WorldWideScience

Sample records for fiberreinforced composite posts

  1. Adapting fiber-reinforced composite root canal posts for use in noncircular-shaped canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Nicola Maria; Butti, Andrea; Plotino, Gianluca; Somma, Francesco

    2006-10-01

    Post placement in oval-shaped root canals implies the sacrifice of sound dental tissue to adapt the canal shape to fit the post, which can result in one of several significant complications. A semidirect, single-visit, chairside procedure is proposed, which permits the use of an almost anatomically shaped post, starting from a preformed fiber-reinforced composite root canal post of the largest size commercially available. The utilization of this post capitalizes on the advantages of both the fiber post and the anatomical post in oval- and ribbon-shaped canals to provide restoration of endodontically treated teeth.

  2. Microhardness of dual-polymerizing resin cements and foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2014-06-01

    The optimal luting material for fiber-reinforced posts to ensure the longevity of foundation restorations remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements and 2 dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts by assessing their Knoop hardness number. Five specimens of dual-polymerizing resin cements (SA Cement Automix, G-Cem LincAce, and Panavia F2.0) and 5 specimens of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins (Clearfil DC Core Plus and Unifil Core EM) were polymerized from the top by irradiation for 40 seconds. Knoop hardness numbers were measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours and 7 days after irradiation. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey compromise post hoc test (α=.05). At both times after irradiation, the 5 resins materials showed the highest Knoop hardness numbers at the 0.5-mm depth. At 7 days after irradiation, the Knoop hardness numbers of the resin materials did not differ significantly between the 8.0-mm and 10.0-mm depths (P>.05). For all materials, the Knoop hardness numbers at 7 days after irradiation were significantly higher than those at 0.5 hours after irradiation at all depths (Presin materials were found to decrease in the following order: DC Core Plus, Unifil Core EM, Panavia F2.0, SA Cement Automix, and G-Cem LincAce (Pcomposite resins were higher than those of the 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements, notable differences were seen among the 5 materials at all depths and at both times after irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts and composite core with varying remaining coronal tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananviriyaporn, Sirirat; Jitarmat, Piyabhorn; Chairat, Surachara; Ranchan, Atchariyaporn

    2012-01-01

    Endodontically treated teeth often have a varying remaining coronal tooth structure, is an important factor in the successful of post-core with crown restoration. This study compared the fracture resistance of pulpless teeth with variable amounts of remaining coronal tooth structure restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts and composite core. Fifty extracted human premolars were endodontically treated and divided into 5 groups of 10 teeth each. Four groups were prepared having axial wall heights of 4 mm around the preparation circumferences. In 3 of the groups with axial tooth structure, mesial axial tooth structure was removed, mesial and lingual axial tooth structure were removed, mesial-lingual and distal axial tooth structure were removed. For the fifth group, all axial tooth structure was removed to the level of the prepared finish line. All 50 prepared teeth were restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts (FRC Postec Plus) and composite resin cores (Multicore Flow). Testing was conducted with a universal testing machine with the application of a static load to the lingual incline plane of buccal cusp at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min at 45 degrees to the long axis of the tooth. The load at failure was recorded. The data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance. The mean value + standard deviation for the failure load of group 1 to 5 were 237.48 +/- 81.87, 242.97 +/- 66.80, 257.67 +/- 70.42, 239.56 +/- 70.42 and 297.70 +/- 99.42 (N), respectively There were no significant differences in the fracture resistance (p structure of endodontically treated tooth had no influenced on the fracture resistance when restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts and composite core.

  4. Retentive strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts with composite resin cores: Effect of remaining coronal structure and root canal dentin conditioning protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-12-01

    The prognosis of a fixed dental prosthesis cemented to endodontically treated teeth is primarily determined by the presence of a ferrule on the tooth. Adhesion of the post in the root canal, conditioning methods for the canal and the amount of coronal structure could also be decisive on survival of reconstructions cemented on endodontically treated teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the effect of remaining coronal structure on the retention of airborne-particle abraded fiber-reinforced composite resin posts built up with composite resin cores after the treatment of root canal dentin with different conditioning protocols. One hundred and fifty extracted human teeth with single root canal space were endodontically treated and divided into 3 groups as follows: group CEJ: the teeth were sectioned at the level of cementoenamel junction (CEJ); group CEJ1: the teeth were sectioned 1 mm above the CEJ; group CEJ2: the teeth were sectioned 2 mm above the CEJ. Each group was further divided into 5 subgroups (n=10 per group) according to the root canal treatments as follows: group C: no conditioning (control); group PH: conditioning with 37% phosphoric acid gel for 15 seconds; group E: conditioning with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 60 seconds; group CHX: conditioning with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) for 60 seconds; group Q: conditioning with combination of 2% CHX with 17% EDTA and a surfactant solution for 60 seconds. Glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts were airborne-particle abraded and luted to the root canal dentin with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem). The retentive force was tested by applying a tensile load parallel to the long axis of these posts at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD post hoc test were used to analyze the data. The highest retention (N) was obtained with the CHX-EDTA conditioned group (374.7 ±29.8) followed by 17% EDTA (367.9 ±33.3) conditioning when 2 mm remaining

  5. The effect of custom adaptation and span-diameter ratio on the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Nicola M; Plotino, Gianluca; Ioppolo, Pietro; Bedini, Rossella; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Somma, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate whether custom modification resulting in an anatomically shaped post and whether the span/diameter ratio (L/D) would affect the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite posts. Preformed glass-fiber posts (Group 1) and modified glass-fiber posts (Group 2) and glass-fiber rods (Groups 3 and 4) (n=20) were loaded to failure in a three-point bending test to determine the maximum load (N), flexural strength (MPa) and flexural modulus (GPa). The span distance tested for Group 3 was 10.0mm, while for Group 4 was 22.0mm. Data were subjected to different statistical analysis with significance levels of P<0.05. The maximum load recorded for Groups 1 and 2 was 72.5+/-5.9N and 73.4+/-6.4N respectively, while for Groups 3 and 4 was 215.3+/-7N and 156.6+/-3.6N respectively. The flexural strength for Groups 1 and 2 was 914.6+/-53.1MPa and 1069.2+/-115.6MPa, while for Groups 3 and 4 was 685.4+/-22.2MPa and 899.6+/-46.1MPa. The flexural modulus recorded for Groups 1 and 2 was 32.6+/-3.2GPa and 33.4+/-2.2GPa respectively, while for Groups 3 and 4 was 13.7+/-0.3GPa and 34.4+/-0.3GPa respectively. The flexural properties of an anatomically custom modified fiber post were not affected by the modification procedure and the span-diameter ratio is an important parameter for the interpretation of flexural strength and flexural modulus values.

  6. Finite element analysis of strength and adhesion of cast posts compared to glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts in anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejak, Beata; Młotkowski, Andrzej

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies on the strength of teeth restored with posts have not resolved the controversy as to which post systems provide the greatest strength and longevity. The purpose of this study was to compare the strength of teeth restored using cast posts with those restored using glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts and to evaluate the bond strength of the posts to dentin. The investigation was conducted by using finite element analysis, combined with the application of contact elements. Three-dimensional (3-D) models of the maxillary central incisors were generated: IT, an intact tooth; CC, a tooth with a ceramic crown; FP, a tooth restored with an FRC (glass fiber-reinforced composite resin) post; CPAu, a tooth restored with a gold alloy cast post; and CPNi, a tooth restored with an NiCr (nickel chromium alloy) cast post. Each model was subjected to vertical and oblique loads with a force of 100 N. To evaluate the strength of the restored tooth, ceramics, and composite resin, the modified von Mises failure criterion was used, the Tsai-Wu criterion for FRC, and the von Mises criterion for gold and NiCr alloy. The equivalent stresses found in the tested models were compared with the tensile strength of the respective materials. Contact stresses in the luting cement-dentin interface were calculated. The maximum mvM (modified von Mises failure criterion) stresses in the dentin of the teeth restored with FRC posts were reduced by 21%, and in those restored with cast NiCr posts, stresses were reduced by 25% when compared to the stresses in the intact tooth. The equivalent stresses in metal posts were several times higher than in FRC posts, but did not exceed the tensile strength of the materials. The highest mvM stress in the luting resin cement around the FRC post was 55% higher than in the luting resin cement around the metal post, under an oblique load. In the ceramic crown, which covered the composite resin post and core, the highest mvM stress was 30.7 MPa

  7. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (Psilanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (Psilane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study.

  8. Micromechanical failure in fiber-reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial

    Micromechanical failure mechanisms occurring in unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites are studied by means of the finite element method as well as experimental testing. This study highlights the effect of micro-scale features such as fiber/matrix interfacial debonding, matrix cracking......, the failure locus of the composite lamina under different loading conditions is obtained by means of computational micromechanics and compared with the predictions of Puck’s model. The results are in very good agreement with the predictions of Puck’s model under different interfiber failure modes. In order...

  9. Effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of glass fiber-reinforced composite root canal posts to composite core material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Er:YAG laser treatments on the FRC post surface decreased the bond strength. Airborne-particle abrasion and HF acid etching are alternative methods for increasing bond strength of FRC posts to composite core material.

  10. Restoration of endodontically treated teeth with major hard tissue loss - influence of post surface design on pull-out bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Andreas Thomas Alfred; Binus, Stefanie Martina; Holzschuh, Barbara; Petschelt, Anselm; Powers, John M; Berthold, Christine

    2014-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate the influence of post surface design and luting system on bond strength of quartz-fiber-reinforced composite posts (QFRCPs) luted to root canal dentin. Single-rooted bovine teeth (n = 650) were randomly assigned (13 groups, n = 50), sectioned, endodontically treated, filled, and post space (length 8 mm) prepared. Custom-made plain-surfaced fiber posts (PSXRO) and (both RTD) macroretentive Macro-Lock Post Illusion X-RO (MLXRO) were inserted into the post spaces using six luting systems: Ketac Cem (KC), Fuji Plus (FP), RelyX Unicem, Multilink Primer_Multilink, Sealbond Ultima_CoreCem, and LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z. As control, a titanium post was cemented with KC. After water storage (24 h, 37°C), pull-out test was performed, followed by failure mode assessment. Bond strength was calculated in MPa and analyzed using anova, Dunnett-T3-test, and Student's t-test with Bonferroni correction. Post design and luting system significantly influenced the bond strength [MPa] (P < 0.05). Compared with the control 4.3 (1.5), all test groups exhibited higher bond strengths (P < 0.05), except for group PSXRO/KC 4.2 (1.0). The remaining bond strengths were PSXRO: FP 8.6 (1.5), RelyX Unicem 10.4 (3.4), Multilink Primer_Multilink 12.7 (3.0), SealBond Ultima_CoreCem 12.7 (3.0), LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z 15.7 (2.5), and MLXRO: KC 7.2 (2.2), FP 13.4 (2.5), RelyX Unicem 9.2 (2.9), Multilink Primer_Multilink 12.5 (4.5), SealBond Ultima_CoreCem 13.7 (4.6), LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z 20.6 (2.2). The bond strengths of MLXRO were higher than those of PSXRO when luted with KC, FP, and LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z (P < 0.05). The post surface design and luting system selection influenced the bond strength of conventionally and adhesively luted QFRCPs to bovine root canal dentin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Radiation processing for carbon fiber-reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Udagawa, Akira; Morita, Yousuke

    2001-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of the fiber composites with crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a polymer matrix by radiation. The uni-directional carbon fiber-reinforced composites were fabricated with PTFE fine powder impregnation method and then crosslinked by electron beams irradiation under selective conditions. The carbon fiber-reinforced crosslinked PTFE composites show good mechanical properties compared with crosslinked PTFE. The radiation resistance of crosslinked PTFE composites is improved more than that of crosslinked resin without fiber. (author)

  12. Crown reattachment with complicated chisel-type fracture using fiber-reinforced post.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanac, Igor; Ramic, Bojana; Premovic, Milica; Drobac, Milan; Petrovic, Ljubomir

    2013-12-01

    Maxillary incisors and specifically their crowns are the most common teeth involved in dental trauma because of their exposed position in the dental arch. Traumatized anterior teeth require quick functional and esthetic repair. In the case of a complex crown fracture, with the necessity of endodontic treatment, fiber-reinforced posts (FRC) were used to create a central support stump to restore the dental morphology. A 24-year-old male patient came to the dental clinic with dental injury to the maxillary left central incisor with a chisel-type fracture that extended subgingivally with a widely open pulp chamber. The patient reported a sports injury had occurred 1 day before. Provisional reposition of the crown was completed using a composite splint and after that endodontic treatment has been performed. Two days later, a fiber-reinforced composite resin post was placed into the canal and adhesive reattachment of the fragment also completed. The tooth was prepared for a composite resin veneer in the gingival third of the vestibular surface because of a visible fracture line. The combined use of a fiber-reinforced composite resin post and the original crown fragment is a simple and efficient procedure for the treatment of traumatized anterior teeth that appears to offer pleasing esthetic and functional results that is less invasive than conventional prosthodontic treatment. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Fiber-reinforced Composite for Chairside Replacement of Anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... option for replacing missing teeth. However, further and long-term clinical investigation will be required to provide additional information on the survival of directly-bonded anterior fixed prosthesis made with FRC systems. Keywords: Case report, composite resin, fiber-reinforced composite. Libyan Journal of Medicine Vol.

  14. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures | Garoushi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed. Keywords: fiber-reinforced composite, fixed partial dentures, particulate resin composite, framework

  15. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland) embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland).

  16. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unidirectional glass fibers were used to make a framework structure with high volume design placed in the pontic (edentulous) region. To reproduce the morphology of natural teeth, the framework structure was then veneered with Gradia (GC, Tokyo, Japan). Keywords: Fiber-reinforced composite; FRC; Posterior ...

  17. Multi-scale simulation of viscoelastic fiber-reinforced composites

    OpenAIRE

    Staub, S.; Andrä, H.; Kabel, M.; Zangmeister, T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an effective algorithm to simulate the anisotropic viscoelastic wbehavior of a fiber-reinforced composite including the influence of the local geometric properties, like fiber-orientation and volume fraction. The considered composites consist of a viscoelastic matrix which is reinforced by elastic fibers. The viscoelastic composite behavior results anisotropic due to the local anisotropic fiber-orientations. The influence of the local time-dependent viscoelastic properties...

  18. Teeth restored using fiber-reinforced posts: in vitro fracture tests and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, M; Rammelsberg, P; Lenz, J; Scheuber, S; Schweizerhof, K; Rues, S

    2010-09-01

    In dentistry the restoration of decayed teeth is challenging and makes great demands on both the dentist and the materials. Hence, fiber-reinforced posts have been introduced. The effects of different variables on the ultimate load on teeth restored using fiber-reinforced posts is controversial, maybe because the results are mostly based on non-standardized in vitro tests and, therefore, give inhomogeneous results. This study combines the advantages of in vitro tests and finite element analysis (FEA) to clarify the effects of ferrule height, post length and cementation technique used for restoration. Sixty-four single rooted premolars were decoronated (ferrule height 1 or 2 mm), endodontically treated and restored using fiber posts (length 2 or 7 mm), composite fillings and metal crowns (resin bonded or cemented). After thermocycling and chewing simulation the samples were loaded until fracture, recording first damage events. Using UNIANOVA to analyze recorded fracture loads, ferrule height and cementation technique were found to be significant, i.e. increased ferrule height and resin bonding of the crown resulted in higher fracture loads. Post length had no significant effect. All conventionally cemented crowns with a 1-mm ferrule height failed during artificial ageing, in contrast to resin-bonded crowns (75% survival rate). FEA confirmed these results and provided information about stress and force distribution within the restoration. Based on the findings of in vitro tests and computations we concluded that crowns, especially those with a small ferrule height, should be resin bonded. Finally, centrally positioned fiber-reinforced posts did not contribute to load transfer as long as the bond between the tooth and composite core was intact. 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Elastic constants and internal friction of fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    We review recent experimental studies at NBS on the anisotropic elastic constants and internal friction of fiber-reinforced composites. Materials that were studied include: boron-aluminum, boron-epoxy, graphite-epoxy, glass-epoxy, and aramid-epoxy. In all cases, elastic-constant direction dependence could be described by relationships developed for single crystals of homogeneous materials. Elastic stiffness and internal friction were found to vary inversely

  20. Electron beam curing of aramid fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, C.B.; Singh, A.; Lopata, V.J.; Boyer, G.D.; Kremers, W.; Mason, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    High strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios have allowed fiber-reinforced composites to be used for many applications, including aircraft and aerospace products, sporting goods and automotive components. Electron beam (EB) processing involves using electrons to initiate polymerization and/or crosslinking reactions in suitable polymer substrates to enhance specific physical and chemical properties. The advantages of using EB processing rather than thermal curing techniques for composites, include reduced internal stresses, a result of curing at ambient temperature, greatly reduced curing times, and better control of energy absorption. The penetration limit for a 10-MeV electron beam is about 4 cm for one-sided treatment of unit-density material, making EB processing suitable for many applications. The penetration limit is inversely proportional to the density of the material. This paper reports on the authors' research program to study EB-curable aramid fiber-reinforced composites. The program objective is to design and manufacture EB-curable composites that meet mechanical and physical property specifications for selected applications. The suitability of standard fabrication methods, such as filament winding and hand lay-up, to EB processing is also discussed

  1. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  2. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallittu P

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC prostheses offer the advantages of good esthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairside-made composite-fixed partial dentures of conventional preparation. Other applications of FRC in dentistry are briefly mentioned. The possibilities fiber reinforcement technology offers must be emphasized to the dental community. Rather than limiting discussion to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed.

  3. Fiber-reinforced bioactive and bioabsorbable hybrid composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttunen, Mikko; Godinho, Pedro; Kellomaeki, Minna [Tampere University of Technology, Institute of Biomaterials, Hermiankatu 12, PO Box 589, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland); Toermaelae, Pertti [Bioretec Ltd, Hermiankatu 22, PO Box 135, FI-33721 Tampere (Finland)], E-mail: mikko.huttunen@tut.fi

    2008-09-01

    Bioabsorbable polymeric bone fracture fixation devices have been developed and used clinically in recent decades to replace metallic implants. An advantage of bioabsorbable polymeric devices is that these materials degrade in the body and the degradation products exit via metabolic routes. Additionally, the strength properties of the bioabsorbable polymeric devices decrease as the device degrades, which promotes bone regeneration (according to Wolff's law) as the remodeling bone tissue is progressively loaded. The most extensively studied bioabsorbable polymers are poly-{alpha}-hydroxy acids. The major limitation of the first generation of bioabsorbable materials and devices was their relatively low mechanical properties and brittle behavior. Therefore, several reinforcing techniques have been used to improve the mechanical properties. These include polymer chain orientation techniques and the use of fiber reinforcements. The latest innovation for bioactive and fiber-reinforced bioabsorbable composites is to use both bioactive and bioresorbable ceramic and bioabsorbable polymeric fiber reinforcement in the same composite structure. This solution of using bioactive and fiber-reinforced bioabsorbable hybrid composites is examined in this study.

  4. Chairside fabricated fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufyan Garoushi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in the materials and techniques for adhesive dentistry have allowed the development of non-invasive or minimally invasive approaches for replacing a missing tooth in those clinical situations when conservation of adjacent teeth is needed. Good mechanical and cosmetic/aesthetic properties of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC, with good bonding properties with composite resin cement and veneering composite are needed in FRC devices. Some recent studies have shown that adhesives of composite resins and luting cements allow diffusion of the adhesives to the FRC framework of the bridges. By this so-called interdiffusion bonding is formed [1]. FRC bridges can be made in dental laboratories or chairside. This article describes a clinical case of chairside (directly made FRC Bridge, which was used according to the principles of minimal invasive approach. Treatment was performed by Professor Vallittu from the University of Turku, Finland.

  5. Natural fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taj, S.; Khan, S.; Munawar, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Natural fibers have been used to reinforce materials for over 3,000 years. More recently they have been employed in combination with plastics. Many types of natural fi fibers have been investigated for use in plastics including Flax, hemp, jute, straw, wood fiber, rice husks, wheat, barley, oats, rye, cane (sugar and bamboo), grass reeds, kenaf, ramie, oil palm empty fruit bunch, sisal, coir, water hyacinth, pennywort, kapok, paper-mulberry, raphia, banana fiber, pineapple leaf fiber and papyrus. Natural fibers have the advantage that they are renewable resources and have marketing appeal. The Asian markets have been using natural fibers for many years e.g., jute is a common reinforcement in India. Natural fibers are increasingly used in automotive and packaging materials. Pakistan is an agricultural country and it is the main stay of Pakistan's economy. Thousands of tons of different crops are produced but most of their wastes do not have any useful utilization. Agricultural wastes include wheat husk, rice husk, and their straw, hemp fiber and shells of various dry fruits. These agricultural wastes can be used to prepare fiber reinforced polymer composites for commercial use. This report examines the different types of fibers available and the current status of research. Many references to the latest work on properties, processing and application have been cited in this review. (author)

  6. Improvement of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites by poling treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S M; Hwang, H Y

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a new non-destructive method has been proposed for damage monitoring of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials using the piezoelectric characteristics of a polymeric matrix. Several studies of the piezoelectric properties of unidirectional glass fiber epoxy composites and damage monitoring of double-cantilever beams have supported the claim that the piezoelectric method is feasible and powerful enough to monitor the damage of glass fiber epoxy composites. Generally, conventional piezoelectric materials have higher piezoelectric characteristics through poling treatment. In this work, we investigated the change of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites before and after poling treatment. The piezoelectric constants (d 33 ) of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites increased by more than 400%. Also, x-ray diffraction tests revealed that poling treatment changed the degree of crystallinity of the epoxy matrix, and this led to the improvement of the piezoelectric characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. (paper)

  7. Effect of surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber-reinforced composite post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. Seventy-five single-rooted human teeth were prepared to receive a glass fiber post (Reblida). The posts were divided into five groups according to the surface treatment: Gr C (control; no treatment), Gr S (silanization for 60 s), Gr AP (airborne-particle abrasion), Gr HF (etching with 9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), and Gr M10 (etching with CH2Cl2 for 10 min). Dual-cure self-adhesive luting agent (Rely X Unicem) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion using micropush-out test. Failure types were examined with stereomicroscope and surface morphology of the posts was characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties of posts were assessed using a three-point bending test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Statistical significance was set at the 0.05 probability level. Groups treated with M10 showed significantly higher bond strength than those obtained with other surface treatments (P C > S > AP > HF. Most failure modes were adhesive type of failures between dentin and luting agent (48.2%). SEM analysis revealed that the fiber post surfaces were modified after surface treatments. The surface treatments did not compromise the flexural properties of fiber posts. Application of M10 to the fiber post surfaces enhanced the adhesion to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

  8. Problems encountered with conventional fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landel, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Preparational, computational, and operational problems associated with fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) are reviewed. Initial preparation of FRCs is shown to involve consideration of the type of prepreg, the setting time, cure conditions and cycles, and cure temperatures. The effects of the choice of bonding agents, the fiber transfer length, and individual fiber responses to bonding agents are noted to have an impact on fiber strength, moisture uptake, and fatigue resistance. The deformation prior to failure and the failure region are modeled through models of mini-, micro- and macro mechanics formulations employing a stiffness matrix, failure criterion, or fracture mechanics. The detection, evaluation, and repair of defects comprises the operational domain, and it is stressed that no good repair techniques exist for FRCs.

