% of all known causes of death and strokes for <10%. Anticoagulant treatment was associated with a 35% lower risk of death. Conclusion The most frequent of the three major outcome measures was death, whose most common causes are not known to be significantly influenced by anticoagulation. This suggests that a more comprehensive approach to the management of NVAF may be needed to improve outcome. This could include, in addition to anticoagulation, interventions targeting modifiable, cause-specific risk factors for death. Clinical Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01090362. PMID:27357359

  14. Mild cognitive impairment impacts health outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing a disease management intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Jocasta; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Carrington, Melinda J; Wiley, Joshua F; Stewart, Simon

    2018-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is prevalent in atrial fibrillation (AF) and has the potential to contribute to poor outcomes. We investigated the influence of MCI on survival and rehospitalisation in patients with chronic forms of AF undergoing a home-based, AF-specific disease management intervention (home-based intervention (HBI)) or standard management (SM). The Montreal Cognitive Assessment tool was administered at baseline (a score of hospital during follow-up (P=0.012) and all-cause rehospitalisation were influenced by MCI during follow-up (OR 3.16 (95% CI 1.46 to 6.84)) but MCI did not influence any outcomes in the SM group. However, survival was negatively influenced by MCI in the HBI group (P=0.036); those with MCI in this group were 5.6 times more likely to die during follow-up (OR 5.57 (95% CI 1.10 to 28.1)). Those with MCI in the HBI group also spent less days alive and out-of-hospital than those with no MCI (P=0.022). MCI was also identified as a significant independent correlate of shortest duration of event-free survival (OR 3.48 (95% CI 1.06 to 11.4)), all-cause rehospitalisation (OR 3.30 (95% CI 1.25 to 8.69)) and cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related rehospitalisation (OR 2.35 (95% CI 1.12 to 4.91)) in this group. The effectiveness of home-based, disease management for patients with chronic forms of AF is negatively affected by comorbid MCI. The benefit of adjunctive support for patients with MCI on CVD-related health outcomes requires further investigation.

  15. Analysis of stroke in ATHENA: a placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-arm trial to assess the efficacy of dronedarone 400 mg BID for the prevention of cardiovascular hospitalization or death from any cause in patients with atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Crijns, Harry J G M; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    , on stroke has been evaluated in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial, ATHENA (A placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-arm Trial to assess the efficacy of dronedarone 400 mg BID for the prevention of cardiovascular Hospitalization or death from any cause in patiENts with Atrial fibrillation....../atrial flutter). METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with persistent or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and at least 1 risk factor for cardiovascular hospitalization were randomized to receive dronedarone (400 mg BID) or double-blind matching placebo and followed up for a minimum of 1 year to a common termination at 30...

  16. TRial of an Educational intervention on patients' knowledge of Atrial fibrillation and anticoagulant therapy, INR control, and outcome of Treatment with warfarin (TREAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattison Helen M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AF patients with a high risk of stroke are recommended anticoagulation with warfarin. However, the benefit of warfarin is dependent upon time spent within the target therapeutic range (TTR of their international normalised ratio (INR (2.0 to 3.0. AF patients possess limited knowledge of their disease and warfarin treatment and this can impact on INR control. Education can improve patients' understanding of warfarin therapy and factors which affect INR control. Methods/Design Randomised controlled trial of an intensive educational intervention will consist of group sessions (between 2-8 patients containing standardised information about the risks and benefits associated with OAC therapy, lifestyle interactions and the importance of monitoring and control of their International Normalised Ratio (INR. Information will be presented within an 'expert-patient' focussed DVD, revised educational booklet and patient worksheets. 200 warfarin-naïve patients who are eligible for warfarin will be randomised to either the intervention or usual care groups. All patients must have ECG-documented AF and be eligible for warfarin (according to the NICE AF guidelines. Exclusion criteria include: aged Discussion More data is needed on the clinical benefit of educational intervention with AF patients receiving warfarin. Trial registration ISRCTN93952605

  17. Complementary medicine use in cancer patients receiving intravenous antineoplastic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanbeltz Zurbano, Regina; Pérez-Fernández, Mª Dolores; Tirapu Nicolás, Bianka; Vera García, Ruth; De la Cruz Sánchez, Susana; Sarobe Carricas, María Teresa

    2017-09-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use has grown considerably, although there is little research on the topic in Spain. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of complementary medicine use in adult cancer patients at the same time as they were receiving conventional treatment in a Spanish referral cancer centre. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in the Ambulatory Treatment Unit during 2 consecutive weeks in March 2015. Adult patients who were receiving intravenous chemotherapy were included. Study variables were obtained from a questionnaire and medical records. 316 patients were included. 32.3% of the patients reported complementary medicine use during this period and 89% were ingesting products by mouth, herbs and natural products being the most commonly used. 81% of patients started to use complementary medicine after diagnosis, and family/friends were the main source of information. 65% of the patients reported improvements, especially in their physical and psychological well-being. Significant predictors of CAM use were female gender (P=0.028), younger age (P<0.001), and secondary education (P=0.009). A large proportion of cancer patients receiving intravenous chemotherapy also use complementary medicine, which they mainly take by mouth. Due to the risk of chemotherapy-CAM interactions, it is important for health-professionals to keep abreast of research on this issue, in order to provide advice on its potential benefit and risks. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. MDCT Evaluation of Left Atrium and Pulmonary Vein in the Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Comparison with the Non-Atrial Fibrillation Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Jung; Choi, Eun Jeong; Ham, Soo Yeon; Oh, Yu Whan; Kim, Young Hoon [Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kyung Sook [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The anatomy of the left atrium (LA) and the pulmonary veins (PVs) is important in planning and performing successful electrophysiologic ablation (EPA) for atrial fibrillation (Afib) patients. The authors estimated the findings of LA and PVs of Afib patients by MDCT, and compared these with the findings of LA and PVs of the non- Afib group using coronary CT angiography (CCTA). From September, 2009 to February, 2010, 91 Afib patients underwent PVCT (male: female = 72:19, mean age = 55.0-years-old) before EPA. At same time, 90 patients underwent CCTA (male: female = 73:17, mean age = 59.1- years-old). Two radiologists reviewed and analyzed all axial and 3D images of LA and PVs retrospectively with consensus. The average LA volumes of the Afib group(100.49 mm3) was larger than that of the non-Afib group (78.38 mm3) (p<0.05). The average lengths of the LA right wall in the Afib group (40.25 mm) was longer than that of the non-Afib group (37.3 mm) (p<0.05). The average distances between the PV ostium and first segmental bifurcation of the Lt superior PV (LSPV) and the RSPV were shorter in the Afib group (LSPV, 19.38 mm: RSPV, 11.49 mm) than in the non-Afib group (LSPV, 23.23 mm: RSPV, 14.25 mm) (p<0.05). There were higher incidences of anomalous branches such as ostial, accessory branches, or common ostia in the Afib group versus the non-Afib group (p<0.05). In Afib group, variable parameters of LA and PVs were obtained and estimated by MDCT, and there was statistically significant difference in the parameters of LA and PVs between Afib and non-Afib groups

  19. Reduced Time in Therapeutic Range and Higher Mortality in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Taking Acenocoumarol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Caravaca, José Miguel; Roldán, Vanessa; Esteve-Pastor, María Asunción; Valdés, Mariano; Vicente, Vicente; Marín, Francisco; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) depends on the quality of anticoagulant control, reflected by the mean time in therapeutic range (TTR) of international normalized ratio 2.0 to 3.0. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the association between TTR and change in TTR (ΔTTR) with the risk of mortality and clinically significant events in a consecutive cohort of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. We included 1361 AF patients stable on VKAs (international normalized ratio 2.0-3.0) during at least the previous 6 months. After 6 months of follow-up we recalculated TTR, calculated ΔTTR (ie, the difference between baseline and 6-month TTRs) and investigated the association of both with the risk of mortality and "clinically significant events" (defined as the composite of stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, acute coronary syndrome, acute heart failure, and all-cause deaths). The median ΔTTR at 6 months of entry was 20% (interquartile range 0-34%), 796 (58.5%) patients had a TTR reduction of at least 20%, while 330 (24.2%) had a TTR <65%. During follow-up, 34 (2.5% [4.16% per year]) patients died and 61 (4.5% [7.47% per year]) had a clinically significant event. Median ΔTTR was significantly higher in patients who died (35.5% vs 20%; P = 0.002) or sustained clinically significant events (28% vs 20%; P = 0.022). Based on Cox regression analyses, the overall risk of mortality at 6 months for each decrease point in TTR was 1.02 (95% CI, 1.01-1.04; P = 0.003), and the risk of clinically significant events was 1.01 (95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P = 0.028). Patients with TTR <65% at 6 months had higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio = 2.96; 95% CI, 1.51-5.81; P = 0.002) and clinically significant events (hazard ratio = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.01-2.88; P = 0.046). Our findings suggest that in AF patients anticoagulated with VKAs, a change in TTR over 6 months (ie, ΔTTR) is an independent risk factor for mortality and clinically significant events

  20. E-cigarette use in patients receiving home oxygen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Yves; Légaré, Martin; Maltais, François

    2015-01-01

    Current smokers who are prescribed home oxygen may not benefit from the therapy. In addition to being an obvious fire hazard, there is some evidence that the physiological mechanisms by which home oxygen is believed to operate are inhibited by smoking. Although their effectiveness is yet to be demonstrated, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often regarded as an aid to smoking cessation. However, several burn accidents in e-cigarette smokers receiving home oxygen therapy have also been reported, leading Health Canada to release a warning of fire risk to oxygen therapy patients from e-cigarettes. It is the authors' position that patients receiving oxygen should definitely not use e-cigarettes. The authors provide suggestions for addressing the delicate issue of home oxygen therapy in current cigarette and⁄or e-cigarette smokers.

  1. E-Cigarette Use in Patients Receiving Home Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Lacasse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current smokers who are prescribed home oxygen may not benefit from the therapy. In addition to being an obvious fire hazard, there is some evidence that the physiological mechanisms by which home oxygen is believed to operate are inhibited by smoking. Although their effectiveness is yet to be demonstrated, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are often regarded as an aid to smoking cessation. However, several burn accidents in e-cigarette smokers receiving home oxygen therapy have also been reported, leading Health Canada to release a warning of fire risk to oxygen therapy patients from e-cigarettes. It is the authors’ position that patients receiving oxygen should definitely not use e-cigarettes. The authors provide suggestions for addressing the delicate issue of home oxygen therapy in current cigarette and/or e-cigarette smokers.

  2. Atrial Fibrillation and Hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprasad N

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation occurs in 10 – 15% of patients with hyperthyroidism. Low serum thyrotropin concentration is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid hormone contributes to arrythmogenic activity by altering the electrophysiological characteristics of atrial myocytes by shortening the action potential duration, enhancing automaticity and triggered activity in the pulmonary vein cardio myocytes. Hyperthyroidism results in excess mortality from increased incidence of circulatory diseases and dysrhythmias. Incidence of cerebral embolism is more in hyperthyroid patients with atrial fibrillation, especially in the elderly and anti-coagulation is indicated in them. Treatment of hyperthyroidism results in conversion to sinus rhythm in up to two-third of patients. Beta-blockers reduce left ventricular hypertrophy and atrial and ventricular arrhythmias in patients with hyperthyroidism. Treatment of sub clinical hyperthyroidism is controversial. Optimizing dose of thyroxine treatment in those with replacement therapy and beta-blockers is useful in exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism.

