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Sample records for fibrillation cardiac arrest

  1. Prevention of deterioration of ventricular fibrillation by basic life support during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalewijn, Reinier A.; Nijpels, Marië A.; Tijssen, Jan G.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2002-01-01

    Survival of cardiac arrest is improved by basic life support (BLS). This study investigated the relationship between ventricular fibrillation (VF) characteristics and survival. In a 2-year prospective study out-of-hospital witnessed non-traumatic cardiac arrests were observed. The probabilities of

  2. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners.

  3. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... magnesium. These minerals help your heart's electrical system work. Abnormally high or low levels can cause cardiac arrest. Severe physical stress. Anything that causes a severe stress on your ...

  4. Ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest produces a chronic striatal hyperdopaminergic state that is worsened by methylphenidate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Gerald J; Harun, Rashed; Fine, David F; Hutchison, Daniel; Grobart, Adam C; Stezoski, Jason P; Munoz, Miranda J; Kochanek, Patrick M; Leak, Rehana K; Drabek, Tomas; Wagner, Amy K

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac arrest survival rates have improved with modern resuscitation techniques, but many survivors experience impairments associated with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI). Currently, little is understood about chronic changes in striatal dopamine (DA) systems after HIBI. Given the common empiric clinical use of DA enhancing agents in neurorehabilitation, investigation evaluating dopaminergic alterations after cardiac arrest (CA) is necessary to optimize rehabilitation approaches. We hypothesized that striatal DA neurotransmission would be altered chronically after ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VF-CA). Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used with median forebrain bundle (MFB) maximal electrical stimulations (60Hz, 10s) in rats to characterize presynaptic components of DA neurotransmission in the dorsal striatum (D-Str) and nucleus accumbens 14 days after a 5-min VF-CA when compared to Sham or Naïve. VF-CA increased D-Str-evoked overflow [DA], total [DA] released, and initial DA release rate versus controls, despite also increasing maximal velocity of DA reuptake (V max ). Methylphenidate (10 mg/kg), a DA transporter inhibitor, was administered to VF-CA and Shams after establishing a baseline, pre-drug 60 Hz, 5 s stimulation response. Methylphenidate increased initial evoked overflow [DA] more-so in VF-CA versus Sham and reduced D-Str V max in VF-CA but not Shams; these findings are consistent with upregulated striatal DA transporter in VF-CA versus Sham. Our work demonstrates that 5-min VF-CA increases electrically stimulated DA release with concomitant upregulation of DA reuptake 2 weeks after brief VF-CA insult. Future work should elucidate how CA insult duration, time after insult, and insult type influence striatal DA neurotransmission and related cognitive and motor functions. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Atrial Fibrillation Following Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management - Are We Giving It the Attention it Deserves?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Erlinge, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Atrial fibrillation has been associated with increased mortality in the general population and mixed populations of critical ill. Atrial fibrillation can also affect patients during post-cardiac arrest care. We sought to assess the prognostic implications of atrial fibrillation follow...

  6. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

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    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  7. Comparison of Quantitative Characteristics of Early Post-resuscitation EEG Between Asphyxial and Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bihua; Chen, Gang; Dai, Chenxi; Wang, Pei; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Yuanyuan; Li, Yongqin

    2018-04-01

    Quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis has shown promising results in studying brain injury and functional recovery after cardiac arrest (CA). However, whether the quantitative characteristics of EEG, as potential indicators of neurological prognosis, are influenced by CA causes is unknown. The purpose of this study was designed to compare the quantitative characteristics of early post-resuscitation EEG between asphyxial CA (ACA) and ventricular fibrillation CA (VFCA) in rats. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were randomized into either ACA or VFCA group. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated after 5-min untreated CA. Characteristics of early post-resuscitation EEG were compared, and the relationships between quantitative EEG features and neurological outcomes were investigated. Compared with VFCA, serum level of S100B, neurological deficit score and brain histopathologic damage score were dramatically higher in the ACA group. Quantitative measures of EEG, including onset time of EEG burst, time to normal trace, burst suppression ratio, and information quantity, were significantly lower for CA caused by asphyxia and correlated with the 96-h neurological outcome and survival. Characteristics of earlier post-resuscitation EEG differed between cardiac and respiratory causes. Quantitative measures of EEG not only predicted neurological outcome and survival, but also have the potential to stratify CA with different causes.

  8. Survival After Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Subway System: First Successful Targeted Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Program in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotto-Oliveira, Renan; Gonzalez, Maria Margarita; Vianna, Caio Brito; Monteiro Alves, Maurício; Timerman, Sergio; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Kern, Karl B

    2015-10-09

    Targeted automated external defibrillator (AED) programs have improved survival rates among patients who have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in US airports, as well as European and Japanese railways. The Sao Paulo (Brazil) Metro subway carries 4.5 million people per day. A targeted AED program was begun in the Sao Paulo Metro with the objective to improve survival from cardiac arrest. A prospective, longitudinal, observational study of all cardiac arrests in the Sao Paulo Metro was performed from September 2006 through November 2012. This study focused on cardiac arrest by ventricular arrhythmias, and the primary endpoint was survival to hospital discharge with minimal neurological impairment. A total of 62 patients had an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. Because no data on cardiac arrest treatment or outcomes existed before beginning this project, the first 16 months of the implementation was used as the initial experience and compared with the subsequent 5 years of full operation. Return of spontaneous circulation was not different between the initial 16 months and the subsequent 5 years (6 of 8 [75%] vs. 39 of 54 [72%]; P=0.88). However, survival to discharge was significantly different once the full program was instituted (0 of 8 vs. 23 of 54 [43%]; P=0.001). Implementation of a targeted AED program in the Sao Paulo Metro subway system saved lives. A short interval between arrest and defibrillation was key for good long-term, neurologically intact survival. These results support strategic expansion of targeted AED programs in other large Latin American cities. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. Ventricular Fibrillation-Induced Cardiac Arrest Results in Regional Cardiac Injury Preferentially in Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery Territory in Piglet Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giridhar Kaliki Venkata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Decreased cardiac function after resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA results from global ischemia of the myocardium. In the evolution of postarrest myocardial dysfunction, preferential involvement of any coronary arterial territory is not known. We hypothesized that there is no preferential involvement of any coronary artery during electrical induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in piglet model. Design. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Methods. 12 piglets were randomized to baseline and electrical induced VF. After 5 min, the animals were resuscitated according to AHA PALS guidelines. After return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, animals were observed for an additional 4 hours prior to cardiac MRI. Data (mean ± SD was analyzed using unpaired t-test; p value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. Segmental wall motion (mm; baseline versus postarrest group in segment 7 (left anterior descending (LAD was 4.68±0.54 versus 3.31±0.64, p=0.0026. In segment 13, it was 3.82±0.96 versus 2.58±0.82, p=0.02. In segment 14, it was 2.42±0.44 versus 1.29±0.99, p=0.028. Conclusion. Postarrest myocardial dysfunction resulted in segmental wall motion defects in the LAD territory. There were no perfusion defects in the involved segments.

  10. Hands-On Defibrillation Skills of Pediatric Acute Care Providers During a Simulated Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalala, Utpal S; Balakumar, Niveditha; Zamora, Maria; Appachi, Elumalai

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Timely defibrillation in ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) is associated with good outcome. While defibrillation skills of pediatric providers have been reported to be poor, the factors related to poor hands-on defibrillation skills of pediatric providers are largely unknown. The aim of our study was to evaluate delay in individual steps of the defibrillation and human and non-human factors associated with poor hands-on defibrillation skills among pediatric acute care providers during a simulated VFCA scenario. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study of video evaluation of hands-on defibrillation skills of pediatric providers in a simulated VFCA in our children's hospital. Each provider was asked to use pads followed by paddles to provide 2 J/kg shock to an infant mannequin in VFCA. The hands-on skills were evaluated for struggle with any step of defibrillation, defined a priori as >10 s delay with particular step. The data was analyzed using chi-square test with significant p -value 10 s delay) with each of connecting the pads/paddles to the device, using pads/paddles on the mannequin and using buttons on the machine was 34 (50%), 26 (38%), and 31 (46%), respectively. Conclusions: The defibrillation skills of providers in a tertiary care children's hospital are poor. Both human and machine-related factors are associated with delay in defibrillation. Prior use of the study defibrillator is associated with a significantly shorter time-to-first shock as compared to prior use of any other defibrillator or no prior use of any defibrillator.

  11. A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Nakashima,1 Tsuneaki Kenzaka,2 Masanobu Okayama,3 Eiji Kajii31Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 2Division of General Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, Japan; 3Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, JapanAbstract: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.Keywords: hyperthyroidism, ventricular fibrillation, treatable cardiac arrest, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest

  12. Crisis management during anaesthesia: cardiac arrest.

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    Runciman, W B; Morris, R W; Watterson, L M; Williamson, J A; Paix, A D

    2005-06-01

    Cardiac arrest attributable to anaesthesia occurs at the rate of between 0.5 and 1 case per 10 000 cases, tends to have a different profile to that of cardiac arrest occurring elsewhere, and has an in-hospital mortality of 20%. However, as individual practitioners encounter cardiac arrest rarely, the rapidity with which the diagnosis is made and the consistency of appropriate management varies considerably. To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD-A SWIFT CHECK", supplemented by a sub-algorithm for cardiac arrest, in the management of cardiac arrest occurring in association with anaesthesia. The potential performance of this structured approach for each the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. There were 129 reports of cardiac arrest associated with anaesthesia among the first 4000 AIMS incident reports. Identified aetiological factors were grouped into five categories: (1) anaesthetic technique (11 cases with this category alone; 32 with this and one or more of the other categories, representing 25% of all 129 cardiac arrests); (2) drug related (16; 32, 25%); (3) associated with surgical procedure (9; 29, 22%); (4) associated with pre-existing medical or surgical disease (30; 82, 64%); (5) unknown (8; 14, 11%). The "real life" presentation and management of cardiac arrest in association with anaesthesia differs substantially from that detailed in general published guidelines. Cardiac rhythms at the time were sinus bradycardia (23%); asystole (22%); tachycardia/ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (14%); and normal (7%), with a further third unknown. Details of treatment were recorded in 110 reports; modalities employed included cardiac compression (72%); adrenaline (61%); 100% oxygen (58%); atropine (38%); intravenous fluids (25%), and electrical defibrillation (17%). There

  13. Prompt prediction of successful defibrillation from 1-s ventricular fibrillation waveform in patients with out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Hiroshi; Hida, Seiji; Oohashi, Satomi; Hayashi, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Hidenori; Honda, Tadayuki

    2011-02-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is a common cardiac arrest rhythm that can be terminated by electrical defibrillation. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there is a strong need for a prompt and reliable predictor of successful defibrillation because myocardial damage can result from repeated futile defibrillation attempts. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) provides excellent time and frequency resolution of signals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether features based on CWT could predict successful defibrillation. VF electrocardiogram (ECG) waveforms stored in ambulance-located defibrillators were collected. Predefibrillation waveforms were divided into 1.0- or 5.12-s VF waveforms. Indices in frequency domain or nonlinear analysis were calculated on the 5.12-s waveform. Simultaneously, CWT was performed on the 1.0-s waveform, and total low-band (1-3 Hz), mid-band (3-10 Hz), and high-band (10-32 Hz) energy were calculated. In 152 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, a total of 233 ECG predefibrillation recordings, consisting of 164 unsuccessful and 69 successful episodes, were analyzed. Indices of frequency domain analysis (peak frequency, centroid frequency, and amplitude spectral area), nonlinear analysis (approximate entropy and Hurst exponent, detrended fluctuation analysis), and CWT analysis (mid-band and high-band energy) were significantly different between unsuccessful and successful episodes (P centroid frequency and total mid-band energy were effective predictors (P < 0.01 for both). Energy spectrum analysis based on CWT as short as a 1.0-s VF ECG waveform enables prompt and reliable prediction of successful defibrillation.

  14. Cardiac Arrest: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Handouts Cardiac arrest (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Cardiac Arrest updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Cardiac arrest Related Health Topics Arrhythmia CPR Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators National Institutes ...

  15. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  16. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

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    ... HRS Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... people of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  17. A model of survival following pre-hospital cardiac arrest based on the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Register.

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    Fridman, Masha; Barnes, Vanessa; Whyman, Andrew; Currell, Alex; Bernard, Stephen; Walker, Tony; Smith, Karen L

    2007-11-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of sudden cardiac arrest patients in Victoria, Australia, as captured via the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Register (VACAR). We used the VACAR data to construct a new model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), which was specified in accordance with observed trends. All cases of cardiac arrest in Victoria that were attended by Victorian ambulance services during the period of 2002-2005. Overall survival to hospital discharge was 3.8% among 18,827 cases of OHCA. Survival was 15.7% among 1726 bystander witnessed, adult cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac aetiology, presenting in ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT), where resuscitation was attempted. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, bystander CPR, cardiac arrest (CA) location, response time, age and sex were predictors of VF/VT, which, in turn, was a strong predictor of survival. The same factors that affected VF/VT made an additional contribution to survival. However, for bystander CPR, CA location and response time this additional contribution was limited to VF/VT patients only. There was no detectable association between survival and age younger than 60 years or response time over 15min. The new model accounts for relationships among predictors of survival. These relationships indicate that interventions such as reduced response times and bystander CPR act in multiple ways to improve survival.

  18. Atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery

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    Nair Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Once considered as nothing more than a nuisance after cardiac surgery, the importance of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF has been realized in the last decade, primarily because of the morbidity associated with the condition. Numerous causative factors have been described without any single factor being singled out as the cause of this complication. POAF has been associated with stroke, renal failure and congestive heart failure, although it is difficult to state whether POAF is directly responsible for these complications. Guidelines have been formulated for prevention of POAF. However, very few cardiothoracic centers follow any form of protocol to prevent POAF. Routine use of prophylaxis would subject all patients to the side effects of anti-arrhythmic drugs, while only a minority of the patients do actually develop this problem postoperatively. Withdrawal of beta blockers in the postoperative period has been implicated as one of the major causes of POAF. Amiodarone, calcium channel blockers and a variety of other pharmacological agents have been used for the prevention of POAF. Atrial pacing is a non-pharmacological measure which has gained popularity in the prevention of POAF. There is considerable controversy regarding whether rate control is superior to rhythm control in the treatment of established atrial fibrillation (AF. Amiodarone plays a central role in both rate control and rhythm control in postoperative AF. Newer drugs like dronedarone and ranazoline are likely to come into the market in the coming years.

  19. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for refractory cardiac arrest

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    Steven A Conrad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR is the use of rapid deployment venoarterial (VA extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to support systemic circulation and vital organ perfusion in patients in refractory cardiac arrest not responding to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Although prospective controlled studies are lacking, observational studies suggest improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR when ECPR is instituted within 30-60 min following cardiac arrest. Adult and pediatric patients with witnessed in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and good quality CPR, failure of at least 15 min of conventional resuscitation, and a potentially reversible cause for arrest are candidates. Percutaneous cannulation where feasible is rapid and can be performed by nonsurgeons (emergency physicians, intensivists, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists. Modern extracorporeal systems are easy to prime and manage and are technically easy to manage with proper training and experience. ECPR can be deployed in the emergency department for out-of-hospital arrest or in various inpatient units for in-hospital arrest. ECPR should be considered for patients with refractory cardiac arrest in hospitals with an existing extracorporeal life support program, able to provide rapid deployment of support, and with resources to provide postresuscitation evaluation and management.

  20. Cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, U; Berild, D; Nielsen, T L

    1992-01-01

    A 27-year-old man, HIV-positive for 4 years, developed ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate. The dosage was 4 mg/kg/day for 18 days. Nephrotoxicity occurred and raised serum potassium. The plasma...

  1. An Audit Of Perioperative Cardiac Arrest At Lagos University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Intraoperative cardiac arrests are not uncommon and are related to both surgical and anaesthetic factors. This study aimed to examine the factors which predispose to a periopeartive cardiac arrest, to assess the appropriateness of therapy and the outcome. Materials and Methods: All perioperative cardiac arrests ...

  2. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, Kathrine B; Hansen, Steen Moller; Pallisgaard, Jannik L

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Despite wide dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), bystander defibrillation rates remain low. We aimed to investigate how route distance to the nearest accessible AED was associated with probability of bystander defibrillation in public and residential locations. METHODS......: We used data from the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry and the Danish AED Network to identify out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and route distances to nearest accessible registered AED during 2008-2013. The association between route distance and bystander defibrillation was described using...... in public locations, the probability of bystander defibrillation at 0, 100 and 200meters from the nearest AED was 35.7% (95% confidence interval 28.0%-43.5%), 21.3% (95% confidence interval 17.4%-25.2%), and 13.7% (95% confidence interval 10.1%-16.8%), respectively. The corresponding numbers for cardiac...

  3. Genetic mutation in Korean patients of sudden cardiac arrest as a surrogating marker of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myoung Kyun; Ki, Chang-Seok; Park, Seung-Jung; Huh, June; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2013-07-01

    Mutation or common intronic variants in cardiac ion channel genes have been suggested to be associated with sudden cardiac death caused by idiopathic ventricular tachyarrhythmia. This study aimed to find mutations in cardiac ion channel genes of Korean sudden cardiac arrest patients with structurally normal heart and to verify association between common genetic variation in cardiac ion channel and sudden cardiac arrest by idiopathic ventricular tachyarrhythmia in Koreans. Study participants were Korean survivors of sudden cardiac arrest caused by idiopathic ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. All coding exons of the SCN5A, KCNQ1, and KCNH2 genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Fifteen survivors of sudden cardiac arrest were included. Three male patients had mutations in SCN5A gene and none in KCNQ1 and KCNH2 genes. Intronic variant (rs2283222) in KCNQ1 gene showed significant association with sudden cardiac arrest (OR 4.05). Four male sudden cardiac arrest survivors had intronic variant (rs11720524) in SCN5A gene. None of female survivors of sudden cardiac arrest had SCN5A gene mutations despite similar frequencies of intronic variants between males and females in 55 normal controls. Common intronic variant in KCNQ1 gene is associated with sudden cardiac arrest caused by idiopathic ventricular tachyarrhythmia in Koreans.

  4. Average current is better than peak current as therapeutic dosage for biphasic waveforms in a ventricular fibrillation pig model of cardiac arrest.

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    Chen, Bihua; Yu, Tao; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Quan, Weilun; Li, Yongqin

    2014-10-01

    Defibrillation current has been shown to be a clinically more relevant dosing unit than energy. However, the effects of average and peak current in determining shock outcome are still undetermined. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between average current, peak current and defibrillation success when different biphasic waveforms were employed. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was electrically induced in 22 domestic male pigs. Animals were then randomized to receive defibrillation using one of two different biphasic waveforms. A grouped up-and-down defibrillation threshold-testing protocol was used to maintain the average success rate of 50% in the neighborhood. In 14 animals (Study A), defibrillations were accomplished with either biphasic truncated exponential (BTE) or rectilinear biphasic waveforms. In eight animals (Study B), shocks were delivered using two BTE waveforms that had identical peak current but different waveform durations. Both average and peak currents were associated with defibrillation success when BTE and rectilinear waveforms were investigated. However, when pathway impedance was less than 90Ω for the BTE waveform, bivariate correlation coefficient was 0.36 (p=0.001) for the average current, but only 0.21 (p=0.06) for the peak current in Study A. In Study B, a high defibrillation success (67.9% vs. 38.8%, pcurrent (14.9±2.1A vs. 13.5±1.7A, pcurrent unchanged. In this porcine model of VF, average current was better than peak current to be an adequate parameter to describe the therapeutic dosage when biphasic defibrillation waveforms were used. The institutional protocol number: P0805. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pathological links between stroke and cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaila Ghanekar; Sydney Corey; Trenton Lippert; Cesar V.Borlongan

    2017-01-01

    There may be a pathological connection between cardiac failure and ischemic stroke.In this article we describe pertinent research that demonstrates subsequent death of cardiac and neural myocytes in the post ischemic stroke brain.Current stroke therapy overlooks the connection between cardiac and cerebrovascular events and fails to address the shared risk factors.Current pre-clinical stroke investigations have provided evidence that suggests the presence of an indirect cell death pathway in which toxic molecules emanate from the stroke brain and trigger cardiac cell death.On the other hand,other studies highlight the presence of a reverse cell death cascade in which toxic molecules from the heart,following cardiac arrest,travel to the brain and induce ischemic cell death.Further examination of these putative cell death pathways between ischemic stroke and cardiac arrest will prompt the advancement of innovative treatments specifically targeting both diseases,leading to ameliorated clinical results of patients diagnosed with heart failure and ischemic stroke.

  6. Electromechanical vortex filaments during cardiac fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, J.; Chebbok, M.; Richter, C.; Schröder-Schetelig, J.; Bittihn, P.; Stein, S.; Uzelac, I.; Fenton, F. H.; Hasenfuß, G.; Gilmour, R. F., Jr.; Luther, S.

    2018-03-01

    The self-organized dynamics of vortex-like rotating waves, which are also known as scroll waves, are the basis of the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns in many excitable chemical and biological systems. In the heart, filament-like phase singularities that are associated with three-dimensional scroll waves are considered to be the organizing centres of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms that underlie the onset, maintenance and control of electromechanical turbulence in the heart are inherently three-dimensional phenomena. However, it has not previously been possible to visualize the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of scroll waves inside cardiac tissues. Here we show that three-dimensional mechanical scroll waves and filament-like phase singularities can be observed deep inside the contracting heart wall using high-resolution four-dimensional ultrasound-based strain imaging. We found that mechanical phase singularities co-exist with electrical phase singularities during cardiac fibrillation. We investigated the dynamics of electrical and mechanical phase singularities by simultaneously measuring the membrane potential, intracellular calcium concentration and mechanical contractions of the heart. We show that cardiac fibrillation can be characterized using the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of mechanical phase singularities, which arise inside the fibrillating contracting ventricular wall. We demonstrate that electrical and mechanical phase singularities show complex interactions and we characterize their dynamics in terms of trajectories, topological charge and lifetime. We anticipate that our findings will provide novel perspectives for non-invasive diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications.

  7. Management of cardiac arrest caused by coronary artery spasm: epinephrine/adrenaline versus nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Gabor; Corre, Olivier; Gueret, Gildas; Nguyen Ba, Vinh; Gilard, Martine; Boschat, Jaques; Arvieux, Charles Chistian

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines imply the use of epinephrine/adrenaline during cardiopulmonary arrest. However, in cardiac arrest situations resulting from coronary artery spasm (CAS), the use of epinephrine/adrenaline could be deleterious. A 49-year-old patient underwent an emergency coronarography with an attempt to stent the coronary arteries. Radiologic imaging revealed a positive methylergonovine maleate (Methergine, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ) test, with subocclusive CAS in several coronary vessels leading to electromechanical dissociation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and intracoronary boluses of isosorbide dinitrate were given to treat CAS. Epinephrine/adrenaline was not administered during resuscitation. Spontaneous circulation was obtained after cardioversion for ventricular fibrillation, and the patient progressively regained consciousness. Resuscitation guidelines do not specify the use of trinitrate derivatives in cardiac arrest situations caused by CAS. The pros and cons of the use of nitrates and epinephrine/adrenaline during cardiac arrest caused by CAS are analyzed in this case report.

  8. Hyperkalemia masked by pseudo-stemi infarct pattern and cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerbhai, Shareez; Masha, Luke; DaSilva-DeAbreu, Adrian; Dhoble, Abhijeet

    2017-12-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common electrolyte abnormality and has well-recognized early electrocardiographic manifestations including PR prolongation and symmetric T wave peaking. With severe increase in serum potassium, dysrhythmias and atrioventricular and bundle branch blocks can be seen on electrocardiogram. Although cardiac arrest is a worrisome consequence of untreated hyperkalemia, rarely does hyperkalemia electrocardiographically manifest as acute ischemia. We present a case of acute renal failure complicated by malignant hyperkalemia and eventual ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest. Recognition of this disorder was delayed secondary to an initial ECG pattern suggesting an acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Emergent coronary angiography performed showed no evidence of coronary artery disease. Pseudo-STEMI patterns are rarely seen in association with acute hyperkalemia and are most commonly described with patient without acute cardiac symptomatology. This is the first such case presenting concurrently with cardiac arrest. A brief review of this rare pseudo-infarct pattern is also given.

  9. Protective head-cooling during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation: the original animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. Brader

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR does not reliably sustain brain viability during cardiac arrest. Pre-hospital adjuncts to standard CPR are needed in order to improve outcomes. A preliminary dog study demonstrated that surface cooling of the head during arrest and CPR can achieve protective levels of brain hypothermia (30°C within 10 minutes. We hypothesized that protective head-cooling during cardiac arrest and CPR improves neurological outcomes. Twelve dogs under light ketamine-halothane-nitrous oxide anesthesia were arrested by transthoracic fibrillation. The treated group consisted of six dogs whose shaven heads were moistened with saline and packed in ice immediately after confirmation of ventricular fibrillation. Six control dogs remained at room temperature. All 12 dogs were subjected to four minutes of ventricular fibrillation and 20 minutes of standard CPR. Spontaneous circulation was restored with drugs and countershocks. Intensive care was provided for five hours post-arrest and the animals were observed for 24 hours. In both groups, five of the six dogs had spontaneous circulation restored. After three hours, mean neurological deficit was significantly lower in the treated group (P=0.016, with head-cooled dogs averaging 37% and the normothermic dogs 62%. Two of the six head-cooled dogs survived 24 hours with neurological deficits of 9% and 0%, respectively. None of the control group dogs survived 24 hours. We concluded that head-cooling attenuates brain injury during cardiac arrest with prolonged CPR. We review the literature related to the use of hypothermia following cardiac arrest and discuss some promising approaches for the pre-hospital setting.

  10. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use...... with electrocardiographic documentation of VT/VF were included. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between SCA and OPD. Pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed regarding age, sex, cardiovascular risk-profile, disease severity, and current use of respiratory drugs. RESULTS...... is associated with an increased observed risk of SCA. The most increased risk was observed in patients with a high cardiovascular risk-profile, and in those who received SABA and, possibly, those who received AC at the time of SCA....

  11. Hemodynamic–directed cardiopulmonary resuscitation during in–hospital cardiac arrest*

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Robert M.; Friess, Stuart H.; Maltese, Matthew R.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Bhalala, Utpal; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines assume that cardiac arrest victims can be treated with a uniform chest compression (CC) depth and a standardized interval administration of vasopressor drugs. This non-personalized approach does not incorporate a patient’s individualized response into ongoing resuscitative efforts. In previously reported porcine models of hypoxic and normoxic ventricular fibrillation (VF), a hemodynamic-directed resuscitation improved short-term survival compared...

  12. Main Complications of Mild Induced Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimanpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to assess the complications of mild induced hypothermia (MIH in patients with cardiac arrest. Presently, based on the guidelines of the American heart Association, MIH following successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in unconscious adult patients due to ventricular fibrillation (VF with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA is essential and required. However, MIH could be associated with complications in Patients with cardiac arrest. Studies conducted on the precautions and care following cardiac arrest and MIH were included. Valid scientific data bases were used for data collection. The obtained results from different studies revealed that mild MIH could be associated with numerous complications and the knowledge and awareness of the medical staff from the complications is required to guarantee successful therapeutic approaches in MIH following cardiac arrest which is a novel medical facility with different styles and complications. Overall, further future studies are required to improve the quality of MIH, to increase survival and to decrease complications rates.

  13. Cardiac arrest during anesthesia at a University Hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: We assessed the incidence and outcomes of cardiac arrest during anesthesia in the operating room at our university hospital. A previous study on intraoperative cardiac arrests covered a period from 1994-1998 and since then; anesthetic personnel, equipment, and workload have increased remarkably.

  14. Cooling the crisis: Therapeutic hypothermia after sickle cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metske, Hennie A.; Postema, Pieter G.; Biemond, Bart J.; Bouman, Catherine S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The management of patients with sickle-cell disease and cardiac arrest presents special challenges. Mild therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival and neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest, however, it may also precipitate sickling in patients with sickle-cell disease. Rigorous

  15. Epidemiology and Outcomes After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Punkaj; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Hill, Kevin D.; Gaynor, J. William; O’Brien, Sean M.; He, Max; Sheng, Shubin; Schexnayder, Stephen M.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Imamura, Michiaki; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicenter data regarding cardiac arrest in children undergoing heart operations are limited. We describe epidemiology and outcomes associated with postoperative cardiac arrest in a large multiinstitutional cohort. Methods Patients younger than 18 years in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2007 through 2012) were included. Patient factors, operative characteristics, and outcomes were described for patients with and without postoperative cardiac arrest. Multivariable models were used to evaluate the association of center volume with cardiac arrest rate and mortality after cardiac arrest, adjusting for patient and procedural factors. Results Of 70,270 patients (97 centers), 1,843 (2.6%) had postoperative cardiac arrest. Younger age, lower weight, and presence of preoperative morbidities (all p < 0.0001) were associated with cardiac arrest. Arrest rate increased with procedural complexity across common benchmark operations, ranging from 0.7% (ventricular septal defect repair) to 12.7% (Norwood operation). Cardiac arrest was associated with significant mortality risk across procedures, ranging from 15.4% to 62.3% (all p < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, arrest rate was not associated with center volume (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 1.57 in low- versus high-volume centers). However, mortality after cardiac arrest was higher in low-volume centers (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.52 to 2.63). This association was present for both high- and low-complexity operations. Conclusions Cardiac arrest carries a significant mortality risk across the stratum of procedural complexity. Although arrest rates are not associated with center volume, lower-volume centers have increased mortality after cardiac arrest. Further study of mechanisms to prevent cardiac arrest and to reduce mortality in those with an arrest is warranted. PMID:25443018

  16. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Johansen, Pernille Palm

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit adults with atrial fibrillation or those who had been treated for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is caused by multiple micro re-entry circuits within the atrial tissue, which result in chaotic rapid activity in the atria....... OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based rehabilitation programmes, alone or with another intervention, compared with no-exercise training controls in adults who currently have AF, or have been treated for AF. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases; CENTRAL...... the benefits and harms of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation on patient-relevant outcomes....

  17. Sudden Cardiac Arrest during Participation in Competitive Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Cameron H; Allan, Katherine S; Connelly, Kim A; Cunningham, Kris; Morrison, Laurie J; Dorian, Paul

    2017-11-16

    The incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during participation in sports activities remains unknown. Preparticipation screening programs aimed at preventing sudden cardiac arrest during sports activities are thought to be able to identify at-risk athletes; however, the efficacy of these programs remains controversial. We sought to identify all sudden cardiac arrests that occurred during participation in sports activities within a specific region of Canada and to determine their causes. In this retrospective study, we used the Rescu Epistry cardiac arrest database (which contains records of every cardiac arrest attended by paramedics in the network region) to identify all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests that occurred from 2009 through 2014 in persons 12 to 45 years of age during participation in a sport. Cases were adjudicated as sudden cardiac arrest (i.e., having a cardiac cause) or as an event resulting from a noncardiac cause, on the basis of records from multiple sources, including ambulance call reports, autopsy reports, in-hospital data, and records of direct interviews with patients or family members. Over the course of 18.5 million person-years of observation, 74 sudden cardiac arrests occurred during participation in a sport; of these, 16 occurred during competitive sports and 58 occurred during noncompetitive sports. The incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during competitive sports was 0.76 cases per 100,000 athlete-years, with 43.8% of the athletes surviving until they were discharged from the hospital. Among the competitive athletes, two deaths were attributed to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and none to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Three cases of sudden cardiac arrest that occurred during participation in competitive sports were determined to have been potentially identifiable if the athletes had undergone preparticipation screening. In our study involving persons who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the incidence of sudden cardiac

  18. ERC initiatives to reduce the burden of cardiac arrest: the European Cardiac Arrest Awareness Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Marios; Lockey, Andrew S

    2013-09-01

    The rate of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Europe remains unacceptably low and could be increased by better bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates. The European Resuscitation Council has announced that there will be a European Cardiac Arrest Awareness Day every year on the 16th of October. This is to coincide with the goals of the Written Declaration passed by the European Parliament in June 2012 that emphasised the importance of equal access to CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED) training. The topic of this year's Awareness Day is 'Children Saving Lives' and it is hoped that all national resuscitation councils will promote awareness of the benefits of training all children in CPR and AED use and lobby for legislative change to ensure that all children receive this training. Children are not just the adults of tomorrow - they are the lifesavers of today and tomorrow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prehospital cardiac arrest survival and neurologic recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, M; Sinclair, D; Butler, G; Cain, E

    1993-01-01

    Many studies of prehospital defibrillation have been conducted but the effects of airway intervention are unknown and neurologic follow-up has been incomplete. A non-randomized cohort prospective study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of defibrillation in prehospital cardiac arrest. Two ambulance companies in the study area developed a defibrillation protocol and they formed the experimental group. A subgroup of these patients received airway management with an esophageal obturator airway (EOA) or endotracheal intubation (ETT). The control group was composed of patients who suffered a prehospital cardiac arrest and did not receive prehospital defibrillation. All survivors were assessed for residual deficits using the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Dementia Rating Scale (DRS). A total of 221 patients were studied over a 32-month period. Both the experimental group (N = 161) and the control group (N = 60) were comparable with respect to age, sex distribution, and ambulance response time. Survival to hospital discharge was 2/60 (3.3%) in the control group and 12/161 (6.3%) in the experimental group. This difference is not statistically significant. Survival in the experimental group by airway management technique was basic airway support (3/76 3.9%), EOA (3/67 4.5%), and ETT (6/48 12.5%). The improved effect on survival by ETT management was statistically significant. Survivors had minor differences in memory, work, and recreation as compared to ischemic heart disease patients as measured by the SIP and DRS. No effect of defibrillation was found on survival to hospital discharge. However, endotracheal intubation improved survival in defibrillated patients. Survivors had a good functional outcome.

  20. Association of National Initiatives to Improve Cardiac Arrest Management With Rates of Bystander Intervention and Patient Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K; Folke, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    resuscitation was attempted were identified between 2001 and 2010 in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Of 29 111 patients with cardiac arrest, we excluded those with presumed noncardiac cause of arrest (n = 7390) and those with cardiac arrests witnessed by emergency medical services personnel (n...

  1. Prediction of cardiac arrest recurrence using ensemble classifiers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nachiket Tapas

    ECG dataset from PhysioNet, Pima Indian Diabetes dataset from UCI Machine Learning Repository and gene expression ... electrical activity, medically the condition is known as cardiac arrest ... ing, (5) lack of physical exercise, etc. [9]. Using ...

  2. The outcome of anaesthesia related cardiac arrest in a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Adekola

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Anaesthesia related cardiac arrest and mortality were linked to cardiovascular depression from halothane overdose in our institution. The burden can be reduced by improving on establishing standard monitoring in the perioperative period, and a team approach to patients care.

  3. Cardiac arrest due to lymphocytic colitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groth Kristian A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia caused by lymphocytic colitis. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian man presented four months prior to a cardiac arrest with watery diarrhea and was diagnosed with lymphocytic colitis. Our patient experienced a witnessed cardiac arrest at his general practitioner's surgery. Two physicians and the emergency medical services resuscitated our patient for one hour and four minutes before arriving at our university hospital. Our patient was defibrillated 16 times due to the recurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. An arterial blood sample revealed a potassium level of 2.0 mmol/L (reference range: 3.5 to 4.6 mmol/L and pH 6.86 (reference range: pH 7.37 to 7.45. As the potassium level was corrected, the propensity for ventricular tachyarrhythmias ceased. Our patient recovered from his cardiac arrest without any neurological deficit. Further tests and examinations revealed no other reason for the cardiac arrest. Conclusion Diarrhea can cause life-threatening situations due to the excretion of potassium, ultimately causing cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia. Physicians treating patients with severe diarrhea should consider monitoring their electrolyte levels.

  4. Location of cardiac arrest and impact of pre-arrest chronic disease and medication use on survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2017-01-01

    location and a higher mortality can be explained by differences in chronic diseases and medication. METHODS: We identified 27,771 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients ≥18 years old from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry (2001-2012). Using National Registries, we identified pre-arrest chronic disease......INTRODUCTION: Cardiac arrest in a private location is associated with a higher mortality when compared to public location. Past studies have not accounted for pre-arrest factors such as chronic disease and medication. AIM: To investigate whether the association between cardiac arrest in a private...

  5. Early Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest after Early Defibrillation: a 24 Months Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Terranova

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease remains the most common cause of death in the United States and most other Western nations. Among these deaths, sudden, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest claims approximately 1000 lives each day in the United States alone. Most of these cardiac arrests are due to ventricular fibrillation. Though highly reversible with the rapid application of a defibrillator, ventricular fibrillation is otherwise fatal within minutes, even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is provided immediately. The overall survival rate in the United States is estimated to be less than 5 percent. Recent developments in automated-external-defibrillator technology have provided a means of increasing the rate of prompt defibrillation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. After minimal training, nonmedical personnel (e.g., flight attendants and casino workers are also able to use defibrillators in the workplace, with lifesaving effects. Nonetheless, such programs have involved designated personnel whose job description includes assisting persons who have had sudden cardiac arrest. Data are still lacking on the success of programs in which automated external defibrillators have been installed in public places to be used by persons who have no specific training or duty to act. Materials and Methods: All patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 2003 and December 2004 and who received early defibrillation for ventricular fibrillation were included. We conducted a 24 months retrospective population-based analysis of the outcome in our population. Results: Over a 24 month period, 446 people had non–traumatic cardiac arrest, and in all of them it was observed to be ventricular fibrillation. In a very few cases, the defibrillator operators were good Samaritans, acting voluntarily. Eighty-nine patients (about 19% with ventricular fibrillation were successfully resuscitated, including eighteen who regained consciousness before

  6. A 35-year-old pregnant woman presenting with sudden cardiac arrest secondary to peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew; Moorhead, Amy; Yost, Dana; Whorton, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest after 25 minutes of ventricular fibrillation (VF) secondary to peripartum cardiomyopathy. This case highlights a rare disease, but also, more importantly, the successful use of the five links of survival: early access to 9-1-1, early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), early defibrillation, early advanced life support, and postresuscitative care. We also demonstrate the importance of high-quality resuscitation practices in order to achieve a successful outcome. Manual compressions can be performed at a guidelines-compliant rate. With training, users are able to achieve high compression fractions. Pre/post shock delays can be minimized to further increase compression fraction. Nationally, CPR interruptions are often long. We recommend closer attention to uninterrupted 2-minute cycles of CPR, minimizing delays in CPR through training, and a focus on a closely choreographed approach. User review of transthoracic impedance feedback data should play a vital role in a cardiac arrest quality-improvement program.

  7. Post-resuscitation care for survivors of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvarya Mangla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest can occur following a myriad of clinical conditions. With advancement of medical science and improvements in Emergency Medical Services systems, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation for patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA continues to increase. Managing these patients is challenging and requires a structured approach including stabilization of cardiopulmonary status, early consideration of neuroprotective strategies, identifying and managing the etiology of arrest and initiating treatment to prevent recurrence. This requires a closely coordinated multidisciplinary team effort. In this article, we will review the initial management of survivors of OHCA, highlighting advances and ongoing controversies.

  8. Resuscitation after prolonged cardiac arrest: role of cardiopulmonary bypass and systemic hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakopoulos, Oliver J; Allen, Bradley S; Buckberg, Gerald D; Hristov, Nikola; Tan, Zhongtuo; Villablanca, J Pablo; Trummer, Georg

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine (1) the role of emergency cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) after prolonged cardiac arrest and failed cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and (2) the use of systemic hyperkalemia during CPB to convert intractable ventricular fibrillation (VF). Thirty-one pigs (34 +/- 2 kg) underwent 15 minutes of cardiac arrest after induced VF, followed by 10 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation-advanced life support. Peripheral CPB was used if cardiopulmonary resuscitation failed to restore stable circulation. Damage was assessed by evaluating hemodynamics, biochemical variables (creatine kinase-MB, neuron-specific enolase), neurologic deficit score, and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone was successful in only 19% (6 of 31 pigs). Cardiopulmonary bypass was initiated in 81% of animals (25 of 31 pigs) either for hypotension (5 of 25 pigs) or intractable VF (20 of 25 pigs). Defibrillation was successful in 7 of 20 animals during the first 10 minutes after initiating CPB. Ventricular fibrillation persisted more than 10 minutes in 13 of 20 pigs, and animals were treated either with repeated defibrillation (6 of 13 pigs) or with a potassium bolus (7 of 13 pigs) to induce transient cardiac arrest. Overall survival at 24 hours was 84% with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (100% of pigs with hypotension; 71% in CPB-VF < 10 minutes). Despite CPB, fatal myocardial failure occurred after VF duration of more than 10 minutes in all pigs treated with electrical defibrillation, whereas hyperkalemia allowed 100% cardioversion and 86% survival. Biochemical variables remained elevated in all groups. Similarly, severe brain injury was present in all animals as confirmed by neurologic deficit score (197 +/- 10) and magnetic resonance imaging. Emergency CPB after prolonged cardiac arrest improves survival and allows systemic hyperkalemia to convert intractable VF, but fails to reduce neurologic damage. 2010 The Society of Thoracic

  9. Characterization of mitochondrial injury after cardiac arrest (COMICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Liu, Xiaowen; Andersen, Lars W; Rittenberger, Jon C; Abella, Benjamin S; Gaieski, David F; Ornato, Joseph P; Gazmuri, Raúl J; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Cocchi, Michael N; Abbate, Antonio; Uber, Amy; Clore, John; Peberdy, Mary Anne; Callaway, Clifton W

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondrial injury post-cardiac arrest has been described in pre-clinical settings but the extent to which this injury occurs in humans remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that increased levels of mitochondrial biomarkers would be associated with mortality and neurological morbidity in post-cardiac arrest subjects. We performed a prospective multicenter study of post-cardiac arrest subjects. Inclusion criteria were comatose adults who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Mitochondrial biomarkers were measured at 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48h after return of spontaneous circulation as well as in healthy controls. Out of 111 subjects enrolled, 102 had evaluable samples at 0h. Cardiac arrest subjects had higher baseline cytochrome c levels compared to controls (2.18ng/mL [0.74, 7.74] vs. 0.16ng/mL [0.03, 0.91], p<0.001), and subjects who died had higher 0h cytochrome c levels compared to survivors (3.66ng/mL [1.40, 14.9] vs. 1.27ng/mL [0.16, 2.37], p<0.001). There were significantly higher Ribonuclease P (RNaseP) (3.3 [1.2, 5.7] vs. 1.2 [0.8, 1.2], p<0.001) and Beta-2microglobulin (B2M) (12.0 [1.0, 22.9], vs. 0.6 [0.6, 1.3], p<0.001) levels in cardiac arrest subjects at baseline compared to the control subjects. There were no differences between survivors and non-survivors for mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA. Cytochrome c was increased in post- cardiac arrest subjects compared to controls, and in post-cardiac arrest non-survivors compared to survivors. Nuclear DNA and cell free DNA was increased in plasma of post-cardiac arrest subjects. There were no differences in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA between survivors and non-survivors. Mitochondrial injury markers showed mixed results in the post-cardiac arrest period. Future research needs to investigate these differences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Socioeconomic factors associated with outcome after cardiac arrest in patients under the age of 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uray, Thomas; Mayr, Florian B; Fitzgibbon, James; Rittenberger, Jon C; Callaway, Clifton W; Drabek, Tomas; Fabio, Anthony; Angus, Derek C; Kochanek, Patrick M; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-08-01

    In a prior study of seven North American cities Pittsburgh had the highest crude rate of cardiac arrest deaths in patients 18 to 64 years of age, particularly in neighborhoods with lower socioeconomic status (SES). We hypothesized that lower SES, associated poor health behaviors (e.g., illicit drug use) and pre-existing comorbid conditions (grouped as socioeconomic factors [SE factors]) could affect the type and severity of cardiac arrest, thus outcomes. We retrospectively identified patients aged 18 to 64 years treated for in-hospital (IHCA) and out-of hospital arrest (OHCA) at two Pittsburgh hospitals between January 2010 and July 2012. We abstracted data on baseline demographics and arrest characteristics like place of residence, insurance and employment status. Favorable cerebral performance category [CPC] (1 or 2) was our primary outcome. We examined the associations between SE factors, cardiac arrest variables and outcome as well as post-resuscitation care. Among 415 subjects who met inclusion criteria, unfavorable CPC were more common in patients who were unemployed, had a history of drug abuse or hypertension. In OHCA, favorable CPC was more often associated with presentation with ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia (OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.43-8.74, p = 0.006) and less often associated with non-cardiovascular arrest etiology (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08-0.62, p = 0.004). We found strong associations between specific SE factors and arrest factors associated with outcome in OHCA patients only. Significant differences in post-resuscitation care existed based on injury severity, not on SES. SE factors strongly influence type and severity of OHCA but not IHCA resulting in an association with outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Witnessed arrest, but not delayed bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves prehospital cardiac arrest survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmir, R B

    2004-05-01

    This study correlated the effect of witnessing a cardiac arrest and instituting bystander CPR (ByCPR), as a secondary end point in a study evaluating the effect of bicarbonate on survival. This prospective, randomised, double blinded clinical intervention trial enrolled 874 prehospital cardiopulmonary arrest patients encountered in a prehospital urban, suburban, and rural regional emergency medical service (EMS) area. This group underwent conventional advanced cardiac life support intervention followed by empiric early administration of sodium bicarbonate (1 mEq/l), monitoring conventional resuscitation parameters. Survival was measured as presence of vital signs on emergency department (ED) arrival. Data were analysed using chi(2) with Pearson correlation and odds ratio where appropriate. The overall survival rate was 13.9% (110 of 792) of prehospital cardiac arrest patients. The mean (SD) time until provision of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ByCPR) by laymen was 2.08 (2.77) minutes, and basic life support (BLS) by emergency medical technicians was 6.62 (5.73) minutes. There was improved survival noted with witnessed cardiac arrest-a 2.2-fold increase in survival, 18.9% (76 of 402) versus 8.6% (27 of 315) compared with unwitnessed arrests (ptwo minutes (p = 0.3752). Survival after prehospital cardiac arrest is more likely when witnessed, but not necessarily when ByCPR was performed by laymen.

  12. Characterization of Mitochondrial Injury after Cardiac Arrest (COMICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W.; Liu, Xiaowen; Andersen, Lars W.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Gaieski, David F.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Gazmuri, Raúl J.; Grossestreur, Anne V.; Cocchi, Michaen N.; Abbate, Antonio; Uber, Amy; Clore, John; Peberdy, Mary Anne; Callaway, Clifton

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Mitochondrial injury post-cardiac arrest has been described in pre-clinical settings but the extent to which this injury occurs in humans remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that increased levels of mitochondrial biomarkers would be associated with mortality and neurological morbidity in post-cardiac arrest subjects. Methods We performed a prospective multicenter study of post-cardiac arrest subjects. Inclusion criteria were comatose adults who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Mitochondrial biomarkers were measured at 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours after return of spontaneous circulation as well as in healthy controls. Results Out of 111 subjects enrolled, 102 had evaluable samples at 0 hours. Cardiac arrest subjects had higher baseline cytochrome c levels compared to controls (2.18 ng/mL [0.74, 7.74] vs. 0.16 ng/mL [0.03, 0.91], p<0.001), and subjects who died had higher 0 hours cytochrome c levels compared to survivors (3.66 ng/mL [1.40, 14.9] vs. 1.27 ng/mL [0.16, 2.37], p<0.001). There were significantly higher RNAase P (3.3 [1.2, 5.7] vs. 1.2 [0.8, 1.2], p<0.001) and B2M (12.0 [1.0, 22.9], vs. 0.6 [0.6, 1.3], p<0.001) levels in cardiac arrest subjects at baseline compared to the control subjects. There were no differences between survivors and non-survivors for mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA. Conclusions Cytochrome C was increased in post-cardiac arrest subjects compared to controls, and in post-cardiac arrest non-survivors compared to survivors. Nuclear DNA and cell free DNA was increased in plasma of post-cardiac arrest subjects. There were no differences in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA between survivors and non-survivors. Mitochondrial injury markers showed mixed results in post-arrest period. Future research needs to investigate these differences. PMID:28126408

  13. Use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ratika; Tang, Anthony; Wells, George; Blackburn, Josée; Stiell, Ian; Simpson, Christopher; Dorian, Paul; Yee, Raymond; Cameron, Doug; Connolly, Stuart; Birnie, David; Nichol, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Background Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are at high risk of recurrent arrests, many of which could be prevented with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). We sought to determine the ICD insertion rate among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and to determine factors associated with ICD implantation. Methods The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study is a prospective, multiphase, before–after study assessing the effectiveness of prehospital interventions for people experiencing cardiac arrest, trauma or respiratory arrest in 19 Ontario communities. We linked OPALS data describing survivors of cardiac arrest with data from all defibrillator implantation centres in Ontario. Results From January 1997 to April 2002, 454 patients in the OPALS study survived to hospital discharge after experiencing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The mean age was 65 (standard deviation 14) years, 122 (26.9%) were women, 398 (87.7%) had a witnessed arrest, 372 (81.9%) had an initial rhythm of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF), and 76 (16.7%) had asystole or another arrhythmia. The median cerebral performance category at discharge (range 1–5, 1 = normal) was 1. Only 58 (12.8%) of the 454 patients received an ICD. Patients with an initial rhythm of VT/VF were more likely than those with an initial rhythm of asystole or another rhythm to undergo device insertion (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–71.50). Similarly, patients with a normal cerebral performance score were more likely than those with abnormal scores to undergo ICD insertion (adjusted OR 12.52, 95% CI 1.74–92.12). Interpretation A minority of patients who survived cardiac arrest underwent ICD insertion. It is unclear whether this low usage rate reflects referral bias, selection bias by electrophysiologists, supply constraint or patient preference. PMID:15505267

  14. Milrinone and esmolol decrease cardiac damage after resuscitation from prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerner, F; Lennmyr, F; Wiklund, L; Martijn, C; Semenas, E

    2015-04-01

    Long-term survival after cardiac arrest (CA) due to shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation (VF) is low. Clearly, there is a need for new pharmacological interventions in the setting of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to improve outcome. Here, hemodynamic parameters and cardiac damage are compared between the treatment group (milrinone, esmolol and vasopressin) and controls (vasopressin only) during resuscitation from prolonged CA in piglets. A total of 26 immature male piglets were subjected to 12-min VF followed by 8-min CPR. The treatment group (n=13) received i.v. (intravenous) boluses vasopressin 0.4 U/kg, esmolol 250 μg/kg and milrinone 25 μg/kg after 13 min, followed by i.v. boluses esmolol 375 μg/kg and milrinone 25 μg/kg after 18 min and continuous esmolol 15 μg/kg/h infusion during 180 min reperfusion, whereas controls (n=13) received equal amounts of vasopressin and saline. A 200 J monophasic counter-shock was delivered to achieve resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after 8 min CPR. If ROSC was not achieved, another 200 J defibrillation and bolus vasopressin 0.4 U/kg would be administered in both groups. Direct current shocks at 360 J were applied as one shot per minute over maximally 5 min. Hemodynamic variables and troponin I as a marker of cardiac injury were recorded. Troponin I levels after 180 min reperfusion were lower in the treatment group than in controls (Pmilrinone, esmolol and vasopressin decreased cardiac injury compared with vasopressin alone. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Serum tau and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nielsen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test serum tau as a predictor of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. METHODS: We measured the neuronal protein tau in serum at 24, 48, and 72 hours after cardiac arrest in 689 patients in the prospective international Target Temperature Management trial. The main outcome...... was poor neurological outcome, defined as Cerebral Performance Categories 3-5 at 6 months. RESULTS: Increased tau was associated with poor outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest (median = 38.5, interquartile range [IQR] = 5.7-245ng/l in poor vs median = 1.5, IQR = 0.7-2.4ng/l in good outcome, for tau....... The accuracy in predicting outcome by serum tau was equally high for patients randomized to 33 °C and 36 °C targeted temperature after cardiac arrest. INTERPRETATION: Serum tau is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological outcome in patients with cardiac arrest. It may be significantly better...

  16. Major life events as potential triggers of sudden cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, April F; Lumley, Thomas; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rea, Thomas D; McKnight, Barbara; Strogatz, David S; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Siscovick, David S

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in association with the recent loss of, or separation from, a family member or friend. Our case-crossover study included 490 apparently healthy married residents of King County, Washington, who suffered sudden cardiac arrest between 1988 and 2005. We compared exposure to spouse-reported family/friend events occurring ≤ 1 month before sudden cardiac arrest with events occurring in the previous 5 months. We evaluated potential effect modification by habitual vigorous physical activity. Recent family/friend events were associated with a higher risk of sudden cardiac arrest (odds ratio [OR] = 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-2.4). ORs for cases with and without habitual vigorous physical activity were 1.1 (0.6-2.2) and 2.0 (1.2-3.1), respectively (interaction P = 0.02). These results suggest family/friend events may trigger sudden cardiac arrest and raise the hypothesis that habitual vigorous physical activity may lower susceptibility to these potential triggers.

  17. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  18. Sudden cardiac arrest in people with epilepsy in the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Robert J.; Blom, Marieke T.; Wassenaar, Merel; Bardai, Abdennasser; Leijten, Frans S.; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Sander, Josemir W.; Thijs, Roland D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain whether characteristics of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF) differed between people with epilepsy and those without and which individuals with epilepsy were at highest risk. Methods: We ascertained 18 people with active epilepsy identified in a community-based registry of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) with ECG-confirmed VT/VF (cases). We compared them with 470 individuals with VT/VF without epilepsy (VT/VF controls) and 54 individuals with epilepsy without VT/VF (epilepsy controls). Data on comorbidity, epilepsy severity, and medication use were collected and entered into (conditional) logistic regression models to identify determinants of VT/VF in epilepsy. Results: In most cases, there was an obvious (10/18) or presumed cardiovascular cause (5/18) in view of preexisting heart disease. In 2 of the 3 remaining events, near–sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) was established after successful resuscitation. Cases had a higher prevalence of congenital/inherited heart disease (17% vs 1%, p = 0.002), and experienced VT/VF at younger age (57 vs 64 years, p = 0.023) than VT/VF controls. VT/VF in cases occurred more frequently at/near home (89% vs 58%, p = 0.009), and was less frequently witnessed (72% vs 89%, p = 0.048) than in VT/VF controls. Cases more frequently had clinically relevant heart disease (50% vs 15%, p = 0.005) and intellectual disability (28% vs 1%, p epilepsy controls. Conclusion: Cardiovascular disease rather than epilepsy characteristics is the main determinant of VT/VF in people with epilepsy in the community. SCA and SUDEP are partially overlapping disease entities. PMID:26092917

  19. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiac arrest following ventilator fire: A rare cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Nazeer Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating room fires are rare events, but when occur they result in serious and sometimes fatal consequences. Anaesthesia ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest is a rare incident and has not been reported. We report a near catastrophic ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest in a patient undergoing subtotal thyroidectomy. In the present case sparks due to friction or electrical short circuit within the ventilator might have acted as source of ignition leading to fire and explosion in the oxygen rich environment. The patient was successfully resuscitated and revived with uneventful recovery and no adverse sequelae. The cardiac arrest was possibly due to severe hypoxia resulting from inhalation of smoke containing high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other noxious gases.

  1. Adrenaline, terlipressin, and corticoids versus adrenaline in the treatment of experimental pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Rafael; Urbano, Javier; Botrán, Marta; López, Jorge; Solana, Maria J; García, Ana; Fernández, Sarah; López-Herce, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    To analyze if treatment with adrenaline (epinephrine) plus terlipressin plus corticoids achieves higher return of spontaneous circulation than adrenaline in an experimental infant animal model of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Prospective randomized animal study. Experimental department in a University Hospital. Forty-nine piglets were studied. Cardiac arrest was induced by at least 10 minutes of removal of mechanical ventilation and was followed by manual external chest compressions and mechanical ventilation. After 3 minutes of resuscitation, piglets that did not achieve return of spontaneous circulation were randomized to two groups: adrenaline 0.02 mg kg every 3 minutes (20 animals) and adrenaline 0.02 mg kg every 3 minutes plus terlipressin 20 μg kg every 6 minutes plus hydrocortisone 30 mg kg one dose (22 animals). Resuscitation was discontinued when return of spontaneous circulation was achieved or after 24 minutes. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 14 piglets (28.5%), 14.2% with only cardiac massage and ventilation. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 25% of piglets treated with adrenaline and in 9.1% of those treated with adrenaline plus terlipressin plus hydrocortisone (p = 0.167). Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 45.4% of animals with pulseless electric activity, 20% with asystole, and 0% with ventricular fibrillation (p = 0.037). Shorter duration of cardiac arrest, higher mean blood pressure and EtCO2 and lower PaCO2 before resuscitation, and higher mean blood pressure during resuscitation were associated with higher return of spontaneous circulation. Treatment with adrenaline plus terlipressin plus corticoids does not achieve higher return of spontaneous circulation than that with adrenaline in an infant animal model of asphyxial cardiac arrest.

  2. Complete maternal and fetal recovery after prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, B S; Burke, T J

    1988-04-01

    A case of complete maternal and fetal recovery after prolonged cardiac arrest from massive lidocaine overdose is presented. A 27-year-old woman at 15 weeks gestation had a complete neurologic recovery after 22 minutes of CPR, including 19 minutes of electromechanical dissociation and asystole, with normal fetal heart function and fetal motion confirmed by ultrasound immediately after resuscitation. The patient delivered a healthy and neurologically normal infant at 40 weeks gestation. This is the longest cardiac arrest in early pregnancy reported in the medical literature with normal maternal and fetal outcome.

  3. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Søholm, Helle

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level of vasopres......AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level...

  4. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg Jørgensen, Mads

    challenges, due to the victim’s physical location, which brings an inherent risk of delay (or altogether absence) of recognition and treatment of cardiac arrest. A low frequency of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and low 30-day survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were identified nearly ten...... years ago in Denmark. These findings led to several national initiatives to strengthen bystander resuscitation attempts and advance care. Despite these nationwide efforts, it was unknown prior to this project whether these efforts resulted in changes in resuscitation attempts by bystanders and changes...

  5. Pattern of perioperative cardiac arrests at University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwari, Y D; Bello, M R; Eni, U E

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative cardiac arrests and death on the table represent the most serious complications of surgery and anaesthesia. This paper was designed to study their pattern, causes and outcomes following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and intensive care unit (ICU) management in our institution. Three year retrospective review of perioperative cardiac arrests and death on operating table following surgical procedure under anaesthesia. For each cardiac arrest or death on the table the sequence of events leading to the arrest was evaluated using case notes, anaesthetic chart and ICU records. Study variables which include demographic data, ASA score, anaesthetic technique, causes and outcome were analysed and discussed. Fourteen perioperative cardiac arrests were encountered following 4051 anaesthetics administered over the three year study period. Twelve out of the fourteen cardiac arrests occurred following general anaesthesia, while the remaining two occurred following spinal anaesthesia. There was no cardiac arrest following local anaesthesia. Children suffered more cardiac arrest than adults. ASA class III and IV risk status suffered more arrests than ASA I and II. Hypoxia from airway problems was the commonest cause of cardiac arrest followed by septic shock. Monitoring with pulse oximeter was done in only 4 out of the 14 cardiac arrests. Only 2 (14%) out of 14 cardiac arrests recovered to home discharge, one of them with significant neurological deficit. Majority of arrests were due to hypoxia from airway problems that were not detected early There is need to improve on patient monitoring, knowledge of CPR and intensive care so as to improve the outcome of perioperative cardiac arrest.

  6. The impact of serum potassium-influencing antihypertensive drugs on the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest : A case–control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alharbi, Fawaz F; Souverein, Patrick C.; de Groot, Mark C.H.; Blom, Marieke T.; de Boer, Anthonius; Klungel, Olaf H.; Tan, Hanno L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a complex multifactorial event and most commonly caused by ventricular tachycardia/ fibrillation (VT/ VF). Some antihypertensive drugs could induce hypokalaemia or hyperkalaemia, which may increase susceptibility to VT/VF and SCA. Objective: To assess the

  7. The impact of serum potassium-influencing antihypertensive drugs on the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alharbi, Fawaz F.; Souverein, Patrick C.; de Groot, Mark C. H.; Blom, Marieke T.; de Boer, Anthonius; Klungel, Olaf H.; Tan, Hanno L.

    2017-01-01

    AimsSudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a complex multifactorial event and most commonly caused by ventricular tachycardia/ fibrillation (VT/ VF). Some antihypertensive drugs could induce hypokalaemia or hyperkalaemia, which may increase susceptibility to VT/VF and SCA. ObjectiveTo assess the association

  8. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhall, Erik; Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias; Saxena, Manoj; Miller, Jennene; Inskip, Deborah; Macken, Lewis; Finfer, Simon; Eatough, Noel; Hammond, Naomi; Bass, Frances; Yarad, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Anne; Bird, Simon; Jewell, Timothy; Davies, Gareth; Ng, Karl; Coward, Sharon; Stewart, Antony; Micallef, Sharon; Parker, Sharyn; Cortado, Dennis; Gould, Ann; Harward, Meg; Thompson, Kelly; Glass, Parisa; Myburgh, John; Smid, Ondrej; Belholavek, Jan; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Boerma, EC

    2016-01-01

    To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome,

  9. Endothelial Dysfunction in Resuscitated Cardiac Arrest (ENDO-RCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Kjærgaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality following initial survival of cardiac arrest remain high despite great efforts to improve resuscitation techniques and post-resuscitation care, in part due to the ischemia-reperfusion injury secondary to the restoration of the blood circulation. Patients resusc...