  9. Placement protocol for an anterior fiber-reinforced composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, D S

    1997-01-01

    The new classification of metal-free restorative materials provides the clinician with a durable, flexible, and aesthetic laboratory-fabricated alternative to conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) full-coverage crowns, inlay and onlay restorations, and single pontic bridges. With exceptional physical and optical characteristics, restorations fabricated utilizing the new ceramic optimized polymer (Ceromer) (Targis, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) and fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) framework (Vectris, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) materials can also be utilized predictably in the anterior segment. The success of metal-free restorations can be achieved by following conventional prosthodontic principles for preparation, cementation, and finishing. This article demonstrates the appropriate treatment protocol in order to achieve aesthetically acceptable and durable anterior results utilizing a metal-free restorative system for "Maryland-like" bridge restorations.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using Composite Binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Fediuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the creation of high-density impermeable concrete. The effect of the “cement, fly ash, and limestone” composite binders obtained by joint grinding with superplasticizer in the varioplanetary mill on the process of structure formation was studied. Compaction of structure on micro- and nanoscale levels was characterized by different techniques: X-ray diffraction, DTA-TGA, and electron microscopy. Results showed that the grinding of active mineral supplements allows crystallization centers to be created by ash particles as a result of the binding of Ca(OH2 during hardening alite, which intensifies the clinker minerals hydration process; the presence of fine grains limestone also leads to the hydrocarboaluminates calcium formation. The relation between cement stone neoplasms composition as well as fibrous concrete porosity and permeability of composite at nanoscale level for use of composite binders with polydispersed mineral supplements was revealed. The results are of potential importance in developing the wide range of fine-grained fiber-reinforced concrete with a compressive strength more than 100 MPa, with low permeability under actual operating conditions.

  11. Direct restoration of severely damaged incisors using short fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the static load-bearing capacity and the failure mode of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with complete crowns made of experimental composite resin (FC) with short fiber fillers, with and without root canal posts. Further aim was to evaluate the effect of fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) on the failure mode of the restoration. The experimental composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt.% of short E-glass fibers (3mm in length) and 22.5 wt.% of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) resin with 55 wt.% of silane treated silica fillers. The clinical crowns of 30 human extracted maxillary incisors were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction. Five groups of direct complete crowns were fabricated (n=6); Group A: made from particulate filler composite resin (PFC) (Grandio Caps, VOCO, control), Group B: PFC with fiber post (everStick, StickTeck), Group C: made from PFC with everStick fiber post and FRC-substructure, Group D: made from FC, Group E: made from FC with FRC-substructure. The root canals were prepared and posts were cemented with resin cement (ParaCem Universal). All restored teeth were stored in water at room temperature for 24h before they were statically loaded with speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p=0.05). Failure modes were visually examined. ANOVA revealed that restorations made from experimental fiber composite resin had higher load-bearing capacity (349N) (p0.05). Restorations made from short glass fiber containing composite resin with IPN-polymer matrix showed better load-bearing capacity than those made with either plain PFC or PFC reinforced with fiber post.

  12. Three dimensional finite element analysis of layered fiber-reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed for a biaxially loaded composite laminate (with a centered hole) consisting of several fiber-reinforced composite layers each with a specified fiber orientation. The detailed stress distribution around the hole was determined. Also, the locations of initial damage zones due to different failure mechanisms were indicated.

  13. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with 2 Different Fiber-reinforced Composite and 2 Conventional Composite Resin Core Buildup Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Ashly Mary; Amirtharaj, L Vijay; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with 2 fiber-reinforced composite resins and 2 conventional composite resin core buildup materials. Sixty noncarious unrestored human maxillary premolars were collected, endodontically treated (except group 1, negative control), and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10). Group 2 was the positive control. The remaining 40 prepared teeth were restored with various direct core buildup materials as follows: group 3 teeth were restored with dual-cure composite resin, group 4 with posterior composite resin, group 5 with fiber-reinforced composite resin, and group 6 with short fiber-reinforced composite resin. Fracture strength testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test. Fracture patterns for each sample were also examined under a light microscope to determine the level of fractures. The mean fracture resistance values (in newtons) were obtained as group 1 > group 6 > group 4 > group 3 > group 5 > group 2. Group 6 showed the highest mean fracture resistance value, which was significantly higher than the other experimental groups, and all the fractures occurred at the level of enamel. Within the limitations of this study, a short fiber-reinforced composite can be used as a direct core buildup material that can effectively resist heavy occlusal forces against fracture and may reinforce the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adhesive Properties of Bonded Orthodontic Retainers to Enamel : Stainless Steel Wire vs Fiber-reinforced Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Krebs, Eliza; Sandham, John; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to compare the bond strength of a stainless steel orthodontic wire vs various fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) used as orthodontic retainers on enamel, analyze the failure types after debonding, and investigate the influence of different application

  15. Damage Precursor Investigation of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials Under Fatigue Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    capability, needs Maintenance Action Damage Detection by NDE and/or in-situ sensors (Ultrasonic, Thermography , Acoustic Emission, etc.) Incipient... Damage Prognosis for Materials and Structures in Complex Systems, AFOSR Discovery Challenge Thrust (DCT) Workshop on Prognosis of Aircraft and Space... Damage Precursor Investigation of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials Under Fatigue Loads by Asha J. Hall, Raymond E. Brennan IV, Anindya

  16. An emerging alternative to thermal curing: Electron curing of fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.; Saunders, C.B.; Lopata, V.J.; Kremers, W.; Chung, M.

    1995-01-01

    Electron curing of fiber-reinforced composites to produce materials with good mechanical properties has been demonstrated by the authors' work, and by Aerospatiale. The attractions of this technology are the technical and processing advantages offered over thermal curing, and the projected cost benefits. Though the work so far has focused on the higher value composites for the aircraft and aerospace industries, the technology can also be used to produce composites for the higher volume industries, such as transportation and automotive

  17. Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Smart Soft Composite Actuators According to Material Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Song, Sung-Hyuk; Ahn, Sung-Hoon [Seoul Nat’l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites, which are made by combining a continuous fiber that acts as reinforcement and a homogeneous polymeric material that acts as a host, are engineering materials with high strength and stiffness and a lightweight structure. In this study, a shape memory alloy(SMA) reinforced composite actuator is presented. This actuator is used to generate large deformations in single lightweight structures and can be used in applications requiring a high degree of adaptability to various external conditions. The proposed actuator consists of numerous individual laminas of the glass-fiber fabric that are embedded in a polymeric matrix. To characterize its deformation behavior, the composition of the actuator was changed by changing the matrix material and the number of the glass-fiber fabric layers. In addition, current of various magnitudes were applied to each actuator to study the effect of the heating of SMA wires on applying current.

  18. Effects of moisture on glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzamora Guzman, Vladimir Joel; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    performance of wind turbine blades over their lifetime. Here, environmental moisture conditions were simulated by immersing glass fiber-reinforced polymer specimens in salt water for a period of up to 8 years. The mechanical properties of specimens were analyzed before and after immersion to evaluate...... the degradation mechanisms. Single-fiber tensile testing was also performed at different moisture conditions. The water-diffusion mechanism was studied to quantify the diffusion coefficients as a function of salt concentration, sample geometry, and fiber direction. Three degradation mechanisms were observed...

  19. Young modulus and internal friction of a fiber-reinforced composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.; Lei, M.; Austin, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    By a kilohertz-frequency resonance method we determined the Young modulus and internal friction of a uniaxially fiber-reinforced composite. The composite comprised glass fibers in an epoxy-resin matrix. We studied three fiber contents: 0, 41, and 49 vol %. The Young modulus fit a linear rule of mixture. The internal friction fit a classical free-damped-oscillator model where one assumes a linear rule of mixture for three quantities: mass, force constant, and mechanical-resistance constant

  20. Short fiber-reinforced composite restorations: A review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Gargoum, Ausama; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo

    2018-02-25

    A newly-recommended method for restoring large cavities is the biomimetic approach of using short fiber-reinforced composite (SFRC) as dentine-replacing material. The aim of the current review was to present an overview of SFRC and to give the clinician a detailed understanding of this new material and treatment strategy based on available-literature review. A thorough literature search was done up to December 2017. The range of relevant publications was surveyed using PubMed and Google Scholar. From the search results, articles related to our search terms were only considered. The search terms used were "short fiber-reinforced composite", "everX posterior", and "fiber-reinforced composite restorations". Of the assessed articles selected (N = 70), most were laboratory-based research with various test specimen designs prepared according to the ISO standard or with extracted teeth; only four articles were clinical reports. A common finding was that by combining the SFRC as a bulk base with conventional composite, the load-bearing capacity and failure mode of the material combination were improved, as compared to plain conventional composite restoration. In the reviewed studies, the biomimetic restoration technique of using SFRC showed promising characteristics, and therefore, might be recommended as an alternative treatment option for large cavities. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  2. A Damage-Dependent Finite Element Analysis for Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.

    1998-01-01

    A progressive damage methodology has been developed to predict damage growth and residual strength of fiber-reinforced composite structure with through penetrations such as a slit. The methodology consists of a damage-dependent constitutive relationship based on continuum damage mechanics. Damage is modeled using volume averaged strain-like quantities known as internal state variables and is represented in the equilibrium equations as damage induced force vectors instead of the usual degradation and modification of the global stiffness matrix.

  3. A fiber-reinforced composite prosthesis restoring a lateral midfacial defect: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurunmäki, Hemmo; Kantola, Rosita; Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watts, David C; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This clinical report describes the use of a glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) substructure to reinforce the silicone elastomer of a large facial prosthesis. The FRC substructure was shaped into a framework and embedded into the silicone elastomer to form a reinforced facial prosthesis. The prosthesis is designed to overcome the disadvantages associated with traditionally fabricated prostheses; namely, delamination of the silicone of the acrylic base, poor marginal adaptation over time, and poor simulation of facial expressions.

  4. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Impacts of Temperature Disparity on Surface Modification of Short Jute Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Reshmi; Choudhury, P. L.; Pandey, K. M.

    2017-08-01

    Chase for manufacturing composite materials without negotiating on the physio-mechanical performance has been prevailing since long. Short jute fiber-reinforced epoxy based composites are prepared and their mechanical properties have been analyzed. The fibers are peroxide-silane treated under varying conditions of temperature from low to high. Results display that the jute composites set at higher temperature values indicate higher values of mechanical properties compared to those synthesized under lower temperature range. The same can be cited for liquid retaining capacity.

  6. Fatigue resistance and stiffness of glass fiber-reinforced urethane dimethacrylate composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narva, Katja K; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2004-02-01

    Retentive properties of cast metal clasps decrease over time because of metal fatigue. Novel fiber-reinforced composite materials are purported to have increased fatigue resistance compared with metals and may offer a solution to the problem of metal fatigue. The aim of this study was to investigate the fatigue resistance and stiffness of E-glass fiber-reinforced composite. Twelve cylindrical fiber-reinforced composite test cylinders (2 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length) were made from light-polymerized urethane dimethacrylate monomer with unidirectional, single-stranded, polymer preimpregnated E-glass fiber reinforcement. Six cylinders were stored in dry conditions and 6 in distilled water for 30 days before testing. Fatigue resistance was measured by a constant-deflection fatigue test with 1 mm of deflection across a specimen span of 11 mm for a maximum of 150,000 loading cycles. The resistance of the cylinder against deflection was measured (N) and the mean values of the force were compared by 1-way analysis of variance (alpha = .05). The flexural modulus (GPa) was calculated for the dry and water-stored cylinders for the first loading cycle. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assess the distribution of the fibers, and the volume percent of fibers and polymer were assessed by combustion analysis. The test cylinders did not fracture due to fatigue following 150,000 loading cycles. Flexural modulus at the first loading cycle was 18.9 (+/- 2.9) GPa and 17.5 (+/- 1.7) GPa for the dry and water-stored cylinders, respectively. The mean force required to cause the first 1-mm deflection was 33.5 (+/- 5.2) N and 37.7 (+/- 3.6) N for the dry and water stored cylinders, respectively; however, the differences were not significant. After 150,000 cycles the mean force to cause 1-mm deflection was significantly reduced to 23.4 (+/- 8.5) N and 13.1 (+/- 3.5) N, respectively (P fiber- and polymer-rich areas within the specimens and indicated that individual fibers were

  7. Modeling of Stress Development During Thermal Damage Healing in Fiber-reinforced Composite Materials Containing Embedded Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Warnet, Laurent; Akkerman, Remko; de Boer, Andries

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite materials are susceptible to damage development through matrix cracking and delamination. This article concerns the use of shape memory alloy (SMA) wires embedded in a composite material to support healing of damage through a local heat treatment. The composite material

  8. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Lassila, Lippo

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot) composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products) and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics) stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech) were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round) and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers. PMID:29130047

  9. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo; Scribante, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot) composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products) and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics) stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech) were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round) and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers.

  10. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers.

  11. DETERMINATION OF EFFECTIVE PROPERTIES OF FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE LAMINATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Skrzat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The determination of effective mechanical properties of multi-layer composite is presented in this paper. Computations based on finite element method predicting properties of inhomogeneous materials require solving huge tasks. More effective is Mori-Tanaka approach, typical for micromechanics problems. For regularly distributed fibers closed-forms for effective composite material properties are possible to derive. The results of homogenization are used in strength analysis of the composite pressure vessel.

  12. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  13. Micromechanical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Composites with Statistically Equivalent Random Fiber Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhi Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the random fiber distribution of a fiber-reinforced composite is of great importance for studying the progressive failure behavior of the material on the micro scale. In this paper, we develop a new algorithm for generating random representative volume elements (RVEs with statistical equivalent fiber distribution against the actual material microstructure. The realistic statistical data is utilized as inputs of the new method, which is archived through implementation of the probability equations. Extensive statistical analysis is conducted to examine the capability of the proposed method and to compare it with existing methods. It is found that the proposed method presents a good match with experimental results in all aspects including the nearest neighbor distance, nearest neighbor orientation, Ripley’s K function, and the radial distribution function. Finite element analysis is presented to predict the effective elastic properties of a carbon/epoxy composite, to validate the generated random representative volume elements, and to provide insights of the effect of fiber distribution on the elastic properties. The present algorithm is shown to be highly accurate and can be used to generate statistically equivalent RVEs for not only fiber-reinforced composites but also other materials such as foam materials and particle-reinforced composites.

  14. Immediate tooth replacement using fiber-reinforced composite and natural tooth pontic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Motevasselian, Fariba

    2010-01-01

    The loss and replacement of anterior maxillary teeth poses several challenges. In patients refusing implant surgery, when minimal tooth reduction is desired, a fiber-reinforced composite fixed-partial denture may be used as a conservative alternative to a conventional fixed-partial denture for replacement of a single missing tooth. This article describes a clinical technique and six-year follow-up. The patient presented with a missing maxillary central incisor due to localized juvenile periodontitis. The abutment teeth were clinically stable. The advantage of supragingival margins and minimal tooth structure removal made the bonded bridge with a natural tooth pontic a viable procedure for this compromised restorative situation.

  15. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing Posterior Teeth: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Vallittu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland. The unidirectional glass fibers were used to make a framework structure with high volume design placed in the pontic (edentulous region. To reproduce the morphology of natural teeth, the framework structure was then veneered with Gradia (GC, Tokyo, Japan.

  16. Fiber-reinforced plastic composites. Possibilities and limitations of applications as machine-construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophey, Lothar

    1988-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite structural materials in engineering applications is discussed in a survey of currently available technology and future prospects. The ongoing rapid growth in the use of these materials is described, and the criteria to be applied in selecting base materials, lamination schemes, fasteners, and processing methods are examined in detail and illustrated with graphs, diagrams, flow charts, and drawings. A description of a sample application (comparing the properties of steel, CFRP, SiC-reinforced Al, CFRP/steel, and CFRP/Al automobile piston rods) is included.

  17. SERIAL SECTIONS THROUGH A CONTINUOUS FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bizet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of a unidirectional glass-fiber composite material is described seeking especially for the influence of the stitching perpendicular to the reinforcement. Serial cuts are performed through the composite and the microstructure is quantified using global parameters and linear morphological analysis. A key result is that the stitching induces variations in fibers spacing within the yarns and in the matrix volume between the yarns. This can affect noticeably the flow of the resin during the manufacturing process and also the mechanical properties of the composite.

  18. Natural tooth pontic with splinting of periodontally weakened teeth using fiber-reinforced composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Srinidhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of missing anterior teeth due to periodontal reasons is challenging due to the poor support of abutment teeth. This prevents the use of fixed partial dentures (FPDs. Fiber-reinforced splinting provides a viable alternative to the dentist while choosing a treatment plan in replacing missing anterior teeth in periodontally compromised patients as opposed to conventional modalities like FPDs or removable partial dentures. Replacing missing teeth using either patient′s own tooth or a denture tooth as pontic can be done by splinting adjacent teeth with fiber reinforced composite. The splinting has an additional advantage of stabilizing adjacent mobile teeth. This case report details the case selection, procedure with follow-up of a case where the natural extracted tooth of the patient was used as pontic to replace a missing anterior tooth. The splinting was done with fiber reinforced composite resin. Fiber-reinforced composite resin splinting of patient′s extracted natural tooth is economical, fast, and easy to use chairside technique with the added benefit of periodontal stabilization.

  19. Crushing characteristics of continuous fiber-reinforced composite tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite tubes can be reinforced with continuous fibers. When such tubes are subjected to crushing loads, the response is complex and depends on interaction between the different mechanisms that control the crushing process. The modes of crushing and their controlling mechanisms are described. Also, the resulting crushing process and its efficiency are addressed.

  20. Interfacial contributions in lignocellulosic fiber-reinforced polyurethane composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy G. Rials; Michael P. Wolcott; John M. Nassar

    2001-01-01

    Whereas lignocellulosic fibers have received considerable attention as a rein- forcing agent in thermoplastic composites, their applicability to reactive polymer systems remains of considerable interest. The hydroxyl-rich nature of natural lignocellulosic fibers suggests that they are particularly useful in thermosetting systems such as polyurethanes. To further this...

  1. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  2. Mechanical Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using Composite Binders

    OpenAIRE

    Fediuk, Roman; Smoliakov, Aleksey; Muraviov, Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the creation of high-density impermeable concrete. The effect of the “cement, fly ash, and limestone” composite binders obtained by joint grinding with superplasticizer in the varioplanetary mill on the process of structure formation was studied. Compaction of structure on micro- and nanoscale levels was characterized by different techniques: X-ray diffraction, DTA-TGA, and electron microscopy. Results showed that the grinding of active mineral supplements allows cryst...

  3. Fiber-Reinforced Reactive Nano-Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene/ matrix interface based on the fabrication of a reactive nano-epoxy matrix with lower surface energy has been improved. Enhanced mechanical properties versus pure epoxy on a three-point bend test include: strength (25 percent), modulus (20 percent), and toughness (30 percent). Increased thermal properties include higher Tg (glass transition temperature) and stable CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). Improved processability for manufacturing composites includes faster wetting rates on macro-fiber surfaces, lower viscosity, better resin infusion rates, and improved rheological properties. Improved interfacial adhesion properties with Spectra fibers by pullout tests include initial debonding force of 35 percent, a maximum pullout force of 25 percent, and energy to debond at 65 percent. Improved mechanical properties of Spectra fiber composites (tensile) aging resistance properties include hygrothermal effects. With this innovation, high-performance composites have been created, including carbon fibers/nano-epoxy, glass fibers/nano-epoxy, aramid fibers/ nano-epoxy, and ultra-high-molecularweight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPE).

  4. Relationship of margin design for fiber-reinforced composite crowns to compressive fracture resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Abdulhamaid A; Ayad, Mohamed F; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2011-07-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite restorations provide excellent esthetics; however, little is known regarding the influence of margin design on marginal fit and fracture resistance for this type of crown. This study evaluated the effect of variations in tooth-preparation design on the marginal fit and compressive fracture resistance of fiber-reinforced composite crowns. Three metal dies with a total convergence of 5° and different margin designs (0.5-mm light chamfer, 1.0-mm deep chamfer, and 1.0-mm shoulder) were prepared. Sixty standardized crowns (FibreKor) were made on duplicated base metal alloy dies (n = 20 for each margin design). Marginal fit was stereoscopically evaluated by measuring the distances between each of the four pairs of indentations on the crowns and on the dies. The specimens were then subjected to a compressive fracture-loading test using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple-range test (α = 0.05). Analysis of marginal fit and fracture resistance disclosed a statistically significant difference for tooth-preparation design (p crowns was adversely affected by tooth-preparation design. The marginal gaps were greater for the shoulder margin specimens than in the light or deep chamfer margin specimens; however, the fracture strength of the chamfer margin specimens was greater than that of the shoulder margin specimens. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method for Monitoring Water Content in Epoxy Resins and Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey E. Krauklis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring water content and predicting the water-induced drop in strength of fiber-reinforced composites are of great importance for the oil and gas and marine industries. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic methods are broadly available and often used for process and quality control in industrial applications. A benefit of using such spectroscopic methods over the conventional gravimetric analysis is the possibility to deduce the mass of an absolutely dry material and subsequently the true water content, which is an important indicator of water content-dependent properties. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient and detailed method for estimating the water content in epoxy resins and fiber-reinforced composites. In this study, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR spectroscopy was applied to measure the water content of amine-epoxy neat resin. The method was developed and successfully extended to glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. Based on extensive measurements of neat resin and composite samples of varying water content and thickness, regression was performed, and the quantitative absorbance dependence on water content in the material was established. The mass of an absolutely dry resin was identified, and the true water content was obtained. The method was related to the Beer–Lambert law and explained in such terms. A detailed spectroscopic method for measuring water content in resins and fiber-reinforced composites was developed and described.

  6. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method for Monitoring Water Content in Epoxy Resins and Fiber-Reinforced Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauklis, Andrey E; Gagani, Abedin I; Echtermeyer, Andreas T

    2018-04-11

    Monitoring water content and predicting the water-induced drop in strength of fiber-reinforced composites are of great importance for the oil and gas and marine industries. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods are broadly available and often used for process and quality control in industrial applications. A benefit of using such spectroscopic methods over the conventional gravimetric analysis is the possibility to deduce the mass of an absolutely dry material and subsequently the true water content, which is an important indicator of water content-dependent properties. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient and detailed method for estimating the water content in epoxy resins and fiber-reinforced composites. In this study, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy was applied to measure the water content of amine-epoxy neat resin. The method was developed and successfully extended to glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. Based on extensive measurements of neat resin and composite samples of varying water content and thickness, regression was performed, and the quantitative absorbance dependence on water content in the material was established. The mass of an absolutely dry resin was identified, and the true water content was obtained. The method was related to the Beer-Lambert law and explained in such terms. A detailed spectroscopic method for measuring water content in resins and fiber-reinforced composites was developed and described.

  7. Five-year survival of 3-unit fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures in the posterior area.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heumen, C.C.M. van; Tanner, J.; Dijken, J.W.V. van; Pikaar, R.; Lassila, L.V.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Vallittu, P.K.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of three-unit posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs) made of fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC), and to identify design factors influencing the survival rate. METHODS: 77 patients (52 females, 25 males)

  8. Fracture strength and bending of all-ceramic and fiber-reinforced composites in inlay-retained fixed partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Saridag

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: Zirconia-based ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated the highest fracture strength. The fiber-reinforced composite inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated higher bending values than did the all-ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures.