  3. Failure in short-term prediction of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation from continuous electrocardiogram in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Molly; Fetics, Barry J; Lai, Shenghan; Dalal, Darshan; Insel, Jerald; Berger, Ronald D

    2010-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting are prone to malignant ventricular arrhythmias. We sought to test whether electrocardiographic (ECG) markers of autonomic tone, ventricular irritability, and repolarization lability could be used in short-term prediction of ventricular arrhythmias in this patient population. We studied 38 patients with sustained (>30 seconds) monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, or ventricular fibrillation while monitored in the ICU and 30 patients without arrhythmia in the ICU who served as controls. All patients had at least 12 hours of continuously recorded multilead ECG before arrhythmic event. Mean heart rate and measures of heart rate variability, QT variability, and ventricular ectopy were quantified in 1-hour epochs for the 12 hours before the arrhythmic event and in 5-minute epochs for the last hour preevent (and using a random termination time point in controls). A modest downward trend in QT variability and a rise in heart rate were observed hours before polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation events, although no significant changes heralded monomorphic ventricular tachycardia and no changes in any parameter predicted imminent ventricular arrhythmia of any type. There were no significant differences in ECG parameters between arrhythmia patients and controls. In ICU patients, sustained ventricular arrhythmias are not preceded by change in ECG measures of autonomic tone, repolarization variability, and ventricular ectopy. Short-term arrhythmia prediction may be difficult or impossible in this patient population based on ECG measures alone. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictive value of CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores for acute myocardial infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Hui; Han, Bing; Fu, Qiang; Zong, Zhenkun

    2017-07-05

    The presence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) confers a poor prognosis in atrial fibrillation (AF), associated with increased mortality dramatically. This study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of CHADS 2 and CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc scores for AMI in patients with AF. This retrospective study enrolled 5140 consecutive nonvalvular AF patients, 300 patients with AMI and 4840 patients without AMI. We identified the optimal cut-off values of the CHADS 2 and CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc scores each based on receiver operating characteristic curves to predict the risk of AMI. Both CHADS 2 score and CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score were associated with an increased odds ratio of the prevalence of AMI in patients with AF, after adjustment for hyperlipidaemia, hyperuricemia, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and obstructive sleep apnea. The present results showed that the area under the curve (AUC) for CHADS 2 score was 0.787 with a similar accuracy of the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score (AUC 0.750) in predicting "high-risk" AF patients who developed AMI. However, the predictive accuracy of the two clinical-based risk scores was fair. The CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score has fair predictive value for identifying high-risk patients with AF and is not significantly superior to CHADS 2 in predicting patients who develop AMI.

  5. Detection of left atrial thrombus by intracardiac echocardiography in patients undergoing ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Chenni S; Banchs, Javier E; Moukabary, Talal; Moradkhan, Raman; Gonzalez, Mario D

    2015-09-01

    The role of intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) to detect thrombus within left atrium (LA) before atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation despite a recent transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is not well defined. We examined the prevalence of LA/left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus using ICE immediately prior to AF ablation in patients in whom anticoagulation was not withheld. We analyzed 122 consecutive patients (62.6 ± 10.8 years, 90 males, CHA(2)DS(2) -VASc score 2.4 ± 1.5, persistent AF 29.5 %) who underwent an ICE-guided AF ablation 1 day after a negative (n = 120) or inconclusive (n = 2) TEE for LA thrombus. LA was imaged with ICE from the right atrium, coronary sinus, and right ventricular inflow tract (RVIT). ICE and TEE images were compared for LAA area, thrombus, and spontaneous echo contrast (SEC). LAA was adequately visualized in 99 and 100 % of patients with TEE and ICE, respectively. RVIT was the best ICE view for LAA visualization. The LAA 2-D-area measured by TEE was 4.9 ± 0.5 vs. 5 ± 0.5 cm(2) by ICE (P = NS). ICE identified a thrombus in seven patients with a previous negative TEE, leading to cancellation of ablation. It ruled out a thrombus in two patients with an inconclusive TEE. Thrombi were found in the LAA (n = 4), atrial septum (n = 2), and left superior pulmonary vein (n = 1). SEC during TEE was more frequent in patients with thrombus on ICE than those without (85.7 vs. 17.4 %; p = 0.03; positive predictive value 23.1 %, negative predictive value 98.9 %). The results of our staged imaging approach suggest that ICE has a complimentary value in re-screening the LA/LAA for thrombus after a recent negative or equivocal TEE. The presence of SEC during TEE increases the probability of finding a thrombus with ICE, which could potentially be dislodged during catheter manipulation.

  6. Association Between Dabigatran vs Warfarin and Risk of Osteoporotic Fractures Among Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wallis C Y; Chan, Esther W; Cheung, Ching-Lung; Sing, Chor Wing; Man, Kenneth K C; Lip, Gregory Y H; Siu, Chung-Wah; Lam, Joanne K Y; Lee, Alan C H; Wong, Ian C K

    2017-03-21

    The risk of osteoporotic fracture with dabigatran use in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is unknown. To investigate the risk of osteoporotic fracture with dabigatran vs warfarin in patients with NVAF. Retrospective cohort study using a population-wide database managed by the Hong Kong Hospital Authority. Patients newly diagnosed with NVAF from 2010 through 2014 and prescribed dabigatran or warfarin were matched by propensity score at a 1:2 ratio with follow-up until July 31, 2016. Dabigatran or warfarin use during the study period. Risk of osteoporotic hip fracture and vertebral fracture was compared between dabigatran and warfarin users using Poisson regression. The corresponding incidence rate ratio (IRR) and absolute risk difference (ARD) with 95% CIs were calculated. Among 51 496 patients newly diagnosed with NVAF, 8152 new users of dabigatran (n = 3268) and warfarin (n = 4884) were matched by propensity score (50% women; mean [SD] age, 74 [11] years). Osteoporotic fracture developed in 104 (1.3%) patients during follow-up (32 dabigatran users [1.0%]; 72 warfarin users [1.5%]). Results of Poisson regression analysis showed that dabigatran use was associated with a significantly lower risk of osteoporotic fracture compared with warfarin (0.7 vs 1.1 per 100 person-years; ARD per 100 person-years, -0.68 [95% CI, -0.38 to -0.86]; IRR, 0.38 [95% CI, 0.22 to 0.66]). The association with lower risk was statistically significant in patients with a history of falls, fractures, or both (dabigatran vs warfarin, 1.6 vs 3.6 per 100 person-years; ARD per 100 person-years, -3.15 [95% CI, -2.40 to -3.45]; IRR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.04 to 0.33]), but not in those without a history (0.6 vs 0.7 per 100 person-years; ARD per 100 person-years, -0.04 [95% CI, 0.67 to -0.39]; IRR, 0.95 [95% CI, 0.45 to 1.96]) (P value for interaction, osteoporotic fracture. Additional study, perhaps including randomized clinical trials, may be warranted to further understand

  7. Bone Mineral Density in Patients Receiving Anticonvulsant Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Yıldırım

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to determine possible effects of anticonvulsant drugs on bone mineral density. Twenty two patients with epilepsy who have been receiving anticonvulsant drugs and also 22 healthy controls were included in the study. The average age was 28.9 ± 8.9 years in the patients group and 30.5 ± 6.9 years in the control group. The average drug receiving time was 6.45 ± 4.2 years. At baseline ESR, hemogram, urine deoxypiridinoline (DPD, routine biochemical and hormonal values were determined in both groups. Lumbar spine and left femur bone mineral density (BMD values were determined with hologic 2000 DEXA. In the statistical analysis, urine DPD levels in the patient group were significantly higher than control group (p0.05. Lumbar spine and left femur BMD values were significantly decreased in patients group (respectively p<0.01, p<0.001. We determined that in the patients using anticonvulsant drugs there was an increase in bone resorption and this effect was more evident in cortical bone than trabecular bone.

  8. Blastomycosis and Histoplasmosis in a Patient with Glioblastoma Receiving Temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbeli, Aiham H; Yu, John

    2016-10-01

    Malignant glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common primary malignancy of the brain in the U.S. Temozolomide (TMZ) is the cornerstone of management along with surgical resection and radiotherapy. Because of the reduction in the CD4+ lymphocyte count as a side effect of TMZ use, this patient population is under risk for opportunistic infections like Pneumocystis jiroveci. A male patient with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiform presented with non-productive cough and chest pain. Before presentation, the patient received the standard therapy including surgical resection, radiation and TMZ. Computerized tomography of the chest showed a very large cavitary lesion in the upper segment of the right lower lobe and multiple nodular lesions with some starting to cavitate. Cytology of the bronchioalveolar lavage with special stain showed large, broad based budding yeast-like cells, morphologically consistent with blastomyces and macrophages filled with yeast-like forms, morphologically consistent with histoplasma. The patient was treated with intraconazole intended for 12 months. To the best of our knowledge, our case represents the first documented case of lung infection with both blastomyces and histoplasma in a patient after receiving TMZ for newly diagnosed GBM. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  9. The clinical efficacy of dabigatran etexilate for preventing stroke in atrial fibrillation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis CR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Ellis, Daniel W KaiserVanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: The use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs for stroke and systemic embolism prevention in the setting of specifically non valvular atrial fibrillation has provided clinicians with a realistic treatment alternative to the traditional dose-adjusted, warfarin-based anticoagulation that is targeted to a therapeutic international normalized ratio range of 2.0–3.0. We discuss the use of dabigatran in the setting of mechanical heart valves, atrial fibrillation or left atrial catheter ablation procedures, reversal of the drug in the setting of adverse bleeding events, and background on the molecular biology and development of this novel treatment for stroke reduction.Keywords: NOACs, systemic embolism, atrial fibrillation, stroke, dabigatran etexilate

  10. Assessment of CHADS2 and CHA 2DS 2-VASc scores in obstructive sleep apnea patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Filip M; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Platek, Anna E; Hrynkiewicz-Szymanska, Anna; Karpinski, Grzegorz; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2015-05-01

    Assessment of stroke risk and implementation of appropriate antithrombotic therapy is an important issue in atrial fibrillation patients. Current risk scores do not take into consideration the comorbidities associated with elevated thromboembolic like obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of the study was to establish whether atrial fibrillation patients with coexisting OSA have higher stroke risk according to CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores. Two hundred fifty-four consecutive patients hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of atrial fibrillation participated in the study. All patients underwent whole night polygraphy and were scored in both CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc according to their medical records or de novo diagnosis. The study population was predominantly male (65.4%; mean age, 57.5 ± 10.0 years) with a high prevalence of hypertension (73.6%), dyslipidemia (63.4%), and obesity (42.9%). OSA was present in 47.6% of patients, who more often had history of stroke (p = 0.0007). Stroke risk profile assessed by both CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores was higher in patients with OSA (1.2 ± 0.9 vs. 0.8 ± 0.6; p vs. 1.5 ± 1.1; p = 0.001) than without it. Differences in the stroke risk remained significant across different age strata, and the trend for point values in CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores rose along with OSA severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI; p for trend stroke prediction models.

  11. Outcome of patients receiving photodynamic therapy for early esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corti, Luigi; Skarlatos, John; Boso, Caterina; Cardin, Fabrizio; Kosma, Lambrini; Koukourakis, Michael I.; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Norberto, Lorenzo; Shaffer, Moshe; Beroukas, Kostantinos

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has shown remarkable activity in a variety of human cancers. In the present study, we report the effects of PDT on inoperable early-stage esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients were treated with an argon dye laser (630 nm wavelength, 300-800 mW of power, energy dose of 200-300 J/cm) after intravenous injection of 5 mg/kg of hematoporphyrin derivative. Eighteen patients (29.5%) had in situ carcinoma (Tis), 30 (48.5%) had T1-stage cancer, 7 (11%) had T2-stage cancer, and 7 (11%) had recurrent disease in the anastomotic area after previous surgery without evidence of invasion outside the lumen. Patients with residual disease after two rounds of PDT received definitive radiotherapy. Patients were evaluated for response to therapy and survival. The follow-up time ranged from 3 to 90 months (median, 32 months). Results: The complete response (CR) rate was 37% (23 of 62) in patients who received PDT alone and 82% (51 of 62) in those who also received radiotherapy. The CR rate after PDT alone was statistically higher (p = 0.04) for patients who had Tis/T1 lesions (21 of 48; 44%) than for those with T2-stage disease (2 of 7; 28%) or recurrent tumors (0 of 7; 0%). Fifty-two percent of patients who had CR following PDT alone did not suffer local tumor recurrence. The median local progression-free survival times after PDT and additional radiotherapy (in cases with incomplete response) was 49 months for Tis- and T1-stage lesions, 30 months for those with T2-stage disease, and 14 months for patients with locally recurrent disease. Patients who completely responded to PDT had a median overall survival (OS) of 50 months, which was significantly longer (p < 0.003) than that of patients not responding to PDT. Toxicity was minimal; we recorded three cases of esophageal stenosis (7%) and one case of tracheo-esophageal fistula (2.5%) after combined PDT and radiotherapy. Conclusion: PDT is an effective regimen for early

  12. European Society of Cardiology smartphone and tablet applications for patients with atrial fibrillation and their health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Dipak; Chua, Winnie W L; Fabritz, Larissa; Hendriks, Jeroen; Casadei, Barbara; Schotten, Ulrich; Vardas, Panos; Heidbuchel, Hein; Dean, Veronica; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2018-01-01