  10. Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest in an Adult Burn Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-07

    of in-hospital CA are likely to report widely varying survival rates as a result of study populations with characteristic but distinct demo- graphics ...Rehabil 1997;18:S119. [2] Sandroni C, Nolan J. In-hospital cardiac arrest: incidence, prognosis and possible measures to improve survival. Intens Care Med

  11. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald

    2013-01-01

    intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance...

  12. Cardiac Arrest after Local Anaesthetic Toxicity in a Paediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Maria Torres de Araújo Azi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a paediatric patient undergoing urological procedure in which a possible inadvertent intravascular or intraosseous injection of bupivacaine with adrenaline in usual doses caused subsequent cardiac arrest, completely reversed after administration of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion. Early diagnosis of local anaesthetics toxicity and adequate cardiovascular resuscitation manoeuvres contribute to the favourable outcome.

  13. Therapeutic Hypothermia after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Gildea, Marianne R; Scholefield, Barnaby R; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Berger, John T; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Newth, Christopher J L; Topjian, Alexis; Bennett, Kimberly S; Koch, Joshua D; Pham, Nga; Chanani, Nikhil K; Pineda, Jose A; Harrison, Rick; Dalton, Heidi J; Alten, Jeffrey; Schleien, Charles L; Goodman, Denise M; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Bhalala, Utpal S; Schwarz, Adam J; Porter, Melissa B; Shah, Samir; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Wu, Theodore; Skellett, Sophie; Thomas, Neal J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Baines, Paul B; Pappachan, John; Mathur, Mudit; Lloyd, Eric; van der Jagt, Elise W; Dobyns, Emily L; Meyer, Michael T; Sanders, Ronald C; Clark, Amy E; Dean, J Michael

    2017-01-26

    Targeted temperature management is recommended for comatose adults and children after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; however, data on temperature management after in-hospital cardiac arrest are limited. In a trial conducted at 37 children's hospitals, we compared two temperature interventions in children who had had in-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose children older than 48 hours and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a score of 70 or higher on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II, on which scores range from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients who had had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before the cardiac arrest. The trial was terminated because of futility after 329 patients had undergone randomization. Among the 257 patients who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest and who could be evaluated, the rate of the primary efficacy outcome did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (36% [48 of 133 patients] and 39% [48 of 124 patients], respectively; relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.27; P=0.63). Among 317 patients who could be evaluated for change in neurobehavioral function, the change in VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months did not differ significantly between the groups (P=0.70). Among 327 patients who could be evaluated for 1-year survival, the rate of 1-year survival did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (49% [81 of 166 patients] and 46% [74 of 161 patients], respectively; relative risk, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.34; P=0.56). The incidences of blood-product use, infection, and serious adverse

  14. A forgotten approach after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial ınfarction: Neuroprotective therapeutic hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Özçelik

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, therapeutic hypothermia is defined as the reduction of body temperature to 32-34 ° C within the first 4-6 hours for neuroprotective purposes and to be maintained at this level for 12-24 hours after reaching the target temperature. Therapeutic hypothermia has been practiced since the 1940s. The aim of therapeutic hypothermia is to reduce cerebral edema, convulsive activity, metabolic demand and associated complications by providing low body heat. Therapeutic hypothermia is applied to increase life expectancy and quality of life. In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, should be performed in comatose patients where initial rhythm is ventricular fibrillation and spontaneous circulation is returned. Herein, we present a 44 years old patient who had an aborted sudden cardiac death due to acute myocardial infarction and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation for 30 minutes and discharged after 6 days with a successful therapeutic hypothermia.

  15. Prolonged closed cardiac massage using LUCAS device in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged transport time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Matevossian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Edouard Matevossian1, Dietrich Doll4, Jakob Säckl1, Inga Sinicina5, Jürgen Schneider2, Gerhard Simon3, Norbert Hüser11Department of Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive-Care Medicine; 3Department of Radiology, Technische Universität of Munich, Germany; 4Department of Visceral, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Philips University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 5Institute of Clinical Forensic Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Saving more human lives through more effective reanimation measures is the goal of the new international guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation as the decisive aspect for survival after cardiovascular arrest is that basic resuscitation should start immediately. According to the updated guidelines, the greatest efficacy in cardiac massage is only achieved when the right compression point, an adequate compression depth, vertical pressure, the correct frequency, and equally long phases of compression and decompression are achieved. The very highest priority is placed on restoring continuous circulation. Against this background, standardized continuous chest compression with active decompression has contributed to a favorable outcome in this case. The hydraulically operated and variably adjustable automatic Lund University Cardiac Arrest System (LUCAS device (Jolife, Lund, Sweden undoubtedly meets these requirements. This case report describes a 44-year-old patient who – approximately 15 min after the onset of clinical death due to apparent ventricular fibrillation – received cardiopulmonary resuscitation, initially by laypersons and then by the emergency medical team (manual chest compressions followed by situation-adjusted LUCAS compressions. Sinus rhythm was restored after more than 90 min of continuous resuscitation, with seven defibrillations. Interventional diagnostic workup did not reveal a causal morphological correlate for the condition on coronary

  16. Association between percutaneous hemodynamic support device and survival from cardiac arrest in the state of Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Andrew; Sawyer, Kelly N; Devlin, William; Swor, Robert

    2018-05-01

    The role of circulatory support in the post-cardiac arrest period remains controversial. Our objective was to investigate the association between treatment with a percutaneous hemodynamic support device and outcome after admission for cardiac arrest. We performed a retrospective study of adult patients with admission diagnosis of cardiac arrest or ventricular fibrillation (VF) from the Michigan Inpatient Database, treated between July 1, 2010, and June 30, 2013. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, treatments, and disposition were electronically abstracted based on ICD-9 codes at the hospital level. Mixed-effects logistic regression models were fit to test the effect of percutaneous hemodynamic support device defined as either percutaneous left ventricular assist device (pLVAD) or intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) on survival. These models controlled for age, sex, VF, myocardial infarction (MI), and cardiogenic shock with hospital modeled as a random effect. A total of 103 hospitals contributed 4393 patients for analysis, predominately male (58.8%) with a mean age of 64.1years (SD 15.5). On univariate analysis, younger age, male sex, VF as the initial rhythm, acute MI, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous hemodynamic support device, and absence of cardiogenic shock were associated with survival to discharge (each p<0.001). Mixed-effects logistic regressions revealed use of percutaneous hemodynamic support device was significantly associated with survival among all patients (OR 1.8 (1.28-2.54)), and especially in those with acute MI (OR 1.95 (1.31-2.93)) or cardiogenic shock (OR 1.96 (1.29-2.98)). Treatment with percutaneous hemodynamic support device in the post-arrest period may provide left ventricular support and improve outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exercise-related cardiac arrest in cardiac rehabilitation - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribed physical activity plays a major role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease, and as with any other form of treatment its benefits must be weighed against its possible risks. This study attempted to establish the safety of cardiac rehabilitation as a medical intervention at the Johannesburg Cardiac ...

  18. Community involvement in out of hospital cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Ali; Raad, Mohamad; Chams, Nour; Chams, Sana; Bachir, Rana; El Sayed, Mazen J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Developing countries including Lebanon report low survival rates and poor neurologic outcomes in affected victims. Community involvement through early recognition and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can improve OHCA survival. This study assesses knowledge and attitude of university students in Lebanon and identifies potential barriers and facilitators to learning and performing CPR. A cross-sectional survey was administered to university students. The questionnaire included questions regarding the following data elements: demographics, knowledge, and awareness about sudden cardiac arrest, CPR, automated external defibrillator (AED) use, prior CPR and AED training, ability to perform CPR or use AED, barriers to performing/learning CPR/AED, and preferred location for attending CPR/AED courses. Descriptive analysis followed by multivariate analysis was carried out to identify predictors and barriers to learning and performing CPR. A total of 948 students completed the survey. Participants’ mean age was 20.1 (±2.1) years with 53.1% women. Less than half of participants (42.9%) were able to identify all the presenting signs of cardiac arrest. Only 33.7% of participants felt able to perform CPR when witnessing a cardiac arrest. Fewer participants (20.3%) reported receiving previous CPR training. Several perceived barriers to learning and performing CPR were also reported. Significant predictors of willingness to perform CPR when faced with a cardiac arrest were: earning higher income, previous CPR training and feeling confident in one's ability to apply an AED, or perform CPR. Lacking enough expertise in performing CPR was a significant barrier to willingness to perform CPR. University students in Lebanon are familiar with the symptoms of cardiac arrest, however, they are not well trained in CPR and lack confidence to perform it. The attitude towards the importance of

  19. Effects of adrenaline on rhythm transitions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neset, Andres; Nordseth, Trond; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Wik, Lars; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2013-11-01

    We wanted to study the effects of intravenous (i.v.) adrenaline (epinephrine) on rhythm transitions during cardiac arrest with initial or secondary ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia (VF/VT). Post hoc analysis of patients included in a randomised controlled trial of i.v. drugs in adult, non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients who were defibrillated and had a readable electrocardiography recording. Patients who received adrenaline were compared with patients who did not. Cardiac rhythms were annotated manually using the defibrillator data. Eight hundred and forty-nine patients were included in the randomised trial of which 223 were included in this analysis; 119 in the adrenaline group and 104 in the no-adrenaline group. The proportion of patients with one or more VF/VT episodes after temporary return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was higher in the adrenaline than in the no-adrenaline group, 24% vs. 12%, P = 0.03. Most relapses from ROSC to VF/VT in the no-adrenaline group occurred during the first 20 min of resuscitation, whereas patients in the adrenaline group experienced such relapses even after 20 min. Fibrillations from asystole or pulseless electrical activity, shock resistant VF/VT and the number of rhythm transitions per patient was higher in the adrenalin group compared with the no-adrenalin group: 90% vs. 69%, P adrenaline had more rhythm transitions from ROSC and non-shockable rhythms to VF/VT. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Posibilities of cardiac pacemaker use in paroxsysmal atrial fibrilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Kamenik

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of atrial fibrillation is a big therapeutic challenge because of all known negative consequences of this the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia. Numerous of clinical studies showed bad control or ineffectiveness of antiarhythmic drugs. Nonfarmakological therapies like surgical treatment, radiofrequency ablation and atrial pacing are being tested. Effectiveness of atrial pacing in prevention of paroxysmal artial fibrillation has been documented in numerous prospective studies and is effective for a long time interval, but only for patients with bradicardic underlying cardiac rhythm. In Normocardic rhythm or normal AV conduction the effective Atrial fibrillation prevention was not proven. The mechanism of action is based on premature atrial complex suppression, reduction of dispersion of refractoriness after short-long cycles and reduction of interatrial conduction delay. The atrial stimulation site or multi-site atrial pacing could be effective in AF prevention when interatrial conduction delay is present; otherwise the difference is not significant.Conclusions: In bradicardic patient who has frequent paroxysms of atrial fibrillation, regardless if bradycardia is due to ineffective antiarrhythmic drug treathement, implantation of DDDR pacemaker with atrial prevention algorhythm is indicated. If the P-wave duration is >120 milliseconds multi-site atrial pacing or septal atrial pacing should be considered. Pacemaker diagnostic tools could be used for adequate start of anticoagulant therapy and control of effectiveness of anthyarhythmic drug therapy.

  1. A Unique Case of Cardiac Arrest following K2 Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD accounts for up to 450,000 deaths every year in the United States (Zipes et al. (2006. Most cases of sudden cardiac death occur in subjects with no prior history of heart disease (Myerburg et al. (1998. The incidence of sudden death in a general population has been shown to increase contemporaneously with substance abuse (Phillips et al. (1999. The causative association of sudden death with cocaine, methadone, and volatile agents is well established (Adgey et al. (1995 and Isner et al. (1986. We describe a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest temporally related to abuse of the synthetic cannabinoid street drug known as K2. To our knowledge, there are no previously documented cases of sudden cardiac death associated with synthetic cannabinoids although they have been linked to myocardial infarction in teenagers despite normal coronary angiography (Mir et al. (2011.

  2. Interrater variability of EEG interpretation in comatose cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rosén, Ingmar; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: EEG is widely used to predict outcome in comatose cardiac arrest patients, but its value has been limited by lack of a uniform classification. We used the EEG terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) to assess interrater variability in a cohort...... who were blinded for patient outcome. Percent agreement and kappa (κ) for the categories in the ACNS EEG terminology and for prespecified malignant EEG-patterns were calculated. RESULTS: There was substantial interrater agreement (κ 0.71) for highly malignant patterns and moderate agreement (κ 0.......42) for malignant patterns. Substantial agreement was found for malignant periodic or rhythmic patterns (κ 0.72) while agreement for identifying an unreactive EEG was fair (κ 0.26). CONCLUSIONS: The ACNS EEG terminology can be used to identify highly malignant EEG-patterns in post cardiac arrest patients...

  3. Cardiac arrest during a twin birth caesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampín-Huerta, F R; Moreira-Gómez, D; Lozano-Requelme, M L; Molina-Nieto, F; Fontán-García-Boente, L; Moreira-Pacheco, M

    2016-04-01

    The case of a 35 year-old pregnant woman with a right ovarian vein thrombosis complicated with a floating thrombus in the inferior vena cava reaching the right atrium, is presented. The patient had a cardiac arrest due to a pulmonary embolism during a twin-birth caesarean delivery. Discussion includes the pathophysiology of this condition and management options in a cardiac arrest secondary to this aetiology, recovered with stable blood pressure, highlighting the role of thrombolytic therapy in the Postoperative Care Unit in this situation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiac ion channels and mechanisms for protection against atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Sørensen, Ulrik S

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is recognised as the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice. Ongoing drug development is aiming at obtaining atrial specific effects in order to prevent pro-arrhythmic, devastating ventricular effects. In principle, this is possible due to a differe...... to the recent discovery that Ca(2+)-activated small conductance K(+) channels (SK channels) are important for the repolarisation of atrial action potentials. Finally, an overview of current pharmacological treatment of AF is included....

  5. Relationship between chest compression rates and outcomes from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Ahamed H; Guffey, Danielle; Aufderheide, Tom P; Brown, Siobhan; Morrison, Laurie J; Nichols, Patrick; Powell, Judy; Daya, Mohamud; Bigham, Blair L; Atkins, Dianne L; Berg, Robert; Davis, Dan; Stiell, Ian; Sopko, George; Nichol, Graham

    2012-06-19

    Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend a chest compression rate of at least 100 compressions per minute. Animal and human studies have reported that blood flow is greatest with chest compression rates near 120/min, but few have reported rates used during out-of-hospital (OOH) cardiopulmonary resuscitation or the relationship between rate and outcome. The purpose of this study was to describe chest compression rates used by emergency medical services providers to resuscitate patients with OOH cardiac arrest and to determine the relationship between chest compression rate and outcome. Included were patients aged ≥ 20 years with OOH cardiac arrest treated by emergency medical services providers participating in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Data were abstracted from monitor-defibrillator recordings during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Multiple logistic regression analysis assessed the association between chest compression rate and outcome. From December 2005 to May 2007, 3098 patients with OOH cardiac arrest were included in this study. Mean age was 67 ± 16 years, and 8.6% survived to hospital discharge. Mean compression rate was 112 ± 19/min. A curvilinear association between chest compression rate and return of spontaneous circulation was found in cubic spline models after multivariable adjustment (P=0.012). Return of spontaneous circulation rates peaked at a compression rate of ≈ 125/min and then declined. Chest compression rate was not significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge in multivariable categorical or cubic spline models. Chest compression rate was associated with return of spontaneous circulation but not with survival to hospital discharge in OOH cardiac arrest.

  6. C.A.U.S.E.: Cardiac arrest ultra-sound exam--a better approach to managing patients in primary non-arrhythmogenic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Caleb; Shuler, Klaus; Hannan, Hashibul; Sonyika, Chionesu; Likourezos, Antonios; Marshall, John

    2008-02-01

    Cardiac arrest is a condition frequently encountered by physicians in the hospital setting including the Emergency Department, Intensive Care Unit and medical/surgical wards. This paper reviews the current literature involving the use of ultrasound in resuscitation and proposes an algorithmic approach for the use of ultrasound during cardiac arrest. At present there is the need for a means of differentiating between various causes of cardiac arrest, which are not a direct result of a primary ventricular arrhythmia. Identifying the cause of pulseless electrical activity or asystole is important as the underlying cause is what guides management in such cases. This approach, incorporating ultrasound to manage cardiac arrest aids in the diagnosis of the most common and easily reversible causes of cardiac arrest not caused by primary ventricular arrhythmia, namely; severe hypovolemia, tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, and massive pulmonary embolus. These four conditions are addressed in this paper using four accepted emergency ultrasound applications to be performed during resuscitation of a cardiac arrest patient with the aim of determining the underlying cause of a cardiac arrest. Identifying the underlying cause of cardiac arrest represents the one of the greatest challenges of managing patients with asystole or PEA and accurate determination has the potential to improve management by guiding therapeutic decisions. We include several clinical images demonstrating examples of cardiac tamponade, massive pulmonary embolus, and severe hypovolemia secondary to abdominal aortic aneurysm. In conclusion, this protocol has the potential to reduce the time required to determine the etiology of a cardiac arrest and thus decrease the time between arrest and appropriate therapy.

  7. National Institutes of Health-Funded Cardiac Arrest Research: A 10-Year Trend Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coute, Ryan A; Panchal, Ashish R; Mader, Timothy J; Neumar, Robert W

    2017-07-12

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of death in the United States, claiming over 450 000 lives annually. Improving survival depends on the ability to conduct CA research and on the translation and implementation of research findings into practice. Our objective was to provide a descriptive analysis of annual National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding for CA research over the past decade. A search within NIH RePORTER for the years 2007 to 2016 was performed using the terms: "cardiac arrest" or "cardiopulmonary resuscitation" or "heart arrest" or "circulatory arrest" or "pulseless electrical activity" or "ventricular fibrillation" or "resuscitation." Grants were reviewed and categorized as CA research (yes/no) using predefined criteria. The annual NIH funding for CA research, number of individual grants, and principal investigators were tabulated. The total NIH investment in CA research for 2015 was calculated and compared to those for other leading causes of death within the United States. Interrater reliability among 3 independent reviewers for fiscal year 2015 was assessed using Fleiss κ. The search yielded 2763 NIH-funded grants, of which 745 (27.0%) were classified as CA research (κ=0.86 [95%CI 0.80-0.93]). Total inflation-adjusted NIH funding for CA research was $35.4 million in 2007, peaked at $76.7 million in 2010, and has decreased to $28.5 million in 2016. Per annual death, NIH invests ≈$2200 for stroke, ≈$2100 for heart disease, and ≈$91 for CA. This analysis demonstrates that the annual NIH investment in CA research is low relative to other leading causes of death in the United States and has declined over the past decade. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  8. Usefulness of emergency ultrasound in nontraumatic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpicelli, Giovanni

    2011-02-01

    Treatment of nontraumatic cardiac arrest in the hospital setting depends on the recognition of heart rhythm and differential diagnosis of the underlying condition while maintaining a constant oxygenated blood flow by ventilation and chest compression. Diagnostic process relies only on patient's history, physical findings, and active electrocardiography. Ultrasound is not currently scheduled in the resuscitation guidelines. Nevertheless, the use of real-time ultrasonography during resuscitation has the potential to improve diagnostic accuracy and allows the physician a greater confidence in deciding aggressive life-saving therapeutic procedures. This article reviews the current opinions and literature about the use of emergency ultrasound during resuscitation of nontraumatic cardiac arrest. Cardiac and lung ultrasound have a great potential in identifying the reversible mechanical causes of pulseless electrical activity or asystole. Brief examination of the heart can even detect a real cardiac standstill regardless of electrical activity displayed on the monitor, which is a crucial prognostic indicator. Moreover, ultrasound can be useful to verify and monitor the tracheal tube placement. Limitation to the use of ultrasound is the need to minimize the no-flow intervals during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, real-time ultrasound can be successfully applied during brief pausing of chest compression and first pulse-check. Finally, lung sonographic examination targeted to the detection of signs of pulmonary congestion has the potential to allow hemodynamic noninvasive monitoring before and after mechanical cardiopulmonary maneuvers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Therapeutic hypothermia following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; does it start in the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, R; Sherren, P B

    2010-12-01

    The use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is a well-practised treatment modality in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, recent evidence points to advantages in starting the cooling process as soon as possible after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). There are no data on implementation of this treatment in the emergency department. A telephone survey was conducted of the 233 emergency departments in the UK. The most senior available clinician was asked if, in cases where they have a patient with a ROSC after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, would therapeutic hypothermia be started in the emergency department. Of the 233 hospitals called, 230 responded, of which 35% would start cooling in the emergency department. Of this 35%, over half (56%) said the decision to start cooling was made by the emergency physician before consultation with the ICU. Also, of the 35% who would begin cooling in the emergency department, 55% would cool only for ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia, 66% would monitor temperature centrally, and 14% would use specialised cooling equipment. There is often a delay in getting patients to ICU from the emergency department, and thus the decision not to start cooling in the emergency department may impact significantly on patient outcome. The dissemination of these data may persuade emergency physicians that starting treatment in the emergency department is an appropriate and justifiable decision that is becoming a more accepted practice throughout the UK.

  10. Ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: Incidence, predictive factors, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesel, Laurence; Berthon, Charlotte; Messas, Nathan; Lim, Han S; Girardey, Mélanie; Marzak, Halim; Marchandot, Benjamin; Trinh, Annie; Ohlmann, Patrick; Morel, Olivier

    2018-04-06

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a stress-related transient cardiomyopathy. Life-threatening arrhythmias (LTA) can occur and worsen prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and outcome of LTA in TTC, as well as its predictive factors and clinical implications. We studied 214 consecutive cases of TTC over 8 years. The study cohort was divided into 2 groups: those with LTA (LTA group) and those without (non-LTA group). LTA was defined as ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or cardiac arrest. LTA occurred in 10.7% of patients mainly in the first 24 hours of hospitalization: ventricular tachycardia (n = 2), ventricular fibrillation (n = 11), cardiac arrest (n = 10: 5 asystole, 3 complete heart block, and 2 sinoatrial block). LTA were associated with lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and a high rate of conduction disturbances. In-hospital (39.1% vs 8.9%; P 105 ms were independent predictors of LTA. In cases where a device was implanted, conduction disturbances persisted after the index event despite complete recovery of LVEF. There was no ventricular arrhythmia recurrence during follow-up. LTA occur early in patients presenting with TTC and is associated with significantly worse short- and long-term prognosis. Left ventricular impairment and QRS duration >105 ms are independent predictors of LTA. Ventricular arrhythmias occurred in the acute phase without further recurrence recorded in hospital survivors, whereas severe conduction disorders persisted during long-term follow-up. These findings may have implications on the choice of device therapy for this specific patient subgroup. Copyright © 2018 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Is Ward Experience in Resuscitation Effort Related to the Prognosis of Unexpected Cardiac Arrest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Kuang Hou

    2007-09-01

    Conclusion: Hospital wards with more than 5 cardiac arrests per year have a better patient survival rate than those with fewer arrests. This is despite all ward staff receiving the same level of training.

  12. Calmodulin Mutations Associated with Recurrent Cardiac Arrest in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Graf, Elisabeth; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Ovadia, Marc; Papagiannis, John; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Rathi, Subodh G.; Kunic, Jennifer D.; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Clark, Travis; Shaffer, Christian; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kääb, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Chazin, Walter J.; Schwartz, Peter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Life-threatening disorders of heart rhythm may arise during infancy and can result in the sudden and tragic death of a child. We performed exome sequencing on two unrelated infants presenting with recurrent cardiac arrest to discover a genetic cause. Methods and Results We ascertained two unrelated infants (probands) with recurrent cardiac arrest and dramatically prolonged QTc interval who were both born to healthy parents. The two parent-child trios were investigated using exome sequencing to search for de novo genetic variants. We then performed follow-up candidate gene screening on an independent cohort of 82 subjects with congenital long-QT syndrome without an identified genetic cause. Biochemical studies were performed to determine the functional consequences of mutations discovered in two genes encoding calmodulin. We discovered three heterozygous de novo mutations in either CALM1 or CALM2, two of the three human genes encoding calmodulin, in the two probands and in two additional subjects with recurrent cardiac arrest. All mutation carriers were infants who exhibited life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias combined variably with epilepsy and delayed neurodevelopment. Mutations altered residues in or adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain. Recombinant mutant calmodulins exhibited several fold reductions in calcium binding affinity. Conclusions Human calmodulin mutations disrupt calcium ion binding to the protein and are associated with a life-threatening condition in early infancy. Defects in calmodulin function will disrupt important calcium signaling events in heart affecting membrane ion channels, a plausible molecular mechanism for potentially deadly disturbances in heart rhythm during infancy. PMID:23388215

  13. Survey on current practices for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Hans; Cronberg, Tobias; Dünser, Martin W; Duranteau, Jacques; Horn, Janneke; Oddo, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    To investigate current practices and timing of neurological prognostication in comatose cardiac arrest patients. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to the 8000 members of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine during September and October 2012. The survey had 27 questions divided into three categories: background data, clinical data, decision-making and consequences. A total of 1025 respondents (13%) answered the survey with complete forms in more than 90%. Twenty per cent of respondents practiced outside of Europe. Overall, 22% answered that they had national recommendations, with the highest percentage in the Netherlands (>80%). Eighty-nine per cent used induced hypothermia (32-34 °C) for comatose cardiac arrest patients, while 11% did not. Twenty per cent had separate prognostication protocols for hypothermia patients. Seventy-nine per cent recognized that neurological examination alone is not enough to predict outcome and a similar number (76%) used additional methods. Intermittent electroencephalography (EEG), brain computed tomography (CT) scan and evoked potentials (EP) were considered most useful. Poor prognosis was defined as cerebral performance category (CPC) 3-5 (58%) or CPC 4-5 (39%) or other (3%). When prognosis was considered poor, 73% would actively withdraw intensive care while 20% would not and 7% were uncertain. National recommendations for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest are uncommon and only one physician out of five uses a separate protocol for hypothermia treated patients. A neurological examination alone was considered insufficient to predict outcome in comatose patients and most respondents advocated a multimodal approach: EEG, brain CT and EP were considered most useful. Uncertainty regarding neurological prognostication and decisions on level of care was substantial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Management of Patients After Cardiac Arrest: Now the Real Work Begins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Varinder K; Grunau, Brian E; Debicki, Derek B; Zhou, Jian; Hegazy, Ahmed F; McPherson, Terry; Nagpal, A Dave

    2018-02-01

    Survival with a good quality of life after cardiac arrest continues to be abysmal. Coordinated resuscitative care does not end with the effective return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC)-in fact, quite the contrary is true. Along with identifying and appropriately treating the precipitating cause, various components of the post-cardiac arrest syndrome also require diligent observation and management, including post-cardiac arrest neurologic injury and myocardial dysfunction, systemic ischemia-reperfusion phenomenon with potential consequent multiorgan failure, and the various sequelae of critical illness. There is growing evidence that an early invasive approach to coronary reperfusion with percutaneous coronary intervention, together with active targeted temperature management and optimization of hemodynamic, ventilator, and metabolic parameters, may improve survival and neurologic outcomes in cardiac arrest survivors. Neuroprognostication is complex, as are survivorship issues and long-term rehabilitation. Our paramedics, emergency physicians, and resuscitation specialists are all to be congratulated for ever-increasing success with ROSC… but now the real work begins. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A CASE OF GRANISETRON ASSOCIATED INTRAOPERATIVE CARDIAC ARREST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Harbi, Mohammed; Al Rifai, Derar; Al Habeeb, Hassan; Wambi, Freddie; Geldhof, Georges; Dimitriou, Vassilios

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of intraoperative severe bradycardia that resulted in asystole and cardiac arrest shortly after (granisetron 1mg for postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis, that occurred in a female patient who underwent an elective total thyroidectomy. After two cycles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, spontaneous circulation and sinus rhythm returned successfully. Postoperatively, the patient was diagnosed with a drug-induced long QT syndrome. At the time of the event, granisetron was the only medication administered. Furthermore, there was no reason to suspect electrolyte abnormalities. We explore the association of the onset of severe sinus bradycardia with the intravenous administration of granisetron.

  16. Advanced life support for cardiac arrest beyond the algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Søren Steemann; Isbye, Dan Lou; Pfeiffer, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In an advanced emergency medical service all parts of the advanced life support (ALS) algorithm can be provided. This evidence-based algorithm outlines resuscitative efforts for the first 10-15 minutes after cardiac arrest, whereafter the algorithm repeats itself. Restoration of spontaneous...... circulation fails in most cases, but in some circumstances the patient may benefit from additional interventional approaches, in which case transport to hospital with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation is indicated. This paper has summarized treatments outside the ALS algorithm, which may be beneficial...

  17. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: rationale and outline of the AmsteRdam Resuscitation Studies (ARREST) registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A; Berdowski, J; Souverein, P C; De Bruin, M L; Koster, R W; de Boer, A; Tan, H L

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA. Methods and analysis We set up a large-scale prospective community-based registry (AmsteRdam Resuscitation Studies, ARREST) in which we prospectively include all resuscitation attempts from OHCA in a large study region in the Netherlands in collaboration with Emergency Medical Services. Of all OHCA victims since June 2005, we prospectively collect medical history (through hospital and general practitioner), and current and previous medication use (through community pharmacy). In addition, we include DNA samples from OHCA victims with documented ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation during the resuscitation attempt since July 2007. Various study designs are employed to analyse the data of the ARREST registry, including case–control, cohort, case only and case-cross over designs. Ethics and dissemination We describe the rationale, outline and potential results of the ARREST registry. The design allows for a stable and reliable collection of multiple determinants of OHCA, while assuring that the patient, lay-caregiver or medical professional is not hindered in any way. Such comprehensive data collection is required to unravel the complex basis of OHCA. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant scientific symposia. PMID:25332818

  18. Electronic registration of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Dahl, Michael; Gade, John

    2007-01-01

    of cardiac arrest. 83 of those (28 %) received first aid. The first aid was provided by layman (68 %), physicians (11 %), nurses (11 %) and first-aiders (4 %). In 6 % the identity of the first aid provider was unknown. The majority of the patients (n = 177 (58 %)) had asystole upon ambulance arrival. 37 (12...... patients according to whether they received first aid, the identity of the first aid provider and the initial cardiac rhythm as diagnosed by the patient monitor.   Results: 18,666 patients where in contact with an emergency ambulance in the study period. Of those 296 (89/100,000/year) met the definition...... a considerably higher incidence rate for OHCA, than documented by the analogue nationwide registry. Further we discovered a high rate of first aid to OHCA-patients. Finally our data showed a high occurence of asystolia in patients who met the official criteria for OHCA....

  19. Benefits of cardiac sonography performed by a non-expert sonographer in patients with non-traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Suat; Yavuz, Erdal; Al, Behçet; Cindoruk, Şener; Altunbaş, Gökhan; Gümüşboğa, Hasan; Yıldırım, Cuma

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a rapid cardiac ultrasound assessment performed by trained non-expert sonographers integrated into the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). This study was prospectively performed in 179 patients (104 males and 75 females) who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in an emergency department (ED) during two calendar years (2013 and 2014). Two senior doctors, who had received emergency cardiac ultrasonography training, performed cardiac ultrasound through the apical, subxiphoid, or parasternal windows. Ultrasound evaluation and pulse controls were performed simultaneously. SPSS 18.0 was used for statistical analysis. A total of 63.7% (114) of the cardiopulmonary arrest incidents occurred out of the hospital. Only 13 patients had a femoral pulse during the initial evaluation, while 166 showed no femoral pulse. Initial monitoring showed a regular rhythm in 53 patients, ventricular fibrillation in 18 patients, and no rhythms in 108 patients. The first evaluation with ultrasound detected an effective heart rate in 26 patients and ventricular fibrillation in 14 patients, while no effective heart rate was observed in 139 patients. In addition, ultrasound revealed pericardial tamponade in seven patients and right ventricular enlargement in four cases. Global hypokinesia was detected in four patients and hypovolemia was observed in another four patients. The use of real-time ultrasonography during resuscitation with real-time femoral pulse check can help facilitate the distinguishing of pea-type arrest, ascertain the cause of the arrest, infer a suitable treatment, and optimize medical management decisions regarding CPR termination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Brain Injury and Recovery after Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxian Deng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable prognostic methods for cerebral functional outcome of post cardiac-arrest (CA patients are necessary, especially since therapeutic hypothermia (TH as a standard treatment. Traditional neurophysiological prognostic indicators, such as clinical examination and chemical biomarkers, may result in indecisive outcome predictions and do not directly reflect neuronal activity, though they have remained the mainstay of clinical prognosis. The most recent advances in electrophysiological methods—electroencephalography (EEG pattern, evoked potential (EP and cellular electrophysiological measurement—were developed to complement these deficiencies, and will be examined in this review article. EEG pattern (reactivity and continuity provides real-time and accurate information for early-stage (particularly in the first 24 h hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury patients with high sensitivity. However, the signal is easily affected by external stimuli, thus the measurements of EP should be combined with EEG background to validate the predicted neurologic functional result. Cellular electrophysiology, such as multi-unit activity (MUA and local field potentials (LFP, has strong potential for improving prognostication and therapy by offering additional neurophysiologic information to understand the underlying mechanisms of therapeutic methods. Electrophysiology provides reliable and precise prognostication on both global and cellular levels secondary to cerebral injury in cardiac arrest patients treated with TH.

  1. In-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Martha; Rodriguez, Roger; Callejas, Allison; Carranza, Douglas; Zeron, Hilda; Sánchez, Carlos; Del Castillo, Jimena; López-Herce, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the characteristic and the prognostic factors of in-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) in a public hospital Honduras. A prospective observational study was performed on pediatric in-hospital CA as a part of a multicenter international study. One hundred forty-six children were studied. The primary end point was survival at hospital discharge. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of each factor on mortality. Cardiac arrest occurred in the emergency department in 66.9%. Respiratory diseases and sepsis were predominant causes of CA. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 60% of patients, and 22.6% survived to hospital discharge. The factors related with mortality were nonrespiratory cause of CA (odds ratio [OR], 2.55; P = 0.045), adrenaline administration (OR, 4.96; P = 0.008), and a duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation more than 10 minutes (OR, 3.40; P = 0.012). In-hospital CA in children in a developing country has low survival. Patients with nonrespiratory causes and those who need adrenaline administration and prolonged resuscitation had worse prognosis.

  2. Association between dental caries and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Yasunori; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang, Bo; Uehara, Yoshinari; Ogawa, Masahiro; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nonogi, Hiroshi; Nagao, Ken; Kimura, Takeshi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-04-01

    Oral infection contributes to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. We hypothesized that dental caries may be associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) of cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin. We compared the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (785,591 cases of OHCA: 55.4% of cardiac origin and 44.6% of non-cardiac origin) to the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries between 2005 and 2011 in the 47 prefectures of Japan. In both the total population and males over 65 years, the number of cases of dental caries was significantly associated with the number of OHCA of total and cardiac origin from 2005 to 2011, but not those of non-cardiac origin. In the total population, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was not significantly associated with the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (total OHCA: r correlation coefficient=0.22, p=0.14; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.25, p=0.09; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=-0.002, p=0.99). Among male patients over 65 years, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was significantly associated with OHCA of total and cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin (total OHCA: r=0.47, p<0.001; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.37, p=0.01; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=0.28, p=0.054). While oral hygiene is important in all age groups, it may be particularly associated with OHCAs of cardiac origin in males over 65 years. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Perioperative cardiac arrest: an evolutionary analysis of the intra-operative cardiac arrest incidence in tertiary centers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Fachini Vane

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Great changes in medicine have taken place over the last 25 years worldwide. These changes in technologies, patient risks, patient profile, and laws regulating the medicine have impacted the incidence of cardiac arrest. It has been postulated that the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest has decreased over the years, especially in developed countries. The authors hypothesized that, as in the rest of the world, the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest is decreasing in Brazil, a developing country. Objectives: The aim of this study was to search the literature to evaluate the publications that relate the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest in Brazil and analyze the trend in the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest. Contents: There were 4 articles that met our inclusion criteria, resulting in 204,072 patients undergoing regional or general anesthesia in two tertiary and academic hospitals, totalizing 627 cases of intraoperative cardiac arrest. The mean intraoperative cardiac arrest incidence for the 25 years period was 30.72:10,000 anesthesias. There was a decrease from 39:10,000 anesthesias to 13:10,000 anesthesias in the analyzed period, with the related lethality from 48.3% to 30.8%. Also, the main causes of anesthesia-related cause of mortality changed from machine malfunction and drug overdose to hypovolemia and respiratory causes. Conclusions: There was a clear reduction in the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest in the last 25 years in Brazil. This reduction is seen worldwide and might be a result of multiple factors, including new laws regulating the medicine in Brazil, incorporation of technologies, better human development level of the country, and better patient care. Resumo: Justificativa: Nos últimos 25 anos ocorreram grandes mudanças na medicina em todo o mundo. Essas mudanças de tecnologias, riscos do paciente, perfil do paciente e leis que regulam medicamentos tiveram impacto na incid

  4. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  5. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke Normark

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term function of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors are sparse. We examined return to work as a proxy of preserved function without major neurologic deficits in survivors. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Denmark, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have been systematically repo...

  6. Outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--why do physicians withhold resuscitation attempts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsted, Tina I; Rasmussen, Lars S; Lippert, Freddy K

    2004-01-01

    To describe the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a focus on why physicians withhold resuscitation attempts.......To describe the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a focus on why physicians withhold resuscitation attempts....

  7. Low cerebral blood flow after cardiac arrest is not associated with anaerobic cerebral metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Ainslie, Philip N.; Hinssen, S.; Aries, M.J.; Bisschops, Laurens L.; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van der Hoeven, J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study Estimation of cerebral anaerobic metabolism in survivors and non-survivors after cardiac arrest. Methods We performed an observational study in twenty comatose patients after cardiac arrest and 19 healthy control subjects. We measured mean flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery

  8. Electrocardiographic changes during induced therapeutic hypothermia in comatose survivors after cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pablo; Salinas; Esteban; Lopez-de-Sa; Laura; Pena-Conde; Ana; Viana-Tejedor; Juan; Ramon; Rey-Blas; Eduardo; Armada; Jose; Luis; Lopez-Sendon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety of therapeutic hypothermia(TH) concerning arrhythmias we analyzed serial electrocardiograms(ECG) during TH.METHODS: All patients recovered from a cardiac arrest with Glasgow < 9 at admission were treated with induced mild TH to 32-34℃. TH was obtained with cool fluid infusion or a specific intravascular device. Twelvelead ECG before,during,and after TH,as well as ECG telemetry data was recorded in all patients. From a total of 54 patients admitted with cardiac arrest during the study period,47 patients had the 3 ECG and telemetry data available. ECG analysis was blinded and performed with manual caliper by two independent cardiologists from blinded copies of original ECG,recorded at 25 mm/s and 10 mm/m V. Coronary care unit staff analyzed ECG telemetry for rhythm disturbances. Variables measured in ECG were rhythm,RR,PR,QT and corrected QT(QTc by Bazett formula,measured in lead v2) intervals,QRS duration,presence of Osborn’s J wave and U wave,as well as ST segment displacement and T wave amplitude in leads Ⅱ,v2 and v5.RESULTS: Heart rate went down an average of 19 bpm during hypothermia and increased again 16 bpm with rewarming(P < 0.0005,both). There was a nonsignificant prolongation of the PR interval during TH and a significant decrease with rewarming(P = 0.041). QRS duration significantly prolonged(P = 0.041) with TH and shortened back(P < 0.005) with rewarming. QTc interval presented a mean prolongation of 58 ms(P < 0.005) during TH and a significant shortening with rewarming of 22.2 ms(P = 0.017). Osborn or J wave was found in 21.3% of the patients. New arrhythmias occurred in 38.3% of the patients. Most frequent arrhythmia was non-sustained ventricular tachycardia(19.1%),followed by severe bradycardia or paced rhythm(10.6%),accelerated nodal rhythm(8.5%) and atrial fibrillation(6.4%). No life threatening arrhythmias(sustained ventricular tachycardia,polymorphic ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation) occurred

  9. Resuscitation outcomes comparing year 2000 with year 2005 ALS guidelines in a pig model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthos, Theodoros; Tsirikos-Karapanos, Nikolas; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Tsiftsi, Katerina; Ekmektzoglou, Konstantinos A; Papadimitriou, Lila

    2007-06-01

    Ventricular fibrillation remains the leading cause of death in western societies. International organizations publish guidelines to follow in case of cardiac arrest. The aim of the present study is to assess whether the newly published guidelines record similar resuscitation success with the 2000 Advanced Life Support Guidelines on Resuscitation in a swine model of cardiac arrest. Nineteen landrace/large white pigs were used. Ventricular fibrillation was induced with the use of a transvenous pacing wire inserted into the right ventricle. The animals were randomized into two groups. In Group A, 10 animals were resuscitated using the 2000 guidelines, whereas in Group B, 9 animals were resuscitated using the 2005 guidelines. Both algorithms recorded similar successful resuscitation rates, as 60% of the animals in Group A and 44.5% in Group B were successfully resuscitated. However, animals in Group A restored a rhythm, compatible with a pulse, quicker than those in Group B (p=0.002). Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was not adversely affected by three defibrillation attempts in Group A. Both algorithms' resulted in comparable resuscitation success, however, guidelines 2000 resulted in faster resuscitation times. These preliminary results merit further investigation.

  10. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is insufficient knowledge of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the very young. OBJECTIVES: This nationwide study sought to examine age-stratified OHCA characteristics and the role of parental socioeconomic differences and its contribution to mortality in the young...... population. METHODS: All OHCA patients in Denmark, ≤21 years of age, were identified from 2001 to 2010. The population was divided into infants (adolescents/young adults (16-21 years). Multivariate logistic regression......-school children, school children and high school adolescents were 11.5, 3.5, 1.3 and 5.3 per 100,000 inhabitants. Overall bystander CPR rate was 48.8%, and for age groups: 55.4%, 41.2%, 44.9% and 63.0%, respectively. Overall 30-day survival rate was 8.1%, and for age groups: 1.4%, 4.5%, 16.1% and 9...

  11. Current practice in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Pison, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) management, with special focus on in-hospital diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty-three European centres, all members of the EHRA-EP Research network......, completed the questions of the survey. A dedicated strategy for OHCA management is active in 85% of the centres. Shockable tachyarrhythmias such as initial OHCA rhythm are reported in >70% of the patients in 64% of the centres. In-hospital therapeutic hypothermia was applied in >50% of the patients in 53...... management strategy, including coronary angiography/PCI and implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy, while therapeutic hypothermia appears to be underused....

  12. Opiate Withdrawal Complicated by Tetany and Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfanali R. Kugasia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with symptoms of opiate withdrawal, after the administration of opiate antagonist by paramedics, are a common presentation in the emergency department of hospitals. Though most of opiate withdrawal symptoms are benign, rarely they can become life threatening. This case highlights how a benign opiate withdrawal symptom of hyperventilation led to severe respiratory alkalosis that degenerated into tetany and cardiac arrest. Though this patient was successfully resuscitated, it is imperative that severe withdrawal symptoms are timely identified and immediate steps are taken to prevent catastrophes. An easier way to reverse the severe opiate withdrawal symptom would be with either low dose methadone or partial opiate agonists like buprenorphine. However, if severe acid-base disorder is identified, it would be safer to electively intubate these patients for better control of their respiratory and acid-base status.

  13. Risk Factor Analyses for the Return of Spontaneous Circulation in the Asphyxiation Cardiac Arrest Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Jun Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Animal models of asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA are frequently used in basic research to mirror the clinical course of cardiac arrest (CA. The rates of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in ACA animal models are lower than those from studies that have utilized ventricular fibrillation (VF animal models. The purpose of this study was to characterize the factors associated with the ROSC in the ACA porcine model. Methods: Forty-eight healthy miniature pigs underwent endotracheal tube clamping to induce CA. Once induced, CA was maintained untreated for a period of 8 min. Two minutes following the initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, defibrillation was attempted until ROSC was achieved or the animal died. To assess the factors associated with ROSC in this CA model, logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze gender, the time of preparation, the amplitude spectrum area (AMSA from the beginning of CPR and the pH at the beginning of CPR. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to evaluate the predictive value of AMSA for ROSC. Results: ROSC was only 52.1% successful in this ACA porcine model. The multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that ROSC significantly depended on the time of preparation, AMSA at the beginning of CPR and pH at the beginning of CPR. The area under the ROC curve in for AMSA at the beginning of CPR was 0.878 successful in predicting ROSC (95% confidence intervals: 0.773∼0.983, and the optimum cut-off value was 15.62 (specificity 95.7% and sensitivity 80.0%. Conclusions: The time of preparation, AMSA and the pH at the beginning of CPR were associated with ROSC in this ACA porcine model. AMSA also predicted the likelihood of ROSC in this ACA animal model.

  14. Early Recognition of Foreign Body Aspiration as the Cause of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body aspiration (FBA is uncommon in the adult population but can be a life-threatening condition. Clinical manifestations vary according to the degree of airway obstruction, and, in some cases, making the correct diagnosis requires a high level of clinical suspicion combined with a detailed history and exam. Sudden cardiac arrest after FBA may occur secondary to asphyxiation. We present a 48-year-old male with no history of cardiac disease brought to the emergency department after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The patient was resuscitated after 15 minutes of cardiac arrest. He was initially managed with therapeutic hypothermia (TH. Subsequent history suggested FBA as a possible etiology of the cardiac arrest, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy demonstrated a piece of meat and bone lodged in the left main stem bronchus. The foreign body was removed with the bronchoscope and the patient clinically improved with full neurological recovery. Therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia has been reported to have high mortality and poor neurological outcomes. This case highlights the importance of early identification of FBA causing cardiac arrest, and we report a positive neurological outcome for postresuscitation therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia.

  15. Automatic detection of atrial fibrillation in cardiac vibration signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueser, C; Diesel, J; Zink, M D H; Winter, S; Schauerte, P; Leonhardt, S

    2013-01-01

    We present a study on the feasibility of the automatic detection of atrial fibrillation (AF) from cardiac vibration signals (ballistocardiograms/BCGs) recorded by unobtrusive bedmounted sensors. The proposed system is intended as a screening and monitoring tool in home-healthcare applications and not as a replacement for ECG-based methods used in clinical environments. Based on BCG data recorded in a study with 10 AF patients, we evaluate and rank seven popular machine learning algorithms (naive Bayes, linear and quadratic discriminant analysis, support vector machines, random forests as well as bagged and boosted trees) for their performance in separating 30 s long BCG epochs into one of three classes: sinus rhythm, atrial fibrillation, and artifact. For each algorithm, feature subsets of a set of statistical time-frequency-domain and time-domain features were selected based on the mutual information between features and class labels as well as first- and second-order interactions among features. The classifiers were evaluated on a set of 856 epochs by means of 10-fold cross-validation. The best algorithm (random forests) achieved a Matthews correlation coefficient, mean sensitivity, and mean specificity of 0.921, 0.938, and 0.982, respectively.

  16. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnet, Frederic; Triba, Mohamed N; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frederic; Hubert, Hervé; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Escutnaire, Josephine; Guenin, Aurelien; Hoogvorst, Astrid; Marbeuf-Gueye, Carol; Reuter, Paul-Georges; Javaud, Nicolas; Vicaut, Eric; Chevret, Sylvie

    2017-02-01

    Relationship between cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation (CPR) durations and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain unclear. Our primary aim was to determine the association between survival without neurologic sequelae and cardiac arrest intervals in the setting of witnessed OHCA. We analyzed 27,301 non-traumatic, witnessed OHCA patients in France included in the national registry from June 1, 2011 through December 1, 2015. We analyzed cardiac arrest intervals, designated as no-flow (NF; from collapse to start of CPR) and low-flow (LF; from start of CPR to cessation of resuscitation) in relation to 30-day survival without sequelae. We determined the influence of recognized prognostic factors (age, gender, initial rhythm, location of cardiac arrest) on this relation. For the entire cohort, the area delimited by a value of NF greater than 12min (95% confidence interval: 11-13min) and LF greater than 33min (95% confidence interval: 29-45min), yielded a probability of 30-day survival of less than 1%. These sets of values were greatly influenced by initial cardiac arrest rhythm, age, sex and location of cardiac arrest. Extended CPR duration (greater than 40min) in the setting of initial shockable cardiac rhythm is associated with greater than 1% survival with NF less than 18min. The NF interval was highly influential on the LF interval regardless of outcome, whether return of spontaneous circulation (padvanced techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical versus manual chest compressions for cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Steven C; Hassan, Nizar; Bigham, Blair L; Morrison, Laurie J

    2014-02-27

    This is the first update of the Cochrane review on mechanical chest compression devices published in 2011 (Brooks 2011). Mechanical chest compression devices have been proposed to improve the effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). To assess the effectiveness of mechanical chest compressions versus standard manual chest compressions with respect to neurologically intact survival in patients who suffer cardiac arrest. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Studies (CENTRAL; 2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2013 January Week 1), EMBASE (1980 to 2013 January Week 2), Science Citation abstracts (1960 to 18 November 2009), Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) (1970 to 11 January 2013) on Thomson Reuters Web of Science, biotechnology and bioengineering abstracts (1982 to 18 November 2009), conference proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S) (1990 to 11 January 2013) and clinicaltrials.gov (2 August 2013). We applied no language restrictions. Experts in the field of mechanical chest compression devices and manufacturers were contacted. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs and quasi-randomised studies comparing mechanical chest compressions versus manual chest compressions during CPR for patients with atraumatic cardiac arrest. Two review authors abstracted data independently; disagreement between review authors was resolved by consensus and by a third review author if consensus could not be reached. The methodologies of selected studies were evaluated by a single author for risk of bias. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge with good neurological outcome. We planned to use RevMan 5 (Version 5.2. The Nordic Cochrane Centre) and the DerSimonian & Laird method (random-effects model) to provide a pooled estimate for risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), if data allowed. Two new studies were included in this update. Six trials in total, including data from 1166

  18. Vernakalant hydrochloride for the rapid conversion of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowey, Peter R; Dorian, Paul; Mitchell, L Brent

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative atrial arrhythmias are common and are associated with considerable morbidity. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vernakalant for the conversion of atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFL) after cardiac surgery....

  19. The effect of 50% compared to 100% inspired oxygen fraction on brain oxygenation and post cardiac arrest mitochondrial function in experimental cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelskylä, Annika; Nurmi, Jouni; Jousi, Milla; Schramko, Alexey; Mervaala, Eero; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2017-07-01

    We hypothesised that the use of 50% compared to 100% oxygen maintains cerebral oxygenation and ameliorates the disturbance of cardiac mitochondrial respiration during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced electrically in anaesthetised healthy adult pigs and left untreated for seven minutes followed by randomisation to manual ventilation with 50% or 100% oxygen and mechanical chest compressions (LUCAS ® ). Defibrillation was performed at thirteen minutes and repeated if necessary every two minutes with 1mg intravenous adrenaline. Cerebral oxygenation was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy (rSO 2 , INVOS™5100C Cerebral Oximeter) and with a probe (NEUROVENT-PTO, RAUMEDIC) in the frontal brain cortex (PbO 2 ). Heart biopsies were obtained 20min after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) with an analysis of mitochondrial respiration (OROBOROS Instruments Corp., Innsbruck, Austria), and compared to four control animals without VF and CPR. Brain rSO 2 and PbO 2 were log transformed and analysed with a mixed linear model and mitochondrial respiration with an analysis of variance. Of the twenty pigs, one had a breach of protocol and was excluded, leaving nine pigs in the 50% group and ten in the 100% group. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in six pigs in the 50% group and eight in the 100% group. The rSO 2 (p=0.007) was lower with FiO 2 50%, but the PbO 2 was not (p=0.93). After ROSC there were significant interactions between time and FiO 2 regarding both rSO 2 (p=0.001) and PbO 2 (p=0.004). Compared to the controls, mitochondrial respiration was decreased, with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) levels of 57 (17)pmols -1 mg -1 compared to 92 (23)pmols -1 mg -1 (p=0.008), but there was no difference between different oxygen fractions (p=0.79). The use of 50% oxygen during CPR results in lower cerebral oximetry values compared to 100% oxygen but there is no difference in brain tissue oxygen. Cardiac

  20. Effects of Intraosseous Tibial vs. Intravenous Vasopressin in a Hypovolemic Cardiac Arrest Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Fulkerson, MSN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study compared the effects of vasopressin via tibial intraosseous (IO and intravenous (IV routes on maximum plasma concentration (Cmax, the time to maximum concentration (Tmax, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, and time to ROSC in a hypovolemic cardiac arrest model. Methods: This study was a randomized prospective, between-subjects experimental design. A computer program randomly assigned 28 Yorkshire swine to one of four groups: IV (n=7, IO tibia (n=7, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR + defibrillation (n=7, and a control group that received just CPR (n=7. Ventricular fibrillation was induced, and subjects remained in arrest for two minutes. CPR was initiated and 40 units of vasopressin were administered via IO or IV routes. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, and 4 minutes. CPR and defibrillation were initiated for 20 minutes or until ROSC was achieved. We measured vasopressin concentrations using highperformance liquid chromatography. Results: There was no significant difference between the IO and IV groups relative to achieving ROSC (p=1.0 but a significant difference between the IV compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031 and IV compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001. There was a significant difference between the IO group compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031 and IO compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001. There was no significant difference between the CPR + defibrillation group and the CPR group (p=0.127. There was no significant difference in Cmax between the IO and IV groups (p=0.079. The mean ± standard deviation of Cmax of the IO group was 58,709±25,463pg/mL compared to the IV group, which was 106,198±62,135pg/mL. There was no significant difference in mean Tmax between the groups (p=0.084. There were no significant differences in odds of ROSC between the tibial IO and IV groups. Conclusion: Prompt access to the vascular system using the IO route can circumvent

  1. Poisson cluster analysis of cardiac arrest incidence in Columbus, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Craig; Cudnik, Michael T; Sasson, Comilla; Schwartz, Greg; Semple, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Scarce resources in disease prevention and emergency medical services (EMS) need to be focused on high-risk areas of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Cluster analysis using geographic information systems (GISs) was used to find these high-risk areas and test potential predictive variables. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of EMS-treated adults with OHCAs occurring in Columbus, Ohio, from April 1, 2004, through March 31, 2009. The OHCAs were aggregated to census tracts and incidence rates were calculated based on their adult populations. Poisson cluster analysis determined significant clusters of high-risk census tracts. Both census tract-level and case-level characteristics were tested for association with high-risk areas by multivariate logistic regression. A total of 2,037 eligible OHCAs occurred within the city limits during the study period. The mean incidence rate was 0.85 OHCAs/1,000 population/year. There were five significant geographic clusters with 76 high-risk census tracts out of the total of 245 census tracts. In the case-level analysis, being in a high-risk cluster was associated with a slightly younger age (-3 years, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99-1.00), not being white, non-Hispanic (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.45-0.64), cardiac arrest occurring at home (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.23-1.71), and not receiving bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62-0.96), but with higher survival to hospital discharge (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.30-2.46). In the census tract-level analysis, high-risk census tracts were also associated with a slightly lower average age (-0.1 years, OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.22) and a lower proportion of white, non-Hispanic patients (-0.298, OR 0.04, 95% CI 0.01-0.19), but also a lower proportion of high-school graduates (-0.184, OR 0.00, 95% CI 0.00-0.00). This analysis identified high-risk census tracts and associated census tract-level and case-level characteristics that can be used to

  2. Importance of the first link: description and recognition of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in an emergency call.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdowski, Jocelyn; Beekhuis, Freerk; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Tijssen, Jan G P; Koster, Rudolph W

    2009-04-21

    The content of emergency calls for suspected cardiac arrest is rarely analyzed. This study investigated the recognition of a cardiac arrest by dispatchers and its influence on survival rates. During 8 months, voice recordings of 14,800 consecutive emergency calls were collected to audit content and cardiac arrest recognition. The presence of cardiac arrest during the call was assessed from the ambulance crew report. Included calls were placed by laypersons on site and did not involve trauma. Prevalence of cardiac arrest was 3.0%. Of the 285 cardiac arrests, 82 (29%) were not recognized during the call, and 64 of 267 suspected calls (24%) were not cardiac arrest. We analyzed a random sample (n=506) of 9230 control calls. Three-month survival was 5% when a cardiac arrest was not recognized versus 14% when it was recognized (P=0.04). If the dispatcher did not recognize the cardiac arrest, the ambulance was dispatched a mean of 0.94 minute later (P<0.001) and arrived 1.40 minutes later on scene (P=0.01) compared with recognized calls. The main reason for not recognizing the cardiac arrest was not asking if the patient was breathing (42 of 82) and not asking to describe the type of breathing (16 of 82). Normal breathing was never mentioned in true cardiac arrest calls. A logistic regression model identified spontaneous trigger words like facial color that could contribute to cardiac arrest recognition (odds ratio, 7.8 to 9.7). Not recognizing a cardiac arrest during emergency calls decreases survival. Spontaneous words that the caller uses to describe the patient may aid in faster and better recognition of a cardiac arrest.

  3. Outcome among patients suffering from in-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trpković Sladjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In relation to pre-hospital treatment of patients with cardiac arrest (CA in the field where resuscitation is often started by nonprofessionals, resuscitation in hospital is most commonly performed by well-trained personnel. Objective. The aim was to define the factors associated with an improved outcome among patients suffering from the inhospital CA (IHCA. Methods. The prospective study included a total of 100 patients in the Emergency Center over two-year period. The patterns by the Utstein-Style guidelines recorded the following: age, sex, reason for hospital admission, comorbidity, cause and origin of CA, continuous monitoring, time of arrival of the medical emergency team and time of delivery of the first defibrillation shock (DC. Results. Most patients (61% had cardiac etiology. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC was achieved in 58% of patients. ROSC was more frequently achieved in younger patients (57.69±11.37, (p<0.05, non-surgical patients (76.1%, (p<0.01 and in patients who were in continuous monitoring (66.7% (p<0.05. The outcome of CPR was significantly better in patients who received advanced life support (ALS (76.6% (p<0.01. Time until the delivery of the first DC shock was significantly shorter in patients who achieved ROSC (1.67±1.13 min, (p<0.01. A total of 5% of IHCA patients survived to hospital discharge. Conclusion. In our study, the outcome of CPR was better in patients who were younger and with non-surgical diseases, which are prognostic factors that we cannot control. Factors associated with better outcome of IHCA patients were: continuous monitoring, shorter time until the delivery of the first DC and ALS. This means that better education of medical staff, better organization and up-to-dated technical equipment are needed.

  4. Sex differences in the prehospital management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Bryn E; Umarov, Temur

    2016-08-01

    Sex differences exist in the diagnosis and treatment of several cardiovascular diseases. Our objective was to determine whether sex differences exist in the use of guideline-recommended treatments in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We included adult patients with non-traumatic OHCA treated by emergency medical services (EMS) in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Prehospital Resuscitation using an IMpedance valve and Early versus Delayed (ROC PRIMED) database during 2007-2009. Outcomes included prehospital treatment intervals, procedures, and medications. Data were analysed using multivariable linear and logistic regression models that adjusted for sex, age, witnessed arrest, public location, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and first known rhythm of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation. We studied 15,584 patients; 64% were male and median age was 68 years (interquartile range 55-80). In multivariable analyses, intervals from EMS dispatch to first rhythm capture (p=0.001) and first EMS CPR (p=0.001) were longer in women than in men. Women were less likely to receive successful intravenous or intraosseous access (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.71-0.86) but equally likely to receive a successful advanced airway (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.86-1.02). Women were less likely to receive adrenaline (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.74-0.88), atropine (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.80-0.92), and lidocaine or amiodarone (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.61-0.75). Women were less likely than men to receive guideline-recommended treatments for OHCA. The reasons for these differences require further exploration, and EMS provider education and training should specifically address these sex differences in the treatment of OHCA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lithium toxicity precipitated by thyrotoxicosis due to silent thyroiditis: cardiac arrest, quadriplegia, and coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoshinori; Taki, Katsumi; Honda, Yuki; Takahashi, Shoichiro; Yoshimura, Ashio

    2013-06-01

    Lithium is widely used to treat bipolar disorders. Lithium toxicity is generally caused by inappropriately high doses of lithium or impaired lithium excretion. Most lithium is eliminated via the kidneys and, since thyroid hormone increases tubular reabsorption of lithium, thyrotoxicosis could contribute to the development of lithium toxicity. We report a case of severe lithium toxicity that was apparently precipitated by the onset of thyrotoxicosis resulting from silent thyroiditis and dehydration. The patient was a 64-year-old woman who was admitted for muscle weakness in the lower extremities, diarrhea, and palpitations. She had bipolar disorder and was being treated with lithium carbonate, which she discontinued one week before admission. Her circulating lithium levels had been monitored yearly. Early in her admission she was dehydrated and had febrile episodes, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and muscle weakness. Initially, fluid therapy was started, but she lost consciousness and had a cardiac arrest for 2 minutes due to prolonged sinus arrest. Chest compression and manual artificial ventilation were performed, and body surface pacing was started. Serum lithium was markedly elevated to 3.81 mEq/L (therapeutic range, 0.4-1.0 mEq/L), and thyroid hormone levels were increased (free triiodothyronine, 8.12 pg/mL; free thyroxine, 4.45 ng/dL), while thyrotropin (TSH) was suppressed (quadriplegia and deep coma. She gradually recovered. On day 36, she was discharged without any neurological symptoms or thyrotoxicosis. A 64-year-old woman taking lithium for bipolar disorder developed lithium toxicity in the setting of what seemed likely to be a recent onset of thyrotoxicosis due to silent thyroiditis. Thyrotoxicosis may be a contributing cause of lithium toxicity, particularly if it is abrupt in onset and even with cessation of lithium therapy if renal function is compromised. Thyroid function should be assessed immediately in patients with suspected lithium

  6. Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: just a matter of defibrillators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Gasparetto, Nicola; Stella, Federica; Bortoluzzi, Andrea; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Basso, Cristina

    2014-08-01

    Out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a leading cause of death all over the world. Although the outcome of OHCA resulting from 'nonshockable' rhythms (asystole and pulseless electrical activity) is poor regardless of resuscitation efforts, 'shockable' rhythms such as ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation may carry a good prognosis if early defibrillation is performed. At present, simplified cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques (hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and automated external defibrillators (AEDs) offer lay people the possibility to provide lifesaving treatment to OHCA victims in the critical minutes before the arrival of the emergency medical system. Programs aimed at increasing provision of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of AEDs by lay people have been set up in different countries, including Italy, and have contributed to improve survival rates. However, success of these programs critically depends on appropriate planning and design, and on cultural predisposition of witnesses to undertake immediate measures of resuscitation in the case of OHCA. Placement of a large number of AEDs may carry high costs and little benefits if it is uncoordinated and not preceded by educational campaigns to spread widely the 'culture of resuscitation' in the population.