  9. Effect of thermal-mechanical cycling on thermal expansion behavior of boron fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Y.C.; He, S.Y.; Yang, D.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of boron fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composite subjected to thermal-mechanical cycling (TMC) was studied. Experimental results showed that TMC affected greatly the thermal expansion behavior of the composite. Using a simple analysis model of internal stress in the fibers, the stress change during the thermal expansion coefficient measurements of the composite subjected to TMC was calculated. The results indicated that TMC could induce the interfacial degradation of the composite, and the more the numbers of TMC cycles, or the higher the applied stress level of TMC, the more serious the interfacial degradation of the composite became. The proposed one-dimensional analysis model was proved to be a simple and qualitative approach to probing the interfacial degradation of unidirectional fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites during TMC

  10. Standard Guide for Identification of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composite Materials in Databases

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide establishes essential and desirable data elements for fiber-reinforced composite materials for two purposes: to establish the material identification component of data-reporting requirements for test reporting and to provide information for the design of material property databases. 1.1.1 This guide is the first part of a two-part modular approach. The first part serves to identify the material and the second part serves to describe testing procedures and variables and to record results. 1.1.2 For mechanical testing, the related document is Guide E 1434. The interaction of this guide with Guide E 1434 is emphasized by the common numbering of data elements. Data Elements A1 through G13 are included in this guide, and numbering of data elements in Guide E 1434 begins with H1 for the next data element block. This guide is most commonly used in combination with a guide for reporting the test procedures and results such as Guide E 1434. 1.2 These guidelines are specific to fiber-reinforced polyme...

  11. High-strength fiber-reinforced plastic reinforcement of wood and wood composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingley, D.A.; Eng, P. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Research and development underway since 1982 has led to the development of a method of reinforcing wood and wood composite structural products (WWC) using high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic. This method allows the use of less wood fiber and lower grade wood fiber for a given load capacity. The first WWC in which reinforcement has been marketed is glulam beams. Marketed under the trade name FiRP{trademark} Reinforced glulam, the product has gained code approval and is now being used in the construction of buildings and bridges in the United States, Japan and other countries. The high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic (FiRP{trademark} Reinforced panel (RP)) has specific characteristics that are required to provide for proper use in WWC`s. This paper discusses these characteristics and the testing requirements to develop code approved allowable design values for carbon, aramid and fiberglass RP`s for such uses. Specific issues such as in-service characteristics, i.e. long term creep tests and tension-tension fatigue tests, are discussed.

  12. Interfacial studies on the O3 modified carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, O 3 modification method was used for the surface treatment of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber. The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The interfacial properties of carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 (CF/PA6) composites were investigated by means of the single fiber pull-out tests. As a result, it was found that IFSS values of the composites with O 3 treated carbon fiber are increased by 60% compared to that without treatment. XPS results show that O 3 treatment increases the amount of carboxyl groups on carbon fiber surface, thus the interfacial adhesion between carbon fiber and PA6 matrix is effectively promoted

  13. Esthetic rehabilitation of single anterior edentulous space using fiber-reinforced composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-reinforced composite (FRC fixed prosthesis is an innovative alternative to a traditional metal restoration, as it is a conservative treatment method. This case report demonstrates a detailed procedure for restoring a missing anterior tooth with an FRC. A 44-year-old woman visited our department with an avulsed tooth that had fallen out on the previous day and was completely dry. This tooth was replanted, but it failed after one year. A semi-direct technique was used to fabricate a FRC fixed partial prosthesis for its replacement. The FRC framework and the pontic were fabricated using a duplicated cast model and nanofilled composite resin. Later on, interproximal contact, tooth shape, and shade were adjusted at chairside. This technique not only enables the clinician to replace a missing tooth immediately after extraction for minimizing esthetic problems, but it also decreases both tooth reduction and cost.

  14. Influence of airborne-particle abrasion on mechanical properties and bond strength of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos Jose; Santana, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pereira, Janaina Carla; Araujo, Tatiana Santos; Menezes, Murilo Souza

    2008-06-01

    Controversy exists concerning the use of fiber-reinforced posts to improve bond strength to resin cement because some precementation treatments can compromise the mechanical properties of the posts. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of airborne-particle abrasion on the mechanical properties and microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts. Flexural strength (delta(f)), flexural modulus (E(f)), and stiffness (S) were assessed using a 3-point bending test for glass fiber-reinforced and carbon fiber-reinforced resin posts submitted to airborne-particle abrasion (AB) with 50-microm Al(2)O(3), and for posts without any surface treatment (controls) (n=10). Forty glass fiber (GF) and 40 carbon fiber (CF) posts were submitted to 1 of 4 surface treatments (n=10) prior to MTBS testing: silane (S); silane and adhesive (SA); airborne-particle abrasion with 50-microm Al(2)O(3) and silane (ABS); airborne-particle abrasion, silane, and adhesive (ABSA). Two composite resin restorations (Filtek Z250) with rounded depressions in the lateral face were bilaterally fixed to the post with resin cement (RelyX ARC). Next, the specimen was sectioned with a precision saw running perpendicular to the bonded surface to obtain 10 bonded beam specimens with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2). Each beam specimen was tested in a mechanical testing machine (EMIC 2,000 DL), under stress, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). Failure patterns of tested specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 3-point bending test demonstrated significant differences among groups only for the post type factor for flexural strength, flexural modulus, and stiffness. The carbon fiber posts exhibited significantly higher mean flexural strength (P=.001), flexural modulus (P=.003), and stiffness (P=.001) values when compared with glass

  15. Ultrasonic measurement of elastic constants in fiber-reinforced polymer composites under influence of absorbed moisture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.A.; Toftegaard, H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an attempt to quantify hygral aging in fiber-reinforced polymer composites by the elastic constants C-11 and C-33. Quantitative ultrasonic measurements of the elastic constants for three different unidirectional as well as three different cross-ply specimens were compared. The......, and typically moisture expansion coefficients are reported. Moreover, as the ultrasonic pulse form changed in the anisotropic materials, different broadband methods were used to calculate the elastic constants. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved........ The specimens were manufactured with different moisture resistant surfaces and immersed in water for 24 h. By calculating the elastic constants, it was taken into account that hygral aging was accompanied by absorption of moisture in the polymer matrix. Moisture changed the laminate dimensions significantly...

  16. Load-Bearing Capacity of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Abutments and One-Piece Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, Marina; Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Escuin, Tomas; Vinas, Miguel; Lassila, Lippo V J; Närhi, Timo O

    2015-06-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) can potentially help in a physiologic stress transmission due to its excellent biomechanical matching with living tissues. Novel one-piece FRC implants and abutments with two different fiber orientations were loaded until failure to assess the load-bearing capacity, fracture patterns, and precision of fit. The one-piece FRC implants showed significantly higher load-bearing capacity compared to FRC abutments regardless of the fiber orientation (p < 0.001). For FRC abutments, bidirectional abutments showed significantly higher loads compared to unidirectional abutments (p < 0.001). The type of structure and fiber orientation are strong determinant factors of the load-bearing capacity of FRC implants and abutments.

  17. Stress-temperature-lifetime response of nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC composites in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    Time-to-failure tests were conducted in four-point flexure and in air as a function of stress levels and temperatures to study the lifetime response of various Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC (designated as Nic/SiC) composites with a graphitic interfacial coating. The results indicated that all of the Nic/SiC composites exhibit a similar stress-dependent failure at applied stress greater than a threshold value. In this case, the lifetimes of the composites increased with decrease in both stress level and test temperature. The lifetime of the composites appeared to be relatively insensitive to the thickness of graphitic interface layer and was enhanced somewhat by the addition of oxidation inhibitors. Electron microscopy and oxidation studies indicated that the life of the Nic/SiC composites was governed by the oxidation of the graphitic interfaces and the on of glass(es) in composites due to the oxidation of the fiber and matrix, inhibitor phases

  18. Osseointegration of fiber-reinforced composite implants: histological and ultrastructural observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballo, A M; Cekic-Nagas, I; Ergun, G; Lassila, L; Palmquist, A; Borchardt, P; Lausmaa, J; Thomsen, P; Vallittu, P K; Närhi, T O

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone tissue response to fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) in comparison with titanium (Ti) implants after 12 weeks of implantation in cancellous bone using histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis. Thirty grit-blasted cylindrical FRC implants with BisGMA-TEGDMA polymer matrix were fabricated and divided into three groups: (1) 60s light-cured FRC (FRC-L group), (2) 24h polymerized FRC (FRC group), and (3) bioactive glass FRC (FRC-BAG group). Titanium implants were used as a control group. The surface analyses were performed with scanning electron microscopy and 3D SEM. The bone-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were determined using histomorphometry and SEM. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on Focused Ion Beam prepared samples of the intact bone-implant interface. The FRC, FRC-BAG and Ti implants were integrated into host bone. In contrast, FRC-L implants had a consistent fibrous capsule around the circumference of the entire implant separating the implant from direct bone contact. The highest values of BIC were obtained with FRC-BAG (58±11%) and Ti implants (54±13%), followed by FRC implants (48±10%), but no significant differences in BIC or BA were observed (p=0.07, p=0.06, respectively). TEM images showed a direct contact between nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of bone and both FRC and FRC-BAG surfaces. Fiber-reinforced composite implants are capable of establishing a close bone contact comparable with the osseointegration of titanium implants having similar surface roughness. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Fiber Geometry and Representative Volume Element on Elastic and Thermal Properties of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Siva Bhaskara Rao Devireddy; Sandhyarani Biswas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present work is focused on the evaluation of elastic and thermal properties of unidirectional fiber-reinforced polymer composites with different volume fractions of fiber up to 0.7 using micromechanical approach. Two ways for calculating the material properties, that is, analytical and numerical approaches, were presented. In numerical approach, finite element analysis was used to evaluate the elastic modulus and thermal conductivity of composite from the constituent material prope...

  20. ZnO Piezoelectric Nanowires for Use in a Self-Powered Structural Health Monitoring Device for Fiber-Reinforced Composites Uploading Attachment Instructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new self-powered structural health monitoring (SHM) system for fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites by using...

  1. Technical features and criteria in designing fiber-reinforced composite materials: from the aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Antonio; Ronca, Dante; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Chierchia, Marianna; De Santis, Roberto; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Polymer-based composite materials are ideal for applications where high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios are required. From aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications, fiber-reinforced polymers have replaced metals, thus emerging as an interesting alternative. As widely reported, the mechanical behavior of the composite materials involves investigation on micro- and macro-scale, taking into consideration micromechanics, macromechanics and lamination theory. Clinical situations often require repairing connective tissues and the use of composite materials may be suitable for these applications because of the possibility to design tissue substitutes or implants with the required mechanical properties. Accordingly, this review aims at stressing the importance of fiber-reinforced composite materials to make advanced and biomimetic prostheses with tailored mechanical properties, starting from the basic principle design, technologies, and a brief overview of composites applications in several fields. Fiber-reinforced composite materials for artificial tendons, ligaments, and intervertebral discs, as well as for hip stems and mandible models will be reviewed, highlighting the possibility to mimic the mechanical properties of the soft and hard tissues that they replace.

  2. Effects of Interface Modification on Mechanical Behavior of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1997-01-01

    Unidirectional celsian matrix composites having approx. 42 volume percent of uncoated or BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were tested in three-point bend at room temperature. The uncoated fiber-reinforced composites showed catastrophic failure with strength of 210 +/- 35 MPa and a flat fracture surface. In contrast, composites reinforced with BN/SiC-coated fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout. Values of first matrix cracking stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 %, respectively, with ultimate strength as high as 960 MPa. The elastic Young's modulus of the uncoated and BN/SiC-coated fiber-reinforced composites were measured as 184 q 4 GPa and 165 +/- 5 GPa, respectively. Fiber push-through tests and microscopic examination indicated no chemical reaction at the uncoated or coated fiber-matrix interface. The low strength of the uncoated fiber-reinforced composite is probably due to degradation of the fibers from mechanical surface damage during processing. Because both the coated and uncoated fiber reinforced composites exhibited weak interfaces, the beneficial effect of the BN-SiC dual layer is primarily the protection of fibers from mechanical damage during processing.

  3. Effects of Subscale Size and Shape on Global Energy Dissipation in a Multiscale Model of a Fiber-Reinforced Composite Exhibiting Post-Peak Strain Softening Using Abaqus and FEAMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan, J.; Bednarcyk, Brett, A.; Arnold, Steven, M.

    2012-01-01

    A mesh objective crack band model is implemented in the generalized method of cells (GMC) micromechanics model to predict failure of a composite repeating unit cell (RUC). The micromechanics calculations are achieved using the MAC/GMC core engine within the ImMAC suite of micromechanics codes, developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The microscale RUC is linked to a macroscale Abaqus/Standard finite element model using the FEAMAC multiscale framework (included in the ImMAC suite). The effects of the relationship between the characteristic length of the finite element and the size of the microscale RUC on the total energy dissipation of the multiscale model are investigated. A simple 2-D composite square subjected to uniaxial tension is used to demonstrate the effects of scaling the dimensions of the RUC such that the length of the sides of the RUC are equal to the characteristic length of the finite element. These results are compared to simulations where the size of the RUC is fixed, independent of the element size. Simulations are carried out for a variety of mesh densities and element shapes, including square and triangular. Results indicate that a consistent size and shape must be used to yield preserve energy dissipation across the scales.

  4. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  5. Flexural properties of polyethylene, glass and carbon fiber-reinforced resin composites for prosthetic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Irie, Masao; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Minagi, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    High flexural properties are needed for fixed partial denture or implant prosthesis to resist susceptibility to failures caused by occlusal overload. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the effects of four different kinds of fibers on the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites. Polyethylene fiber, glass fiber and two types of carbon fibers were used for reinforcement. Seven groups of specimens, 2 × 2 × 25 mm, were prepared (n = 10 per group). Four groups of resin composite specimens were reinforced with polyethylene, glass or one type of carbon fiber. The remaining three groups served as controls, with each group comprising one brand of resin composite without any fiber. After 24-h water storage in 37°C distilled water, the flexural properties of each specimen were examined with static three-point flexural test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Compared to the control without any fiber, glass and carbon fibers significantly increased the flexural strength (p glass fiber (p glass fibers (p > 0.05). Fibers could, therefore, improve the flexural properties of resin composite and carbon fibers in longitudinal form yielded the better effects for reinforcement.

  6. Manufacturing Energy Intensity and Opportunity Analysis for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites and Other Lightweight Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddell, Heather; Brueske, Sabine; Carpenter, Alberta; Cresko, Joseph

    2016-09-22

    With their high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are important materials for lightweighting in structural applications; however, manufacturing challenges such as low process throughput and poor quality control can lead to high costs and variable performance, limiting their use in commercial applications. One of the most significant challenges for advanced composite materials is their high manufacturing energy intensity. This study explored the energy intensities of two lightweight FRP composite materials (glass- and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers), with three lightweight metals (aluminum, magnesium, and titanium) and structural steel (as a reference material) included for comparison. Energy consumption for current typical and state-of-the-art manufacturing processes were estimated for each material, deconstructing manufacturing process energy use by sub-process and manufacturing pathway in order to better understand the most energy intensive steps. Energy saving opportunities were identified and quantified for each production step based on a review of applied R&D technologies currently under development in order to estimate the practical minimum energy intensity. Results demonstrate that while carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have the highest current manufacturing energy intensity of all materials considered, the large differences between current typical and state-of-the-art energy intensity levels (the 'current opportunity') and between state-of-the-art and practical minimum energy intensity levels (the 'R&D opportunity') suggest that large-scale energy savings are within reach.

  7. Effect of Home Bleaching on Microleakage of Fiber-reinforced and Particle-filled Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching may exert some negative effects on existing composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of home bleaching on microleakage of fiber-reinforced and particle-filled composite resins. Materials and methods. Ninety class V cavities (1.5×2×3 mm were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 90 bovine teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=15 and restored as follows: Groups 1 and 2 with Z100, groups 3 and 4 with Z250, and groups 5 and 6 with Nulite F composite resins. All the specimens were thermocycled. Groups 1, 3 and 5 were selected as control groups (without bleaching and the experimental groups 2, 4 and 6 were bleached with 22% carbamide peroxide gel. All the samples were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours and then sectioned longitudinally. Dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope (×25, at both the gingival and incisal margins. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05. Results. Statistical analyses revealed that bleaching gel increased microleakage only at gingival margins with Z250 (P=0.007. Moreover, the control groups showed a statistically significant difference in microleakage at their gingival margins. Nulite F had the maximum microleakage while Z250 showed the minimum (P=0.006. Conclusion. Microleakage of home-bleached restorations might be related to the type of composite resin used.

  8. Advancing Discontinuous Fiber-Reinforced Composites above Critical Length for Replacing Current Dental Composites and Amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2017-02-01

    Clinicians have been aware that posterior dental particulate-filled composites (PFCs) have many placement disadvantages and indeed fail clinically at an average rate faster than amalgam alloys. Secondary caries is most commonly identified as the chief failure mechanism for both dental PFCs and amalgam. In terms of a solution, fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) above critical length (L c ) can provide mechanical property safety factors with compound molding packing qualities to reduce many problems associated with dental PFCs. Discontinuous chopped fibers above the necessary L c have been incorporated into dental PFCs to make consolidated molding compounds that can be tested for comparisons with PFC controls on mechanical properties, wear resistance, void-defect occurrence and packing ability to reestablish the interproximal contact. Further, imaging characterizations can aid in providing comparisons for FRCs with other materials using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and photographs. Also, the amalgam filling material has finally been tested by appropriate ASTM flexural bending methods that eliminate shear failure associated with short span lengths in dental standards for comparison with dental PFCs to best explain increased longevity for the amalgam when compared to dental PFCs. Accurate mechanical tests also provide significant proof for superior advantages with FRCs. Mechanical properties tested included flexural strength, yield strength, modulus, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release and critical stress intensity factor. FRC molding compounds with fibers above L c extensively improve all mechanical properties over PFC dental paste and over the amalgam for all mechanical properties except modulus. The dental PFC also demonstrated superior mechanical properties over the amalgam except modulus to provide a better explanation for increased PFC failure due to secondary caries. With lower PFC modulus, increased adhesive

  9. Physical and Mechanical Characteristics of Kevlar Fiber-Reinforced PC/ABS Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljira Sujirote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the composites between polycarbonate (PC and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS alloy and Kevlar fiber were prepared. The flexural and tensile properties of PC/ABS alloy and its composites were determined using a universal testing machine. The synergistic behavior of flexural modulus was observed for all regions of PC contents, while the synergism of flexural strength and tensile strength were found in some PC contents. It was found that the optimum weight ratio of PC:ABS was 60:40. In the Kevlar Fiber-reinforced PC/ABS composite system at PC:ABS of 60:40, both flexural modulus and strength were increased with matrix contents. Additionally, the flexural strength drastically increased with the matrix content and then reached the maximum value of 167 MPa at the matrix content of 33.4 wt%. The results from peel test, water contact measurement, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM reveal that the interfacial adhesion between the Kevlar fiber and the polymer matrix could be improved by increasing the PC content in the matrix.

  10. Temperature changes caused by light curing of fiber-reinforced composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilday, Nurcan Ozakar; Sagsoz, Omer; Karatas, Ozcan; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Çelik, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to evaluate temperature change in fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) resin photopolymerized with a light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing unit (LCU). Materials and Methods: Forty dentine disks (1 mm thick and 8 mm diameter) were prepared from human molars. The FRC specimens (2 mm thickness and 8 mm diameter) consisted of polyethylene fiber (Construct (CT)) products or glass fiber (ever Stick (ES)) and one hybrid composite bonded to the dentin disks and polymerized with an LED LCU. Control groups were prepared using the hybrid composite. Temperature rise in dentine samples under the FRC bonded disks was measured using a K-type thermocouple, and data were recorded. Temperature change data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's test. Results: The results show that addition of fiber (one or two layers) did not change temperature rise values at any of the exposure times (P > 0.05). The CT fiber/two layer/40 s group exhibited the greatest temperature rise (5.49 ± 0.62) and the ES/one layer/10 s group the lowest rise (1.75 ± 0.32). A significant difference was observed in temperature rise measured during 10 and 20 s exposures (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Maximal temperature rise determined in all groups was not critical for pulpal health, although clinicians need to note temperature rises during polymerization. PMID:26069409

  11. Affordable Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites Win 1995 R and D 100 Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Affordable fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (AFReCC) with high strength and toughness, good thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, and oxidation resistance are needed for high-temperature structural applications. AFReCC materials will have various applications in advanced high-efficiency and high-performance engines: that is, the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), space propulsion components, and land-based systems. For example, silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites show promise for meeting the criteria of high strength, thermal conductivity, and toughness required for the HSCT combustor liner. AFReCC received R&D Magazine's prestigious R&D 100 Award in 1995. The fabrication process for these composites has three steps. In the first step, fiber preforms are made and chemical vapor infiltration is used to apply the desired interface coating on the fibers. This step also rigidizes the preform. The second step consists of resin infiltration, which after pyrolysis, yields an interconnected network of porous carbon as the matrix. In the final step of the process, the carbon-containing preform is infiltrated with molten silicon or silicon alloys in a furnace. This converts the carbon to silicon carbide leaving as little as 5 percent residual free silicon or refractory disilicide phase. This process is suitable for any type of small-diameter fiber (e.g., carbon, alumina, or silicon carbide) woven into a two- or three-dimensional architecture. This processing approach leads to dense composites where matrix microstructure and composition can be tailored for optimum properties. It has much lower processing cost (less than 50 percent) in comparison to other approaches to fabricating silicon-carbide-based composites. The photograph shows the various AFReCC components. Thermomechanical and thermochemical characterization of these composites under the hostile environments that will be encountered in engine applications is underway.

  12. Root canal filling: fracture strength of fiber-reinforced composite-restored roots and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, Marília Pivetta; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of root canal filling techniques on root fracture resistance and to analyze, by finite element analysis (FEA), the expansion of the endodontic sealer in two different root canal techniques. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with rotary files to a standardized working length of 14 mm. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin using plastic cylinders as molds, and allocated into 3 groups (n=10): G(lateral) - lateral condensation; G(single-cone) - single cone; G(tagger) - Tagger's hybrid technique. The root canals were prepared to a length of 11 mm with the #3 preparation bur of a tapered glass fiber-reinforced composite post system. All roots received glass fiber posts, which were adhesively cemented and a composite resin core was built. All groups were subjected to a fracture strength test (1 mm/min, 45°). Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. FEA was performed using two models: one simulated lateral condensation and Tagger's hybrid technique, and the other one simulated the single-cone technique. The second model was designed with an amount of gutta-percha two times smaller and a sealer layer two times thicker than the first model. The results were analyzed using von Mises stress criteria. One-way ANOVA indicated that the root canal filling technique affected the fracture strength (p=0.004). The G(lateral) and G(tagger) produced similar fracture strength values, while G(single-cone) showed the lowest values. The FEA showed that the single-cone model generated higher stress in the root canal walls. Sealer thickness seems to influence the fracture strength of restored endodontically treated teeth.

  13. Clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite crowns in pulp-treated primary molars: 12-month results

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadzadeh, Zahra; Parisay, Iman; Mehrabkhani, Maryam; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of tooth-colored fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) crowns in pulp-treated second primary mandibular teeth. Materials and Methods: This split-mouth randomized, clinical trial performed on 67 children between 3 and 6 years with two primary mandibular second molars requiring pulp treatment. After pulp therapy, the teeth were randomly assigned to stainless steel crown (SSC) or FRC crown groups. Modified United States Public ...