    Abstract We are in the midst of a digital revolution in health care, although the application of new and useful technology in routine clinical practice is variable. The Characterizing Atrial fibrillation by Translating its Causes into Health Modifiers in the Elderly (CATCH ME) Consortium, in collaboration with the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), has funded the creation of two applications (apps) in atrial fibrillation (AF) for use in smartphones and tablets. The patient app aims to enhance patient education, improve communication between patients and health care professionals, and encourage active patient involvement in the management of their condition. The health care professional app is designed as an interactive management tool incorporating the new ESC Practice Guidelines on AF and supported by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), with the aim of improving best practice approaches for the care of patients with AF. Both stand-alone apps are now freely available for Android and iOS devices though the Google Play, Amazon, and Apple stores. In this article, we outline the rationale for the design and implementation of these apps. Our objective is to demonstrate the value of integrating novel digital technology into clinical practice, with the potential for patient engagement, optimization of pharmacological and interventional therapy in AF, and ultimately to improve patient outcomes. PMID:29040548

  13. Role of galectin 3 and epicardial fat thickness in the development of atrial fibrillation in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Ionin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the epicardial fat thickness (EFT in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS, including paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation (AF. To relate EFT to the fibroid heart marker, i.e. galectin 3. Materials and methods. We examined 100 patients with MS (50 with AF, and 50 healthy persons made the control group. Serum galectin 3 was measured by ELISA method. The EFT was measured with echocardiography. Results. EFT in patients with MS was twofold higher than in healthy persons. EFT in patients with MS and AF didn't differ significantly from that in patients with MS without AF. Positive correlation between the levels of EFT and galectin 3 in serum was revealed. Serum galectin 3 and EFT were associated with atrial fibrillation in patients with MS (OR:1,27, 95% CI 1,02-1,58 and OR:1,73, 95% CI 1,37-2,19, correspondingly.Conclusion. Definition of EFT at echocardiography can be used in the assessment of risk AF in patients with MS.

  14. Risk Factors for Failure of Direct Current Cardioversion in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Soran, Handrean; Banerjee, Moulinath; Mohamad, Jamal B.; Adam, Safwaan; Ho, Jan Hoong; Ismaeel, Shakawan M.; Dhage, Shaishav; Syed, Akheel A.; Abdulla, Ibrahem M. A.; Younis, Naveed; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a well-recognised risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is higher among patients with T2DM. Direct current cardioversion (DCCV) is an important management option in persistent AF. We sought to determine independent risk factors for immediate and short-term outcomes of DCCV for treatment of AF in patients with T2DM. Methods. Retrospective outcome analysis of DCCV for persistent AF in 102 T2DM patie...

  15. Consistency of safety and efficacy of new oral anticoagulants across subgroups of patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Lega

    Full Text Available AIMS: The well-known limitations of vitamin K antagonists (VKA led to development of new oral anticoagulants (NOAC in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the consistency of treatment effects of NOAC irrespective of age, comorbidities, or prior VKA exposure. METHODS AND RESULTS: All randomized, controlled phase III trials comparing NOAC to VKA up to October 2012 were eligible provided their results (stroke/systemic embolism (SSE and major bleeding (MB were reported according to age (≤ or >75 years, renal function, CHADS2 score, presence of diabetes mellitus or heart failure, prior VKA use or previous cerebrovascular events. Interactions were considered significant at p <0.05. Three studies (50,578 patients were included, respectively evaluating apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran versus warfarin. A trend towards interaction with heart failure (p = 0.08 was observed with respect to SSE reduction, this being greater in patients not presenting heart failure (RR = 0.76 [0.67-0.86] than in those with heart failure (RR = 0.90 [0.78-1.04]; Significant interaction (p = 0.01 with CHADS2 score was observed, NOAC achieving a greater reduction in bleeding risk in patients with a score of 0-1 (RR 0.67 CI 0.57-0.79 than in those with a score ≥2 (RR 0.85 CI 0.74-0.98. Comparison of MB in patients with (RR 0.97 CI 0.79-1.18 and without (RR 0.76 CI 0.65-0.88 diabetes mellitus showed a similar trend (p = 0.06. No other interactions were found. All subgroups derived benefit from NOA in terms of SSE or MB reduction. CONCLUSIONS: NOAC appeared to be more effective and safer than VKA in reducing SSE or MB irrespective of patient comorbidities. Thromboembolism risk, evaluated by CHADS2 score and, to a lesser extent, diabetes mellitus modified the treatment effects of NOAC without complete loss of benefit with respect to MB reduction.

  16. Quinidine-induced ventricular flutter and fibrillation without digitalis therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, R. W.; Wellens, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    Three cases are described with documented ventricular flutter and fibrillation during quinidine medication without concomitant digitalis therapy. In all three patients the arrhythmia developed while they were receiving moderate doses of quinidine. Although no changes in QRS width were observed after

  17. [Clinical characteristics of patients with atrial fibrillation treated with direct oral anticoagulants attended in primary care setting. The SILVER-AP study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Figuera, Mariano; Cinza, Sergio; Marín, Nuria; Egocheaga, Isabel; Prieto, Miguel Angel

    2017-07-29

    To analyse the clinical characteristics and management of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) treated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC). Observational, cross-sectional and multicentre study. Autonomous Communities in which the general practitioner can prescribe DOAC (n=9). The study included a total of 790 patients on chronic treatment with anticoagulants, and on whom therapy was changed, as well as being currently on treatment with DOAC for at least for 3 months. A record was made of the sociodemographic and clinical management date. Mean age was 78.6±8.4 years, and 50.5% of patients were men. Mean CHADS 2 score was 2.6±1.2, mean CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score was 4.3±1.6, and the mean HAS-BLED score was 2.3±1.0. Mean duration of treatment with DOAC was 15.8±12.5 months. Rivaroxaban was the DOAC most frequently prescribed (57.8%), followed by dabigatran (23.7%), and apixaban (18.5%). Of the patients receiving rivaroxaban, 70.2% were taking the dose of 20mg/daily. Of the patients receiving dabigatran, 41.7% were taking the dose of 150mg twice daily, and in the case of apixaban, 56.2% were taking the dose of 5mg twice daily. Satisfaction (ACTS Burdens scale 52.0±7.2 and ACTS Benefits scale 12.1±2.2), and therapeutic adherence (97.8% of patients took their medication regularly) with DOAC were high. Patients treated with DOAC in Spain have a high thromboembolic risk. A significant proportion of patients receive a lower dose of DOAC than that recommended according to their clinical profile. Satisfaction and medication adherence are high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Phage Neutralization by Sera of Patients Receiving Phage Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żaczek, Maciej; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Kłak, Marlena; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of our investigation was to verify whether phage therapy (PT) can induce antiphage antibodies. The antiphage activity was determined in sera from 122 patients from the Phage Therapy Unit in Wrocław with bacterial infections before and during PT, and in sera from 30 healthy volunteers using a neutralization test. Furthermore, levels of antiphage antibodies were investigated in sera of 19 patients receiving staphylococcal phages and sera of 20 healthy volunteers using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phages were administered orally, locally, orally/locally, intrarectally, or orally/intrarectally. The rate of phage inactivation (K) estimated the level of phages' neutralization by human sera. Low K rates were found in sera of healthy volunteers (K≤1.73). Low K rates were detected before PT (K≤1.64). High antiphage activity of sera K>18 was observed in 12.3% of examined patients (n=15) treated with phages locally (n=13) or locally/orally (n=2) from 15 to 60 days of PT. High K rates were found in patients treated with some Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis phages. Low K rates were observed during PT in sera of patients using phages orally (K≤1.04). Increased inactivation of phages by sera of patients receiving PT decreased after therapy. These results suggest that the antiphage activity in patients' sera depends on the route of phage administration and phage type. The induction of antiphage activity of sera during or after PT does not exclude a favorable result of PT. PMID:24893003

  19. Intermittent vs. Continuous Anticoagulation theRapy in patiEnts with Atrial Fibrillation (iCARE-AF): a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakis, Stavros; Stoner, Julie A; Kardokus, Joel; Garabelli, Paul J; Po, Sunny S; Lazzara, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesized that intermittent anticoagulation based on daily rhythm monitoring using the novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) is feasible and safe among patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Patients with paroxysmal AF and ≥1 risk factors for stroke were randomized to either intermittent or continuous anticoagulation. Those in the intermittent group were instructed to transmit a daily ECG using an iPhone-based rhythm monitoring device. If AF was detected, patients received one of the NOACs for 48 h-1 week. Patients who failed to transmit an ECG for three consecutive days or more than 7 days total were crossed over to continuous anticoagulation. Patients in the continuous group received one of the NOACs. Fifty-eight patients were randomized to either intermittent (n = 29) or continuous anticoagulation (n = 29). Over a median follow-up of 20 months, 20 patients in the intermittent group failed to submit a daily ECG at least once (median three failed submissions). Four patients (14 %) crossed over to continuous anticoagulation due to failure to submit an ECG for three consecutive days. One stroke (continuous group) occurred during the study. Major bleeding occurred in two patients in the continuous and one patient in the intermittent group, after crossing over to continuous anticoagulation. In a prespecified per-protocol analysis, gastrointestinal bleeding was more frequent in the continuous group (16 vs. 0 %; p = 0.047). Intermittent anticoagulation based on daily rhythm monitoring is feasible and may decrease bleeding in low-risk patients with paroxysmal AF. A larger trial, adequately powered to detect clinical outcomes, is warranted.

  20. Comparison of hospital length of stay between hospitalized non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients treated with either apixaban or warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Amanda M; Jing, Yonghua; Johnston, Stephen; Trocio, Jeffrey; Singhal, Shalabh; Bruno, Amanda; Graham, John

    2015-01-01

    Hospital length of stay (LOS) is an important cost driver for hospitals and payers alike. Hospitalized non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients treated with apixaban may have shorter LOS than those treated with warfarin because of the absence of need for INR monitoring in apixaban. Thus, this study compared hospital LOS between hospitalized NVAF patients treated with either apixaban or warfarin. This was a retrospective, observational cohort study based on a large US database including diagnosis, procedure, and drug administration information from >600 acute-care hospitals. Patients selected for study were aged ≥18 years and had a hospitalization record with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis code for atrial fibrillation (AF) in any position from 1 January 2013 to 28 February 2014 (index hospitalization). Patients with diagnoses indicative of rheumatic mitral valvular heart disease or a valve replacement procedure during index hospitalization were excluded. Patients were required to have been treated with either apixaban or warfarin, and not treated with rivaroxaban or dabigatran, during index hospitalization. Apixaban patients were propensity score (PS) matched to warfarin patients at a 1:1 ratio, using patient demographic/clinical and hospital characteristics. The study outcome was hospital LOS, calculated as discharge date minus admission date; a sensitivity analysis calculated hospital LOS as discharge date minus first anticoagulant administration date. Sub-analyses were conducted among patients with a primary diagnosis of AF. The study included 832 apixaban patients matched to 832 warfarin patients. Mean [standard deviation (SD)] and median hospital LOS were significantly (p < 0.001) shorter in apixaban patients (4.5 [4.2] and 3 days) than in warfarin patients (5.4 [5.0] and 4). Results were consistent in the sensitivity and sub-analyses. Among NVAF patients, apixaban treatment was associated with shorter hospital LOS when compared with warfarin treatment. These

  1. Communication difficulties and psychoemotional distress in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaila, Rabia; Zbidat, Wajdi; Anwar, Kabaha; Bayya, Abed; Linton, David M; Sviri, Sigal

    2011-11-01

    Difficulties in communication in intensive care patients receiving mechanical ventilation are a source of stressful experiences and psychoemotional distress. To examine the association between communication characteristics and psychoemotional distress among patients treated with mechanical ventilation in a medical intensive care unit and to identify factors that may be predictive of psychological outcomes. A total of 65 critically ill patients, extubated within the preceding 72 hours, were included in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected by using a structured interview. Separate regression analysis of data on 3 psychoemotional outcomes (psychological distress, fear, and anger) were used for baseline variables, communication characteristics, and stressful experiences. Difficulty in communication was a positive predictor of patients' psychological distress, and length of anesthesia was a negative predictor. Fear and anger were also positively related to difficulty in communication. In addition, the number of communication methods was negatively associated with feelings of fear and anger. Finally, the stressful experiences associated with the endotracheal tube were positively related to feelings of anger. Patients treated with mechanical ventilation experience a moderate to extreme level of psychoemotional distress because they cannot speak and communicate their needs. Nurses should be aware of the patients' need to communicate. Decreasing stressful experiences associated with the endotracheal tube and implementing more appropriate communication methods may reduce patients' distress.