  7. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F.; Calle, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and goal of study: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with

  8. GLP-1 analogues for neuroprotection after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    one-to-one fashion to a 6-hour and 15-minute infusion of either Exenatide or placebo. Patients are eligible for inclusion if resuscitated from cardiac arrest with randomization from 20 minutes to 240 minutes after return of spontaneous circulation. The co-primary endpoint is feasibility, defined......Background: Attenuating the neurological damage occurring after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is an ongoing research effort. This dual-centre study investigates the neuroprotective effects of the glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogue Exenatide administered within 4 hours from the return of spontaneous...... circulation to comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design: This pilot study will randomize a total of 120 unconscious patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest undergoing targeted temperature management in a blinded...

  9. Influence of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest on hospital mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Greetje; Brinkman, Sylvia; Bisschops, Laurens L. A.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; de Lange, Dylan W.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Following two randomized controlled trials that demonstrated reduced mortality and better neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients, mild therapeutic hypothermia was implemented in many intensive care units. Up to now, no large observational studies have confirmed the beneficial

  10. Transfusion Associated Hyperkalemia and Cardiac Arrest in an Infant after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Wan Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest associated with hyperkalemia during red blood cell transfusion is a rare but fatal complication. Herein, we report a case of transfusion-associated cardiac arrest following the initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in a 9-month old infant. Her serum potassium level was increased to 9.0 mEq/L, soon after the newly primed circuit with pre-stored red blood cell (RBC was started and followed by sudden cardiac arrest. Eventually, circulation was restored and the potassium level decreased to 5.1 mEq/L after 5 min. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO priming is a relatively massive transfusion into a pediatric patient. Thus, to prevent cardiac arrest during blood-primed ECMO in neonates and infants, freshly irradiated and washed RBCs should be used when priming the ECMO circuit, to minimize the potassium concentration. Also, physicians should be aware of all possible complications associated with transfusions during ECMO.

  11. Indicators of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage as a Cause of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Zachariah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH may present with cardiac arrest (SAH-CA. We report a case of SAH-CA to assist providers in distinguishing SAH as an etiology of cardiac arrest despite electrocardiogram findings that may be suggestive of a cardiac etiology. SAH-CA is associated with high rates of return of spontaneous circulation, but overall poor outcome. An initially non-shockable cardiac rhythm and the absence of brain stem reflexes are important clues in indentifying SAH-CA.

  12. Postoperative Cardiac Arrest after Heart Surgery: Does Extracorporeal Perfusion Support a Paradigm Change in Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gologorsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early institution of extracorporeal perfusion support (ECPS may improve survival after cardiac arrest. Two patients sustained unexpected cardiac arrest in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU following cardiac interventions. ECPS was initiated due to failure to restore hemodynamics after prolonged (over 60 minutes advanced cardiac life support (ACLS protocol-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Despite relatively late institution of ECPS, both patients survived with preserved neurological function. This communication focuses on the utility of ECPS in the ICU as a part of resuscitative efforts.

  13. Cardiac Arrest After Status Epilepticus: Bupropion and Ecstasy Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zübeyde Tuba Duran

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bupropion is a monocyclic antidepressant that has been known to cause seizures in high therapeutic doses or acute high doses. Bupropion is a selective norepinephrine, dopamine and minimally serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Overdose of bupropion may lead to recurrent seizures, hypoxia and death. It is important to be aware in terms of bradycardia-asystole as a significant consequence of seizure and hypoxia. Patients using high dose of bupropion should be closely monitored in terms of cardiological and neurological. In this study, we presented a 19 year-old female patient who did not have previous history of epilepsy but who used oral bupropion to reduce nicotine addiction. A status epilepticus and cardiac arrest developed in a case receiving 1,8 g bupropion for suicide. 3.4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA and benzodiazepine were detected in urine sample. We did not find any cases in the literature related to MDMA and bupropion overdose. Therefore, we presented this rare case.

  14. Early prognostication markers in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetkova, M; Koenig, M A; Jia, X

    2016-03-01

    Established prognostication markers, such as clinical findings, electroencephalography (EEG) and biochemical markers, used by clinicians to predict neurological outcome after cardiac arrest (CA) are altered under therapeutic hypothermia (TH) conditions and their validity remains uncertain. MEDLINE and Embase were searched for evidence on the current standards for neurological outcome prediction for out-of-hospital CA patients treated with TH and the validity of a wide range of prognostication markers. Relevant studies that suggested one or several established biomarkers and multimodal approaches for prognostication are included and reviewed. Whilst the prognostic accuracy of various tests after TH has been questioned, pupillary light reflexes and somatosensory evoked potentials are still strongly associated with negative outcome for early prognostication. Increasingly, EEG background activity has also been identified as a valid predictor for outcome after 72 h after CA and a preferred prognostic method in clinical settings. Neuroimaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, can identify functional and structural brain injury but are not readily available at the patient's bedside because of limited availability and high costs. A multimodal algorithm composed of neurological examination, EEG-based quantitative testing and somatosensory evoked potentials, in conjunction with newer magnetic resonance imaging sequences, if available, holds promise for accurate prognostication in CA patients treated with TH. In order to avoid premature withdrawal of care, prognostication should be performed more than 72 h after CA. © 2015 EAN.

  15. Adrenaline in cardiac arrest: Prefilled syringes are faster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Claire; Gillett, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Standard ampoules and prefilled syringes of adrenaline are widely available in Australasian EDs for use in cardiac arrest. We hypothesise that prefilled syringes can be administered more rapidly and accurately when compared with the two available standard ampoules. This is a triple arm superiority study comparing the time to i.v. administration and accuracy of dosing of three currently available preparations of adrenaline. In their standard packaging, prefilled syringes were on average more than 12 s faster to administer than the 1 mL 1:1000 ampoules and more than 16 s faster than the 10 mL 1:10,000 ampoules (P adrenaline utilising a Minijet (CSL Limited, Parkville, Victoria, Australia) is faster than using adrenaline in glass ampoules presented in their plastic packaging. Removing the plastic packaging from the 1 mL (1 mg) ampoule might result in more rapid administration similar to the Minijet. Resuscitation personnel requiring rapid access to adrenaline should consider storing it as either Minijets or ampoules devoid of packaging. These results might be extrapolatable to other clinical scenarios, including pre-hospital and anaesthesia, where other drugs are required for rapid use. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  16. Cardiac Arrest in Patients Managed for Convulsive Status Epilepticus: Characteristics, Predictors, and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legriel, Stephane; Bresson, Edouard; Deye, Nicolas; Grimaldi, David; Sauneuf, Bertrand; Lesieur, Olivier; Lascarrou, Jean-Baptiste; Argaud, Laurent; Chelly, Jonathan; Beuret, Pascal; Schnell, David; Chateauneuf, Anne-Laure; Holleville, Mathilde; Perier, François; Lemiale, Virginie; Bruel, Cedric; Cronier, Pierrick; Pichon, Nicolas; Mongardon, Nicolas; de-Prost, Nicolas; Dumas, Florence; Cariou, Alain

    2018-05-08

    Cardiac arrest is a catastrophic event that may arise during the management of convulsive status epilepticus. We aimed to report the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and early predictors of convulsive status epilepticus-related cardiac arrest. Retrospective multicenter study. Seventeen university or university affiliated participating ICUs in France and Belgium. Consecutive patients admitted to the participating ICUs for management of successfully resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest complicating the initial management of convulsive status epilepticus between 2000 and 2015. Patients were compared with controls without cardiac arrest identified in a single-center registry of convulsive status epilepticus patients, regarding characteristics, management, and outcome. None. We included 49 cases with convulsive status epilepticus-cardiac arrest and 235 controls. In the cases, median time from medical team arrival to cardiac arrest was 25 minutes (interquartile range, 5-85 min). First recorded rhythm was asystole in 25 patients (51%) and pulseless electrical activity in 13 patients (27%). A significantly larger proportion of patients had a favorable 1-year outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 5) among controls (90/235; 38%) than among cases (10/49; 21%; p = 0.02). By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of cardiac arrest were pulse oximetry less than 97% on scene (odds ratio, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.03-7.26; p = 0.04), drug poisoning as the cause of convulsive status epilepticus (odds ratio, 4.13; 95% CI, 1.27-13.53; p = 0.02), and complications during early management (odds ratio, 11.98; 95% CI, 4.67-34.69; p status epilepticus, relative hypoxemia, on-scene management complications, and drug poisoning as the cause of convulsive status epilepticus were strong early predictors of cardiac arrest, suggesting areas for improvement.

  17. Communication between members of the cardiac arrest team--a postal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, J; Turner, B; Gabbott, D A

    2001-05-01

    Effective communication enhances team building and is perceived to improve the quality of team performance. A recent publication from the Resuscitation Council (UK) has highlighted this fact and recommended that cardiac arrest team members make contact daily. We wished to identify how often members of this team communicate prior to a cardiopulmonary arrest. A questionnaire on cardiac arrest team composition, leadership, communication and debriefing was distributed nationally to Resuscitation Training Officers (RTOs) and their responses analysed. One hundred and thirty (55%) RTOs replied. Physicians and anaesthetists were the most prominent members of the team. The Medical Senior House Officer is usually nominated as the team leader. Eighty-seven centres (67%) have no communication between team members prior to attending a cardiopulmonary arrest. In 33%, communication occurs but is either informal or fortuitous. The RTOs felt that communication is important to enhance team dynamics and optimise task allocation. Only 7% achieve a formal debrief following a cardiac arrest. Communication between members of the cardiac arrest team before and after a cardiac arrest is poor. Training and development of these skills may improve performance and should be prioritised. Team leadership does not necessarily reflect experience or training.

  18. Survival in patients without acute ST elevation after cardiac arrest and association with early coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankiewicz, J; Nielsen, N; Annborn, M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether early coronary angiography (CAG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of a presumed cardiac cause is associated with improved outcomes in patients without acute ST elevation. METHODS: The target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTM) trial...... showed no difference in all-cause mortality or neurological outcome between an intervention of 33 and 36 °C. In this post hoc analysis, 544 patients where the admission electrocardiogram did not show acute ST elevation were included. Early CAG was defined as being performed on admission or within...... early CAG was not significantly associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS: In this post hoc observational study of a large randomized trial, early coronary angiography for patients without acute ST elevation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of a presumed cardiac cause was not associated with improved...

  19. Concomitant atrial fibrillation surgery for people undergoing cardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Mark D; Karmali, Kunal N; Berendsen, Mark A; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Kruse, Jane; McCarthy, Patrick M; Malaisrie, S C

    2016-01-01

    Background People with atrial fibrillation (AF) often undergo cardiac surgery for other underlying reasons and are frequently offered concomitant AF surgery to reduce the frequency of short- and long-term AF and improve short- and long-term outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of concomitant AF surgery among people with AF who are undergoing cardiac surgery on short-term and long-term (12 months or greater) health-related outcomes, health-related quality of life, and costs. Search methods Starting from the year when the first “maze” AF surgery was reported (1987), we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library (March 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (March 2016), Embase Ovid (March 2016), Web of Science (March 2016), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE, April 2015), and Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA, March 2016). We searched trial registers in April 2016. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of any concomitant AF surgery compared with no AF surgery among adults with preoperative AF, regardless of symptoms, who were undergoing cardiac surgery for another indication. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected studies and extracted data. We evaluated the risk of bias using the Cochrane ‘Risk of bias’ tool. We included outcome data on all-cause and cardiovascular-specific mortality, freedom from atrial fibrillation, flutter, or tachycardia off antiarrhythmic medications, as measured by patient electrocardiographic monitoring greater than three months after the procedure, procedural safety, 30-day rehospitalisation, need for post-discharge direct current cardioversion, health-related quality of life, and direct costs. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using a fixed-effect model when heterogeneity was low (I2 ≤ 50%) and random

  20. Patient-centric Blood Pressure–targeted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improves Survival from Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Stuart H.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Lampe, Joshua W.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. Objectives: To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods: After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure–targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. Measurements and Main Results: The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9–13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0–12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0–3] vs. 2 [range, 2–2]; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Blood pressure–targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest. PMID:25321490

  1. Patient-centric blood pressure-targeted cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves survival from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M; Friess, Stuart H; Naim, Maryam Y; Lampe, Joshua W; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A

    2014-12-01

    Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure-targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9-13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0-12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0-3] vs. 2 [range, 2-2]; P = 0.003). Blood pressure-targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest.

  2. Cardiac arrest caused by sibutramine obtained over the Internet: a case of a young woman without pre-existing cardiovascular disease successfully resuscitated using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunya, Naofumi; Sawamoto, Keigo; Uemura, Shuji; Kyan, Ryoko; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Junichi; Kouzu, Hidemichi; Kokubu, Nobuaki; Miura, Tetsuji; Narimatsu, Eichi

    2017-07-01

    Sibutramine is a weight loss agent that was withdrawn from the market in the USA and European Union because it increases adverse events in patients with cardiovascular diseases. However, non-prescription weight loss pills containing sibutramine can be still easily purchased over the Internet. A 21-year-old woman without history of cardiovascular diseases developed cardiac arrest. She was a user of a weight loss pills, containing sibutramine and hypokalemia-inducing agents, imported from Thailand over the Internet. She was successfully resuscitated without any neurological deficits by using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for refractory ventricular fibrillation. This case indicates that sibutramine can cause cardiac arrest even in subjects without pre-existing cardiovascular disease when combined with agents that promote QT prolongation.

  3. [Survival of out-hospital cardiac arrests attended by a mobile intensive care unit in Asturias (Spain) in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Llaca, F; Suárez-Gil, P; Viña-Soria, L; García-Castro, A; Castro-Delgado, R; Fente Álvarez, A I; Álvarez-Ramos, M B

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate attendance timings, out- and in-hospital characteristics, and survival of cardiac arrests attended by an advanced life support unit in Asturias (Spain) in 2010. Factors related to survival upon admission and at discharge were also analyzed. A retrospective, observational trial was carried out involving a cohort of out-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) occurring between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2010, with one year of follow-up from OHCA. Health Care Area IV of the Principality of Asturias, with a population of 342,020 in 2010. All patients with OHCA and attended by an advanced life support unit were considered. Demographic data, the etiology of cardiac arrest, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), attendance timings and survival upon admission, at discharge and after one year. A total of 177 OHCA were included. Of these, 120 underwent CPR by the advanced life support team. Sixty-six of these cases (55%) were caused by presumed heart disease. A total of 63 patients (52.5%) recovered spontaneous circulation, and 51 (42.5%) maintained circulation upon admission to hospital. Thirteen patients (10.8%) were discharged alive. After one year, 11 patients were still alive (9.2%) - 9 of them (7.5%) with a Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score of 1. Ventricular fibrillation and short attendance timings were related to increased survival. The survival rate upon admission was better than in other series and similar at discharge. Initial rhythm and attendance timings were related. Public automated external defibrillators (AED) were not used, and bystander CPR was infrequent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased platelet mitochondrial respiration after cardiac arrest and resuscitation as a potential peripheral biosignature of cerebral bioenergetic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Michael A; Sutton, Robert M; Karlsson, Michael; Sjövall, Fredrik; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A; Margulies, Susan S; Kilbaugh, Todd J

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) results in a sepsis-like syndrome with activation of the innate immune system and increased mitochondrial bioenergetics. To determine if platelet mitochondrial respiration increases following CA in a porcine pediatric model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF) CA, and if this readily obtained biomarker is associated with decreased brain mitochondrial respiration. CA protocol: 7 min of asphyxia, followed by VF, protocolized titration of compression depth to systolic blood pressure of 90 mmHg and vasopressor administration to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mmHg. platelet integrated mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) function evaluated pre- and post-CA/ROSC four hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Secondary outcome: correlation of platelet mitochondrial bioenergetics to cerebral bioenergetic function. Platelet maximal oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOSCI+CII), P respiration through Complex II (OXPHOSCII, P respiration was not due to uncoupling, as the LEAKCI + CII respiration (mitochondrial respiration independent of ATP-production) was unchanged after CA/ROSC. Larger increases in platelet mitochondrial respiratory control ratio (RCR) compared to pre-CA RCR were significantly correlated with lower RCRs in the cortex (P respiration. Platelet mitochondrial respiration is significantly increased four hours after ROSC. Future studies will identify mechanistic relationships between this serum biomarker and altered cerebral bioenergetics function following cardiac arrest.

  5. Mitral valve prolapse and sudden cardiac arrest in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kumar; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Teodorescu, Carmen; Reinier, Kyndaron; Nichols, Gregory A; Gunson, Karen; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S

    2016-02-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is relatively common in the general population with recently reported prevalence of 1% and familial clustering (Framingham Heart Study). However, its association with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to characterize the frequency and clinical profile of patients with MVP who suffer SCA in the community. Patients with SCA cases were prospectively identified in the population-based Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study (population ~1 million). The presence of MVP was identified from echocardiograms recorded prior but unrelated to the SCA event. The detailed clinical profile of patients with SCA and MVP was compared with that of SCA patients without MVP to identify potential differences. A total of 729 SCA patients were evaluated over a 12-year period (mean age 69.5 ± 14.8 years; 64.6% men). MVP was observed in 17 (2.3%) prior to the SCA event (95% confidence interval 1.2%-3.4%). Mitral regurgitation was present in 14 SCA patients with MVP (82.3%) and was moderate or severe in 10 (58.8%). Compared with SCA patients without MVP, SCA patients with MVP were younger (mean age 60.9 ± 16.4 years vs 69.7 ± 14.7 years; P = .02), with fewer risk factors (diabetes 5.9% vs 46.4%; P = .001; hypertension 41.2% vs 78.9%; P = .001) or known coronary disease (29.4% vs 65.6%; P MVP was observed in a small proportion (2.3%) of SCA patients in the general population, suggesting a low risk overall. Since SCA patients with MVP were characterized by younger age and relatively low cardiovascular comorbidity, a focus on imaging for valve structure/insufficiency as well as genetics could aid future risk stratification approaches. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Contemporary approach to neurologic prognostication of coma after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hamouda, Nawfel; Taccone, Fabio S; Rossetti, Andrea O; Oddo, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Coma after cardiac arrest (CA) is an important cause of admission to the ICU. Prognosis of post-CA coma has significantly improved over the past decade, particularly because of aggressive postresuscitation care and the use of therapeutic targeted temperature management (TTM). TTM and sedatives used to maintain controlled cooling might delay neurologic reflexes and reduce the accuracy of clinical examination. In the early ICU phase, patients' good recovery may often be indistinguishable (based on neurologic examination alone) from patients who eventually will have a poor prognosis. Prognostication of post-CA coma, therefore, has evolved toward a multimodal approach that combines neurologic examination with EEG and evoked potentials. Blood biomarkers (eg, neuron-specific enolase [NSE] and soluble 100-β protein) are useful complements for coma prognostication; however, results vary among commercial laboratory assays, and applying one single cutoff level (eg, > 33 μg/L for NSE) for poor prognostication is not recommended. Neuroimaging, mainly diffusion MRI, is emerging as a promising tool for prognostication, but its precise role needs further study before it can be widely used. This multimodal approach might reduce false-positive rates of poor prognosis, thereby providing optimal prognostication of comatose CA survivors. The aim of this review is to summarize studies and the principal tools presently available for outcome prediction and to describe a practical approach to the multimodal prognostication of coma after CA, with a particular focus on neuromonitoring tools. We also propose an algorithm for the optimal use of such multimodal tools during the early ICU phase of post-CA coma.

  7. Young man presenting with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hans David; Lombardi, William L; Steinberg, Zachary Louis

    2018-06-22

    A man in his early 30s with remote history of a febrile rash as a toddler presented to the emergency room following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest while riding his bicycle. He received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and one shock from an automatic external defibrillator, successfully restoring sinus rhythm. On arrival, he was haemodynamically stable without ECG evidence of ST segment changes to suggest active ischaemia, and an initial troponin I was mildly elevated at 0.10 ng/mL (normal <0.04 ng/mL). A CT angiogram (CTA) was obtained showing a normal-appearing aorta and no abnormal extracardiac findings. Urgent coronary angiography was performed; images are shown in figure 1A-C. Echocardiogram revealed a mildly reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (45%) with a hypokinetic inferior wall.heartjnl;heartjnl-2018-312966v1/F1F1F1Figure 1(A) Right coronary artery angiogram in the left anterior oblique cranial projection. (B) Left coronary artery angiogram in the right anterior oblique caudal projection. (C) Left coronary artery angiogram in the right anterior oblique cranial projection. CAUD, caudal; CRAN, cranial; LAO, left anterior oblique; RAO, right anterior oblique. What is the next best step in the management of this patient at this time?Complete revascularisation via percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Referral for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG).Initiation of high-dose steroids.Initiation of dual-antiplatelet therapy without planned revascularisation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Optimizing Neurologically Intact Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Call to Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Goodloe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. national out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest survival rates, although improving recently, have remained suboptimal despite the collective efforts of individuals, communities, and professional societies. Only until very recently, and still with inconsistency, has focus been placed specifically on survival with pre-arrest neurologic function. The reality of current approaches to sudden cardiac arrest is that they are often lacking an integrative, multi-disciplinary approach, and without deserved funding and outcome analysis. In this manuscript, a multidisciplinary group of authors propose practice, process, technology, and policy initiatives to improve cardiac arrest survival with a focus on neurologic function. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  9. Association between prehospital physician involvement and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Annika; Steinmetz, Jacob; Wissenberg, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an important public health problem. While several interventions are known to improve survival, the impact of physician-delivered advanced cardiac life support for OHCA is unclear. We aimed to assess the association between prehospital physician...

  10. Optimizing survival outcomes for adult patients with nontraumatic cardiac arrest [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna; Zaurova, Milana

    2016-10-22

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  11. Cardiac arrest while exercising on mountains in national or provincial parks: A national observational study from 2012 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eujene; Park, Jeong Ho; Kong, So Yeon; Hong, Ki Jeong; Ro, Young Sun; Song, Kyoung Jun; Ryu, Hyun Ho; Shin, Sang Do

    2017-12-20

    Previous studies on cardiac arrest in mountainous areas were focused on environmental features such as altitude and temperature. However, those are limited to factors affecting the prognosis of patients after cardiac arrest. We analyzed the cardiac arrests in national or provincial parks located in the mountains and determined the factors affecting the prognosis of patients after cardiac arrest. This study included all emergency medical service (EMS) treated patients over the age of 40 experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) of presumed cardiac etiology during exercise, between January 2012 and December 2015. The main focus of interest was the location of cardiac arrest occurrence (national mountain parks and provincial parks vs. other sites). The main outcome was survival to discharge and multivariable logistic regression was performed to adjust for possible confounding effects. A total 1835 patients who suffered a cardiac arrest while exercising were included. From these, 68 patients experienced cardiac arrest in national or provincial parks, and 1767 occurred in other locations. The unadjusted and adjusted ORs (95% CI) for a good cerebral performance scale (CPC) were 0.09 (0.01-0.63) and 0.08(0.01-0.56), survival discharges were 0.13(0.03-0.53) and 0.11 (0.03-0.48). Cardiac arrests occurring while exercising in the mountainous areas have worse prognosis compared to alternative locations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Association of Ambient Fine Particles With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Robert A.; Ito, Kazuhiko; Freese, John; Kaufman, Brad J.; De Claro, Danilynn; Braun, James; Prezant, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity has been associated with particulate matter (PM) air pollution, although the relation between pollutants and sudden death from cardiac arrest has not been established. This study examined associations between out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and fine PM (of aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm, or PM2.5), ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide in New York City. The authors analyzed 8,216 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of primary cardiac etiology during the years 2002–2006. Time-series and case-crossover analyses were conducted, controlling for season, day-of-week, same-day, and delayed/apparent temperature. An increased risk of cardiac arrest in time-series (relative risk (RR) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.10) and case-crossover (RR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.08) analysis for a PM2.5 increase of 10 μg/m3 in the average of 0- and 1-day lags was found. The association was significant in the warm season (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.15) but not the cold season (RR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.07). Associations of cardiac arrest with other pollutants were weaker. These findings, consistent with studies implicating acute cardiovascular effects of PM, support a link between PM2.5 and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Since few individuals survive an arrest, air pollution control may help prevent future cardiovascular mortality. PMID:20729350

  13. Cardiac Arrest following a Myocardial Infarction in a Child Treated with Methylphenidate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Kim; Gormsen, Lise Kirstine; Kim, Won Yong

    2015-01-01

    -years, did not report any cases of myocardial infarction in current users of methylphenidate, and the risk of serious adverse cardiac events was not found to be increased. We present a case with an 11-year-old child, treated with methylphenidate, who suffered cardiac arrest and was diagnosed with a remote...... myocardial infarction. This demonstrates that myocardial infarction can happen due to methylphenidate exposure in a cardiac healthy child, without cardiovascular risk factors....

  14. Temporal Trends in Coverage of Historical Cardiac Arrests Using a Volunteer-Based Network of Automated External Defibrillators Accessible to Laypersons and Emergency Dispatch Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carolina Malta; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Wissenberg, Mads

    2014-01-01

    public cardiac arrest coverage in high- and low-risk areas. METHODS AND RESULTS: All public cardiac arrests (1994-2011) and all registered AEDs (2007-2011) in Copenhagen, Denmark, were identified and geocoded. AED coverage of cardiac arrests was defined as historical arrests ≤100 m from an AED. High...

  15. Temporal variation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in an equatorial climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marcus Eh; Ng, Faith Sp; Yap, Susan; Yong, Kok Leong; Peberdy, Mary A; Ornato, Joseph P

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether there is a seasonal variation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in an equatorial climate, which does not experience seasonal environmental change. We conducted an observational prospective study looking at the occurrence of OHCA in Singapore. Included were all patients with OHCA presented to Emergency Departments across the country. We examined the monthly, daily, and hourly number of cases over a three-year period. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). From October, 1st 2001 to October, 14th 2004, 2428 patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age for cardiac arrests was 60.6 years with 68.0% male. Ethnic distribution was 69.5% Chinese, 15.0% Malay, 11.0% Indian, and 4.4% Others. There was no significant seasonal variation (spring/summer/fall/winter) of events (ANOVA P = 0.71), monthly variation (P = 0.88) or yearly variation (P = 0.26). We did find weekly peaks on Mondays and a circadian pattern with daily peaks from 9-10 am. We did not find any discernable seasonal pattern of cardiac arrests. This contrasts with findings from temperate countries and suggests a climatic influence on cardiac arrest occurrence. We also found that sudden cardiac arrests follow a circadian pattern.

  16. Electroencephalography (EEG) for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest and targeted temperature management; rationale and study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhall, Erik; Rosén, Ingmar; Rossetti, Andrea O; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Cronberg, Tobias

    2014-08-16

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is widely used to assess neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after cardiac arrest, but its value is limited by varying definitions of pathological patterns and by inter-rater variability. The American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) has recently proposed a standardized EEG-terminology for critical care to address these limitations. In the TTM-trial, 399 post cardiac arrest patients who remained comatose after rewarming underwent a routine EEG. The presence of clinical seizures, use of sedatives and antiepileptic drugs during the EEG-registration were prospectively documented. A well-defined terminology for interpreting post cardiac arrest EEGs is critical for the use of EEG as a prognostic tool. The TTM-trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01020916).

  17. Cardiac Arrest Secondary to Lightning Strike: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotariu, Elena L; Manole, Mioara D

    2017-08-01

    Lightning strike injuries, although less common than electrical injuries, have a higher morbidity rate because of critical alterations of the circulatory system, respiratory system, and central nervous system. Most lightning-related deaths occur immediately after injury because of arrhythmia or respiratory failure. We describe the case of a pediatric patient who experienced cardiorespiratory arrest secondary to a lightning strike, where the Advanced Cardiac Life Support and Basic Life Support chain of survival was well executed, leading to return of spontaneous circulation and intact neurological survival. We review the pathophysiology of lightning injuries, prognostic factors of favorable outcome after cardiac arrest, including bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, shockable rhythm, and automatic external defibrillator use, and the importance of temperature management after cardiac arrest.

  18. Sudden Cardiac Arrest due to Brugada Syndrome: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Soleimanirad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brugada Syndrome is a rare cause of sudden cardiac arrest and has a unique ECG pattern. In fact, with ST-segment elevation down sloping in the right precordial leads (v1-v3, RBBB pattern in lateral leads and J-point elevation is revealed. We must notice and avoid trigger factors of this syndrome during general anesthesia. Patient is a 39 old man who attended to emergency department with sudden cardiac arrest and resuscitate. He was transferred to ICU for management of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Complementary studies concluded the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome. We must consider Brugada syndrome within patients with family history of sudden cardiac arrest. Moreover, we must avoid trigger factors of this syndrome such as fever, bradicardia and electrolyte abnormality (specialy Na, Ca abnormalities during general anesthesia and if they appear, we should treat them.

  19. [Consideration of early rehabilitation in the treatment of post-cardiac arrest syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masaki; Ogasawara, Sadanobu; Kadowaki, Aya; Onizuka, Shouzaburou; Samejima, Mituhiro

    2011-04-01

    Resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest is an unnatural pathophysiological state. In 2008, ILCOR has proposed "post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS)". Clinicians must focus on treating to reverse the pathophysiological manifestations of PCAS in bed. Immobility, deconditioning, and weakness are common problems in patients with critical illness. Therapeutic strategies have to be identified to give patients after ROSC the best chance for survival with good neurological function. Concerning the beneficial effects of early mobilization after stroke, and the efficacy of a strategy for whole-body rehabilitation in the earliest days of critical illness on functional outcomes, the intervention of early rehabilitation care by an interdisciplinary team seems to contribute to good long-time outcome of post-cardiac arrest patients.

  20. Infectious complications after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest-A comparison between two target temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankiewicz, Josef; Nielsen, Niklas; Linder, Adam

    2017-01-01

    -to-treat population. Five-hundred patients (53%) developed pneumonia, severe sepsis or septic shock which was associated with mortality in multivariate analysis (Hazard ratio [HR] 1.39; 95%CI 1.13-1.70; p=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of infectious complications between......BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that target temperature management (TTM) increases the probability of infectious complications after cardiac arrest. We aimed to compare the incidence of pneumonia, severe sepsis and septic shock after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in patients with two...... complications were recorded daily during the ICU-stay. Pneumonia, severe sepsis and septic shock were considered infectious complications. Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive-protein (CRP) levels were measured at 24h, 48h and 72h after cardiac arrest. RESULTS: There were 939 patients in the modified intention...

  1. The experiences of male sudden cardiac arrest survivors and their partners: a gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uren, Alan; Galdas, Paul

    2015-02-01

    To explore how masculinities shape the experiences of men and their partners after survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest report depression, dependence on others for daily functioning, decreased participation in society and significant decreases in quality of life. There is growing evidence that masculine gender identities play a central role in the recovery experiences of men and their families following other major cardiac events. However, to date, there has been no examination of how masculinities shape men's experiences of recovery following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Interview study guided by an interpretive description approach. Data were subjected to thematic analysis. A purposive sample of seven male sudden cardiac arrest survivors and 6 female partners was recruited in 2010 from a secondary care centre in British Columbia, Canada. Three themes were prominent in the experiences of the participants: (1) Support and self-reliance; (2) Dealing with emotional (in) vulnerability; and (3) No longer a 'He-man'. Masculinities played a role in men's experiences of recovery and adaptation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Hegemonic masculinity partly explained men's experiences, notably their reluctance to seek professional support and reactions to changes in lifestyle. However, the study also suggests that the popular stereotype of men being 'strong and silent' in the face of ill-health may only be a part of a more complex story. Nurses would benefit from taking into consideration the potential influence of male gender identities on men's recovery postcardiac arrest. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Survivors of cardiac arrest with good neurological outcome show considerable impairments of memory functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzgruber, Patrick; Kliegel, Andreas; Wandaller, Cosima; Uray, Thomas; Losert, Heidrun; Laggner, Anton N; Sterz, Fritz; Kliegel, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Deficits in cognitive function are a well-known dysfunction in survivors of cardiac arrest. However, data concerning memory function in this neurological vulnerable patient collective remain scarce and inconclusive. Therefore, we aimed to assess multiple aspects of retrospective and prospective memory performance in patients after cardiac arrest. We prospectively enrolled 33 survivors of cardiac arrest, with cerebral performance categories (CPC) 1 and 2 and a control-group (n=33) matched in sex, age and educational-level. To assess retrospective and prospective memory performance we administrated 4 weeks after cardiac arrest the "Rey Adult Learning Test" (RAVLT), the "Digit-Span-Backwards Test", the "Logic-Memory Test" and the "Red-Pencil Test". Results indicate an impairment in immediate and delayed free recall, but not in recognition. However, the overall impairment in immediate recall was qualified by analyzing RAVLT performance, showing that patients were only impaired in trials 4 and 5 of the learning sequence. Moreover, working and prospective memory as well as prose recall were worse in cardiac arrest survivors. Cranial computed tomography was available in 61% of all patients (n=20) but there was no specific neurological damage detectable that could be linked to this cognitive impairment. Episodic long-term memory functioning appears to be particularly impaired after cardiac arrest. In contrast, short-term memory storage, even tested via free-call, seems not to be affected. Based on cranial computed tomography we suggest that global brain ischemia rather than focal brain lesions appear to underlie these effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Time series analysis as input for clinical predictive modeling: modeling cardiac arrest in a pediatric ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Curtis E; Turley, James P

    2011-10-24

    Thousands of children experience cardiac arrest events every year in pediatric intensive care units. Most of these children die. Cardiac arrest prediction tools are used as part of medical emergency team evaluations to identify patients in standard hospital beds that are at high risk for cardiac arrest. There are no models to predict cardiac arrest in pediatric intensive care units though, where the risk of an arrest is 10 times higher than for standard hospital beds. Current tools are based on a multivariable approach that does not characterize deterioration, which often precedes cardiac arrests. Characterizing deterioration requires a time series approach. The purpose of this study is to propose a method that will allow for time series data to be used in clinical prediction models. Successful implementation of these methods has the potential to bring arrest prediction to the pediatric intensive care environment, possibly allowing for interventions that can save lives and prevent disabilities. We reviewed prediction models from nonclinical domains that employ time series data, and identified the steps that are necessary for building predictive models using time series clinical data. We illustrate the method by applying it to the specific case of building a predictive model for cardiac arrest in a pediatric intensive care unit. Time course analysis studies from genomic analysis provided a modeling template that was compatible with the steps required to develop a model from clinical time series data. The steps include: 1) selecting candidate variables; 2) specifying measurement parameters; 3) defining data format; 4) defining time window duration and resolution; 5) calculating latent variables for candidate variables not directly measured; 6) calculating time series features as latent variables; 7) creating data subsets to measure model performance effects attributable to various classes of candidate variables; 8) reducing the number of candidate features; 9

  4. Prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Michael Mundt; Dixen, Ulrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest. DESIGN: Structured interview of 250 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome and relatives of 48 patients with witnessed cardiac arrest. The following courses of action...... hundred and thirteen patients (45%) knew of thrombolytic therapy. Twenty-seven of 75 patients with knowledge of the benefit of prompt treatment with thrombolysis, acted in accordance with this awareness. CONCLUSION: Patients misinterpret symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and are misguided when calling...

  5. Death and Cardiac Arrest in U.S. Triathlon Participants, 1985 to 2016: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kevin M; Creswell, Lawrence L; Haas, Tammy S; Thomas, Taylor; Tung, Monica; Isaacson, Erin; Garberich, Ross F; Maron, Barry J

    2017-10-17

    Reports of race-related triathlon fatalities have raised questions regarding athlete safety. To describe death and cardiac arrest among triathlon participants. Case series. United States. Participants in U.S. triathlon races from 1985 to 2016. Data on deaths and cardiac arrests were assembled from such sources as the U.S. National Registry of Sudden Death in Athletes (which uses news media, Internet searches, LexisNexis archival databases, and news clipping services) and USA Triathlon (USAT) records. Incidence of death or cardiac arrest in USAT-sanctioned races from 2006 to 2016 was calculated. A total of 135 sudden deaths, resuscitated cardiac arrests, and trauma-related deaths were compiled; mean (±SE) age of victims was 46.7 ± 12.4 years, and 85% were male. Most sudden deaths and cardiac arrests occurred in the swim segment (n = 90); the others occurred during bicycling (n = 7), running (n = 15), and postrace recovery (n = 8). Fifteen trauma-related deaths occurred during the bike segment. Incidence of death or cardiac arrest among USAT participants (n = 4 776 443) was 1.74 per 100 000 (2.40 in men and 0.74 in women per 100 000; P < 0.001). In men, risk increased substantially with age and was much greater for those aged 60 years and older (18.6 per 100 000 participants). Death or cardiac arrest risk was similar for short, intermediate, and long races (1.61 vs. 1.41 vs. 1.92 per 100 000 participants). At autopsy, 27 of 61 decedents (44%) had clinically relevant cardiovascular abnormalities, most frequently atherosclerotic coronary disease or cardiomyopathy. Case identification may be incomplete and may underestimate events, particularly in the early study period. In addition, prerace medical history is unknown in most cases. Deaths and cardiac arrests during the triathlon are not rare; most have occurred in middle-aged and older men. Most sudden deaths in triathletes happened during the swim segment, and clinically silent cardiovascular disease

  6. Epinephrine in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest: Helpful or Harmful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huan; Li, Chun-Sheng

    2017-09-05

    Epinephrine is the primary drug administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to reverse cardiac arrest. The evidence for the use of adrenaline in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and in-hospital resuscitation is inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review on the clinical efficacy of adrenaline in adult OHCA patients to evaluate whether epinephrine provides any overall benefit for patients. The EMBASE and PubMed databases were searched with the key words "epinephrine," "cardiac arrest," and variations of these terms. Data from clinical randomized trials, meta-analyses, guidelines, and recent reviews were selected for review. Sudden cardiac arrest causes 544,000 deaths in China each year, with survival occurring in CPR. There is currently insufficient evidence to support or reject epinephrine administration during resuscitation. We believe that epinephrine may have a role in resuscitation, as administration of epinephrine during CPR increases the probability of restoring cardiac activity with pulses, which is an essential intermediate step toward long-term survival. The administration of adrenaline was associated with improved short-term survival (ROSC). However, it appears that the use of adrenaline is associated with no benefit on survival to hospital discharge or survival with favorable neurological outcome after OHCA, and it may have a harmful effect. Larger placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized control trials are required to definitively establish the effect of epinephrine.

  7. Cardiorespiratory interactions and blood flow generation during cardiac arrest and other states of low blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Gardar; Yannopoulos, Demetris; McKnite, Scott H; Lurie, Keith G

    2003-06-01

    Recent advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation have shed light on the importance of cardiorespiratory interactions during shock and cardiac arrest. This review focuses on recently published studies that evaluate factors that determine preload during chest compression, methods that can augment preload, and the detrimental effects of hyperventilation and interrupting chest compressions. Refilling of the ventricles, so-called ventricular preload, is diminished during cardiovascular collapse and resuscitation from cardiac arrest. In light of the potential detrimental effects and challenges of large-volume fluid resuscitations, other methods have increasing importance. During cardiac arrest, active decompression of the chest and impedance of inspiratory airflow during the recoil of the chest work by increasing negative intrathoracic pressure and, hence, increase refilling of the ventricles and increase cardiac preload, with improvement in survival. Conversely, increased frequency of ventilation has detrimental effects on coronary perfusion pressure and survival rates in cardiac arrest and severe shock. Prolonged interruption of chest compressions for delivering single-rescuer ventilation or analyzing rhythm before shock delivery is associated with decreased survival rate. Cardiorespiratory interactions are of profound importance in states of cardiovascular collapse in which increased negative intrathoracic pressure during decompression of the chest has a favorable effect and increased intrathoracic pressure with ventilation has a detrimental effect on survival rate.

  8. F-MARC: promoting the prevention and management of sudden cardiac arrest in football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Efraim Benjamin; Dvorak, J; Schmied, C; Meyer, T

    2015-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death is the most common cause of unnatural death in football. To prevent and urgently manage sudden cardiac arrest on the football field-of-play, F-MARC (FIFA Medical and Research Centre) has been fully committed to a programme of research, education, standardisation and practical implementation. This strategy has detected football players at medical risk during mandatory precompetition medical assessments. Additionally, FIFA has (1) sponsored internationally accepted guidelines for the interpretation of an athlete's ECG, (2) developed field-of-play-specific protocols for the recognition, response, resuscitation and removal of a football player having sudden cardiac arrest and (3) introduced and distributed the FIFA medical emergency bag which has already resulted in the successful resuscitation of a football player who had a sudden cardiac arrest on the field-of-play. Recently FIFA, in association with the Institute of Sports and Preventive Medicine in Saarbrücken, Germany, established a worldwide Sudden Death Registry with a view to documenting fatal events on the football field-of-play. These activities by F-MARC are testimony to FIFA's continued commitment to minimising sudden cardiac arrest while playing football. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Opium Addiction as a Novel Predictor of Atrial Fibrillation after Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Soleimani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is one of the most frequent complications after cardiac surgery. It occurs in approximately 20% to 35% of patients after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery and in more than 50% of patients after valve surgery (1. AF after cardiac surgery is a major cause of patients’ morbidity and mortality. Moreover, it can prolong hospitalization and increase health care costs in these patients (2.

  10. Patients with cardiac arrest are ventilated two times faster than guidelines recommend : An observational prehospital study using tracheal pressure measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maertens, Vicky L.; De Smedt, Lieven E. G.; Lemoyne, Sabine; Huybrechts, Sofie A. M.; Wouters, Kristien; Kalmar, Alain F.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.

    Aim: To measure ventilation rate using tracheal airway pressures in prehospitally intubated patients with and without cardiac arrest. Methods: Prospective observational study. In 98 patients (57 with and 41 without cardiac arrest) an air-filled catheter was inserted into the endotracheal tube and

  11. Non-invasive measurements of cardiac output in atrial fibrillation: Inert gas rebreathing and impedance cardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To test the effect of interventions, knowledge of cardiac output (CO) is important. However, the irregular heart rate might cause some methods for determination of CO to have inherent weaknesses....

  12. Prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Michael Mundt; Dixen, Ulrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    -four per cent of the patients admitted with cardiac arrest expressed no prior symptoms. Two-thirds of patients with typical symptoms interpreted it as cardiac-still only half took action within 20 min. Fifty per cent of patients who called a physician were delayed by wrong advice or misinterpretation. One...... for medical assistance. Perceiving jeopardy had positive influence on the behaviour. Awareness of therapeutic options influences the decision-making process....

  13. F-MARC: promoting the prevention and management of sudden cardiac arrest in football

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Efraim Benjamin; Dvorak, J; Schmied, C; Meyer, T

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is the most common cause of unnatural death in football. To prevent and urgently manage sudden cardiac arrest on the football field-of-play, F-MARC (FIFA Medical and Research Centre) has been fully committed to a programme of research, education, standardisation and practical implementation. This strategy has detected football players at medical risk during mandatory precompetition medical assessments. Additionally, FIFA has (1) sponsored internationally accepted guidelin...

  14. Therapeutic Hypothermia Reduces Oxidative Damage and Alters Antioxidant Defenses after Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenhaar, Fernanda S.; Medeiros, Tássia M.; Heemann, Fernanda M.; Behling, Camile S.; Putti, Jordana S.; Mahl, Camila D.; Verona, Cleber; da Silva, Ana Carolina A.; Guerra, Maria C.; Gonçalves, Carlos A. S.; Oliveira, Vanessa M.; Riveiro, Diego F. M.; Vieira, Silvia R. R.

    2017-01-01

    After cardiac arrest, organ damage consequent to ischemia-reperfusion has been attributed to oxidative stress. Mild therapeutic hypothermia has been applied to reduce this damage, and it may reduce oxidative damage as well. This study aimed to compare oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses in patients treated with controlled normothermia versus mild therapeutic hypothermia during postcardiac arrest syndrome. The sample consisted of 31 patients under controlled normothermia (36°C) and 11 patients treated with 24 h mild therapeutic hypothermia (33°C), victims of in- or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Parameters were assessed at 6, 12, 36, and 72 h after cardiac arrest in the central venous blood samples. Hypothermic and normothermic patients had similar S100B levels, a biomarker of brain injury. Xanthine oxidase activity is similar between hypothermic and normothermic patients; however, it decreases posthypothermia treatment. Xanthine oxidase activity is positively correlated with lactate and S100B and inversely correlated with pH, calcium, and sodium levels. Hypothermia reduces malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, markers of oxidative damage. Concomitantly, hypothermia increases the activity of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase while decreasing the activity of serum paraoxonase-1. These findings suggest that mild therapeutic hypothermia reduces oxidative damage and alters antioxidant defenses in postcardiac arrest patients. PMID:28553435

  15. Cardiac monitoring for detection of atrial fibrillation after TIA: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korompoki, Eleni; Del Giudice, Angela; Hillmann, Steffi; Malzahn, Uwe; Gladstone, David J; Heuschmann, Peter; Veltkamp, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose The detection rate of atrial fibrillation has not been studied specifically in transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients although extrapolation from ischemic stroke may be inadequate. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the rate of newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation using different methods of ECG monitoring in TIA. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed following a pre-specified protocol the PRISMA statement. Prospective observational studies and randomized controlled trials were considered that included TIA patients who underwent cardiac monitoring for >12 h. Primary outcome was frequency of detection of atrial fibrillation ≥30 s. Analyses of subgroups and of duration and type of monitoring were performed. Results Seventeen studies enrolling 1163 patients were included. The pooled atrial fibrillation detection rate for all methods was 4% (95% CI: 2-7%). Yield of monitoring was higher in selected (higher age, more extensive testing for arrhythmias before enrolment, or presumed cardioembolic/cryptogenic cause) than in unselected cohorts (7% vs 3%). Pooled mean atrial fibrillation detection rates rose with duration of monitoring: 4% (24 h), 5% (24 h to 7 days) and 6% (>7 days), respectively. Yield of non-invasive was significantly lower than that of invasive monitoring (4% vs. 11%). Significant heterogeneity was observed among studies (I 2 =60.61%). Conclusion This first meta-analysis of atrial fibrillation detection in TIA patients finds a lower atrial fibrillation detection rate in TIA than reported for IS and TIA cohorts in previous meta-analyses. Prospective studies are needed to determine actual prevalence of atrial fibrillation and optimal diagnostic procedure for atrial fibrillation detection in TIA.

  16. Prognostic value of serum phosphate level in adult patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Hun; Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Youn, Chun Song; Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Sung Min; Heo, Tag; Min, Yong Il

    2018-07-01

    Several studies have reported increased levels of phosphate after cardiac arrest. Given the relationship between phosphate level and the severity of ischaemic injury reported in previous studies, higher phosphate levels may be associated with worse outcomes. We investigated the prognostic value of phosphate level after the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in adult cardiac arrest patients. This study was a retrospective observational study including adult cardiac arrest survivors treated at the Chonnam National University Hospital between January 2014 and June 2017. From medical records, data regarding clinical characteristics, outcome at hospital discharge, and laboratory parameters including phosphate levels after ROSC were collected. The primary outcome was poor outcome at hospital discharge, defined as Cerebral Performance Categories 3-5. Of the 674 included patients, 465 had poor outcome at hospital discharge. Serum phosphate level was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome than in those with good outcome (p level was correlated with time to ROSC (r = 0.350, p level. In multivariate analysis, a higher phosphate level was independently associated with poor outcome at hospital discharge (odds ratio, 1.432; 95% CI, 1.245-1.626; p level after ROSC was independently associated with poor outcome at hospital discharge in adult cardiac arrest patients. However, given its modest prognostic performance, phosphate level should be used in combination with other prognostic indicators. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician's management of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Breena R; Orue, Aristides; Stapleton, Edward; Lovato, Luis; Vangala, Sitaram; Tinoco, Lucia Solorzano; Morales, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA) created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician's management of simulated code scenarios. Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest), a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, PSEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills.

  18. Targeted temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cronberg, Tobias; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Horn, Janneke; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wise, Matt P.; Åneman, Anders; al-Subaie, Nawaf; Boesgaard, Søren; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Brunetti, Iole; Bugge, Jan Frederik; Hingston, Christopher D.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Koopmans, Matty; Køber, Lars; Langørgen, Jørund; Lilja, Gisela; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Rundgren, Malin; Rylander, Christian; Smid, Ondrej; Werer, Christophe; Winkel, Per; Friberg, Hans; Pellis, Thomas; Køber, Lars V.; Annane, Djillali; Wernerman, Jan; Lange, Theis; Karlsson, Ulla-Britt; Jergle-Almqvist, Liz; Grevstad, Berit; Whitfield, Kate; Micallef, Sharon; Glass, Parisa; Myburgh, John; Saxena, Manoj; Stewart, Antony; Finfer, Simon; Bishop, Gillian; Rajbhandari, Dorrilyn

    2013-01-01

    Unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have a high risk of death or poor neurologic function. Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended by international guidelines, but the supporting evidence is limited, and the target temperature associated with the best outcome is unknown. Our

  19. Bystander efforts and 1-year outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N.

    2017-01-01

    changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. RESULTS Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period...

  20. Defibrillation probability and impedance change between shocks during resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, Robert G.; Koster, Rudolph W.; Sun, Charles; Moffat, George; Barger, Joseph; Dodson, Pamela P.; Chapman, Fred W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Technical data now gathered by automated external defibrillators (AEDs) allows closer evaluation of the behavior of defibrillation shocks administered during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed technical data from a large case series to evaluate the change in transthoracic

  1. Pulmonary emboli cardiac arrest with CPR complication: Liver laceration and massive abdominal bleed, a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lundqvist

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Pulmonary emboli with subsequent right ventricular failure may cause backwards stasis, and parenchymal organ e.g. liver enlargement. The risk for laceration injuries and internal bleed must be acknowledged when applying external forces as in case of cardiac arrest and need for resuscitation. Frequent and vigilant control of positioning of manual as well as mechanical compressions is of importance.

  2. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA. ME......-reviewed journals and presented at relevant scientific symposia....

  3. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Yaghmour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we performed a survey on 25 nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This survey included age and gender of the participants. In the first question, they were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with mouth to mouth breathing for witnessed cardiac arrest victims. In the second question, they were asked about their willingness to perform chest compression only for cardiac arrest victims. Results: Among the participating nurses, 96% were female with a mean age of 31 years. Only 40% were willing to perform CPR that requires mouth to mouth ventilation. On the other hand, 92% were willing to perform chest compression only without mouth to mouth ventilation. The mean age of the nurses who would do CPR was lower compared to those who would not. Conclusions: In this survey, we demonstrated that eliminating mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver could lead to markedly higher willingness to perform CPR for witnessed cardiac arrest victims in CPR trained nursing personnel. Our study is in agreement with other studies advocating that chest-compression-only CPR could lead to higher bystander resuscitation efforts.

  4. Sudden Cardiac arrest Risk profile in a group of amateur level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... males and females in this group of university basketball players showed varying signs of SCA risk, with the overall risk being reasonably low, albeit abnormalities were highlighted in some and Marfanoid characteristics were clearly evident in others. Key words: Sudden cardiac arrest; Basketball players, Marfan syndrome; ...

  5. Standardized EEG interpretation in patients after cardiac arrest: Correlation with other prognostic predictors.

    OpenAIRE

    Beuchat, I.; Solari, D.; Novy, J.; Oddo, M.; Rossetti, A.O.

    2018-01-01

    Standardized EEG patterns according to the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) ("highly malignant", "malignant" and "benign") demonstrated good correlation with outcome after cardiac arrest (CA). However, this approach relates to EEGs after target temperature management (TTM), and correlation to other recognized outcome predictors remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between categorized EEG and other outcome predictors, during and after TTM, at different temperatur...

  6. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. AIM: To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OH...

  7. Prognostic significance of clinical seizures after cardiac arrest and target temperature management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybeck, Anna; Friberg, Hans; Aneman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Clinical seizures are common after cardiac arrest and predictive of a poor neurological outcome. Seizures may be myoclonic, tonic-clonic or a combination of seizure types. This study reports the incidence and prognostic significance of clinical seizures in the target temperature management (...

  8. Circumstances and causes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in sudden death survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vreede-Swagemakers, J. J.; Gorgels, A. P.; Dubois-Arbouw, W. I.; Dalstra, J.; Daemen, M. J.; van Ree, J. W.; Stijns, R. E.; Wellens, H. J.

    1998-01-01

    To study the circumstances and medical profile of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) patients in whom resuscitation was attempted by the ambulance service, and to identify causes of SCA in survivors and factors that influence resuscitation success rate. During a five year period (1991-95)

  9. Prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Kragholm, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: It is unclear whether prolonged resuscitation can result in successful outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA). We assessed associations between duration of pre-hospital resuscitation on survival and functional outcome following OHCA in patients achieving pre-hospital return...

  10. [Relationship between previous severity of illness and outcome of in-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M; Rodríguez, J; Espejo, A; del Olmo, R; Llanos, S; Del Castillo, J; López-Herce, J

    2014-07-01

    To analyze the relationship between previous severity of illness, lactic acid, creatinine and inotropic index with mortality of in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) in children, and the value of a prognostic index designed for adults. The study included total of 44 children aged from 1 month to 18 years old who suffered a cardiac arrest while in hospital. The relationship between previous severity of illness scores (PRIMS and PELOD), lactic acid, creatinine, treatment with vasoactive drugs, inotropic index with return of spontaneous circulation and survival at hospital discharge was analyzed. The large majority (90.3%) of patients had a return of spontaneous circulation, and 59% survived at hospital discharge. More than two-thirds (68.2%) were treated with inotropic drugs at the time of the CA. The patients who died had a higher lactic acid before the CA (3.4 mmol/L) than survivors (1.4 mmol/L), P=.04. There were no significant differences in PRIMS, PELOD, creatinine, inotropic drugs, and inotropic index before CA between patients who died and survivors. A high lactic acid previous to cardiac arrest could be a prognostic factor of in-hospital cardiac arrest in children. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Anxiety and depression among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, G; Nilsson, G; Nielsen, N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) may experience psychological distress but the actual prevalence is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate anxiety and depression within a large cohort of OHCA-survivors. METHODS: OHCA-survivors randomized to targeted temperature o...

  12. Early Head CT Findings Are Associated With Outcomes After Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Rebecca M; Shekdar, Karuna; Licht, Dan; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Topjian, Alexis A

    2015-07-01

    Head CT after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is often obtained to evaluate intracranial pathology. Among children admitted to the PICU following pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, we hypothesized that loss of gray-white matter differentiation and basilar cistern and sulcal effacement are associated with mortality and unfavorable neurologic outcome. Retrospective, cohort study. Single, tertiary-care center PICU. Seventy-eight patients less than 18 years old who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to PICU admission and had a head CT within 24 hours of return of spontaneous circulation were evaluated from July 2005 through May 2012. None. Median time to head CT from return of spontaneous circulation was 3.3 hours (1.0, 6.0). Median patient age was 2.3 years (0.4, 9.5). Thirty-nine patients (50%) survived, of whom 29 (74%) had favorable neurologic outcome. Nonsurvivors were more likely than survivors to have 1) loss of gray-white matter differentiation (Hounsfield unit ratios, 0.96 [0.88, 1.07] vs 1.1 [1.07, 1.2]; p pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Select patients may have favorable outcomes despite these findings.

  13. Successful emergency splenectomy during cardiac arrest due to cytomegalovirus-induced atraumatic splenic rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glesner, Matilde Kanstrup; Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Nielsen, Jesper Meng Rahn

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with fever and a petechial rash on suspicion of meningitis. Shortly after arriving she developed cardiac arrest. Blood work up showed severe lactate acidosis, anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A focused assessment with sonography in trauma...

  14. Unstandardized treatment of electroencephalographic status epilepticus does not improve outcome of comatose patients after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Cloostermans, M.C.; Beishuizen, A.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Electroencephalographic status epilepticus occurs in 9–35% of comatose patients after cardiac arrest. Mortality is 90–100%. It is unclear whether (some) seizure patterns represent a condition in which anti-epileptic treatment may improve outcome, or severe ischemic damage, in which

  15. Epinephrine in cardiac arrest: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cané, Ignacio; Valverde-León, María Del Rocío; Rodríguez-Borrego, María Aurora

    2016-12-08

    evaluate the effectiveness of epinephrine used during cardiac arrest and its effect on the survival rates and neurological condition. systematic review of scientific literature with meta-analysis, using a random effects model. The following databases were used to research clinical trials and observational studies: Medline, Embase and Cochrane, from 2005 to 2015. when the Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) with administration of epinephrine was compared with ROSC without administration, increased rates were found with administration (OR 2.02. 95% CI 1.49 to 2.75; I2 = 95%). Meta-analysis showed an increase in survival to discharge or 30 days after administration of epinephrine (OR 1.23; 95% IC 1.05-1.44; I2=83%). Stratification by shockable and non-shockable rhythms showed an increase in survival for non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.52; 95% IC 1.29-1.78; I2=42%). When compared with delayed administration, the administration of epinephrine within 10 minutes showed an increased survival rate (OR 2.03; 95% IC 1.77-2.32; I2=0%). administration of epinephrine appears to increase the rate of ROSC, but when compared with other therapies, no positive effect was found on survival rates of patients with favorable neurological status. avaliar a efetividade da adrenalina na parada cardíaca e seu efeito na sobrevivência e no estado neurológico. revisão sistemática da literatura científica com meta-análise utilizando um modelo de efeitos aleatórios. Revisão em Medline, Embase e Cochrane, desde 2005 até 2015 de ensaios clínicos e estudos observacionais. observou-se aumento nas taxas de retorno de circulação espontânea com a administração de adrenalina (OR 2,02; 95% IC 1,49-2,75; I2=95%) comparadas com a não administração de adrenalina. A meta-análise mostrou um aumento da sobrevivência na alta ou depois de 30 dias da administração de adrenalina (OR 1,23; 95% IC 1,05-1,44; I2=83%). Quando estratificados por ritmos desfibrilháveis e não desfibrilh

  16. Sudden cardiac arrest as a rare presentation of myxedema coma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhan, Divya; Sapkota, Deepak; Verma, Prakash; Kandel, Saroj; Abdulfattah, Omar; Lixon, Antony; Zwenge, Deribe; Schmidt, Frances

    2017-01-01

    Myxedema coma is a decompensated hypothyroidism which occurs due to long-standing, undiagnosed, or untreated hypothyroidism. Untreated hypothyroidism is known to affect almost all organs including the heart. It is associated with a decrease in cardiac output, stroke volume due to decreased myocardial contractility, and an increase in systemic vascular resistance. It can cause cardiac arrhythmias and the most commonly seen conduction abnormalities are sinus bradycardia, heart block, ventricular tachycardia, and torsade de pointes. The authors report a case of an elderly man who presented with sudden cardiac arrest and myxedema coma and who was successfully revived.

  17. Extracorporeal life support for cardiac arrest in a 13-year-old girl caused by Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyoung Hwan; Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Lee, Dong Hun

    2015-10-01

    Generally, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome presents good prognosis. However, several case reports demonstrated malignant arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death as WPW syndrome's first presentation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using extracorporeal life support is a therapeutic option in refractory cardiac arrest. We present a WPW syndrome patient who had sudden cardiac arrest as the first presentation of the disease and treated it using extracorporeal life support with good neurologic outcome.