  14. The effect of box preparation on the strength of glass fiber-reinforced composite inlay-retained fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Breuklander, Marijn H; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2005-04-01

    Nonstandardized box dimensions for inlay-retained fixed partial dentures (FPDs) may result in uneven distribution of the forces on the connector region of such restorations. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of box dimensions on the initial and final failure strength of inlay-retained fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) FPDs. Twenty-one inlay-retained FPDs were prepared using FRC (everStick) frameworks with unidirectional fiber reinforcement between mandibular first premolars and first molars. Boxes were prepared using conventional inlay burs (Cerinlay), and small and large ultrasonic tips (SONICSYS approx). Box dimensions were measured after preparation with a digital micrometer. All restorations were subjected to thermal cycling (6000 cycles, 5 degrees C-55 degrees C). Fracture testing was performed in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Acoustic emission signals were monitored during loading of the specimens. Initial and final fracture strength values (2-way ANOVA, Bonferroni post hoc tests, alpha =.05) and failure types (Fisher exact test) were statistically compared for each group. Significant differences (P =.0146 and P =.0086) were observed between the groups in the dimensions of the boxes prepared using conventional burs buccolingually (2.8-3.0 mm in molars, 3.1-4.3 mm in premolars) and the small size (2.5-2.9, 2.9-3.8 mm) or large size (2.6-3.8, 3.2-4.9 mm) ultrasonic tips for the premolars and the molars, respectively. No significant differences were found at the initial and final failures between the conventionally prepared group (842 +/- 267 N, 1161 +/- 428 N) and those prepared with either small (1088 +/- 381 N, 1320 +/- 380 N) or large ultrasonic tips (1070 +/- 280 N, 1557 +/- 321 N), respectively. The failure analysis demonstrated no significant difference in failure types but predominant delamination of the veneering resin (85%) in all experimental groups. According to acoustic emission tests, a higher energy level was

  15. Toughening of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy polymer composites via copolymers and graphene nano-platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Markus A.

    Carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites currently play a significant role in many different industries. Due to their high cross-link density, aromatic epoxy polymers used as the matrix in composite materials are very strong and stiff however they lack toughness. This dissertation investigates three areas of the carbon fiber-reinforced composite, which have the potential to increase toughness: the carbon fiber surface; the fiber/matrix interphase; and the matrix material. Approaches to improving each area are presented which lead to enhancing the overall composite toughness without reducing other composite mechanical properties. The toughening of the base matrix material, DGEBA/mPDA, was accomplished by two methods: first, using low concentrations of aliphatic copolymers to enhance energy absorption and second by adding graphene nano-platelets (GnP) to act as crack deflection agents. 1wt% copolymer concentration was determined to substantially increase the notched Izod impact strength without reducing other static-mechanical properties. Toughening of DGEBA/mPDA using 3wt% GnP was found to be dependent on the aspect ratio of GnP and treatment of GnP with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). GnP C750 enhanced flexural properties but not fracture toughness because the small aspect ratio cannot effectively deflect cracks. TEPA-grafting enhanced GnP/matrix bonding. Larger aspect ratio GnP M5 and M25 showed significant increases in fracture toughness due to better crack deflection but also decreased flexural strength based on limited GnP/matrix bonding. TEPA-grafting mitigated some of the flexural strength reductions for GnP M5, due to enhanced GnP/matrix adhesion. In the high-fiber volume fraction composite, the fiber/matrix bonding was enhanced with UV-ozone surface treatment by reducing a weak fiber surface boundary layer and increasing the concentration of reactive oxygen groups on the fiber surface. Further increases in Mode I fracture toughness were seen with the

  16. Optimum design for glass fiber-reinforced composite clasps using nonlinear finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hiromi; Nishi, Yasuhiro; Tsuru, Kazunori; Nagaoka, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an optimum glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) clasp. Three-dimensional finite element models were constructed of FRC circumferential clasp arms and an abutment tooth. The basic clasp arm was half-oval, without a taper, 2.60 mm wide and 1.30 mm thick. Four modified clasp arms were prepared by changing the width or thickness of the basic clasp (width/thickness: 2.60 mm/0.65 mm, 2.60 mm/1.95 mm, 1.30 mm/1.30 mm, and 3.90 mm/1.30 mm). Forced displacements of 5 mm in the removal direction were applied to the nodes at the base of the clasp arm. The retentive forces and maximum tensile stresses of the five FRC clasp arms ranged from 1.00-16.30 N and from 58.9-151 MPa, respectively. Results showed that an optimum FRC clasp was a circumferential clasp with 2.60 mm width and 1.30 mm thickness, which had sufficient retentive force and low risk of tensile failure.

  17. Fiber-reinforced composite analysis using optical coherence tomography after mechanical and thermal cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyotoku, B. B. C.; Braz, A. K. S.; Braz, R.; Gomes, A. S. L.

    2007-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are new materials which have been used for a variety of dental applications, including tooth splinting, replacement of missing teeth, treatment of dental emergencies, reinforcement of resin provisional fixed prosthodontic restorations, orthodontic retention, and other clinical applications. Different fiber types are available, but little clinical information has been disseminated. The traditional microscopy investigation, most commonly used to study this material, is a destructive technique, which requires specimen sectioning and are essentially surface measurements. On the basis of these considerations, the aim of this research is to analyze the interior of a dental sample reinforced with fiber after a mechanical and thermal cycling to emulate oral conditions using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The device we are using is a home built Fourier domain OCT working at 800 nm with 6 μm resolution. The results are compared with microscopy images to validate OCT as a working method. In long term, fractures allow bacterial invasion provoking plaque and calculus formation that can cause caries and periodontal disease. Therefore, non invasive imaging of the bridge fiber enables the possibility of periodic clinical evaluation to ensure the patient health. Furthermore, OCT images can provide a powerful method for quantitative analysis of crack propagation, and can potentially be used for in vivo assessment.

  18. Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites for Earth-to-orbit rocket engine turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Jerry W.; Schnittgrund, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (FRCMC) are emerging materials systems that offer potential for use in liquid rocket engines. Advantages of these materials in rocket engine turbomachinery include performance gain due to higher turbine inlet temperature, reduced launch costs, reduced maintenance with associated cost benefits, and reduced weight. This program was initiated to assess the state of FRCMC development and to propose a plan for their implementation into liquid rocket engine turbomachinery. A complete range of FRCMC materials was investigated relative to their development status and feasibility for use in the hot gas path of earth-to-orbit rocket engine turbomachinery. Of the candidate systems, carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) offers the greatest near-term potential. Critical hot gas path components were identified, and the first stage inlet nozzle and turbine rotor of the fuel turbopump for the liquid oxygen/hydrogen Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) were selected for conceptual design and analysis. The critical issues associated with the use of FRCMC were identified. Turbine blades were designed, analyzed and fabricated. The Technology Development Plan, completed as Task 5 of this program, provides a course of action for resolution of these issues.

  19. In vitro evaluation of veneering composites and fibers on the color of fiber-reinforced composite restorations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Color match between fiber-reinforced composite (FRC restorations and teeth is an imperative factor in esthetic dentistry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of veneering composites and fibers on the color change of FRC restorations.Glass and polyethylene fibers were used to reinforce a direct microhybrid composite (Z250, 3M ESPE and a microfilled composite (Gradia Indirect, GC. There were eight experimental groups (n=5 disks per group. Four groups were used as the controls (non-FRC control and the others were used as experimental groups. CIELAB parameters (L*, a* and b* of specimens were evaluated against a white background using a spectrophotometer to assess the color change. The color difference (ΔE* and color coordinates were (L*, a* and b* analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test.Both types of composite and fiber influenced the color parameters (ΔL*, Δa*. The incorporation of fibers into the composite in the experimental groups made them darker than the control groups, except in the Gradia Indirect+ glass fibers group. Δb* is affected by types of fibers only in direct fiber reinforced composite. No statistically significant differences were recognized in ΔE* among the groups (p>0.05.The findings of the present study suggest that the tested FRC restorations exhibited no difference in color in comparison with non-FRC restoration. Hence, the types of veneering composites and fibers did not influence the color change (ΔE* of FRC restorations.

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Veneering Composites and Fibers on the Color of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Hasani, Zahra; Ahmadi, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Color match between fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) restorations and teeth is an imperative factor in esthetic dentistry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of veneering composites and fibers on the color change of FRC restorations. Materials and Methods: Glass and polyethylene fibers were used to reinforce a direct microhybrid composite (Z250, 3M ESPE) and a microfilled composite (Gradia Indirect, GC). There were eight experimental groups (n=5 disks per group). Four groups were used as the controls (non-FRC control) and the others were used as experimental groups. CIELAB parameters (L*, a* and b*) of specimens were evaluated against a white background using a spectrophotometer to assess the color change. The color difference (ΔE*) and color coordinates were (L*, a* and b*) analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Both types of composite and fiber influenced the color parameters (ΔL*, Δa*). The incorporation of fibers into the composite in the experimental groups made them darker than the control groups, except in the Gradia Indirect+ glass fibers group. Δb* is affected by types of fibers only in direct fiber reinforced composite. No statistically significant differences were recognized in ΔE* among the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that the tested FRC restorations exhibited no difference in color in comparison with non-FRC restoration. Hence, the types of veneering composites and fibers did not influence the color change (ΔE*) of FRC restorations. PMID:25584060

  1. Carbon fiber-reinforced cyanate ester/nano-ZrW2O8 composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Rogalski, Mark K; Kessler, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in the design and fabrication of a variety of high performance aerospace components. The mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between the high CTE polymer matrix and low CTE fiber reinforcements in such composite systems can lead to dimensional instability and deterioration of material lifetimes due to development of residual thermal stresses. The magnitude of thermally induced residual stresses in fiber-reinforced composite systems can be minimized by replacement of conventional polymer matrices with a low CTE, polymer nanocomposite matrix. Zirconium tungstate (ZrW(2)O(8)) is a unique ceramic material that exhibits isotropic negative thermal expansion and has excellent potential as a filler for development of low CTE polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, we report the fabrication and thermal characterization of novel, multiscale, macro-nano hybrid composite laminates comprising bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy)/ZrW(2)O(8) nanocomposite matrices reinforced with unidirectional carbon fibers. The results reveal that incorporation of nanoparticles facilitates a reduction in CTE of the composite systems, which in turn results in a reduction in panel warpage and curvature after the cure because of mitigation of thermally induced residual stresses.

  2. Influence of Different Techniques of Laboratory Construction on the Fracture Resistance of Fiber-Reinforced Composite (FRC) Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellakwa, Ayman E; Shortall, Adrian C; Marquis, Peter M

    2004-11-15

    The aim of the current investigation is to evaluate optimal pontic and retainer fiber positions for Polyethylene fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) restorations. In series I notch disc specimens were used to mimic loading cuspal regions of pontics. Four groups (n=15/group; codes A to D) were prepared from Artglass composite. Groups A to C were reinforced with polyethylene fibers, and group D was an unreinforced control. Fibers were positioned either around (A), beneath the notch (B), or at the disc base (C). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h before testing to failure (CHS=1mm/min) in a universal testing machine. Mean torque to failure values ranked [P C = D. In series II five groups of three unit bridges (n =5/group; codes A to E) were prepared from Artglass dental composite without (group A) or with (groups B to E) different Connect fiber reinforcement locations/techniques. Bridges were cemented using 2 bond resin cement to a standardized substructure. After storage, as per series I, bridges were loaded mid-pontic region to failure. One-way ANOVA showed no significant (P=0.08) difference between test groups. The research hypothesis was that notched disc and 3 unit bridge test techniques would discriminate equally between fiber-reinforced specimens and an unreinforced composite control was rejected.

  3. Shear Performance of Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites Beam-Column Joint Using Various Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizal Hanif

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands of reinforcement in the joint panel are now requiring more effective system to reduce the complicated fabrication by widely used precast system. The joint panel is responsible to keep the load transfer through beam and column as a crucial part in a structural frame that ensures the main feature of the whole structure during earthquake. Since precast system might reduce the joint panel monolithic integrity and stiffness, an innovation by adding fiber into the grouting system will give a breakthrough. The loading test of precast concrete beam-column joints using FRCC (Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites in joint panel was conducted to evaluate the influences of fiber towards shear performance. The experimental factor is fiber types with same volume fraction in mortar matrix of joint panel. Two specimens with Aramid-fiber and PP-fiber by two percent of volume fraction are designed to fail by shear failure in joint panel by reversed cyclic testing method. The comparison amongst those experiment results by various parameters for the shear performance of FRCC beam-column joints using various fibers are discussed. Preceding specimens was using no fiber, PVA fiber, and steel fiber has been carried out. Through the current experimental results and the comparison with previous experiment results, it can be recognized that by using fibers in joint panel was observed qualitatively could prevent crack widening with equitable and smaller crack width, improved the shear capacity by widening the hysteretic area, increased maximum load in positive loading and negative loading, and decreased the deformation rate. Elastic modulus properties of fiber are observed to give the most impact towards shear performance.

  4. Fracture behavior of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kohji; Garoushi, Sufyan K; Vallittu, Pekka K; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2016-12-01

    Objective: The applications of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) in restorative dentistry have not been well reported. This study aimed to clarify the static mechanical properties of anterior crown restorations prepared using two types of single-structure FRC. Materials and methods : An experimental crown restoration was designed for an upper anterior incisor. The restorations were made from IPS Empress CAD for CEREC (Emp), IPS e.max ® CAD (eMx), experimental single-structure all-FRC (a-FRC), Filtek™ Supreme XTE (XTE), and commercially available single-structure short-FRC (everX Posterior™) ( n = 8 for each material) (s-FRC). The a-FRC restorations were prepared from an experimental FRC blank using a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. A fracture test was performed to assess the fracture load, toughness, and failure mode. The fracture loads were vertically applied on the restorations. The surface micromorphology of the FRC restorations was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The data were analyzed by analysis of variance ( p = .05) followed by Tukey's test. Results : s-FRC showed the highest mean fracture load (1145.0 ± 89.6 N) and toughness (26.2 ± 5.8 Ncm) among all the groups tested. With regard to the micromorphology of the prosthetic surface, local crushing of the fiberglass was observed in s-FRC, whereas chopped fiberglass was observed in a-FRC. Conclusions : The restorations made of short-FRC showed a higher load-bearing capacity than those made of the experimental all-FRC blanks for CAD/CAM. The brittle-like fractures were exhibited in the recent dental esthetic materials, while local crushing fractures were shown for single-structure FRC restorations.

  5. Probability of failure of veneered glass fiber-reinforced composites and glass-infiltrated alumina with or without zirconia reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kok-Heng; Chai, John

    2003-01-01

    The probability of failure under flexural load of veneered specimens of a unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite (FibreKor/Sculpture), a bidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite (Vectris/Targis), a glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina/Vita alpha), and a zirconia-reinforced glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Zirconia/Vita alpha) was investigated; a metal-ceramic (PG200/Vita omega) system served as a control. Ten uniform beams of the veneered core materials were fabricated for each system and subjected to a three-point bending test. The data were analyzed using the Weibull method. The failure load of specimens at a 10% probability of failure (B10 load) was compared. The mode of failure was analyzed. The B10 load of the systems investigated was not significantly different from that of the metal-ceramic system. FibreKor possessed significantly higher B10 load than Vectris, In-Ceram Alumina, and In-Ceram Zirconia. The B10 strength loads of Vectris, In-Ceram Alumina, and In-Ceram Zirconia were not significantly different from one another. The probability of FibreKor to fracture under a flexural load was significantly lower than that of Vectris, In-Ceram Alumina, or In-Ceram Zirconia.

  6. Effects of Fiber Coating Composition on Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Elderidge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Celsian matrix composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers, precoated with a dual layer of BN/SiC by chemical vapor deposition in two separate batches, were fabricated. Mechanical properties of the composites were measured in three-point flexure. Despite supposedly identical processing, the composite panels fabricated with fibers coated in two batches exhibited substantially different mechanical behavior. The first matrix cracking stresses (sigma(sub mc)) of the composites reinforced with fibers coated in batch 1 and batch 2 were 436 and 122 MPa, respectively. This large difference in sigma(sub mc) was attributed to differences in fiber sliding stresses(tau(sub friction)), 121.2+/-48.7 and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively, for the two composites as determined by the fiber push-in method. Such a large difference in values of tau(sub friction) for the two composites was found to be due to the difference in the compositions of the interface coatings. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis revealed the presence of carbon layers between the fiber and BN, and also between the BN and SiC coatings in the composite showing lower tau(sub friction). This resulted in lower sigma(sub mc) in agreement with the ACK theory. The ultimate strengths of the two composites, 904 and 759 MPa, depended mainly on the fiber volume fraction and were not significantly effected by tau(sub friction) values, as expected. The poor reproducibility of the fiber coating composition between the two batches was judged to be the primary source of the large differences in performance of the two composites.

  7. Fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Yetkiner, Enver; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Objective: To analyze the fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro. Methods: Roots of human mandibular central incisors were covered with silicone, mimicking the

  8. Effect of Different Liners on Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored with Conventional and Short Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Doozandeh, Maryam; Ghaffaripour, Dordaneh

    2018-01-11

    To see whether applying four different liners under short fiber-reinforced composite (SFRC), everX Posterior, compared to conventional composite resin, Z250, affected their strengthening property in premolar MOD cavities. Mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared in 120 sound maxillary premolars divided into 10 groups (n = 12) in terms of two composite resin types and 4 liners or no liner. For each composite resin, in 5 groups no liner, resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), conventional flowable composite (COFL), self-adhesive flowable composite resin (SAFL), and self-adhesive resin cement (SARC) were applied prior to restoring incrementally. After water storage and thermocycling, static fracture resistance was tested. Data (in Newtons) were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Fracture resistance was significantly affected by composite resin type (p = 0.02), but not by the liner (p > 0.05). The interaction of the two factors was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). SFRC exhibited higher fracture strength (1470 ± 200 N) compared to conventional composite resin (1350 ± 290), irrespective of the application of liners. Application of SARC and SAFL liners led to a higher number of restorable fractures for both composite resins. The four liners can be used without interfering with the higher efficacy of SFRC, compared to conventional composite resins, to improve the fracture strength of premolar MOD cavities. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  10. Effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy composites and the neat resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Funk, Joan G.; Collins, William D.; Gray, Stephanie L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy-resin composites have been investigated. Composites with carbon, glass, and aramid reinforcement fibers were individually studied. The epoxy was a commercially-available resin that was especially developed for pultrusion fabrication. The pultrusions were conducted at 400 F with postcures at 400, 450, 500, and 550 F. Measurements of the flexural, shear, and interlaminar fracture-toughness properties showed that significant postcuring can occur during the pultrusion process. All three mechanical properties were degraded by the higher (500 and 550 F) temperatures; photomicrographs suggest that the degradation was caused at the fiber-resin interface for all three fiber types.

  11. A refined finite element method for bending analysis of laminated plates integrated with piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzegar, J.; Abbasi, A.

    2018-03-01

    This research presents a finite element formulation based on four-variable refined plate theory for bending analysis of cross-ply and angle-ply laminated composite plates integrated with a piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite actuator under electromechanical loading. The four-variable refined plate theory is a simple and efficient higher-order shear deformation theory, which predicts parabolic variation of transverse shear stresses across the plate thickness and satisfies zero traction conditions on the plate free surfaces. The weak form of governing equations is derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and a 4-node non-conforming rectangular plate element with 8 degrees of freedom per node is introduced for discretizing the domain. Several benchmark problems are solved by the developed MATLAB code and the obtained results are compared with those from exact and other numerical solutions, showing good agreement.

  12. Designing the fiber volume ratio in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic composites under Hertzian stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kee Sung; Jang, Kyung Soon; Park, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae Woo; Han, In Sub; Woo, Sang Kuk

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Optimum fiber volume ratios in the SiC/SiC composite layers were designed under Hertzian stress. → FEM analysis and spherical indentation experiments were undertaken. → Boron nitride-pyrocarbon double coatings on the SiC fiber were effective. → Fiber volume ratio should be designed against flexural stress. -- Abstract: Finite element method (FEM) analysis and experimental studies are undertaken on the design of the fiber volume ratio in silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC composites under indentation contact stresses. Boron nitride (BN)/Pyrocarbon (PyC) are selected as the coating materials for the SiC fiber. Various SiC matrix/coating/fiber/coating/matrix structures are modeled by introducing a woven fiber layer in the SiC matrix. Especially, this study attempts to find the optimum fiber volume ratio in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramics under Hertzian stress. The analysis is performed by changing the fiber type, fiber volume ratio, coating material, number of coating layers, and stacking sequence of the coating layers. The variation in the stress for composites in relation to the fiber volume ratio in the contact axial or radial direction is also analyzed. The same structures are fabricated experimentally by a hot process, and the mechanical behaviors regarding the load-displacement are evaluated using the Hertzian indentation method. Various SiC matrix/coating/fiber/coating/matrix structures are fabricated, and mechanical characterization is performed by changing the coating layer, according to the introduction (or omission) of the coating layer, and the number of woven fiber mats. The results show that the damage mode changes from Hertzian stress to flexural stress as the fiber volume ratio increases in composites because of the decreased matrix volume fraction, which intensifies the radial crack damage. The result significantly indicates that the optimum fiber volume ratio in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramics should be designed for

  13. Mechanical properties of banana/kenaf fiber-reinforced hybrid polyester composites: Effect of woven fabric and random orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavudeen, A.; Rajini, N.; Karthikeyan, S.; Thiruchitrambalam, M.; Venkateshwaren, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper is presents the fabrications of kenaf/banana fiber hybrid composites. • Effect of weaving pattern and random orientation on mechanical properties was studied. • Role of interfacial adhesion due to chemical modifications were analyzed with the aid of SEM. • Hybridization of kenaf and banana fibers in plain woven composites exhibits maximum mechanical strength. - Abstract: The present work deals with the effect of weaving patterns and random orientatation on the mechanical properties of banana, kenaf and banana/kenaf fiber-reinforced hybrid polyester composites. Composites were prepared using the hand lay-up method with two different weaving patterns, namely, plain and twill type. Of the two weaving patterns, the plain type showed improved tensile properties compared to the twill type in all the fabricated composites. Furthermore, the maximum increase in mechanical strength was observed in the plain woven hybrid composites rather than in randomly oriented composites. This indicates minimum stress development at the interface of composites due to the distribution of load transfer along the fiber direction. Moreover, alkali (NaOH) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) treatments appear to provide an additional improvement in mechanical strength through enhanced interfacial bonding. Morphological studies of fractured mechanical testing samples were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand the de-bonding of fiber/matrix adhesion

  14. Three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liping; Lu, Gang; Chen, Dachuan; Li, Wenjun; Lu, Chunsheng

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates the three-dimensional (3D) injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method. The polymer melt was modeled as a power law fluid and the fibers were considered as rigid cylindrical bodies. The filling details and fiber orientation in the injection-molding process were studied. The results indicated that the SPH method could effectively predict the order of filling, fiber accumulation, and heterogeneous distribution of fibers. The SPH simulation also showed that fibers were mainly aligned to the flow direction in the skin layer and inclined to the flow direction in the core layer. Additionally, the fiber-orientation state in the simulation was quantitatively analyzed and found to be consistent with the results calculated by conventional tensor methods.

  15. A new system for posterior restorations: a combination of ceramic optimized polymer and fiber-reinforced composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, L; Trinkner, T; Pescatore, C

    1997-01-01

    Due to the need for increased strength characteristics and enhanced aesthetic expectations of the patients, metal-free, aesthetic restorative systems for the anterior and posterior dentition are currently available. A new "space-age" restorative material has been developed that is a combination of a ceramic optimized polymer (Ceromer) (Targis/Vectris, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) and a fiber-reinforced composite framework material. The purpose of this article is to discuss the qualities that render this material particularly suitable for a variety of indications, including laboratory-fabricated restorations for the stress-bearing posterior regions. The material lends itself to diversification. Its indication for inlays, onlays, full-coverage crown restorations, and conservative single pontic inlay bridges is presented.