  2. Reduced occurrence of atrial fibrillation in acute myocardial infarction treated with streptokinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F E; Sørensen, H T; Christensen, J H

    1991-01-01

    In a historical follow-up study of 152 hospital patients with acute myocardial infarction, the frequency of life-threatening arrhythmias (ventricular fibrillation, sustained ventricular tachycardia, 3rd degree AV-block, 2nd degree AV-block (Mobitz type II), and asystole) and atrial fibrillation...... in 76 patients treated with streptokinase was compared with their frequency in 76 patients who did not receive a thrombolytic therapy. Among those treated with streptokinase two patients (3%) developed atrial fibrillation, compared with 12 (16%) in the control group (P = 0.009). Life......-threatening arrhythmias occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. Further studies should confirm and clarify the mechanism of the reduced frequency of atrial fibrillation in the streptokinase-treated patients....

  3. Validating Appetite Assessment Tools among Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfino, Alessio; Kaysen, George A.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Doyle, Julie; Delgado, Cynthia; Dwyer, Tjien; Laviano, Alessandro; Fanelli, Filippo Rossi; Johansen, Kirsten L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the performance of appetite assessment tools among patients receiving hemodialysis. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Seven dialysis facilities in Northern California. Subjects 221 patients receiving hemodialysis. Intervention We assessed five appetite assessment tools [self-assessment of appetite, subjective assessment of appetite, visual analogue scale (VAS), Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) score and the Anorexia Questionnaire (AQ)]. Main outcome measures Reported food intake, normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), and change in body weight were used as criterion measures, and we assessed associations among the appetite tools and biomarkers associated with nutrition and inflammation. Patients were asked to report their appetite and the percentage of food eaten (from 0% to 100%) during the last meal compared to usual intake. Results Fifty-eight (26%) patients reported food intake ≤50% (defined as poor appetite). The prevalence of anorexia was 12% by self-assessment of appetite, 6% by subjective assessment of appetite, 24% by VAS, 17% by FAACT score, and 12% by AQ. All tools were significantly associated with food intake ≤50% (panorexic patients based on the VAS (1.1 ± 0.3 vs 1.2 ± 0.3, p=0.03). Ln IL-6 correlated inversely with food intake (p=0.03), but neither IL-6 nor CRP correlated with any of the appetite tools. Furthermore, only the self-assessment of appetite was significantly associated with serum albumin (p=0.02), prealbumin (p=0.02) and adiponectin concentrations (p=0.03). Conclusions Alternative appetite assessment tools yielded widely different estimates of the prevalence of anorexia in hemodialysis. When considering self-reported food intake as the criterion standard for anorexia, the FAACT score and VAS discriminated patients reasonably well. PMID:26522141

  4. Long-term survival in patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy: the importance of performing atrio-ventricular junction ablation in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Maurizio; Auricchio, Angelo; Metra, Marco; Regoli, François; Fantoni, Cecilia; Lamp, Barbara; Curnis, Antonio; Vogt, Juergen; Klersy, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Aims To investigate the effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) on survival in heart failure (HF) patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) and the role of atrio-ventricular junction (AVJ) ablation in these patients. Methods and results Data from 1285 consecutive patients implanted with CRT devices are presented: 1042 patients were in sinus rhythm (SR) and 243 (19%) in AF. Rate control in AF was achieved by either ablating the AVJ in 118 patients (AVJ-abl) or prescribing negative chronotropic drugs (AF-Drugs). Compared with SR, patients with AF were significantly older, more likely to be non-ischaemic, with higher ejection fraction, shorter QRS duration, and less often received ICD back-up. During a median follow-up of 34 months, 170/1042 patients in SR and 39/243 in AF died (mortality: 8.4 and 8.9 per 100 person-year, respectively). Adjusted hazard ratios were similar for all-cause and cardiac mortality [0.9 (0.57–1.42), P = 0.64 and 1.00 (0.60–1.66) P = 0.99, respectively]. Among AF patients, only 11/118 AVJ-abl patients died vs. 28/125 AF-Drugs patients (mortality: 4.3 and 15.2 per 100 person-year, respectively, P < 0.001). Adjusted hazard ratios of AVJ-abl vs. AF-Drugs was 0.26 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09–0.73, P = 0.010] for all-cause mortality, 0.31 (95% CI 0.10–0.99, P = 0.048) for cardiac mortality, and 0.15 (95% CI 0.03–0.70, P = 0.016) for HF mortality. Conclusion Patients with HF and AF treated with CRT have similar mortality compared with patients in SR. In AF, AVJ ablation in addition to CRT significantly improves overall survival compared with CRT alone, primarily by reducing HF death. PMID:18390869

  5. Validating the HeartQoL questionnaire in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Marie S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Berg, Selina K

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with impaired health-related quality-of-life (HRQL). When assessing HRQL, disease-specific and generic instruments are used, which may hinder outcome comparisons across studies. A newly developed core ischaemic heart disease-specific HRQL questio...

  6. RIVAROXABAN IN THE PREVENTION OF THROMBOEMBOLIC COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Gilyarov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation are highlighted. The alternative antithrombotic agents, including rivaroxaban presented along with the traditional drugs (acetyl-salicylic acid, warfarin. Efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban is considered on the basis of the results of the ROCKET-AF study.

  7. Atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Casper N

    2013-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication after myocardial infarction (MI) and new-onset AF has been demonstrated to be associated with adverse outcome and a large excess risk of death in both MI and aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Prevention of new-onset AF is therefore a potential therapeutic target in AS and MI patients. Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent AF. Accordingly, statins are recommended as a class IIa recommendation for prevention of new-onset AF after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, this preventive effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with AS or a large scale first-time MI patient sample and data in patients not undergoing invasive cardiac interventions are limited. This PhD thesis was conducted at the Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, with the aim to investigate the three aforementioned questions and to add to the existing evidence of AF prevention with statins. This was done using three different settings: 1) a randomized patients sample of 1,873 from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 2) a register patient sample of 97,499 with first-time MI, and 3) all published studies until beginning of June 2011 examining statin treatment on new-onset and recurrent AF in patients not undergoing cardiac surgery. This thesis revealed that statins did not lower the incidence or the time to new-onset AF in patients with asymptomatic AS. However, statin treatment showed an independently preventive effect on new-onset AF, including type-dependent effect and a trend to dosage-dependent effect. In addition, this thesis showed that good compliance to statin treatment was important to prevent new-onset AF. Finally, the meta-analysis in this PhD thesis showed a preventive effect in the observational studies although this effect was absent in the randomized controlled trials. Based on this PhD thesis

  8. Diagnosing Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Ischemic Strokes and Transient Ischemic Attacks Using Echocardiographic Measurements of Left Atrium Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Kristoffer Grundtvig; Christensen, Hanne Krarup; Høst, Nis

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five to 35 percentage of stroke cases are cryptogenic, and it has been demonstrated that paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) is the causal agent in up to 25% of these incidents. The purpose of this study was to investigate if left atrial (LA) parameters have value for diagnosing paroxysmal...... AF in patients with ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA). We retrospectively analyzed 219 patients who after acute IS or TIA underwent a transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Patients were designated as patients with paroxysmal AF if they had one or more reported incidents...... of AF before or after their echocardiographic examination. Patients in the paroxysmal AF group were significantly older and had higher CHA2DS2-VASc score than patients without paroxysmal AF (p

  9. Incidence of atrial fibrillation in patients with either heart failure or acute myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle D; Pedersen, Ole D; Køber, Lars

    2011-01-01

    We examined the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Patients either had a recent myocardial infarction (with or without clinical heart failure) or symptomatic heart failure (without a recent MI). Patients were with and without treatment...

  10. Retrospective Evaluation of the Pancreatic Cancer Patients Who Received Chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feryal Karaca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy and in locally advanced disease, chemotherapy (CT or chemoradiotherapy (CRT are implemented. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the general characteristics and survival of our patients receiving CRT. Material and Method: Between the years 2009-2013, 62 pancreatic cancer patients were taken into study who admitted to Van Training and Research Hospital. Eight patients who had whipple operation received radiotherapy (RT with concurrent CT. Fifty-four patients who were considered to be inoperable underwent CRT. As adjuvant treatment dose, 45 Gy (1,8 Gy/fx/day radiotherapy was administered to pancreas and regional lymph nodes. In patients who had taken definitive CRT, average 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fx/day dose was given. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 19 software package; Kaplan-Meier analysis method was used for survival and log-range test for comparisons. Results: Twenty-four patients (38.7% were female and 38 (61.3% were male. Eleven patients (17.7% were at stage IA, 16 (25.8% were stage IB, 13 (20.9% were stage IIA, 8 (12.9% were stage IIB and 14 (22.5% were staged as stage III. Two-year disease free survival (DFS; time from the date of biopsy until the date of recurrence was approximately 436 days and the median DFS was found to be 362 days. The average overall survival (OS time; time from the date of biopsy until the date of death were found to be approximately 854 days, the median survival time was found to be 916 days. Survival due to tumor localization (head, body and tail showed no significant difference statistically (log-range chi-square=0.366;p=0.833. Discussion: According to our single center experience, our data in pancreatic cancer patients were parallel with international data. In preclinical experiments, effective drug therapies for curative modalities are under investigation for pancreatic cancer patients.

  11. Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... of your body's cells and organs. Read More "Atrial Fibrillation" Articles Atrial Fibrillation / Who Is at Risk for ...

  12. Expression of platelet-bound stromal cell-derived factor-1 in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellos, Konstantinos; Rahmann, A; Kilias, A; Ruf, M; Sopova, K; Stamatelopoulos, K; Jorbenadze, R; Weretka, S; Geisler, T; Gawaz, M; Weig, H-J; Bigalke, B

    2012-01-01

    Blood cell infiltration and inflammation are involved in atrial remodelling during atrial fibrillation (AF) although the exact mechanisms of inflammatory cell recruitment remain poorly understood. Platelet-bound stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is increased in cases of ischemic myocardium and regulates recruitment of CXCR4(+) cells on the vascular wall. Whether platelet-bound SDF-1 expression is differentially influenced by non-valvular paroxysmal or permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been reported so far. A total of 1291 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing coronary angiography were recruited. Among the patients with SAP, platelet-bound-SDF-1 is increased in patients with paroxysmal AF compared with SR or to persistent/permanent AF (P disease. Further in vivo studies are required to elucidate the role of SDF-1 in atrial remodeling and the atrial fibrillation course.

  13. Treatment Adherence as a New Choice Factor for Optimization of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Hemostatic Gene Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Skirdenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate treatment adherence and prevalence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene mutations in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and provide rationale of choice for oral anticoagulation therapy.Material and methods. Treatment adherence was evaluated in 137 AF patients (aged 35-85 years with quantitative estimation of drug therapy adherence along with compliance to medical support and lifestyle modifications. Among them 82 patients underwent polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene polymorphisms.Results. Patients receiving anticoagulation therapy are characterized by lower level of adherence compared to patients without anticoagulants (65.2±19.3% vs 68.5±19.1%; Wald-Wolfowitz; p<0.05. Considering all studied parameters men are less adherent than women (54.7±18.6% vs 60.6±16.7%; Kolmogorov-Smirnov; p<0.05. Patients receiving new oral anticoagulants (NOAC have better compliance compared with patients of warfarin group. Mutations in CYP2C9 gene were detected in 32.9%, VKORC1 – in 68.3%, and their combination – in 21.9% of study participants. Warfarin therapy may be potentially dangerous in such patients due to low adherence.Conclusion. Considering high prevalence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene mutations treatment adherence should be estimated to optimize choice of anticoagulation therapy. NOAC treatment should be considered in patients with low adherence for prevention of thromboembolic complications.