  18. Clinical evaluation of unselected cardiac arrest survivors in a tertiary center over a 1-yearperiod (the LAZARUZ study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, P.; Corell, P; Henriksen, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: When the cause of an aborted cardiac arrest is unclear the initiation of therapy, counseling and family screening is challenging. Methods: We included 43 unselected, prospectively identified cardiac arrest survivors with or without a diagnosis. Family history for cardiac disease...... of the electrocardiogram. We suggest that these ECG derived clues be investigated in future studies including genetic test results and data from relatives. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  19. Mobile-phone dispatch of laypersons for CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringh, Mattias; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Hollenberg, Jacob; Jonsson, Martin; Fredman, David; Nordberg, Per; Järnbert-Pettersson, Hans; Hasselqvist-Ax, Ingela; Riva, Gabriel; Svensson, Leif

    2015-06-11

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by bystanders is associated with increased survival rates among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We investigated whether rates of bystander-initiated CPR could be increased with the use of a mobile-phone positioning system that could instantly locate mobile-phone users and dispatch lay volunteers who were trained in CPR to a patient nearby with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We conducted a blinded, randomized, controlled trial in Stockholm from April 2012 through December 2013. A mobile-phone positioning system that was activated when ambulance, fire, and police services were dispatched was used to locate trained volunteers who were within 500 m of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; volunteers were then dispatched to the patients (the intervention group) or not dispatched to them (the control group). The primary outcome was bystander-initiated CPR before the arrival of ambulance, fire, and police services. A total of 5989 lay volunteers who were trained in CPR were recruited initially, and overall 9828 were recruited during the study. The mobile-phone positioning system was activated in 667 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests: 46% (306 patients) in the intervention group and 54% (361 patients) in the control group. The rate of bystander-initiated CPR was 62% (188 of 305 patients) in the intervention group and 48% (172 of 360 patients) in the control group (absolute difference for intervention vs. control, 14 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 6 to 21; PCPR was associated with significantly increased rates of bystander-initiated CPR among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and Stockholm County; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01789554.).

  20. Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by basic vs advanced life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghavi, Prachi; Jena, Anupam B; Newhouse, Joseph P; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2015-02-01

    Most out-of-hospital cardiac arrests receiving emergency medical services in the United States are treated by ambulance service providers trained in advanced life support (ALS), but supporting evidence for the use of ALS over basic life support (BLS) is limited. To compare the effects of BLS and ALS on outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Observational cohort study of a nationally representative sample of traditional Medicare beneficiaries from nonrural counties who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2009, and October 2, 2011, and for whom ALS or BLS ambulance services were billed to Medicare (31,292 ALS cases and 1643 BLS cases). Propensity score methods were used to compare the effects of ALS and BLS on patient survival, neurological performance, and medical spending after cardiac arrest. Survival to hospital discharge, to 30 days, and to 90 days; neurological performance; and incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year. Survival to hospital discharge was greater among patients receiving BLS (13.1% vs 9.2% for ALS; 4.0 [95% CI, 2.3-5.7] percentage point difference), as was survival to 90 days (8.0% vs 5.4% for ALS; 2.6 [95% CI, 1.2-4.0] percentage point difference). Basic life support was associated with better neurological functioning among hospitalized patients (21.8% vs 44.8% with poor neurological functioning for ALS; 23.0 [95% CI, 18.6-27.4] percentage point difference). Incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year for BLS relative to ALS was $154,333. Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received BLS had higher survival at hospital discharge and at 90 days compared with those who received ALS and were less likely to experience poor neurological functioning.

  1. Management of simulated maternal cardiac arrest by residents: didactic teaching versus electronic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hards, Andrea; Davies, Sharon; Salman, Aliya; Erik-Soussi, Magda; Balki, Mrinalini

    2012-09-01

    Successful resuscitation of a pregnant woman undergoing cardiac arrest and survival of the fetus require prompt, high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The objective of this observational study was to assess management of maternal cardiac arrest by anesthesia residents using high-fidelity simulation and compare subsequent performance following either didactic teaching or electronic learning (e-learning). Twenty anesthesia residents were randomized to receive either didactic teaching (Didactic group, n = 10) or e-learning (Electronic group, n = 10) on maternal cardiac arrest. Baseline management skills were tested using high-fidelity simulation, with repeat simulation testing one month after their teaching intervention. The time from cardiac arrest to start of perimortem Cesarean delivery (PMCD) was measured, and the technical and nontechnical skills scores between the two teaching groups were compared. The median [interquartile range] time to PMCD decreased after teaching, from 4.5 min [3.4 to 5.1 min] to 3.5 min [2.5 to 4.0 min] (P = 0.03), although the change within each group was not statistically significant (Didactic group 4.9 to 3.8 min, P = 0.2; Electronic group 3.9 to 2.5 min, P = 0.07; Didactic group vs Electronic group, P = 1.0). Even after teaching, only 65% of participants started PMCD within four minutes. Technical and nontechnical skills scores improved after teaching in both groups, and there were no differences between the groups. There are gaps in the knowledge and implementation of resuscitation protocols and the recommended modifications for pregnancy among residents. Teaching can improve performance during management of maternal cardiac arrest. Electronic learning and didactic teaching offer similar benefits.

  2. Sudden cardiac arrest in sports - need for uniform registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, E E; Borjesson, M; Sharma, S

    2016-01-01

    , the importance of gender, ethnicity and age of the athlete, as well as the type and level of sporting activity. A precise instruction for autopsy practice in the case of a SCD of athletes is given, including the role of molecular samples and evaluation of possible doping. Rational decisions about cardiac...... preparticipation screening and cardiac safety at sport facilities requires increased data quality concerning incidence, aetiology and management of SCA/SCD in sports. Uniform standard registration of SCA/SCD in athletes and leisure sportsmen would be a first step towards this goal....

  3. Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C versus 36°C after Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cronberg, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Background Unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have a high risk of death or poor neurologic function. Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended by international guidelines, but the supporting evidence is limited, and the target temperature associated with the best outcome...... is unknown. Our objective was to compare two target temperatures, both intended to prevent fever. Methods In an international trial, we randomly assigned 950 unconscious adults after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause to targeted temperature management at either 33°C or 36°C....... The primary outcome was all-cause mortality through the end of the trial. Secondary outcomes included a composite of poor neurologic function or death at 180 days, as evaluated with the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale and the modified Rankin scale. Results In total, 939 patients were included...

  4. Randomized controlled trial of internal and external targeted temperature management methods in post- cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, Xinqi; Li, Huihua; Ng, Mingwei; Lim, Eric Tien Siang; Pothiawala, Sohil; Tan, Kenneth Boon Kiat; Sewa, Duu Wen; Shahidah, Nur; Pek, Pin Pin; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2018-01-01

    Targeted temperature management post-cardiac arrest is currently implemented using various methods, broadly categorized as internal and external. This study aimed to evaluate survival-to-hospital discharge and neurological outcomes (Glasgow-Pittsburgh Score) of post-cardiac arrest patients undergoing internal cooling verses external cooling. A randomized controlled trial of post-resuscitation cardiac arrest patients was conducted from October 2008-September 2014. Patients were randomized to either internal or external cooling methods. Historical controls were selected matched by age and gender. Analysis using SPSS version 21.0 presented descriptive statistics and frequencies while univariate logistic regression was done using R 3.1.3. 23 patients were randomized to internal cooling and 22 patients to external cooling and 42 matched controls were selected. No significant difference was seen between internal and external cooling in terms of survival, neurological outcomes and complications. However in the internal cooling arm, there was lower risk of developing overcooling (p=0.01) and rebound hyperthermia (p=0.02). Compared to normothermia, internal cooling had higher survival (OR=3.36, 95% CI=(1.130, 10.412), and lower risk of developing cardiac arrhythmias (OR=0.18, 95% CI=(0.04, 0.63)). Subgroup analysis showed those with cardiac cause of arrest (OR=4.29, 95% CI=(1.26, 15.80)) and sustained ROSC (OR=5.50, 95% CI=(1.64, 20.39)) had better survival with internal cooling compared to normothermia. Cooling curves showed tighter temperature control for internal compared to external cooling. Internal cooling showed tighter temperature control compared to external cooling. Internal cooling can potentially provide better survival-to-hospital discharge outcomes and reduce cardiac arrhythmia complications in carefully selected patients as compared to normothermia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Clinical Trials in Cardiac Arrest and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Lessons from the Past and Ideas for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Frontera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Elevated intracranial pressure that occurs at the time of cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to inadequate cerebral blood flow, which may mimic the brain injury cascade that occurs after cardiac arrest. Insights from clinical trials in cardiac arrest may provide direction for future early brain injury research after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Methods. A search of PubMed from 1980 to 2012 and clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify published and ongoing randomized clinical trials in aneurysmal SAH and cardiac arrest patients. Only English, adult, human studies with primary or secondary mortality or neurological outcomes were included. Results. A total of 142 trials (82 SAH, 60 cardiac arrest met the review criteria (103 published, 39 ongoing. The majority of both published and ongoing SAH trials focus on delayed secondary insults after SAH (70%, while 100% of cardiac arrest trials tested interventions within the first few hours of ictus. No SAH trials addressing treatment of early brain injury were identified. Twenty-nine percent of SAH and 13% of cardiac arrest trials showed outcome benefit, though there is no overlap mechanistically. Conclusions. Clinical trials in SAH assessing acute brain injury are warranted and successful interventions identified by the cardiac arrest literature may be reasonable targets of the study.

  6. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: determinant factors for immediate survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aparecida Morais

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze determinant factors for the immediate survival of persons who receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the advanced support units of the Mobile Emergency Medical Services (SAMU of Belo Horizonte.METHOD: this is a retrospective, epidemiological study which analyzed 1,165 assistance forms, from the period 2008 - 2010. The collected data followed the Utstein style, being submitted to descriptive and analytical statistics with tests with levels of significance of 5%.RESULTS: the majority were male, the median age was 64 years, and the ambulance response time, nine minutes. Immediate survival was observed in 239 persons. An association was ascertained of this outcome with "cardiac arrest witnessed by persons trained in basic life support" (OR=3.49; p<0.05; CI 95%, "cardiac arrest witnessed by Mobile Emergency Medical Services teams" (OR=2.99; p<0.05; CI95%, "only the carry out of basic life support" (OR=0.142; p<0.05; CI95%, and "initial cardiac rhythm of asystole" (OR=0.33; p<0.05; CI 95%.CONCLUSION: early access to cardiopulmonary resuscitation was related to a favorable outcome, and the non-undertaking of advanced support, and asystole, were associated with worse outcomes. Basic and advanced life support techniques can alter survival in the event of cardiac arrest.

  7. Paediatric traumatic cardiac arrest: a Delphi study to establish consensus on definition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Annette C; Vassallo, James; Nutbeam, Tim; Lyttle, Mark D; Maconochie, Ian K; Enki, Doyo G; Smith, Jason E

    2018-04-28

    Paediatric traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) is associated with low survival and poor outcomes. The mechanisms that underlie TCA are different from medical cardiac arrest; the approach to treatment of TCA may therefore also need to differ to optimise outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the opinion of subject matter experts regarding the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric TCA, and to reach consensus on how best to manage this group of patients. An online Delphi study was conducted over three rounds, with the aim of achieving consensus (defined as 70% agreement) on statements related to the diagnosis and management of paediatric TCA. Participants were invited from paediatric and adult emergency medicine, paediatric anaesthetics, paediatric ICU and paediatric surgery, as well as Paediatric Major Trauma Centre leads and representatives from the Resuscitation Council UK. Statements were informed by literature reviews and were based on elements of APLS resuscitation algorithms as well as some concepts used in the management of adult TCA; they ranged from confirmation of cardiac arrest to the indications for thoracotomy. 73 experts completed all three rounds between June and November 2016. Consensus was reached on 14 statements regarding the diagnosis and management of paediatric TCA; oxygenation and ventilatory support, along with rapid volume replacement with warmed blood, improve survival. The duration of cardiac arrest and the lack of a response to intervention, along with cardiac standstill on ultrasound, help to guide the decision to terminate resuscitation. This study has given a consensus-based framework to guide protocol development in the management of paediatric TCA, though further work is required in other key areas including its acceptability to clinicians. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Bystander Defibrillation for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Public vs Residential Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik; Rajan, Shahzleen; Kragholm, Kristian; Ejlskov, Linda; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Gerds, Thomas A; Hjortshøj, Søren; Lippert, Freddy; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Wissenberg, Mads

    2017-05-01

    Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). To examine calendar changes in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. This nationwide study identified 18 688 patients in Denmark with first-time OHCA from June 1, 2001, to December 31, 2012, using the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Patients had a presumed cardiac cause of arrest that was not witnessed by emergency medical services personnel. Data were analyzed from April 1, 2015, to December 10, 2016. Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher-assisted guidance of bystander resuscitation efforts. The proportion of patients who received bystander defibrillation according to the location of the cardiac arrest and their subsequent 30-day survival. Of the 18 688 patients with OHCAs (67.8% men and 32.2% women; median [interquartile range] age, 72 [62-80] years), 4783 (25.6%) had a cardiac arrest in a public location and 13 905 (74.4%) in a residential location. The number of registered AEDs increased from 141 in 2007 to 7800 in 2012. The distribution of AED location was consistently skewed in favor of public locations. Bystander defibrillation increased in public locations from 3 of 245 (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.4%-3.5%) in 2001 to 78 of 510 (15.3%; 95% CI, 12.4%-18.7%) in 2012 (P bystander defibrillation increased in public locations from 8.3% (95% CI, 1.5%-35.4%) in 2001/2002 to 57

  9. Therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Clark, Amy E; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Newth, Christopher J L; Bennett, Kimberly S; Berger, John T; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A; Koch, Joshua D; Schleien, Charles L; Dalton, Heidi J; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Thomas, Neal J; van der Jagt, Elise W; Porter, Melissa B; Meyer, Michael T; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S; Bhalala, Utpal S; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A; Sanders, Ronald C; Dean, J Michael

    2015-05-14

    Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children's hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P=0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P=0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P=0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a good functional outcome at 1 year. (Funded by

  10. Locating AED Enabled Medical Drones to Enhance Cardiac Arrest Response Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulver, Aaron; Wei, Ran; Mann, Clay

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) is prevalent in the United States. Each year between 180,000 and 400,000 people die due to cardiac arrest. The automated external defibrillator (AED) has greatly enhanced survival rates for OOHCA. However, one of the important components of successful cardiac arrest treatment is emergency medical services (EMS) response time (i.e., the time from EMS "wheels rolling" until arrival at the OOHCA scene). Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have regularly been used for remote sensing and aerial imagery collection, but there are new opportunities to use drones for medical emergencies. The purpose of this study is to develop a geographic approach to the placement of a network of medical drones, equipped with an automated external defibrillator, designed to minimize travel time to victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our goal was to have one drone on scene within one minute for at least 90% of demand for AED shock therapy, while minimizing implementation costs. In our study, the current estimated travel times were evaluated in Salt Lake County using geographical information systems (GIS) and compared to the estimated travel times of a network of AED enabled medical drones. We employed a location model, the Maximum Coverage Location Problem (MCLP), to determine the best configuration of drones to increase service coverage within one minute. We found that, using traditional vehicles, only 4.3% of the demand can be reached (travel time) within one minute utilizing current EMS agency locations, while 96.4% of demand can be reached within five minutes using current EMS vehicles and facility locations. Analyses show that using existing EMS stations to launch drones resulted in 80.1% of cardiac arrest demand being reached within one minute Allowing new sites to launch drones resulted in 90.3% of demand being reached within one minute. Finally, using existing EMS and new sites resulted in 90.3% of demand being reached while greatly reducing

  11. Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders.

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    Juan Jiménez-Jáimez

    Full Text Available Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying aetiology described is long QT syndrome (LQTS, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF. Little phenotypical data about CALM2 mutations is available.The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical manifestations of the Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 in two unrelated children in southern Spain with apparently unexplained cardiac arrest/death.Two unrelated children aged 4 and 7, who were born to healthy parents, were studied. Both presented with sudden cardiac arrest. The first was resuscitated after a VF episode, and the second died suddenly. In both cases the baseline QTc interval was within normal limits. Peripheral blood DNA was available to perform targeted gene sequencing.The surviving 4-year-old girl had a positive epinephrine test for LQTS, and polymorphic ventricular ectopic beats were seen on a previous 24-hour Holter recording from the deceased 7-year-old boy, suggestive of a possible underlying CPVT phenotype. A p.Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 was detected in both cases. This affected a highly conserved across species residue, and the location in the protein was adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain, predicting a high pathogenic effect.Human calmodulin 2 mutation p.Asn98Ser is associated with sudden cardiac death in childhood with a variable clinical penetrance. Our results provide new phenotypical information about clinical behaviour of this mutation.

  12. A Report of Brugada Syndrome Presenting with Cardiac Arrest Triggered by Verapamil Intoxication

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    Kahraman Yakut

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brugada syndrome is a disease characterized by a specific electrocardiographic pattern and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. We present this case with the updated literature to emphasise the need to consider the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome in patients admitted to the emergency ward with sudden cardiac arrest. Case Report: A 16-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency ward with complaints of weakness and abdominal pain, and she had four cardiac arrests during her evaluation period. She was referred to our clinic for permanent pacemaker implantation. She was on a temporary pace maker after having had C-reactive protein. Her physical exam was normal except for bilaterally decreased lung sounds. Lung x-ray and computed tomography, which were performed by another institution, revealed minimal pleural effusion and nothing else of significance. Blood and peritoneal fluid samples were sterile. Echocardiographic exam and cardiac enzymes were also in the normal ranges. Electrocardiographic showed incomplete right branch block in leads V1 and V2. An ajmaline test revealed specific electrocardiographic findings of the type I Brugada pattern. We proposed implanting an implantable cardioverter defibrillator to the patient as there were positive findings on the ajmaline test as well as a history of sudden cardiac arrest. After this treatment proposal, the patient’s family admitted that she had taken a high dose of verapamil and thus, the encountered bradycardia was associated with verapamil overuse. The ajmaline test was repeated as it was contemplated that the previous positive ajmaline test had been associated with verapamil overuse. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation was proposed again as there was a history of sudden cardiac arrest; however, the family did not consent to implantable cardioverter defibrillator, and the patient was discharged and followed up. Conclusion: Brugada syndrome should be

  13. A Report of Brugada Syndrome Presenting with Cardiac Arrest Triggered by Verapamil Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakut, Kahraman; Erdoğan, İlkay; Varan, Birgül; Atar, İlyas

    2017-12-01

    Brugada syndrome is a disease characterized by a specific electrocardiographic pattern and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. We present this case with the updated literature to emphasise the need to consider the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome in patients admitted to the emergency ward with sudden cardiac arrest. A 16-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency ward with complaints of weakness and abdominal pain, and she had four cardiac arrests during her evaluation period. She was referred to our clinic for permanent pacemaker implantation. She was on a temporary pace maker after having had C-reactive protein. Her physical exam was normal except for bilaterally decreased lung sounds. Lung x-ray and computed tomography, which were performed by another institution, revealed minimal pleural effusion and nothing else of significance. Blood and peritoneal fluid samples were sterile. Echocardiographic exam and cardiac enzymes were also in the normal ranges. Electrocardiographic showed incomplete right branch block in leads V1 and V2. An ajmaline test revealed specific electrocardiographic findings of the type I Brugada pattern. We proposed implanting an implantable cardioverter defibrillator to the patient as there were positive findings on the ajmaline test as well as a history of sudden cardiac arrest. After this treatment proposal, the patient's family admitted that she had taken a high dose of verapamil and thus, the encountered bradycardia was associated with verapamil overuse. The ajmaline test was repeated as it was contemplated that the previous positive ajmaline test had been associated with verapamil overuse. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation was proposed again as there was a history of sudden cardiac arrest; however, the family did not consent to implantable cardioverter defibrillator, and the patient was discharged and followed up. Brugada syndrome should be considered for patients who are admitted to the emergency ward

  14. Clinical experience and skills of physicians in hospital cardiac arrest teams in Denmark: a nationwide study

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    Lauridsen KG

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kasper G Lauridsen,1–3 Anders S Schmidt,1–3 Philip Caap,3,4 Rasmus Aagaard,2,3,5 Bo Løfgren1,3,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Clinical Research Unit, Regional Hospital of Randers, Randers, 3Research Center for Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, 4Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Randers Regional Hospital, Denmark Background: The quality of in-hospital resuscitation is poor and may be affected by the clinical experience and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training. This study aimed to investigate the clinical experience, self-perceived skills, CPR training and knowledge of the guidelines on when to abandon resuscitation among physicians of cardiac arrest teams. Methods: We performed a nationwide cross-sectional study in Denmark. Telephone interviews were conducted with physicians in the cardiac arrest teams in public somatic hospitals using a structured questionnaire. Results: In total, 93 physicians (53% male from 45 hospitals participated in the study. Median age was 34 (interquartile range: 30–39 years. Respondents were medical students working as locum physicians (5%, physicians in training (79% and consultants (16%, and the median postgraduate clinical experience was 48 (19–87 months. Most respondents (92% felt confident in treating a cardiac arrest, while fewer respondents felt confident in performing intubation (41% and focused cardiac ultrasound (39% during cardiac arrest. Median time since last CPR training was 4 (2–10 months, and 48% had attended a European Resuscitation Council (ERC Advanced Life Support course. The majority (84% felt confident in terminating resuscitation; however, only 9% were able to state the ERC guidelines on when to abandon resuscitation. Conclusion: Physicians of Danish cardiac arrest teams are often inexperienced and do not feel competent performing important clinical skills during resuscitation. Less than half have

  15. Experimental cardiac arrest treatment with adrenaline, vasopressin, or placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palácio, Manoel Ângelo Gomes; Paiva, Edison Ferreira de; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes de; Timerman, Ari

    2013-12-01

    The effect of vasoconstrictors in prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not been fully clarified. To evaluate adrenaline and vasopressin pressure effect, and observe the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective, randomized, blinded, and placebo-controlled study. After seven minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, pigs received two minutes cycles of CPR. Defibrillation was attempted (4 J/kg) once at 9 minutes, and after every cycle if a shockable rhythm was present, after what CPR was immediately resumed. At 9 minutes and every five minutes intervals, 0.02 mg/kg (n = 12 pigs) adrenaline, or 0.4 U/kg (n = 12) vasopressin, or 0.2 mL/kg (n = 8) 0.9% saline solution was administered. CPR continued for 30 minutes or until the ROSC. Coronary perfusion pressure increased to about 20 mmHg in the three groups. Following vasoconstrictors doses, pressure level reached 35 mmHg versus 15 mmHg with placebo (p < 0.001). Vasopressin effect remained at 15-20 mmHg after three doses versus zero with adrenaline or placebo. ROSC rate differed (p = 0.031) among adrenaline (10/12), vasopressin (6/12), and placebo (2/8). Time-to-ROSC did not differ (16 minutes), nor the number of doses previously received (one or two). There was no difference between vasoconstrictors, but against placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate (p = 0.019). The vasoconstrictors initial pressure effect was equivalent and vasopressin maintained a late effect at prolonged resuscitation. Nevertheless, when compared with placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate.

  16. Experimental Cardiac Arrest Treatment with Adrenaline, Vasopressin, or Placebo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palácio, Manoel Ângelo Gomes; de Paiva, Edison Ferreira; de Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Timerman, Ari

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of vasoconstrictors in prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not been fully clarified. Objectives To evaluate adrenaline and vasopressin pressure effect, and observe the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Methods A prospective, randomized, blinded, and placebo-controlled study. After seven minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, pigs received two minutes cycles of CPR. Defibrillation was attempted (4 J/kg) once at 9 minutes, and after every cycle if a shockable rhythm was present, after what CPR was immediately resumed. At 9 minutes and every five minutes intervals, 0.02 mg/kg (n = 12 pigs) adrenaline, or 0.4 U/kg (n = 12) vasopressin, or 0.2 mL/kg (n = 8) 0.9% saline solution was administered. CPR continued for 30 minutes or until the ROSC. Results Coronary perfusion pressure increased to about 20 mmHg in the three groups. Following vasoconstrictors doses, pressure level reached 35 mmHg versus 15 mmHg with placebo (p adrenaline or placebo. ROSC rate differed (p = 0.031) among adrenaline (10/12), vasopressin (6/12), and placebo (2/8). Time-to-ROSC did not differ (16 minutes), nor the number of doses previously received (one or two). There was no difference between vasoconstrictors, but against placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate (p = 0.019). Conclusion The vasoconstrictors initial pressure effect was equivalent and vasopressin maintained a late effect at prolonged resuscitation. Nevertheless, when compared with placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate. PMID:24173134

  17. Prehospital traumatic cardiac arrest: the cost of futility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemurgy, A S; Norris, P A; Olson, S M; Hurst, J M; Albrink, M H

    1993-09-01

    Of 12,462 trauma patients cared for by prehospital services from October 1, 1989 to March 31, 1991, 138 patients underwent CPR at the scene or during transport because of the absence of blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. Ninety-six (70%) suffered blunt trauma, 42 (30%) suffered penetrating trauma. Sixty (43%) were transported by air utilizing county-wide transport protocols. None of the patients survived. Aggregate care cost $871,186.00. In 11 cases (8%), tissue for transplantation was procured (only corneas). Trauma patients who require CPR at the scene or in transport die. Infrequent organ procurement does not seem to justify the cost (primarily borne by hospitals), consumption of resources, and exposure of health care providers to occupational health hazards. The wisdom of transporting trauma victims suffering cardiopulmonary arrest at the scene or during transport must be questioned. Allocation of resources to these patients is not an insular medical issue, but a broad concern for our society, and society should decide if the "cost of futility" is excessive.

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients treated with catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt

    2016-01-01

    ) versus 20.7mL kg(-1) min(-1), p of main effect=0.003, p of interaction between time and intervention=0.020). No significant difference between groups on Short Form-36 was found (53.8 versus 51.9 points, P=.20). Two serious adverse events (atrial fibrillation in relation to physical exercise and death...... unrelated to rehabilitation) occurred in the cardiac rehabilitation group versus one in the usual care group (death unrelated to intervention) (P=.56). In the cardiac rehabilitation group 16 patients versus 7 in the usual care group reported non-serious adverse events (P=.047). CONCLUSION: Comprehensive...

  19. Impact of Early Vasopressor Administration on Neurological Outcomes after Prolonged Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Michael W; Tyson, Clark

    2017-06-01

    Introduction Vasopressors are associated with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), but no long-term benefit has been demonstrated in randomized trials. However, these trials did not control for the timing of vasopressor administration which may influence outcomes. Consequently, the objective of this study was to develop a model describing the likelihood of favorable neurological outcome (cerebral performance category [CPC] 1 or 2) as a function of the public safety answering point call receipt (PSAP)-to-pressor-interval (PPI) in prolonged out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Hypothesis The likelihood of favorable neurological outcome declines with increasing PPI. This investigation was a retrospective study of cardiac arrest using linked data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) database (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Atlanta, Georgia USA]; American Heart Association [Dallas, Texas USA]; and Emory University Department of Emergency Medicine [Atlanta, Georgia USA]) and the North Carolina (USA) Prehospital Medical Information System. Adult patients suffering a bystander-witnessed, non-traumatic cardiac arrest between January 2012 and June 2014 were included. Logistic regression was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of neurological outcome as a function of PPI, while controlling for patient age, gender, and race; endotracheal intubation (ETI); shockable rhythm; layperson cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); and field hypothermia. Of the 2,100 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 913 (43.5%) experienced ROSC, 618 (29.4%) survived to hospital admission, 187 (8.9%) survived to hospital discharge, and 155 (7.4%) were discharged with favorable neurological outcomes (CPC 1 or 2). Favorable neurological outcome was less likely with increasing PPI (OR=0.90; PCPR, and ETI were not independent predictors of favorable neurological outcome. In this evaluation, time to vasopressor administration was significantly associated with

  20. Determinants of occurrence and survival after sudden cardiac arrest-A European perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Empana, Jean-Philippe; Blom, Marieke T; Bӧttiger, Bernd W

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The ESCAPE-NET project ("European Sudden Cardiac Arrest network- towards Prevention, Education and New Effective Treatments") aims to study: (1) risk factors and mechanisms for the occurrence of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the population, and (2) risk factors and treatment strategies...... for survival after SCA on a European scale. METHODS: This is an Horizon2020 funded program of the European Union, performed by a European public-private consortium of 16 partners across 10 EU countries. There are 11 deep-phenotyped SCA cohorts for the study of risk factors and treatment strategies for survival...... ongoing efforts on SCA outside Europe and within Europe including the EuReCa project....

  1. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses

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    Cássia Regina Vancini Campanharo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of survivors was evaluated at discharge, after six months and one year.RESULTSOf the 285 patients, 16 survived until hospital discharge, and 13 remained alive after one year, making possible to identify factors associated with survival. There were no losses in the process.CONCLUSIONCohort studies help identify risks and disease outcomes. Considering cardiac arrest, they can subsidize public policies, encourage future studies and training programs for CPR, thereby improving the prognosis of patients.

  2. Pravastatin But Not Simvastatin Improves Survival and Neurofunctional Outcome After Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

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    Stefan Bergt, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cardiac arrest (CA followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome. We compared the effects of pravastatin and simvastatin on survival and neurofunction in a murine model of CA/CPR. Pravastatin, a hydrophilic statin, increased survival and neurofunction during a 28-day follow-up period. This therapy was associated with improved pulmonary function, reduced pulmonary edema, and increased endothelial cell function in vitro. In contrast, lipophilic simvastatin did not modulate survival but increased pulmonary edema and impaired endothelial cell function. Although pravastatin may display a therapeutic option for post-CA syndrome, the application of simvastatin may require re-evaluation. Key Words: cardiac arrest, endothelial cell function, ischemia and reperfusion injury, pravastatin, resuscitation, simvastatin

  3. European Resuscitation Council (ERC) - the Network to fight against cardiac arrest in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffay, Violetta

    2013-09-01

    The ideas of collaboration and formation of scientific societies and registries for cardiac arrest were developed in the 18th century. The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) was formed in 1990. Nowadays, the ERC network consists of 30 National Resuscitation Councils (NRCs), which have an obligation to ensure that effective resuscitation services are provided and to promote education, training, and research in all aspects of resuscitation science. The central role of NRCs in decreasing the incidence of cardiac arrest may be highlighted and enhanced by the incorporation and implementation of the following suggestions. NRCs should emphasize and actively participate in acute care training of healthcare professionals and of lay rescuers. Implementation of current resuscitation guidelines should be a priority of each NRC and identification of the weakest link in the chain of survival should be a priority. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Nursing Homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pape, Marianne; Rajan, Shahzleen; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival among nursing home residents who suffers out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is sparsely studied. Deployment of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in nursing home facilities in Denmark is unknown. We examined 30-day survival following OHCA in nursing and private home...... residents. METHODS: This register-based, nationwide, follow-up study identified OHCA-patients ≥18 years of age with a resuscitation attempt in nursing homes and private homes using Danish Cardiac Arrest Register data from June 1, 2001 to December 31, 2014. The primary outcome measure was 30-day survival....... Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess factors potentially associated with survival among nursing and private home residents separately. RESULTS: Of 26,999 OCHAs, 2516 (9.3%) occurred in nursing homes, and 24,483 (90.7%) in private homes. Nursing home residents were older (median 83 (Q1...

  5. Bystander defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Public vs Residential Locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). Objective: To examine calendar changes...... in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationwide study......, 2016. Exposures: Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher...

  6. Intravascular versus surface cooling for targeted temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Guy W; Thomas, Richard M; Vamvakas, George

    2016-01-01

    , maintenance and rewarming phases in addition to adverse events. All-cause mortality, as well as a composite of poor neurological function or death, as evaluated by the Cerebral Performance Category and modified Rankin scale were analysed. RESULTS: For patients managed at 33 °C there was no difference between......BACKGROUND: Targeted temperature management is recommended after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and may be achieved using a variety of cooling devices. This study was conducted to explore the performance and outcomes for intravascular versus surface devices for targeted temperature management after...... out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHOD: A retrospective analysis of data from the Targeted Temperature Management trial. N = 934. A total of 240 patients (26%) managed with intravascular versus 694 (74%) with surface devices. Devices were assessed for speed and precision during the induction...

  7. Neurological prognostication of outcome in patients in coma after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Management of coma after cardiac arrest has improved during the past decade, allowing an increasing proportion of patients to survive, thus prognostication has become an integral part of post-resuscitation care. Neurologists are increasingly confronted with raised expectations of next of kin and the necessity to provide early predictions of long-term prognosis. During the past decade, as technology and clinical evidence have evolved, post-cardiac arrest prognostication has moved towards a multimodal paradigm combining clinical examination with additional methods, consisting of electrophysiology, blood biomarkers, and brain imaging, to optimise prognostic accuracy. Prognostication should never be based on a single indicator; although some variables have very low false positive rates for poor outcome, multimodal assessment provides resassurance about the reliability of a prognostic estimate by offering concordant evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Delayed-onset Reversible Cortical Blindness after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Aaron; de Souza, Rainha J.; Pai Kakode, Varun R.

    2017-01-01

    We present a patient who presented with cortical blindness (CB) 1 week after repeated cardiac arrest while undergoing treatment for an acute myocardial infarction. He had been revived within 5 min in each instance and was apparently neurologically normal until presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging showed subtle hyperintensities on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging in both temporooccipital cortices. A rapid recovery over the next 2 weeks was remarkable for the appearance of metamorphopsia. CB may present even days to weeks after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy following cardiac arrest, even in patients apparently without immediate neurological sequelae. The pathogenesis of this phenomenon remains to be fully elucidated, but is likely to be due to delayed effects of anoxia on the occipital cortex and may be analogous to the previously described syndrome of delayed posthypoxic leukoencephalopathy. Prognosis for visual recovery appears to be good. PMID:28936091

  9. Post-cardiac arrest level of free-plasma DNA and DNA-histone complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, A N; Hvas, A-M; Grejs, A M

    2017-01-01

    Background Plasma DNA-histone complexes and total free-plasma DNA have the potential to quantify the ischaemia-reperfusion damages occurring after cardiac arrest. Furthermore, DNA-histone complexes may have the potential of being a target for future treatment. The aim was to examine if plasma DNA-histone...... after 22, 46 and 70 h. Samples for DNA-histone complexes were quantified by Cell Death Detection ELISAplus. The total free-plasma DNA analyses were quantified with qPCR by analysing the Beta-2 microglobulin gene. The control group comprised 40 healthy individuals. Results We found no difference...... in the level of DNA-histone complexes between the 22-h sample and healthy individuals (P = 0.10). In the 46-h sample, there was an increased level of DNA-histone complexes in non-survivors compared with survivors 30 days after the cardiac arrest (P

  10. Identifying non-technical skills and barriers for improvement of teamwork in cardiac arrest teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.O.; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The application of non-technical skills (NTSs) in health care has previously been described in other health-care educational programmes. NTSs are behavioural principles such as leadership, task distribution and communication. The aim of this study was to identify NTSs suitable...... for improving team performance in multi-professional cardiac arrest teams, and to describe barriers to the use and implementation of such NTSs by using a qualitative method. Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 Danish Advanced Life Support instructors during the period April...... 2006 to November 2006. Interviews were focussed on barriers and recommendations for teamwork in the cardiac arrest team, optimal policy for improvement of resuscitation training and clinical practice, use of cognitive aids and adoption of European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines 2005. Interviews...

  11. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Ergül

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  12. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergül, Yakup; Ekici, Bariş; Keskin, Sabiha

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  13. Critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Oluf; Maaløe, Rikke; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2010-01-01

    Background Critical incident reports can identify areas for improvement in resuscitation practice. The Danish Patient Safety Database is a mandatory reporting system and receives critical incident reports submitted by hospital personnel. The aim of this study is to identify, analyse and categorize...... critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database. Methods The search terms “cardiac arrest” and “resuscitation” were used to identify reports in the Danish Patient Safety Database. Identified critical incidents were then classified into categories. Results One...

  14. Ketamine infusion for refractory status epilepticus: A case report of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffman, Lauren; Yan Yiu, Ho; Farrokh, Salia; Lewin, John; Geocadin, Romergryko; Ziai, Wendy

    2018-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) has a high mortality rate and is often difficult to treat. When traditional therapies fail ketamine may be considered. There are limited reports of adverse cardiac events with the use of ketamine for RSE and no reports of cardiac arrest in this context. Evaluate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias associated with the use of ketamine for RSE. Retrospective chart review of nine patients who underwent ketamine infusion for RSE. Etiology of refractory status epilepticus included autoimmune/infectious process (Zeiler et al., 2014), ischemic stroke (Bleck, 2005) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (Bleck, 2005). Of the nine patients who received ketamine, two had documented cardiac events; one remained clinically stable and the other developed multiple arrhythmias, including recurrent episodes of asystole. Once ketamine was discontinued the latter patient stabilized with the addition of anti arrhythmic therapy. Ketamine is utilized to treat refractory status epilepticus, but should be used with caution in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, as there may be an increased risk of life threatening arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Location of cardiac arrest in a city center: strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in public locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Public-access defibrillation with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) is being implemented in many countries worldwide with considerable financial implications. The potential benefit and economic consequences of focused or unfocused AED deployment are unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS......: All cardiac arrests in public in Copenhagen, Denmark, from 1994 through 2005 were geographically located, as were 104 public AEDs placed by local initiatives. In accordance with European Resuscitation Council and American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines, areas with a high incidence of cardiac...... arrests were defined as those with 1 cardiac arrest every 2 or 5 years, respectively. There were 1274 cardiac arrests in public locations. According to the European Resuscitation Council or AHA guidelines, AEDs needed to be deployed in 1.2% and 10.6% of the city area, providing coverage for 19.5% (n=249...

  16. Outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 minutes in drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia : Dutch nationwide retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J. K.; Verkade, H. J.; Burgerhof, J. G.; Bierens, J. J.; van Rheenen, P. F.; Kneyber, M. C.; Albers, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the outcome of drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia, and to determine distinct criteria for termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in drowned children with hypothermia and absence of spontaneous circulation. DESIGN Nationwide retrospective cohort study.

  17. Wearable cardioverter defibrillators for the prevention of sudden cardiac arrest: a health technology assessment and patient focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettinger S

    2017-11-01

    -to-medium term, but the quality of existing evidence is very low. AEs and SAEs need to be more appropriately reported in order to further evaluate the safety of the device. High-quality comparative evidence and well-described disease groups are required to assess the effectiveness of the WCD and to determine which patient groups may benefit most from the intervention. Keywords: sudden cardiac arrest, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, cardioverter defibrillator, external, wearable, patient involvement

  18. Antiarrhythmia drugs for cardiac arrest: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yu; He, Qing; Yang, Min; Zhan, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Antiarrhythmia agents have been used in the treatment of cardiac arrest, and we aimed to review the relevant clinical controlled trials to assess the effects of antiarrhythmics during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Methods We searched databases including Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; MEDLINE, and EMBASE. Clinical controlled trials that addressed the effects of antiarrhythmics (including amiodarone, lidocaine, magnesium, and other new potassium-channel blockers) ...

  19. Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest from Trauma (EPR-CAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-07-1-0682 TITLE: Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest from Trauma ( EPR -CAT) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...thoracotomy and open chest CPR, results in unacceptably low survival rates. Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation ( EPR ) was developed to rapidly preserve...further recommended that the trauma surgeons involved in the study obtain hospital privileges for cannulation for the EPR flush. This has been

  20. Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest from Trauma (EPR CAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-07-1-0682 TITLE: Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest from Trauma ( EPR -CAT) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Preservation and Resuscitation ( EPR ) was developed to rapidly preserve the organism during ischemia, using hypothermia, drugs, and fluids, to “buy time...privileges for cannulation for the EPR flush. This has been accomplished. Given the complexity of our planned intervention for trauma patients in

  1. Evaluation of intensified prehospital treatment in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L

    1991-01-01

    During a period of 3 years three different types of emergency medical service (EMS) systems were evaluated in a city with about 238,000 inhabitants/population density of 570/km2. Included were 393 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in whom prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation was provid...... survive and the more patients survive with good cerebral function. However, the ambulances with specially trained paramedics were only effective in the area with 340 inhabitants/km2....

  2. Antidepressant Use and Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, P; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Folke, F

    2012-01-01

    being the most frequently used type of antidepressant (50.8%). Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs; odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.50) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; OR = 1.21, CI: 1.00-1.47) were both associated with comparable increases in risk of OHCA.......17-12.2). An association between cardiac arrest and antidepressant use could be documented in both the SSRI and TCA classes of drugs....

  3. Transient Cardiac Arrest in Patient With Left Ventricular Noncompaction (Spongiform Cardiomyopathy)

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Shinya; Ito, Hiroshi; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC), also known as spongiform cardiomyopathy, is a severe disease that has not previously been discussed with respect to general anesthesia. We treated a child with LVNC who experienced cardiac arrest. Dental treatment under general anesthesia was scheduled because the patient had a risk of endocarditis due to dental caries along with a history of being uncooperative for dental care. During sevoflurane induction, severe hypotension and laryngospasm resulted i...

  4. Enhanced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity improves cardiac outcomes in a murine model of cardiac arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Piao

    Full Text Available Post-ischemic changes in cellular metabolism alter myocardial and neurological function. Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH, the limiting step in mitochondrial glucose oxidation, is inhibited by increased expression of PDH kinase (PDK during ischemia/reperfusion injury. This results in decreased utilization of glucose to generate cellular ATP. Post-cardiac arrest (CA hypothermia improves outcomes and alters metabolism, but its influence on PDH and PDK activity following CA are unknown. We hypothesized that therapeutic hypothermia (TH following CA is associated with the inhibition of PDK activity and increased PDH activity. We further hypothesized that an inhibitor of PDK activity, dichloroacetate (DCA, would improve PDH activity and post-CA outcomes.Anesthetized and ventilated adult female C57BL/6 wild-type mice underwent a 12-minute KCl-induced CA followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Compared to normothermic (37°C CA controls, administering TH (30°C improved overall survival (72-hour survival rate: 62.5% vs. 28.6%, P<0.001, post-resuscitation myocardial function (ejection fraction: 50.9±3.1% vs. 27.2±2.0%, P<0.001; aorta systolic pressure: 132.7±7.3 vs. 72.3±3.0 mmHg, P<0.001, and neurological scores at 72-hour post CA (9.5±1.3 vs. 5.4±1.3, P<0.05. In both heart and brain, CA increased lactate concentrations (1.9-fold and 3.1-fold increase, respectively, P<0.01, decreased PDH enzyme activity (24% and 50% reduction, respectively, P<0.01, and increased PDK protein expressions (1.2-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively, P<0.01. In contrast, post-CA treatment with TH normalized lactate concentrations (P<0.01 and P<0.05 and PDK expressions (P<0.001 and P<0.05, while increasing PDH activity (P<0.01 and P<0.01 in both the heart and brain. Additionally, treatment with DCA (0.2 mg/g body weight 30 min prior to CA improved both myocardial hemodynamics 2 hours post-CA (aortic systolic pressure: 123±3 vs. 96±4 mmHg, P<0.001 and 72-hour survival rates

  5. Reliability of pulse oximetry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a piglet model of neonatal cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammad Ahmad; Mendler, Marc; Maurer, Miriam; Waitz, Markus; Huang, Li; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is widely used in intensive care and emergency conditions to monitor arterial oxygenation and to guide oxygen therapy. To study the reliability of pulse oximetry in comparison with CO-oximetry in newborn piglets during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In a prospective cohort study in 30 healthy newborn piglets, cardiac arrest was induced, and thereafter each piglet received CPR for 20 min. Arterial oxygen saturation was monitored continuously by pulse oximetry (SpO2). Arterial blood was analyzed for functional oxygenation (SaO2) every 2 min. SpO2 was compared with coinciding SaO2 values and bias considered whenever the difference (SpO2 - SaO2) was beyond ±5%. Bias values were decreased at the baseline measurements (mean: 2.5 ± 4.6%) with higher precision and accuracy compared with values across the experiment. Two minutes after cardiac arrest, there was a marked decrease in precision and accuracy as well as an increase in bias up to 13 ± 34%, reaching a maximum of 45.6 ± 28.3% after 10 min over a mean SaO2 range of 29-58%. Pulse oximetry showed increased bias and decreased accuracy and precision during CPR in a model of neonatal cardiac arrest. We recommend further studies to clarify the exact mechanisms of these false readings to improve reliability of pulse oximetry during the marked desaturation and hypoperfusion found during CPR. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Solving fatigue-related problems with cardiac arrest survivors living in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Joo; Rogers, Joan C; Raina, Ketki D; Callaway, Clifton W; Rittenberger, Jon C; Leibold, Mary Lou; Holm, Margo B

    2017-09-01

    The aim was to describe fatigue-related problems reported by post-cardiac arrest adults with chronic fatigue and energy conservation strategies generated using an Energy Conservation plus Problem Solving Therapy intervention. Following an introduction to the intervention process outlined in a Participant Workbook, participants engaged in the telephone intervention by identifying one to two fatigue-related problems. They then brainstormed with the interventionist to identify potential strategies to reduce fatigue, tested them, and either modified the strategies or moved to the next problem over three to five sessions. Eighteen cardiac arrest survivors with chronic fatigue identified instrumental activities of daily living and leisure activities as fatigue-related activities more frequently than basic activities of daily living. Energy Conservation strategies used most frequently were: plan ahead, pace yourself, delegate to others, and simplify the task. Post-cardiac arrest adults living in the community with chronic fatigue can return to previous daily activities by using energy conservation strategies such as planning ahead, pacing tasks, delegating tasks, and simplifying tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiac arrest due to hyperkalemia following irradiated packed red cells transfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, Kazuharu [Yamamoto-kumiai General Hospital, Noshiro, Akita (Japan); Ohta, Sukejuurou; Kojima, Yukiko; Mizunuma, Takahide; Nishikawa, Toshiaki

    1998-11-01

    We describe two cases of cardiac arrest due to hyperkalemia following transfusion of irradiated packed red cells. Case 1: Because sudden, rapid and massive hemorrage occurred in a 69-year-old male patient undergoing the left lobectomy of the liver, 8 units of irradiated packed red cells were rapidly transfused, the patient developed cardiac arrest. Serum kalium concentration after transfusion was 7.6 mEq/l. Case 2: A 7-month-old girl scheduled for closure of a ventricular septal defect, developed cardiac arrest due to hyperkalemia at the start of cardiopulmonary bypass. The extracorporeal circuit was primed with 6 units of irradiated packed red blood cells. Serum kalium concentration immediately after the start of cardiopulmonary bypass was 10.6 mEq/l. Analysis of kalium concentration in the pilot tubes of the same packs revealed 56-61 mEq/l. These case reports suggest that fresh irradiated packed red cells should be transfused during massive bleeding and for pediatric patients to prevent severe hyperkalemia. (author)

  8. Improved performance of maternal-fetal medicine staff after maternal cardiac arrest simulation-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Nelli; Eisen, Lewis A; Bayya, Jyothshna V; Dulu, Alina; Bernstein, Peter S; Merkatz, Irwin R; Goffman, Dena

    2011-09-01

    To determine the impact of simulation-based maternal cardiac arrest training on performance, knowledge, and confidence among Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff. Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff (n = 19) participated in a maternal arrest simulation program. Based on evaluation of performance during initial simulations, an intervention was designed including: basic life support course, advanced cardiac life support pregnancy modification lecture, and simulation practice. Postintervention evaluative simulations were performed. All simulations included a knowledge test, confidence survey, and debriefing. A checklist with 9 pregnancy modification (maternal) and 16 critical care (25 total) tasks was used for scoring. Postintervention scores reflected statistically significant improvement. Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff demonstrated statistically significant improvement in timely initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (120 vs 32 seconds, P = .042) and cesarean delivery (240 vs 159 seconds, P = .017). Prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation initiation and pregnancy modifications application are critical in maternal and fetal survival during cardiac arrest. Simulation is a useful tool for Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff to improve skills, knowledge, and confidence in the management of this catastrophic event. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  9. Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality in trauma patients. A 14-yr survey from a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo T O Carlucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little information on the factors influencing intraoperative cardiac arrest and its outcomes in trauma patients is available. This survey evaluated the associated factors and outcomes of intraoperative cardiac arrest in trauma patients in a Brazilian teaching hospital between 1996 and 2009. METHODS: Cardiac arrest during anesthesia in trauma patients was identified from an anesthesia database. The data collected included patient demographics, ASA physical status classification, anesthesia provider information, type of surgery, surgical areas and outcome. All intraoperative cardiac arrests and deaths in trauma patients were reviewed and grouped by associated factors and also analyzed as totally anesthesia-related, partially anesthesia-related, totally surgery-related or totally trauma patient condition-related. FINDINGS: Fifty-one cardiac arrests and 42 deaths occurred during anesthesia in trauma patients. They were associated with male patients (P<0.001 and young adults (18-35 years (P=0.04 with ASA physical status IV or V (P<0.001 undergoing gastroenterological or multiclinical surgeries (P<0.001. Motor vehicle crashes and violence were the main causes of trauma (P<0.001. Uncontrolled hemorrhage or head injury were the most significant associated factors of intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality (P<0.001. All cardiac arrests and deaths reported were totally related to trauma patient condition. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality incidence was highest in male trauma patients at a younger age with poor clinical condition, mainly related to uncontrolled hemorrhage and head injury, resulted from motor vehicle accidents and violence.

  10. Serial measurement of neuron specific enolase improves prognostication in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron specific enolase (NSE has repeatedly been evaluated for neurological prognostication in patients after cardiac arrest. However, it is unclear whether current guidelines for NSE cutoff levels also apply to cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Thus, we investigated the prognostic significance of absolute NSE levels and NSE kinetics in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Methods In a prospective study of 35 patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, NSE was measured daily for four days following admission. Outcome was assessed at ICU discharge using the CPC score. All patients received hypothermia treatment for 24 hours at 33°C with a surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Results The cutoff for absolute NSE levels in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 72 hours after cardiac arrest was 57 μg/l with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.82 (sensitivity 47%, specificity 100%. The cutoff level for NSE kinetics in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 was an absolute increase of 7.9 μg/l (AUC 0.78, sensitivity 63%, specificity 100% and a relative increase of 33.1% (AUC 0.803, sensitivity 67%, specificity 100% at 48 hours compared to admission. Conclusion In cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia, prognostication of unfavourable outcome by NSE kinetics between admission and 48 hours after resuscitation may be superior to prognostication by absolute NSE levels.

  11. Results of rapid-response extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children with refractory cardiac arrest following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Awan, Abid; Manlhiot, Cedric; Guechef, Alexander; Al-Halees, Zohair; Al-Ahmadi, Mamdouh; McCrindle, Brian W; Kalloghlian, Avedis

    2014-02-01

    Survival of children having cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is very poor. We sought to examine current era outcomes of extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) support for refractory arrest following surgical correction of congenital heart disease. Demographic, anatomical, clinical, surgical and support details of children requiring postoperative ECPR (2007-12) were included in multivariable logistic regression models to determine the factors associated with survival. Thirty-nine children, median age 44 days (4 days-10 years), required postoperative ECPR at a median interval of 1 day (up to 15 days) after surgery. Thirteen (33%) children had single-ventricle pathology; Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS)-1 categories were 2, 3, 4 and 6 in 6, 15, 13 and 5 patients, respectively. Median CPR duration was 34 (8-125) min, while median support duration was 4 (1-17) days. Seven (18%) patients underwent cardiac re-operation, 28 (72%) survived >24 h after support discontinuation and 16 (41%) survived. Survival rates in neonates, infants and older children were 53, 39 and 17% (P=0.13). Survival rates for single- vs two-ventricle pathology patients were 54 and 35%, (P=0.25) and 50, 47, 23 and 60% in RACHS-1 2, 3, 4 and 6 patients, respectively (P=0.37). Survivors had shorter CPR duration (25 vs 34 min, P=0.05), lower pre-arrest lactate (2.6 vs 4.6 mmol/l, P=0.05) and postextracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) peak lactate (15.4 vs 20.0 mmol/l, P<0.001). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with death were higher immediate post-ECMO lactate (odds ratio, OR 1.34 per mmol/l, P=0.008) and renal failure requiring haemodialysis (OR 14.1, P=0.01). ECPR plays a valuable role in children having refractory postoperative cardiac arrest. Survival is unrelated to cardiac physiology or surgical complexity. Timely support prior to the emergence of end-organ injury and surgical correction of residual cardiac lesions might enhance

  12. Emergency feasibility in medical intensive care unit of extracorporeal life support for refractory cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégarbane, Bruno; Leprince, Pascal; Deye, Nicolas; Résière, Dabor; Guerrier, Gilles; Rettab, Samia; Théodore, Jonathan; Karyo, Souheil; Gandjbakhch, Iradj; Baud, Frédéric J

    2007-05-01

    To report the feasibility, complications, and outcomes of emergency extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in refractory cardiac arrests in medical intensive care unit (ICU). Prospective cohort study in the medical ICU in a university hospital in collaboration with the cardiosurgical team of a neighboring hospital. Seventeen patients (poisonings: 12/17) admitted over a 2-year period for cardiac arrest unresponsive to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and advanced cardiac life support, without return of spontaneous circulation. ECLS femoral implantation under continuous cardiac massage, using a centrifugal pump connected to a hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator. Stable ECLS was achieved in 14 of 17 patients. Early complications included massive transfusions (n=8) and the need for surgical revision at the cannulation site for bleeding (n=1). Four patients (24%) survived at medical ICU discharge. Deaths resulted from multiorgan failure (n=8), thoracic bleeding(n=2), severe sepsis (n=2), and brain death (n=1). Massive hemorrhagic pulmonary edema during CPR (n=5) and major capillary leak syndrome (n=6) were observed. Three cardiotoxic-poisoned patients (18%, CPR duration: 30, 100, and 180 min) were alive at 1-year follow-up without sequelae. Two of these patients survived despite elevated plasma lactate concentrations before cannulation (39.0 and 20.0 mmol/l). ECLS was associated with a significantly lower ICU mortality rate than that expected from the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (91.9%) and lower than the maximum Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (>90%). Emergency ECLS is feasible in medical ICU and should be considered as a resuscitative tool for selected patients suffering from refractory cardiac arrest.

  13. Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N; Hansen, Steen M; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Rajan, Shahzleen; Lippert, Freddy; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Fonager, Kirsten; Jensen, Svend E; Gerds, Thomas A; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2017-05-04

    The effect of bystander interventions on long-term functional outcomes among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has not been extensively studied. We linked nationwide data on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Denmark to functional outcome data and reported the 1-year risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period. During the study period, among the 2084 patients who had cardiac arrests that were not witnessed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, the rate of bystander CPR increased from 66.7% to 80.6% (Pbystander defibrillation increased from 2.1% to 16.8% (Pbystander CPR was associated with a risk of brain damage or nursing home admission that was significantly lower than that associated with no bystander resuscitation (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 0.82), as well as a lower risk of death from any cause (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.99) and a lower risk of the composite end point of brain damage, nursing home admission, or death (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.84). The risks of these outcomes were even lower among patients who received bystander defibrillation as compared with no bystander resuscitation. In our study, we found that bystander CPR and defibrillation were associated with risks of brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause that were significantly lower than those associated with no bystander resuscitation. (Funded by Tryg

  14. [Cardiac arrest in spectators in German football stadiums. Precautionary measures, frequency and short-term outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, T; Preisegger, T; Rombach, D; Madler, C

    2014-09-01

    Provision of medical care is an important element of safety precautions for visitors of sports arenas. The organizational requirements are especially high if cardiac arrest occurs; how this scenario is managed may thus serve as the ultimate indicator of the quality of stadium medical care. The objectives of this study were to analyze the structures and the resources available for the medical care of spectators in German professional soccer stadiums and to identify the frequency and the primary resuscitation success of cardiac arrest. In 2011 a questionnaire-based survey was performed among the clubs of the first and second German soccer leagues regarding medical care of spectators during the seasons 2008/2009 and 2009/2010. The focus was on the qualifications of emergency teams, the equipment and the incidence of cardiac arrest. A total of 15 stadiums were included (38%) in the survey. The mean number of physicians and emergency medical technicians on site was 0.6/10,000 seats and 16/10,000 seats, respectively. Of the latter, a mean of 82% (minimum 20% and maximum 100%) had received training with automatic external defibrillators. In 87% of the stadiums regular advanced life support training (ALS) was required. The mean number of defibrillators per stadium was 2.8/10,000 seats (minimum 1.3 and maximum 3.8) including 1.7 automatic defibrillators (minimum 0.4 and maximum 2.8). For patient transport, a mean of 0.65 ALS ambulance vehicles per 10,000 seats (minimum 0.14 and maximum 1.46) were available on site. In all stadiums staff members were connected via mobile radio communication with the stadium medical control room. A total of 52 cardiac arrests (=0.25/100,000 spectators) were recorded of which 96% of the patients were transported to hospitals with spontaneous circulation. Cardiac arrests are not a rare occurrence in German soccer stadiums. The participating stadiums are overall well prepared for such incidents in terms of organization, staff and technology and

  15. Transient cardiac arrest in patient with left ventricular noncompaction (spongiform cardiomyopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shinya; Ito, Hiroshi; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC), also known as spongiform cardiomyopathy, is a severe disease that has not previously been discussed with respect to general anesthesia. We treated a child with LVNC who experienced cardiac arrest. Dental treatment under general anesthesia was scheduled because the patient had a risk of endocarditis due to dental caries along with a history of being uncooperative for dental care. During sevoflurane induction, severe hypotension and laryngospasm resulted in cardiac arrest. Basic life support (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) was initiated to resuscitate the child, and his cardiorespiratory condition improved. Thereafter, an opioid-based anesthetic was performed, and recovery was smooth. In LVNC, opioid-based anesthesia is suggested to avoid the significant cardiac suppression seen with a volatile anesthetic, once intravenous access is established. Additionally, all operating room staff should master Advanced Cardiac Life Support/Pediatric Advanced Life Support (including intraosseous access), and more than 1 anesthesiologist should be present to induce general anesthesia, if possible, for this high-risk patient.

  16. Relationship between arterial partial oxygen pressure after resuscitation from cardiac arrest and mortality in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lee P; Durward, Andrew; Tibby, Shane M

    2012-07-17

    Observational studies in adults have shown a worse outcome associated with hyperoxia after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Extrapolating from adult data, current pediatric resuscitation guidelines recommend avoiding hyperoxia. We investigated the relationship between arterial partial oxygen pressure and survival in patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) after cardiac arrest. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Pediatric Intensive Care Audit Network (PICANet) database between 2003 and 2010 (n=122,521). Patients aged oxygen status and outcome was modeled with logistic regression, with nonlinearities explored via multivariable fractional polynomials. Covariates included age, sex, ethnicity, congenital heart disease, out-of-hospital arrest, year, Pediatric Index of Mortality-2 (PIM2) mortality risk, and organ supportive therapies. Of 1875 patients, 735 (39%) died in PICU. Based on the first arterial gas, 207 patients (11%) had hyperoxia (Pa(O)(2) ≥300 mm Hg) and 448 (24%) had hypoxia (Pa(O)(2) <60 mm Hg). We found a significant nonlinear relationship between Pa(O)(2) and PICU mortality. After covariate adjustment, risk of death increased sharply with increasing hypoxia (odds ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.80-2.21 at Pa(O)(2) of 23 mm Hg). There was also an association with increasing hyperoxia, although not as dramatic as that for hypoxia (odds ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.37 at 600 mm Hg). We observed an increasing mortality risk with advancing age, which was more pronounced in the presence of congenital heart disease. Both severe hypoxia and, to a lesser extent, hyperoxia are associated with an increased risk of death after PICU admission after cardiac arrest.

  17. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime facilitates successful resuscitation in a dose-dependent fashion in a pig model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Kook; Kim, Mu Jin; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Choi, Sung Soo; Park, Sang Wook; Yun, Seong Woo; Lee, Sung Min; Lee, Dong Hun; Min, Yong Il

    2016-06-01

    Ischemic contracture compromises the hemodynamic effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and resuscitability from cardiac arrest. In a pig model of cardiac arrest, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) attenuated ischemic contracture. We investigated the effects of different doses of BDM to determine whether increasing the dose of BDM could improve the hemodynamic effectiveness of CPR further, thus ultimately improving resuscitability. After 16minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation and 8minutes of basic life support, 36 pigs were divided randomly into 3 groups that received 50mg/kg (low-dose group) of BDM, 100mg/kg (high-dose group) of BDM, or an equivalent volume of saline (control group) during advanced cardiovascular life support. During advanced cardiovascular life support, the control group showed an increase in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and a decrease in LV chamber area. In contrast, the BDM-treated groups showed a decrease in the LV wall thickness and an increase in the LV chamber area in a dose-dependent fashion. Mixed-model analyses of the LV wall thickness and LV chamber area revealed significant group effects and group-time interactions. Central venous oxygen saturation at 3minutes after the drug administration was 21.6% (18.4-31.9), 39.2% (28.8-53.7), and 54.0% (47.5-69.4) in the control, low-dose, and high-dose groups, respectively (Pfashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Insertable cardiac event recorder in detection of atrial fibrillation after cryptogenic stroke: an audit report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etgen, Thorleif; Hochreiter, Manfred; Mundel, Markus; Freudenberger, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent risk factor in ischemic stroke but often remains undetected. We analyzed the value of insertable cardiac event recorder in detection of AF in a 1-year cohort of patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke. All patients with cryptogenic stroke and eligibility for oral anticoagulation were offered the insertion of a cardiac event recorder. Regular follow-up for 1 year recorded the incidence of AF. Of the 393 patients with ischemic stroke, 65 (16.5%) had a cryptogenic stroke, and in 22 eligible patients, an event recorder was inserted. After 1 year, in 6 of 22 patients (27.3%), AF was detected. These preliminary data show that insertion of cardiac event recorder was eligible in approximately one third of patients with cryptogenic stroke and detected in approximately one quarter of these patients new AF.