  16. On the Theory and Numerical Simulation of Cohesive Crack Propagation with Application to Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraraju, Siva Shankar; Garikipati, Krishna; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of crack propagation is among the predominant modes of failure in many natural and engineering structures, often leading to severe loss of structural integrity and catastrophic failure. Thus, the ability to understand and a priori simulate the evolution of this failure mode has been one of the cornerstones of applied mechanics and structural engineering and is broadly referred to as "fracture mechanics." The work reported herein focuses on extending this understanding, in the context of through-thickness crack propagation in cohesive materials, through the development of a continuum-level multiscale numerical framework, which represents cracks as displacement discontinuities across a surface of zero measure. This report presents the relevant theory, mathematical framework, numerical modeling, and experimental investigations of through-thickness crack propagation in fiber-reinforced composites using the Variational Multiscale Cohesive Method (VMCM) developed by the authors.

  17. Thermographic Non-Destructive Evaluation for Natural Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers, including mineral and plant fibers, are increasingly used for polymer composite materials due to their low environmental impact. In this paper, thermographic non-destructive inspection techniques were used to evaluate and characterize basalt, jute/hemp and bagasse fibers composite panels. Different defects were analyzed in terms of impact damage, delaminations and resin abnormalities. Of particular interest, homogeneous particleboards of sugarcane bagasse, a new plant fiber material, were studied. Pulsed phase thermography and principal component thermography were used as the post-processing methods. In addition, ultrasonic C-scan and continuous wave terahertz imaging were also carried out on the mineral fiber laminates for comparative purposes. Finally, an analytical comparison of different methods was given.

  18. Geometrical Effect on Thermal Conductivity of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite along Different In-plane Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zenong; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Li, Yanxia; Wang, Xiaolei; Gu, Yizhuo; Liu, Qianli; Tian, Jie; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-11-01

    This paper focuses on the anisotropic characteristics of the in-plane thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced polymer composite based on experiment and simulation. Thermal conductivity along different in-plane orientations was measured by laser flash analysis (LFA) and steady-state heat flow method. Their heat transfer processes were simulated to reveal the geometrical effect on thermal conduction. The results show that the in-plane thermal conduction of unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite is greatly influenced by the sample geometry at an in-plane orientation angle between 0° to 90°. By defining radius-to-thickness as a dimensionless shape factor for the LFA sample, the apparent thermal conductivity shows a dramatic change when the shape factor is close to the tangent of the orientation angle (tanθ). Based on finite element analysis, this phenomenon was revealed to correlate with the change of the heat transfer process. When the shape factor is larger than tanθ, the apparent thermal conductivity is consistent with the estimated value according to the theoretical model. For a sample with a shape factor smaller than tanθ, the apparent thermal conductivity shows a slow growth around a low value, which seriously deviates from the theory estimation. This phenomenon was revealed to correlate with the change of the heat transfer process from a continuous path to a zigzag path. These results will be helpful in optimizing the ply scheme of composite laminates for thermal management applications.

  19. Fiber-reinforced composite inlay fixed partial dentures: the influence of restorative materials and abutment design on stress distribution investigated by finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappelli, G; Scalise, L; Coccia, E; Procaccini, M

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite may be successful used to fabricate inlay fixed partial dentures. This study used a finite element model to investigate three-dimensional stress distribution in a 3-unit fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture, and compared three types of fiber and three abutment configurations. A finite element model of a 3-unit fixed partial denture was used to investigate stress distribution in three different fiber-reinforced composite systems (1) Ribbond Triaxial plus Sinfony; 2) EverStick plus Sinfony; 3) Vectris Pontic/Frame plus Sinfony) and in three different abutment configurations (minimal distal-occlusal and mesial-occlusal preparation; extensive distal-occlusal and mesial-occlusal preparation; mesial-occlusal-distal preparation of both abutment teeth). Maximum load of 196 N was applied at the center of the occlusal and buccal surfaces of the pontic. Stress distribution was calculated in the tooth/restoration complex and in the abutment preparation. When a vertical load was applied, no substantial differences between stress amount in the molar and in the premolar connectors was found. When a lateral load was applied, the stress was greater in the premolar connector than in the molar connector. In all designs investigated, stress was concentrated at the cervical margins of the proximal boxes adjacent to the pontic; no stress concentrated at the occlusal box preparation surface. Within the limitations of this study, the results suggest that different fiber-reinforced composite systems show similar pattern of stress distribution. Stress concentrates at the connector areas and in the prepared teeth. Peak stress is at the cervical margin of the boxes adjacent to the pontic.

  20. A comprehensive study of woven carbon fiber-reinforced nylon 6 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Selvum

    Liquid molding of thermoset composites has become very popular in all industry sectors, including aerospace, automotive, mass transit, and sporting goods, but the cost of materials and processing has limited the use to high-end applications. Thermoplastic composites are relatively cheap; however, the use has been limited to components with short fiber reinforcing. The high melt viscosity and short processing window precludes their use in the liquid molding of large structures and applications with continuous fiber reinforcement. The current research addresses the processing parameters, methodology, and limitations of vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) of carbon fabric-reinforced, thermoplastic polyamide 6 (PA6). The material used is casting grade PA6. The process developed for using VARTM to produce carbon fabric-reinforced PA6 composites is explained in detail. The effects of infusion temperature and flow distance on the fiber weight fraction and crystallinity of the PA6 resin are presented. The degree of conversion from monomer to polymer was determined. Microscopic studies to show the wet-out of the fibers at the filament level are also presented. Tensile, flexural, short beam shear strength (SBSS), and low-velocity impact test results are presented and compared to a equivalent thermoset matrix composite. The rubber toughened epoxy system (SC-15) was chosen for the comparative study because the system has been especially developed to overcome the brittle nature of epoxy composites. The environmental effects of moisture and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the carbon/nylon 6 composite were investigated. The samples were immersed in boiling water for 100 hr, and mechanical tests were conducted. Results showed that moisture causes plasticization of the matrix and attacks the fiber matrix interface. This leads to deterioration of the mechanical properties. The samples were also exposed to UV for up to 600 hr, and post exposure tests were conducted. The

  1. Effect of expansive admixtures on the shrinkage and mechanical properties of high-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Chang; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2013-01-01

    High-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites (HPFRCCs) are characterized by strain-hardening and multiple cracking during the inelastic deformation process, but they also develop high shrinkage strain. This study investigates the effects of replacing Portland cement with calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive admixtures (CSA EXAs) to compensate for the shrinkage and associated mechanical behavior of HPFRCCs. Two types of CSA EXA (CSA-K and CSA-J), each with a different chemical composition, are used in this study. Various replacement ratios (0%, 8%, 10%, 12%, and 14% by weight of cement) of CSA EXA are considered for the design of HPFRCC mixtures reinforced with 1.5% polyethylene (PE) fibers by volume. Mechanical properties, such as shrinkage compensation, compressive strength, flexural strength, and direct tensile strength, of the HPFRCC mixtures are examined. Also, crack width and development are investigated to determine the effects of the EXAs on the performance of the HPFRCC mixtures, and a performance index is used to quantify the performance of mixture. The results indicate that replacements of 10% CSA-K (Type 1) and 8% CSA-J (Type 2) considerably enhance the mechanical properties and reduce shrinkage of HPFRCCs.

  2. Effect of Expansive Admixtures on the Shrinkage and Mechanical Properties of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites (HPFRCCs are characterized by strain-hardening and multiple cracking during the inelastic deformation process, but they also develop high shrinkage strain. This study investigates the effects of replacing Portland cement with calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive admixtures (CSA EXAs to compensate for the shrinkage and associated mechanical behavior of HPFRCCs. Two types of CSA EXA (CSA-K and CSA-J, each with a different chemical composition, are used in this study. Various replacement ratios (0%, 8%, 10%, 12%, and 14% by weight of cement of CSA EXA are considered for the design of HPFRCC mixtures reinforced with 1.5% polyethylene (PE fibers by volume. Mechanical properties, such as shrinkage compensation, compressive strength, flexural strength, and direct tensile strength, of the HPFRCC mixtures are examined. Also, crack width and development are investigated to determine the effects of the EXAs on the performance of the HPFRCC mixtures, and a performance index is used to quantify the performance of mixture. The results indicate that replacements of 10% CSA-K (Type 1 and 8% CSA-J (Type 2 considerably enhance the mechanical properties and reduce shrinkage of HPFRCCs.

  3. Framework design of an anterior fiber-reinforced hybrid composite fixed partial denture: a 3D finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Gomi, Harunori; Nakasone, Yuji; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal design of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) framework to obtain the maximum reinforcement for fixed partial dentures (FPDs) under three different loading conditions using three-dimensional finite element (FE) analysis. materials and methods: A three-unit FPD replacing the maxillary right lateral incisor was constructed using FE analysis software (ANSYS 10.0, ANSYS). A fiber framework of the pontic was designed with three variations: with the main framework curved labially (FRC1), located in the center (FRC2), or curved lingually (FRC3). Each framework was compared with a hybrid composite FPD without any fiber reinforcement (C-FPD). A lateral load was applied to the three different loading points of the pontic 0 mm, 3 mm, and 6 mm from the incisal edge, each representing loading conditions 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Localized high stress concentration was observed around the connectors under all loading conditions. In all FRC-FPD models, the FRC framework showed stress-bearing capacity for the FPD. The highest stress reduction ratio under all loading conditions was obtained using the FRC1 model. The FRC1 framework also best reduced displacement of the framework. This study suggests that the optimum design of an FRC framework is to labially curve the FRC of the main framework at the region of the pontic.

  4. Shear modulus of 5 flowable composites to the EverStick Ortho fiber-reinforced composite retainer: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchli, Lorenz; Pintus, Stefano; Steineck, Markus; Lüthy, Heinz; Wichelhaus, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Although fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) are now available for use as orthodontic retainers, little is known about their bonding properties. Our aim in this study was to investigate the adhesive properties of various composites to a commercially available FRC retainer. Five flowable composites (Grandio Flow [Voco GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany], Synergy Flow [Coltène/Whaledent AG, Genf, Switzerland], Tetric Flow [Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan Fürstentum, Liechtenstein], Tetric Flow Chroma [Ivoclar Vivadent AG], and Transbond LR [3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) were tested for their shear bond strengths to the EverStick Ortho (Stick Tech Ltd Oy, Turku, Finland) FRC retainer stick. Each group contained 15 samples and underwent 1000 aging cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. A testing machine was used to measure the shear bond strengths at the composite-FRC interface. All specimens were visually controlled for the location of the fracture line. Typical shear bond strengths were measured at 40 N or 8 MPa. No significant difference was found between the 5 composites (ANOVA, P < or = 0.05). The fracture line was consistently in the FRC retainer. All composites had similar bonding characteristics, and visual inspection consistently showed fractures in the FRC retainer. Because the point of least resistance was in the retainer, we concluded that all tested composites were equally effective.

  5. Clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite crowns in pulp-treated primary molars: 12-month results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Zahra; Parisay, Iman; Mehrabkhani, Maryam; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of tooth-colored fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) crowns in pulp-treated second primary mandibular teeth. This split-mouth randomized, clinical trial performed on 67 children between 3 and 6 years with two primary mandibular second molars requiring pulp treatment. After pulp therapy, the teeth were randomly assigned to stainless steel crown (SSC) or FRC crown groups. Modified United States Public Health Service criteria were used to evaluate marginal integrity, marginal discoloration, and secondary caries in FRC crowns at intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months. Retention rate and gingival health were also compared between the two groups. The data were analyzed using Friedman, Cochran, and McNemar's tests at a significance level of 0.05. Intact marginal integrity in FRC crowns at 3, 6, and 12 months were 93.2%, 94.8%, and 94.2%, respectively. Marginal discoloration and secondary caries were not found at any of the FRC crowns. The retention rates of the FRC crowns were 100%, 98.3%, and 89.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively, whereas all the SSCs were found to be present and intact after 12 months ( P = 0.016). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in gingival health. According to the results of this study, it seems that when esthetics is a concern, in cooperative patients with good oral hygiene, FRC crowns can be considered as a valuable procedure.

  6. Monotonic and cyclic responses of impact polypropylene and continuous glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene composites at different strain rates

    KAUST Repository

    Yudhanto, Arief

    2016-03-08

    Impact copolymer polypropylene (IPP), a blend of isotactic polypropylene and ethylene-propylene rubber, and its continuous glass fiber composite form (glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene, GFIPP) are promising materials for impact-prone automotive structures. However, basic mechanical properties and corresponding damage of IPP and GFIPP at different rates, which are of keen interest in the material development stage and numerical tool validation, have not been reported. Here, we applied monotonic and cyclic tensile loads to IPP and GFIPP at different strain rates (0.001/s, 0.01/s and 0.1/s) to study the mechanical properties, failure modes and the damage parameters. We used monotonic and cyclic tests to obtain mechanical properties and define damage parameters, respectively. We also used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images to visualize the failure mode. We found that IPP generally exhibits brittle fracture (with relatively low failure strain of 2.69-3.74%) and viscoelastic-viscoplastic behavior. GFIPP [90]8 is generally insensitive to strain rate due to localized damage initiation mostly in the matrix phase leading to catastrophic transverse failure. In contrast, GFIPP [±45]s is sensitive to the strain rate as indicated by the change in shear modulus, shear strength and failure mode.

  7. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Marta; Natale, Gabriele; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Griffini, Gianmarco

    2016-07-16

    Glass (GFR) and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D) printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C) thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol) as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  8. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Invernizzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Glass (GFR and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethylphenol as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  9. A testing platform for durability studies of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under concurrent hygrothermo-mechanical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-12-11

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus.

  10. In vitro evaluation of fracture resistance of Fiber-Reinforced Composite inlay bridges in upper anterior and lower posterior teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalalian E.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Considering flexural strength of fiber-reinforced composites (FRC and also the role of conservative cavities in protecting sound tissue of abutments, the aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of these bridges by handmade samples in vitro.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 44 sound newly extracted teeth were used to make 22 fixed inlay bridges including 11 three unit anterior upper inlay bridges substituting clinical model of upper central and 11 three unit posterior lower inlay bridges substituting clinical model of lower first molar. Specimens were prepared with FRC and mounted with artificial PDL in acryl. Cases were exposed to final load by using Universal Testing Machine (Instron 1195 with the speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed by Kolmogorov- Smirnov, independent sample T and Kaplan-Meier tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: Based on the statistical tests, the 95% confidence interval of mean was 450-562 N in anterior and  1473- 1761 N in posterior area. Fracture strength was high in the studied groups. Fractures in both groups occurred on composite facing, and the framework remained intact. The highest percentage of fracture in posterior teeth was in the middle of pontic towards the distal connector and in the anterior teeth in the lateral connector, between central pontic and lateral abutment. Using the independent sample T  test a significant statistical difference was observed between two groups (P<0.001. The fracture resistance of anterior samples was lower than the posterior ones.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study regarding the high fracture resistance in both areas FRC inlay bridges could be recommended for upper anterior and lower posterior teeth in clinical dentistry certainly more studies are needed to ascertain this treatment option.

  11. Effect of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polyamide-6/Polypropylene Composites for Lightweight Automotive Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huu-Duc Nguyen-Tran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of lightweight automotive parts is an important issue for improving the efficiency of vehicles. Polymer composites have been widely applied to reduce weight and improve mechanical properties by mixing polymers with carbon fibers, glass fibers, and carbon nanotubes. Polypropylene (PP has been added to carbon fiber-reinforced nylon-6 (CF/PA6 composite to achieve further weight reduction and water resistance. However, the mechanical properties were reduced by the addition of PP. In this research, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs were added to compensate for the reduced mechanical properties experienced when adding PP. Tensile testing and bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. A small amount of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PA6/PP composites. For example, the density of CF/PA6 was reduced from 1.214 to 1.131 g/cm3 (6.8% by adding 30 wt % PP, and the tensile strength of 30 wt % PP composite was improved from 168 to 173 MPa (3.0% by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs with small increase of density (1.135 g/cm3. The developed composite will be widely used for lightweight automotive parts with improved mechanical properties.

  12. Effect of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polyamide-6/Polypropylene Composites for Lightweight Automotive Parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Tran, Huu-Duc; Hoang, Van-Tho; Do, Van-Ta; Chun, Doo-Man; Yum, Young-Jin

    2018-03-15

    The development of lightweight automotive parts is an important issue for improving the efficiency of vehicles. Polymer composites have been widely applied to reduce weight and improve mechanical properties by mixing polymers with carbon fibers, glass fibers, and carbon nanotubes. Polypropylene (PP) has been added to carbon fiber-reinforced nylon-6 (CF/PA6) composite to achieve further weight reduction and water resistance. However, the mechanical properties were reduced by the addition of PP. In this research, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to compensate for the reduced mechanical properties experienced when adding PP. Tensile testing and bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. A small amount of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PA6/PP composites. For example, the density of CF/PA6 was reduced from 1.214 to 1.131 g/cm³ (6.8%) by adding 30 wt % PP, and the tensile strength of 30 wt % PP composite was improved from 168 to 173 MPa (3.0%) by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs with small increase of density (1.135 g/cm³). The developed composite will be widely used for lightweight automotive parts with improved mechanical properties.

  13. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials Systems to Enhance Reinforced Concrete Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marshall, Orange

    1998-01-01

    .... Investigations included shear rehabilitation techniques for concrete beams, in field test methods to determine the bond strength of FRP composites, and low temperature evaluation of FRP performance...

  14. Effect of short glass fiber/filler particle proportion on flexural and diametral tensile strength of a novel fiber-reinforced composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; de Almeida, Letícia Nunes; Mendes, Gustavo Adolfo Martins; Kasuya, Amanda Vessoni Barbosa; Favarão, Isabella Negro; de Paula, Marcella Silva

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of glass fiber/filler particles proportion on flexural strength and diametral tensile strength of an experimental fiber-reinforced composite. Four experimental groups (N=10) were created using an experimental short fiber-reinforced composite, having as a factor under study the glass fiber (F) and filler particle (P) proportion: F22.5/P55 with 22.5 wt% of fiber and 55 wt% of filler particles; F25/P52.5 with 25 wt% of fiber and 52.5 wt% of filler particles; F27.5/P50 with 27.5 wt% of fiber and 50 wt% of filler particles; F30/P47.5 with 30 wt% of fiber and 47.5 wt% of filler particles. The experimental composite was made up by a methacrylate-based resin (50% Bis-GMA and 50% TEGDMA). Specimens were prepared for Flexural Strength (FS) (25 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm) and for Diametral Tensile Strength (DTS) (3×6 Ø mm) and tested at 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. The results (in MPa) showed significance (different superscript letters mean statistical significant difference) for FS (ptensile strength of an experimental composite reinforced with glass fibers. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of implant design and bioactive glass coating on biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballo, Ahmed M; Akca, Eralp; Ozen, Tuncer; Moritz, Niko; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka; Närhi, Timo

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of implant design and bioactive glass (BAG) coating on the response of bone to fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implants. Three different FRC implant types were manufactured for the study: non-threaded implants with a BAG coating; threaded implants with a BAG coating; and threaded implants with a grit-blasted surface. Thirty-six implants (six implants for each group per time point) were installed in the tibiae of six pigs. After an implantation period of 4 and 12 wk, the implants were retrieved and prepared for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), push-out testing, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Micro-CT demonstrated that the screw-threads and implant structure remained undamaged during the installation. The threaded FRC/BAG implants had the highest bone volume after 12 wk of implantation. The push-out strengths of the threaded FRC/BAG implants after 4 and 12 wk (463°N and 676°N, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the threaded FRC implants (416°N and 549°N, respectively) and the nonthreaded FRC/BAG implants (219°N and 430°N, respectively). Statistically significant correlation was found between bone volume and push-out strength values. This study showed that osseointegrated FRC implants can withstand the static loading up to failure without fracture, and that the addition of BAG significantly improves the push-out strength of FRC implants. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  16. Modeling Strength Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites Subjected to Cyclic Loading at Elevated Temperatures in Oxidative Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the strength degradation of non-oxide and oxide/oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) subjected to cyclic loading at elevated temperatures in oxidative environments has been investigated. Considering damage mechanisms of matrix cracking, interface debonding, interface wear, interface oxidation and fibers fracture, the composite residual strength model has been established by combining the micro stress field of the damaged composites, the damage models, and the fracture criterion. The relationships between the composite residual strength, fatigue peak stress, interface debonding, fibers failure and cycle number have been established. The effects of peak stress level, initial and steady-state interface shear stress, fiber Weibull modulus and fiber strength, and testing temperature on the degradation of composite strength and fibers failure have been investigated. The evolution of residual strength versus cycle number curves of non-oxide and oxide/oxide CMCs under cyclic loading at elevated temperatures in oxidative environments have been predicted.

  17. Water absorption and tensile strength degradation of Petung bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper) fiber-reinforced polymeric composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judawisastra, H.; Sitohang, Ramona; Rosadi, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Bamboo fibers have attracted great interest and are believed to have the potential as natural fiber for reinforcing polymer composites. This research aims to study water absorption behavior and its effect to tensile strength of the composites made from petung bamboo fiber, which is one of the most

  18. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  19. High-Strength and Optically Transparent Fiber-Reinforced Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For many applications there exists a need for mechanically strong composite materials of high optical quality and transparency equivalent to window glass. One method...

  20. Natural Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composite for Ballistic Armor Against Class III-A Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fabio Cassiano; Holanda, Luane Isquerdo Ferreira; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Gomes, Alaelson Vieira; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Epoxy matrix composites reinforced with up to 30 vol pct of continuous and aligned natural mallow fibers were for the first time ballistic tested as personal armor against class III-A 9 mm FMJ ammunition. The ballistic efficiency of these composites was assessed by measuring the dissipated energy and residual velocity after the bullet perforation. The results were compared to those in similar tests of aramid fabric (Kevlar™) commonly used in vests for personal protections. Visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy analysis of impact-fractured samples revealed failure mechanisms associated with fiber pullout and rupture as well as epoxy cracking. As compared to Kevlar™, the mallow fiber composite displayed practically the same ballistic efficiency. However, there is a reduction in both weight and cost, which makes the mallow fiber composites a promising material for personal ballistic protection.

  1. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  2. Conduction noise absorption by fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ok Hyoung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lim, Yun-Soo

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all electronic equipment is susceptible to malfunction as a result of electromagnetic interference. In this study, glass fiber, and carbon fiber as a type reinforcement and epoxy as a matrix material were used to fabricate composite materials. In an attempt to increase the conduction noise absorption, carbon nanotubes were grown on the surface of glass fibers and carbon fibers. A microstrip line with characteristic impedance of 50 Ω in connection with network analyzer was used to measure the conduction noise absorption. In comparing a glass fiber/epoxy composite with a GF-CNT/Ep composite, it was demonstrated that the CNTs significantly influence the noise absorption property mainly due to increase in electric conductivity. In the carbon fiber composites, however, the effectiveness of CNTs on the degree of electric conductivity is negligible, resulting in a small change in reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave. - Research Highlights: → In this study, glass fiber and carbon fiber as a type reinforcement and epoxy as a matrix material were used to fabricate composite materials. In an attempt to increase the conduction noise absorption, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of glass fibers and carbon fibers. A microstrip line with characteristic impedance of 50 Ω in connection with network analyzer was used to measure the conduction noise absorption. → In comparing a glass fiber/epoxy composite with a GF-CNT/Ep composite, it was demonstrated that the CNTs significantly influence the noise absorption property mainly due to increase in electric conductivity. In the carbon fiber composites, however, the effectiveness of CNTs on the degree of electric conductivity is negligible, resulting in a small change in reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave.

  3. Mechanical and physical properties of wood fiber-reinforced, sulfur-based wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Ben S. Bryant

    1993-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite was made from sulfur impregnated, oven dried, wet-formed fiber mats. The fiber mats consisted of a 50/50 mixture of recycled newsprint pulp and mechanical hardwood pulp from several species made from chips in a laboratory refiner. The thickness of the composites was 0.125 inch and the specific gravity of the unimpregnated fiber mat was 0.2. The...