  14. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns of psychological symptoms between trajectories. This naturalistic study focused on 241 cancer patients receiving psychological care at psycho-oncology institutions. Data were collected before the initiation of psychological care, and 3 and 9 months thereafter. Latent class growth analysis was applied to identify personal control trajectories. Three personal control trajectories were identified: enduring improvement (41%), temporary improvement (50%), and deterioration (9%). Education and baseline physical symptoms distinguished these trajectories. In the whole group, improvements in personal control were associated with improvements in psychological symptoms. Patients at distinct trajectories reported different levels of psychological symptoms, but did not differ in their courses of psychological symptoms. Patients in the enduring and temporary control improvement groups experienced significant psychological symptoms reductions over time, whereas patients in the control deterioration group maintained high psychological symptoms. Improvements in personal control seem to depend on initial control level: those who start with the highest control levels show subsequent improvements, whereas those with the lowest control levels show subsequent deterioration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Which diabetic patients should receive podiatry care? An objective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, M; Molyneaux, L; Yue, D K

    2005-08-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of lower limb amputation in Australia. However, due to limited resources, it is not feasible for everyone with diabetes to access podiatry care, and some objective guidelines of who should receive podiatry is required. A total of 250 patients with neuropathy (Biothesiometer; Biomedical Instruments, Newbury, Ohio, USA) ( > 30, age podiatry care (mean of estimates from 10 reports), the NNT to prevent one foot ulcer per year was: no neuropathy (vibration perception threshold (VPT) 30) alone, NNT = 45; +cannot feel monofilament, NNT = 18; +previous ulcer/amputation, NNT = 7. Provision of podiatry care to diabetic patients should not be only economically based, but should also be directed to those with reduced sensation, especially where there is a previous history of ulceration or amputation.

  16. How health information is received by diabetic patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Zare-Farashbandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge of correct information-seeking behavior by the patients can provide health specialists and health information specialists with valuable information in improving health care. This study aimed to investigate the passive receipt and active seeking of health information by diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: A survey method was used in this research on 6426 diabetic patients of whom 362 patients were selected by a no percentage stratified random sampling. The Longo information-seeking behavior questionnaire was used to collect data and they were analyzed by SPSS 20 software. Results: The most common information source by diabetic patients was practitioners (3.12. The minimum usage among the information sources were from charity organizations and emergency phone lines with a usage of close to zero. The amount of health information gained passively from each source has the lowest average of 4.18 and usage of this information in making health decision has the highest average score of 5.83. Analysis of the data related to active seeking of information showed that knowledge of available medical information from each source has the lowest average score of 3.95 and ability in using the acquired information for making medical decisions has the highest average score of 5.28. The paired t-test showed that differences between passive information receipt (41.68 and active information seeking (39.20 considered as statistically significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Because diabetic patients are more passive information receivers than active information seekers, the health information must be distributed by passive means to these patients. In addition, information-seeking behavior during different time periods should be investigated; to identify more effective distribution of health information.

  17. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options—a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Bax, Jeroen; Hylek, Elaine; Kaab, Stefan; Schotten, Ulrich; Wegscheider, Karl; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Ezekowitz, Michael; Diener, Hans; Haegeli, Laurent; Heidbuchel, Hein; Lane, Deirdre; Mont, Luis; Willems, Stephan; Dorian, Paul; Aunes-Jansson, Maria; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Borentain, Maria; Breitenstein, Stefanie; Brueckmann, Martina; Cater, Nilo; Clemens, Andreas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Dubner, Sergio; Edvardsson, Nils G.; Friberg, Leif; Goette, Andreas; Gulizia, Michele; Hatala, Robert; Horwood, Jenny; Szumowski, Lukas; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Josef; Leute, Angelika; Lobban, Trudie; Meyer, Ralf; Millerhagen, Jay; Morgan, John; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Baertels, Christoph; Oeff, Michael; Paar, Dieter; Polifka, Juergen; Ravens, Ursula; Rosin, Ludger; Stegink, W.; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Vardas, Panos; Vincent, Alphons; Walter, Maureen; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A. John

    2012-01-01

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section is covered, and suggestions for the improvement of management in each area are put forward. Combined, the propositions formulate a perspective to implement comprehensive management in AF. PMID:21791573

  18. Sex-related differences in presentation, treatment, and outcome of patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe: a report from the Euro Observational Research Programme Pilot survey on Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Laroche, Cécile; Boriani, Giuseppe; Cimaglia, Paolo; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Santini, Massimo; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Popescu, Mircea Ioachim; Tica, Otilia; Hellum, Camilla Fragtrup; Mortensen, Bettina; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the epidemiology and clinical management of AF are evident. Of note, females are more symptomatic and if age >65, are at higher risk of thromboembolism if incident AF develops, compared with males. In an analysis from the dataset of the Euro Observational Research Programme on Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot survey (n = 3119), we examined sex-related differences in presentation, treatment, and outcome of contemporary patients with AF in Europe.Female subjects were older (P failure and hypertension. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction was more common in females (P < 0.0001), as was valvular heart disease (P = 0.0003). Females were more symptomatic compared with males with a higher proportion being EHRA Class III and IV (P = 0.0012). The more common symptoms that were more prevalent in females were palpitations (P < 0.0001) and fear/anxiety (P = 0.0007). Other symptoms (e.g. dyspnoea, chest pain, fatigue, etc.) were not different between males and females. Health status scores were significantly lower for females overall, specifically for the psychological and physical domains (both P < 0.0001) but not for the sexual activity domain (P = 0.9023). Females were less likely to have electrical cardioversion (18.9 vs. 25.5%, P < 0.0001), and more likely to receive rate control (P = 0.002). Among patients recruited in hospital and discharged alive (n = 2009), documented contraindications to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) were evident in 23.8% of females. A CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 was found in 94.7% of females and 74.6% of males (P < 0.0001), with oral anticoagulants being used in 95.3 and 76.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). A HAS-BLED score of ≥3 was found in 12.2% of females and 14.5% of males. Independent predictors of VKA use in females on multivariate analysis were CHA2DS2-VASc score (P = 0.0007), lower HAS-BLED score (P = 0.0284), and prosthetic mechanical valves (P = 0.0276). The EORP-AF Pilot survey provides contemporary data on sex

  19. Management of Major Bleeding in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Treated With Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants Compared With Warfarin in Clinical Practice (from Phase II of the Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation [ORBIT-AF II]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Simon, DaJuanicia N; Thomas, Laine; Ansell, Jack; Fonarow, Gregg C; Gersh, Bernard J; Kowey, Peter R; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Peterson, Eric D; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2017-05-15

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are effective at preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, little is known about the management of bleeding in contemporary, clinical use of NOACs. We aimed to assess the frequency, management, and outcomes of major bleeding in the setting of community use of NOACs. Using the Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation II registry, we analyzed rates of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis major bleeding and subsequent outcomes in patients treated with NOACs versus warfarin. Outcomes of interest included acute and chronic bleeding management, recurrent bleeding, thromboembolic events, and death. In total, 344 patients with atrial fibrillation experienced major bleeding events over a median follow-up of 360 days follow-up: n = 273 on NOAC (3.3 per 100 patient-years) and n = 71 on warfarin (3.5 per 100 patient-years). Intracranial bleeding was uncommon but similar (0.34 per 100 patient-years for NOAC vs 0.44 for warfarin, p = 0.5), as was gastrointestinal bleeding (1.8 for NOAC vs 1.3 for warfarin, p = 0.1). Blood products and correction agents were less commonly used in NOAC patients with major bleeds compared with warfarin-treated patients (53% vs 76%, p = 0.0004 for blood products; 0% vs 1.5% for recombinant factor; p = 0.0499); no patients received pharmacologic hemostatic agents (aminocaproic acid, tranexamic acid, desmopressin, aprotinin). Within 30 days, 23 NOAC-treated patients (8.4%) died versus 5 (7.0%) on warfarin (p = 0.7). At follow-up, 126 NOAC-treated (46%) and 29 warfarin-treated patients (41%) were not receiving any anticoagulation. In conclusion, rates of major bleeding are similar in warfarin and NOAC-treated patients in clinical practice. However, NOAC-related bleeds require less blood product administration and rarely require factor replacement. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options--a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y H; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2012-01-01

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes...... covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section...

  1. Polypharmacy and effects of apixaban versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation: post hoc analysis of the ARISTOTLE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers Focks, Jeroen; Brouwer, Marc A; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Thomas, Laine; Lopes, Renato D; Washam, Jeffrey B; Lanas, Fernando; Xavier, Denis; Husted, Steen; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H; Granger, Christopher B; Verheugt, Freek W A

    2016-06-15

     To determine whether the treatment effect of apixaban versus warfarin differs with increasing numbers of concomitant drugs used by patients with atrial fibrillation.  Post hoc analysis performed in 2015 of results from ARISTOTLE (apixaban for reduction in stroke and other thromboembolic events in atrial fibrillation)-a multicentre, double blind, double dummy trial that started in 2006 and ended in 2011.  18 201 ARISTOTLE trial participants.  In the ARISTOTLE trial, patients were randomised to either 5 mg apixaban twice daily (n=9120) or warfarin (target international normalised ratio range 2.0-3.0; n=9081). In the post hoc analysis, patients were divided into groups according to the number of concomitant drug treatments used at baseline (0-5, 6-8, ≥9 drugs) with a median follow-up of 1.8 years.  Clinical outcomes and treatment effects of apixaban versus warfarin (adjusted for age, sex, and country).  Each patient used a median of six drugs (interquartile range 5-9); polypharmacy (≥5 drugs) was seen in 13 932 (76.5%) patients. Greater numbers of concomitant drugs were used in older patients, women, and patients in the United States. The number of comorbidities increased across groups of increasing numbers of drugs (0-5, 6-8, ≥9 drugs), as did the proportions of patients treated with drugs that interact with warfarin or apixaban. Mortality also rose significantly with the number of drug treatments (PARISTOTLE trial, three quarters of patients had polypharmacy; this subgroup had an increased comorbidity, more interacting drugs, increased mortality, and higher rates of thromboembolic and bleeding complications. In terms of a potential differential response to anticoagulation therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation and polypharmacy, apixaban was more effective than warfarin, and is at least just as safe.Trial registration ARISTOTLE trial, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00412984. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  2. IMPACT OF ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY ON THE INDICATORS OF ARTERIAL STIFFNESS AND ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AFTER CARDIOEMBOLIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Zolotovskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the impact of anticoagulant therapy on the indicators of arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction (ED in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF after cardioembolic stroke (CES.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 93 patients with AF after CES. The patients were divided into two groups: a study group in which all patients (n=48 received anticoagulants and a comparison group (n=45 in which the patients did not take anticoagulants, although the latter had been prescribed. The follow-up duration was 180.5±5.5 days. During this time the patients visited their doctors twice: the first visit was at baseline, the second one was after 24 weeks.All the patients underwent three-dimensional sphygmography. The levels of glucose, creatinine, total cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins, and triglycerides were determined. The markers of endothelial function, such as von Willebrand factor, plasminogen, antithrombin III,  and tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, were estimated.Results. All the patients in the study and comparison groups had a higher comorbidity index of obvious somatic pathology. The patients from both groups showed changes in all cardiac morphometric and functional parameters. It was noted that after 6 months of a follow-up, there was a statistically significant positive trend in the indicators of arterial stiffness in the patients taking anticoagulants. The study group showed a significant correlation of blood pressure with the argumentation index. The 6-month follow-up revealed a strong correlation between the cardioankle vascular index and all the indicators of ED in the study group. After 24 weeks, in both groups there were 12 (12.9% deaths: 3 (6.25% and 8 (17.8% in the study and comparison groups, respectively.Conclusion. The findings suggest that in patients with AF after CES, the indicators of arterial stiffness and endothelial function tend to improve during anticoagulant therapy.

  3. Incidence and Risk Factors of Stroke or Systemic Embolism in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iguchi, Moritake; Tezuka, Yuji; Ogawa, Hisashi

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a heterogeneous syndrome, but the effect of the type and severity of HF on the incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (SE) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is unclear.Methods and Results:The Fushimi AF Registry is a community-based prospective survey of AF ...... of HF in patients with AF. The incidence of stroke/SE was markedly increased in the 30 days after admission for HF, but compensated 'stable' HF did not appear to confer an independent risk.......BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a heterogeneous syndrome, but the effect of the type and severity of HF on the incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (SE) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is unclear.Methods and Results:The Fushimi AF Registry is a community-based prospective survey of AF....... On multivariate analysis, the incidence of stroke/SE was not associated with pre-existing HF (hazard ratio (HR), 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92-1.64) or each criterion for the definition of pre-existing HF, but was associated with high B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal proBNP levels (above...