  19. Identifying Important Gaps in Randomized Controlled Trials of Adult Cardiac Arrest Treatments: A Systematic Review of the Published Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shashank S.; Sukul, Devraj; Lazarus, John J.; Polavarapu, Vivek; Chan, Paul S.; Neumar, Robert W.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac arrests are a major public health concern worldwide. The extent and types of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) – our most reliable source of clinical evidence – conducted in these high-risk patients over recent years are largely unknown. Methods and Results We performed a systematic review, identifying all RCTs published in PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library from 1995 to 2014 that focused on acute treatment of non-traumatic cardiac arrest in adults. We then extracted data on the setting of study populations, types and timing of interventions studied, risk of bias, outcomes reported and how these factors have changed over time. Over this twenty-year period, 92 RCTs were published containing 64,309 patients (median, 225.5 per trial). Of these, 81 RCTs (88.0%) involved out-of-hospital cardiac arrest whereas 4 (4.3%) involved in-hospital cardiac arrest and 7 (7.6%) included both. Eighteen RCTs (19.6%) were performed in the U.S., 68 (73.9%) were performed outside the U.S., and 6 (6.5%) were performed in both settings. Thirty-eight RCTs (41.3%) evaluated drug therapy, 39 (42.4%) evaluated device therapy, and 15 (16.3%) evaluated protocol improvements. Seventy-four RCTs (80.4%) examined interventions during the cardiac arrest, 15 (16.3%) examined post-cardiac arrest treatment, and 3 (3.3%) studied both. Overall, reporting of risk of bias was limited. The most common outcome reported was ROSC: 86 (93.5%) with only 22 (23.9%) reporting survival beyond 6 months. Fifty-three RCTs (57.6%) reported global ordinal outcomes whereas 15 (16.3%) reported quality-of-life. RCTs in the last 5 years were more likely to be focused on protocol improvement and post-cardiac arrest care. Conclusions Important gaps in RCTs of cardiac arrest treatments exist, especially those examining in-hospital cardiac arrest, protocol improvement, post-cardiac arrest care, and long-term or quality-of-life outcomes. PMID:27756794

  20. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest : rationale and outline of the AmsteRdam Resuscitation Studies (ARREST) registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A; Berdowski, J; Souverein, P C; De Bruin, M L; Koster, R W; de Boer, A; Tan, H L

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA.

  1. Serum Potassium Changes During Therapeutic Hypothermia After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest-Should It Be Treated?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soeholm, Helle; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with adverse events, for example hypokalemia and arrhythmias. In the present study, we report the impact of serum potassium changes related to the rate of cardiac arrhythmias, and the advantages...

  2. Early central diabetes insipidus: An ominous sign in post-cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Minjung Kathy; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Tae Rim; Yoon, Hee; Hwang, Sung Yeon; Cha, Won Chul; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Keun Jeong; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) after cardiac arrest is not well described. Thus, we aim to study the occurrences, outcomes, and risk factors of CDI of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We retrospectively analyzed post-OHCA patients treated at a single center. Central diabetes insipidus was retrospectively defined by diagnostic criteria. One-month cerebral performance category (CPC) scores were collected for outcomes. Of the 169 patients evaluated, 36 patients (21.3%) were diagnosed with CDI. All CDI patients had a poor neurologic outcome of either CPC 4 (13.9%) or CPC 5 (86.1%), and CDI was strongly associated with mortality. Age (odds ratio [OR], 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-0.99), respiratory arrest (OR, 6.62; 95% CI, 1.23-35.44), asphyxia (OR, 9.26; 95% CI, 2.17-34.61), and gray to white matter ratio on brain computed tomogram (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95) were associated with the development of CDI. The onset of CDI was earlier (P diabetes insipidus patients with death or brain death had earlier occurrence of CDI and more maximum urine output. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Study regarding the survival of patients suffering a traumatic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, V; Tudorache, O; Nicolau, M; Strambu, V

    2015-01-01

    Severe trauma is the most frequent cause of death in young people, in civilized countries with major social and vital costs. The speed of diagnostic decision making and the precocity of treatment approaches are both essential and depend on the specialists' colaboration. The present study aims to emphasize the actual situation of medical interventions in case of cardiorespiratory arrest due to trauma. 1387 patients who suffered a cardio respiratory arrest both traumatic and non-traumatic were included in order to point out the place of traumatic arrest. Resuscitation of such patients is considered useless and resource consumer by many trauma practitioners who are reporting survival rates of 0%-3.5%. As the determinant of lesions, trauma etiology was as it follows car accidents - 43%, high falls - 30%, suicidal attempts - 3%, domestic violence - 3%, other causes - 21%. Hypovolemia remains the major cause of cardiac arrest and death and that is why the efforts of emergency providers (trauma team) must be oriented towards "hidden death" in order to avoid it. This condition could be revealed and solved easier with minimal diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers in the emergency department.

  4. Cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy: an analysis of incidence and risk factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Johanne

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is thought that patients with cardiomyopathy have an increased risk of cardiac arrest on induction of anesthesia, but there is little available data. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and potential risk factors for cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy in our institution. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed. Eligible patients included patients admitted between 1998 and 2008 with the International Statistical Classification of Disease code for cardiomyopathy (ICD-9 code 425) who underwent airway intervention for sedation or general anesthesia in the operating room, cardiac diagnostic and interventional unit (CDIU) or intensive care unit. Patients undergoing emergency airway intervention following cardiovascular collapse were excluded. For each patient, we recorded patient demographics, disease severity, anesthesia location, and anesthetic technique. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with cardiomyopathy underwent a total of 236 anesthetic events, and four cardiac arrests were identified. One was related to bradycardia (HR<60), two were attributed to bradycardia in association with severe hypotension (systolic blood pressure<45), and the fourth arrest was related to isolated severe hypotension. Two occurred in the operating suite and two in the CDIU. There was no resulting mortality. One patient progressed to heart transplantation. Multiple combinations of anesthetic drugs were used for induction of anesthesia. CONCLUSION: We performed a review of the last 10 years of anesthesia events in children with cardiomyopathy. We report four cardiac arrests in two patients and 236 anesthetic events (1.7%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest review of these patients to date but is limited by its retrospective nature. The low cardiac arrest incidence prevents the identification of risk factors and the development of a cardiac arrest risk predictive clinical

  5. Improving outcomes from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in young children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Dianne L; Berger, Stuart

    2012-03-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an unusual but devastating occurrence in a young person. Years of life-lost are substantial and long-term health care costs of survivors can be high. However, there have been noteworthy improvements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) standards, out-of hospital care, and postcardiac arrest therapies that have resulted in a several-fold improvement in resuscitation outcomes. Recent interest and research in resuscitation of children has the promise of generating improvements in the outcomes of these patients. Integrated and coordinated care in the out-of-hospital and hospital settings are required. This article will review the epidemiology of OHCA, the 2010 CPR guidelines, and developments in public access defibrillation for children.

  6. Percutenous Catheter Ablation of the Accessory Pathway in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Associated with Familial Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Topaloglu, Serkan; Aras, Dursun

    2008-01-01

    Percutenous catheter ablation of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a highly successful mode of therapy. Sudden cardiac arrest survivors associated with WPW syndrome should undergo radiofrequency catheter ablation. WPW syndrome associated with familial atrial fibrillation is a very rare condition. Herein, we describe a case who presented with sudden cardiac arrest secondary to WPW syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation and treated via radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:18379660

  7. Percutenous Catheter Ablation of the Accessory Pathway in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Associated with Familial Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Cay

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Percutenous catheter ablation of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a highly successful mode of therapy. Sudden cardiac arrest survivors associated with WPW syndrome should undergo radiofrequency catheter ablation. WPW syndrome associated with familial atrial fibrillation is a very rare condition. Herein, we describe a case who presented with sudden cardiac arrest secondary to WPW syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation and treated via radiofrequency catheter ablation.

  8. Prognostic value of relative adrenal insufficiency after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pene, Frédéric; Hyvernat, Hervé; Mallet, Vincent; Cariou, Alain; Carli, Pierre; Spaulding, Christian; Dugue, Marie-Annick; Mira, Jean-Paul

    2005-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of relative adrenal insufficiency in patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest, and its prognostic role in post-resuscitation disease. A prospective observational single-center study in a medical intensive care unit. 64 patients hospitalised in the intensive care unit after successful resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A corticotropin-stimulation test was performed between 12 and 24 h following admission: serum cortisol level was measured before and 60 min after administration of tetracosactide 250 microg. Patients with an incremental response less than 9 microg/dl were considered to have relative adrenal insufficiency (non-responders). Variables were expressed as medians and interquartile ranges. 33 patients (52%) had relative adrenal insufficiency. Baseline cortisol level was higher in non-responders than in responders (41 [27.2-55.5] vs. 22.8 [15.7-35.1] microg/dl respectively, P=0.001). A long interval before initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was associated with relative adrenal insufficiency (5 [3-10] vs. 3 [3-5] min, P=0.03). Of the 38 patients with post-resuscitation shock, 13 died of irreversible multiorgan failure. The presence of relative adrenal insufficiency was identified as a poor prognostic factor of shock-related mortality (log-rank P=0.02). A trend towards higher mortality in non-responders was identified in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio 6.77, CI 95% 0.94-48.99, P=0.058). Relative adrenal insufficiency occurs frequently after successful resuscitation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and appears to be associated with a poor prognosis in cases of post-resuscitation shock. The role of corticosteroid supplementation should be evaluated in this setting.

  9. Laryngeal tube use in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by paramedics in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunde Geir A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there are numerous supraglottic airway alternatives to endotracheal intubation, it remains unclear which airway technique is optimal for use in prehospital cardiac arrests. We evaluated the use of the laryngeal tube (LT as an airway management tool among adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients treated by our ambulance services in the Haukeland and Innlandet hospital districts. Methods Post-resuscitation forms and data concerning airway management in 347 adult OHCA victims were retrospectively assessed with regard to LT insertion success rates, ease and speed of insertion and insertion-related problems. Results A total of 402 insertions were performed on 347 OHCA patients. Overall, LT insertion was successful in 85.3% of the patients, with a 74.4% first-attempt success rate. In the minority of patients (n = 46, 13.3%, the LT insertion time exceeded 30 seconds. Insertion-related problems were recorded in 52.7% of the patients. Lack of respiratory sounds on auscultation (n = 100, 28.8%, problematic initial tube positioning (n = 85, 24.5%, air leakage (n = 61, 17.6%, vomitus/aspiration (n = 44, 12.7%, and tube dislocation (n = 17, 4.9% were the most common problems reported. Insertion difficulty was graded and documented for 95.4% of the patients, with the majority of insertions assessed as being “Easy” (62.5% or “Intermediate” (24.8%. Only 8.1% of the insertions were considered to be “Difficult”. Conclusions We found a high number of insertion related problems, indicating that supraglottic airway devices offering promising results in manikin studies may be less reliable in real-life resuscitations. Still, we consider the laryngeal tube to be an important alternative for airway management in prehospital cardiac arrest victims.

  10. Ambulance cardiopulmonary resuscitation: outcomes and associated factors in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell Ortiz, Fernando; García Del Águila, Javier; Fernández Del Valle, Patricia; J Mellado-Vergel, Francisco; Vergara-Pérez, Santiago; R Ruiz-Montero, María; Martínez-Lara, Manuela; J Gómez-Jiménez, Francisco; Gonzáez-Lobato, Ismael; García-Escudero, Guillermo; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Caballero-García, Auxiliadora; Vivar-Díaz, Itziar; Olavarría-Govantes, Luis

    2018-06-01

    To assess factors associated with survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during ambulance transport. Retrospective analysis of a registry of OHCA cases treated between 2008 and 2014. We included patients who had not recovered circulation at the time it was decided to transport to a hospital and who were rejected as non-heart-beating donors. Multivariate analysis was used to explore factors associated with the use of ambulance CPR, survival, and neurologic outcome. Out of a total of 7241 cases, 259 (3.6%) were given CPR during emergency transport. The mean (SD) age was 51.6 (23.6) years; 27 (10.1%) were aged 16 years or younger. The following variables were associated with the use of CPR during transport: age 16 years or under (odds ratio [OR], 6.48; 95% CI, 3.91-10.76); P<.001)], witnessed OHCA (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.16-2.26; P=.004), cardiac arrest outside the home (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 2.38-4.21; P<.001), noncardiac cause (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07-2.02; P=.019], initially shockable rhythm (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.17-2.37; P=.004), no prior basic life support (OR, 3.48; 95% CI, 2.58-4.70; P<.001), and orotracheal intubation (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.24-2.99; P=.003). One patient (0.38%) survived to discharge with good neurologic outcome. Ambulance CPR by a physician on board is applied in few OHCA cases. Young patient age, cardiac arrest outside the home, the presence of a witness, lack of a shockable rhythm on responder arrival, lack of basic life support prior to responder arrival, noncardiac cause, and orotracheal intubation are associated with the use of ambulance CPR, a strategy that can be considered futile.

  11. Take Heart America: A comprehensive, community-wide, systems-based approach to the treatment of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lick, Charles J; Aufderheide, Tom P; Niskanen, Robert A; Steinkamp, Janet E; Davis, Scott P; Nygaard, Susan D; Bemenderfer, Kim K; Gonzales, Louis; Kalla, Jeffrey A; Wald, Sarah K; Gillquist, Debbie L; Sayre, Michael R; Osaki Holm, Susie Y; Oski Holm, Susie Y; Oakes, Dana A; Provo, Terry A; Racht, Ed M; Olsen, John D; Yannopoulos, Demetris; Lurie, Keith G

    2011-01-01

    To determine out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival rates before and after implementation of the Take Heart America program (a community-based initiative that sequentially deployed all of the most highly recommended 2005 American Heart Association resuscitation guidelines in an effort to increase out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival). Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in Anoka County, MN, and greater St. Cloud, MN, from November 2005 to June 2009. Two sites in Minnesota with a combined population of 439,692 people (greater St. Cloud and Anoka County) implemented: 1) widespread cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator skills training in schools and businesses; 2) retraining of all emergency medical services personnel in methods to enhance circulation, including minimizing cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruptions, performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation before and after single-shock defibrillation, and use of an impedance threshold device; 3) additional deployment of automated external defibrillators in schools and public places; and 4) protocols for transport to and treatment by cardiac arrest centers for therapeutic hypothermia, coronary artery evaluation and treatment, and electrophysiological evaluation. More than 28,000 people were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator use in the two sites. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates increased from 20% to 29% (p = .086, odds ratio 1.7, 95% confidence interval 0.96-2.89). Three cardiac arrest centers were established, and hypothermia therapy for admitted out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims increased from 0% to 45%. Survival to hospital discharge for all patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in these two sites improved from 8.5% (nine of 106, historical control) to 19% (48 of 247, intervention phase) (p = .011, odds ratio 2.60, confidence interval 1.19-6.26). A financial analysis revealed that the cardiac arrest centers

  12. Combining creatinine and volume kinetics identifies missed cases of acute kidney injury following cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Fluid resuscitation in the critically ill often results in a positive fluid balance, potentially diluting the serum creatinine concentration and delaying diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods Dilution during AKI was quantified by combining creatinine and volume kinetics to account for fluid type, and rates of fluid infusion and urine output. The model was refined using simulated patients receiving crystalloids or colloids under four glomerular filtration rate (GFR) change scenarios and then applied to a cohort of critically ill patients following cardiac arrest. Results The creatinine concentration decreased during six hours of fluid infusion at 1 litre-per-hour in simulated patients, irrespective of fluid type or extent of change in GFR (from 0% to 67% reduction). This delayed diagnosis of AKI by 2 to 9 hours. Crystalloids reduced creatinine concentration by 11 to 19% whereas colloids reduced concentration by 36 to 43%. The greatest reduction was at the end of the infusion period. Fluid dilution alone could not explain the rapid reduction of plasma creatinine concentration observed in 39 of 49 patients after cardiac arrest. Additional loss of creatinine production could account for those changes. AKI was suggested in six patients demonstrating little change in creatinine, since a 52 ± 13% reduction in GFR was required after accounting for fluid dilution and reduced creatinine production. Increased injury biomarkers within a few hours of cardiac arrest, including urinary cystatin C and plasma and urinary Neutrophil-Gelatinase-Associated-Lipocalin (biomarker-positive, creatinine-negative patients) also indicated AKI in these patients. Conclusions Creatinine and volume kinetics combined to quantify GFR loss, even in the absence of an increase in creatinine. The model improved disease severity estimation, and demonstrated that diagnostic delays due to dilution are minimally affected by fluid type. Creatinine sampling should be delayed at least

  13. Platelet aggregation during targeted temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Anni Nørgaard; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Grejs, Anders Morten

    2017-01-01

    Some studies conclude that mild hypothermia causes platelet dysfunction leading to an increased bleeding risk, whereas others state that platelet aggregation is enhanced during mild hypothermia. Therefore, the aim of this study was to clarify whether standard or prolonged duration of targeted...... temperature management affected platelet aggregation. We randomised 82 comatose patients resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to either 24 hours (standard group) or 48 hours (prolonged group) of targeted temperature management at 33±1°C. Blood samples were collected 22 hours, 46 hours and 70......® decreased by 14% (95% CI -8%;-20%), p management....

  14. EMuRgency: Addressing cardiac arrest with socio-technical innovation in a smart learning region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jeschke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the EMuRgency project. The project has the goal to increase awareness and competences regarding the problem of cardiac arrest in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine (EMR and to use socio-technical innovations to transfer it into a smart learning region. Based on the conscious competence framework solutions for stakeholders on different levels of the framework are introduced, namely a public display network, mobile learning apps and a volunteer notification system. Finally, a future research outlook is given.

  15. Emergency cricothyrotomy for trismus caused by instantaneous rigor in cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hee; Jung, Koo Young

    2012-07-01

    Instantaneous rigor as muscle stiffening occurring in the moment of death (or cardiac arrest) can be confused with rigor mortis. If trismus is caused by instantaneous rigor, orotracheal intubation is impossible and a surgical airway should be secured. Here, we report 2 patients who had emergency cricothyrotomy for trismus caused by instantaneous rigor. This case report aims to help physicians understand instantaneous rigor and to emphasize the importance of securing a surgical airway quickly on the occurrence of trismus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Benefits of computer screen-based simulation in learning cardiac arrest procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnetain, Elodie; Boucheix, Jean-Michel; Hamet, Maël; Freysz, Marc

    2010-07-01

    What is the best way to train medical students early so that they acquire basic skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation as effectively as possible? Studies have shown the benefits of high-fidelity patient simulators, but have also demonstrated their limits. New computer screen-based multimedia simulators have fewer constraints than high-fidelity patient simulators. In this area, as yet, there has been no research on the effectiveness of transfer of learning from a computer screen-based simulator to more realistic situations such as those encountered with high-fidelity patient simulators. We tested the benefits of learning cardiac arrest procedures using a multimedia computer screen-based simulator in 28 Year 2 medical students. Just before the end of the traditional resuscitation course, we compared two groups. An experiment group (EG) was first asked to learn to perform the appropriate procedures in a cardiac arrest scenario (CA1) in the computer screen-based learning environment and was then tested on a high-fidelity patient simulator in another cardiac arrest simulation (CA2). While the EG was learning to perform CA1 procedures in the computer screen-based learning environment, a control group (CG) actively continued to learn cardiac arrest procedures using practical exercises in a traditional class environment. Both groups were given the same amount of practice, exercises and trials. The CG was then also tested on the high-fidelity patient simulator for CA2, after which it was asked to perform CA1 using the computer screen-based simulator. Performances with both simulators were scored on a precise 23-point scale. On the test on a high-fidelity patient simulator, the EG trained with a multimedia computer screen-based simulator performed significantly better than the CG trained with traditional exercises and practice (16.21 versus 11.13 of 23 possible points, respectively; p<0.001). Computer screen-based simulation appears to be effective in preparing learners to

  17. Medical attention proposal for patients under the iodo therapy in cardiac arrest cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, A.L.; Bacelar, A.; Campomar, A.; Fialkowski, S.; Zaluski, M.A.; Lucena, A.F.

    1996-01-01

    This research has like aim to present a proposition about how to attend the patients which are under the iodo therapy, and the possibility they can show a cardiac arrest during their hospitalization. The physical medical department with the nurse group and the team of ICU (Intensive Care Unit) looked for to establish basic norms of radiological protection in order to avoid the radiation and contamination of all workers involved with one patient, without changing the routine of attendance service. We analyzed all rules of service including the attendance the hospital room and mainly if it is necessary to lead the patient to the ICU. (authors). 4 refs

  18. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic hypothermia and post-resuscitation care after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrén, M; Silfvast, T; Rubertsson, S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Sudden cardiac arrest survivors suffer from ischaemic brain injury that may lead to poor neurological outcome and death. The reperfusion injury that occurs is associated with damaging biochemical reactions, which are suppressed by mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH). In several...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (SSAI). METHODS: Relevant studies were identified after two consensus meetings of the SSAI Task Force on Therapeutic Hypothermia (SSAITFTH) and via literature search of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Medline. Evidence was assessed and consensus...

  19. Sinus bradycardia during hypothermia in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bradycardia is a common finding in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), presumably as a normal physiological response to low body temperature. We hypothesized that a normal physiological response with sinus bradycardia (SB...... the hypothermia phase of TH had a 17% 180-day mortality rate compared to 38% in no-SB patients (phypothermia was directly associated with lower odds of unfavorable...... neurological outcome (ORunadjusted=0.42 (0.23-0.75, phypothermia is independently associated with a lower 180-day mortality rate and may thus be a novel, early marker of favorable outcome in comatose survivors of OHCA....

  20. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival in rural Northwest Ireland: 17 years' experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Masterson, Siobhán

    2011-05-01

    SAVES, the name used to describe a register of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), was established in rural Northwest Ireland in 1992. From 1992 to 2008, 80 survivors were identified (population 239,000 (2006)). Most incidents were witnessed (69\\/70) and all were in shockable rhythm at the time of first rhythm analysis (66\\/66). Of 66 patients who could be traced, 46 were alive in December 2008. Average survival rates appeared to increase over the lifetime of the database. SAVES has also contributed to the development of a national OHCA register.

  1. [Assessment of the prognosis in patients who remain comatose after resuscitation from cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Emilie; Fedder, Anette Marianne; Dyrskog, Stig Eric; Degn, Niels Sanderhoff; Hassager, Christian; Jensen, Reinhold; Kirkegaard, Hans; Weber, Sven; Hoffmann-Petersen, Joachim Torp; Larsen, Niels Heden; Strange, Ditte Gry; Sonne, Morten; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-06-30

    In Denmark there are around 3,500 unexpected cardiac arrests (CA) out of hospital each year. There is an unknown number of CA in hospitals. The survival rate after CA outside a hospital in Denmark is 10% after 30 days. There are varying data for the neurological outcome in this group of patients. The purpose of this work is to disseminate new knowledge and to help standardizing the treatment in the group of patients who remain comatose after being resuscitated from CA. Assessment of the prognosis for a patient in this group can be made after 72 hours and a multi-modal approach to the patient is required.

  2. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Probability of bystander defibrillation relative to distance to nearest automated external defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergaard, Kathrine B; Hansen, Steen Moller; Pallisgaard, Jannik L; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Wissenberg, Mads; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy K; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Folke, Fredrik

    2018-03-01

    Despite wide dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), bystander defibrillation rates remain low. We aimed to investigate how route distance to the nearest accessible AED was associated with probability of bystander defibrillation in public and residential locations. We used data from the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry and the Danish AED Network to identify out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and route distances to nearest accessible registered AED during 2008-2013. The association between route distance and bystander defibrillation was described using restricted cubic spline logistic regression. We included 6971 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases. The proportion of arrests according to distance in meters (≤100, 101-200, >200) to the nearest accessible AED was: 4.6% (n=320), 5.3% (n=370), and 90.1% (n=6281), respectively. For cardiac arrests in public locations, the probability of bystander defibrillation at 0, 100 and 200m from the nearest AED was 35.7% (95% confidence interval 28.0%-43.5%), 21.3% (95% confidence interval 17.4%-25.2%), and 13.7% (95% confidence interval 10.1%-16.8%), respectively. The corresponding numbers for cardiac arrests in residential locations were 7.0% (95% confidence interval -2.1%-16.1%), 1.5% (95% confidence interval 0.002%-2.8%), and 0.9% (95% confidence interval 0.0005%-1.7%), respectively. In public locations, the probability of bystander defibrillation decreased rapidly within the first 100m route distance from cardiac arrest to nearest accessible AED whereas the probability of bystander defibrillation was low for all distances in residential areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of out-of-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest in Qatar: A nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Furqan B; Consunji, Rafael; El-Menyar, Ayman; George, Pooja; Peralta, Ruben; Al-Thani, Hassan; Thomas, Stephen Hodges; Alinier, Guillaume; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Singh, Rajvir; Castren, Maaret; Cameron, Peter A; Djarv, Therese

    2017-08-01

    Traumatic cardiac arrest studies have reported improved survival rates recently, ranging from 1.7-7.5%. This population-based nationwide study aims to describe the epidemiology, interventions and outcomes, and determine predictors of survival from out-of-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest (OHTCA) in Qatar. An observational retrospective population-based study was conducted on OHTCA patients in Qatar, from January 2010 to December 2015. Traumatic cardiac arrest was redefined to include out-of-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest (OHTCA) and in-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest (IHTCA). A total of 410 OHTCA patients were included in the 6-year study period. The mean annual crude incidence rate of OHTCA was 4.0 per 100,000 population, in Qatar. OHTCA mostly occurred in males with a median age of 33. There was a preponderance of blunt injuries (94.3%) and head injuries (66.3%). Overall, the survival rate was 2.4%. Shockable rhythm, prehospital external hemorrhage control, in-hospital blood transfusion, and surgery were associated with higher odds of survival. Adrenaline (Epinephrine) lowered the odds of survival. The incidence of OHTCA was less than expected, with a low rate of survival. Thoracotomy was not associated with improved survival while Adrenaline administration lowered survival in OHTCA patients with majority blunt injuries. Interventions to enable early prehospital control of hemorrhage, blood transfusion, thoracostomy and surgery improved survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    ); and in females (4.8% in 2001 to 6.7% in 2010), psexes in patients with a non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.00; CI 0.72-1.40), while female sex was positively associated...... characteristics in females with a lower proportion of shockable rhythm. In an adjusted model, female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm.......AIM: Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. METHODS: Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation...

  5. Estimating cost-effectiveness of mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation training strategies to improve survival from cardiac arrest in private locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swor, Robert; Compton, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Most cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) trainees are young, and most cardiac arrests occur in private residences witnessed by older individuals. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of a CPR training program targeted at citizens over the age of 50 years compared with that of current nontargeted public CPR training. A model was developed using cardiac arrest and known demographic data from a single suburban zip code (population 36,325) including: local data (1997-1999) regarding cardiac arrest locations (public vs. private); incremental survival with CPR (historical survival rate 7.8%, adjusted odds ratio for CPR 2.0); arrest bystander demographics obtained from bystander telephone interviews; zip code demographics regarding population age and distribution; and 12.50 dollars per student for the cost of CPR training. Published rates of CPR training programs by age were used to estimate the numbers typically trained. Several assumptions were made: 1) there would be one bystander per. arrest; 2) the bystander would always perform CPR if trained; 3) cardiac arrest would be evenly distributed in the population; and 4) CPR training for a proportion of the population would proportionally increase CPR provision. Rates of arrest, bystanders by age, number of CPR trainees needed to result in increased arrest survival, and training cost per life saved for a one-year study period were calculated. There were 24.3 cardiac arrests per year, with 21.9 (90%) occurring in homes. In 66.5% of the home arrests, the bystander was more than 50 years old. To yield one additional survivor using the current CPR training strategy, 12,306 people needed to be trained (3,510 bystanders aged 50 years), which resulted in CPR provision to 7.14 additional patients. The training cost per life saved for a bystander aged 50 years was 785,040 dollars. Using a strategy of training only those cost of 53,383 dollars per life saved. Using these assumptions, current CPR training strategy is not a cost

  6. Blood levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Stoppe

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion injury following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is associated with a systemic inflammatory response, resulting in post-resuscitation disease. In the present study we investigated the response of the pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF to CPR in patients admitted to the hospital after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. To describe the magnitude of MIF release, we compared the blood levels from CPR patients with those obtained in healthy volunteers and with an aged- and gender-matched group of patients undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of extracorporeal circulation.Blood samples of 17 patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC after OHCA were obtained upon admission to the intensive care unit, and 6, 12, 24, 72 and 96 h later. Arrest and treatment related data were documented according to the Utstein style.In patients after ROSC, MIF levels at admission (475.2±157.8 ng/ml were significantly higher than in healthy volunteers (12.5±16.9 ng/ml, p<0.007 and in patients after cardiac surgery (78.2±41.6 ng/ml, p<0.007. Six hours after admission, MIF levels were decreased by more than 50% (150.5±127.2 ng/ml, p<0.007, but were not further reduced in the subsequent time course and remained significantly higher than the values observed during the ICU stay of cardiac surgical patients. In this small group of patients, MIF levels could not discriminate between survivors and non-survivors and were not affected by treatment with mild therapeutic hypothermia.MIF shows a rapid and pronounced increase following CPR, hence allowing a very early assessment of the inflammatory response. Further studies are warranted in larger patient groups to determine the prognostic significance of MIF.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01412619.

  7. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Morimura, Naoto; Nagao, Ken; Asai, Yasufumi; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Tahara, Yoshio; Atsumi, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    A favorable neurological outcome is likely to be achieved in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients with ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) on the initial electrocardiogram (ECG). However, in patients without pre-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation despite the initial VF/VT, the outcome is extremely low by conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) may enhance cerebral blood flow and recovery of neurological function. We prospectively examined how ECPR for OHCA with VF/VT would affect neurological outcomes. The design of this trial was a prospective, observational study. We compared differences of outcome at 1 and 6 months after OHCA between ECPR group (26 hospitals) and non-ECPR group (20 hospitals). Primary endpoints were the rate of favorable outcomes defined by the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance and Overall Performance Categories (CPC) 1 or 2 at 1 and 6 months after OHCA. Based on intention-to-treat analysis, CPC 1 or 2 were 12.3% (32/260) in the ECPR group and 1.5% (3/194) in the non-ECPR group at 1 month (P<0.0001), and 11.2% (29/260) and 2.6% (5/194) at 6 months (P=0.001), respectively. By per protocol analysis, CPC 1 or 2 were 13.7% (32/234) in the ECPR group and 1.9% (3/159) in the non-ECPR group at 1 month (P<0.0001), and 12.4% (29/234) and 3.1% (5/159) at 6 months (P=0.002), respectively. In OHCA patients with VF/VT on the initial ECG, a treatment bundle including ECPR, therapeutic hypothermia and IABP was associated with improved neurological outcome at 1 and 6 months after OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamic effects of adrenaline (epinephrine) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial pulseless electrical activity (PEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordseth, Trond; Olasveengen, Theresa Mariero; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Wik, Lars; Steen, Petter Andreas; Skogvoll, Eirik

    2012-08-01

    In cardiac arrest, pulseless electrical activity (PEA) is a challenging clinical syndrome. In a randomized study comparing intravenous (i.v.) access and drugs versus no i.v. access or drugs during advanced life support (ALS), adrenaline (epinephrine) improved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in patients with PEA. Originating from this study, we investigated the time-dependent effects of adrenaline on clinical state transitions in patients with initial PEA, using a non-parametric multi-state statistical model. Patients with available defibrillator recordings were included, of whom 101 received adrenaline and 73 did not. There were significantly more state transitions in the adrenaline group than in the no-adrenaline group (rate ratio = 1.6, pAdrenaline markedly increased the rate of transition from PEA to ROSC during ALS and slowed the rate of being declared dead; e.g. by 20 min 20% of patients in the adrenaline group had been declared dead and 25% had obtained ROSC, whereas 50% in the no-adrenaline group have been declared dead and 15% had obtained ROSC. The differential effect of adrenaline could be seen after approx. 10 min of ALS for most transitions. For both groups the probability of deteriorating from PEA to asystole was highest during the first 15 min. Adrenaline increased the rate of transition from PEA to ventricular fibrillation or -tachycardia (VF/VT), and from ROSC to VF/VT. Adrenaline has notable clinical effects during ALS in patients with initial PEA. The drug extends the time window for ROSC to develop, but also renders the patient more unstable. Further research should investigate the optimal dose, timing and mode of adrenaline administration during ALS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Automatic selection of optimal cardiac-phase in coronary CT angiography. Its clinical usefulness for patients with atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Ryota; Narita, Hiroshi; Anno, Hirofumi; Ida, Yoshihiro; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Katada, Kazuhiro; Motoyama, Sadako; Sarai, Masayoshi; Tsuyuki, Masaharu

    2008-01-01

    The optimal cardiac phases for coronary CT angiography (CTA) are end-systole and mid-diastole, in which cardiac movement is slow. In conventional methods, these cardiac phases are determined by visual selection. We have compared the images in the optimal cardiac phases that were selected by the conventional method and cardiac-phase search software (Phase Navi), and examined the clinical usefulness of Phase Navi in patients with atrial fibrillation. The subjects were 38 patients (regular rhythm: 20, atrial fibrillation: 18). The continuity scores of patients with regular rhythm (Phase Navi, conventional methods) were 2.4±0.3-2.5±0.3 in end-systole and 2.4±0.5-2.4±0.4 in mid-diastole. The scores of patients with atrial fibrillation (Phase Navi, conventional methods) were 2.3±0.4-2.3±0.4 in end-systole, and 2.2±0.5-2.1±0.6 in mid-diastole. Because the continuity scores of the optimal images from Phase Navi were similar to those from the conventional method, Phase Navi had clinical usefulness in patients with atrial fibrillation. (author)

  10. Factors Associated With Successful Resuscitation After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Temporal Trends in Survival and Comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Hassager, Christian; Lippert, Freddy

    2015-01-01

    (multivariate odds ratio [OR]=3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1 to 5.0), witnessed arrest (multivariate OR=3.5; 95% CI 2.7 to 4.6), and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a public area (multivariate OR=2.1; 95% CI 1.6 to 2.8), whereas no comorbidity (multivariate OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.8 to 1.45), sex...

  11. Synaptic Plasticity in Cardiac Innervation and Its Potential Role in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse L. Ashton

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity is defined as the ability of synapses to change their strength of transmission. Plasticity of synaptic connections in the brain is a major focus of neuroscience research, as it is the primary mechanism underpinning learning and memory. Beyond the brain however, plasticity in peripheral neurons is less well understood, particularly in the neurons innervating the heart. The atria receive rich innervation from the autonomic branch of the peripheral nervous system. Sympathetic neurons are clustered in stellate and cervical ganglia alongside the spinal cord and extend fibers to the heart directly innervating the myocardium. These neurons are major drivers of hyperactive sympathetic activity observed in heart disease, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Both pre- and postsynaptic changes have been observed to occur at synapses formed by sympathetic ganglion neurons, suggesting that plasticity at sympathetic neuro-cardiac synapses is a major contributor to arrhythmias. Less is known about the plasticity in parasympathetic neurons located in clusters on the heart surface. These neuronal clusters, termed ganglionated plexi, or “little brains,” can independently modulate neural control of the heart and stimulation that enhances their excitability can induce arrhythmia such as atrial fibrillation. The ability of these neurons to alter parasympathetic activity suggests that plasticity may indeed occur at the synapses formed on and by ganglionated plexi neurons. Such changes may not only fine-tune autonomic innervation of the heart, but could also be a source of maladaptive plasticity during atrial fibrillation.

  12. Clinical predictors of shockable versus non-shockable rhythms in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2016-01-01

    Aim To identify factors associated with a non-shockable rhythm as first recorded heart rhythm. Methods Patients ≥18 years old suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 2001 and 2012 were identified in the population-based Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Danish administrative registries were...... used to identify chronic diseases (within 10 years) and drug prescriptions (within 180 days). A multivariable logistic regression model, including patient related and cardiac arrest related characteristics, was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with non-shockable rhythm. Results...... compared to patients with shockable rhythm. In the adjusted multivariable regression model, pre-existing non-cardiovascular disease and drug prescription were associated with a non-shockable rhythm e.g. chronic obstructive lung disease (OR 1.44 [95% CI: 1.32–1.58]); and the prescription for antidepressants...

  13. Lay Bystanders' Perspectives on What Facilitates Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Use of Automated External Defibrillators in Real Cardiac Arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest will fail to receive bystander intervention (cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] or defibrillation) despite widespread CPR training and the dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). We sought to investigate what...... factors encourage lay bystanders to initiate CPR and AED use in a cohort of bystanders previously trained in CPR techniques who were present at an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: One-hundred and twenty-eight semistructured qualitative interviews with CPR-trained lay bystanders...... to consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, where an AED was present were conducted (from January 2012 to April 2015, in Denmark). Purposive maximum variation sampling was used to establish the breadth of the bystander perspective. Twenty-six of the 128 interviews were chosen for further in-depth analyses...

  14. Improvements in logistics could increase survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömsöe, A; Afzelius, S; Axelsson, C; Södersved Källestedt, M L; Enlund, M; Svensson, L; Herlitz, J

    2013-06-01

    In a review based on estimations and assumptions, to report the estimated number of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started and to speculate about possible future improvements in Sweden. An observational study. All ambulance organisations in Sweden. Patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry who suffered an OHCA between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. Approximately 80% of OHCA cases in Sweden in which CPR was started are included. None In 11 005 patients, the 1-month survival rate was 9.4%. There are approximately 5000 OHCA cases annually in which CPR is started and 30-day survival is achieved in up to 500 patients yearly (6 per 100 000 inhabitants). Based on findings on survival in relation to the time to calling for the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and the start of CPR and defibrillation, it was estimated that, if the delay from collapse to (i) calling EMS, (ii) the start of CPR, and (iii) the time to defibrillation were reduced to <2 min, <2 min, and <8 min, respectively, 300-400 additional lives could be saved. Based on findings relating to the delay to calling for the EMS and the start of CPR and defibrillation, we speculate that 300-400 additional OHCA patients yearly (4 per 100 000 inhabitants) could be saved in Sweden. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  15. Possibly preventable cardiac arrest in a morbidly obese patient - a comment on the 2015 ERC guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Felix Patricius; Hoeren, Claudia Johanna Maria; Kellmeyer, Phillipp; Hohloch, Lisa; Busch, Hans-Jörg; Bayer, Jörg

    2016-10-04

    The incidence of overweight and obesity has been steadily on the rise and has reached epidemic proportions in various countries and this represents a well-known major health problem. Nevertheless, current guidelines for resuscitation do not include special sequences of action in this subset of patients. The aim of this letter is to bring this controversy into focus and to suggest alterations of the known standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the obese. An obese patient weighing 272 kg fell to the floor, afterwards being unable to get up again. Thus, emergency services were called for assistance. There were no signs or symptoms signifying that the person had been harmed in consequence of the fall. Only when brought into a supine position the patient suffered an immediate cardiac arrest. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed but there was no return of a stable spontaneous circulation until the patient was brought into a full lateral position. In spite of immediate emergency care the patient ultimately suffered a lethal hypoxic brain damage. A full lateral position should be considered in obese patients having a cardiac arrest as it might help to re-establish stable circulatory conditions.

  16. Assessment of muscle tissue oxygen saturation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Scarlatti, Audrey; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Dellamonica, Jean; Bernardin, Gilles; Ichai, Carole

    2015-12-01

    Pathophysiology of cardiac arrest corresponds to an ischemia-reperfusion syndrome with deep impairment of microcirculation. Muscular tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is a noninvasive method of evaluation of microcirculation. Our study was aimed at assessing the prognosis value of muscular StO2 in patients admitted for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and treated with hypothermia. We conducted a prospective bicentric observational study including OHCA patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Baseline StO2, derived variables (desaturation and resaturation slopes), and lactate levels were compared at different times between patients with good and poor outcomes. Prognosis was assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score at 6 months after admission (CPC 1-2, good outcome; CPC 3-5, poor outcome). Forty-four patients were included, 17 good and 27 poor outcomes at 6 months. At admission, StO2 and lactate levels were lower in good outcome patients. Desaturation and resaturation slopes did not differ between groups. After an OHCA treated with therapeutic hypothermia, StO2 was correlated with outcome. Further research is needed to better understand the pathophysiological process underlying our results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and outdoor air pollution exposure in Copenhagen, Denmark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Wichmann

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally and air pollution can be a contributing cause. Acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest are frequent manifestations of coronary heart disease. The objectives of the study were to investigate the association between 4 657 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA and hourly and daily outdoor levels of PM(10, PM(2.5, coarse fraction of PM (PM(10-2.5, ultrafine particle proxies, NO(x, NO(2, O(3 and CO in Copenhagen, Denmark, for the period 2000-2010. Susceptible groups by age and sex was also investigated. A case-crossover design was applied. None of the hourly lags of any of the pollutants were significantly associated with OHCA events. The strongest association with OHCA events was observed for the daily lag4 of PM(2.5, lag3 of PM(10, lag3 of PM(10-2.5, lag3 of NO(x and lag4 of CO. An IQR increase of PM(2.5 and PM(10 was associated with a significant increase of 4% (95% CI: 0%; 9% and 5% (95% CI: 1%; 9% in OHCA events with 3 days lag, respectively. None of the other daily lags or other pollutants was significantly associated with OHCA events. Adjustment for O(3 slightly increased the association between OHCA and PM(2.5 and PM(10. No susceptible groups were identified.

  18. Spinal anesthesia after intraoperative cardiac arrest during general anesthesia in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitaker EE

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Emmett E Whitaker,1,2 Veronica Miler,1,2 Jason Bryant,1,2 Stephanie Proicou,1 Rama Jayanthi,3,4 Joseph D Tobias1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Division of Pediatric Urology, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 4Department of Urology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Although generally safe and effective, severe perioperative complications, including cardiac arrest, may occur during general anesthesia in infants. With the emergence of evidence that specific anesthetic agents may affect future neurocognitive outcomes, there has been an increased focus on alternatives to general anesthesia, including spinal anesthesia. We present a case of cardiac arrest during general anesthesia in an infant who required urologic surgery. During the subsequent anesthetic care, spinal anesthesia was offered as an alternative to general anesthesia. The risks of severe perioperative complications during general anesthesia are reviewed, etiologic factors for such events are presented, and the use of spinal anesthesia as an alternative to general anesthesia is discussed. Keywords: child, pediatric anesthesia, complications

  19. The Evolution and Application of Cardiac Monitoring for Occult Atrial Fibrillation in Cryptogenic Stroke and TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel J; Shah, Kavit; Modi, Sumul; Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Zahoor, Salman; Affan, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    The evaluation of the stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patient has been historically predominated by the initial evaluation in the hospital setting. As the etiology of stroke has eluded us in approximately one third of all acute events, the medical community has been eager to seek the answer to this mystery. In recent years, we have seen an explosion of innovations and trends allowing for a more detailed post stroke assessment strategy aimed at the identification of occult atrial fibrillation as the etiologic cause for the cryptogenic event. This has been achieved through the evolution and aggressive application and study of prolonged and advanced cardiac monitoring. This review is aimed to clarify and elucidate the standard and novel cardiac monitoring methods that have become available for use by the medical community and expected in the higher level care of cryptogenic stroke and TIA patients. These cardiac monitoring methods and devices are as heterogeneous as our patient population and have their own advantages and disadvantages. Many factors may be taken into consideration in choosing the appropriate cardiac monitoring method and are highlighted for consideration in this review. With a judicious approach to investigating the cryptogenic stroke population, and applying a wealth of novel treatment options, we may move forward into a new era of stroke prevention.

  20. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: the prospect of E-CPR in the Maastricht region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A S; Pijls, R W M; Weerwind, P W; Delnoij, T S R; de Jong, W C; Gorgels, A P M; Maessen, J G

    2016-02-01

    The current outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in the Maastricht region was analysed with the prospect of implementing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR). A retrospective analysis of adult patients who were resuscitated for OHCA during a 24-month period was performed. 195 patients (age 66 [57-75] years, 82 % male) were resuscitated for OHCA by the emergency medical services and survived to admission at the emergency department. Survival to hospital discharge was 46.2 %. Notable differences between non-survivors and survivors were observed and included: age (70 [58-79] years) vs. (63 [55-72] years, p = 0.01), chronic heart failure (18 vs. 7 %, p = 0.02), shockable rhythm (67 vs. 99 %, p < 0.01), and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) at departure from the site of the arrest (46 vs. 99 %, p < 0.01) and on arrival to the emergency department (43 vs. 98 %, p < 0.01), respectively. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed in 32 % of non-survivors vs. 59 % among survivors, p < 0.01. Therapeutic hypothermia was provided in non-survivors (20 %) vs. survivors (43 %), p < 0.01. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed in 14 % of non-survivors while 52 % of survivors received PCI (p < 0.01). No statistical significance was observed in terms of gender, witnessed arrest, bystander CPR, or automated external defibrillator deployed among the cohort. At hospital discharge, moderately severe neurological disability was present in six survivors. These observations are compatible with the notion that a shockable rhythm, ROSC, and post-arrest care improve survival outcome. Potentially, initiating E-CPR in the resuscitation phase in patients with a shockable rhythm and no ROSC might serve as a bridge to definite treatment and improve survival outcome.

  1. Preliminary observations in systemic oxygen consumption during targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uber, Amy; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Ross, Catherine E; Patel, Parth V; Trehan, Ambica; Donnino, Michael W; Berg, Katherine M

    2018-06-01

    Limited data suggests low oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), driven by mitochondrial injury, is associated with mortality after cardiac arrest. Due to the challenges of measurement in the critically ill, post-arrest metabolism remains poorly characterized. We monitored VO 2 , carbon dioxide production (VCO 2 ) and the respiratory quotient (RQ) in post-arrest patients and explored associations with outcome. Using a gas exchange monitor, we measured continuous VO 2 and VCO 2 in post- arrest patients treated with targeted temperature management. We used area under the curve and medians over time to evaluate the association between VO 2 , VCO 2 , RQ and the VO 2 :lactate ratio with survival. In 17 patients, VO 2 in the first 12 h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was associated with survival (median in survivors 3.35 mL/kg/min [2.98,3.88] vs. non-survivors 2.61 mL/kg/min [2.21,2.94], p = .039). This did not persist over 24 h. The VO 2 :lactate ratio was associated with survival (median in survivors 1.4 [IQR: 1.1,1.7] vs. non-survivors 0.8 [IQR: 0.6,1.2] p  0.7 (p = .131). VCO 2 was not associated with survival. There was a significant association between VO 2 and mortality in the first 12 h after ROSC, but not over 24 h. Lower VO 2: lactate ratio was associated with mortality. A large percentage of patients had RQs below physiologic norms. Further research is needed to explore whether these parameters could have true prognostic value or be a potential treatment target. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Full recovery two months after therapeutic hypothermia following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a patient with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, J.; Cha, K.S.; Oh, J.H.; Lee, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic impairments are very common among patients who get a recovery of spontaneous circulation after suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Therapeutic hypothermia is established as a standardized therapeutic strategy for those patients in whom it decreases mortality rate and improves neurologic outcome. Herein, we report a case of patient who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with ischaemic heart disease and ventricular arrhythmia and got a full recovery without any neurologic impediments 2 months after being managed with therapeutic hypothermia. (author)

  3. Lay Bystanders' Perspectives on What Facilitates Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Use of Automated External Defibrillators in Real Cardiac Arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    factors encourage lay bystanders to initiate CPR and AED use in a cohort of bystanders previously trained in CPR techniques who were present at an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: One-hundred and twenty-eight semistructured qualitative interviews with CPR-trained lay bystanders...... obligation to act. CONCLUSIONS: Several factors other than previous hands-on CPR training facilitate lay bystander instigation of CPR and AED use. The recognition and modification of these factors may increase lay bystander CPR rates and patient survival following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest....

  4. Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jae-Sun; Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Park, Junbeom; Park, Jin-Kyu; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Joung, Boyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2015-10-15

    The present study was performed for elucidating the associations between the morphology of the papillary muscles (PMs) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). We retrospectively reviewed history, laboratory data, electrocardiography, echocardiography, coronary angiography, and cardiac CT/MRI for 190 patients with SCA. The prevalence of accessory PMs and PM hypertrophy in patients with SCA of unknown cause was compared with that in patients with SCA of known causes and 98 age- and sex-matched patients without SCA. An accessory PM was defined as a PM with origins separated from the anterolateral and posteromedial PMs, or a PM that branched into two or three bellies at the base of the anterolateral or posteromedial PM. PM hypertrophy was defined as at least one of the two PMs having a diameter of ≥1.1cm. In 49 patients (age 49.9±15.9years; 38 men) the cause of SCA was unknown, whereas 141 (age 54.2±16.6years; 121 men) had a known cause. The prevalence of accessory PMs was significantly higher in the unknown-cause group than in the known-cause group (24.5% and 7.8%, respectively; p=0.002) or the no-SCA group (7.1%, p=0.003). The same was true for PM hypertrophy (unknown-cause 12.2%, known-cause 2.1%, p=0.010; no SCA group 1.0%, p=0.006). By logistic regression, accessory PM and PM hypertrophy were independently associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. An accessory PM and PM hypertrophy are associated with SCA of unknown cause. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Malignant Course of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery Causing Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantha Narayanan, Mahesh; DeZorzi, Christopher; Akinapelli, Abhilash; Mahfood Haddad, Toufik; Smer, Aiman; Baskaran, Janani; Biddle, William P

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported to occur in patients with congenital anomalous coronary artery disease. About 80% of the anomalies are benign and incidental findings at the time of catheterization. We present a case of sudden cardiac arrest caused by anomalous left anterior descending artery. 61-year-old African American female was brought to the emergency department after sudden cardiac arrest. Initial EKG showed sinus rhythm with RBBB and LAFB with nonspecific ST-T wave changes. Coronary angiogram revealed no atherosclerotic disease. The left coronary artery was found to originate from the right coronary cusp. Cardiac CAT scan revealed similar findings with interarterial and intramural course. Patient received one-vessel arterial bypass graft to her anomalous coronary vessel along with a defibrillator for secondary prevention. Sudden cardiac arrest secondary to congenital anomalous coronary artery disease is characterized by insufficient coronary flow by the anomalous left coronary artery to meet elevated left ventricular (LV) myocardial demand. High risk defects include those involved with the proximal coronary artery or coursing of the anomalous artery between the aorta and pulmonary trunk. Per guidelines, our patient received one vessel bypass graft to her anomalous vessel. It is important for clinicians to recognize such presentations of anomalous coronary artery.

  6. Malignant Course of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery Causing Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Anantha Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported to occur in patients with congenital anomalous coronary artery disease. About 80% of the anomalies are benign and incidental findings at the time of catheterization. We present a case of sudden cardiac arrest caused by anomalous left anterior descending artery. 61-year-old African American female was brought to the emergency department after sudden cardiac arrest. Initial EKG showed sinus rhythm with RBBB and LAFB with nonspecific ST-T wave changes. Coronary angiogram revealed no atherosclerotic disease. The left coronary artery was found to originate from the right coronary cusp. Cardiac CAT scan revealed similar findings with interarterial and intramural course. Patient received one-vessel arterial bypass graft to her anomalous coronary vessel along with a defibrillator for secondary prevention. Sudden cardiac arrest secondary to congenital anomalous coronary artery disease is characterized by insufficient coronary flow by the anomalous left coronary artery to meet elevated left ventricular (LV myocardial demand. High risk defects include those involved with the proximal coronary artery or coursing of the anomalous artery between the aorta and pulmonary trunk. Per guidelines, our patient received one vessel bypass graft to her anomalous vessel. It is important for clinicians to recognize such presentations of anomalous coronary artery.

  7. Integration of cardiac computed tomography into pulmonary vein isolation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, T.F.; Klemm, H.; Willems, S.; Koops, A.; Adam, G.; Begemann, P.G.; Nagel, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Detailed anatomic information of the left atrium is necessary for securely performing radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation-triggering ectopies in the pulmonary vein ostia. In this study the impact of a preinterventionally acquired cardiac computed tomography (CT) on pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) was assessed. Materials and methods: Examinations of 54 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation undergoing PVI were analyzed. In 27 patients a supplementary cardiac CT was obtained prior to PVI (CT group, 12 women, 15 men, 59.7 ± 9.9 years of age): 16 x 1.5 mm collimation, 0.2 pitch, 120 kV tube voltage, 400 effective mAs. The fluoroscopy time, effective dose and quantity of radiofrequency (RF) pulses of the following catheter ablation were compared to 27 patients undergoing stand-alone PVI (11 women, 16 men, 62.0 ± 9.9 years of age). Mann-Whitney tests served for statistical comparison. Results: CT datasets were successfully integrated into the ablation procedure of each patient in the CT group. The mean quantity of RF pulses was significantly lower in the CT group (22.1 ± 8.0 vs. 29.1 ± 11.9, p = 0.030), and a significant reduction of fluoroscopy time was found (41.8 ± 12.0 min vs. 51.2 ± 16.0 min, p = 0.005). Effective doses of the catheter ablation differed in an equivalent dimension but altogether not significantly (14.9 ± 10.0 mSv vs. 20.0 ± 16.0 mSv, p = 0.203). The mean additive effective dose of the cardiac CT was 85 ± 0.3 mSv. (orig.)

  8. Variations in survival after cardiac arrest among academic medical center-affiliated hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Christopher Kurz

    Full Text Available Variation exists in cardiac arrest (CA survival among institutions. We sought to determine institutional-level characteristics of academic medical centers (AMCs associated with CA survival.We examined discharge data from AMCs participating with Vizient clinical database-resource manager. We identified cases using ICD-9 diagnosis code 427.5 (CA or procedure code 99.60 (CPR. We estimated hospital-specific risk-standardized survival rates (RSSRs using mixed effects logistic regression, adjusting for individual mortality risk. Institutional and community characteristics of AMCs with higher than average survival were compared with those with lower survival.We analyzed data on 3,686,296 discharges in 2012, of which 33,700 (0.91% included a CA diagnosis. Overall survival was 42.3% (95% CI 41.8-42.9 with median institutional RSSR of 42.6% (IQR 35.7-51.0; Min-Max 19.4-101.6. We identified 28 AMCs with above average survival (median RSSR 61.8% and 20 AMCs with below average survival (median RSSR 26.8%. Compared to AMCs with below average survival, those with high CA survival had higher CA volume (median 262 vs.119 discharges, p = 0.002, total beds (722 vs. 452, p = 0.02, and annual surgical volume (24,939 vs. 13,109, p<0.001, more likely to offer cardiac catheterization (100% vs. 72%, p = 0.007 or cardiac surgery (93% vs. 61%, p = 0.02 and cared for catchment areas with higher household income ($61,922 vs. $49,104, p = 0.004 and lower poverty rates (14.6% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.03.Using discharge data from Vizient, we showed AMCs with higher CA and surgical case volume, cardiac catheterization and cardiac surgery facilities, and catchment areas with higher socioeconomic status had higher risk-standardized CA survival.

  9. The Extent of Myocardial Injury During Prolonged Targeted Temperature Management After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grejs, Anders Morten; Gjedsted, Jakob; Thygesen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent of myocardial injury by cardiac biomarkers during prolonged targeted temperature management of 24 hours vs 48 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS: This randomized Scandinavian multicenter study compares the extent of myocardial...... injury estimated by hs-cTnTAUC of prolonged targeted temperature management of 48 hours vs 24 hours, although the CK-MBAUC was significantly higher during 48 hours vs 24 hours. Hence, it seems unlikely that the duration of targeted temperature management has a beneficial effect on the extent...... injury quantified by area under the curve (AUC) of cardiac biomarkers during prolonged targeted temperature management at 33°C ± 1°C of 24 hours and 48 hours, respectively. Through a period of 2.5 years, 161 comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients were randomized to targeted temperature...

  10. Reperfusion injury protection during Basic Life Support improves circulation and survival outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaty, Guillaume; Lurie, Keith; Metzger, Anja; Lick, Michael; Bartos, Jason A; Rees, Jennifer N; McKnite, Scott; Puertas, Laura; Pepe, Paul; Fowler, Raymond; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic postconditioning (PC) using three intentional pauses at the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves outcomes after cardiac arrest in pigs when epinephrine (epi) is used before defibrillation. We hypothesized PC, performed during basic life support (BLS) in the absence of epinephrine, would reduce reperfusion injury and enhance 24h functional recovery. Prospective animal investigation. Animal laboratory Female farm pigs (n=46, 39±1kg). Protocol A: After 12min of ventricular fibrillation (VF), 28 pigs were randomized to four groups: (A) Standard CPR (SCPR), (B) active compression-decompression CPR with an impedance threshold device (ACD-ITD), (C) SCPR+PC (SCPR+PC) and (D) ACD-ITD CPR+PC. Protocol B: After 15min of VF, 18 pigs were randomized to ACD-ITD CPR or ACD-ITD+PC. The BLS duration was 2.75min in Protocol A and 5min in Protocol B. Following BLS, up to three shocks were delivered. Without return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), CPR was resumed and epi (0.5mg) and defibrillation delivered. The primary end point was survival without major adverse events. Hemodynamic parameters and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were also measured. Data are presented as mean±SEM. Protocol A: ACD-ITD+PC (group D) improved coronary perfusion pressure after 3min of BLS versus the three other groups (28±6, 35±7, 23±5 and 47±7 for groups A, B, C, D respectively, p=0.05). There were no significant differences in 24h survival between groups. LVEF 4h post ROSC was significantly higher with ACD-ITD+PC vs ACD-ITD alone (52.5±3% vs. 37.5±6.6%, p=0.045). Survival rates were significantly higher with ACD-ITD+PC vs. ACD-ITD alone (p=0.027). BLS using ACD-ITD+PC reduced post resuscitation cardiac dysfunction and improved functional recovery after prolonged untreated VF in pigs. 12-11. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracorporeal Life Support and New Therapeutic Strategies for Cardiac Arrest Caused by Acute Myocardial Infarction - a Critical Approach for a Critical Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedek Theodora

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the most recent developments in providing advanced supportive measures for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the results obtained using these new therapies in patients with cardiac arrest caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Also detailed are new approaches such as extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR, intra-arrest percutaneous coronary intervention, or the regional models for systems of care aiming to reduce the critical times from cardiac arrest to initiation of ECPR and coronary revascularization.

  12. Cognitive function in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest after target temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, Gisela; Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans

    2015-01-01

    assessed with tests for memory (Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test), executive functions (Frontal Assessment Battery), and attention/mental speed (Symbol Digit Modalities Test). A control group of 119 matched patients hospitalized for acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction without cardiac arrest...... was more affected among cardiac arrest patients, but results for memory and executive functioning were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive function was comparable in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest when a temperature of 33°C and 36°C was targeted. Cognitive impairment detected in cardiac arrest...... performed the same assessments. Half of the cardiac arrest survivors had cognitive impairment, which was mostly mild. Cognitive outcome did not differ (P>0.30) between the 2 temperature groups (33°C/36°C). Compared with control subjects with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, attention/mental speed...

  13. Successful resuscitation of hypermagnesaemic asystolic cardiac arrest with the use of early transvenous cardiac pacemaker: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M A; Crystal, C S; Helphenstine, J; Young, S E

    2006-03-01

    A 63 year old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) with 1 week of progressive dyspnoea, constipation, and generalized weakness. She had undergone spinal fustion surgery 10 days previously, and had a history of chronic renal insufficiency. The patient had been using milk of magnesia and magnesium citrate in unknown amounts to alleviate her constipation over this time frame. During her ED stay she became progressively hypotensive and bradycardic, and despite aggressive resuscitative measures she suffered an asystolic arrest 1 hour into her ED course. She was resuscitated with conventional therapy, but her haemodynamic profile did not improve significantly until transvenous cardiac pacing was employed. Her magnesium level was 10.4 mmol/l. Treatment of magnesium overload has focused upon haemodialysis, forced diuresis, and the use of intravenous calcium salts. Case reports have previously documented survival of moderately to severely ill patients when these modalities have been used. Likewise, failure of resuscitation despite use of these methods has been previously noted. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case clearly demonstrating the efficacy of transvenous cardiac pacing to successfully resuscitate a patient upon whom multiple vasopressors, fluids, and calcium previously had no clear effect.