  4. Thermal Protection of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites by Ceramic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kandola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal barrier efficiency of two types of ceramic particle, glass flakes and aluminum titanate, dispersed on the surface of carbon-fiber epoxy composites, has been evaluated using a cone calorimeter at 35 and 50 kW/m2, in addition to temperature gradients through the samples’ thicknesses, measured by inserting thermocouples on the exposed and back surfaces during the cone tests. Two techniques of dispersing ceramic particles on the surface have been employed, one where particles were dispersed on semi-cured laminate and the other where their dispersion in a phenolic resin was applied on the laminate surface, using the same method as used previously for glass fiber composites. The morphology and durability of the coatings to water absorption, peeling, impact and flexural tension were also studied and compared with those previously reported for glass-fiber epoxy composites. With both methods, uniform coatings could be achieved, which were durable to peeling or water absorption with a minimal adverse effect on the mechanical properties of composites. While all these properties were comparable to those previously observed for glass fiber composites, the ceramic particles have seen to be more effective on this less flammable, carbon fiber composite substrate.

  5. Self-sealing of thermal fatigue and mechanical damage in fiber-reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Jericho L.

    Fiber reinforced composite tanks provide a promising method of storage for liquid oxygen and hydrogen for aerospace applications. The inherent thermal fatigue of these vessels leads to the formation of microcracks, which allow gas phase leakage across the tank walls. In this dissertation, self-healing functionality is imparted to a structural composite to effectively seal microcracks induced by both mechanical and thermal loading cycles. Two different microencapsulated healing chemistries are investigated in woven glass fiber/epoxy and uni-weave carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Self-healing of mechanically induced damage was first studied in a room temperature cured plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite with encapsulated dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) monomer and wax protected Grubbs' catalyst healing components. A controlled amount of microcracking was introduced through cyclic indentation of opposing surfaces of the composite. The resulting damage zone was proportional to the indentation load. Healing was assessed through the use of a pressure cell apparatus to detect nitrogen flow through the thickness direction of the damaged composite. Successful healing resulted in a perfect seal, with no measurable gas flow. The effect of DCPD microcapsule size (51 microm and 18 microm) and concentration (0--12.2 wt%) on the self-sealing ability was investigated. Composite specimens with 6.5 wt% 51 microm capsules sealed 67% of the time, compared to 13% for the control panels without healing components. A thermally stable, dual microcapsule healing chemistry comprised of silanol terminated poly(dimethyl siloxane) plus a crosslinking agent and a tin catalyst was employed to allow higher composite processing temperatures. The microcapsules were incorporated into a satin weave E-glass fiber/epoxy composite processed at 120°C to yield a glass transition temperature of 127°C. Self-sealing ability after mechanical damage was assessed for different microcapsule sizees (25 microm and 42

  6. A Study of Failure Strength for Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates with Consideration of Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite laminates can exhibit the nonlinear properties due to the fiber/matrix interface debonding and matrix plastic deformation. In this paper, by incorporating the interface stress-displacement relations between fibers and matrix, as well as the viscoplastic constitutive model for describing plastic behaviors of matrix materials, a micromechanical model is used to investigate the failure strength of the composites with imperfect interface bonding. Meanwhile, the classic laminate theory, which provides the relation between micro- and macroscale responses for composite laminates, is employed. Theory results show good consistency with the experimental data under unidirectional tensile conditions at both 23°C and 650°C. On this basis, the interface debonding influences on the failure strength of the [0/90]s and [0/±45/90]s composite laminates are studied. The numerical results show that all of the unidirectional (UD laminates with imperfect interface bonding provide a sharp decrease in failure strength in the σxx-σyy plane at 23°C. However, the decreasing is restricted in some specific region. In addition, for [0/90]s and [0/±45/90]s composite laminates, the debonding interface influences on the failure envelope can be ignored when the working temperature is increased to 650°C.

  7. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  8. Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites in Multilayered Armor for Personal Ballistic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fábio Cassiano; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Lima, Édio Pereira; da Luz, Fernanda Santos

    2017-10-01

    Lighter and less expensive polymer composites reinforced with natural fibers have been investigated as possible components of a multilayered armor system (MAS) for personal protection against high-velocity ammunition. Their ballistic performance was consistently found comparable with that of conventional Kevlar® synthetic aramid fiber. Among the numerous existing natural fibers with the potential for reinforcing polymer composites to replace Kevlar® in MAS, mallow fiber has not been fully investigated. Thus, the objective of this work is to evaluate the ballistic performance of epoxy composites reinforced with 30 vol.% of aligned mallow fibers as a second MAS layer backing a front ceramic plate. The results using high-velocity 7.62 ammunition show a similar indentation to a Kevlar® layer with the same thickness. An impedance matching calculation supports the similar ballistic performance of mallow fiber composite and Kevlar®. Reduced MAS costs associated with the mallow fiber composite are practical advantages over Kevlar®.

  9. The Impact Resistance of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Mehrdad Shokrieh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced composites are widely used instead of traditional materials in various technological applications. Therefore, by considering the extensive applications of these materials, a proper knowledge of their impact behavior (from low- to high-velocity as well as their static behavior is necessary. In order to study the effects of strain rates on the behavior of these materials, special testing machines are needed. Most of the research efforts in this feld are focused on application of real loading and gripping boundary conditions on the testing specimens. In this paper, a detailed review of different types of impact testing techniques and the strain rate dependence of mechanical and strength properties of polymer composite materials  are presented. In this respect, an attempt is made to present and summarize the methods of impact tests and the strain rate effects on the tensile, compressive, shear and bending properties of the fber-reinforced polymer composite materials. Moreover, a classifcation of the state-of-the-art of the testing techniques to characterize composite material properties in a wide range of strain rates are also given.

  10. Viscoelastic bending model for continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites in melt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, U.; Akkerman, R.

    2017-01-01

    Bending of single plies or stacks of multiple plies is an essential deformation mechanism during thermoforming of thermoplastic composites. A reliable prediction of the forming process requires an accurate description of the bending behavior. To this end, a characterization method for the bending of

  11. Recent advances in electron-beam curing of carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coqueret, Xavier; Krzeminski, Mickael; Ponsaud, Philippe; Defoort, Brigitte

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking polymerization initiated by high-energy radiation is a very attractive technique for the fabrication of high-performance composite materials. The method offers many advantages compared to conventional energy- and time-consuming thermal curing processes. Free radical and cationic poly-addition chemistries have been investigated in some details by various research groups along the previous years. A high degree of control over curing kinetics and material properties can be exerted by adjusting the composition of matrix precursors as well as by acting on process parameters. However, the comparison with state-of-the-art thermally cured composites revealed the lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured composites and the higher brittleness of the radiation-cured matrix. Improving fiber-matrix adhesion and upgrading polymer network toughness are thus two major challenges in this area. We have investigated several points related to these issues, and particularly the reduction of the matrix shrinkage on curing, the wettability of carbon fibers, the design of fiber-matrix interface and the use of thermoplastic toughening agents. Significant improvements were achieved on transverse strain at break by applying original surface treatments on the fibers so as to induce covalent coupling with the matrix. A drastic enhancement of the K IC value exceeding 2 MPa m 1/2 was also obtained for acrylate-based matrices toughened with high T g thermoplastics.

  12. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. I - Stress singularities and solution structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental mechanics of delamination in fiber composite laminates is studied. Mathematical formulation of the problem is based on laminate anisotropic elasticity theory and interlaminar fracture mechanics concepts. Stress singularities and complete solution structures associated with general composite delaminations are determined. For a fully open delamination with traction-free surfaces, oscillatory stress singularities always appear, leading to physically inadmissible field solutions. A refined model is introduced by considering a partially closed delamination with crack surfaces in finite-length contact. Stress singularities associated with a partially closed delamination having frictional crack-surface contact are determined, and are found to be different from the inverse square-root one of the frictionless-contact case. In the case of a delamination with very small area of crack closure, a simplified model having a square-root stress singularity is employed by taking the limit of the partially closed delamination. The possible presence of logarithmic-type stress singularity is examined; no logarithmic singularity of any kind is found in the composite delamination problem. Numerical examples of dominant stress singularities are shown for delaminations having crack-tip closure with different frictional coefficients between general (1) and (2) graphite-epoxy composites. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13221

  13. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  14. Cold spray of metal-polymer composite coatings onto carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP)

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolussi, Vincent; Borit, François; Chesnaud, Anthony; Jeandin, Michel; Faessel, Matthieu; Figliuzzi, Bruno; Willot, François; Roche, K.; Surdon, G.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The growing use of Polymer-Matrix Composite (PMC) materials within transport industry raises new security concerns, especially those due to lightning. To protect these electrically insulating materials, conductive coatings can be applied. Due to the high level of required properties, cold spray is believed to be an effective way to achieve these coatings. Recent studies showed that obstacles remained to be overcome when cold spraying metallic particles onto Carbon Fibe...

  15. Mechanics of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Buckling Modes and Failure Under Compression Along Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Kholmogorov, S. A.; Gazizullin, R. K.

    2018-01-01

    One-dimensional linearized problems on the possible buckling modes of an internal or peripheral layer of unidirectional multilayer composites with rectilinear fibers under compression in the fiber direction are considered. The investigations are carried out using the known Kirchhoff-Love and Timoshenko models for the layers. The binder, modeled as an elastic foundation, is described by the equations of elasticity theory, which are simplified in accordance to the model of a transversely soft layer and are integrated along the transverse coordinate considering the kinematic coupling relations for a layer and foundation layers. Exact analytical solutions of the problems formulated are found, which are used to calculate a composite made of an HSE 180 REM prepreg based on a unidirectional carbon fiber tape. The possible buckling modes of its internal and peripheral layers are identified. Calculation results are compared with experimental data obtained earlier. It is concluded that, for the composite studied, the flexural buckling of layers in the uniform axial compression of specimens along fibers is impossible — the failure mechanism is delamination with buckling of a fiber bundle according to the pure shear mode. It is realized (due to the low average transverse shear modulus) at the value of the ultimate compression stress equal to the average shear modulus. It is shown that such a shear buckling mode can be identified only on the basis of equations constructed using the Timoshenko shear model to describe the deformation process of layers.

  16. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  17. Strain redistribution around holes and notches in fiber-reinforced cross-woven brittle matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben Krogsdal; Brøndsted, Povl

    1997-01-01

    A study of the strain redistribution around holes in two different cross-woven ceramic matrix composites is presented. The strain redistribution around holes in C-f/SiCm and SiCf/SiCm has been measured experimentally under plane stress conditions. Using micro-mechanics and Continuum Damage...... Mechanics, and an identification procedure based on a uni-axial tensile test and a shear test the strain redistribution around a hole or a notch due to matrix cracking can be predicted. Damage due to fiber breakage is not included in the model. Initial matrix damage in the C-f/SiCm material has...

  18. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  19. RESIDUAL PROPERTIES OF FIBER-REINFORCED REFRACTORY COMPOSITES WITH A FIRECLAY FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Jogl

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to develop a composite material for industrial use that is resistant to the effect of high temperatures. The binder system based on aluminous cement was modified by adding finely-ground ceramic powder and metakaolin to reduce costs and also to reduce adverse effects on the environment due to high energy consumption for cement production. Additives were applied as a partial aluminous cement replacement in doses of 10, 20 and 30% by weight. The composites were evaluated on the basis of their mechanical properties and their bulk density after gradual temperature loading. The influence of basalt fibers and modifications to the binder system were studied at the same time. Basalt fibers were applied in doses of 0.5% and 2.0% by volume. The results confirmed the potential of the mineral additives studied here for practical applications, taking into account the residual mechanical parameters after thermal loading. The addition of ceramic powder reduced the bulk density by 5% for each 10% of cement substitution, but the residual values were very similar. The bulk density and the compressive strength were reduced when basalt fibers were applied, and the flexural strength was significantly increased in proportion to the fiber dosages. Metakaolin seems to be a more suitable additive than the ceramic powder that was applied here, because there was a significant increase in the mechanical parameters and also in the residual values of all properties that were studied.

  20. Interfacial strength development in thermoplastic resins and fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Jeremy C.; Loos, Alfred C.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental program to develop test methods to be used to characterize interfacial (autohesive) strength development in polysulfone thermoplastic resin and graphite-polysulfone prepreg during processing is reported. Two test methods were used to examine interfacial strength development in neat resin samples. These included an interfacial tension test and a compact tension (CT) fracture toughness test. The interfacial tensile test proved to be very difficult to perform with a considerable amount of data scatter. Thus, the interfacial test was discarded in favor of the fracture toughness test. Interfacial strength development was observed by measuring the refracture toughness of precracked compact tension specimens that were rehealed at a given temperature and contact time. The measured refracture toughness was correlated with temperature and contact time. Interfacial strength development in graphite-polysulfone unidirectional composites was measured using a double cantilever beam (DCB) interlaminar fracture toughness test. The critical strain energy release rate of refractured composite specimens was measured as a function of healing temperature and contact time.

  1. A Constitutive Formulation for the Linear Thermoelastic Behavior of Arbitrary Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Usal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The linear thermoelastic behavior of a composite material reinforced by two independent and inextensible fiber families has been analyzed theoretically. The composite material is assumed to be anisotropic, compressible, dependent on temperature gradient, and showing linear elastic behavior. Basic principles and axioms of modern continuum mechanics and equations belonging to kinematics and deformation geometries of fibers have provided guidance and have been determining in the process of this study. The matrix material is supposed to be made of elastic material involving an artificial anisotropy due to fibers reinforcing by arbitrary distributions. As a result of thermodynamic constraints, it has been determined that the free energy function is dependent on a symmetric tensor and two vectors whereas the heat flux vector function is dependent on a symmetric tensor and three vectors. The free energy and heat flux vector functions have been represented by a power series expansion, and the type and the number of terms taken into consideration in this series expansion have determined the linearity of the medium. The linear constitutive equations of the stress and heat flux vector are substituted in the Cauchy equation of motion and in the equation of conservation of energy to obtain the field equations.

  2. Enhanced Infrared Image Processing for Impacted Carbon/Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Avdelidis, Nicolas P; Osman, Ahmad; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Sfarra, Stefano; Fernandes, Henrique; Matikas, Theodore E; Maldague, Xavier P V

    2017-12-26

    In this paper, an infrared pre-processing modality is presented. Different from a signal smoothing modality which only uses a polynomial fitting as the pre-processing method, the presented modality instead takes into account the low-order derivatives to pre-process the raw thermal data prior to applying the advanced post-processing techniques such as principal component thermography and pulsed phase thermography. Different cases were studied involving several defects in CFRPs and GFRPs for pulsed thermography and vibrothermography. Ultrasonic testing and signal-to-noise ratio analysis are used for the validation of the thermographic results. Finally, a verification that the presented modality can enhance the thermal image performance effectively is provided.

  3. Evaluation of load-deflection properties of fiber-reinforced composites and its comparison with stainless steel wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Alavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of common sized fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs to different deflections due to bending forces and comparing it with stainless steel (SS wires. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two FRC groups with 0.75 mm and 1.2 mm diameters (Everstick Ortho, Stick Tech, Finland and three SS groups with 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.7 mm diameters (3M Uniteck, Monrovia, California, USA were tested. Each group contained 10 samples that were tested according to a three point bending test. Each group was tested at deflections of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm and the data was analyzed using the repeated measure ANOVA by SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, IBM SPSS, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois, USA. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The highest recorded load belonged to the 1.2 mm FRC and after that 0.7 mm SS wire, 0.75 mm FRC, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch SS wire and finally 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wire. The 0.7 mm SS wire and 0.75 mm FRC were compared as retainers and the results showed the 0.7 mm SS wire showed significantly higher load compared with 0.75 mm FRC (P < 0.05. The 1.2 mm FRC had significantly higher load compared to 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wires (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results showed that the 1.2 mm FRC group had significantly higher load compared to SS wires and other FRC groups under the 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm deflections. Therefore, it can be suggested that FRC can be used as an esthetic replacement for SS wires for active and passive purposes in orthodontics.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite Processing by the Liquid Route: Literature Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Eric; Arvieu, Corinne; Mantaux, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    One of the technologies used to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs) is liquid route processing. One solution is to inject a liquid metal under pressure or at constant rate through a fibrous preform. This foundry technique overcomes the problem of the wettability of ceramic fibers by liquid metal. The liquid route can also be used to produce semiproducts by coating a filament with a molten metal. These processes involve physical phenomena combined with mass and heat transfer and phase change. The phase change phenomena related to solidification and also to the melting of the metal during the process notably result in modifications to the permeability of porous media, in gaps in impregnation, in the appearance of defects (porosities), and in segregation in the final product. In this article, we provide a state-of-the-art review of numerical models and simulation developed to study these physical phenomena involved in MMC processing by the liquid route.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite Processing by the Liquid Route: Literature Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Eric; Arvieu, Corinne; Mantaux, Olivier

    2018-04-01

    One of the technologies used to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs) is liquid route processing. One solution is to inject a liquid metal under pressure or at constant rate through a fibrous preform. This foundry technique overcomes the problem of the wettability of ceramic fibers by liquid metal. The liquid route can also be used to produce semiproducts by coating a filament with a molten metal. These processes involve physical phenomena combined with mass and heat transfer and phase change. The phase change phenomena related to solidification and also to the melting of the metal during the process notably result in modifications to the permeability of porous media, in gaps in impregnation, in the appearance of defects (porosities), and in segregation in the final product. In this article, we provide a state-of-the-art review of numerical models and simulation developed to study these physical phenomena involved in MMC processing by the liquid route.

  6. Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAMOS, Marcelo Barbosa; PEGORARO, Thiago Amadei; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando; CARVALHO, Ricardo Marins

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-ESPE and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray) used for cementing fiber-reinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron) under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. Material and methods Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a) no light activation; b) light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c) light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds) for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. Results Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. Conclusions The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent. PMID:23138743

  7. Influence of Thin-Film Adhesives in Pullout Tests Between Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloy and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2018-01-01

    Strips of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) were bonded together using multiple thin film adhesives and their mechanical strengths were evaluated under pullout test configuration. Tensile and lap shear tests were conducted to confirm the deformation of SMAs at room temperature and to evaluate the adhesive strength between the NiTi strips and the PMC. Optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the interfacial bonding after failure. Simple equations on composite tensile elongation were used to fit the experimental data on tensile properties. ABAQUS models were generated to show the effects of enhanced bond strength and the distribution of stress in SMA and PMC. The results revealed that the addition of thin film adhesives increased the average adhesive strength between SMA and PMC while halting the room temperature shape memory effect within the pullout specimen.

  8. Synergistic Effects of Stress-Rupture and Cyclic Loading on Strain Response of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperature in Oxidizing Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longbiao Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the synergistic effects of stress rupture and cyclic loading on the strain response of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs at elevated temperature in air have been investigated. The stress-strain relationships considering interface wear and interface oxidation in the interface debonded region under stress rupture and cyclic loading have been developed to establish the relationship between the peak strain, the interface debonded length, the interface oxidation length and the interface slip lengths. The effects of the stress rupture time, stress levels, matrix crack spacing, fiber volume fraction and oxidation temperature on the peak strain and the interface slip lengths have been investigated. The experimental fatigue hysteresis loops, interface slip lengths, peak strain and interface oxidation length of cross-ply SiC/MAS (magnesium alumino-silicate, MAS composite under cyclic fatigue and stress rupture at 566 and 1093 °C in air have been predicted.

  9. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  10. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  11. Multi-Objective Patch Optimization with Integrated Kinematic Draping Simulation for Continuous–Discontinuous Fiber-Reinforced Composite Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Fengler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous fiber-reinforced polymers (DiCoFRP in combination with local continuous fiber reinforced polymers (CoFRP provide both a high design freedom and high weight-specific mechanical properties. For the optimization of CoFRP patches on complexly shaped DiCoFRP structures, an optimization strategy is needed which considers manufacturing constraints during the optimization procedure. Therefore, a genetic algorithm is combined with a kinematic draping simulation. To determine the optimal patch position with regard to structural performance and overall material consumption, a multi-objective optimization strategy is used. The resulting Pareto front and a corresponding heat-map of the patch position are useful tools for the design engineer to choose the right amount of reinforcement. The proposed patch optimization procedure is applied to two example structures and the effect of different optimization setups is demonstrated.

  12. Effects of Fiber Content on Mechanical Properties of CVD SiC Fiber-Reinforced Strontium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1996-01-01

    Unidirectional CVD SiC(f)(SCS-6) fiber-reinforced strontium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass-ceramic matrix composites containing various volume fractions, approximately 16 to 40 volume %, of fibers were fabricated by hot pressing at 1400 C for 2 h under 27.6 MPa. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase formed, with complete absence of the undesired hexacelsian phase, in the matrix. Room temperature mechanical properties were measured in 3-point flexure. The matrix microcracking stress and the ultimate strength increased with increase in fiber volume fraction, reached maximum values for V(sub f) approximately equal to 0.35, and degraded at higher fiber loadings. This degradation in mechanical properties is related to the change in failure mode, from tensile at lower V(sub f) to interlaminar shear at higher fiber contents. The extent of fiber loading did not have noticeable effect on either fiber-matrix debonding stress, or frictional sliding stress at the interface. The applicability of micromechanical models in predicting the mechanical properties of the composites was also examined. The currently available theoretical models do not appear to be useful in predicting the values of the first matrix cracking stress, and the ultimate strength of the SCS-6/SAS composites.

  13. Modification of a Phenolic Resin with Epoxy- and Methacrylate-Functionalized Silica Sols to Improve the Ablation Resistance of Their Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized silica sols were obtained by the hydrolytic condensation of (γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPMS, (γ-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPMS and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS. Three different sols were obtained: MPS (derived from MPMS and TEOS, GPS-MPS (derived from GPMS, MPMS and TEOS, and GPSD (derived from GPMS, TEOS and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA. These silica sols were mixed with a phenolic resin (PR. Ethylenediamine was used as a hardener for epoxy-functionalized sols and benzoyl peroxide was used as an initiator of the free-radical polymerization of methacrylate-functionalized silica sols. Glass fiber-reinforced composites were obtained from the neat PR and MPS-PR, GPS-MPS-PR and GPSD-PR. The resulting composites were evaluated as ablation resistant materials in an acetylene-oxygen flame. A large increase in the ablation resistance was observed when the PR was modified by the functionalized silica sols. The ablation resistance of the composites decreased as follows: GPSD-PR > MPS-PR > GPS-MPS-PR > PR.