  4. Potentially avoidable inpatient nights among warfarin receiving patients; an audit of a single university teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, Dónall

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant (OAT) that needs active management to ensure therapeutic range. Initial management is often carried out as an inpatient, though not requiring inpatient facilities. This mismatch results in financial costs which could be directed more efficaciously. The extent of this has previously been unknown. Here we aim to calculate the potential number of bed nights which may be saved among those being dose optimized as inpatients and examine associated factors. METHODS: A 6 week prospective audit of inpatients receiving OAT, at Cork University Hospital, was carried out. The study period was from 11th June 2007 to 20th July 2007. Data was collected from patient\\'s medications prescription charts, medical record files, and computerised haematology laboratory records. The indications for OAT, the patient laboratory coagulation results and therapeutic intervals along with patient demographics were analysed. The level of potentially avoidable inpatient nights in those receiving OAT in hospital was calculated and the potential cost savings quantified. Potential avoidable bed nights were defined as patients remaining in hospital for the purpose of optimizing OAT dosage, while receiving subtherapeutic or therapeutic OAT (being titred up to therapeutic levels) and co-administered covering low molecular weight heparin, and requiring no other active care. The average cost of euro638 was taken as the per night hospital stay cost for a non-Intensive Care bed. Ethical approval was granted from the Ethical Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals, Cork, Ireland. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients were included in the audit. There was 94 men (59.4%) and 64 women (40.6%). The mean age was 67.8 years, with a median age of 70 years.Atrial Fibrillation (43%, n = 70), followed by aortic valve replacement (15%, n = 23) and pulmonary emboli (11%, n = 18) were the commonest reasons for prescribing OAT. 54% had previously been prescribed OAT prior to

  5. Palliative care for patients with cancer: do patients receive the care they consider important?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Hofstede, J.; Rijken, P.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Donker, G.A.; Francke, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care from a GP and homecare nurse. Care for physical/psychosocial well-being, respect for patients’ autonomy and information provision are important elements of palliative care, but it is not known whether patients receive the care

  6. Clinical outcomes and management associated with major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with apixaban or warfarin: insights from the ARISTOTLE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Claes; Hylek, Elaine M; Alexander, John H; Hanna, Michael; Lopes, Renato D; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Thomas, Laine; Al-Khalidi, Hussein; Alings, Marco; Xavier, Dennis; Ansell, Jack; Goto, Shinya; Ruzyllo, Witold; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Verheugt, Freek W A; Zhu, Jun; Granger, Christopher B; Wallentin, Lars

    2015-05-21

    In the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial, apixaban compared with warfarin reduced the risk of stroke, major bleed, and death in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this ancillary study, we evaluated clinical consequences of major bleeds, as well as management and treatment effects of warfarin vs. apixaban. Major International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis bleeding was defined as overt bleeding accompanied by a decrease in haemoglobin (Hb) of ≥2 g/dL or transfusion of ≥2 units of packed red cells, occurring at a critical site or resulting in death. Time to event [death, ischaemic stroke, or myocardial infarction (MI)] was evaluated by Cox regression models. The excess risk associated with bleeding was evaluated by separate time-dependent indicators for intracranial (ICH) and non-intracranial haemorrhage. Major bleeding occurred in 848 individuals (4.7%), of whom 126 (14.9%) died within 30 days. Of 176 patients with an ICH, 76 (43.2%) died, and of the 695 patients with major non-ICH, 64 (9.2%) died within 30 days of the bleeding. The risk of death, ischaemic stroke, or MI was increased roughly 12-fold after a major non-ICH bleeding event within 30 days. Corresponding risk of death following an ICH was markedly increased, with HR 121.5 (95% CI 91.3-161.8) as was stroke or MI with HR 21.95 (95% CI 9.88-48.81), respectively. Among patients with major bleeds, 20.8% received vitamin K and/or related medications (fresh frozen plasma, coagulation factors, factor VIIa) to stop bleeding within 3 days, and 37% received blood transfusion. There was no interaction between apixaban and warfarin and major bleeding on the risk of death, stroke, or MI. Major bleeding was associated with substantially increased risk of death, ischaemic stroke, or MI, especially following ICH, and this risk was similarly elevated regardless of treatment with apixaban or warfarin. These results underscore the

  7. Characteristics and outcomes of atrial fibrillation patients with or without specific symptoms: results from the PREFER in AF registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhai, Ameet; Darius, Harald; De Caterina, Raffaele; Smart, Angela; Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves; Schilling, Richard John; Zamorano, José Luis; Shah, Mit; Bramlage, Peter; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common condition that is a major cause of stroke. A significant proportion of patients with AF are not classically symptomatic at diagnosis or soon after diagnosis. There is little information comparing their characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of patients with symptoms, which predominate in clinical trials to those without. We analysed data from the Prevention of Thromboembolic Events-European Registry in Atrial Fibrillation. This was a prospective, real-world registry with a 12-month follow-up that included AF patients aged 18 years and over. Patients were divided into those with and without AF symptoms using the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) score (Category I vs. Categories II-IV). Of the 6196 patients (mean age 72 years) with EHRA scores available, 501 (8.1%) were asymptomatic. A lower proportion of asymptomatic patients was female (22.8 vs. 41.2%), with less noted to have heart failure and coronary artery disease (P attack; P = 0.840). Patients with higher CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores experienced more events, independent of symptoms. Antithrombotic therapy was comparable for both groups at baseline and at follow-up. The similar clinical characteristics and frequency of adverse events between asymptomatic and symptomatic AF patients revives the question of whether screening programmes to detect people with asymptomatic AF are worthwhile, particularly in those aged 65 and over potentially likely to have clinical and economic benefits from anticoagulants. This evidence may be informative if clinicians may not be comfortable participating in future clinical trials, leaving asymptomatic patients with AF and high stroke risk without anticoagulation.

  8. Predictors of Elevated Cardiac Enzyme Levels in Hospitalized Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and No Known Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinales, Karyne L; Najib, Mohammad Q; Marella, Punnaiah C; Katayama, Minako; Chaliki, Hari P

    2016-02-01

    We retrospectively studied the predictive capabilities of elevated cardiac enzyme levels in terms of the prognosis of patients who were hospitalized with atrial fibrillation and who had no known coronary artery disease. Among 321 patients with atrial fibrillation, 60 without known coronary artery disease had their cardiac enzyme concentrations measured during hospitalization and underwent stress testing or cardiac catheterization within 12 months before or after hospitalization. We then compared the clinical and electrocardiographic characteristics of the 20 patients who had elevated cardiac enzyme levels and the 40 patients who had normal levels. Age, sex, and comorbidities did not differ between the groups. In the patients with elevated cardiac enzyme levels, the mean concentrations of troponin T and creatine kinase-MB isoenzymes were 0.08 ± 0.08 ng/mL and 6.49 ± 4.94 ng/mL, respectively. In univariate analyses, only peak heart rate during atrial tachyarrhythmia was predictive of elevated enzyme levels (P <0.0001). Mean heart rate was higher in the elevated-level patients (146 ± 22 vs 117 ± 29 beats/min; P=0.0007). Upon multivariate analysis, heart rate was the only independent predictor of elevated levels. Coronary artery disease was found in only 2 patients who had elevated levels and in one patient who had normal levels (P=0.26). Increased myocardial demand is probably why the presenting heart rate was predictive of elevated cardiac enzyme levels. Most patients with elevated enzyme levels did not have coronary artery disease, and none died of cardiac causes during the 6-month follow-up period. To validate our findings, larger studies are warranted.

  9. Left atrial appendage thrombus with resulting stroke post-RF ablation for atrial fibrillation in a patient on dabigatran.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, R

    2015-11-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is licensed for use in prevention of deep venous thromboembolism and in prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). It has also been used in patients for other indications as a substitute for warfarin therapy because it requires no monitoring; one group being patients undergoing radiofrequency (RF), ablation for AF, although there have been no consensus guidelines with regards to dosage and timing of dose. We report the case of a patient with documentary evidence of left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus formation and neurological sequelae post-RF ablation despite being on dabigatran. This case highlights the concern that periprocedural dabigatran may not provide adequate protection from development of LAA thrombus and that a standardised protocol will need to be developed and undergo large multicentre trials before dabigatran can be safely used for patients undergoing RF-ablation.

  10. Malnourished patients on hemodialysis improve after receiving a nutritional intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, Adaiane; Barros, Elvino Guardão; Veronese, Francisco Veríssimo; Thomé, Fernando Saldanha

    2011-12-01

    Malnutrition is multifactorial and may be modified by nutritional intervention. We aimed to assess the impact of an intervention on the nutritional status of malnourished hemodialysis patients and their acceptance of a non-industrialized nutritional supplement. 18 patients were studied, they were selected from a previous nutritional assessment where nutritional risk was defined as: subjective global assessment > 15 plus one criterion for malnutrition. The following variables were assessed: anthropometric parameters, subjective global assessment, dietary intake, six-minute walking test, quality of life (SF-36), and biochemical tests. Patients were randomized to either Control or Intervention Groups. The Intervention Group received a dietetic supplement during dialysis containing 355 kcal, prepared from simple ingredients. After three months, subjects from the Control Group and other patients also considered at nutritional risk underwent the same intervention. The study groups were compared after three months, and all patients were analyzed before and after the intervention. Fifteen men and three women, aged 56.4 ± 15.6 years-old, nine in each group, were studied. The Intervention Group showed an improvement in the subjective global assessment (p = 0.04). There were differences in role physical and bodily pain domains of SF-36, with improvement in the Intervention Group and worsening in the Control Group (p = 0.034 and p = 0.021). Comparisons before and after intervention for all patients showed improvement in the subjective global assessment (16.18 ± 4.27 versus 14.37 ± 4.20, p = 0.04), and in the six-minute walking test (496.60 ± 132.59 versus 547.80 ± 132.48 m; p = 0.036). The nutritional supplement was well tolerated by all patients, and it did not cause side effects. The nutritional intervention improved the subjective global assessment and quality of life of hemodialysis patients at short-term. A global intervention by a dietitian produced specific and

  11. Incidence and predictors of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in patients older than 70 years with complete atrioventricular block and dual chamber pacemaker implantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Radeljic, Vjekoslav

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To evaluate predictors of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in patients older than 70 years with complete atrioventricular (AV) block, normal left ventricular systolic function, and implanted dual chamber (DDD) pacemaker. METHODS: Hundred and eighty six patients with complete AV block were admitted over one year to the Sisters of Mercy University Hospital. The study recruited patients older than 70 years, with no history of atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or reduced left ventricular systolic function. All the patients were implanted with the same pacemaker. Out of 103 patients who were eligible for the study, 81 (78%) were evaluated. Among those 81 (78%) were evaluated. Eighty one (78%) patients were evaluated. Follow-up time ranged from 12 to 33 months (average +\\/-standard deviation 23 +\\/- 5 months). Primary end-point was asymptomatic atrial fibrillation occurrence recorded by the pacemaker. Atrial fibrillation occurrence was defined as atrial high rate episodes (AHRE) lasting >5 minutes. Binary logistic regression was used to identify the predictors of development of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation. Results. The 81 patients were stratified into two groups depending on the presence of AHRE lasting >5 minutes (group 1 had AHRE>5 minutes and group 2 AHRE<5 minutes). AHRE lasting >5 minutes were detected in 49 (60%) patients after 3 months and in 53 (65%) patients after 18 moths. After 3 months, only hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 17.63; P = 0.020) was identified as a predictor of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation. After 18 months, hypertension (OR, 14.0; P = 0.036), P wave duration >100 ms in 12 lead ECG (OR, 16.5; P = 0.001), and intracardial atrial electrogram signal amplitude >4 mV (OR, 4.27; P = 0.045) were identified as predictors of atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSION: In our study population, hypertension was the most robust and constant predictor of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation after 3 months, while P wave duration >100 ms in 12-lead ECG and

  12. Results of preventive radioiodine therapy in euthyroid patients with history of hyperthyroidism prior to administration of amiodarone with permanent atrial fibrillation--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Zgorzalewicz-Stachowiak, Małgorzata; Woliński, Kosma; Płazińska, Maria Teresa; Miechowicz, Izabela; Kwiecińska, Barbara; Czepczyński, Rafał; Królicki, Leszek; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine (RAI) therapy is a standard procedure in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. However, the use of RAI in euthyroid patients requiring chronic administration of amiodarone (AM) where other antiarrhythmic drugs may lack efficacy is still controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of an AM therapy prior to treatment with radioiodine therapy in euthyroid patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (PAF), who had been treated for hyperthyroidism in the past. This was a retrospective observational study. Patients were assessed at baseline and two, six, eight, and 12 months after RAI therapy. 17 euthyroid patients with PAF were qualified to the RAI (female/male 3/14; age range 65 to 87, median 71). The patients required chronic administration of AM as a prophylaxis against sudden death. Each patient received an ablative dose of 800 MBq (22 mCi) of 131I. At baseline and during follow-up, no side effects of the therapy and no signs of drug intolerance were observed. Subclinical hyperthyroidism occurred in two (11.8%) cases after two months of RAI and five weeks of AM administration. In this situation, RAI therapy was repeated. Three patients (17.6%) after six months, and another two (11.8%) after eight months, required an additional dose of 131I due to amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT). Twelve patients (70.6%) returned to spontaneous sinus rhythm within two months. Fourteen patients (82.4%) had sinus rhythm during follow-up after six and 12 months of treatment. Preventive RAI in euthyroid (but previously hyperthyroid) patients with PAF before administration of AM may be the method of choice. This is particularly important for patients who will require permanent AM administration as a life-saving drug.