  14. The Role of Post-Resuscitation Electrocardiogram in Patients With ST-Segment Changes in the Immediate Post-Cardiac Arrest Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Min, Sun-Yang; Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Lee, Hui Jai; Shin, Jonghwan; Ko, Byuk Sung; Ahn, Shin; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2017-03-13

    The authors aimed to evaluate the role of post-resuscitation electrocardiogram (ECG) in patients showing significant ST-segment changes on the initial ECG and to provide useful diagnostic indicators for physicians to determine in which out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients brain computed tomography (CT) should be performed before emergency coronary angiography. The usefulness of immediate brain CT and ECG for all resuscitated patients with nontraumatic OHCA remains controversial. Between January 2010 and December 2014, 1,088 consecutive adult nontraumatic patients with return of spontaneous circulation who visited the emergency department of 3 tertiary care hospitals were enrolled. After excluding 245 patients with obvious extracardiac causes, 200 patients were finally included. The patients were categorized into 2 groups: those with ST-segment changes with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (n = 50) and those with OHCA of suspected cardiac origin group (n = 150). The combination of 4 ECG characteristics including narrow QRS (<120 ms), atrial fibrillation, prolonged QTc interval (≥460 ms), and ≥4 ST-segment depressions had a 66.0% sensitivity, 80.0% specificity, 52.4% positive predictive value, and 87.6% negative predictive value for predicting SAH. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves in the post-resuscitation ECG findings was 0.816 for SAH. SAH was observed in a substantial number of OHCA survivors (25.0%) with significant ST-segment changes on post-resuscitation ECG. Resuscitated patients with narrow QRS complex and any 2 ECG findings of atrial fibrillation, QTc interval prolongation, or ≥4 ST-segment depressions may help identify patients who need brain CT as the next diagnostic work-up. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sildenafil Protects against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Following Cardiac Arrest in a Porcine Model: Possible Role of the Renin-Angiotensin System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoxing; Zhang, Qian; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sold as Viagra, is a cardioprotector against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Our study explored whether sildenafil protects against I/R-induced damage in a porcine cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR) model via modulating the renin-angiotensin system. Male pigs were randomly divided to three groups: Sham group, Saline group, and sildenafil (0.5 mg/kg) group. Thirty min after drug infusion, ventricular fibrillation (8 min) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (up to 30 min) was conducted in these animals. We found that sildenafil ameliorated the reduced cardiac function and improved the 24-h survival rate in this model. Sildenafil partly attenuated the increases of plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang (1–7) levels after CAR. Sildenafil also decreased apoptosis and Ang II expression in myocardium. The increases of expression of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE), ACE2, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R), and the Ang (1–7) receptor Mas in myocardial tissue were enhanced after CAR. Sildenafil suppressed AT1R up-regulation, but had no effect on ACE, ACE2, and Mas expression. Sildenafilfurther boosted the upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and inducible nitric oxide synthase(iNOS). Collectively, our results suggest that cardioprotection of sildenafil in CAR model is accompanied by an inhibition of Ang II-AT1R axis activation. PMID:26569234

  16. Sildenafil Protects against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Following Cardiac Arrest in a Porcine Model: Possible Role of the Renin-Angiotensin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxing Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sold as Viagra, is a cardioprotector against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Our study explored whether sildenafil protects against I/R-induced damage in a porcine cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR model via modulating the renin-angiotensin system. Male pigs were randomly divided to three groups: Sham group, Saline group, and sildenafil (0.5 mg/kg group. Thirty min after drug infusion, ventricular fibrillation (8 min and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (up to 30 min was conducted in these animals. We found that sildenafil ameliorated the reduced cardiac function and improved the 24-h survival rate in this model. Sildenafil partly attenuated the increases of plasma angiotensin II (Ang II and Ang (1–7 levels after CAR. Sildenafil also decreased apoptosis and Ang II expression in myocardium. The increases of expression of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE, ACE2, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R, and the Ang (1–7 receptor Mas in myocardial tissue were enhanced after CAR. Sildenafil suppressed AT1R up-regulation, but had no effect on ACE, ACE2, and Mas expression. Sildenafilfurther boosted the upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP and inducible nitric oxide synthase(iNOS. Collectively, our results suggest that cardioprotection of sildenafil in CAR model is accompanied by an inhibition of Ang II-AT1R axis activation.

  17. Clinical usefulness of cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakakura, Kazuyoshi; Anno, Hirofumi; Kondo, Takeshi [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan); and others

    1993-05-01

    We studied the clinical usefulness of cine mode magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) from aspects of image quality and cardiac function. The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the myocardium was significantly (p<0.05) lower in patients with AF than those with normal sinus rhythm. Two radiologists who did not know any patient's information evaluated the image quality visually by marking method on a scale of 12 points. There was no difference of image quality between the two groups. The standard deviation of R-R interval was significantly (r=-0.92, p<0.001) correlated with the S/N ratio in myocardium. Consequently, it was not favorable to estimate visually cardiac cine MR image in patients with AF, when standard deviation of R-R interval was large. The left ventricular (LV) end diastolic, end systolic and stroke volumes and ejection fraction were closely (r=0.82[approx]0.95, p<0.05[approx]0.001) correlated between MR imaging and M-mode echocardiography, respectively. The ability to detect left side valvular regurgitation was almost equal in both MR imaging and color Doppler echocardiography. This result was coincided to previous papers in patients with normal sinus rhythm. In conclusion, cine mode MR imaging was also useful to analyze cardiac function and detect valvular regurgitation in patients with AF. (author).

  18. Milrinone Use is Associated With Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation Following Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Gregory A.; Murray, Katherine T.; Yu, Chang; Byrne, John G.; Greelish, James P.; Petracek, Michael R.; Hoff, Steven J.; Ball, Stephen K.; Brown, Nancy J.; Pretorius, Mias

    2009-01-01

    Background Postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF), a frequent complication following cardiac surgery, causes morbidity and prolongs hospitalization. Inotropic drugs are commonly used perioperatively to support ventricular function. This study tested the hypothesis that the use of inotropic drugs is associated with postoperative AF. Methods and Results We evaluated perioperative risk factors in 232 patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery. All patients were in sinus rhythm at surgery. Sixty-seven (28.9%) patients developed AF a mean of 2.9±2.1 days after surgery. Patients who developed AF stayed in the hospital longer (PMilrinone use was associated with an increased risk of postoperative AF (58.2% versus 26.1% in non-users, Pmilrinone use (odds ratio 4.86, 95% CI 2.31-10.25, Pmilrinone use (odds ratio 4.45, 95% CI 2.01-9.84, Pmilrinone use with postoperative AF. Conclusion Milrinone use is an independent risk factor for postoperative AF following elective cardiac surgery. PMID:18824641

  19. Factors Promoting Survival After Prolonged Resuscitation Attempts: A Case of Survival With Good Neurological Outcome Following 60 Minutes of Downtime After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Douglas; Gluer, Robert; Murdoch, Dale

    2018-03-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is a significant cause of death affecting approximately 25,000 people in Australia annually. We present an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with prolonged down time and recurrent ventricular arrhythmias treated with extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation. The patient survived to hospital discharge with good neurological outcome. The patient's excellent outcome was a result of immediate good quality CPR, high level premorbid function, reversible cause of arrest and rapid access to an ECMO centre. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of pre-hospital administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) by emergency medical services for patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest in Japan: controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Shinji; Tomio, Jun; Takahashi, Hideto; Ichikawa, Masao; Nishida, Masamichi; Morimura, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2013-12-10

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pre-hospital adrenaline (epinephrine) administered by emergency medical services to patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest. Controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study, in which pairs of patients with or without (control) adrenaline were created with a sequential risk set matching based on time dependent propensity score. Japan's nationwide registry database of patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest registered between January 2007 and December 2010. Among patients aged 15-94 with out of hospital cardiac arrest witnessed by a bystander, we created 1990 pairs of patients with and without adrenaline with an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) and 9058 pairs among those with non-VF/VT. Overall and neurologically intact survival at one month or at discharge, whichever was earlier. After propensity matching, pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services was associated with a higher proportion of overall survival (17.0% v 13.4%; unadjusted odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.60) but not with neurologically intact survival (6.6% v 6.6%; 1.01, 0.78 to 1.30) among those with VF/VT; and higher proportions of overall survival (4.0% v 2.4%; odds ratio 1.72, 1.45 to 2.04) and neurologically intact survival (0.7% v 0.4%; 1.57, 1.04 to 2.37) among those with non-VF/VT. Pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services improves the long term outcome in patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest, although the absolute increase of neurologically intact survival was minimal.

  1. Brain stem death as the vital determinant for resumption of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Y W Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous circulation returns to less than half of adult cardiac arrest victims who received in-hospital resuscitation. One clue for this disheartening outcome arises from the prognosis that asystole invariably takes place, after a time lag, on diagnosis of brain stem death. The designation of brain stem death as the point of no return further suggests that permanent impairment of the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery precedes death. It follows that a crucial determinant for successful revival of an arrested heart is that spontaneous circulation must resume before brain stem death commences. Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that maintained functional integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a neural substrate that is intimately related to brain stem death and central circulatory regulation, holds the key to the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An animal model of brain stem death employing the pesticide mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rats was used. Intravenous administration of lethal doses of mevinphos elicited an abrupt cardiac arrest, accompanied by elevated systemic arterial pressure and anoxia, augmented neuronal excitability and enhanced microvascular perfusion in RVLM. This period represents the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation in our experimental model. Animals with restored spontaneous circulation exhibited maintained neuronal functionality in RVLM beyond this critical time-window, alongside resumption of baseline tissue oxygen and enhancement of local blood flow. Intriguingly, animals that subsequently died manifested sustained anoxia, diminished local blood flow, depressed mitochondrial electron transport activities and reduced ATP production, leading to necrotic cell death in RVLM. That amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction and

  2. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA) created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest), a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, PSEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills. PMID:27378010

  3. Differences between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in residential and public locations and implications for public-access defibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy

    2010-01-01

    The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur in residential locations, but knowledge about strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in residential areas is lacking. We examined whether residential OHCA areas suitable for placement of automated external defibrillat...... defibrillators could be identified on the basis of demographic characteristics and characterized individuals with OHCA in residential locations....

  4. The influence of body composition on therapeutic hypothermia: a prospective observational study of patients after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jimmink, Joost J.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Paulus, Frederique; Mathus-Vliegen, Lisbeth M. H.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Vroom, Margreeth B.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) benefit from therapeutic hypothermia for 24 hours. The time needed to reach hypothermia (target temperature of 32 degrees C to 34 degrees C) varies widely. In this study, we explore the relation between measures of body composition

  5. Assessment of quality of life and cognitive function after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with successful resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alem, Anouk P.; Waalewijn, Reinier A.; Koster, Rudolph W.; de Vos, Rien

    2004-01-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluated the impact of the time-related elements of the "chain of survival" on the quality of life of patients, taking their characteristics into account. Between 1995 and 2002, consecutive, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients from Amsterdam and the surrounding

  6. Comorbidity and favorable neurologic outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients of 70 years and older

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beesems, Stefanie G.; Blom, Marieke T.; van der Pas, Martine H. A.; Hulleman, Michiel; van de Glind, Esther M. M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Tan, Hanno L.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced age is reported to be associated with lower survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to establish survival rate and neurological outcome at hospital discharge after OHCA in older patients and evaluated whether pre-OHCA comorbidity was associated with favorable

  7. Comorbidity and favorable neurologic outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients of 70 years and older

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beesems, Stefanie G.; Blom, Marieke T.; van der Pas, Martine H. A.; Hulleman, Michiel; van de Glind, Esther M. M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Tan, Hanno L.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    Introduction: Advanced age is reported to be associated with lower survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to establish survival rate and neurological outcome at hospital discharge after OHCA in older patients and evaluated whether pre-OHCA comorbidity was associated with

  8. In-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; Langendijk, Pim N J; Koopmans, Richard P

    2007-01-01

    a case-control study in which patients, for whom intervention of the advanced life support resuscitation team was requested for cardiac arrest between 1995 and 2003 in the Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, were compared with controls regarding current use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs...

  9. Improved survival after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using new guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, Jacob; Barnung, S.; Nielsen, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. We hypothesized that the implementations of 2005 European Resuscitation Council resuscitation guidelines were associated with improved 30-day survival after OHCA. METHODS: We prospectively recorded data on all....... Treatment after implementation was confirmed as a significant predictor of better 30-day survival in a logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The implementation of new resuscitation guidelines was associated with improved 30-day survival after OHCA Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...... patients with OHCA treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit of Copenhagen in two periods: 1 June 2004 until 31 August 2005 (before implementation) and 1 January 2006 until 31 March 2007 (after implementation), separated by a 4-month period in which the above-mentioned change took place. RESULTS: We found...

  10. Implementation of near-infrared spectroscopy in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Juan G.; Xiao, Feng; Ferrara, Davon; Ewing, Jennifer; Zhang, Shu; Alexander, Steven; Battarbee, Harold

    2002-07-01

    Transient global cerebral ischemia accompanying cardiac arrest (CA) often leads to permanent brain damage with poor neurological outcome. The precise chain of events underlying the cerebral damage after CA is still not fully understood. Progress in this area may profit from the development of new non-invasive tools that provide real-time information on the vascular and cellular processes preceding the damage. One way to assess these processes is through near-IR spectroscopy, which has demonstrated the ability to quantify changes in blood volume, hemoglobin oxygenation, cytochrome oxidase redox state, and tissue water content. Here we report on the successful implementation of this form of spectroscopy in a rat model of asphyxial CA and resuscitation, under hypothermic and normothermic conditions. Preliminary results are shown that provide a new temporal insight into the cerebral circulation during CA and post-resuscitation.

  11. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated...... with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. METHODS: We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from...... the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. RESULTS: We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised...

  12. Life Saving Apps: Linking Cardiac Arrest Victims to Emergency Services and Volunteer Responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim Choi Keung, Sarah N; Khan, Mohammed O; Smith, Christopher; Perkins, Gavin; Murphy, Paddie; Arvanitis, Theodoros N

    2016-01-01

    In cases of emergency, such as out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, the first few minutes are crucial for victims to receive care and have a positive outcome. However, emergency services often arrive on scene after those first few minutes, making any bridging solutions key. Finding a defibrillator or accessing a trained volunteer responder are some of the technological solutions that are being developed to support the chain of survival. This paper looks at technologies, in particular those linked to mobile apps that have been used to locate defibrillators and responder apps that enable responders to attend to nearby emergencies. We review a selection of apps and also assess the challenges and considerations for such apps.

  13. Prolonged cardiac arrest complicating a massive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction associated with marijuana consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Orsini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recreational substance use and misuse constitute a major public health issue. The annual rate of recreational drug overdose-related deaths is increasing exponentially, making unintentional overdose as the leading cause of injury-related deaths in the United States. Marijuana is the most widely used recreational illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Although it is generally regarded as having low acute toxicity, heavy marijuana usage has been associated with life-threatening consequences. Marijuana is increasingly becoming legal in the United States for both medical and recreational use. Although the most commonly seen adverse effects resulting from its consumption are typically associated with neurobehavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms, cases of severe toxicity involving the cardiovascular system have been reported. In this report, the authors describe a case of cannabis-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction leading to a prolonged cardiac arrest.

  14. The impact of therapeutic hypothermia on neurological function and quality of life after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Horsted, Tina I

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the impact of therapeutic hypothermia on cognitive function and quality of life in comatose survivors of out of Hospital Cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS: We prospectively studied comatose survivors of OHCA consecutively admitted in a 4-year period. Therapeutic hypothermia......=0.01. No significant differences were found in long-term survival (57% vs. 56% alive at 30 months), MMSE, or SF-36. Therapeutic hypothermia (hazard ratio: 0.15, p=0.007) and bystander CPR (hazard ratio 0.19, p=0.002) were significantly related to survival in the intervention period. CONCLUSION: CPC...... at discharge from hospital was significantly improved following implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients resuscitated from OCHA with VF/VT. However, significant improvement in survival, cognitive status or quality of life could not be detected at long-term follow-up....

  15. An unusual reason for severe bradycardia leading to cardiac arrest during general anaesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzkova, Klara; Stourac, Petr; Kanovsky, Jan; Krikava, Ivo; Toukalkova, Michaela; Sevcik, Pavel

    2014-12-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy also known as transient balooning syndrome is an increasingly reported phenomenon characterized by acute reversible apical or midventricular dysfunction. This stress- induced cardiomyopathy mimics myocardial infarction, but without significant coronary artery disease, and rarely presents in perioperative period. We report a case of postmenopausal woman scheduled to undergo elective cholecystectomy, with no history of coronary artery disease. She presented perioperatively with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy by unique manifestation-asystoly. This uncommon cause of cardiac arrest during anaesthesia was possibly induced by preoperative emotional stress. There was full recovery thanks to intensive management. In Takotsubo cardiomyopathy related cardiogenic shock we used the calcium sensitiser levosimendan successfully. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has an excellent long-term prognosis and nearly all patients have full recovery of left ventricular function. We emphasize the importance of heavy premedication by stress compromised patients and the need of sufficiently deep anaesthesia and analgesia during surgeries.

  16. Is there a difference in survival between men and women suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, Johan; Persson, Carina; Strömberg, Anna; Arestedt, Kristofer

    2014-01-01

    To describe in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) events with regard to sex and to investigate if sex is associated with survival. Previous studies exploring differences between sexes are incongruent with regard to clinical outcomes. In order to provide equality and improve care, further investigations into these aspects are warranted. This registry study included 286 CAs. To investigate if sex was associated with survival, logistic regression analyses were performed. The proportion of CA with a resuscitation attempt compared to CA without resuscitation was higher among men. There were no associations between sex and survival when controlling for previously known predictors and interaction effects. Sex does not appear to be a predictor for survival among patients suffering CA where resuscitation is attempted. The difference regarding proportion of resuscitation attempts requires more attention. It is important to consider possible interaction effects when studying the sex perspective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A first city-wide early defibrillation project in a German city: 5-year results of the Bochum against sudden cardiac arrest study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanefeld Christoph

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immediate defibrillation is the decisive determinant of prognosis in patients suffering from cardiac/circulatory arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation (VF. Therefore, various national and international associations recommend that first responders use defibrillators as soon as possible and also recommend public access to early defibrillation programmes. Here we report the results of the first city-wide early defibrillation project in a large German urban area. Methods There were 155 automated external defibrillators (AEDs put into operation in the Bochum municipal area, and 6,294 people took part in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and AED training. Free, accessible AEDs were installed in places with large volumes of people. Additionally, emergency forces were progressively equipped with AEDs. Results Twelve AED administrations prior to the arrival of an emergency physician were recorded and analysed over a period of 5 years (08/2004-08/2009. Rhythm analysis via AED demonstrated VF in seven cases, non-malignant dysrhythmias in four cases and asystole in one case. Two of the seven patients with VF were successfully defibrillated and survived cardiac/circulatory arrest without any neurological sequelae. Eight of the 12 AED applications were performed by laymen. The mean time between switching the unit on and applying the electrodes to the patient was 39 seconds (SD +/-20 sec. On average, another 20 seconds elapsed before the AED recommendation of "shock delivery" was displayed, and a total of 96 seconds elapsed before shock administration (± 56 sec. Conclusion Consistent with other reports, our findings show that the organisation of a city-wide initiative by a project office combining public access and first-responder defibrillation programmes can be safe, feasible and successful. Our experiences confirm that strategic planning of AED placement is a prerequisite for successful, cost-effective resuscitation.

  18. Metabolic determinants of electrical failure in ex-vivo canine model of cardiac arrest: evidence for the protective role of inorganic pyrophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Shibayama

    Full Text Available Deterioration of ventricular fibrillation (VF into asystole or severe bradycardia (electrical failure heralds a fatal outcome of cardiac arrest. The role of metabolism in the timing of electrical failure remains unknown.To determine metabolic factors of early electrical failure in an ex-vivo canine model of cardiac arrest (VF+global ischemia.Metabolomic screening was performed in left ventricular biopsies collected before and after 0.3, 2, 5, 10 and 20 min of VF and global ischemia. Electrical activity was monitored via plunge needle electrodes and pseudo-ECG. Four out of nine hearts exhibited electrical failure at 10.1±0.9 min (early-asys, while 5/9 hearts maintained VF for at least 19.7 min (late-asys. As compared to late-asys, early-asys hearts had more ADP, less phosphocreatine, and higher levels of lactate at some time points during VF/ischemia (all comparisons p<0.05. Pre-ischemic samples from late-asys hearts contained ∼25 times more inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi than early-asys hearts. A mechanistic role of PPi in cardioprotection was then tested by monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ during 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia using potentiometric probe TMRM in rabbit adult ventricular myocytes incubated with PPi versus control group. Untreated myocytes experienced significant loss of ΔΨ while in the PPi-treated myocytes ΔΨ was relatively maintained throughout 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia as compared to control (p<0.05.High tissue level of PPi may prevent ΔΨm loss and electrical failure at the early phase of ischemic stress. The link between the two protective effects may involve decreased rates of mitochondrial ATP hydrolysis and lactate accumulation.

  19. Comparison of the effects of sternal and tibial intraosseous administered resuscitative drugs on return of spontaneous circulation in a swine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Mara; Martinez, Andre; Long, Audrey; Johnson, Michelle; Blouin, Dawn; Johnson, Arthur D; Burgert, James M

    2016-01-01

    Compare vasopressin, amiodarone, and epinephrine administration by sternal intraosseous (SIO), tibial intraosseous (TIO), and intravenous (IV) routes in a swine model of cardiac arrest. Prospective, randomized, between subjects, experimental design. Laboratory. Male Yorkshire-cross swine (N = 35), seven per group. Swine were randomized to SIO, TIO, IV, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with defibrillation, or CPR-only groups. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced under general anesthesia. Mechanical CPR began 2 minutes postarrest. Vasopressin (40 U) was administered to the SIO, TIO, and IV groups 4 minutes postarrest. Defibrillation was performed and amiodarone (300 mg) was administered 6 minutes postarrest. Defibrillation was repeated, and epinephrine (1 mg) was administered 10 minutes postarrest. Defibrillation was repeated every 2 minutes and epinephrine repeated every 4 minutes until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or 26 postarrest minutes elapsed. Rate of ROSC, time to ROSC, and odds of ROSC. There were no significant differences in rate of ROSC between the SIO and TIO (p = 0.22) or IV groups (p = 1.0). Time to ROSC was five times less in the SIO group than the TIO group (p = 0.003) but not compared to IV (p = 0.125). Time to ROSC in the IV group was significantly less than the TIO group (p = 0.04). Odds of ROSC for the SIO group were five times higher compared to the TIO group but same as IV. Odds of ROSC in the IV group were higher than the TIO group. There was a statistically significant delay in the time to ROSC and a clinically significant difference in odds of ROSC when resuscitative drugs, including lipophilic amiodarone, were administered by the TIO route compared to the SIO and IV routes in a swine model of sudden cardiac arrest. Further investigations are warranted to isolate the mechanism behind these findings.

  20. Impact of community-wide police car deployment of automated external defibrillators on survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerburg, Robert J; Fenster, Jeffrey; Velez, Mauricio; Rosenberg, Donald; Lai, Shenghan; Kurlansky, Paul; Newton, Starbuck; Knox, Melenda; Castellanos, Agustin

    2002-08-27

    Disappointing survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests encourage strategies for faster defibrillation, such as use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) by nonconventional responders. AEDs were provided to all Miami-Dade County, Florida, police. AED-equipped police (P-AED) and conventional emergency medical rescue (EMS) responders are simultaneously deployed to possible cardiac arrests. Times from 9-1-1 contact to the scene were compared for P-AED and concurrently deployed EMS, and both were compared with historical EMS experience. Survival with P-AED was compared with outcomes when EMS was the sole responder. Among 420 paired dispatches of P-AED and EMS, the mean+/-SD P-AED time from 9-1-1 call to arrival at the scene was 6.16+/-4.27 minutes, compared with 7.56+/-3.60 minutes for EMS (P<0.001). Police arrived first to 56% of the calls. The time to first responder arrival among P-AED and EMS was 4.88+/-2.88 minutes (P<0.001), compared with a historical response time of 7.64+/-3.66 minutes when EMS was the sole responder. A 17.2% survival rate was observed for victims with ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT/VF), compared with 9.0% for standard EMS before P-AED implementation (P=0.047). However, VT/VF benefit was diluted by the observation that 61% of the initial rhythms were nonshockable, reducing the absolute survival benefit among the total study population to 1.6% (P-AED, 7.6%; EMS, 6.0%). P-AED establishes a layer of responders that generate improved response times and survival from VT/VF. There was no benefit for victims with nonshockable rhythms.

  1. The effect of CO2 and non-CO2-generating buffers on cerebral acidosis after cardiac arrest: A 31P NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, J M; Martin, G B; Paradis, N A; Nowak, R M; Walton, D; Appleton, T J; Welch, K M

    1989-04-01

    There is controversy regarding the use of alkalinizing agents during reperfusion after cardiac arrest. The potential deleterious effects of sodium bicarbonate (bicarb) administration, including paradoxic cerebral acidosis, have led to the search for alternative agents. Tromethamine (tris) is a non-CO2-generating buffer that has been proposed for use during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The purpose of this experiment was to compare the ability of tris with bicarb to correct brain pH (pH B) during reperfusion after a 12-minute cardiac arrest. Adult mongrel dogs were instrumented and placed in the bore of a Bruker Biospec 1.89 tesla superconducting magnet system. Ventricular fibrillation was induced; after 12 minutes, cardiopulmonary bypass was initiated and maintained for two hours with minimum flows of 80 mL/kg/min. Bicarb (n = 5) or tris (n = 5) were administered to correct arterial pH as rapidly as possible. 31P NMR spectra were obtained at baseline and throughout ischemia and reperfusion. The pH B was determined with the inorganic phosphate relative to the phosphocreatine resonance signal shift. Profile analysis indicates a difference between groups (P less than .02) related to an initial delay in pH B correction in the tris group. By 48 minutes of reperfusion, pH B did not differ between the groups. Moreover, there was no evidence of paradoxic cerebral acidosis in the bicarb group. Although tris corrects blood pH as quickly as bicarb, it is less effective in correcting pH B. Absence of paradoxic acidosis may be caused by efficient elimination of CO2 by cardiopulmonary bypass.

  2. Current and Emerging Uses of Insertable Cardiac Monitors: Evaluation of Syncope and Monitoring for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomson, Todd T; Passman, Rod

    Insertable cardiac monitors (ICMs) have provided clinicians with a superb tool for assessing infrequent or potentially asymptomatic arrhythmias. ICMs have shown their usefulness in the evaluation of unexplained syncope, providing high diagnostic yields in a cost-effective manner. While unexplained syncope continues to be the most common reason for their use, ICMs are increasingly being used for the monitoring of atrial fibrillation (AF). Recent trials have demonstrated that a substantial proportion of patients with cryptogenic stroke have AF detected only by the prolonged monitoring provided by ICMs. A particularly promising and emerging use for ICMs is in the management of anticoagulation in patients with known paroxysmal AF. The introduction in recent years of ICMs with automatic AF detection algorithms and continuous remote monitoring in combination with novel oral anticoagulants have opened the door for targeted anticoagulation guided by remote monitoring, a strategy that has recently shown promise in pilot studies of this technique. While further research is needed before official recommendations can be given, this use of ICMs opens exciting new possibilities for personalized medicine that could potentially reduce bleeding risk and improve quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  3. Profile of atrial fibrillation inpatients: Cardiovascular risk factors and cardiac rehabilitation programme delivery and referral patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robyn; Zhang, Ling; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Proctor, Ross; Neubeck, Lis

    2015-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasingly common; however, the cardiovascular risk factor profile and the patterns of delivery and referral to cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in this population are poorly described. We conducted an audit of medical records (n = 145) of patients admitted with AF in one local health district in Sydney, Australia. Patients were aged a mean 72 years, and 51% were male. Lack of risk factor documentation was common. Despite this, 65% had two or more modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension (63%) and hypercholesterolaemia (52%). Referral to Phase II CR occurred for 25% and was decreased with permanent AF diagnosis and increased with more risk factors. AF patients admitted to hospital have multiple cardiovascular risk factors but limited risk factor screening and/or referral to outpatient CR programmes. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Chest compression rates and survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Ahamed H; Guffey, Danielle; Pepe, Paul E; Brown, Siobhan P; Brooks, Steven C; Callaway, Clifton W; Christenson, Jim; Davis, Daniel P; Daya, Mohamud R; Gray, Randal; Kudenchuk, Peter J; Larsen, Jonathan; Lin, Steve; Menegazzi, James J; Sheehan, Kellie; Sopko, George; Stiell, Ian; Nichol, Graham; Aufderheide, Tom P

    2015-04-01

    Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend a chest compression rate of at least 100 compressions/min. A recent clinical study reported optimal return of spontaneous circulation with rates between 100 and 120/min during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the relationship between compression rate and survival is still undetermined. Prospective, observational study. Data is from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Prehospital Resuscitation IMpedance threshold device and Early versus Delayed analysis clinical trial. Adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by emergency medical service providers. None. Data were abstracted from monitor-defibrillator recordings for the first five minutes of emergency medical service cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Multiple logistic regression assessed odds ratio for survival by compression rate categories (compression fraction and depth, first rhythm, and study site. Compression rate data were available for 10,371 patients; 6,399 also had chest compression fraction and depth data. Age (mean±SD) was 67±16 years. Chest compression rate was 111±19 per minute, compression fraction was 0.70±0.17, and compression depth was 42±12 mm. Circulation was restored in 34%; 9% survived to hospital discharge. After adjustment for covariates without chest compression depth and fraction (n=10,371), a global test found no significant relationship between compression rate and survival (p=0.19). However, after adjustment for covariates including chest compression depth and fraction (n=6,399), the global test found a significant relationship between compression rate and survival (p=0.02), with the reference group (100-119 compressions/min) having the greatest likelihood for survival. After adjustment for chest compression fraction and depth, compression rates between 100 and 120 per minute were associated with greatest survival to hospital discharge.

  5. Why persons choose to opt out of an exception from informed consent cardiac arrest trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Maria J; Deiorio, Nicole M; Schmidt, Terri A; Zive, Dana M; Griffiths, Denise; Newgard, Craig D

    2013-06-01

    We sought to characterize persons who requested to opt out of an exception from informed consent (EFIC) cardiac arrest trial and their reasons for opting out. At one site of a multi-site, out-of-hospital, cardiac arrest EFIC trial (September 2007 - June 2009), persons who did not want to participate in the study could request an opt-out "NO STUDY" bracelet to prevent trial enrollment. We surveyed all persons who requested a bracelet by phone interview, web or mail. Opt-out bracelets were advertised in all public communication about the study, including community consultation and public disclosure efforts. Survey questions included demographics, Likert scale items about attitudes toward the trial and research in general, plus open-ended questions. We used descriptive statistics for standardized questions and qualitative analysis to identify common themes from open-ended questions. Sixty bracelets were requested by 50 individuals. Surveys were completed by 46 persons (92% response rate). Seventy percent of respondents agreed emergency research is important, but 87% objected to any research without consent. In the qualitative analysis, 5 overlapping themes emerged: questioning the ethics of EFIC research; concerns about how the study would impact end-of-life preferences; subjective emotions including sarcasm, anger, and allusions to past unethical research; negative reference to unrelated public health controversies; and objections to the study protocol based on misinformation. A primary reason for opting out from this EFIC trial was opposition to all research without informed consent, despite stated support for emergency research. Understanding the demographics and beliefs of persons opting out may aid researchers planning EFIC studies and help provide clarity in future EFIC-related community education efforts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Bækgaard, Josefine Stokholm; Claesson, Andreas; Hollenberg, Jacob; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy K

    2017-06-01

    Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from 01/01/2013-31/12/2013. OHCAs were collected from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry and the Mobile Critical Care Unit database. Emergency call recordings were identified and evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to all OHCAs and witnessed OHCAs only to analyse the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised; OHCA recognition was positively associated with bystander CPR (odds ratio [OR]=7.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.10-12.05) in all OHCAs; and ROSC (OR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.13-3.06) and 30-day survival (OR=2.80, 95% CI: 1.58-4.96) in witnessed OHCA. Predictors of OHCA recognition were addressing breathing (OR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.17-2.66) and callers located by the patient's side (OR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.46-3.19). Recognition of OHCA during emergency calls was positively associated with the provision of bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival in witnessed OHCA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Resuscitation outcomes of reproductive-age females who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Manabu; Nagata, Takashi; Abe, Takeru; Nabeshima, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    Although some studies have shown that women in their reproductive years have better resuscitation outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), conflicting results and methodological problems have also been noted. Thus, we evaluated the resuscitation outcomes of OHCA of females by age. This was a prospective observational study using registry data from all OHCA cases between 2005 and 2012 in Japan. The subjects were females aged 18-110 years who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Logistic regression analyses were performed using total and propensity-matched patients. There were 381,123 OHCA cases that met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, females aged 18-49 and 50-60 years of age had similar rates of return of spontaneous circulation before hospital arrival and 1-month survival (all p>0.60). In contrast, females aged 18-49 years of age had significantly lower rates of 1-month survival with minimal neurological impairment than did females aged 50-60 years of age (after adjusting for selected variables: Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (CPC (1, 2)), OR=0.45, p=0.020; Overall Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (OPC (1, 2)): OR=0.42, p= 0.014; after adjustment for all variables: CPC (1, 2), OR=0.27, p= 0.008; OPC (1, 2), OR=0.29, p=0.009). Women of reproductive age did not show improved resuscitation outcomes in OHCA. Additionally, women in their reproductive years showed worse neurological outcomes one month after the event, which may be explained by the negative effects of estrogen. These findings need to be verified in further studies.

  8. Cardiac arrest risk standardization using administrative data compared to registry data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne V Grossestreuer

    Full Text Available Methods for comparing hospitals regarding cardiac arrest (CA outcomes, vital for improving resuscitation performance, rely on data collected by cardiac arrest registries. However, most CA patients are treated at hospitals that do not participate in such registries. This study aimed to determine whether CA risk standardization modeling based on administrative data could perform as well as that based on registry data.Two risk standardization logistic regression models were developed using 2453 patients treated from 2000-2015 at three hospitals in an academic health system. Registry and administrative data were accessed for all patients. The outcome was death at hospital discharge. The registry model was considered the "gold standard" with which to compare the administrative model, using metrics including comparing areas under the curve, calibration curves, and Bland-Altman plots. The administrative risk standardization model had a c-statistic of 0.891 (95% CI: 0.876-0.905 compared to a registry c-statistic of 0.907 (95% CI: 0.895-0.919. When limited to only non-modifiable factors, the administrative model had a c-statistic of 0.818 (95% CI: 0.799-0.838 compared to a registry c-statistic of 0.810 (95% CI: 0.788-0.831. All models were well-calibrated. There was no significant difference between c-statistics of the models, providing evidence that valid risk standardization can be performed using administrative data.Risk standardization using administrative data performs comparably to standardization using registry data. This methodology represents a new tool that can enable opportunities to compare hospital performance in specific hospital systems or across the entire US in terms of survival after CA.

  9. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a Danish health region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjølner, J; Greisen, J; Jørgensen, M R S; Terkelsen, C J; Ilkjaer, L B; Hansen, T M; Eiskjaer, H; Christensen, S; Gjedsted, J

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (ECPR) has emerged as a feasible rescue therapy for refractory, normothermic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Reported survival rates vary and comparison between studies is hampered by heterogeneous study populations, differences in bystander intervention and in pre-hospital emergency service organisation. We aimed to describe the first experiences, treatment details, complications and outcome with ECPR for OHCA in a Danish health region. Retrospective study of adult patients admitted at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark between 1 January 2011 and 1 July 2015 with witnessed, refractory, normothermic OHCA treated with ECPR. OHCA was managed with pre-hospital advanced airway management and mechanical chest compression during transport. Relevant pre-hospital and in-hospital data were collected with special focus on low-flow time and ECPR duration. Survival to hospital discharge with Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) of 1 and 2 at hospital discharge was the primary endpoint. Twenty-one patients were included. Median pre-hospital low-flow time was 54 min [range 5-100] and median total low-flow time was 121 min [range 55-192]. Seven patients survived (33%). Survivors had a CPC score of 1 or 2 at hospital discharge. Five survivors had a shockable initial rhythm. In all survivors coronary occlusion was the presumed cause of cardiac arrest. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation is feasible as a rescue therapy in normothermic refractory OHCA in highly selected patients. Low-flow time was longer than previously reported. Survival with favourable neurological outcome is possible despite prolonged low-flow duration. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Cardiac arrest in chronic metabolic alkalosis due to sodium bicarbonate abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiński, Grzegorz; Korta, Teresa; Debowska, Małgorzata; Kosiński, Cezary; Kubik, Tomasz; Romanik, Wojciech; Kański, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Moderate metabolic alkalosis has not been considered as a life-threatening situation by many authors, but when it persists and pH increases above 7.65, the situation may become critical. We present a case of a 61-yr-old alcoholic male patient, who had been consuming approximately 200 g of sodium bicarbonate daily for twenty years, due to persisitent heartburn and abdominal pains. The patient was admitted to the ITU after home cardiac arrest and resuscitation. On admission he was unconscious and in respiratory distress, with a GCS of 5. Blood gases revealed that his pH was 7.64, HCO3 44 mmol L(-1), K+ 2.4 mmol L(-1)l, Cl- 44 mmol L(-1), and lactate concentration over 15 mmol L(-1). He was treated with controlled hypercapnia, up to a PaCO2 of 63 mm Hg, sedation, and administration of a large amount of chloride (864 mmol during the first day). The patient regained consciousness after 48 h, was extubated and transferred to the internal medicine department where he died 3 days later. Chronic alkali abuse can lead to various metabolic disturbances, neurologic disturbances and cardiovascular compromise. In the described case, the exact cause of cardiac arrest remained unknown, but may have been caused by alkalosis combined with hypoxia, hypokalemia and poor general condition. The extreme metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.8) could also have been enhanced by the administration of i.v. sodium bicarbonate during resuscitation. The treatment of choice in such cases should consist of vigorous chloride containing fluid resuscitation, ammonium chloride and hemodialysis.

  11. A second chance at life: people's lived experiences of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Ann-Sofie; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Lundblad, Dan; Söderberg, Siv

    2017-12-01

    There is more to illuminate about people's experiences of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and how such an event affects people's lives over time. This study aimed to elucidate meanings of people's lived experiences and changes in everyday life during their first year after surviving OHCA. A qualitative, longitudinal design was used. Eleven people surviving OHCA from northern Sweden agreed to participate and were interviewed 6 and 12 months after the event. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was used to analyse the transcribed texts. The structural analysis resulted in two themes: (i) striving to regain one's usual self and (ii) a second chance at life, and subthemes (ia) testing the body, (ib) pursuing the ordinary life, (ic) gratitude for help to survival, (iia) regaining a sense of security with one's body, (iib) getting to know a new self, and (iic) seeking meaning and establishing a future. To conclude, we suggest that people experienced meanings of surviving OHCA over time as striving to regain their usual self and getting a second chance at life. The event affected them in many ways and resulted in a lot of emotions and many things to think about. Participants experienced back-and-forth emotions, when comparing their present lives to both their lives before cardiac arrest and those lives they planned for the future. During their first year, participants' daily lives were still influenced by 'being dead' and returning to life. As time passed, they wanted to resume their ordinary lives and hoped for continued lives filled with meaning and joyous activities. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Electrocardiographic Findings in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Presenting With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarak, Bradley; Goodman, Shaun G; Brieger, David; Gale, Chris P; Tan, Nigel S; Budaj, Andrzej; Wong, Graham C; Huynh, Thao; Tan, Mary K; Udell, Jacob A; Bagai, Akshay; Fox, Keith A A; Yan, Andrew T

    2018-02-01

    We sought to characterize presenting electrocardiographic findings in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). In the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events and Canadian ACS Registry I, we examined presenting and 24- to 48-hour follow-up ECGs (electrocardiogram) of ACS patients who survived to hospital admission, stratified by presentation with OHCA. We assessed the prevalence of ST-segment deviation and bundle branch blocks (assessed by an independent ECG core laboratory) and their association with in-hospital and 6-month mortality among those with OHCA. Of the 12,040 ACS patients, 215 (1.8%) survived to hospital admission after OHCA. Those with OHCA had higher presenting rates of ST-segment elevation, ST-segment depression, T-wave inversion, precordial Q-waves, left bundle branch block (LBBB), and right bundle branch block (RBBB) than those without. Among patients with OHCA, those with ST-segment elevation had significantly lower in-hospital mortality (20.9% vs 33.0%, p = 0.044) and a trend toward lower 6-month mortality (27% vs 39%, p = 0.060) compared with those without ST-segment elevation. Conversely, among OCHA patients, LBBB was associated with significantly higher in-hospital and 6-month mortality rates (58% vs 22%, p presenting ECG resolved by 24 to 48 hours. In conclusion, compared with ACS patients without cardiac arrest, those with OHCA had higher rates of ST-segment elevation, LBBB, and RBBB on admission. Among OHCA patients, ST-segment elevation was associated with lower in-hospital mortality, whereas LBBB was associated with higher in-hospital and 6-month mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of cardiac cachexia and atrial fibrillation in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arámbula-Garza, Estefanía; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; González-Islas, Dulce; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Santellano-Juárez, Brenda; Keirns-Davies, Candace; Peláez-Hernández, Viridiana; Sánchez-Santillán, Rocío; Pineda-Juárez, Juan; Cintora-Martínez, Carlos; Pablo-Santiago, Ruth

    2016-11-15

    Cachexia is a common complication in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) associated with inflammatory response activation. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent arrhythmia (26%), probably both exacerbate the cardiac cachexia (CC). Evaluate the association of cardiac cachexia and atrial fibrillation in heart failure patients. In a case control study, CC was diagnosed by electrical bioimpedance with vectorial analysis (BIVA). Subjects with congenital heart disease, cancer, HIV, drug use and other causes than HF were excluded. Of the 359 subjects analyzed (men: 52.9%) median age 65years (55-74). Those with CC were older [72 (61-67)] vs. without [62 (52-70) years old, p<0.01]. During follow-up 47.8% of subjects developed CC and 17.27% AF, this was significantly more frequent in cachectic patients CC (23% vs 12.11%, OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.19-4.01, p=0.006). Subjects, with AF had lower left ventricular ejection fraction (25.49±12.96 vs. 32.01±15.02, p=0.08), lower posterior wall thickness (10.03±2.12 vs. 11.00±2.47, p=0.007), larger diameter of the left atrium (49.87±9.84 vs. 42.66±7.56, p<0.001), and a higher prevalence of CC (85.42% vs. 69.77%, p=0.028). The 50.58% of was in NYHA class I. In NYHA III, 22.95% were in AF vs. 12.10% with not AF (p=0.027). The frequent coexistence of CC and AF as HF complications indicate greater severity of HF, regardless of its type of HF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The administration of dextrose during in-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with increased mortality and neurologic morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Teng J; Andersen, Lars W; Saindon, Brian Z; Giberson, Tyler A; Kim, Won Young; Berg, Katherine; Novack, Victor; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-04-10

    Dextrose may be used during cardiac arrest resuscitation to prevent or reverse hypoglycemia. However, the incidence of dextrose administration during cardiac arrest and the association of dextrose administration with survival and other outcomes are unknown. We used the Get With The Guidelines®-Resuscitation national registry to identify adult patients with an in-hospital cardiac arrest between the years 2000 and 2010. To assess the adjusted effects of dextrose administration on survival, we used multivariable regression models with adjustment for multiple patient, event, and hospital characteristics. We performed additional analyses to examine the effects of dextrose on neurological outcome and return of spontaneous circulation. Among the 100,029 patients included in our study, 4,189 (4.2%) received dextrose during cardiac arrest resuscitation. The rate of dextrose administration increased during the study period (odds ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.12 per year, P dextrose during resuscitation had lower rates of survival compared with patients who did not receive dextrose (relative risk 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98, P = 0.02). Administration of dextrose was associated with worse neurological outcome (relative risk 0.88, 95% CI 0.79-0.99, P = 0.03) but an increased chance of return of spontaneous circulation (relative risk 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.10, P dextrose during resuscitation in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest was found to be associated with a significantly decreased chance of survival and a decreased chance of good neurological outcome.

  15. Team-focused Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Prehospital Principles Adapted for Emergency Department Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Blake; Runyon, Michael; Weekes, Anthony; Pearson, David

    2018-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has high rates of morbidity and mortality, and a growing body of evidence is redefining our approach to the resuscitation of these high-risk patients. Team-focused cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TFCPR), most commonly deployed and described by prehospital care providers, is a focused approach to cardiac arrest care that emphasizes early defibrillation and high-quality, minimally interrupted chest compressions while de-emphasizing endotracheal intubation and intravenous drug administration. TFCPR is associated with statistically significant increases in survival to hospital admission, survival to hospital discharge, and survival with good neurologic outcome; however, the adoption of similar streamlined resuscitation approaches by emergency physicians has not been widely reported. In the absence of a deliberately streamlined approach, such as TFCPR, other advanced therapies and procedures that have not shown similar survival benefit may be prioritized at the expense of simpler evidence-based interventions. This review examines the current literature on cardiac arrest resuscitation. The recent prehospital success of TFCPR is highlighted, including the associated improvements in multiple patient-centered outcomes. The adaptability of TFCPR to the emergency department (ED) setting is also discussed in detail. Finally, we discuss advanced interventions frequently performed during ED cardiac arrest resuscitation that may interfere with early defibrillation and effective high-quality chest compressions. TFCPR has been associated with improved patient outcomes in the prehospital setting. The data are less compelling for other commonly used advanced resuscitation tools and procedures. Emergency physicians should consider incorporating the TFCPR approach into ED cardiac arrest resuscitation to optimize delivery of those interventions most associated with improved outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breena R. Taira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest, a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, P<0.001. Statistically significant improvement was also seen on the number of critical items completed (OR=3.75, 95% CI 2.71-5.19, total items completed (OR=4.55, 95% CI 3.4-6.11, and number of “excellent” scores on a Likert scale (OR=2.66, 95% CI 1.85-3.81. Conclusions: Nicaraguan resident physicians demonstrate improved ability to manage simulated cardiac arrest scenarios after participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills.

  17. Electroencephalography Predicts Poor and Good Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest: A Two-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Tovar Quiroga, Diego F; Juan, Elsa; Novy, Jan; White, Roger D; Ben-Hamouda, Nawfel; Britton, Jeffrey W; Oddo, Mauro; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2017-07-01

    The prognostic role of electroencephalography during and after targeted temperature management in postcardiac arrest patients, relatively to other predictors, is incompletely known. We assessed performances of electroencephalography during and after targeted temperature management toward good and poor outcomes, along with other recognized predictors. Cohort study (April 2009 to March 2016). Two academic hospitals (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN). Consecutive comatose adults admitted after cardiac arrest, identified through prospective registries. All patients were managed with targeted temperature management, receiving prespecified standardized clinical, neurophysiologic (particularly, electroencephalography during and after targeted temperature management), and biochemical evaluations. We assessed electroencephalography variables (reactivity, continuity, epileptiform features, and prespecified "benign" or "highly malignant" patterns based on the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society nomenclature) and other clinical, neurophysiologic (somatosensory-evoked potential), and biochemical prognosticators. Good outcome (Cerebral Performance Categories 1 and 2) and mortality predictions at 3 months were calculated. Among 357 patients, early electroencephalography reactivity and continuity and flexor or better motor reaction had greater than 70% positive predictive value for good outcome; reactivity (80.4%; 95% CI, 75.9-84.4%) and motor response (80.1%; 95% CI, 75.6-84.1%) had highest accuracy. Early benign electroencephalography heralded good outcome in 86.2% (95% CI, 79.8-91.1%). False positive rates for mortality were less than 5% for epileptiform or nonreactive early electroencephalography, nonreactive late electroencephalography, absent somatosensory-evoked potential, absent pupillary or corneal reflexes, presence of myoclonus, and neuron-specific enolase greater than 75 µg/L; accuracy was highest for

  18. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest risk attributable to temperature in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have estimated the associations between extreme temperatures and mortality and morbidity; however, few have investigated the attributable fraction for a wide range of temperatures on the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We obtained daily records of OHCA cases in the 47 Japanese prefectures between 2005 and 2014. We examined the relationship between OHCA and temperature for each prefecture using a Poisson regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model. The estimated prefecture-specific associations were pooled at the nationwide level using a multivariate random-effect meta-analysis. A total of 659,752 cases of OHCA of presumed-cardiac origin met the inclusion criteria. Overall, 23.93% (95% empirical confidence interval [eCI]: 20.15-26.19) of OHCA was attributable to temperature. The attributable fraction to low temperatures was 23.64% (95% eCI: 19.76-25.87), whereas that of high temperatures was 0.29% (95% eCI: 0.21-0.35). The attributable fraction for OHCA was related to moderate low temperature with an overall estimate of 21.86% (95% eCI: 18.10-24.21). Extreme temperatures were responsible for a small fraction. The majority of temperature-related OHCAs were attributable to lower temperatures. The attributable risk of extremely low and high temperatures was markedly lower than that of moderate temperatures.

  19. Antipsychotics and associated risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeke, P; Jensen, A; Folke, F; Gislason, G H; Olesen, J B; Fosbøl, E L; Wissenberg, M; Lippert, F K; Christensen, E F; Nielsen, S L; Holm, E; Kanters, J K; Poulsen, H E; Køber, L; Torp-Pedersen, C

    2014-10-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCAs in Denmark (2001-2010). The risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of the event. Overall, treatment with any antipsychotic drug was associated with OHCA (odds ratio (OR) = 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23-1.89), as was use with typical antipsychotics (OR = 1.66, CI: 1.27-2.17). By contrast, overall, atypical antipsychotic drug use was not (OR = 1.29, CI: 0.90-1.85). Two individual typical antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol (OR = 2.43, CI: 1.20-4.93) and levomepromazine (OR = 2.05, CI: 1.18-3.56), were associated with OHCA, as was one atypical antipsychotic drug, quetiapine (OR = 3.64, CI: 1.59-8.30).

  20. Organ donation in cardiac arrest patients treated with extracorporeal CPR: A single centre observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Maria Chiara; Coppo, Anna; Vargiolu, Alessia; Villa, Jacopo; Rota, Matteo; Avalli, Leonello; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    In a consecutive cohort of cardiac arrest (CA) treated with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR), we describe the incidence of brain death (BD), the eligibility for organ donation and the short-term follow-up of the transplanted organs. All refractory in- and out-of-hospital CA admitted to our Cardiac Intensive Care Unit between January 2011 and September 2016 treated with eCPR were enrolled in the study. 112 CA patients received eCPR. 82 (73.2%) died in hospital, 25 BD (22.3%) and 57 for other causes (50.9%). At the time of first neurological evaluation after rewarming, variables related to evolution to BD were a lower GCS (3 [3-3] vs. 8 [3-11], pdonation in BD patients was 56%, with 39 donated organs: 23 kidneys, 12 livers, and 4 lungs. 89.74% of the transplanted organs reached an early good functional recovery. In refractory CA patients treated with eCPR, the prevalence of BD is high. This population has a high potential for considering organ donation. Donated organs have a good outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The time dependent association of adrenaline administration and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewy, Gordon A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Chikani, Vatsal; Sanders, Arthur B; Otto, Charles W; Spaite, Daniel W; Kern, Karl B

    2015-11-01

    Recommended for decades, the therapeutic value of adrenaline (epinephrine) in the resuscitation of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is controversial. To investigate the possible time-dependent outcomes associated with adrenaline administration by Emergency Medical Services personnel (EMS). A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a near statewide cardiac resuscitation database between 1 January 2005 and 30 November 2013. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the effect of the time interval between EMS dispatch and the initial dose of adrenaline on survival. The primary endpoints were survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurologic outcome. Data from 3469 patients with witnessed OHCA were analyzed. Their mean age was 66.3 years and 69% were male. An initially shockable rhythm was present in 41.8% of patients. Based on a multivariable logistic regression model with initial adrenaline administration time interval (AATI) from EMS dispatch as the covariate, survival was greatest when adrenaline was administered very early but decreased rapidly with increasing (AATI); odds ratio 0.94 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.92-0.97). The AATI had no significant effect on good neurological outcome (OR=0.96, 95% CI=0.90-1.02). In patients with OHCA, survival to hospital discharge was greater in those treated early with adrenaline by EMS especially in the subset of patients with a shockable rhythm. However survival rapidly decreased with increasing adrenaline administration time intervals (AATI). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic value and prognostic implications of early cardiac magnetic resonance in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Susana, Angela; De Lazzari, Manuel; Migliore, Federico; Vescovo, Giovanni; Scarpa, Daniele; Baritussio, Anna; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Giorgi, Benedetta; Basso, Cristina; Iliceto, Sabino; Bucciarelli Ducci, Chiara; Corrado, Domenico; Marra, Martina Perazzolo

    2018-03-15

    In patients who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), it is crucial to establish the underlying cause and its potential reversibility. The purpose of this study was to assess the incremental diagnostic and prognostic role of early cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in survivors of OHCA. Among 139 consecutive OHCA patients, the study enrolled 44 patients (median age 43 years; 84% male) who underwent coronary angiography and CMR ≤7 days after admission. The CMR protocol included T2-weighted sequences for myocardial edema and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) sequences for myocardial fibrosis. Coronary angiography identified obstructive coronary artery disease in 18 of 44 patients in whom CMR confirmed the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease by demonstrating subendocardial or transmural LGE. The presence of myocardial edema allowed differentiation between acute myocardial ischemia (n = 12) and postinfarction myocardial scar (n = 6). Among the remaining 26 patients without obstructive coronary artery disease, CMR in 19 (73%) showed dilated cardiomyopathy in 5, myocarditis in 4, mitral valve prolapse associated with LGE in 3, ischemic scar in 2, idiopathic nonischemic scar in 2, arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in 1, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 1, and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in 1. In this subgroup of 26 patients, 6 (23%) had myocardial edema. During mean follow-up of 36 ± 17 months, all 18 patients with myocardial edema had an uneventful outcome, whereas 9 of 26 (35%) without myocardial edema experienced sudden arrhythmic death (n = 1), appropriate defibrillator interventions (n = 5), and nonarrhythmic death (n = 3; P = .006). In survivors of OHCA, early CMR with a comprehensive tissue characterization protocol provided additional diagnostic and prognostic value. The identification of myocardial edema was associated with a favorable long-term outcome. Copyright © 2018 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of ventricular wall motion with focused echocardiography during cardiac arrest to predict survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Ozen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Our primary goal is to investigate the hypothesis that in patients with a detectable ventricular wall motion (VWM in cardiac ultrasonography (US during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, survival rate is significantly more than in patients without VWM in US. Material and methods: In our prospective, single center study, 129 adult cardiac arrest (CA patients were enrolled. Cardiac US according to Focus Assessed Transthoracic Echo (FATE protocol was performed before CPR. Presence of VWM was recorded on forms along with demographic data, initial rhythm, CA location, presence of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and time until ROSC was obtained. Results: 129 patients were included. ROSC was obtained in 56/77 (72.7% patients with VWM and 3/52 (5.8% patients without VWM which is statistically significant (p > 0.001. Presence of VWM is 95% (95% CI: 0.95–0.99 sensitive and 70% (95% CI: 0.58–0.80 specific for ROSC. 43/77 (55.8% patients with VWM and 1 (1.9% of 52 patients without VWM survived to hospital admission which was statistically significant (p < 0.001. Presence of VWM was 100% (95% CI: 0.87–1.00 sensitive and 54% (95% CI: 0.43–0.64 specific for survival to hospital admission. Conclusion: No patient without VWM in US survived to hospital discharge. Only 3 had ROSC in emergency department and only 1 survived to hospital admission. This data suggests no patient without VWM before the onset of CPR survived to hospital discharge and this may be an indication to end resuscitative efforts early in these patients. Keywords: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Ultrasonography, Echocardiography, Ventricular wall motion

  4. Preoperative Electrocardiogram Score for Predicting New-Onset Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiwei; Andreasen, Jan J; Melgaard, Jacob; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Hansen, John; Schmidt, Erik B; Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Graff, Claus

    2017-02-01

    To investigate if electrocardiogram (ECG) markers from routine preoperative ECGs can be used in combination with clinical data to predict new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) following cardiac surgery. Retrospective observational case-control study. Single-center university hospital. One hundred consecutive adult patients (50 POAF, 50 without POAF) who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, valve surgery, or combinations. Retrospective review of medical records and registration of POAF. Clinical data and demographics were retrieved from the Western Denmark Heart Registry and patient records. Paper tracings of preoperative ECGs were collected from patient records, and ECG measurements were read by two independent readers blinded to outcome. A subset of four clinical variables (age, gender, body mass index, and type of surgery) were selected to form a multivariate clinical prediction model for POAF and five ECG variables (QRS duration, PR interval, P-wave duration, left atrial enlargement, and left ventricular hypertrophy) were used in a multivariate ECG model. Adding ECG variables to the clinical prediction model significantly improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.54 to 0.67 (with cross-validation). The best predictive model for POAF was a combined clinical and ECG model with the following four variables: age, PR-interval, QRS duration, and left atrial enlargement. ECG markers obtained from a routine preoperative ECG may be helpful in predicting new-onset POAF in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Commence, continue, withhold or terminate?: a systematic review of decision-making in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Natalie E; Gott, Merryn; Slark, Julia

    2017-04-01

    When faced with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patient, prehospital and emergency resuscitation providers have to decide when to commence, continue, withhold or terminate resuscitation efforts. Such decisions may be made difficult by incomplete information, clinical, resourcing or scene challenges and ethical dilemmas. This systematic integrative review identifies all research papers examining resuscitation providers' perspectives on resuscitation decision-making for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. A total of 14 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria: nine quantitative, four qualitative and one mixed-methods design. Five themes were identified, describing factors informing resuscitation provider decision-making: the arrest event; patient characteristics; the resuscitation scene; resuscitation provider perspectives; and medicolegal concerns. Established prognostic factors are generally considered important, but there is a lack of resuscitation provider consensus on other factors, indicating that decision-making is influenced by the perspective of resuscitation providers themselves. Resuscitation decision-making research typically draws conclusions from evaluation of cardiac arrest registry data or clinical notes, but these may not capture all salient factors. Future research should explore resuscitation provider perspectives to better understand these important decisions and the clinical, ethical, emotional and cognitive demands placed on resuscitation providers.

  6. Antiarrhythmic Drugs for Nonshockable-Turned-Shockable Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The ALPS Study (Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudenchuk, Peter J; Leroux, Brian G; Daya, Mohamud; Rea, Thomas; Vaillancourt, Christian; Morrison, Laurie J; Callaway, Clifton W; Christenson, James; Ornato, Joseph P; Dunford, James V; Wittwer, Lynn; Weisfeldt, Myron L; Aufderheide, Tom P; Vilke, Gary M; Idris, Ahamed H; Stiell, Ian G; Colella, M Riccardo; Kayea, Tami; Egan, Debra; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Gray, Pamela; Gray, Randal; Straight, Ron; Dorian, Paul

    2017-11-28

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) commonly presents with nonshockable rhythms (asystole and pulseless electric activity). It is unknown whether antiarrhythmic drugs are safe and effective when nonshockable rhythms evolve to shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia [VF/VT]) during resuscitation. Adults with nontraumatic OHCA, vascular access, and VF/VT anytime after ≥1 shock(s) were prospectively randomized, double-blind, to receive amiodarone, lidocaine, or placebo by paramedics. Patients presenting with initial shock-refractory VF/VT were previously reported. The current study was a prespecified analysis in a separate cohort that initially presented with nonshockable OHCA and was randomized on subsequently developing shock-refractory VF/VT. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included discharge functional status and adverse drug-related effects. Of 37 889 patients with OHCA, 3026 with initial VF/VT and 1063 with initial nonshockable-turned-shockable rhythms were treatment-eligible, were randomized, and received their assigned drug. Baseline characteristics among patients with nonshockable-turned-shockable rhythms were balanced across treatment arms, except that recipients of a placebo included fewer men and were less likely to receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Active-drug recipients in this cohort required fewer shocks, supplemental doses of their assigned drug, and ancillary antiarrhythmic drugs than recipients of a placebo ( P discharge ( P =0.24). No significant interaction between treatment assignment and discharge survival occurred with the initiating OHCA rhythm (asystole, pulseless electric activity, or VF/VT). Survival in each of these categories was consistently higher with active drugs, although the trends were not statistically significant. Adjusted absolute differences (95% confidence interval) in survival from nonshockable-turned-shockable arrhythmias

  7. The number of prehospital defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Manabu; Abe, Takeru; Nagata, Takashi; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-04-17

    The relationship between the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks and treatment outcome in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF) is unknown currently. We examined the association between the number of pre-hospitalization defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in OHCA patients. We conducted a prospective observational study using national registry data obtained from patients with OHCA between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012 in Japan. The study subjects were ≥ 18-110 years of age, had suffered from an OHCA before arrival of EMS personnel, had a witnessed collapse, had an initial rhythm that was shockable [VF/ventricular tachycardia (pulseless VT)], were not delivered a shock using a public automated external defibrillator (AED), received one or more shocks using a biphasic defibrillator by EMS personnel, and were transported to a medical institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. There were 20,851 OHCA cases which met the inclusion criteria during the study period. Signal detection analysis was used to identify the cutoff point in the number of prehospital defibrillation shocks most closely related to one-month survival. Variables related to the number of defibrillations or one-month survival in OHCA were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. A cutoff point in the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks most closely associated with 1-month OHCA survival was between two and three (χ(2) = 209.61, p < 0.0001). Among those patients who received two shocks or less, 34.48% survived for at least 1 month, compared with 24.75% of those who received three shocks or more. The number of defibrillations (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.38), OHCA origin (OR = 2.81, 95% CI: 2.26, 3.49), use of ALS devices (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.79), use of epinephrine (OR = 0.33, 95% C: 0.28, 0.39), interval between first defibrillation and first ROSC (OR = 1.45, 95

  8. Anesthesiologist- and System-Related Risk Factors for Risk-Adjusted Pediatric Anesthesia-Related Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgleszewski, Steven E; Graham, Dionne A; Hickey, Paul R; Brustowicz, Robert M; Odegard, Kirsten C; Koka, Rahul; Seefelder, Christian; Navedo, Andres T; Randolph, Adrienne G

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric anesthesia-related cardiac arrest (ARCA) is an uncommon but potentially preventable adverse event. Infants and children with more severe underlying disease are at highest risk. We aimed to identify system- and anesthesiologist-related risk factors for ARCA. We analyzed a prospectively collected patient cohort data set of anesthetics administered from 2000 to 2011 to children at a large tertiary pediatric hospital. Pre-procedure systemic disease level was characterized by ASA physical status (ASA-PS). Two reviewers independently reviewed cardiac arrests and categorized their anesthesia relatedness. Factors associated with ARCA in the univariate analyses were identified for reevaluation after adjustment for patient age and ASA-PS. Cardiac arrest occurred in 142 of 276,209 anesthetics (incidence 5.1/10,000 anesthetics); 72 (2.6/10,000 anesthetics) were classified as anesthesia-related. In the univariate analyses, risk of ARCA was much higher in cardiac patients and for anesthesiologists with lower annual caseload and/or fewer annual days delivering anesthetics (all P risk adjustment for ASA-PS ≥ III and age ≤ 6 months, however, the association with lower annual days delivering anesthetics remained (P = 0.03), but the other factors were no longer significant. Case-mix explained most associations between higher risk of pediatric ARCA and anesthesiologist-related variables at our institution, but the association with fewer annual days delivering anesthetics remained. Our findings highlight the need for rigorous adjustment for patient risk factors in anesthesia patient safety studies.