  14. Effect of silica coating on flexural strength of fiber posts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, LF; Ozcan, M; de Melo, RM; Galhano, GAP; Baldissara, P; Scotti, R; Bottino, MA

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts can be air-abraded to obtain good attachment to the resin cement. This study tested the effect of silica coating on the flexural strength of carbon, opaque, and translucent quartz FRC posts. Materials and Methods: Six experimental groups of FRC posts

  15. Performance of natural curaua fiber-reinforced polyester composites under 7.62 mm bullet impact as a stand-alone ballistic armor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio de Oliveira Braga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A multilayered armor system (MAS is intended to personal protection against high kinetic energy ammunition. MAS layers are composed of materials such as a front ceramic and a back composite that must show both high impact resistance and low weight, usually conflicting characteristics. Synthetic fiber fabrics, such as Kevlar™ and Dyneema™, are the favorite materials to back the front ceramic, due to their high strength, high modulus and relatively low weight. Recently, composites reinforced with natural fibers have been considered as MAS second layer owing to their good performance associated with other advantages as being cheaper and environmentally friendly. Among the natural fibers, those extracted from the leaves of the Ananas erectifolius plant, known as curaua, stand out due to its exceptional high strength and high modulus. Thus, the objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of curaua fiber-reinforced polyester composites subjected to ballistic impact of high energy 7.62 mm ammunition. Composites reinforced with 0, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% of curaua fibers were produced and stand-alone tested as armor target to evaluate the absorbed energy. Analysis of variance (Anova and Tukey's honest significant difference test (HSD made it possible to compare the results to Kevlar™ laminates. Among the tested materials, the 30 vol.% fiber composites were found to be the best alternative to Kevlar™. Keywords: Composite, Natural fiber, Curaua fiber, Ballistic test

  16. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of posterior fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture Part 2: influence of fiber reinforcement on mesial and distal connectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Nobuhisa; Shinya, Akikazu; Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Lassila, Lippo V J; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of connectors under two different loading conditions on displacement and stress distribution generated in isotropic hybrid composite fixed partial denture (C-FPD) and partially anisotropic fiber-reinforced hybrid composite fixed partial denture (FRC-FPD). To this end, two three-dimensional finite element (FE) models of three-unit FPD from mandibular second premolar to mandibular second molar - intended to replace the mandibular first molar - were developed. The two loading conditions employed were a vertical load of 629 N (applied to eight points on the occlusal surface) and a lateral load of 250 N (applied to three points of the pontic). The results suggested that the reinforcing fibers in FRC framework significantly improved the rigidity of the connectors against any twisting and bending moments induced by loading. Consequently, maximum principal stress and displacement generated in the connectors of FRC-FPD were significantly reduced because stresses generated by vertical and lateral loading were transferred to the reinforcing fibers.

  17. Round Robin Tests to Determine Fiber Content of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites by Combustion and Thermogravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Funabashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To propose methods to determine the fiber content of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP for the International Organization for Standardization, the fiber contents of CFRP with polyamide-6 were measured using a combustion method based on ISO 14127 and a thermogravimetry method based on the modified ISO 9924-3 under a round robin test managed by the Polymer Subcommittee of the Industrial Technology Cooperative Promotion Committee in Japan. In the combustion method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~0.3 g were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after burning (ISO 14127. The fiber contents in weight of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 55.720%, 61.088%, or 65.326%, respectively, by 17 research institutes. In the thermogravimetry method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~10 mg were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after heating it to 600°C in nitrogen gas using thermogravimetry apparatus (modified ISO 9924-3. The fiber contents of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 56.908%, 61.579%, or 64.819%, respectively, by 8 research institutes. It was confirmed that thermogravimetry method was as accurate as the combustion method based on ISO 14127.

  18. Bond strength between fiber posts and composite resin core: influence of temperature on silane coupling agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Simamotos Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Rontani, Regina Maria Puppin; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Soares, Carlos José

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of air drying temperature and different silane coupling agents on the bond strength between glass fiber posts and composite resin core. The post surface was cleaned with alcohol and treated with different silane coupling agents, being three prehydrolyzed silanes [Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE)] and one two-component silane [Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply)]. Two post-silanization air drying temperatures, 23ºC and 60ºC, were applied. A cylindrical plastic matrix was placed around the silanized post and filled with composite resin. Each bonded post provided 7 slices for push-out testing. Each slice was loaded to failure under compression at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Scott-Knott tests (α=0.05). Dunnett's test was used to compare the mean of the control group with that of each experimental group. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the interface of the fractured slices. For the 23ºC air drying temperature, the use of RelyX Ceramic Primer resulted in significantly lower bond strength than the other silane coupling agents, while the bond strength with Silane Coupling Agent was the highest of all groups. Only with Silane Coupling Agent, the bond strength for the 23ºC air drying temperature was significantly higher than that for 60ºC air drying. In conclusion, the use of warm air drying after silane application produced no increase in the bond strength between the fiber-reinforced composite post and the composite core. The two-component silane produced higher bond strength than all prehydrolyzed silanes when it was used with air drying at room temperature.

  19. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (ptested FRC posts is required for effective bonding.

  20. Stress and strain analysis of the bone-implant interface: a comparison of fiber-reinforced composite and titanium implants utilizing 3-dimensional finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinya, Akikazu; Ballo, Ahmed M; Lassila, Lippo V J; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Närhi, Timo O; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-03-01

    This study analyzed stress and strain mediated by 2 different implant materials, titanium (Ti) and experimental fiber-reinforced composite (FRC), on the implant and on the bone tissue surrounding the implant. Three-dimensional finite element models constructed from a mandibular bone and an implant were subjected to a load of 50 N in vertical and horizontal directions. Postprocessing files allowed the calculation of stress and strain within the implant materials and stresses at the bone-to-implant interface (stress path). Maximum stress concentrations were located around the implant on the rim of the cortical bone in both implant materials; Ti and overall stresses decreased toward the Ti implant apex. In the FRC implant, a stress value of 0.6 to 2.0 MPa was detected not only on the screw threads but also on the implant surface between the threads. Clear differences were observed in the strain distribution between the materials. Based on the results, the vertical load stress range of the FRC implant was close to the stress level for optimal bone growth. Furthermore, the stress at the bone around the FRC implant was more evenly distributed than that with Ti implant.

  1. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twomey, Janet M. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    2010-04-30

    In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

  2. Effect of location of glass fiber-reinforced composite reinforcement on the flexural properties of a maxillary complete denture in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of the location of glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement on the flexural load at the proportional limit (FL-PL) and the flexural deflection of a maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. Material and methods. Maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures strengthened with and without FRC reinforcement were tested. The polymerized FRC was embedded in the denture base resin in the doughy state and placed (1) under the ridge lap region, (2) in the anterior region, (3) in the middle region or (4) in the anterior and posterior regions. The FL-PL and flexural deflection value at the 100-N loading point of the reinforced maxillary denture specimens were tested. Results. All of the reinforced dentures had a higher FL-PL than the denture without reinforcement but the FL-PL values of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. The efficiency of the FRC reinforcement compared to the unreinforced denture was 1.54-1.75 times greater. All of the reinforced dentures showed significantly lower deflection compared to the unreinforced denture, but the flexural deflections of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions. The location of the FRC reinforcement did not affect the fracture resistance of the maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. All of the reinforced dentures had higher FL-PL and lower flexural deflection than the denture without reinforcement.

  3. Use of the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI approach in the design of improved-performance fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Snipes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New materials are traditionally developed using costly and time-consuming trial-and-error experimental efforts. This is followed by an even lengthier material-certification process. Consequently, it takes 10 to 20 years before a newly-discovered material is commercially employed. An alternative approach to the development of new materials is the so-called materials-by-design approach within which a material is treated as a complex hierarchical system, and its design and optimization is carried out by employing computer-aided engineering analyses, predictive tools and available material databases. In the present work, the materials-by-design approach is utilized to design a grade of fiber-reinforced (FR SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs, the type of materials which are currently being used in stationary components, and are considered for use in rotating components, of the hot sections of gas-turbine engines. Towards that end, a number of mathematical functions and numerical models are developed which relate CMC constituents’ (fibers, fiber coating and matrix microstructure and their properties to the properties and performance of the CMC as a whole. To validate the newly-developed materials-by-design approach, comparisons are made between experimentally measured and computationally predicted selected CMC mechanical properties. Then an optimization procedure is employed to determine the chemical makeup and processing routes for the CMC constituents so that the selected mechanical properties of the CMCs are increased to a preset target level.

  4. Occupational exposures to styrene vapor in a manufacturing plant for fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Duane; Garcia, Alberto; Feng, H Amy

    2011-07-01

    A utility-scale wind turbine blade manufacturing plant requested assistance from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in controlling worker exposures to styrene at a plant that produced 37 and 42 m long fiber-reinforced wind turbine blades. The plant requested NIOSH assistance because previous air sampling conducted by the company indicated concerns about peak styrene concentrations when workers entered the confined space inside of the wind turbine blade. NIOSH researchers conducted two site visits and collected personal breathing zone and area air samples while workers performed the wind turbine blade manufacturing tasks of vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM), gelcoating, glue wiping, and installing the safety platform. All samples were collected during the course of normal employee work activities and analyzed for styrene using NIOSH Method 1501. All sampling was task based since full-shift sampling from a prior Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance inspection did not show any exposures to styrene above the OSHA permissible exposure limit. During the initial NIOSH site visit, 67 personal breathing zone and 18 area air samples were collected while workers performed tasks of VARTM, gelcoating, glue wipe, and installation of a safety platform. After the initial site visit, the company made changes to the glue wipe task that eliminated the need for workers to enter the confined space inside of the wind turbine blade. During the follow-up site visit, 12 personal breathing zone and 8 area air samples were collected from workers performing the modified glue wipe task. During the initial site visit, the geometric means of the personal breathing zone styrene air samples were 1.8 p.p.m. (n = 21) for workers performing the VARTM task, 68 p.p.m. (n = 5) for workers installing a safety platform, and 340 p.p.m. (n = 14) for workers performing the glue wipe task, where n is the number of workers sampled for a

  5. Interfacial Properties of Bamboo Fiber-Reinforced High-Density Polyethylene Composites by Different Methods for Adding Nano Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study was to observe the effect of nano calcium carbonate (CaCO3 modification methods on bamboo fiber (BF used in BF-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE composites manufactured by extrusion molding. Two methods were used to introduce the nano CaCO3 into the BF for modification; the first was blending modification (BM and the second was impregnation modification (IM. In order to determine the effects of the modification methods, the water absorption, surface free energy and interfacial properties of the unmodified composites were compared to those of the composites made from the two modification methods. The results revealed that the percentage increase in the weight of the composite treated by nano CaCO3 decreased and that of the IMBF/HDPE composite was the lowest over the seven months of time. The results obtained by the acid-base model according to the Lewis and Owens-Wendt- Rabel-Kaelble (OWRK equations indicated that the surface energy of the composites was between 40 and 50 mJ/m2. When compared to the control sample, the maximum storage modulus (E′max of the BMBF/HDPE and IMBF/HDPE composites increased 1.43- and 1.53-fold, respectively. The values of the phase-to-phase interaction parameter B and the k value of the modified composites were higher than those of the unmodified composites, while the apparent activation energy Ea and interface parameter A were lower in the modified composites. It can be concluded that nano CaCO3 had an effect on the interfacial properties of BF-reinforced HDPE composites, and the interface bonding between IMBF and HDPE was greatest among the composites.

  6. Effect of surface roughness on osteogenesis in vitro and osseointegration in vivo of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone–nanohydroxyapatite composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yi Deng,1,2 Xiaochen Liu,2 Anxiu Xu,3 Lixin Wang,4 Zuyuan Luo,2 Yunfei Zheng,1 Feng Deng,3 Jie Wei,5 Zhihui Tang,1 Shicheng Wei1–3 12nd Dental Center, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, School and Hospital of Stomatology, 2Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing, 3Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, 4Department of Stomatology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 5Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, and Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: As United States Food and Drug Administration-approved implantable material, carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK possesses an adjustable elastic modulus similar to cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace surgical metallic implants. The bioinertness and inferior osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK, however, limit its clinical application as orthopedic/dental implants. In this study, CFRPEEK–nanohydroxyapatite ternary composites (PEEK/n-HA/CF with variable surface roughness have been successfully fabricated. The effect of surface roughness on their in vitro cellular responses of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells (attachment, proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation and in vivo osseointegration is evaluated. The results show that the hydrophilicity and the amount of Ca ions on the surface are significantly improved as the surface roughness of composite increases. In cell culture tests, the results reveal that the cell proliferation rate and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of cells are a function of the size of surface roughness. The composite with moderate surface roughness significantly increases cell attachment

  7. 6-mm-long implants loaded with fiber-reinforced composite resin-bonded fixed prostheses (FRCRBFDPs). A 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Fabio; Lang, Niklaus P; Ricci, Emanuele; Ferraioli, Lorenzo; Marchetti, Claudio; Botticelli, Daniele

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes and the survival rates of fiber-reinforced composite resin-bonded fixed prostheses (FRCRBFDPs) placed in the posterior area supported by two short (6 mm) implants. Twenty consecutive patients received 40 SLActive 6-mm-long implants with a diameter of 4.1 mm (n = 29) or 4.8 mm (n = 11). Insertion torques and RFA (Resonance Frequency Analysis) were measured at implant installation. The prosthetic rehabilitation was performed after 8 weeks from insertion with a screw-retained two- or three-unit fixed dental prosthesis fabricated of FRCRBFDPs. Implant survival rates and marginal bone levels were evaluated at various time intervals until 5 years after loading. Two of 20 patients lost four implants supporting two FRCRBFDPs between the second and the third year of follow-up (cumulative survival rate: 90% after 5 years). Four patients suffered a fracture of the prosthetic reconstruction, and the success rate of the rehabilitation was 70% after 5 years. A mean marginal bone loss of 0.30 ± 0.34 mm was found after 5 years of function at the remaining implants. The survival of short implants was 90% owing to two bridges losses in the maxilla. However, the success rate of FRCRBFDPs over 5 years was only at 70%. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  9. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Part 2: Delamination behavior and fracture mechanics parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    Based on theories of laminate anisotropic elasticity and interlaminar fracture, the complete solution structure associated with a composite delamination is determined. Fracture mechanics parameters characterizing the interlaminar crack behavior are defined from asymptotic stress solutions for delaminations with different crack-tip deformation configurations. A numerical method employing singular finite elements is developed to study delaminations in fiber composites with any arbitrary combinations of lamination, material, geometric, and crack variables. The special finite elements include the exact delamination stress singularity in its formulation. The method is shown to be computationally accurate and efficient, and operationally simple. To illustrate the basic nature of composite delamination, solutions are shown for edge-delaminated (0/-0/-0/0) and (+ or - 0/+ or - 0/90/90 deg) graphite-epoxy systems under uniform axial extenstion. Three-dimensional crack-tip stress intensity factors, associated energy release rates, and delamination crack-closure are determined for each individual case. The basic mechanics and mechanisms of composite delamination are studied, and fundamental characteristics unique to recently proposed tests for interlaminar fracture toughness of fiber composite laminates are examined.

  10. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. II - The delamination behavior and fracture mechanics parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    Based on theories of laminate anisotropic elasticity and interlaminar fracture, the complete solution structure associated with a composite delamination is determined. Fracture mechanics parameters characterizing the interlaminar crack behavior are defined from asymptotic stress solutions for delaminations with different crack-tip deformation configurations. A numerical method employing singular finite elements is developed to study delaminations in fiber composites with any arbitrary combinations of lamination, material, geometric, and crack variables. The special finite elements include the exact delamination stress singularity in its formulation. The method is shown to be computationally accurate and efficient, and operationally simple. To illustrate the basic nature of composite delamination, solutions are shown for edge-delaminated (0/-0/-0/0) and (+ or - 0/+ or - 0/90/90 deg) graphite-epoxy systems under uniform axial extension. Three-dimensional crack-tip stress intensity factors, associated energy release rates, and delamination crack-closure are determined for each individual case. The basic mechanics and mechanisms of composite delamination are studied, and fundamental characteristics unique to recently proposed tests for interlaminar fracture toughness of fiber composite laminates are examined. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13222

  11. Characterization, Long-Term Behavior Evaluation and Thermomechanical Properties of Untreated and Treated Flax Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Ali

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in the usage of natural fiber reinforced composites in more advanced structural applications. Consequently, the need for improving their mechanical properties as well as service life and long-term behavior modeling and predictions has arisen. In a step towards further development of these materials, in this study, two newly developed biobased resins, derived from soybean oil, methacrylated epoxidized sucrose soyate and double methacrylated epoxidized sucrose soyate are combined with untreated and alkaline treated flax fiber to produce novel biocomposites. Vinyl ester reinforced with flax fiber is used as control in addition to comparing properties of biobased composites against commercial pultruded composites. Effects of alkaline treatment of flax fiber as well as addition of 1% acrylic resin to vinyl ester and the two mentioned biobased resins on mechanical properties are studied. Properties are evaluated in short-term and also, after being exposed to accelerated weathering (i.e. UV and moisture). Moreover, long-term creep of these novel biobased composites and effect of fiber and matrix treatment on viscoelastic behavior is investigated using Time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle. Based on the results of this study, the TTS provides an accelerated method for evaluation of mechanical properties of biobased composites, and satisfactory master curves are achieved by use of this principle. Also, fiber and matrix treatments were effective in increasing mechanical properties of biobased composites in short-term, and treatments delayed the creep response and slowed the process of creep in composites under study in the steady state region. Overall, results of this study reveal the successful production of biocomposites having properties that meet or exceed those of conventional pultruded members while maintaining high biocontent. Composites using treated flax fiber and newly developed resins showed less

  12. Investigation of degradation products produced by recycling the solvent during chemical degradation of fiber-reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucar, Hülya; Simonsen, Morten Enggrob; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2017-01-01

    of solvent consumption by 88%. It was found that the recycled solvent became increasingly more concentrated with degradation products from the epoxy resin and compounds produced by acetone aldol reactions. These degradation products promoted and enhanced the degradation of the composite. Among the compounds...... produced by acetone aldol reaction, the industrially important bulk chemical mesityl oxide accounted for 68–79% of the total chromatographic peak area. Simultaneously, with the optimization of a process for converting composite waste into its constituent (fibers and resin), valuable bulk chemicals can...

  13. Smart carbon nanotube/fiber and PVA fiber-reinforced composites for stress sensing and chloride ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheneder, Joshua

    Fiber reinforced composites (FRC) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers and carbon nanofibers (CNF) had an excellent flexural strength in excess of 18.5 MPa compared to reference samples of 15.8 MPa. It was found that the developed, depending on applied stress and exposure to chloride solutions, composites exhibit some electrical conductivity, from 4.20×10 -4 (Ω-1m-1 to 4.13×10 -4 Ω-1m-1. These dependences can be characterized by piezioresistive and chemoresistive coefficients demonstrating that the material possesses self-sensing capabilities. The sensitivity to stain and chloride solutions can be enhanced by incorporating small amounts of carbon nanofibers (CNF) or carbon nanotube (CNT) into composite structure. Conducted research has demonstrated a strong dependency of electrical properties of composite on crack formation in moist environments. The developed procedure is scalable for industrial application in concrete structures that require nondestructive stress monitoring, integrity under high service loads and stability in harsh environments.

  14. Effect of Silane Coupling Agent on Tribological Properties of Hemp Fiber-Reinforced Plant-Derived Polyamide 1010 Biomass Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Yosuke; Kajiyama, Tetsuto; Yamanaka, Toshiyuki

    2017-09-05

    We have studied the effects of silane coupling agents used for the surface treatment of fiber on the tribological properties of hemp fiber (HF) reinforced plant-derived polyamide 1010 (PA1010) biomass composites. Hemp fibers were surface-treated by two surface treatment methods: (a) alkali treatment by sodium hydroxide solution and (b) surface treatment by silane coupling agents. Three types of silane coupling agents, namely aminosilane, epoxysilane and ureidosilane were used. These HF/PA1010 biomass composites were extruded using a twin extruder, and injection-molded. The mechanical and tribological properties were evaluated by the ring-on-plate type sliding wear test. It was found that tribological properties of HF/PA1010 biomass composites improved with the surface treatment by the silane coupling agent. This may be attributed to the change in the mode of friction and wear mechanism by the interfacial adhesion between fiber and matrix polymer according to the type of silane coupling agent used. In particular, the ureidosilane coupling agent showed the best improvement effect for the tribological properties of these biomass composites in this study.

  15. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Part 1: Stress singularities and solution structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental mechanics of delamination in fiber composite laminates is studied. Mathematical formulation of the problem is based on laminate anisotropic elasticity theory and interlaminar fracture mechanics concepts. Stress singularities and complete solution structures associated with general composite delaminations are determined. For a fully open delamination with traction-free surfaces, oscillatory stress singularities always appear, leading to physically inadmissible field solutions. A refined model is introduced by considering a partially closed delamination with crack surfaces in finite-length contact. Stress singularities associated with a partially closed delamination having frictional crack-surface contact are determined, and are found to be diferent from the inverse square-root one of the frictionless-contact case. In the case of a delamination with very small area of crack closure, a simplified model having a square-root stress singularity is employed by taking the limit of the partially closed delamination. The possible presence of logarithmic-type stress singularity is examined; no logarithmic singularity of any kind is found in the composite delamination problem. Numerical examples of dominant stress singularities are shown for delaminations having crack-tip closure with different frictional coefficients between general (1) and (2) graphite-epoxy composites.

  16. Thermomechanical Fatigue Behavior of a Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Calcium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    The impact of these factors complicating hysteresis analysis may be reduced if the effects of imperfect thermomechanical cycles on material behavior...Temperature," in Fracture Mechanics of Ceramics. Vol. 7: ComPosites. Impact Statistics and High-Temperature Phenomena, Bradt, R.C., Evans, A.G., Hasselman...r), and hoop (0) directions for conditions of applied thermal and mechanical loads may be computed as Ogm A[1 + (b)21] -t, applied(•) (33) armn A 1

  17. Identifying design parameters controlling damage behaviors of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites using micromechanics as a virtual testing tool

    KAUST Repository

    Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah

    2017-03-31

    In this paper, we propose a micromechanical approach to predict damage mechanisms and their interactions in glass fibers/polypropylene thermoplastic composites. First, a representative volume element (RVE) of such materials was rigorously determined using a geometrical two-point probability function and the eigenvalue stabilization of homogenized elastic tensor obtained by Hill-Mandel kinematic homogenization. Next, the 3D finite element models of the RVE were developed accordingly. The fibers were modeled with an isotropic linear elastic material. The matrix was modeled with an isotropic linear elastic, rate-independent hyperbolic Drucker-Prager plasticity coupled with a ductile damage model that is able to show pressure dependency of the yield and damage behavior often found in a thermoplastic material. In addition, cohesive elements were inserted into the fiber-matrix interfaces to simulate debonding. The RVE faces are imposed with periodical boundary conditions to minimize the edge effect. The RVE was then subjected to transverse tensile loading in accordance with experimental tensile tests on [90]8 laminates. The model prediction was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental results in terms of the global stress-strain curves, including the linear and nonlinear portion of the response and also the failure point, making it a useful virtual testing tool for composite material design. Furthermore, the effect of tailoring the main parameters of thermoplastic composites is investigated to provide guidelines for future improvements of these materials.

  18. Long-term provisional anterior tooth replacement using fiber-reinforced composite and avulsed tooth crowns as pontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdagüven, Haktan; Say, Esra Can; Güler, Nurhan

    2010-02-01

    The loss of anterior teeth due to trauma requires immediate attention for function and esthetics. While implant- supported or conventional fixed prostheses may be the treatments of choice for adults, relatively noninvasive and reversible provisional procedures for tooth replacement are necessary for adolescents. In recent years, developments in fiber and composite technology offer a conservative treatment approach to restore the anterior edentulous space as a fixed provisional tooth replacement. This case report presents the chairside procedures of anterior tooth replacement in an adolescent using the avulsed tooth crowns as pontics which were bonded to teeth on either side of the edentulous space and reinforced with a preimpregnated fiber.

  19. Efficacy of Esthetic Retainers: Clinical Comparison between Multistranded Wires and Direct-Bond Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Splints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Scribante

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this longitudinal prospective randomized study was to evaluate the reliability of two different types of orthodontic retainers in clinical use: a multistrand stainless steel wire and a polyethylene ribbon-reinforced resin composite. Moreover the level of satisfaction of the patient about the esthetic result was also analyzed by means of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. 34 patients (9 boys and 25 girls, mean age 14.3, in the finishing phase of orthodontic treatment, were selected for the study. Since splints were applied the number, cause, and date of splint failures were recorded for each single tooth over 12 months. Statistical analysis was performed using a paired -test, Kaplan Meier survival estimates, and the log-rank test. Kruskal Wallis test was performed to analyze VAS recordings. Differences between the bond failure rates were not statistically significant. Esthetic result of VAS was significantly higher for polyethylene ribbon-reinforced resin retainers than for stainless steel wires.