  13. Doripenem pharmacokinetics in critically ill patients receiving continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Seigo; Goto, Koji; Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Objectives of the prospective, open-label study were to investigate pharmacokinetics of doripenem and determine appropriate doripenem regimens during continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) in critically ill patients with renal failure (creatinine clearance times during one dosing interval were measured in order to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters and clearance via hemodiafiltration. Mean half-life (+/-standard deviation) of doripenem was 7.9+/-3.7 hours. Total body clearance of doripenem was 58.0+/-12.7 ml/min, including clearance of 13.5+/-1.6 ml/min via CHDF. An IV dose of 250 mg of doripenem every 12 hours during CHDF provided adequate plasma concentrations for critically ill patients with renal failure, without resulting in accumulation upon steady-state. Thus, under the conditions tested, CHDF appeared to have little effect on doripenem clearance. Therefore, the blood level of doripenem can be satisfactorily controlled by adjustment of doripenem dose and dosing interval, in accordance with residual renal function in patients receiving CHDF.

  14. Apixaban in Comparison With Warfarin in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease: Findings From the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avezum, Alvaro; Lopes, Renato D; Schulte, Phillip J; Lanas, Fernando; Gersh, Bernard J; Hanna, Michael; Pais, Prem; Erol, Cetin; Diaz, Rafael; Bahit, M Cecilia; Bartunek, Jozef; De Caterina, Raffaele; Goto, Shinya; Ruzyllo, Witold; Zhu, Jun; Granger, Christopher B; Alexander, John H

    2015-08-25

    Apixaban is approved for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. However, the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial included a substantial number of patients with valvular heart disease and only excluded patients with clinically significant mitral stenosis or mechanical prosthetic heart valves. We compared the effect of apixaban and warfarin on rates of stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, and death in patients with and without moderate or severe valvular heart disease using Cox proportional hazards modeling. Of the 18 201 patients enrolled in ARISTOTLE, 4808 (26.4%) had a history of moderate or severe valvular heart disease or previous valve surgery. Patients with valvular heart disease had higher rates of stroke or systemic embolism and bleeding than patients without valvular heart disease. There was no evidence of a differential effect of apixaban over warfarin in patients with and without valvular heart disease in reducing stroke and systemic embolism (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.51-0.97 and HR, 0.84; 95%, CI 0.67-1.04; interaction P=0.38), causing less major bleeding (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61-1.04 and HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.55-0.77; interaction P=0.23), and reducing mortality (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.84-1.22 and HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.96; interaction P=0.10). More than a quarter of the patients in ARISTOTLE with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation had moderate or severe valvular heart disease. There was no evidence of a differential effect of apixaban over warfarin in reducing stroke or systemic embolism, causing less bleeding, and reducing death in patients with and without valvular heart disease. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00412984. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Global longitudinal strain corrected by RR interval is a superior predictor of all-cause mortality in patients with systolic heart failure and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modin, Daniel; Sengeløv, Morten; Jørgensen, Peter Godsk

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Quantification of systolic function in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is challenging. A novel approach, based on RR interval correction, to counteract the varying heart cycle lengths in AF has recently been proposed. Whether this method is superior in patients with systolic heart fa...

  16. Risk profiles and antithrombotic treatment of patients newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: perspectives from the international, observational, prospective GARFIELD registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kakkar, A.K.; Mueller, I.; Bassand, J.P.; Fitzmaurice, D.A.; Goldhaber, S.Z.; Goto, S.; Haas, S.; Hacke, W.; Lip, G.Y.; Mantovani, L.G.; Turpie, A.G.G.; Eickels, M. van; Misselwitz, F.; Rushton-Smith, S.; Kayani, G.; Wilkinson, P.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data are available on the characteristics, clinical management, and outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke, from a worldwide perspective. The aim of this study was to describe the baseline characteristics and initial therapeutic management of patients

  17. Autonomic dysfunction and new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction: a CARISMA substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøns, Christian; Raatikainen, Pekka; Gang, Uffe J

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases morbidity and mortality in patients with previous myocardial infarction and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to identify patients with a high risk for new-onset AF in this population using invasive and noninvasive...

  18. Factors Associated With and Outcomes After Ventricular Fibrillation Before and During Primary Angioplasty in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Reza; Risgaard, Bjarke; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the risk factors and outcome of ventricular fibrillation (VF) before and duringprimary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in patients with ST-segment elevationmyocardial infarction. From 1999 to 2012, we consecutively enrolled 5,373 patients withST-segment elevation...

  19. New-onset atrial fibrillation is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in hospitalized heart failure patients: Results of the EuroHeart Failure Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rivero-Ayerza (Maximo); W.J.M. Scholte op Reimer (Wilma); M.J. Lenzen (Mattie); D.A.M.J. Theuns (Dominic); L.J.L.M. Jordaens (Luc); M. Komajda (Michel); F. Follath; K. Swedberg (Karl); J.G.F. Cleland (John)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims: The prognostic significance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in hospitalized patients with heart failure (HF) remains poorly understood. To evaluate in what way AF and its different modes of presentation affect the in-hospital mortality in patients admitted with HF. Methods and results:

  20. Prognosis in patients with atrial fibrillation and CHA2DS2-VASc Score = 0 in a community-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taillandier, Sophie; Olesen, Jonas B; Clémenty, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a CHA(2) DS(2) -VASc score = 0 have a very low risk of stroke and current guidelines even recommend no antithrombotic therapy to these patients. We investigated the rate and risk of adverse events and the impact of antithrombotic management in a communit...

  1. Net clinical benefit of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy versus anticoagulation alone in atrial fibrillation patients: Results from the amadeus trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, Deirdre; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Minini, Pascal; De Peuter, Olaf R.; Buller, Harry R.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: To compare the effect of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet (AP) therapy with anticoagulation alone on stroke and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and examine predictors of clinically relevant bleeding. Methods: Post-hoc analysis of 4576 AF patients [mean (SD)

  2. Performance of the HEMORR(2)HAGES, ATRIA, and HAS-BLED Bleeding Risk-Prediction Scores in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Anticoagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolakis, Stavros; Lane, Deirdre A.; Guo, Yutao; Buller, Harry; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the predictive performance of bleeding risk-estimation tools in a cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing anticoagulation. Background Three bleeding risk-prediction schemes have been derived for and validated in patients with

  3. Outcomes after cardioversion and atrial fibrillation ablation in patients treated with rivaroxaban and warfarin in the ROCKET AF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Stevens, Susanna R; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Patel, Manesh R; Halperin, Jonathan L; Singer, Daniel E; Hankey, Graeme J; Hacke, Werner; Becker, Richard C; Nessel, Christopher C; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Fox, Keith A A; Califf, Robert M; Breithardt, Günter

    2013-05-14

    This study sought to investigate the outcomes following cardioversion or catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) treated with warfarin or rivaroxaban. There are limited data on outcomes following cardioversion or catheter ablation in AF patients treated with factor Xa inhibitors. We compared the incidence of electrical cardioversion (ECV), pharmacologic cardioversion (PCV), or AF ablation and subsequent outcomes in patients in a post hoc analysis of the ROCKET AF (Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation) trial. Over a median follow-up of 2.1 years, 143 patients underwent ECV, 142 underwent PCV, and 79 underwent catheter ablation. The overall incidence of ECV, PCV, or AF ablation was 1.45 per 100 patient-years (n = 321; 1.44 [n = 161] in the warfarin arm, 1.46 [n = 160] in the rivaroxaban arm). The crude rates of stroke and death increased in the first 30 days after cardioversion or ablation. After adjustment for baseline differences, the long-term incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.61 to 3.11), cardiovascular death (HR: 1.57; 95% CI: 0.69 to 3.55), and death from all causes (HR: 1.75; 95% CI: 0.90 to 3.42) were not different before and after cardioversion or AF ablation. Hospitalization increased after cardioversion or AF ablation (HR: 2.01; 95% CI: 1.51 to 2.68), but there was no evidence of a differential effect by randomized treatment (p value for interaction = 0.58). The incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (1.88% vs. 1.86%) and death (1.88% vs. 3.73%) were similar in the rivaroxaban-treated and warfarin-treated groups. Despite an increase in hospitalization, there were no differences in long-term stroke rates or survival following cardioversion or AF ablation. Outcomes were similar in patients treated with rivaroxaban or warfarin

  4. Periodontal disease in a patient receiving Bevacizumab: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gujral Dorothy M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the action of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF thereby acting as an angiogenesis inhibitor. As a result, supply of oxygen and nutrients to tissues is impaired and tumour cell growth is reduced. Reported side effects due to bevacizumab are hypertension and increased risk of bleeding. Bowel perforation has also been reported. Periodontal disease in patients on bevacizumab therapy has not been reported before. Case Presentation We report a case of a forty-three year old woman who developed periodontitis whilst receiving bevacizumab for lung cancer. The periodontal disease remained stable on discontinuation of the drug. Conclusion Further investigations are needed to determine the mechanism for bevacizumab-induced periodontal disease.

  5. Growth differentiation factor 15, a marker of oxidative stress and inflammation, for risk assessment in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallentin, Lars; Hijazi, Ziad; Andersson, Ulrika; Alexander, John H; De Caterina, Raffaele; Hanna, Michael; Horowitz, John D; Hylek, Elaine M; Lopes, Renato D; Asberg, Signild; Granger, Christopher B; Siegbahn, Agneta

    2014-11-18

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15), high-sensitivity troponin, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels are predictive of death and cardiovascular events in healthy elderly subjects, patients with acute coronary syndrome, and patients with heart failure. High-sensitivity troponin I and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide are also prognostic in patients with atrial fibrillation. We evaluated the prognostic value of GDF-15 alone and in addition to clinical characteristics and other biomarkers in patients with atrial fibrillation. The Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial randomized 18 201 patients with atrial fibrillation to apixaban or warfarin. Biomarkers were measured at randomization in 14 798 patients. Efficacy and safety outcomes during 1.9 years of follow-up were compared across quartiles of GDF-15 by use of Cox analyses adjusted for clinical characteristics, randomized treatment, and other biomarkers. The GDF-15 level showed a median of 1383 ng/L (interquartile range, 977-2052 ng/L). Annual rates of stroke or systemic embolism ranged from 0.9% to 2.03% (P<0.001); of major bleeding, from 1.22% to 4.53% (P<0.001); and of mortality, from 1.34% to 7.19% (P<0.001) in the lowest compared with the highest GDF-15 quartile. The prognostic information provided by GDF-15 was independent of clinical characteristics and clinical risk scores. Adjustment for the other cardiac biomarkers attenuated the prognostic value for stroke, whereas the prognostic value for mortality and major bleeding remained. Apixaban consistently reduced stroke, mortality, and bleeding, regardless of GDF-15 levels. GDF-15 is a risk factor for major bleeding, mortality, and stroke in atrial fibrillation. The prognostic value for major bleeding and death remained even in the presence of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity troponin I. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier

  6. Left atrial appendage morphology assessment for risk stratification of embolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupercio, Florentino; Carlos Ruiz, Juan; Briceno, David F; Romero, Jorge; Villablanca, Pedro A; Berardi, Cecilia; Faillace, Robert; Krumerman, Andrew; Fisher, John D; Ferrick, Kevin; Garcia, Mario; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    Thromboembolic event (TE) risk stratification is performed by using CHA2DS2VASc score. It has been suggested that left atrial appendage (LAA) morphology independently influences TE risk in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. LAA morphology has been classified into 4 types: chicken wing, cauliflower, windsock, and cactus. The purpose of this study was to determine TE risk for each LAA morphology in patients with atrial fibrillation with low to intermediate TE risk. A systematic review of MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase for studies that used computed tomography, tridimensional transesophageal echocardiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to categorize the LAA morphologies with assessment of TE prevalence. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were measured using the Mantel-Haenszel method. The fixed effects model was used, and if heterogeneity (I2) was >25%, effects were analyzed using a random model. Eight studies with 2596 patients were included. Eighty-four percent (n=1872) of patients had a CHADS2 score of <2. TE risk was lower in chicken wing morphology than in non-chicken wing morphology (OR 0.46; 95% CI 0.36-0.58). Likewise, chicken wing morphology had lower TE risk than did other morphologies (chicken wing vs cauliflower: OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.26-0.56; chicken wing vs windsock: OR 0.48; 95% CI 0.31-0.73; chicken wing vs cactus: OR 0.49; 95% CI 0.36-0.66). Patients with chicken wing LAA morphology are less likely to develop TE than patients with non-chicken wing morphology. LAA morphology may be a valuable criterion in predicting TE and could affect the stratification and anticoagulation management of patients with low to intermediate TE risk. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Serum Potassium Levels Inversely Correlate with D-Dimer In Patients with Acute-Onset Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Bonfanti, Laura; Picanza, Alessandra; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2014-12-09

    Background: D-dimer values are frequently increased in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared to subjects in sinus rhythm. Hypokalemia plays a role in several cardiovascular diseases, but little is known about the association with AF. Objective: D-dimer values are frequently increased in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with subjects in sinus rhythm. Hypokalemia plays a role in several cardiovascular diseases, but little is known about the association with AF. The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between D-dimer and serum potassium in acute-onset AF (AAF). Methods: To investigate the potential correlation between the values of serum potassium and D-dimer in patients with AAF, we retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory data of all emergency department visits for AAF in 2013. Results: Among 271 consecutive AAF patients with D-dimer assessments, those with hypokalemia (n = 98) had significantly higher D-dimer values than normokalemic patients (139 versus 114 ng/mL, p = 0.004). The rate of patients with D-dimer values exceeding the diagnostic cut-off was higher in the group of patients with hypokalemia than in those with normal serum potassium (26.5% versus 16.2%; p = 0.029). An inverse and highly significant correlation was found between serum potassium and D-dimer (r = -0.21; p enzima conversora de angiotensina e diuréticos. Conclusões: A correlação inversa existente entre os níveis séricos de potássio e D-dímero em pacientes com FAA fornece informações importantes sobre o risco de tromboembolismo nestes pacientes.

  8. THE ASSESSMENT OF COMPLIANCE TO THE USE OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION ACCORDING TO THE PROFILE REGISTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study in the PROFILE register the rate of new oral anticoagulants (NOAC taking in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and to identify the factors influencing it.Material and methods. Patients with AF who applied to the Cardiology Center in 2013-2014 (n=111 were included into the study. The oral anticoagulants (OAC were recommended to patients at the reference visit (n=97. Inquiry in questionnaire format was performed to assess the compliance to recommended therapy at the follow-up visit. Patients were divided into two groups according to taking/not-taking NOAC. Analysis of the facts that influence the compliance to NOAC therapy was performed.Results. At the reference visit 70 patients desired to receive NOAC. At the follow-up visit 29 (41.4% patients refused to take NOAC. Leading causes of NOAC refusal were satisfactory with warfarin (32.6%, the high price of these drugs (23.9%, the description of adverse reactions in the patient information leaflet for medicines (15.2%, and withdrawal by physician in outpatient clinic/hospital (8.7%. Preferential provision of medicines and warfarin therapy at the time of reference visit had a negative impact on the taking of NOAC. Patients taking NOAC were more aware of the possible outcomes of their illness, the possible side effects of OAC and were more familiar with patient information leaflet for medicines.Conclusion. The study assessed NOAC taking rate and the factors influencing patients' compliance to NOAC therapy.

  9. Effect of single intraoperative dose of amiodarone in patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease and atrial fibrillation undergoing valve replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Thiruvenkadam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of sinus rhythm (SR is superior to rate control in atrial fibrillation (AF. In order to achieve SR, we administered single-dose intravenous amiodarone intraoperatively and evaluated its effect on conversion of rheumatic AF to SR in patients undergoing valvular heart surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to amiodarone ( n = 42 or control ( n = 40 group in a double blind manner. The amiodarone group received amiodarone (3 mg/kg intravenously prior to the institution of cardiopulmonary bypass and the control group received the same volume of normal saline. In the amiodarone group, the initial rhythm after the release of aortic cross clamp was noted to be AF in 14.3% ( n = 6 and remained so in 9.5% ( n = 4 of patients till the end of surgery. In the control group, the rhythm soon after the release of aortic cross clamp was AF in 37.5% ( n = 15 ( p = 0.035 and remained so in 32.5% ( n = 13 of patients till the end of surgery ( p = 0.01. At the end of first post-operative day 21.4% ( n = 9 of patients in amiodarone group and 55% ( n = 22 of patients in control group were in AF ( p = 0.002. The requirement of cardioversion/defibrillation was 1.5 (±0.54 in amiodarone group and 2.26 (±0.73 in the control group ( p = 0.014, and the energy needed was 22.5 (±8.86 joules in the amiodarone group and 40.53 (±16.5 in the control group ( p = 0.008. A single intraoperative dose of intravenous amiodarone increased the conversion rate of AF to normal sinus rhythm, reduced the need and energy required for cardioversion/defibrillation and reduced the recurrence of AF within one day.

  10. Effect of physical exercise training on muscle strength and body composition, and their association with functional capacity and quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip Samuel; Mourier, Malene; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2012-01-01

    at 70% of maximal exercise capacity vs control. Muscle strength, exercise capacity, 6-minute walk test, lean body mass, fat percentage, and quality of life were assessed. Results: Muscle strength increased in the training group (p = 0.01), but no change was observed in controls. Lean body mass......Objective: Atrial fibrillation diminishes cardiac function, exercise tolerance and quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine whether exercise training in atrial fibrillation affects muscle strength, body composition, maximal exercise capacity and walking capacity positively......, thus improving quality of life. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Twelve weeks of physical exercise training or control. Patients: Forty-nine patients in permanent atrial fibrillation were randomized to training or control. Methods: Intervention consisted of aerobic training for 1 h 3 times per week...

  11. Aortic Valve Stenosis and Atrial Fibrillation Influence Plasma Fibulin-1 Levels in Patients Treated with Coronary Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Lyck; Dahl, Jordi S; Argraves, W Scott

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that fib......Objectives: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis...... that fibulin-1 levels reflect myocardial fibrosis. Methods: Patients undergoing heart surgery at the Odense University were investigated. By 2012 data on outcome were obtained. Results: In 293 patients, plasma fibulin-1 levels were measured. Patients with AS or atrial fibrillation (AF) had significantly higher...

  12. Fitting the right non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant to the right patient with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yanguang; Pastori, Daniele; Lip, Gregory YH

    2018-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent arrhythmia and is associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke (IS) and systemic embolism (SE). Stroke prevention is a key element for the overall management of AF patients. The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs......), such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, are at least as effective as warfarin in reducing IS/SE with a lower rate of major bleeding. Various analyses from the large Phase III randomised trials demonstrated different efficacy and safety of NOACs in specific subgroups of patients. The randomised trials...... are supplemented by effectiveness and safety data from real world observational cohorts following the availability of these drugs for use in everyday clinical practice. Given the clinical heterogeneity of AF patients, the available data from trials and real-world studies allow us to fit the right NOAC...

  13. Post-marketing surveillance on the long-term use of dabigatran in Japanese patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: Preliminary report of the J-dabigatran surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Atarashi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Ken; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Yasaka, Masahiro; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Makiko; Yagi, Nobutaka; Fukaya, Taku

    2016-04-01

    A post-marketing surveillance (PMS) study is being conducted to investigate the safety and effectiveness of the long-term use of dabigatran etexilate (dabigatran) in Japanese patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Results of an interim analysis of this prospective cohort study including patient characteristics and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) collected up to September 17, 2014 are reported here. Patients with NVAF who began to receive dabigatran for the first time from December 2011 to November 2013 were enrolled at 1042 study sites in Japan. Clinical parameters included patient characteristics, dabigatran dose strength, concomitant medications and outcome events. All outcome events were collected as serious and non-serious adverse events (AEs). ADRs were evaluated in this report. Pre-defined safety events of special interest for intensive survey were serious and non-serious outcome events such as myocardial infarction, as well as the total number of hemorrhage and gastrointestinal disorders. A total of 6772 patients were registered. The safety analysis set included 6148 patients; mean age was 70.8±9.9 (SD) years: 2323 patients (37.8%) were aged 75 years or older. Males accounted for 66.8% of the patients. Mean CHADS2 score was 1.8±1.3; the CHADS2 score was 0 in 13.6%, 1 in 31.3%, 2 in 25.9%, 3 in 14.9%, and 4 to 6 in 11.1% of the patients. Of the 6148 patients, 1701 patients (27.7%) were switchers from warfarin and 4407 patients (71.7%) were non-switchers (OAC naïve patients). Treatment adherence was assessed for the first 3 months from the start of treatment for this analysis. Total 5656 patients (92.0%) reported taking dabigatran twice daily (bid) every day according to the label recommendation. During the follow up period [mean duration of follow up: 498±259 days (corresponding to 8386 patient-years)], pre-defined safety events of special interest for intensive survey (reported as serious ADRs) were: myocardial infarction, reported in 5

  14. Outcomes of temporary interruption of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: results from the rivaroxaban once daily, oral, direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation (ROCKET AF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Matthew W; Douketis, James D; Patel, Manesh R; Piccini, Jonathan P; Hellkamp, Anne S; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Hankey, Graeme J; Singer, Daniel E; Nessel, Christopher C; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Fox, Keith A A; Califf, Robert M; Becker, Richard C

    2014-05-06

    During long-term anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation, temporary interruptions (TIs) of therapy are common, but the relationship between patient outcomes and TIs has not been well studied. We sought to determine reasons for TI, the characteristics of patients undergoing TI, and the relationship between anticoagulant and outcomes among patients with TI. In the Rivaroxaban Once Daily, Oral, Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared With Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF), a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy study of rivaroxaban and warfarin in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, baseline characteristics, management, and outcomes, including stroke, non-central nervous system systemic embolism, death, myocardial infarction, and bleeding, were reported in participants who experienced TI (3-30 days) for any reason. The at-risk period for outcomes associated with TI was from TI start to 30 days after resumption of study drug. In 14 236 participants who received at least 1 dose of study drug, 4692 (33%) experienced TI. Participants with TI were similar to the overall ROCKET AF population in regard to baseline clinical characteristics. Only 6% (n=483) of TI incidences involved bridging therapy. Stroke/systemic embolism rates during the at-risk period were similar in rivaroxaban-treated and warfarin-treated participants (0.30% versus 0.41% per 30 days; hazard ratio [confidence interval]=0.74 [0.36-1.50]; P=0.40). Risk of major bleeding during the at-risk period was also similar in rivaroxaban-treated and warfarin-treated participants (0.99% versus 0.79% per 30 days; hazard ratio [confidence interval]=1.26 [0.80-2.00]; P=0.32). TI of oral anticoagulation is common and is associated with substantial stroke risks and bleeding risks that were similar among patients treated with rivaroxaban or warfarin. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal management strategy in patients with atrial fibrillation

  15. Can preoperative serum level of creatinine predict new-onset atrial fibrillation in non-diabetic male patients undergoing open heart surgery? A retrograde view.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalil Mirhosseini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Renal dysfunction is a risk marker in patients who candidate for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Renal disorder is associated with prolonged stays in intensive care unit and hospital, morbidity and mortality. Aim of this study is specific evaluation of association between preoperative creatinine (Cr with