  9. Successful treatment of thyroid storm presenting as recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiorgan failure by continuous renal replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Soo Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a rare and potentially life-threatening medical emergency. We experienced a case of thyroid storm associated with sepsis caused by pneumonia, which had a catastrophic course including recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF. A 22-year-old female patient with a 10-year history of Graves’ disease was transferred to our emergency department (ED. She had a cardiac arrest at her home and a second cardiac arrest at the ED. Her heart recovered after 20 min of cardiac resuscitation. She was diagnosed with thyroid storm associated with hyperthyroidism complicated by pneumonia and sepsis. Although full conventional medical treatment was given, she had progressive MOF and hemodynamic instability consisting of hyperthermia, tachycardia and hypotension. Because of hepatic and renal failure with refractory hypotension, we reduced the patient’s dose of beta-blocker and antithyroid drug, and she was started on continuous veno-venous renal replacement therapy (CRRT with intravenous albumin and plasma supplementation. Subsequently, her body temperature and pulse rate began to stabilize within 1 h, and her blood pressure reached 120/60 mmHg after 6 h. We discontinued antithyroid drug 3 days after admission because of aggravated hyperbilirubinemia. The patient exhibited progressive improvement in thyroid function even after cessation of antithyroid drug, and she successfully recovered from thyroid storm and MOF. This is the first case of thyroid storm successfully treated by CRRT in a patient considered unfit for antithyroid drug treatment.

  10. Temporal trends in coverage of historical cardiac arrests using a volunteer-based network of automated external defibrillators accessible to laypersons and emergency dispatch centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carolina Malta; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Wissenberg, Mads; Weeke, Peter; Zinckernagel, Line; Ruwald, Martin H; Karlsson, Lena; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Folke, Fredrik

    2014-11-18

    Although increased dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) has been associated with more frequent AED use, the trade-off between the number of deployed AEDs and coverage of cardiac arrests remains unclear. We investigated how volunteer-based AED dissemination affected public cardiac arrest coverage in high- and low-risk areas. All public cardiac arrests (1994-2011) and all registered AEDs (2007-2011) in Copenhagen, Denmark, were identified and geocoded. AED coverage of cardiac arrests was defined as historical arrests ≤100 m from an AED. High-risk areas were defined as those with ≥1 arrest every 2 years and accounted for 1.0% of the total city area. Of 1864 cardiac arrests, 18.0% (n=335) occurred in high-risk areas throughout the study period. From 2007 to 2011, the number of AEDs and the corresponding coverage of cardiac arrests increased from 36 to 552 and from 2.7% to 32.6%, respectively. The corresponding increase for high-risk areas was from 1 to 30 AEDs and coverage from 5.7% to 51.3%, respectively. Since the establishment of the AED network (2007-2011), few arrests (n=55) have occurred ≤100 m from an AED with only 14.5% (n=8) being defibrillated before the arrival of emergency medical services. Despite the lack of a coordinated public access defibrillation program, the number of AEDs increased 15-fold with a corresponding increase in cardiac arrest coverage from 2.7% to 32.6% over a 5-year period. The highest increase in coverage was observed in high-risk areas (from 5.7% to 51.3%). AED networks can be used as useful tools to optimize AED placement in community settings. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Population density, call-response interval, and survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa Toshio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the effects of geographic variation on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The present study investigated the relationship between population density, time between emergency call and ambulance arrival, and survival of OHCA, using the All-Japan Utstein-style registry database, coupled with geographic information system (GIS data. Methods We examined data from 101,287 bystander-witnessed OHCA patients who received emergency medical services (EMS through 4,729 ambulatory centers in Japan between 2005 and 2007. Latitudes and longitudes of each center were determined with address-match geocoding, and linked with the Population Census data using GIS. The endpoints were 1-month survival and neurologically favorable 1-month survival defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories 1 or 2. Results Overall 1-month survival was 7.8%. Neurologically favorable 1-month survival was 3.6%. In very low-density (2 and very high-density (≥10,000/km2 areas, the mean call-response intervals were 9.3 and 6.2 minutes, 1-month survival rates were 5.4% and 9.1%, and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rates were 2.7% and 4.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, cause of arrest, first aid by bystander and the proportion of neighborhood elderly people ≥65 yrs, patients in very high-density areas had a significantly higher survival rate (odds ratio (OR, 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.44 - 1.87; p Conclusion Living in a low-density area was associated with an independent risk of delay in ambulance response, and a low survival rate in cases of OHCA. Distribution of EMS centers according to population size may lead to inequality in health outcomes between urban and rural areas.

  12. Work factors associated with return to work in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descatha, Alexis; Dumas, Florence; Bougouin, Wulfran; Cariou, Alain; Geri, Guillaume

    2018-07-01

    Although the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased over time, little is known about the return to work of OHCA survivors. We aim to evaluate prevalence and factors associated with return to work (RTW) in OHCA survivors. All consecutive OHCA survivors aged 18-65 years and discharged alive from a Paris tertiary intensive care unit between 2000 and 2013 were included. Pre-hospital care, in-hospital care, and after-hospital discharge data, such as work description (work location, job classification, nature of the job) were compared relative to work status and RTW. Factors associated with RTW were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. 153 OHCA survivors were included in the analysis. Among them, 96 (62.8%) returned to work an average of 714 days after OHCA (SD 1031); mostly to the same job (n = 72, 75%). Six patients changed jobs (4%) and 12 reduced their activity (10.6%). Factors associated with RTW were younger age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 3.64 [1.10; 12.02]), being managers and professionals, and service and sales workers (compared to technicians and associate professionals, clerical support workers, respectively aOR 3.43 [1.05; 11.22] and 4.69 [1.14; 19.37]), and workplace occurrence (aOR 11.72 [1.37; 99.93]). Two thirds of OHCA survivors, in the present study, returned to work. Patients with a higher-level job, and with the arrest occurring in the workplace, were more likely to return to work. Further research should include more details of job contents, evolution, financial consequences, as well as prevention practices related to work location. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Intubation is not a marker for coma after in-hospital cardiac arrest: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Katherine M; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Uber, Amy; Patel, Parth V; Donnino, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) strikes over 200,000 people in the United States annually. Targeted temperature management (TTM) is considered beneficial in other settings, but there is no prospective data for IHCA. Recent work on TTM and IHCA found an association between TTM and worse outcome. However, the authors used intubation as a marker for coma to determine eligibility for TTM. The validity of this approach is unexplored. Retrospective, single center study of adult patients with IHCA occurring in an intensive care unit, intubated prior to or during the event, or immediately after ROSC. We evaluated the percentage of patients documented as comatose after arrest, defined as Glasgow Comas Score (GCS) <8 for the primary analysis. We also evaluated the difference in hospital survival in patients with GCS <8 versus ≥8. Two sensitivity analyses using different methods for defining coma using post-ROSC GCS were conducted. 29/102 (28%) intubated patients had a post-ROSC GCS≥8, and 22 (22%) were documented as following commands. Survival in patients with GCS≥8 vs.<8 was 62% (18/29) vs. 37% (27/73) in unadjusted analysis (p=0.02). The adjusted odds ratio for survival to hospital discharge was 3.81 (95%CI: 1.37-10.61, p=0.01). Results were similar in both sensitivity analyses. Intubation prior to or during IHCA was not a valid marker of coma after ROSC. Post-ROSC mental status was associated with hospital survival, and thus could be an important confounder when conducting observational studies on the association of TTM with outcomes in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term increase in coherence between the basal ganglia and motor cortex after asphyxial cardiac arrest and resuscitation in developing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R; Shoykhet, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The basal ganglia are vulnerable to injury during cardiac arrest. Movement disorders are a common morbidity in survivors. Yet, neuronal motor network changes post-arrest remain poorly understood. We compared function of the motor network in adult rats that, during postnatal week 3, underwent 9.5 min of asphyxial cardiac arrest (n = 9) or sham intervention (n = 8). Six months after injury, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFP) from the primary motor cortex (MCx) and single neuron firing and LFP from the rat entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), which corresponds to the primate globus pallidus pars interna. Data were analyzed for firing rates, power, and coherence between MCx and EPN spike and LFP activity. Cardiac arrest survivors display chronic motor deficits. EPN firing rate is lower in cardiac arrest survivors (19.5 ± 2.4 Hz) compared with controls (27.4 ± 2.7 Hz; P motor network after cardiac arrest. Increased motor network synchrony is thought to be antikinetic in primary movement disorders. Characterization of motor network synchrony after cardiac arrest may help guide management of post-hypoxic movement disorders.

  15. Cardiac arrest due to left circumflex coronary artery embolism as a complication of subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation in a patient with mitral and aortic mechanical valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasiewicz, Marcin; Rojek, Aleksandra; Gajek, Jacek; Mysiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old female patient after replacement of aortic and mitral valve with mechanical prostheses and implantation of a pacemaker hospitalized in our clinic due to acute coronary syndrome complicated with cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation. The electrocardiogram performed on admission showed signs of myocardial infarction with concomitant ventricular pacing. After successful resuscitation the coronary angiography was performed, which showed occlusion of the left circumflex artery (LCx) by thrombus. On the basis of intravascular ultrasound imaging the presence of vulnerable plaque, parietal thrombus and dissection of LCx were excluded. It suggested that occlusion of the LCx resulted from its embolism by left-sided heart thrombus due to subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation. In this case suboptimal anticoagulation was partially iatrogenic. Two weeks before the patient had been given vitamin K intravenously due to indeterminable international normalized ratio (INR) level, which caused transient resistance to oral anticoagulants. This case report illustrates tragic difficulties in the treatment with vitamin K antagonists, which concern as many as 2/3 of anticoagulated patients. These troubles contributed to the search for new, more efficient and safer anticoagulants. There are two classes of new oral anticoagulant drugs, which do not require monitoring of coagulation: direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban). In spite of their proven efficacy in the prevention of ischaemic stroke related to atrial fibrillation and prevention or treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, the use of new oral anticoagulants for the treatment of patients with mechanical valve prostheses needs further research.

  16. Ranking Businesses and Municipal Locations by Spatiotemporal Cardiac Arrest Risk to Guide Public Defibrillator Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christopher L F; Brooks, Steven C; Morrison, Laurie J; Chan, Timothy C Y

    2017-03-21

    Efforts to guide automated external defibrillator placement for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) treatment have focused on identifying broadly defined location categories without considering hours of operation. Broad location categories may be composed of many businesses with varying accessibility. Identifying specific locations for automated external defibrillator deployment incorporating operating hours and time of OHCA occurrence may improve automated external defibrillator accessibility. We aim to identify specific businesses and municipal locations that maximize OHCA coverage on the basis of spatiotemporal assessment of OHCA risk in the immediate vicinity of franchise locations. This study was a retrospective population-based cohort study using data from the Toronto Regional RescuNET Epistry cardiac arrest database. We identified all nontraumatic public OHCAs occurring in Toronto, ON, Canada, from January 2007 through December 2015. We identified 41 unique businesses and municipal location types with ≥20 locations in Toronto from the YellowPages, Canadian Franchise Association, and the City of Toronto Open Data Portal. We obtained their geographic coordinates and hours of operation from Web sites, by phone, or in person. We determined the number of OHCAs that occurred within 100 m of each location when it was open (spatiotemporal coverage) for Toronto overall and downtown. The businesses and municipal locations were then ranked by spatiotemporal OHCA coverage. To evaluate temporal stability of the rankings, we calculated intraclass correlation of the annual coverage values. There were 2654 nontraumatic public OHCAs. Tim Hortons ranked first in Toronto, covering 286 OHCAs. Starbucks ranked first in downtown, covering 110 OHCAs. Coffee shops and bank machines from the 5 largest Canadian banks occupied 8 of the top 10 spots in both Toronto and downtown. The rankings exhibited high temporal stability with intraclass correlation values of 0.88 (95

  17. Ranking businesses and municipal locations by spatiotemporal cardiac arrest risk to guide public defibrillator placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christopher L. F.; Brooks, Steven C.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Chan, Timothy C.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background Efforts to guide automated external defibrillator (AED) placement for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) treatment have focused on identifying broadly defined location categories without considering hours of operation. Broad location categories may be composed of many businesses with varying accessibility. Identifying specific locations for AED deployment incorporating operating hours and time of OHCA occurrence may improve AED accessibility. We aim to identify specific businesses and municipal locations that maximize OHCA coverage based on spatiotemporal assessment of OHCA risk in the immediate vicinity of franchise locations. Methods This study was a retrospective population-based cohort study using data from the Toronto Regional RescuNET Epistry cardiac arrest database. We identified all non-traumatic public OHCAs occurring in Toronto, Canada from Jan. 2007–Dec. 2015. We identified 41 unique businesses and municipal location types with 20 or more locations in Toronto from the YellowPages, Canadian Franchise Association, and the City of Toronto Open Data Portal. We obtained their geographic coordinates and hours of operation from websites, phone, or in-person. We determined the number of OHCAs that occurred within 100 m of each location when it was open (spatiotemporal coverage) for Toronto overall and downtown. The businesses and municipal locations were then ranked by spatiotemporal OHCA coverage. To evaluate temporal stability of the rankings, we calculated intra-class correlation (ICC) of the annual coverage values. Results There were 2,654 non-traumatic public OHCAs. Tim Hortons ranked first in Toronto covering 286 OHCAs. Starbucks ranked first in downtown covering 110 OHCAs. Coffee shops and bank machines from the five largest Canadian banks occupied eight of the top 10 spots in both Toronto and downtown. The rankings exhibited high temporal stability with ICC values of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.83–0.93) in Toronto and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.71–0.86) in

  18. Outcome following postanoxic status epilepticus in patients with targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragancea, Irina; Backman, Sofia; Westhall, Erik; Rundgren, Malin; Friberg, Hans; Cronberg, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    Postanoxic electrographic status epilepticus (ESE) is considered a predictor of poor outcome in resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest (CA). Observational data suggest that a subgroup of patients may have a good outcome. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of ESE and potential clinical and electrographic prognostic markers. In this retrospective single study, we analyzed consecutive patients who suffered from CA, and who received temperature management and were monitored with simplified continuous EEG (cEEG) during a five-year period. The patients' charts and cEEG data were initially screened to identify patients with clinical seizures or ESE. The cEEG diagnosis of ESE was retrospectively reanalyzed according to strict criteria by a neurophysiologist blinded to patient outcome. The EEG background patterns prior to the onset of ESE, duration of ESE, presence of clinical seizures, and use of antiepileptic drugs were analyzed. The results of somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) at 48 h after CA were described in all patients with ESE. Antiepileptic treatment strategies were not protocolized. Outcome was evaluated using the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale at 6 months, and good outcome was defined as CPC 1-2. Of 127 patients, 41 (32%) developed ESE. Twenty-five patients had a discontinuous EEG background prior to ESE, and all died without regaining consciousness. Sixteen patients developed a continuous EEG background prior to the start of ESE, four of whom survived, three with CPC 1-2 and one with CPC 3 at 6 months. Among survivors, ESE developed at a median of 46 h after CA. All had preserved N20 peaks on SSEP and NSE values of 18-37 μg/l. Electrographic status epilepticus is common among comatose patients after cardiac arrest, with few survivors. A combination of a continuous EEG background prior to ESE, preserved N20 peaks on SSEPs, and low or moderately elevated NSE levels may indicate a good outcome. This

  19. Variability in case-mix adjusted in-hospital cardiac arrest rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nichol, Graham; Carr, Brendan G; Mitra, Nandita; Bradley, Steven M; Abella, Benjamin S; Groeneveld, Peter W

    2012-02-01

    It is unknown how in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) rates vary across hospitals and predictors of variability. Measure variability in IHCA across hospitals and determine if hospital-level factors predict differences in case-mix adjusted event rates. Get with the Guidelines Resuscitation (GWTG-R) (n=433 hospitals) was used to identify IHCA events between 2003 and 2007. The American Hospital Association survey, Medicare, and US Census were used to obtain detailed information about GWTG-R hospitals. Adult patients with IHCA. Case-mix-adjusted predicted IHCA rates were calculated for each hospital and variability across hospitals was compared. A regression model was used to predict case-mix adjusted event rates using hospital measures of volume, nurse-to-bed ratio, percent intensive care unit beds, palliative care services, urban designation, volume of black patients, income, trauma designation, academic designation, cardiac surgery capability, and a patient risk score. We evaluated 103,117 adult IHCAs at 433 US hospitals. The case-mix adjusted IHCA event rate was highly variable across hospitals, median 1/1000 bed days (interquartile range: 0.7 to 1.3 events/1000 bed days). In a multivariable regression model, case-mix adjusted IHCA event rates were highest in urban hospitals [rate ratio (RR), 1.1; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-1.3; P=0.03] and hospitals with higher proportions of black patients (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3; P=0.01) and lower in larger hospitals (RR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.45-0.66; PCase-mix adjusted IHCA event rates varied considerably across hospitals. Several hospital factors associated with higher IHCA event rates were consistent with factors often linked with lower hospital quality of care.

  20. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest attributable to sunshine: a nationwide, retrospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the population attributable risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) from non-optimal sunshine duration and the relative contribution of daily sunshine hours. National registry data of all cases of OHCA occurred between 2005 and 2014 in the 47 Japanese prefectures were obtained. We examined the relationship between daily duration of sunshine and OHCA risk for each prefecture in Japan using a Poisson regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model, adjusting for confounding factors. The estimated associations for each prefecture were pooled at the nationwide level using a multivariate random-effects meta-analysis. A total of 658 742 cases of OHCA of presumed cardiac origin met our inclusion criteria. The minimum morbidity sunshine duration varied from the 21st percentile in Okayama to the 99th percentile in Hokkaido, Gifu, and Hyogo. Overall, 5.78% [95% empirical confidence interval (eCI): 3.57-7.16] of the OHCA cases were attributable to daily sunshine duration. The attributable fraction for short sunshine duration (below the minimum morbidity sunshine duration) was 4.18% (95% eCI: 2.64-5.38), whereas that for long sunshine duration (above the minimum morbidity sunshine duration) was 1.59% (95% eCI: 0.81-2.21). Daily sunshine duration was responsible for OHCA burden, and a greater number of OHCA cases occurred in patients who were only exposed to sunshine for short periods of time each day. Our findings suggest that public health efforts to reduce OHCA burden should take sunshine level into account. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Dispatcher-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Shibuta, Hidetoshi; Hasegawa, Manabu; Nagata, Takashi

    2018-04-19

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is critical to the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, it is unknown whether bystander CPR with or without dispatcher assistance is more effective or why. Thus, we evaluated the association between dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR (vs. bystander CPR without dispatcher assistance) and survival of patients with OHCA. This is a retrospective, nonrandomized, observational study using national registry data for all OHCAs. We performed a propensity analysis. Patients with OHCA of cardiac origin were 18-100 years of age and received bystander chest compression in Japan between 2005 and 2014. Outcome measures were bystander rescue breathing, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before hospital arrival, and survival and Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) 1 or 2 at 1 month after the event. During the study period, 1,176,351 OHCAs occurred, and 87,400 cases met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, a negative association was observed between dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR and outcome measures in a fully-adjusted model [odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) for ROSC = 0.87 (0.78-0.97), P < 0.05; OR (95% CI) for 1-month survival = 0.81 (0.65-1.00), P < 0.05; OR (95% CI) for CPC 1 or 2 = 0.64 (0.43-0.93), P < 0.05]. OR of survival for dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR tended to decrease as the emergency medical services response time increased. Survival benefit was less for dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR with dispatcher assistance than without dispatcher assistance. Low quality is hypothesized to be the cause of the reduced benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests During the Japanese Professional Baseball Championship Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2018-03-14

    Because the Japan Professional Baseball Championship Series (Japan Series) is a stressful sports event, it is possible that watching Japan Series matches may increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Therefore, we investigated the potential association between the Japan Series and the incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) events. National registry data for all cases of OHCA between 2005 and 2014 from 47 prefectures of Japan were obtained. We used a time-stratified case-crossover design with a conditional Poisson regression model to compare OHCA events during the Japan Series with those events that occurred during the periods except for dates of the Japan Series. The estimated associations for each prefecture were pooled at the nationwide level using a random-effects meta-analysis. In total, 666,020 OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin were reported during the study period. On days of Japan Series matches, the pooled relative risk of OHCA was 1.033 (95% confidence interval 1.012 to 1.055; p = 0.002; I 2  = 3.5%, P for heterogeneity = 0.405). Stratified analyses by gender revealed that the substantial increase in OHCA during the events was observed for men, whereas we found no significant increase for women. We also found a considerable rise in OHCA among patients aged ≥65 years; however, there was no significant evidence of increased risk in those aged 18 to 64 years. In conclusion, stressful baseball match is associated with an increased risk of OHCA. Prevention measures for severe emotional stress-related OHCA should be implemented, particularly for elderly men. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Current and Future Status of Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Rohit K; Singal, Deepa; Bednarczyk, Joseph; Lamarche, Yoan; Singh, Gurmeet; Rao, Vivek; Kanji, Hussein D; Arora, Rakesh C; Manji, Rizwan A; Fan, Eddy; Nagpal, A Dave

    2017-01-01

    Numerous series, propensity-matched trials, and meta-analyses suggest that appropriate use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) for in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) can be lifesaving. Even with an antecedent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration in excess of 45 minutes, 30-day survival with favourable neurologic outcome using E-CPR is approximately 35%-45%. Survival may be related to age, duration of CPR, or etiology. Associated complications include sepsis, renal failure, limb and neurologic complications, hemorrhage, and thrombosis. However, methodological biases-including small sample size, selection bias, publication bias, and inability to control for confounders-in these series prevent definitive conclusions. As such, the 2015 American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support guidelines update recommended E-CPR as a Level of Evidence IIb recommendation in appropriate cases. The absence of high-quality evidence presents an opportunity for clinician/scientists to generate practice-defining data through collaborative investigation and prospective trials. A multidisciplinary dialogue is required to standardize the field and promote multicentre investigation of E-CPR with data sharing and the development of a foundation for high-quality trials. The objectives of this review are to (1) provide an overview of the strengths and limitations of currently available studies investigating the use of E-CPR in patients with IHCA and highlight knowledge gaps; (2) create a framework for the standardization of terminology, clinical practice, data collection, and investigation of E-CPR for patients with IHCA that will help ensure congruence in future work in this area; and (3) propose suggestions to guide future research by the cardiovascular community to advance this important field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of public health initiatives with outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest at home and in public locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christopher B., Fordyce; Carolina M., Hansen; Kragholm, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Importance  Little is known about the influence of comprehensive public health initiatives according to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) location, particularly at home, where resuscitation efforts and outcomes have historically been poor.Objective  To describe temporal trends in bystander...... cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first-responder defibrillation for OHCAs stratified by home vs public location and their association with survival and neurological outcomes.Design, Setting, and Participants  This observational study reviewed 8269 patients with OHCAs (5602 [67.7%] at home and 2667 [32.......3%] in public) for whom resuscitation was attempted using data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014. The setting was 16 counties in North Carolina.Exposures  Patients were stratified by home vs public OHCA. Public health initiatives...

  5. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable...... rhythm from AEDs used by laypersons with the corresponding proportion recorded by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) on arrival. METHODS: In a 20-month study, we collected data on OHCAs in the Capital Region of Denmark where an AED was deployed prior to arrival of EMS. The AEDs were brought...... to the emergency medical dispatch centre for data downloading and rhythm analysis. Patient data were retrieved from the medical records from the admitting hospital, whereas data on EMS rhythm analyses were obtained from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register between 2001 and 2010. RESULTS: A total of 121 AEDs were...

  6. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by medical dispatchers in emergency medical dispatch centres in two countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Andréll, Cecilia; Viereck, Søren

    2016-01-01

    in two steps; registry data were merged with electronically registered emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch centres in the two regions. Cases with missing or non-OHCA dispatch codes were analysed further by auditing emergency call recordings using a uniform data collection template......INTRODUCTION: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains low. Early recognition by emergency medical dispatchers is essential for an effective chain of actions, leading to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of an automated external defibrillator and rapid dispatching...... of the emergency medical services. AIM: To analyse and compare the accuracy of OHCA recognition by medical dispatchers in two countries. METHOD: An observational register-based study collecting data from national cardiac arrest registers in Denmark and Sweden during a six-month period in 2013. Data were analysed...

  7. Prophylactic antibiotics are associated with a lower incidence of pneumonia in cardiac arrest survivors treated with targeted temperature management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, David J; Nielsen, Niklas; Fraser, Gilles L

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prophylactic antibiotics (PRO) reduce the incidence of early-onset pneumonia in comatose patients with structural brain injury, but have not been examined in cardiac arrest survivors undergoing targeted temperature management (TTM). We investigated the effect of PRO on the development...... of pneumonia in that population. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study comparing patients treated with PRO to those not receiving PRO (no-PRO) using Northern Hypothermia Network registry data. Cardiac arrest survivors ≥ 18 years of age with a GCS...-34 °C were enrolled in the registry. Differences were analyzed in univariate analyses and with logistic regression models to evaluate independent associations of clinical factors with incidence of pneumonia and good functional outcome. RESULTS: 416 of 1240 patients (33.5%) received PRO. Groups were...

  8. Advanced life support therapy and on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: Applying signal processing and pattern recognition methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve Eftestøl

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In the US alone, several hundred thousands die of sudden cardiac arrests each year. Basic life support defined as chest compressions and ventilations and early defibrillation are the only factors proven to increase the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and are key elements in the chain of survival defined by the American Heart Association. The current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines treat all patients the same, but studies show need for more individualiza- tion of treatment. This review will focus on ideas on how to strengthen the weak parts of the chain of survival including the ability to measure the effects of therapy, improve time efficiency, and optimize the sequence and quality of the various components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  9. Uhl’s anomaly: A one and a half ventricular repair in a patient presenting with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald Chounoune

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Uhl’s anomaly, first reported in 1952, is an extremely rare congenital cardiac defect characterized by partial or complete loss of the right ventricular myocardium and unknown etiology. Fewer than 100 cases have been described. The response to medical management is poor and there is no known ideal surgical approach or timing for treatment. We report the case of a previously active adolescent male presenting with cardiac arrest, who underwent successful bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis (“Glenn” anastomosis with right atrial reduction and right ventricular free wall plication.

  10. A predictive model to identify patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes at high risk of cardiac arrest or in-hospital mortality: An IMMEDIATE Trial sub-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhab Ray

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The multivariable predictive model developed identified patients with very early ACS at high risk of cardiac arrest or death. Using this model could assist treating those with greatest potential benefit from GIK.

  11. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn Adams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT and confidence surveys (CS were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9±8.9 versus post: 72.8±6.1, p=0.01 and CS total scores (pre: 22.2±6.4 versus post: 29.9±3.4, p=0.007. Significant differences were noted in airway management, p=0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p=0.008; left uterine displacement, p=0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p=0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p=0.074; chest compressions, p=0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p=0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p=0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency.

  12. Colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector for verification of endotracheal tube placement in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, S R; Sciammarella, J; Viccellio, P; Thode, H; Delagi, R

    1995-06-01

    To evaluate the ability of a disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector to verify proper endotracheal (ET) tube placement in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and to correlate semiquantitative CO2 measurements with the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Prospective, observational study using a convenience sample of intubated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. A disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector was attached to the ET tube after intubation. In the absence of a colorimetric change, the paramedics reassessed the tube placement and could reintubate the patient. Tube placement was verified at the hospital. Paramedics were instructed to contact the base station and report the colorimetric change upon hospital arrival. ROSC was defined as restoration of a self-sustaining pulse until hospital arrival. Between December 1990 and May 1993, ET tubes were placed in 566 victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. 541 of the 566 intubations (95.6%) were associated with a color change. In one case with a color change and out-of-hospital clinical evidence of proper tube placement, the tube was determined to be in the esophagus at the hospital. Correct placement of the remaining 565 of 566 (99.8%) tubes was verified. Of the 566 patients who had a colorimetric change, 91 (16%) had ROSC vs one of 25 (4%) patients who did not have a color change. In one subgroup (n = 179), the degree of color change was highly associated with ROSC (p = 0.004). A disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector appears reliable in verifying proper ET tube placement in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The degree of color change correlates with the probability of ROSC.

  13. GLP-1 analogues for neuroprotection after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Frydland, Martin; Høfsten, Dan Eik; Engstrøm, Thomas; Køber, Lars; Schmidt, Henrik; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2016-06-30

    Attenuating the neurological damage occurring after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is an ongoing research effort. This dual-centre study investigates the neuroprotective effects of the glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogue Exenatide administered within 4 hours from the return of spontaneous circulation to comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This pilot study will randomize a total of 120 unconscious patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest undergoing targeted temperature management in a blinded one-to-one fashion to a 6-hour and 15-minute infusion of either Exenatide or placebo. Patients are eligible for inclusion if resuscitated from cardiac arrest with randomization from 20 minutes to 240 minutes after return of spontaneous circulation. The co-primary endpoint is feasibility, defined as the initiation of treatment within the inclusion window in more than 90 % of participants, and efficacy, defined as the area under the neuron-specific enolase curve from 0 to 72 hours after admission. Secondary endpoints include all-cause mortality at 30 days and Cerebral Performance Category as well as a modified Rankin Score at 180 days. The study has been approved by the Danish National Board of Health and the local Ethics Committee and is monitored by Good Clinical Practice units. The study is currently enrolling. This paper presents the methods and planned statistical analyses used in the GLP-1 trial and aims to minimize bias and data-driven reporting of results. 1) Danish National Board of Health, EudraCT 2013-004311-45. Registered on 25 March 2014. 2) Videnskabsetisk komité C, Region Hovedstaden, No. 45728. Registered on 29 January 2014. 3) Clinicaltrial.gov, NCT02442791 . Registered on 25 of January 2015.

  14. Adrenaline (epinephrine) dosing period and survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a retrospective review of prospectively collected data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sam A; Huszti, Ella; Bradley, Steven M; Chan, Paul S; Bryson, Chris L; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Nichol, Graham

    2014-03-01

    Expert guidelines for treatment of cardiac arrest recommend administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) every three to five minutes. However, the effects of different dosing periods of epinephrine remain unclear. We sought to evaluate the association between epinephrine average dosing period and survival to hospital discharge in adults with an in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA). We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 20,909 IHCA events from 505 hospitals participating in the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-R) quality improvement registry. Epinephrine average dosing period was defined as the time between the first epinephrine dose and the resuscitation endpoint, divided by the total number of epinephrine doses received subsequent to the first epinephrine dose. Associations with survival to hospital discharge were assessed by using generalized estimating equations to construct multivariable logistic regression models. Compared to a referent epinephrine average dosing period of 4 to <5 min per dose, survival to hospital discharge was significantly higher in patients with the following epinephrine average dosing periods: for 6 to <7 min/dose, adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.41 (95%CI: 1.12, 1.78); for 7 to <8 min/dose, adjusted OR, 1.30 (95%CI: 1.02, 1.65); for 8 to <9 min/dose, adjusted OR, 1.79 (95%CI: 1.38, 2.32); for 9 to <10 min/dose, adjusted OR, 2.17 (95%CI: 1.62, 2.92). This pattern was consistent for both shockable and non-shockable cardiac arrest rhythms. Less frequent average epinephrine dosing than recommended by consensus guidelines was associated with improved survival of in-hospital cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests and Outdoor Air Pollution Exposure in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Janine; Folke, Fredrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    -of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) and hourly and daily outdoor levels of PM(10), PM(2.5), coarse fraction of PM (PM(10-2.5)), ultrafine particle proxies, NO(x), NO(2), O(3) and CO in Copenhagen, Denmark, for the period 2000-2010. Susceptible groups by age and sex was also investigated. A case-crossover design...... was applied. None of the hourly lags of any of the pollutants were significantly associated with OHCA events. The strongest association with OHCA events was observed for the daily lag4 of PM(2.5), lag3 of PM(10), lag3 of PM(10-2.5), lag3 of NO(x) and lag4 of CO. An IQR increase of PM(2.5) and PM(10......) was associated with a significant increase of 4% (95% CI: 0%; 9%) and 5% (95% CI: 1%; 9%) in OHCA events with 3 days lag, respectively. None of the other daily lags or other pollutants was significantly associated with OHCA events. Adjustment for O(3) slightly increased the association between OHCA and PM(2...

  16. End-tidal carbon dioxide and defibrillation success in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savastano, Simone; Baldi, Enrico; Raimondi, Maurizio; Palo, Alessandra; Belliato, Mirko; Cacciatore, Elisa; Corazza, Valentina; Molinari, Simone; Canevari, Fabrizio; Danza, Aurora I; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Iotti, Giorgio Antonio; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona

    2017-12-01

    Basing on the relationship between the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the responsiveness of VF to the defibrillation we aimed to assess whether the values of ETCO2 in the minute before defibrillation could predict the effectiveness of the shock. We retrospectively evaluated the reports generated by the manual monitor/defibrillator (Corpuls by GS Elektromedizinische Geräte G. Stemple GmbH, Germany) used for cases of VF cardiac arrest from January 2015 to December 2016. The mean ETCO2 value of the minute preceding the shock (METCO2 60 ) was computed. A blind evaluation of the effectiveness of each shock was provided by three cardiologists. A total amount of 207 shocks were delivered for 62 patients. When considering the three tertiles of METCO2 60 (T1:METCO2 60 ≤ 20mmHg; T2: 20mmHg 31mmHg) a statistically significant difference between the percentages of shock success was found (T1: 50%; T2: 63%; T3: 78%; Chi square p=0.003; p for trend CPR, monitored via ETCO2, and suggest ETCO2 monitoring as an additional weapon to guide defibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of argon on temperature modulation and neurological outcome in hypothermia treated rats following cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brücken, Anne; Bleilevens, Christian; Föhr, Philipp; Nolte, Kay; Rossaint, Rolf; Marx, Gernot; Fries, Michael; Derwall, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Combining xenon and mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) after cardiac arrest (CA) confers a degree of protection that is greater than either of the two interventions alone. However, xenon is very costly which might preclude a widespread use. We investigated whether the inexpensive gas argon would enhance hypothermia induced neurologic recovery in a similar manner. Following nine minutes of CA and three minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation 21 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive MTH (33°C for 6h), MTH plus argon (70% for 1h), or no treatment. A first day condition score assessed behaviour, motor activity and overall condition. A neurological deficit score (NDS) was calculated daily for seven days following the experiment before the animals were killed and the brains harvested for histopathological analysis. All animals survived. Animals that received MTH alone showed best overall neurologic function. Strikingly, this effect was abolished in the argon-augmented MTH group, where animals showed worse neurologic outcome being significant in the first day condition score and on day one to three and five in the NDS in comparison to MTH treated rats. Results were reflected by the neurohistopathological analysis. Our study demonstrates that argon augmented MTH does not improve functional recovery after CA in rats, but may even worsen neurologic function in this model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bystander Automated External Defibrillator Use and Clinical Outcomes after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Mathias J; Vognsen, Mikael; Andersen, Mikkel S

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To systematically review studies comparing bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use to no AED use in regard to clinical outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and to provide a descriptive summary of studies on the cost-effectiveness of bystander AED use. Methods: We...... randomized trials, and 13 cost-effectiveness studies were included. Meta-analysis of 6 observational studies without critical risk of bias showed that bystander AED use was associated with survival to hospital discharge (all rhythms OR: 1.73 [95% CI: 1.36, 2.18], shockable rhythms OR: 1.66 [95% CI: 1.54, 1.......79]) and favorable neurological outcome (all rhythms OR: 2.12 [95% CI: 1.36, 3.29], shockable rhythms OR: 2.37 [95% CI: 1.58, 3.57]). There was no association between bystander AED use and neurological outcome for non-shockable rhythms (OR: 0.76 [95% CI: 0.10, 5.87]). The Public-Access Defibrillation trial found...

  19. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest in Lower Austria--a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegel, Andreas; Gamper, Gunnar; Mayr, Harald

    2011-04-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after cardiac arrest in Lower Austria. A questionnaire was sent to intensive care units (ICUs) in Lower Austria. Methods of inducing and maintaining hypothermia, the practise of rewarming, concomitant therapies and reasons not to cool were documented. Of the 23 ICUs 10 (43%) used TH. Nine (39%) cooled their patients to 32-34°C and one to 34-35°C. Duration of cooling was 24 h (n=8, 35%), 24-48 h (n=1) or 48 h (n=1). For induction of hypothermia, ICUs used cold infusions (n=5, 22%), surface (n=7, 30%) or endovascular cooling (n=6, 26%). The same methods were used during the maintenance period. Reasons not to cool were insufficient staff resources (n=4, 17%), technical complexity of cooling (n=4, 17%) and too little information (n=3, 13%). In conclusion, TH has been poorly implemented in Lower Austria. The reasons for not using hypothermia could possibly be dispelled by education.

  20. Drones may be used to save lives in out of hospital cardiac arrest due to drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, A; Svensson, L; Nordberg, P; Ringh, M; Rosenqvist, M; Djarv, T; Samuelsson, J; Hernborg, O; Dahlbom, P; Jansson, A; Hollenberg, J

    2017-05-01

    Drowning leading to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and death is a major public health concern. Submersion with duration of less than 10min is associated with favorable neurological outcome and nearby bystanders play a considerable role in rescue and resuscitation. Drones can provide a visual overview of an accident scene, their potential as lifesaving tools in drowning has not been evaluated. The aim of this simulation study was to evaluate the efficiency of a drone for providing earlier location of a submerged possible drowning victim in comparison with standard procedure. This randomized simulation study used a submerged manikin placed in a shallow (drone transmitting video to a tablet (intervention). Time from start to contact with the manikin was the primary endpoint. Twenty searches were performed in total, 10 for each group. The median time from start to contact with the manikin was 4:34min (IQR 2:56-7:48) for the search party (control) and 0:47min (IQR 0:38-0:58) for the drone-system (intervention) respectively (pdrone was 3:38min (IQR 2:02-6:38). A drone transmitting live video to a tablet is feasible, time saving in comparison to traditional search parties and may be used for providing earlier location of submerged victims at a beach. Drone search can possibly contribute to earlier onset of CPR in drowning victims. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Debriefing bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is valuable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Fjordholt, Martin; Pedersen, Birgitte Dahl; Østergaard, Doris; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-11-01

    To explore the concept of debriefing bystanders after participating in an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation attempt including (1) bystanders' most commonly addressed reactions after participating in a resuscitation attempt when receiving debriefing from medical dispatchers; (2) their perception of effects of receiving debriefing and (3) bystanders' recommendations for a systematic debriefing concept. Qualitative study based on telephone debriefing to bystanders and interviews with bystanders who received debriefing. Data was analyzed using the phenomenological approach. Six themes emerged from analysis of debriefing audio files: (1) identification of OHCA; (2) emotional and perceptual experience with OHCA; (3) collaboration with healthcare professionals; (4) patients outcome; (5) coping with the experience and (6) general reflections. When evaluating the concept, bystanders expressed positive short term effect of receiving debriefing and a retention of this effect after two months. Recommendations for a future debriefing concept were given. Debriefing by emergency medical dispatchers to OHCA bystanders stimulates reflection, positively influencing the ability to cope with the emotional reactions and the cognitive perception of own performance and motivates improvement of CPR skills. Importantly, it increases confidence to provide CPR in the future. Implementation of telephone debriefing to bystanders at Emergency Medical Dispatch Centres is a low complexity and a low cost intervention though the logistic challenges have to be considered. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Interventions designed using quality improvement methods reduce the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests during pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, James P; Kreeger, Renee; Varughese, Anna M; Wittkugel, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Although serious complications during pediatric anesthesia are less common than they were 20 years ago, serious airway events continue to occur. Based on Quality Improvement (QI) data from our institution, a QI project was designed to reduce the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests. A quality improvement team consisting of members of the Department of Anesthesia was formed and QI data from previous years were analyzed. The QI team developed a Smart Aim, Key Driver Diagram, and specific Interventions that focused on the accessibility of emergency drugs, the use of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants for endotracheal intubation in children 2 years and younger, and the presence of anesthesia providers until emergence from anesthesia in high-risk patients. The percentage of cases where muscle relaxants were utilized in children 2 years and younger for endotracheal intubation and where atropine and succinylcholine were readily available increased at both our base and outpatient facilities. Over the 2.5-year study period, the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests was reduced by 44% and 59%, respectively compared to the previous 2-year period. We utilized QI methodology to design and implement a project which led to greater standardization of clinical practice within a large pediatric anesthesia group. Based on an understanding of system issues impacting our clinical practice, we designed and tested interventions that led to a significant reduction in the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Waveform Integrity in Atrial Fibrillation: The Forgotten Issue of Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Iniesta, Miguel; Ródenas, Juan; Alcaraz, Raúl; Rieta, José J

    2017-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in clinical practice with an increasing prevalence of about 15% in the elderly. Despite other alternatives, catheter ablation is currently considered as the first-line therapy for the treatment of AF. This strategy relies on cardiac electrophysiology systems, which use intracardiac electrograms (EGM) as the basis to determine the cardiac structures contributing to sustain the arrhythmia. However, the noise-free acquisition of these recordings is impossible and they are often contaminated by different perturbations. Although suppression of nuisance signals without affecting the original EGM pattern is essential for any other later analysis, not much attention has been paid to this issue, being frequently considered as trivial. The present work introduces the first thorough study on the significant fallout that regular filtering, aimed at reducing acquisition noise, provokes on EGM pattern morphology. This approach has been compared with more refined denoising strategies. Performance has been assessed both in time and frequency by well established parameters for EGM characterization. The study comprised synthesized and real EGMs with unipolar and bipolar recordings. Results reported that regular filtering altered substantially atrial waveform morphology and was unable to remove moderate amounts of noise, thus turning time and spectral characterization of the EGM notably inaccurate. Methods based on Wavelet transform provided the highest ability to preserve EGM morphology with improvements between 20 and beyond 40%, to minimize dominant atrial frequency estimation error with up to 25% reduction, as well as to reduce huge levels of noise with up to 10 dB better reduction. Consequently, these algorithms are recommended as a replacement of regular filtering to avoid significant alterations in the EGMs. This could lead to more accurate and truthful analyses of atrial activity dynamics aimed at understanding and

  4. Carvedilol for prevention of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Shan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF remains the most common complication after cardiac surgery. Current guidelines recommend β-blockers to prevent POAF. Carvedilol is a non-selective β-adrenergic blocker with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and multiple cationic channel blocking properties. These unique properties of carvedilol have generated interest in its use as a prophylaxis for POAF. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of carvedilol in preventing POAF. METHODS: PubMed from the inception to September 2013 was searched for studies assessing the effect of carvedilol on POAF occurrence. Pooled relative risk (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI was calculated using random- or fixed-effect models when appropriate. Six comparative trials (three randomized controlled trials and three nonrandomized controlled trials including 765 participants met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Carvedilol was associated with a significant reduction in POAF (relative risk [RR] 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37 to 0.64, p<0.001. Subgroup analyses yielded similar results. In a subgroup analysis, carvedilol appeared to be superior to metoprolol for the prevention of POAF (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.70, p<0.001. No evidence of heterogeneity was observed. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, carvedilol may effectively reduce the incidence of POAF in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. It appeared to be superior to metoprolol. A large-scale, well-designed randomized controlled trial is needed to conclusively answer the question regarding the utility of carvedilol in the prevention of POAF.

  5. Longterm effects of cardiac mediastinal nerve cryoablation on neural inducibility of atrial fibrillation in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz; Glavinovic, Tamara; Armour, J Andrew; Cardinal, René; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz; Kus, Teresa

    2011-04-26

    In canines, excessive activation of select mediastinal nerve inputs to the intrinsic cardiac nervous system induces atrial fibrillation (AF). Since ablation of neural elements is proposed as an adjunct to circumferential pulmonary vein ablation for AF, we investigated the short and long-term effects of mediastinal nerve ablation on AF inducibility. Under general anesthesia, in 11 dogs several mediastinal nerve sites were identified on the superior vena cava that, when stimulated electrically during the atrial refractory period, reproducibly initiated AF. Cryoablation of one nerve site was then performed and inducibility retested early (1-2 months post Cryo; n=7) or late (4 months post Cryo; n=4). Four additional dogs that underwent a sham procedure were retested 1 to 2 months post-surgery. Stimulation induced AF at 91% of nerve sites tested in control versus 21% nerve sites early and 54% late post-ablation (both P<0.05). Fewer stimuli were required to induce AF in controls versus the Early Cryo group; this capacity returned to normal values in the Late Cryo group. AF episodes were longer in control versus the Early or Late Cryo groups. Heart rate responses to vagal or stellate ganglion stimulation, as well as to local nicotine infusion into the right coronary artery, were similar in all groups. In conclusion, focal damage to intrinsic cardiac neuronal inputs causes short-term stunning of neuronal inducibility of AF without major loss of overall adrenergic or cholinergic efferent neuronal control. That recovery of AF inducibility occurs rapidly post-surgery indicates the plasticity of intrathoracic neuronal elements to focal injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions-A nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2010-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  7. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions--a nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2011-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  8. Investigation of the relationship between venticular fibrillation duration and cardiac/neurological damage in a rabbit model of electrically induced arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chun-Lin; Wei, Hong-Yan; Liu, Zi-You; Li, Xing; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Li, Yu-Jie; Zhan, Hong; Jing, Xiao-Li; Xiong, Yan; Liu, Yan-Yan; Wu, Gui-Fu

    2010-12-01

    To establish a simple, economic, and reliable alternating current (AC)-induced cardiac arrest (ACCA) model in rabbits for cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation research. Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 27 New Zealand rabbits by external transthoracic AC, which were randomly divided into three groups according to the duration of untreated ACCA (ACCA-3 minutes, ACCA-5 minutes, and ACCA-8 minutes). After ACCA, all animals received cardiopulmonary resuscitation for 2 minutes and subsequent defibrillation until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The troponin I levels were measured at 4 hours after ROSC. Animals died spontaneously or were killed at 72 hours after ROSC. The hippocampus were removed and fixed in 3% formalin. TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling and Nissl stainings were performed in 10-μm thickness coronal sections. Furthermore, two rabbits (without induction of ventricular fibrillation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and defibrillation) served as normal control group. Mean survival times after ROSC were 48.57 hours ± 24.70 hours, 18.0 hours ± 15.13 hours, and 3.88 hours ± 2.39 hours for groups ACCA-3 minutes, ACCA-5 minutes, and ACCA-8 minutes, respectively. Survival was significantly different between ACCA-3 minutes and other two groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.01). Neuronal necrosis and apoptosis were found in the hippocampus CA1, CA2, and CA3 areas of group ACCA-3 minutes. In contrast, neuronal necrosis and TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling positive cells were fewer in control animals. The rabbits in group ACCA-3 minutes had significant neuronal damage with apoptosis in hippocampus CA1, CA2, and CA3 areas at 72 hours after ROSC and survived longer than those in other groups. The model we describe may be a simple, economic, and reliable model for experimental investigation on cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation.

  9. Vagal stimulation targets select populations of intrinsic cardiac neurons to control neurally induced atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Armour, J Andrew; Vinet, Alain; Jacquemet, Vincent; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2016-11-01

    Mediastinal nerve stimulation (MNS) reproducibly evokes atrial fibrillation (AF) by excessive and heterogeneous activation of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons. This study evaluated whether preemptive vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) impacts MNS-induced evoked changes in IC neural network activity to thereby alter susceptibility to AF. IC neuronal activity in the right atrial ganglionated plexus was directly recorded in anesthetized canines (n = 8) using a linear microelectrode array concomitant with right atrial electrical activity in response to: 1) epicardial touch or great vessel occlusion vs. 2) stellate or vagal stimulation. From these stressors, post hoc analysis (based on the Skellam distribution) defined IC neurons so recorded as afferent, efferent, or convergent (afferent and efferent inputs) local circuit neurons (LCN). The capacity of right-sided MNS to modify IC activity in the induction of AF was determined before and after preemptive right (RCV)- vs. left (LCV)-sided VNS (15 Hz, 500 μs; 1.2× bradycardia threshold). Neuronal (n = 89) activity at baseline (0.11 ± 0.29 Hz) increased during MNS-induced AF (0.51 ± 1.30 Hz; P neuronal synchrony increased during neurally induced AF, a local neural network response mitigated by preemptive VNS. These antiarrhythmic effects persisted post-VNS for, on average, 26 min. In conclusion, VNS preferentially targets convergent LCNs and their interactive coherence to mitigate the potential for neurally induced AF. The antiarrhythmic properties imposed by VNS exhibit memory. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. The Use of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnostic Workup and Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Haemers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and imposes a huge clinical and economic burden. AF is correlated with an increased morbidity and mortality, mainly due to stroke and heart failure. Cardiovascular imaging modalities, including echocardiography, computed tomography (CT, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, play a central role in the workup and treatment of AF. One of the major advantages of CMR is the high contrast to noise ratio combined with good spatial and temporal resolution, without any radiation burden. This allows a detailed assessment of the structure and function of the left atrium (LA. Of particular interest is the ability to visualize the extent of LA wall injury. We provide a focused review of the value of CMR in identifying the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of AF, its role in stroke prevention and in the guidance of radiofrequency catheter ablation. CMR is a promising technique that could add valuable information for therapeutic decision making in specific subpopulations with AF.

  11. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  12. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Villarroel, José Paul Perales; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  13. EuReCa Serbia one 2014 - Research center Subotica: Sudden cardiac arrest: Six month follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budimski Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in Europe and they account for 40% of all fatal cases among patients under 75 years. The incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA that were managed by EMS in Europe, including all rhythmes, varies between 38 and 86 per 100 000 people. Epidemiological data on sudden cardiac arrest in Republic of Serbia were not known before Eureca ONE study. AIM: The aim of this paper is to point out the importance of researching cardiac arrest, and the first results of EURECA SERBIA programme 2014. will enable comparison of resuscitation procedures quality and survival rate, both within our country, and relative to European participants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective study. Data were gathered through specific questionnaire during the period of six months, from October 1, 2014 to April 1, 2015. This qustionnaire covered all patients that have had OHCA on the territory of Subotica, and were treated by the EMS. In cases with achieved ROSC, survival was monitored after a month. RESULTS: Emergency medical service of Subotica covers the territory with 141 554 citizens. Cardiac arrest was recorded in 46 patients that EMS treated. The incidence of OHCA during six month period was 32,5/100 000. Number of initiated resuscitations is 44, i.e. 31,08/100 000. The most often place of OHCA event was patient's home (27 61%, or 19, 07/100 000. Heart condition was the cause of OHCA in 100% of all cases (44, that is 31, 08/100 000. 15 patients (34,09% or 10,6/100 000 achieved ROSC, and 12 (27%, that is 8,47/100 000 had pulse and measurable blood pressure at hospital door. 6 patients of all hospitalized were discharged (4,23/100 000, and the incidence of survival after 30 days was 4,23/100 0. ' CONCLUSION: EuReCa One 2014 programme enables inclusion into European register of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. There are differences in observed variables that cannot be explained by precise definition of

  14. Solar radiation and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-11-01

    Although several studies have estimated the effects of temperature on mortality and morbidity, little is known regarding the burden of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) attributable to solar radiation. We obtained data for all cases of OHCA and meteorological data reported between 2011 and 2014 in 3 Japanese prefectures: Hokkaido, Ibaraki, and Fukuoka. We first examined the relationship between daily solar radiation and OHCA risk for each prefecture using time-varying distributed lag non-linear models and then pooled the results in a multivariate random-effects meta-analysis. The attributable fractions of OHCA were calculated for low and high solar radiation, defined as solar radiation below and above the minimum morbidity solar radiation, respectively. The minimum morbidity solar radiation was defined as the specific solar radiation associated with the lowest morbidity risk. A total of 49,892 cases of OHCA occurred during the study period. The minimum morbidity solar radiation for each prefecture was the 100th percentile (72.5 MJ/m 2 ) in Hokkaido, the 83rd percentile (59.7 MJ/m 2 ) in Ibaraki, and the 70th percentile (53.8 MJ/m 2 ) in Fukuoka. Overall, 20.00% (95% empirical confidence interval [eCI]: 10.97-27.04) of the OHCA cases were attributable to daily solar radiation. The attributable fraction for low solar radiation was 19.50% (95% eCI: 10.00-26.92), whereas that for high solar radiation was 0.50% (95% eCI: -0.07-1.01). Low solar radiation was associated with a substantial attributable risk for OHCA. Our findings suggest that public health efforts to reduce OHCA burden should consider the solar radiation level. Large prospective studies with longitudinal collection of individual data is required to more conclusively assess the impact of solar radiation on OHCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F; Calle, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    BACKGROUND AND GOAL OF STUDY: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with decreased depth. In patients undergoing prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation by health care professionals, chest compression rate and depth were recorded using an accelerometer (E-series monitor-defibrillator, Zoll, U.S.A.). Compression depth was compared for rates 120/min. A difference in compression depth ≥0.5 cm was considered clinically significant. Mixed models with repeated measurements of chest compression depth and rate (level 1) nested within patients (level 2) were used with compression rate as a continuous and as a categorical predictor of depth. Results are reported as means and standard error (SE). One hundred and thirty-three consecutive patients were analysed (213,409 compressions). Of all compressions 2% were 120/min, 36% were 5 cm. In 77 out of 133 (58%) patients a statistically significant lower depth was observed for rates >120/min compared to rates 80-120/min, in 40 out of 133 (30%) this difference was also clinically significant. The mixed models predicted that the deepest compression (4.5 cm) occurred at a rate of 86/min, with progressively lower compression depths at higher rates. Rates >145/min would result in a depth compression depth for rates 80-120/min was on average 4.5 cm (SE 0.06) compared to 4.1 cm (SE 0.06) for compressions >120/min (mean difference 0.4 cm, Pcompression rates and lower compression depths. Avoiding excessive compression rates may lead to more compressions of sufficient depth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. "Stayin' alive": a novel mental metronome to maintain compression rates in simulated cardiac arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, John W; Sturgell, Jeremy L; Matlock, David L; Bockewitz, Elizabeth G; Barker, Lisa T

    2012-11-01

    A novel and yet untested memory aid has anecdotally been proposed for aiding practitioners in complying with American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compression rate guidelines (at least 100 compressions per minute). This study investigates how subjects using this memory aid adhered to current CPR guidelines in the short and long term. A prospective observational study was conducted with medical providers certified in 2005 AHA guideline CPR. Subjects were randomly paired and alternated administering CPR compressions on a mannequin during a standardized cardiac arrest scenario. While performing compressions, subjects listened to a digital recording of the Bee Gees song "Stayin' Alive," and were asked to time compressions to the musical beat. After at least 5 weeks, the participants were retested without directly listening to the recorded music. Attitudinal views were gathered using a post-session questionnaire. Fifteen subjects (mean age 29.3 years, 66.7% resident physicians and 80% male) were enrolled. The mean compression rate during the primary assessment (with music) was 109.1, and during the secondary assessment (without music) the rate was 113.2. Mean CPR compression rates did not vary by training level, CPR experience, or time to secondary assessment. Subjects felt that utilizing the music improved their ability to provide CPR and they felt more confident in performing CPR. Medical providers trained to use a novel musical memory aid effectively maintained AHA guideline CPR compression rates initially and in long-term follow-up. Subjects felt that the aid improved their technical abilities and confidence in providing CPR. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Cost-utility analysis of treating out of hospital cardiac arrests in Jerusalem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Gary M; Kark, Jeremy D; Einav, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) initiates a chain of responses including emergency medical service mobilization and medical treatment, transfer and admission first to a hospital Emergency Department (ED) and then usually to an intensive care unit and ward. Costly pre- and in-hospital care may be followed by prolonged post discharge expenditure on treatment of patients with severe neurological sequelae. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of treatment of OHCA by calculating the cost per Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. We studied 3355 consecutive non-traumatic OHCAs (2005-2010) in Jerusalem, Israel, supplemented by hospital utilization data extracted from patient files (n = 570) and post-discharge follow-up (n = 196). Demographic, utilization and economic data were incorporated into a spreadsheet model to calculate the cost-utility ratio. Advanced life support was administered to 2264 of the 3355 OHCAs (67.5%) and 1048 (45.6%) patients were transferred to the ED. Of 676 (20.1%) patients who survived the ED and were admitted, there were 206 (6.1%) survivors to discharge, among them only 113 (3.4%) neurologically intact. Total cost ($39,100,000) per DALY averted (1353) was $28,864. The current package of OHCA interventions in Jerusalem appears to be very cost-effective as the cost per averted DALY of $28,864 is less than the Gross Domestic Product per capita ($33,261). This paper provides a basis for studying the effects of potential interventions that can be evaluated in terms of their incremental costs per averted DALY for treatment of OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Early prediction of coma recovery after cardiac arrest with blinded pupillometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Daria; Rossetti, Andrea O; Carteron, Laurent; Miroz, John-Paul; Novy, Jan; Eckert, Philippe; Oddo, Mauro

    2017-06-01

    Prognostication studies on comatose cardiac arrest (CA) patients are limited by lack of blinding, potentially causing overestimation of outcome predictors and self-fulfilling prophecy. Using a blinded approach, we analyzed the value of quantitative automated pupillometry to predict neurological recovery after CA. We examined a prospective cohort of 103 comatose adult patients who were unconscious 48 hours after CA and underwent repeated measurements of quantitative pupillary light reflex (PLR) using the Neurolight-Algiscan device. Clinical examination, electroencephalography (EEG), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), and serum neuron-specific enolase were performed in parallel, as part of standard multimodal assessment. Automated pupillometry results were blinded to clinicians involved in patient care. Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) at 1 year was the outcome endpoint. Survivors (n = 50 patients; 32 CPC 1, 16 CPC 2, 2 CPC 3) had higher quantitative PLR (median = 20 [range = 13-41] vs 11 [0-55] %, p < 0.0001) and constriction velocity (1.46 [0.85-4.63] vs 0.94 [0.16-4.97] mm/s, p < 0.0001) than nonsurvivors. At 48 hours, a quantitative PLR < 13% had 100% specificity and positive predictive value to predict poor recovery (0% false-positive rate), and provided equal performance to that of EEG and SSEP. Reduced quantitative PLR correlated with higher serum neuron-specific enolase (Spearman r = -0.52, p < 0.0001). Reduced quantitative PLR correlates with postanoxic brain injury and, when compared to standard multimodal assessment, is highly accurate in predicting long-term prognosis after CA. This is the first prognostication study to show the value of automated pupillometry using a blinded approach to minimize self-fulfilling prophecy. Ann Neurol 2017;81:804-810. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  19. Improving Providers' Role Definitions to Decrease Overcrowding and Improve In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Marion; Schweickert, William; Neefe, Stacie; Tsypenyuk, Boris; Falk, Scott Austin; Holena, Daniel N

    2016-07-01

    How nontechnical factors such as inadequate role definition and overcrowding affect outcomes of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is unknown. Using a bundled intervention, we sought to improve providers' role definitions and decrease overcrowding during IHCA events. To determine if a bundled intervention consisting of a nurse/physician leadership dyad, visual cues for provider roles, and a "role check" would lead to reductions in crowding and improve perceptions of communication and team leadership. Baseline data on the number and type of IHCA providers were collected. Providers were asked to complete a postevent survey rating communication and leadership. A bundled intervention was then introduced. Data were then obtained for the subsequent IHCA events. Twenty ICHA events were captured before and 34 after the intervention. The number of physicians present at pulse checks 2 (median [interquartile range]: 6 [5-8] before vs 5 [3-6] after, P = .02) and 3 (7 [5-9] vs 4 [4-5], P = .004) decreased significantly after the intervention. The overall number of providers at the third pulse check (18 [14-22] before vs 14 [12-16] after, P = .04) also decreased after the intervention. On a 10-point Likert scale, ratings of communication (8 [7-8]) and physician leadership (8 [7-9]) did not differ significantly from before to after the intervention. Both the physician leads (90%) and patients' primary nurses (97%) were able to identify clear nurse leaders. A bundled intervention targeted at improving IHCA response led to a decrease in overcrowding at ICHA events without substantial changes in the perceptions of communication or physician leadership. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Digitization of Electrocardiogram From Telemetry Prior to In-hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attin, Mina; Wang, Lu; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Lin, Chii-Dean; Lemus, Hector; Spadafore, Maxwell; Najarian, Kayvan

    2016-03-01

    Analyzing telemetry electrocardiogram (ECG) data over an extended period is often time-consuming because digital records are not widely available at hospitals. Investigating trends and patterns in the ECG data could lead to establishing predictors that would shorten response time to in-hospital cardiac arrest (I-HCA). This study was conducted to validate a novel method of digitizing paper ECG tracings from telemetry systems in order to facilitate the use of heart rate as a diagnostic feature prior to I-HCA. This multicenter study used telemetry to investigate full-disclosure ECG papers of 44 cardiovascular patients obtained within 1 hr of I-HCA with initial rhythms of pulseless electrical activity and asystole. Digital ECGs were available for seven of these patients. An algorithm to digitize the full-disclosure ECG papers was developed using the shortest path method. The heart rate was measured manually (averaging R-R intervals) for ECG papers and automatically for digitized and digital ECGs. Significant correlations were found between manual and automated measurements of digitized ECGs (p < .001) and between digitized and digital ECGs (p < .001). Bland-Altman methods showed bias = .001 s, SD = .0276 s, lower and upper 95% limits of agreement for digitized and digital ECGs = .055 and -.053 s, and percentage error = 0.22%. Root mean square (rms), percentage rms difference, and signal to noise ratio values were in acceptable ranges. The digitization method was validated. Digitized ECG provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring heart rate over an extended period of time. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Søholm, Helle; Wanscher, Michael; Lippert, Freddy K; Møller, Jacob E; Køber, Lars; Hassager, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level of vasopressor support and mortality. In a 6-year period, 310 comatose OHCA patients treated with TH were included. Temperature, hemodynamic parameters and level of vasopressors were registered from admission to 24h after rewarming. Level of vasopressor support was assessed by the cardiovascular sub-score of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA). The population was stratified by use of dopamine as first line intervention (D-group) or use of dopamine+norepinephrine/epinephrine (DA-group). Primary endpoint was 30-day mortality and secondary endpoint was in-hospital cause of death. Patients in the DA-group carried a 49% all-cause 30-day mortality rate compared to 23% in the D-group, plog-rank<0.0001, corresponding to an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 2.0 (95% CI: 1.3-3.0), p=0.001). The DA-group had an increased 30-day mortality due to neurological injury (HR=1.7 (95% CI: 1.1-2.7), p=0.02). Cause of death was anoxic brain injury in 78%, cardiovascular failure in 18% and multi-organ failure in 4%. The hemodynamic changes of TH reversed at normothermia, although the requirement for vasopressor support (cardiovascular SOFA≥3) persisted in 80% of patients. In survivors after OHCA treated with TH the induced hemodynamic changes reversed after normothermia, while the need for vasopressor support persisted. Patients requiring addition of norepinephrine/epinephrine on top of dopamine had an increased 30-day all-cause mortality, as well as death from neurological injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A smartphone application for dispatch of lay responders to out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Ellinor; Claesson, Andreas; Nordberg, Per; Djärv, Therese; Lundgren, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Forsberg, Sune; Riva, Gabriel; Ringh, Mattias

    2018-05-01

    Dispatch of lay volunteers trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) may improve survival in cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The aim of this study was to investigate the functionality and performance of a smartphone application for locating and alerting nearby trained laymen/women in cases of OHCA. A system using a smartphone application activated by Emergency Dispatch Centres was used to locate and alert laymen/women to nearby suspected OHCAs. Lay responders were instructed either to perform CPR or collect a nearby AED. An online survey was carried out among the responders. From February to August 2016, the system was activated in 685 cases of suspected OHCA. Among these, 224 cases were Emergency Medical Services (EMSs)-treated OHCAs (33%). EMS-witnessed cases (n = 11) and cases with missing survey data (n = 15) were excluded. In the remaining 198 OHCAs, lay responders arrived at the scene in 116 cases (58%), and prior to EMSs in 51 cases (26%). An AED was attached in 17 cases (9%) and 4 (2%) were defibrillated. Lay responders performed CPR in 54 cases (27%). Median distance to the OHCA was 560 m (IQR 332-860 m), and 1280 m (IQR 748-1776 m) via AED pick-up. The survey-answering rate was 82%. A smartphone application can be used to alert CPR-trained lay volunteers to OHCAs for CPR. Further improvements are needed to shorten the time to defibrillation before EMS arrival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The value of arterial blood gas parameters for prediction of mortality in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Isabel von Auenmueller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sudden cardiac death is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and early prognostication remains challenging. There is a lack of valid parameters for the prediction of survival after cardiac arrest. Aims: This study aims to investigate if arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to our hospital after resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were included in this retrospective study. The patient's survival 5 days after resuscitation defined the study end-point. For the statistical analysis, the mean, standard deviation, Student's t-test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were used (level of significance P< 0.05. Results: Arterial blood gas samples were taken from 170 patients. In particular, pH < 7.0 (odds ratio [OR]: 7.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.11–16.69; P< 0.001 and lactate ≥ 5.0 mmol/L (OR: 6.79; 95% CI: 2.77–16.66; P< 0.001 showed strong and independent correlations with mortality within the first 5 days after hospital admission. Conclusion: Our study results indicate that several arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital resuscitation. The most relevant parameters are pH and lactate because they are strongly and independently associated with mortality within the first 5 days after resuscitation. Despite this correlation, none of these parameters by oneself is strong enough to allow an early prognostication. Still, these parameters can contribute as part of a multimodal approach to assessing the patients' prognosis.

  4. An Exploratory Study of Functional Status in Post Cardiac Arrest Survivors Discharged To Home

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whitcomb, John J

    2005-01-01

    .... Aims of the project were to describe perceived functional capacity, physical functional performance, mental health, symptom distress, and demographic factors in survivors of cardiopulmonary arrest...

  5. Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Elderly Patients with the Cox Maze Procedure Concurrently with Other Cardiac Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Hong Kuh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In elderly patients who have atrial fibrillation (AF, surgical ablation of the arrhythmia during cardiac surgery may be challenging. Despite the reported advantages of ablating AF with the Cox maze procedure (CMP, the addition of the CMP may complicate other cardiac operations. We evaluated the effect of the CMP in elderly patients concurrent with other cardiac operations. Methods: From October 2007 to December 2015, we enrolled 27 patients aged >70 years who had AF and who underwent the CMP concurrently with other cardiac operations. The mean preoperative additive European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score was 8±11 (high risk. Results: Only 1 hospital death occurred (4%. The Kaplan-Meier method showed a high 5‐year cumulative survival rate (92%. At mean follow‐up of 51 months, 23 patients (89% had sinus rhythm conversion. The postoperative left atrial dimensions did not significantly differ between the 8 patients who had reduction plasty for giant left atrium (53.4±7.5 cm and the 19 patients who did not have reduction plasty (48.7±5.7 cm. Conclusion: In patients aged >70 years, concurrent CMP may be associated with a high rate of sinus rhythm conversion without increased surgical risk, despite the added complexity of the main cardiac procedure.

  6. Development and validation of risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A; Patel, Krishna; Nixon, Edel; Soar, Jasmeet; Smith, Gary B; Gwinnutt, Carl; Nolan, Jerry P; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2014-08-01

    The National Cardiac Arrest Audit (NCAA) is the UK national clinical audit for in-hospital cardiac arrest. To make fair comparisons among health care providers, clinical indicators require case mix adjustment using a validated risk model. The aim of this study was to develop and validate risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team in UK hospitals. Risk models for two outcomes-return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for greater than 20min and survival to hospital discharge-were developed and validated using data for in-hospital cardiac arrests between April 2011 and March 2013. For each outcome, a full model was fitted and then simplified by testing for non-linearity, combining categories and stepwise reduction. Finally, interactions between predictors were considered. Models were assessed for discrimination, calibration and accuracy. 22,479 in-hospital cardiac arrests in 143 hospitals were included (14,688 development, 7791 validation). The final risk model for ROSC>20min included: age (non-linear), sex, prior length of stay in hospital, reason for attendance, location of arrest, presenting rhythm, and interactions between presenting rhythm and location of arrest. The model for hospital survival included the same predictors, excluding sex. Both models had acceptable performance across the range of measures, although discrimination for hospital mortality exceeded that for ROSC>20min (c index 0.81 versus 0.72). Validated risk models for ROSC>20min and hospital survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest have been developed. These models will strengthen comparative reporting in NCAA and support local quality improvement. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Development and validation of risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A.; Patel, Krishna; Nixon, Edel; Soar, Jasmeet; Smith, Gary B.; Gwinnutt, Carl; Nolan, Jerry P.; Rowan, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The National Cardiac Arrest Audit (NCAA) is the UK national clinical audit for in-hospital cardiac arrest. To make fair comparisons among health care providers, clinical indicators require case mix adjustment using a validated risk model. The aim of this study was to develop and validate risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team in UK hospitals. Methods Risk models for two outcomes—return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for greater than 20 min and survival to hospital discharge—were developed and validated using data for in-hospital cardiac arrests between April 2011 and March 2013. For each outcome, a full model was fitted and then simplified by testing for non-linearity, combining categories and stepwise reduction. Finally, interactions between predictors were considered. Models were assessed for discrimination, calibration and accuracy. Results 22,479 in-hospital cardiac arrests in 143 hospitals were included (14,688 development, 7791 validation). The final risk model for ROSC > 20 min included: age (non-linear), sex, prior length of stay in hospital, reason for attendance, location of arrest, presenting rhythm, and interactions between presenting rhythm and location of arrest. The model for hospital survival included the same predictors, excluding sex. Both models had acceptable performance across the range of measures, although discrimination for hospital mortality exceeded that for ROSC > 20 min (c index 0.81 versus 0.72). Conclusions Validated risk models for ROSC > 20 min and hospital survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest have been developed. These models will strengthen comparative reporting in NCAA and support local quality improvement. PMID:24830872

  8. Vagal stimulation targets select populations of intrinsic cardiac neurons to control neurally induced atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Armour, J. Andrew; Vinet, Alain; Jacquemet, Vincent; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2016-01-01

    Mediastinal nerve stimulation (MNS) reproducibly evokes atrial fibrillation (AF) by excessive and heterogeneous activation of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons. This study evaluated whether preemptive vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) impacts MNS-induced evoked changes in IC neural network activity to thereby alter susceptibility to AF. IC neuronal activity in the right atrial ganglionated plexus was directly recorded in anesthetized canines (n = 8) using a linear microelectrode array concomitant with right atrial electrical activity in response to: 1) epicardial touch or great vessel occlusion vs. 2) stellate or vagal stimulation. From these stressors, post hoc analysis (based on the Skellam distribution) defined IC neurons so recorded as afferent, efferent, or convergent (afferent and efferent inputs) local circuit neurons (LCN). The capacity of right-sided MNS to modify IC activity in the induction of AF was determined before and after preemptive right (RCV)- vs. left (LCV)-sided VNS (15 Hz, 500 μs; 1.2× bradycardia threshold). Neuronal (n = 89) activity at baseline (0.11 ± 0.29 Hz) increased during MNS-induced AF (0.51 ± 1.30 Hz; P < 0.001). Convergent LCNs were preferentially activated by MNS. Preemptive RCV reduced MNS-induced changes in LCN activity (by 70%) while mitigating MNS-induced AF (by 75%). Preemptive LCV reduced LCN activity by 60% while mitigating AF potential by 40%. IC neuronal synchrony increased during neurally induced AF, a local neural network response mitigated by preemptive VNS. These antiarrhythmic effects persisted post-VNS for, on average, 26 min. In conclusion, VNS preferentially targets convergent LCNs and their interactive coherence to mitigate the potential for neurally induced AF. The antiarrhythmic properties imposed by VNS exhibit memory. PMID:27591222

  9. Predictors of sudden cardiac death in atrial fibrillation: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study.

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    Ryan J Koene

    Full Text Available We previously reported that incident atrial fibrillation (AF is associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD in the general population. We now aimed to identify predictors of SCD in persons with AF from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study, a community-based cohort study. We included all participants who attended visit 1 (1987-89 and had no prior AF (n = 14,836. Incident AF was identified from study electrocardiograms and hospitalization discharge codes through 2012. SCD was physician-adjudicated. We used cause-specific Cox proportional hazards models, followed by stepwise selection (backwards elimination, removing all variables with p>0.10 to identify predictors of SCD in participants with AF. AF occurred in 2321 (15.6% participants (age 45-64 years, 58% male, 18% black. Over a median of 3.3 years, SCD occurred in 110 of those with AF (4.7%. Predictors of SCD in AF included higher age, body mass index (BMI, coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, current smoker, left ventricular hypertrophy, increased heart rate, and decreased albumin. Predictors associated only with SCD and not other cardiovascular (CV death included increased BMI (HR per 5-unit increase, 1.15, 95% CI, 0.97-1.36, p = 0.10, increased heart rate (HR per SD increase, 1.18, 95% CI 0.99-1.41, p = 0.07, and low albumin (HR per SD decrease 1.23, 95% CI 1.02-1.48, p = 0.03. In the ARIC study, predictors of SCD in AF that are not associated with non-sudden CV death included increased BMI, increased heart rate, and low albumin. Further research to confirm these findings in larger community-based cohorts and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms to facilitate prevention is warranted.

  10. Chest compressions before defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials

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    Meier Pascal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current 2005 guidelines for advanced cardiac life support strongly recommend immediate defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, findings from experimental and clinical studies have indicated a potential advantage of pretreatment with chest compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR prior to defibrillation in improving outcomes. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the beneficial effect of chest compression-first versus defibrillation-first on survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods Main outcome measures were survival to hospital discharge (primary endpoint, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, neurologic outcome and long-term survival. Randomized, controlled clinical trials that were published between January 1, 1950, and June 19, 2010, were identified by a computerized search using SCOPUS, MEDLINE, BIOS, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts database, and Web of Science and supplemented by conference proceedings. Random effects models were used to calculate pooled odds ratios (ORs. A subgroup analysis was conducted to explore the effects of response interval greater than 5 min on outcomes. Results A total of four trials enrolling 1503 subjects were integrated into this analysis. No difference was found between chest compression-first versus defibrillation-first in the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (OR 1.01 [0.82-1.26]; P = 0.979, survival to hospital discharge (OR 1.10 [0.70-1.70]; P = 0.686 or favorable neurologic outcomes (OR 1.02 [0.31-3.38]; P = 0.979. For 1-year survival, however, the OR point estimates favored chest compression first (OR 1.38 [0.95-2.02]; P = 0.092 but the 95% CI crossed 1.0, suggesting insufficient estimate precision. Similarly, for cases with prolonged response times (> 5 min point estimates pointed toward superiority of chest compression first (OR 1.45 [0

  11. Comparative Study of Nifekalant Versus Amiodarone for Shock-Resistant Ventricular Fibrillation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amino, Mari; Yoshioka, Koichiro; Opthof, Tobias; Morita, Seiji; Uemura, Shunryo; Tamura, Kozo; Fukushima, Tomokazu; Higami, Shigeo; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Akieda, Kazuki; Shima, Makiyoshi; Fujibayashi, Daisuke; Hashida, Tadashi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Kodama, Itsuo; Tanabe, Teruhisa

    2010-01-01

    Background: In Japan, intravenous nifekalant ( NIF) was often used for direct current cardioversion-resistant ventricular fibrillation (VF), until the use of intravenous amiodarone (AMD) was approved in 2007. The defibrillatory efficacy of NIF and AMD has thus far not been compared for

  12. Data supporting the use of end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2 measurement to guide management of cardiac arrest: A systematic review

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    Edison F. Paiva

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article, “The Use of End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide (ETCO2 Measurement to Guide Management of Cardiac Arrest: A Systematic Review” [1]. This article is a systematic review and meta-analysis of existing data on the subject of whether any level of end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2 measured during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR correlates with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC or survival in adult patients experiencing cardiac arrest in any setting. These data are made publicly available to enable critical or extended analyses. Keywords: Cardiac arrest, End tidal carbon dioxide, Prognostication, Advanced cardiac life support, Capnography, Systematic review, Meta-analysis

  13. No fate but what we make: a case of full recovery after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Mafalda; Sousa, Pedro J; Ferreira, Jorge; Andrade, Maria J; Gonçalves, Pedro A; Romão, Cristina

    2009-12-11

    An 80 years old man suffered a cardiac arrest shortly after arrival to his local health department. Basic Life Support was started promptly and nine minutes later, on evaluation by an Advanced Life Support team, the victim was defibrillated with a 200J shock. When orotracheal intubation was attempted, masseter muscle contraction was noticed: on reevaluation, the victim had pulse and spontaneous breathing.Thirty minutes later, the patient had been transferred to an emergency department. As he complained of chest pain, the ECG showed a ST segment depression in leads V4 to V6 and laboratory tests showed cardiac troponine I slightly elevated. A coronary angiography was performed urgently: significant left main plus three vessel coronary artery disease was disclosed.Eighteen hours after the cardiac arrest, a quadruple coronary artery bypass grafting operation was undertaken. During surgery, a fresh thrombus was removed from the middle left anterior descendent artery. Post-operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged seven days after the procedure. Twenty four months later, he remains asymptomatic.In this case, the immediate call for the Advanced Life Support team, prompt basic life support and the successful defibrillation, altogether, contributed for the full recovery. Furthermore, the swiftness in the detection and treatment of the acute reversible cause (myocardial ischemia in this case) was crucial for long-term prognosis.

  14. Inspiratory impedance during active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized evaluation in patients in cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, P; Lurie, K G; Payen, D

    2000-03-07

    Blood pressure is severely reduced in patients in cardiac arrest receiving standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although active compression-decompression (ACD) CPR improves acute hemodynamic parameters, arterial pressures remain suboptimal with this technique. We performed ACD CPR in patients with a new inspiratory threshold valve (ITV) to determine whether lowering intrathoracic pressures during the "relaxation" phase of ACD CPR would enhance venous blood return and overall CPR efficiency. This prospective, randomized, blinded trial was performed in prehospital mobile intensive care units in Paris, France. Patients in nontraumatic cardiac arrest received ACD CPR plus the ITV or ACD CPR alone for 30 minutes during advanced cardiac life support. End tidal CO(2) (ETCO(2)), diastolic blood pressure (DAP) and coronary perfusion pressure, and time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were measured. Groups were similar with respect to age, gender, and initial rhythm. Mean maximal ETCO(2), coronary perfusion pressure, and DAP values, respectively (in mm Hg), were 13.1+/-0.9, 25.0+/-1.4, and 36.5+/-1.5 with ACD CPR alone versus 19.1+/-1.0, 43.3+/-1.6, and 56.4+/-1.7 with ACD plus valve (PCPR alone after 26.5+/-0.7 minutes versus 4 of 11 patients with ACD CPR plus ITV after 19.8+/-2.8 minutes (PCPR increases the efficiency of CPR, leading to diastolic arterial pressures of >50 mm Hg. The long-term benefits of this new CPR technology are under investigation.

  15. Characteristics and outcome among patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Factors associated with survival

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    Trpković S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to define factors associated with an improved outcome among patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA using the Utstain style data collection. We examined 200 patients suffering from OHCA in a prospective study in a two years period. We determined survival from cardiac arrest (CA to discharge from hospital and the factors associated with survival. 78% of CA patients had a cardiac aetiology, 65% occurred at home, 3.7% received bystander CPR. 36% were found in VF/VT, 64% in asystole/PEA. 52% of patients were intubated in the field, survival to discharge from hospital was significantly higher among patients who were intubated in the field. The mean response time was 6.6 minutes. 66.7% of patients were given the shock after 4 minutes. 131 (65.5% were pronounced dead in the field, 69 patients were transported to the hospital. 53 (76.8% patients of them died during the transport or in the ED, 7 died after hospital admission and 9 survived to hospital discharge. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that variables significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge were: age, endotracheal intubation in the field and mean response time. The outcome of CPR was better in patients who were younger, who were intubated in the field and when the response time was shorter.

  16. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a load-distributing band external cardiac support device for in-hospital cardiac arrest: a single centre experience of AutoPulse-CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, J R; White, S; Quinn, N; Gubran, C J; Ludman, P F; Townend, J N; Doshi, S N

    2015-02-01

    Poor quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) predicts adverse outcome. During invasive cardiac procedures automated-CPR (A-CPR) may help maintain effective resuscitation. The use of A-CPR following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) remains poorly described. Firstly, we aimed to assess the efficiency of healthcare staff using A-CPR in a cardiac arrest scenario at baseline, following re-training and over time (Scenario-based training). Secondly, we studied our clinical experience of A-CPR at our institution over a 2-year period, with particular emphasis on the details of invasive cardiac procedures performed, problems encountered, resuscitation rates and in-hospital outcome (AutoPulse-CPR Registry). Scenario-based training: Forty healthcare professionals were assessed. At baseline, time-to-position device was slow (mean 59 (±24) s (range 15-96s)), with the majority (57%) unable to mode-switch. Following re-training time-to-position reduced (28 (±9) s, pCPR Registry: 285 patients suffered IHCA, 25 received A-CPR. Survival to hospital discharge following conventional CPR was 28/260 (11%) and 7/25 (28%) following A-CPR. A-CPR supported invasive procedures in 9 patients, 2 of whom had A-CPR dependant circulation during transfer to the catheter lab. A-CPR may provide excellent haemodynamic support and facilitate simultaneous invasive cardiac procedures. A significant learning curve exists when integrating A-CPR into clinical practice. Further studies are required to better define the role and effectiveness of A-CPR following IHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring spatial patterns of sudden cardiac arrests in the city of Toronto using Poisson kriging and Hot Spot analyses.

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    Przybysz, Raymond; Bunch, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Our study looked at out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest events in the City of Toronto. These are relatively rare events, yet present a serious global clinical and public health problem. We report on the application of spatial methods and tools that, although relatively well known to geographers and natural resource scientists, need to become better known and used more frequently by health care researchers. Our data came from the population-based Rescu Epistry cardiac arrest database. We limited it to the residents of the City of Toronto who experienced sudden arrest in 2010. The data was aggregated at the Dissemination Area level, and population rates were calculated. Poisson kriging was carried out on one year of data using three different spatial weights. Kriging estimates were then compared in Hot Spot analyses. Spatial analysis revealed that Poisson kriging can yield reliable rates using limited data of high quality. We observed the highest rates of sudden arrests in the north and central parts of Etobicoke, western parts of North York as well as the central and southwestern parts of Scarborough while the lowest rates were found in north and eastern parts of Scarborough, downtown Toronto, and East York as well as east central parts of North York. Influence of spatial neighbours on the results did not extend past two rings of adjacent units. Poisson kriging has the potential to be applied to a wide range of healthcare research, particularly on rare events. This approach can be successfully combined with other spatial methods. More applied research, is needed to establish a wider acceptance for this method, especially among healthcare researchers and epidemiologists.

  18. Impact of Bystander Automated External Defibrillator Use on Survival and Functional Outcomes in Shockable Observed Public Cardiac Arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Ross A; Brown, Siobhan P; Rea, Thomas; Aufderheide, Tom; Barbic, David; Buick, Jason E; Christenson, James; Idris, Ahamed H; Jasti, Jamie; Kampp, Michael; Kudenchuk, Peter; May, Susanne; Muhr, Marc; Nichol, Graham; Ornato, Joseph P; Sopko, George; Vaillancourt, Christian; Morrison, Laurie; Weisfeldt, Myron

    2018-02-26

    Background - Survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with shockable rhythms can be improved with early defibrillation. Although shockable OHCA accounts for only ≈25% of overall arrests, ≈60% of public OHCAs are shockable, offering the possibility of restoring thousands of individuals to full recovery with early defibrillation by bystanders. We sought to determine the association of bystander automated external defibrillator use with survival and functional outcomes in shockable observed public OHCA. Methods - From 2011 to 2015, the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium prospectively collected detailed information on all cardiac arrests at 9 regional centers. The exposures were shock administration by a bystander-applied automated external defibrillator in comparison with initial defibrillation by emergency medical services. The primary outcome measure was discharge with normal or near-normal (favorable) functional status defined as a modified Rankin Score ≤2. Survival to hospital discharge was the secondary outcome measure. Results -Among 49 555 OHCAs, 4115 (8.3%) observed public OHCAs were analyzed, of which 2500 (60.8%) were shockable. A bystander shock was applied in 18.8% of the shockable arrests. Patients shocked by a bystander were significantly more likely to survive to discharge (66.5% versus 43.0%) and be discharged with favorable functional outcome (57.1% versus 32.7%) than patients initially shocked by emergency medical services. After adjusting for known predictors of outcome, the odds ratio associated with a bystander shock was 2.62 (95% confidence interval, 2.07-3.31) for survival to hospital discharge and 2.73 (95% confidence interval, 2.17-3.44) for discharge with favorable functional outcome. The benefit of bystander shock increased progressively as emergency medical services response time became longer. Conclusions - Bystander automated external defibrillator use before emergency medical services arrival in shockable observed

  19. Abordagem do paciente reanimado, pós-parada cardiorrespiratória Care of patient resuscitated from cardiac arrest

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    João Carlos Ramos Gonçalves Pereira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A parada cardiorrespiratória (PCR ocorrida em ambulatório tem elevada mortalidade, sendo a sobrevida entre 5% e 35%. Dos pacientes que são reanimados uma percentagem elevada permanece com déficits neurológicos, resultantes das lesões ocorridas, tanto no período de ausência de circulação ou durante a reperfusão. No entanto a compreensão dos mecanismos da lesão cerebral não tem traduzido na melhoria do prognóstico. A hipotermia terapêutica após a reanimação parece ser uma opção válida associada à diminuição destas seqüelas neurológicas. O objetivo deste estudo foi rever a evidência científica relativa à abordagem do paciente reanimado após PCR. CONTEÚDO: Descrição e abordagem dos principais fatores de risco associados à lesão neurológica após PCR, bem como dos seus critérios de prognóstico.Feita pesquisa não sistemática na base de dados PubMed dos artigos referentes à abordagem terapêutica dos pacientes reanimados de parada cardíaca. As referências bibliográficas dos artigos de revisão foram igualmente analisadas. Elaboradas normas práticas para essa abordagem. CONCLUSÕES: Os pacientes que sobrevivem à PCR têm elevado risco de permanecer com lesões neurológicas graves. A hipotermia terapêutica e o controle das variáveis fisiológicas, com otimização da perfusão cerebral, podem melhorar o seu prognóstico.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major cause of death with survival rates as low as 5% to 35%. A large number of patients who survive resuscitation will face significant neurological damage, as a result of the ischemia that occurs both during cardiac arrest and reperfusion. However understanding of the mechanisms responsible for brain damage has not resulted in prognostic improvement. Therapeutic hypothermia after resuscitation may be a valid option associated to reduction of neurological damage. The purpose of this study was to

  20. The influence of motor activity on the development of cardiac arrhythmias during experimental emotional stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyaninskiy, L. S.; Urmancheyeva, T. G.; Stepanyan, Y. P.; Fufacheva, A. A.; Gritsak, A. V.; Kuznetsova, B. A.; Kvitka, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental emotional stress which can produce various disorders of cardiac rhythm: sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular, extrasystoles and paroxysmal ventricular tachysystoles was studied. In these conditions the adrenalin content in the blood and myocardium is increased 3 to 4 times. It is found that moderate motor activity leads to a relative decrease of adrenalin in the myocardium and arrest of cardiac arrhythmias.

  1. Serial plasma choline measurements after cardiac arrest in patients undergoing mild therapeutic hypothermia: a prospective observational pilot trial.

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    Christian Storm

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Choline is related to phospholipid metabolism and is a marker for global ischaemia with a small reference range in healthy volunteers. The aim of our study was to characterize the early kinetics of plasma free choline in patients after cardiac arrest. Additionally, we investigated the potential of plasma free choline to predict neurological outcome. METHODS: Twenty patients admitted to our medical intensive care unit were included in this prospective, observational trial. All patients were enrolled between May 2010 and May 2011. They received post cardiac arrest treatment including mild therapeutic hypothermia which was initiated with a combination of cold fluid and a feedback surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Sixteen blood samples per patient were analysed for plasma free choline levels within the first week after resuscitation. Choline was detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Most patients showed elevated choline levels on admission (median 14.8 µmol/L; interquartile range; IQR 9.9-20.1 which subsequently decreased. 48 hours after cardiac arrest choline levels in all patients reached subnormal levels at a median of 4.0 µmol/L (IQR 3-4.9; p = 0.001. Subsequently, choline levels normalized within seven days. There was no significant difference in choline levels when groups were analyzed in relation to neurological outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate a choline deficiency in the early postresucitation phase. This could potentially result in impaired cell membrane recovery. The detailed characterization of the early choline time course may aid in planning of choline supplementation trials. In a limited number of patients, choline was not promising as a biomarker for outcome prediction.

  2. Bystander-witnessed cardiac arrest is associated with reported agonal breathing and leads to less frequent bystander CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkrolf, P; Metelmann, B; Scharte, C; Zarbock, A; Hahnenkamp, K; Bohn, A

    2018-04-18

    Although the importance of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown in multiple studies, the rate of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation is still relatively low in many countries. Little is known on bystanders' perceptions influencing the decision to start cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Our study aims to determine such factors. Semi-structured telephone interviews with bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests between December 2014 and April 2016 were performed in a prospective manner. This single-center survey was conducted in the city of Münster, Germany. The bystander's sex and age, the perception of the victim's breathing and initial condition were correlated with the share of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the corresponding group. 101 telephone interviews were performed with 57 male and 44 female participants showing a mean age of 52.7 (SD ± 16.3). In case of apnoea 38 out of 46 bystanders (82.6%) started cardiopulmonary resuscitation; while in case of descriptions indicating agonal breathing 19 out of 35 bystanders (54.3%) started cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = .007). If the patient was found unconscious 47 out of 63 bystanders (74.7%) performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation, while in cases of witnessed cardiac arrest 19 out of 38 bystanders (50%) attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = .012). Witnessed change of consciousness is an independent factor significantly lowering the probability of starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (regression coefficient -1.489, p bystander-CPR was started. These data reinforce the importance of teaching the recognition of early cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Blood glucose level and outcome after cardiac arrest: insights from a large registry in the hypothermia era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviaud, Fabrice; Dumas, Florence; Demars, Nadège; Geri, Guillaume; Bouglé, Adrien; Morichau-Beauchant, Tristan; Nguyen, Yên-Lan; Bougouin, Wulfran; Pène, Frédéric; Charpentier, Julien; Cariou, Alain

    2014-06-01

    The influence of blood glucose (BG) level during the post-resuscitation period after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is still debated. To evaluate the relationship between blood glucose level and outcome, we included the median glycemia and its maximal amplitude over the first 48 h following ICU admission in an analysis of outcome predictors. We conducted a database study in a cardiac arrest center in Paris, France. Between 2006 and 2010, we included 381 patients who were all resuscitated from an OHCA. A moderate glycemic control was applied in all patients. The median glycemia and the largest change over the first 48 h were included in a multivariate analysis that was performed to determine parameters associated with a favorable outcome. Of the 381 patients, 136 (36 %) had a favorable outcome (CPC 1-2). Median BG level was 7.6 mmol/L (6.3-9.8) in patients with a favorable outcome compared to 9.0 mmol/L (IQR 7.1-10.6) for patients with an unfavorable outcome (p level variation was 7.1 (4.2-11) and 9.6 (5.9-13.6) mmol/L in patients with and without a favorable outcome, respectively (p level over the first 48 h was found to be an independent predictor of poor issue [OR = 0.43; 95 % CI (0.24-0.78), p = 0.006]. Finally a progressive increase in median BG level was associated with a progressive increase in the proportion of patients with a poor outcome. We observed a relationship between high blood glucose level and outcome after cardiac arrest. These results suggest the need to test a strategy combining both control of glycemia and minimization of glycemic variations for its ability to improve post-resuscitation care.

  4. Reliability of Pulse Oximetry during Progressive Hypoxia, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, and Recovery in a Piglet Model of Neonatal Hypoxic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammad Ahmad; Weber, Claudia; Waitz, Markus; Huang, Li; Hummler, Helmut D; Mendler, Marc Robin

    2017-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is widely used in intensive care and emergency conditions to monitor arterial oxygenation and to guide oxygen therapy. To study the reliability of pulse oximetry in comparison with CO-oximetry in newborn piglets during progressive hypoxia, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Thirty-three newborn piglets were exposed to hypoxia until asystole occurred and then resuscitated until ROSC. Arterial oxygen saturation was monitored continuously by pulse oximetry (SpO2) with one sensor applied to the wrist of the right forelimb (FL) and another to the thigh of the left hind limb (HL). Arterial functional oxygen saturation (SaO2) was measured at baseline and at predefined intervals during each phase of the experiment. SpO2 was compared with coinciding SaO2 values and bias considered whenever the difference (SpO2 - SaO2) was beyond ±5%. Bias values were lower at the baseline measurements (-3.7 ± 2.3% in FL and -4.1 ± 3.4% in HL) as well as after ROSC (1.5 ± 4.2% in FL and 0.2 ± 4.6% in HL) with higher precision and accuracy than during other experiment phases. During hypoxia induction, cardiac arrest, and CPR, there was a marked decrease in precision and accuracy as well as an increase in bias up to 43 ± 26 and 56 ± 27% in FL and HL, respectively, over a range of SaO2 from 13 to 51%. Pulse oximetry showed increased bias and decreased accuracy and precision during marked hypoxemia in a model of neonatal hypoxic cardiac arrest. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Nielsen, Anne Møller

    2014-12-01

    Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable rhythm from AEDs used by laypersons with the corresponding proportion recorded by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) on arrival. In a 20-month study, we collected data on OHCAs in the Capital Region of Denmark where an AED was deployed prior to arrival of EMS. The AEDs were brought to the emergency medical dispatch centre for data downloading and rhythm analysis. Patient data were retrieved from the medical records from the admitting hospital, whereas data on EMS rhythm analyses were obtained from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register between 2001 and 2010. A total of 121 AEDs were deployed, of which 91 cases were OHCAs with presumed cardiac origin. The prevalence of initial shockable rhythm was 55.0% (95% CI [44.7-64.8%]). This was significantly greater than the proportion recorded by the EMS (27.6%, 95% CI [27.0-28.3%], p<0.0001). Shockable arrests were significantly more likely to be witnessed (92% vs. 34%, p<0.0001) and the bystander CPR rate was higher (98% vs. 85%, p=0.04). More patients with initial shockable rhythm achieved return of spontaneous circulation upon hospital arrival (88% vs. 7%, p<0.0001) and had higher 30-day survival rate (72% vs. 5%, p<0.0001). AEDs used by laypersons revealed a higher proportion of shockable rhythms compared to the EMS rhythm analyses. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex: a nationwide registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy K; Weeke, Peter; Karlsson, Lena; Rajan, Shahzleen; Søndergaard, Kathrine Bach; Kragholm, Kristian; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Nielsen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation was attempted, were identified through the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry 2001-2010. A total of 19,372 patients were included. One-third were female, with a median age of 75 years (IQR 65-83). Compared to females, males were five years younger; and less likely to have severe comorbidities, e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (12.8% vs. 16.5%); but more likely to have arrest outside of the home (29.4% vs. 18.7%), receive bystander CPR (32.9% vs. 25.9%), and have a shockable rhythm (32.6% vs. 17.2%), all p<0.001. Thirty-day crude survival increased in males (3.0% in 2001 to 12.9% in 2010); and in females (4.8% in 2001 to 6.7% in 2010), p<0.001. Multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusted for patient characteristics including comorbidities, showed no survival difference between sexes in patients with a non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.00; CI 0.72-1.40), while female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm (OR 1.31; CI 1.07-1.59). Analyses were rhythm-stratified due to interaction between sex and heart rhythm; there was no interaction between sex and calendar-year. Temporal increase in crude survival was more marked in males due to poorer prognostic characteristics in females with a lower proportion of shockable rhythm. In an adjusted model, female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest (ALASCA and the effectiveness of an early intervention service: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakx Wilbert GM

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac arrest survivors may experience hypoxic brain injury that results in cognitive impairments which frequently remain unrecognised. This may lead to limitations in daily activities and participation in society, a decreased quality of life for the patient, and a high strain for the caregiver. Publications about interventions directed at improving quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest are scarce. Therefore, evidence about effective rehabilitation programmes for cardiac arrest survivors is urgently needed. This paper presents the design of the ALASCA (Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest trial, a randomised, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effects of a new early intervention service for survivors of a cardiac arrest and their caregivers. Methods/design The study population comprises all people who survive two weeks after a cardiac arrest and are admitted to one of the participating hospitals in the Southern part of the Netherlands. In a two-group randomised, controlled clinical trial, half of the participants will receive an early intervention service. The early intervention service consists of several consultations with a specialised nurse for the patient and their caregiver during the first three months after the cardiac arrest. The intervention is directed at screening for cognitive problems, provision of informational, emotional and practical support, and stimulating self-management. If necessary, referral to specialised care can take place. Persons in the control group will receive the care as usual. The primary outcome measures are the extent of participation in society and quality of life of the patient one year after a cardiac arrest. Secondary outcome measures are the level of cognitive, emotional and cardiovascular impairment and daily functioning of the patient, as well as the strain for and quality of life of the caregiver. Participants and their caregivers will be followed

  8. Eccentric apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unmasked by multimodality imaging: an uncommon but missed cause of out of hospital cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towe, Eric; Sharma, Saurabh; Geske, Jeffrey; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A woman in her late 50s experienced a witnessed, sudden out of hospital cardiac arrest. Initial workup included coronary angiography, transthoracic echocardiogram and a CT scan of the chest to rule out pulmonary embolus. She was subsequently discharged home without an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or a life vest. On follow-up at another facility, an ICD was placed and a Holter monitor showed no ventricular ectopy. Further transthoracic echocardiographic images were obtained, which were suggestive of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A limited transthoracic echocardiogram with contrast was performed, which did not elucidate the hypertrophy. However, eccentric left ventricular apical wall hypertrophy was visualised by a coronary CT scan. PMID:26153133

  9. Effect of initial lactate level on short-term survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Sarıaydın, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated whether serum lactate levels (SLL at admission in patients with cardiac arrest (CA can predict successful return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC or short-term survival, especially within the first 24 h. Materials and methods: This prospective, observational study was conducted in the emergency department (ED of a training and research hospital from April 2015 through February 2016. It included all patients older than 18 years who presented to the ED during the study period with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The study measured two outcomes: whether ROSC was achieved and whether short-term survival was achieved. ROSC was defined as the presence of spontaneous circulation for the first hour after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Survival was defined as having survived for a minimum of 24 h after ROSC. Results: The study included 140 patients who were admitted to the ED with OHCA. ROSC was achieved in 55 patients (39.3%, and survival for 24 h following CA was achieved in 42 patients (30%. The mean SLL in the ROSC (+ and ROSC (- groups were 9.1 ± 3.2 mmol/L and 9.8 ± 2.9 mmol/L, respectively. The mean SLL in the survivor and non-survivor groups were 8.6 ± 2.9 mmol/L and 10 ± 3.1 mmol/L, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.1. A multivariate regression model assessing the factors that predicted both ROSC and 24-h survival showed the odds ratio (OR of initial SLL was 1.3 (95% CI: 1.05–1.6 and 1.1 (95% CI: 0.9–1.3, respectively. Conclusions: This study showed that in OHCA patients, SLL on admission was not associated with increased ROSC achievement or 24-h survival. Keywords: Cardiac arrest, Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA, Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, Serum lactate, Emergency department

  10. A comparative study of defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance during simulated cardiac arrest in nursing student teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikeland Husebø Sissel I

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although nurses must be able to respond quickly and effectively to cardiac arrest, numerous studies have demonstrated poor performance. Simulation is a promising learning tool for resuscitation team training but there are few studies that examine simulation for training defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (D-CPR in teams from the nursing education perspective. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which nursing student teams follow the D-CPR-algorithm in a simulated cardiac arrest, and if observing a simulated cardiac arrest scenario and participating in the post simulation debriefing would improve team performance. Methods We studied video-recorded simulations of D-CPR performance in 28 nursing student teams. Besides describing the overall performance of D-CPR, we compared D-CPR performance in two groups. Group A (n = 14 performed D-CPR in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario, while Group B (n = 14 performed D-CPR after first observing performance of Group A and participating in the debriefing. We developed a D-CPR checklist to assess team performance. Results Overall there were large variations in how accurately the nursing student teams performed the specific parts of the D-CPR algorithm. While few teams performed opening the airways and examination of breathing correctly, all teams used a 30:2 compression: ventilation ratio. We found no difference between Group A and Group B in D-CPR performance, either in regard to total points on the check list or to time variables. Conclusion We found that none of the nursing student teams achieved top scores on the D-CPR-checklist. Observing the training of other teams did not increase subsequent performance. We think all this indicates that more time must be assigned for repetitive practice and reflection. Moreover, the most important aspects of D-CPR, such as early defibrillation and hands-off time in relation to shock, must be highlighted in team

  11. Detailed statistical analysis plan for the target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Winkel, Per; Cronberg, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Animal experimental studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurological function with temperature regulation to hypothermia after cardiac arrest. According to a systematic review, previous trials were small, had a risk of bias, evaluated select populations......, and did not treat hyperthermia in the control groups. The optimal target temperature management (TTM) strategy is not known. To prevent outcome reporting bias, selective reporting and data-driven results, we present the a priori defined detailed statistical analysis plan as an update to the previously...

  12. Association of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Survival According to Ambulance Response Times After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gerds, Thomas A; Kragholm, Kristian; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-12-20

    Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between time from 911 call to emergency medical service arrival (response time) and survival according to whether bystander CPR was provided (yes or no). Reported are 30-day survival chances with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals. With increasing response times, adjusted 30-day survival chances decreased for both patients with bystander CPR and those without. However, the contrast between the survival chances of patients with versus without bystander CPR increased over time: within 5 minutes, 30-day survival was 14.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8-16.4) versus 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6), corresponding to 2.3 times higher chances of survival associated with bystander CPR; within 10 minutes, 30-day survival chances were 6.7% (95% CI: 5.4-8.1) versus 2.2% (95% CI: 1.5-3.1), corresponding to 3.0 times higher chances of 30-day survival associated with bystander CPR. The contrast in 30-day survival became statistically insignificant when response time was >13 minutes (bystander CPR vs no bystander CPR: 3.7% [95% CI: 2.2-5.4] vs 1.5% [95% CI: 0.6-2.7]), but 30-day survival was still 2.5 times higher associated with bystander CPR. Based on the model and Danish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest statistics, an additional 233 patients could potentially be saved annually if response time was reduced from 10 to 5 minutes and 119 patients if response time was reduced from 7 (the median

  13. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls - a systematic review of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Rothman, Josephine Philip

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The medical dispatcher plays an essential role as part of the first link in the Chain of Survival, by recognising the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) during the emergency call, dispatching the appropriate first responder or emergency medical services response, performing...... in compliance with the PRISMA guidelines. We systematically searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library on 4 November 2015. Observational studies, reporting the proportion of clinically confirmed OHCAs that was recognised during the emergency call, were included. Two authors independently screened...

  14. Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) in out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, A; Fredman, D; Svensson, L; Ringh, M; Hollenberg, J; Nordberg, P; Rosenqvist, M; Djarv, T; Österberg, S; Lennartsson, J; Ban, Y

    2016-10-12

    The use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) prior to EMS arrival can increase 30-day survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) significantly. Drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can fly with high velocity and potentially transport devices such as AEDs to the site of OHCAs. The aim of this explorative study was to investigate the feasibility of a drone system in decreasing response time and delivering an AED. Data of Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates from historical OHCA in Stockholm County was used in a model using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to find suitable placements and visualize response times for the use of an AED equipped drone. Two different geographical models, urban and rural, were calculated using a multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) model. Test-flights with an AED were performed on these locations in rural areas. In total, based on 3,165 retrospective OHCAs in Stockholm County between 2006-2013, twenty locations were identified for the potential placement of a drone. In a GIS-simulated model of urban OHCA, the drone arrived before EMS in 32 % of cases, and the mean amount of time saved was 1.5 min. In rural OHCA the drone arrived before EMS in 93 % of cases with a mean amount of time saved of 19 min. In these rural locations during (n = 13) test flights, latch-release of the AED from low altitude (3-4 m) or landing the drone on flat ground were the safest ways to deliver an AED to the bystander and were superior to parachute release. The difference in response time for EMS between urban and rural areas is substantial, as is the possible amount of time saved using this UAV-system. However, yet another technical device needs to fit into the chain of survival. We know nothing of how productive or even counterproductive this system might be in clinical reality. To use drones in rural areas to deliver an AED in OHCA may be safe and feasible. Suitable placement of drone systems can be designed by using GIS models

  15. The impact of cardiac arrest on the long-term wellbeing and caregiver burden of family caregivers: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijnen, Helena Gfm; Rasquin, Sascha Mc; van Heugten, Caroline M; Verbunt, Jeanine A; Moulaert, Véronique Rm

    2017-09-01

    The purpose was to gain insight in the functioning of caregivers of cardiac arrest survivors at 12 months after a cardiac arrest. Secondly, the course of the wellbeing of the caregivers during the first year was studied. Finally, factors that are associated with a higher care burden at 12 months after the cardiac arrest were investigated. A total of 195 family caregivers of cardiac arrest survivors were included. Quality of life (SF-36, EuroQol-VAS), caregiver strain (CSI) and emotional functioning (HADS, IES) were measured at two weeks, three months and one year after the cardiac arrest. Thereby, the caregiver was asked to fill out the cognitive failure questionnaire (CFQ) to evaluate their view on the cognitive status of the patient. Caregiver strain was high in 16 (15%) of the caregivers at 12 months. Anxiety was present in 33 (25%) caregivers and depression in 18 (14%) caregivers at 12 months. The repeated measures MANOVA showed that during the first year the following variables improved significantly: SF-36 domains social and mental health, role physical, role emotional and vitality, caregiver strain, HADS and IES ( Pcaregiver strain correlated significantly (explained variance 63%, P=0.03) with caregiver HADS ( P=0.01), EuroQol-VAS ( P=0.02), and the CFQ ( Pcaregivers improves during the first year up to normal levels, but caregivers with emotional problems or perceived cognitive problems at 12 months are at risk for developing a higher care burden.

  16. Age × Gender Interaction Effect on Resuscitation Outcomes in Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Ono, Junko; Nagata, Takashi; Hasegawa, Manabu

    2017-08-01

    Although an interaction between gender and age has been shown to influence resuscitation outcomes in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), this interaction has not been investigated in Asian populations. In this prospective, observational study, data from all cases of OHCA in Japan between 2005 and 2012 were obtained from the Japanese National Registry. We determined the relative excess risk due to interaction and the ratio of odds ratios (ORs) to assess the interaction effect of gender and age on the incidence of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before hospital arrival, 1-month survival, and neurologically intact survival 1 month after OHCA. Male gender was associated with decreased ROSC and lower 1-month survival rates in patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin. Older age was associated with lower 1-month and neurologically intact survival rates in male patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac and noncardiac origin and with increased ROSC in male patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin. The relative excess risk due to interaction for ROSC in patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin was statistically significant (OR 0.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.06 to 0.32). The ratio of ORs for ROSC was statistically significant in patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.47) and of noncardiac origin (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.92). In conclusion, the interaction effect between age and gender on ROSC was positive in OHCA cases of presumed cardiac origin and negative in those of noncardiac origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between oxidative stress index and post-CPR early mortality in cardiac arrest patients: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Hasan; Türkdoğan, Kenan Ahmet; Zorlu, Ali; Aydın, Hüseyin; Kurt, Recep; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2015-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a series of lifesaving actions that improve the chance of survival following cardiac arrest (CA). Many clinical and laboratory parameters, such as the presence of asystole, out-of-hospital CPR, and duration of cardiac arrest, are associated with failed CPR in patients with CA. Asystole is a state of no cardiac electrical activity, along with the absence of contractions of the myocardium and absence of cardiac output. Oxidative stress index (OSI), which is the ratio of total oxidative status to total antioxidant status, increases by ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated whether OSI levels in patients with CA could predict early mortality after CPR. This study has a prospective observational cohort design. Five patients with a history of cancer, four patients who developed hemolysis in their blood, six patients who were transferred to our hospital from other hospitals, and six patients in whom blood samples for OSI could not be stored properly were excluded. Finally, a total of 90 in-hospital or out-of-hospital CA patients and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers as the control group were evaluated prospectively. The patients were classified according to the CPR response into a successful group (n=46) and a failed group (n=44). Comparisons between groups were performed using one-way ANOVA with post hoc analysis by Tukey's HSD or independent samples t-test and the Kruskal-Wallis tests or Mann- Whitney U test for normally and abnormally distributed data, respectively. Also, we used chi-square test, Spearman's correlation test, univariate and multible logistic regression analyses, and receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. OSI was 3.0±4.0, 5.6±4.3, and 8.7±3.8 in the control group, the successful CPR group, and the failed CPR group, respectively (pOSI on admission, ischemia-modified albumin, presence of asystole, mean duration of cardiac arrest, out-of-hospital CPR, pH, and potassium and sodium levels were

  18. Variable effects of high-dose adrenaline relative to standard-dose adrenaline on resuscitation outcomes according to cardiac arrest duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeung, Kyung Woon; Ryu, Hyun Ho; Song, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Byung Kook; Lee, Hyoung Youn; Heo, Tag; Min, Yong Il

    2011-07-01

    Adjustment of adrenaline (epinephrine) dosage according to cardiac arrest (CA) duration, rather than administering the same dose, may theoretically improve resuscitation outcomes. We evaluated variable effects of high-dose adrenaline (HDA) relative to standard-dose adrenaline (SDA) on resuscitation outcomes according to CA duration. Twenty-eight male domestic pigs were randomised to the following 4 groups according to the dosage of adrenaline (SDA 0.02 mg/kg vs. HDA 0.2mg/kg) and duration of CA before beginning cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): 6 min SDA, 6 min HDA, 13 min SDA, or 13 min HDA. After the predetermined duration of untreated ventricular fibrillation, CPR was provided. All animals in the 6 min SDA, 6 min HDA, and 13 min HDA groups were successfully resuscitated, while only 4 of 7 pigs in the 13 min SDA group were successfully resuscitated (p=0.043). HDA groups showed higher right atrial pressure, more frequent ventricular ectopic beats, higher blood glucose, higher troponin-I, and more severe metabolic acidosis than SDA groups. Animals of 13 min groups showed more severe metabolic acidosis and higher troponin-I than animals of 6 min groups. All successfully resuscitated animals, except two animals in the 13 min HDA group, survived for 7 days (p=0.121). Neurologic deficit score was not affected by the dose of adrenaline. HDA showed benefit in achieving restoration of spontaneous circulation in 13 min CA, when compared with 6 min CA. However, this benefit did not translate into improved long-term survival or neurologic outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Thromboembolism and bleeding risk scores and predictors of cardiac death in a population with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa da; Silva, Pollyana Ardavicius E; Lima, Marcos Correia; Sant'Anna, Lívia Tanure; Silva, Túlio Corrêa; Moreira, Pedro Henrique Vilela; Gandra, Robert Moreira; Cavalcanti, Túlio Ramos; Mourão, Plínio Henrique Vaz

    2017-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia, with risk of systemic embolism and death. It presents rheumatic etiology in up to 32% of developing countries, whose anticoagulation and evolution data are scarce. to determine the predictors of cardiac death considering the clinical profile, thromboembolism and bleeding scores of patients with AF of a single center, with high prevalence of rheumatic heart disease. 302 patients with AF were studied, mean age 58.1 years; 161 women; 96 pts with rheumatic etiology. Patients underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation, measurement of risk scores and the mean follow-up of 12.8 months. 174 were using warfarin. The averages of the HAS-BLED and ATRIA scores were 1.4 and 1.2, respectively. Percent time in therapeutic range of international normalized ratio was 45.8%. Thirty patients (9.9%) had cardiac death and 41 had some type of bleeding due to warfarin. By univariate analysis, there was statistical significance between cardiac death and permanent AF, blood pressure, systolic dysfunction, R2CHADS2, CCS, EHRA and HAS-BLED. There was no association with valvular AF. By multivariate analysis, systemic arterial and pulmonary artery pressures, classification CCS and systolic dysfunction showed statistical significance. There was no association between cardiac death and valvular AF. Independent predictors of cardiac death were low measures of blood pressure, higher score CCS classification and the presence of systolic ventricular dysfunction. A fibrilação atrial (FA) é uma arritmia comum, com risco de embolia sistêmica e morte. Apresenta etiologia reumática em até 32% dos países em desenvolvimento, cujos dados de anticoagulação e evolução são escassos. Verificar as variáveis preditoras de morte cardíaca (MC) conforme o perfil clínico, os escores de tromboembolismo e de sangramento dos pacientes com FA de uma única instituição universitária, com alta prevalência de cardiopatia reumática. Foram estudados 302

  20. Hypothermia after cardiac arrest should be further evaluated-A systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans; Gluud, Christian

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend mild induced hypothermia (MIH) to reduce mortality and neurological impairment after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our objective was to systematically evaluate the evidence for MIH taking into consideration the risks of systematic and random error and to GRADE...... the evidence. METHODS: Systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of randomised trials evaluating MIH after cardiac arrest in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases until May 2009. Retrieved trials were evaluated with Cochrane methodology. Meta-analytic estimates....... The substantial risk of bias and concerns with directness rated down the quality of the evidence to low. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence regarding MIH after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is still inconclusive and associated with non-negligible risks of systematic and random errors. Using GRADE-methodology, we conclude...

  1. Successful resuscitation from two cardiac arrests in a female patient with critical aortic stenosis, severe mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijušković Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of sudden cardiac death in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is up to 34% and resuscitation is described as highly unsuccessful. Case report. A 72-year-old female patient with severe aortic stenosis combined with severe mitral regurgitation and three-vessel coronary artery disease was successfully resuscitated following two in-hospital cardiac arrests. The first cardiac arrest occurred immediately after intraarterial injection of low osmolar iodinated agent during coronary angiography. Angiography revealed 90% occlusion of the proximal left main coronary artery and circumflex branch. The second arrest followed induction of anesthesia. Following successful open-chest resuscitation, aortic valve replacement, mitral valvuloplasty and three-vessel aortocoronary bypass were performed. Postoperative pericardial tamponade required surgical revision. The patient recovered completely. Conclusion. Decision to start resuscitation may be justified in selected patients with critical aortic stenosis, even though cardiopulmonary resuscitation in such cases is generally considered futile.

  2. A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre trial comparing vasopressin and adrenaline in patients with cardiac arrest presenting to or in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Tiah, Ling; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Tan, Elaine Ching Ching; Ong, Victor Yeok Kein; Tan, Elizabeth Ai Theng; Poh, Bee Yen; Pek, Pin Pin; Chen, Yuming

    2012-08-01

    To compare vasopressin and adrenaline in the treatment of patients with cardiac arrest presenting to or in the Emergency Department (ED). A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre, parallel-design clinical trial in four adult hospitals. Eligible cardiac arrest patients (confirmed by the absence of pulse, unresponsiveness and apnea) aged >16 (aged>21 for one hospital) were randomly assigned to intravenous adrenaline (1mg) or vasopressin (40 IU) at ED. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or contraindication for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were excluded. Patients received additional open label doses of adrenaline as per current guidelines. Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge (defined as participant discharged alive or survival to 30 days post-arrest). The study recruited 727 participants (adrenaline = 353; vasopressin = 374). Baseline characteristics of the two groups were comparable. Eight participants (2.3%) from adrenaline and 11 (2.9%) from vasopressin group survived to hospital discharge with no significant difference between groups (p = 0.27, RR = 1.72, 95% CI = 0.65-4.51). After adjustment for race, medical history, bystander CPR and prior adrenaline given, more participants survived to hospital admission with vasopressin (22.2%) than with adrenaline (16.7%) (p = 0.05, RR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.02-2.04). Sub-group analysis suggested improved outcomes for vasopressin in participants with prolonged arrest times. Combination of vasopressin and adrenaline did not improve long term survival but seemed to improve survival to admission in patients with prolonged cardiac arrest. Further studies on the effect of vasopressin combined with therapeutic hypothermia on patients with prolonged cardiac arrest are needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prognostic EEG patterns in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest with particular focus on Generalized Periodic Epileptiform Discharges (GPEDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, P; Malissin, I; Tran-Dinh, Y R; Deye, N; Baud, F; Lévy, B I; Kubis, N

    2014-04-01

    We assessed clinical and early electrophysiological characteristics, in particular Generalized Periodic Epileptiform Discharges (GPEDs) patterns, of consecutive patients during a 1-year period, hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) after resuscitation following cardiac arrest (CA). Consecutive patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest (CA) with first EEG recordings within 48hours were included. Clinical data were collected from hospital records, in particular therapeutic hypothermia. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were re-analyzed retrospectively. Sixty-two patients were included. Forty-two patients (68%) were treated with therapeutic hypothermia according to international guidelines. Global mortality was 74% but not significantly different between patients who benefited from therapeutic hypothermia compared to those who did not. All the patients who did not have an initial background activity (36/62; 58%) died. By contrast, initial background activity was present in 26/62 (42%) and among these patients, 16/26 (61%) survived. Electroencephalography demonstrated GPEDs patterns in 5 patients, all treated by therapeutic hypothermia and antiepileptic drugs. One of these survived and showed persistent background activity with responsiveness to benzodiazepine intravenous injection. Patients presenting suppressed background activity, even when treated by hypothermia, have a high probability of poor outcome. Thorough analysis of EEG patterns might help to identify patients with a better chance of survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The association of emergency department administration of sodium bicarbonate after out of hospital cardiac arrest with outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chuan; Hung, Ming-Szu; Liu, Chia-Yen; Hsiao, Cheng-Ting; Yang, Yao-Hsu

    2018-03-05

    Sodium bicarbonate administration is mostly restricted to in-hospital use in Taiwan. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of sodium bicarbonate on outcomes among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). This population-based study used a 16-year database to analyze the association between sodium bicarbonate administration for resuscitation in the emergency department (ED) and outcomes. All adult patients with OHCA were identified through diagnostic and procedure codes. The primary outcome was survival to hospital admission and secondary outcome was the rate of death within the first 30days of incidence of cardiac arrest. Cox proportional-hazards regression, logistic regression, and propensity analyses were conducted. Among 5589 total OHCA patients, 15.1% (844) had survival to hospital admission. For all patients, a positive association was noted between sodium bicarbonate administration during resuscitation in the ED and survival to hospital admission (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 4.47; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.82-5.22, p<0.001). In propensity-matched patients, a positive association was also noted (adjusted OR, 4.61; 95% CI: 3.90-5.46, p<0.001). Among patients with OHCA in Taiwan, administration of sodium bicarbonate during ED resuscitation was significantly associated with an increased rate of survival to hospital admission. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest and Death in US Competitive Athletes: A 2-Year Prospective Surveillance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Danielle F; Siebert, David M; Kucera, Kristen L; Thomas, Leah Cox; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Lopez-Anderson, Martha; Suchsland, Monica Z; Harmon, Kimberly G; Drezner, Jonathan A

    2018-04-09

    To determine the etiology of sudden cardiac arrest and death (SCA/D) in competitive athletes through a prospective national surveillance program. Sudden cardiac arrest and death cases in middle school, high school, college, and professional athletes were identified from July 2014 to June 2016 through traditional and social media searches, reporting to the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research, communication with state and national high school associations, review of the Parent Heart Watch database, and search of student-athlete deaths on the NCAA Resolutions List. Autopsy reports and medical records were reviewed by a multidisciplinary panel to determine the underlying cause.