  20. Paper-based energy-storage devices comprising carbon fiber-reinforced polypyrrole-cladophora nanocellulose composite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razaq, Aamir; Sjoedin, Martin; Stroemme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert [Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Nyholm, Leif [Department of Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    Composites of polypyrrole (PPy) and Cladophora nanocellulose, reinforced with 8 {mu}m-thick chopped carbon filaments, can be used as electrode materials to obtain paper-based energy-storage devices with unprecedented performance at high charge and discharge rates. Charge capacities of more than 200 C g{sup -1} (PPy) are obtained for paper-based electrodes at potential scan rates as high as 500 mV s{sup -1}, whereas cell capacitances of {proportional_to}60-70 F g{sup -1} (PPy) are reached for symmetric supercapacitor cells with capacitances up to 3.0 F (i.e.,0.48 F cm{sup -2}) when charged to 0.6 V using current densities as high as 31 A g{sup -1} based on the PPy weight (i.e., 99 mA cm{sup -2}). Energy and power densities of 1.75 Wh kg{sup -1} and 2.7 kW kg{sup -1}, respectively, are obtained when normalized with respect to twice the PPy weight of the smaller electrode. No loss in cell capacitance is seen during charging/discharging at 7.7 A g{sup -1} (PPy) over 1500 cycles. It is proposed that the nonelectroactive carbon filaments decrease the contact resistances and the resistance of the reduced PPy composite. The present straightforward approach represents significant progress in the development of low-cost and environmentally friendly paper-based energy-storage devices for high-power applications. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Self-Healing Capability of Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites for Recovery of Watertightness and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Nishiwaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Various types of fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCCs were experimentally studied to evaluate their self-healing capabilities regarding their watertightness and mechanical properties. Cracks were induced in the FRCC specimens during a tensile loading test, and the specimens were then immersed in static water for self-healing. By water permeability and reloading tests, it was determined that the FRCCs containing synthetic fiber and cracks of width within a certain range (<0.1 mm exhibited good self-healing capabilities regarding their watertightness. Particularly, the high polarity of the synthetic fiber (polyvinyl alcohol (PVA series and hybrid fiber reinforcing (polyethylene (PE and steel code (SC series showed high recovery ratio. Moreover, these series also showed high potential of self-healing of mechanical properties. It was confirmed that recovery of mechanical property could be obtained only in case when crack width was sufficiently narrow, both the visible surface cracks and the very fine cracks around the bridging of the SC fibers. Recovery of the bond strength by filling of the very fine cracks around the bridging fibers enhanced the recovery of the mechanical property.

  2. Progressive Failure of a Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composite Using the Method of Cells: Discretization Objective Computational Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The smeared crack band theory is implemented within the generalized method of cells and high-fidelity generalized method of cells micromechanics models to capture progressive failure within the constituents of a composite material while retaining objectivity with respect to the size of the discretization elements used in the model. An repeating unit cell containing 13 randomly arranged fibers is modeled and subjected to a combination of transverse tension/compression and transverse shear loading. The implementation is verified against experimental data (where available), and an equivalent finite element model utilizing the same implementation of the crack band theory. To evaluate the performance of the crack band theory within a repeating unit cell that is more amenable to a multiscale implementation, a single fiber is modeled with generalized method of cells and high-fidelity generalized method of cells using a relatively coarse subcell mesh which is subjected to the same loading scenarios as the multiple fiber repeating unit cell. The generalized method of cells and high-fidelity generalized method of cells models are validated against a very refined finite element model.

  3. Efficacy of Esthetic Retainers: Clinical Comparison between Multistranded Wires and Direct-Bond Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Splints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribante, Andrea; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Broggini, Simona; D'Allocco, Marina; Gandini, Paola

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal prospective randomized study was to evaluate the reliability of two different types of orthodontic retainers in clinical use: a multistrand stainless steel wire and a polyethylene ribbon-reinforced resin composite. Moreover the level of satisfaction of the patient about the esthetic result was also analyzed by means of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). 34 patients (9 boys and 25 girls, mean age 14.3), in the finishing phase of orthodontic treatment, were selected for the study. Since splints were applied the number, cause, and date of splint failures were recorded for each single tooth over 12 months. Statistical analysis was performed using a paired t-test, Kaplan Meier survival estimates, and the log-rank test. Kruskal Wallis test was performed to analyze VAS recordings. Differences between the bond failure rates were not statistically significant. Esthetic result of VAS was significantly higher for polyethylene ribbon-reinforced resin retainers than for stainless steel wires. PMID:22114597

  4. Influence of screw holes and gamma sterilization on properties of phosphate glass fiber-reinforced composite bone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew J; Harper, Lee; Scotchford, Colin A; Scammell, Brigitte E; Rudd, Chris D

    2013-05-01

    Polymers prepared from polylactic acid (PLA) have found a multitude of uses as medical devices. For a material that degrades, the main advantage is that an implant would not necessitate a second surgical event for removal. In this study, fibers produced from a quaternary phosphate-based glass (PBG) in the system 50P2O5-40CaO-5Na2O-5Fe2O3 were used to reinforce PLA polymer. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of screw holes in a range of PBG-reinforced PLA composites with varying fiber layup and volume fraction. The flexural properties obtained showed that the strength and modulus values increased with increasing fiber volume fraction; from 96 MPa to 320 MPa for strength and between 4 GPa and 24 GPa for modulus. Furthermore, utilizing a larger number of thinner unidirectional (UD) fiber prepreg layers provided a significant increase in mechanical properties, which was attributed to enhanced wet out and thus better fiber dispersion during production. The effect of gamma sterilization via flexural tests showed no statistically significant difference between the sterilized and nonsterilized samples, with the exception of the modulus values for samples with screw holes. Degradation profiles revealed that samples with screw holes degraded faster than those without screw holes due to an increased surface area for the plates with screw holes in PBS up to 30 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis revealed fiber pullout before and after degradation. Compared with various fiber impregnation samples, with 25% volume fraction, 8 thinner unidirectional prepreg stacked samples had the shortest fiber pull-out lengths in comparison to the other samples investigated.

  5. Post-buckling analysis of composite beams: A simple intuitive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    form expressions for eval- uating the post-buckling behaviour of composite beams with axially immovable ends using an ..... References. Carlos E N M 2009 Buckling and post-buckling of extensible rods revisited: A multiple-scale solution. Int.

  6. Rapid replacement of Tangier Island bridges including lightweight and durable fiber-reinforced polymer deck systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite cellular deck systems were used as new bridge decks on two replacement bridges on Tangier Island, Virginia. The most important characteristics of this application were reduced self-weight and increased durabil...

  7. The effect of post type and length on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, John D; McLaren, Charles I; Yaman, Peter; Bin-Shuwaish, Mohammed S; Dennison, Joseph D; McDonald, Neville J

    2009-03-01

    Few studies have been conducted to determine a correlation between the flexural modulus of metal and fiber-reinforced posts and the fracture resistance and failure mode of teeth restored with posts. Questions remain as to whether a longer post length or a post with a higher flexural modulus will significantly improve the fracture resistance of a tooth restored with a prefabricated post and core. The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture resistance and mode of failure of endodontically treated teeth restored with 3 different post systems, including 2 fiber-reinforced posts (Light-Post and Snowlight) and a stainless steel post (ParaPost XP). Seventy single-rooted premolars were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction and then endodontically treated. Teeth were distributed into 7 groups. Three different prefabricated posts were cemented into a post space either 5 or 10 mm in depth, and composite resin (ParaPost ParaCore automix) cores were fabricated. A composite resin core group without a post served as a negative control. Specimens were loaded at 90 degrees to the longitudinal axis until ultimate failure occurred. An initial failure load and mode of failure were also recorded. Statistical analysis was performed for initial and ultimate failure loads of groups by using 2-way ANOVA (P=.05). The groups with ParaPost XP posts demonstrated significantly higher initial and ultimate mean failure loads when compared with the fiber-reinforced post groups. The highest mean (SD) initial failure load was with the ParaPost XP group with a 10-mm post length (170.05 (60.08) N), and the lowest was with the Snowlight group with the 5-mm post length (62.85 (18.47) N). The stiffness and the load to initial fracture of the teeth restored with ParaPost XP posts were higher compared with the fiber-reinforced post groups.

  8. A structured analysis of in vitro failure loads and failure modes of fiber, metal, and ceramic post-and-core systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Kreulen, C.M.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study sought to aggregate literature data on in vitro failure loads and failure modes of prefabricated fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) post systems and to compare them to those of prefabricated metal, custom-cast, and ceramic post systems. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The literature was

  9. An experimental and theoretical investigation of stick-slip, steady-state and roughness dominated sliding in fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackin, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composites depends strongly upon the properties of the fiber/matrix interface. Enhanced fracture resistance and strain to failure are synonymous with debonding and sliding of the reinforcement phase. Thus, the two key properties of the composite are the interfacial toughness and the post-debond sliding stress. After debonding a variety of interfacial sliding phenomena are noted, including: stick-slip, steady-state, and roughness dominated sliding. The interfacial properties, including the coefficient of friction, the radial clamping pressure, asperity amplitude, the elastic properties of the constituents, and the compliance of the test machine, each play a role in the operative sliding phenomenon. Experiments have been conducted to explore each of these phenomena. In addition, models have been developed that rationalize all of the observed behavior

  10. Post-buckling analysis of composite beams: A simple intuitive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    post-buckling analysis of composite beams poses difficulty in selecting an accurate axial dis- placement ... endeavour of the present work is to propose an approximate closed-form expressions for eval- uating the ..... The post-buckling load expressions presented in table 3 also reveal the existence of quadratic. 0. 10. 20. 30.

  11. Evaluation of Different Techniques of Active Thermography for Quantification of Artificial Defects in Fiber-Reinforced Composites Using Thermal and Phase Contrast Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Röllig, Mathias; Gower, Michael; Lodeiro, Maria; Baker, Graham; Monte, Christian; Adibekyan, Albert; Gutschwager, Berndt; Knazowicka, Lenka; Blahut, Ales

    2018-05-01

    For assuring the safety and reliability of components and constructions in energy applications made of fiber-reinforced polymers (e.g., blades of wind turbines and tidal power plants, engine chassis, flexible oil and gas pipelines) innovative non-destructive testing methods are required. Within the European project VITCEA complementary methods (shearography, microwave, ultrasonics and thermography) have been further developed and validated. Together with partners from the industry, test specimens have been constructed and selected on-site containing different artificial and natural defect artefacts. As base materials, carbon and glass fibers in different orientations and layering embedded in different matrix materials (epoxy, polyamide) have been considered. In this contribution, the validation of flash and lock-in thermography to these testing problems is presented. Data analysis is based on thermal contrasts and phase evaluation techniques. Experimental data are compared to analytical and numerical models. Among others, the influence of two different types of artificial defects (flat bottom holes and delaminations) with varying diameters and depths and of two different materials (CFRP and GFRP) with unidirectional and quasi-isotropic fiber alignment is discussed.

  12. A clinical evaluation on adhesive posts in extensive composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavamnasiri M. Associate Professor

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem: A few studies have been conducted about bioglass posts."nAim: The aim of this study was to compare bioglass posts with prefabricated metallic posts in clinical performance of extensive composite restorations for anterior endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods: Sixty endodontocally maxillary anterior teeth, with horizontally or vertically destruction, were selected. Teeth were divided into two groups based on the kind of post: Metallic prefabricated parapost and bioglass post. Each group was divided into three subgroups based on anterior bite: normal, deep bite and edge to edge. Gutta-percha was removed from 2/3 of canal length for parapost and 1/3 for bioglass post. After etching with phosphoric-acid (37% and applying dentine bonding syntac, Duo cement was used for the adhesion of bioglass post and a self cured composite (Degufil for parapost. Restoration was done with a hybrid composite (Heliomolar. Follow up studies, radio-graphically and clinically, were done every three months for a 1.5-year period. Exact Fisher and Pearson tests were used for data analysis."nResults: Apical lesion was not observed in any of the radiographs. Post seal was increased by resin cement and dentin bonding agent. Post type did not significantly affect on the clinical success rate of the restorations. The retention of restoration, for both posts, was the same. Crown destruction had no significant effect on success rate. The type of anterior bite had a significant effect on success rate, as the total 6.6% failure rate was related to the patients with anterior deep bite."nConclusion: It is suggested to use metallic paraposts and bioglass posts, in extensive composite restorations for patients with deep-bite, more conservatively.

  13. Environmental durability of reinforced concrete deck girders strengthened for shear with surface bonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced : concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effor...

  14. Environmental Durability of Reinforced Concrete Deck Girders Strengthened for Shear with Surface-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    "This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort...

  15. Adhesive retention of experimental fiber-reinforced composite, orthodontic acrylic resin, and aliphatic urethane acrylate to silicone elastomer for maxillofacial prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosor, Begüm Yerci; Artunç, Celal; Şahan, Heval

    2015-07-01

    A key factor of an implant-retained facial prosthesis is the success of the bonding between the substructure and the silicone elastomer. Little has been reported on the bonding of fiber reinforced composite (FRC) to silicone elastomers. Experimental FRC could be a solution for facial prostheses supported by light-activated aliphatic urethane acrylate, orthodontic acrylic resin, or commercially available FRCs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding of the experimental FRC, orthodontic acrylic resin, and light-activated aliphatic urethane acrylate to a commercially available high-temperature vulcanizing silicone elastomer. Shear and 180-degree peel bond strengths of 3 different substructures (experimental FRC, orthodontic acrylic resin, light-activated aliphatic urethane acrylate) (n=15) to a high-temperature vulcanizing maxillofacial silicone elastomer (M511) with a primer (G611) were assessed after 200 hours of accelerated artificial light-aging. The specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 10 mm/min. Data were collected and statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, followed by the Bonferroni correction and the Dunnett post hoc test (α=.05). Modes of failure were visually determined and categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed and were statistically analyzed with the chi-squared goodness-of-fit test (α=.05). As the mean shear bond strength values were evaluated statistically, no difference was found among the experimental FRC, aliphatic urethane acrylate, and orthodontic acrylic resin subgroups (P>.05). The mean peel bond strengths of experimental fiber reinforced composite and aliphatic urethane acrylate were not found to be statistically different (P>.05). The mean value of the orthodontic acrylic resin subgroup peel bond strength was found to be statistically lower (P.05). Shear forces predominantly exhibited cohesive failure (64.4%), whereas peel forces predominantly exhibited adhesive failure (93.3%). The

  16. Thermal post-buckling of slender composite and FGM columns ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple and novel finite element (FE) formulation is proposed to study the thermal post-buckling of composite and FGM columns with axially immovable ends and operating in severe thermal environment. A linear eigenvalue analysis gives the critical buckling temperature but practically the buckled columns canwithstand ...

  17. Polishing and coating carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites with a carbon-titanium layer enhances adhesion and growth of osteoblast-like MG63 cells and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacáková, L; Starý, V; Kofronová, O; Lisá, V

    2001-03-15

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites (CFRC) are considered to be promising materials for orthopedic and dental surgery. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to be similar to those of bone, and their chemical composition (close to pure carbon) promises that they will be tolerated well by the surrounding tissue. In this study, CFRC composites were fabricated from phenolic resin and unidirectionally oriented Torayca carbon fibers by carbonization (1000 degrees C) and graphitization (2500 degrees C). The material then was cut with a diamond saw into sheets of 8 x 10 x 3 mm, and the upper surface was polished by colloidal SiO2 and/or covered with a carbon-titanium (C:Ti) layer (3.3 microm) using the plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition method. Three different kinds of modified samples were prepared: polished only, covered only, and polished + covered. Untreated samples served as a control. The surface roughness of these samples, measured by a Talysurf profilometer, decreased significantly after polishing but usually did not decrease after coating with a C:Ti layer. On all three modified surfaces, human osteoblast-like cells of the MG63 line and rat vascular smooth muscle cells (both cultured in a Dulbecco's minimum essential medium with 10% fetal bovine serum) adhered at higher numbers (by 21-87% on day 1 after seeding) and exhibited a shorter population doubling time (by 13-40%). On day 4 after seeding, these cells attained higher population densities (by 61-378%), volume (by 18-37%), and protein content (by 16-120%). These results were more pronounced in VSMC than in MG63 cells and in both groups of C:Ti-covered samples than in the polished only samples. The release of carbon particles from the CFRC composites was significantly decreased--by 8 times in the polished only, 24 times in the covered only, and 42 times in the polished + covered samples. These results show that both polishing and carbon-titanium covering significantly improve the

  18. Effect of anodic surface treatment on PAN-based carbon fiber and its relationship to the fracture toughness of the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarraf, Hamid; Skarpova, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    The effect of anodic surface treatment on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers surface properties and the mechanical behavior of the resulting carbon fiber-polymer composites has been studied in terms of the contact angle measurements of fibers and the fracture toughness of composites...

  19. Microscale damage mechanisms and degradation of fiber-reinforced composites for wind energy applications: results of Danish–Chinese collaborative investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Zhou, H.W.; Yi, H.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research works in the area of experimental and computational analyses of microscale mechanisms of strength, damage and degradation of glass fiber polymer composites for wind energy applications, which were carried out in the framework of a series of Sino–Danish collaborative research...... projects, are summarized in this article. In a series of scanning electron microscopy in situ experimental studies of composite degradation under off-axis tensile, compressive and cyclic loadings as well as three-dimensional computational experiments based on micromechanics of composites and damage...

  20. Squid pen-inspired chitinous functional materials: Hierarchical chitin fibers by centrifugal jet-spinning and transparent chitin fiber-reinforced composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Joong-Kwon; Lim, Young-Woo; Hwang, Hyun-Bin; Kwon, Hee-Young; Bae, Byeong-Soo; Jin, Jungho

    2018-01-01

    Here, inspired by the fibrous composite structure of a squid pen, we introduce hierarchical chitin fibers (herein, termed "Chiber") and their transparent composites and demonstrate the potential of these chitinous functional materials as a sustainable separation-membrane and reinforcing filler for composites. We employ a centrifugal jet-spinning process to fabricate Chiber with aligned chitin nanofibrillar architectures, for which we discuss the processing-morphology relationship. A nonwoven fiber-mat made of Chiber exhibits excellent adsorbing performance for a toxic ionic dye (Congo Red), and has a low coefficient of thermal expansion comparable to that of glass fibers. Finally, we demonstrate a squid pen-mimetic transparent composite using Chiber and investigate its optical property.

  1. Rapid Strengthening of Full-Sized Concrete Beams with Powder-Actuated fastening Systems and Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Composite Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bank, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    A research study was conducted to determine if the method of retrofitting reinforced concrete beams with powder-actuated fasteners and composite materials was applicable to full-scale flexural members...

  2. Physical-Mechanical Properties of a Fiber-Reinforced Composite Based on an ELUR-P Carbon Tape and XT-118 Binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Kholmogorov, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    A series of tests to identify the physical-mechanical properties of a unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced composite based on an ELUR-P carbon fibers and an XT-118 epoxy binder were performed. The form of the stress-strain diagrams of specimens loaded in tension in the longitudinal, transverse, and ±45° directions and in compression in the longitudinal and ±45° directions were examined. Tensile diagrams were also determined for the XT-118 binder alone. The relation between the tangential shear modulus and shear strains of the composite was highly nonlinear from the very beginning of loading and depended on the loading type. Such a nonlinear response of the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite in shear cannot be the result of plastic deformation of binder, but can be explained only by structural changes caused by the inner buckling instability of the composite at micro- and mesolevels..

  3. Matrix structure evolution and thermo-mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiangcheng, E-mail: lixiangcheng@wust.edu.cn; Li, Yaxiong; Chen, Liufang; Zhu, Boquan, E-mail: zbqref@263.net

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Carbon fibers are formed in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites under the action of nano Ni. • Starting growth temperature is 900 °C and growth mechanism agrees with V–S model. • The high temperature strength of composites can be increased by above 40%. • The thermal shock resistance can be enhanced by above 20%. - Abstract: The spalling and corrosion during the thermal cycles are the main causes of the damages observed in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites that are used in molten-iron system. Using the catalyst of nano Ni and ball pitch in the matrix, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites were prepared with the anti-oxidant addition of silicon. The results indicate that the high temperature of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites can be increased by above 42%, and the thermal shock resistance can be enhanced by above 20% because the ball pitch is carbonized and releases C{sub x}H{sub y} vapor, which can be pyrolized to carbon atoms and subsequently deposited into carbon fibers under the catalyst action. The starting temperature of carbon fiber growth is approximately 900 °C, and their diameter and aspect ratio can increase with the rising temperature. The in-situ generation of carbon fibers in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C castable composites can significantly improve the fibers’ thermo-mechanical properties.

  4. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironova, M.; Ivanova, M.; Naidenov, V.; Georgiev, I.; Stary, J.

    2015-10-01

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro - fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete.

  5. Reinforced concrete T-beams externally prestressed with unbonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennitz, Anders; Nilimaa, Jonny; Täljsten, Björn

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a series of experiments examining the behavior of seven beams prestressed with unbonded external carbon fiberreinforced polymer (CFRP) tendons anchored using a newly developed anchorage and post-tensioning system. The effects of varying the initial tendon depth, prestressing...

  6. Non-destructive evaluation of fiber-reinforced composites with a fast 2D fiber-optic laser-ultrasound scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; Shtokolov, Alex; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Laser ultrasonic (LU) inspection represents an attractive, non-contact method to evaluate composite materials. Current non-contact systems, however, have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact piezoelectric detection. They are also difficult to adjust, very expensive, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Here, we demonstrate that most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe scheme. In particular, a new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of an all-optical LU pump-probe system for high speed non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) of aircraft composites. The performance of the LU system is demonstrated on a composite sample typically used in the aircraft industry. Wide-band ultrasound probe signals are generated directly at the sample surface with a pulsed diode-pumped laser delivering nanosecond laser pulses at a 1 kHz repetition rate with a pulse energy of 2 mJ. A balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is employed to detect pressure signals in a 1-10 MHz frequency range at the same point (an 8 μm focal spot) on the composite surface. A fast (up to 100 mm/s) 2D translation system is employed to move the sample during scanning and produce a complete B-scan consisting of one thousand A-scans in less than a second. The sensitivity of this system, in terms of the noise equivalent pressure, is found to be only 10 dB above the Nyquist thermal noise limit. To our knowledge, this is the best reported sensitivity for a non-contact ultrasonic detector of this dimension.

  7. Environmental durability of reinforced concrete deck girders strengthened for shear with surface-bonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort ...

  8. Clinical studies of fiber-reinforced resin-bonded fixed partial dentures: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heumen, C.C.M. van; Kreulen, C.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, follow-up studies on fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FRC FPDs) have been described. Combining the results of these studies to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of FRC FPDs is challenging. The objective of this systematic review was to obtain survival

  9. Size-Resolved Characterization of Particles and Fibers Released during Abrasion of Fiber-Reinforced Composite in a Workplace Influenced by Ambient Background Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Kirsten I.; Levin, Marcus; Jensen, Alexander C. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of high-to low-resolution microscopy and particle chemical analysis during normal vacuum and cryo-conditions to identify the nature and relative abundances of process-generated particles and fibers from sanding of a glass and carbon fiber epoxy layer-composite in a workplace...... of ambient particles to the background in the production facility was observed in the sub-micron size range. Fibers are posing a dominant exposure risk in the micron size range, with carbon fibers dominating in count....

  10. Numerical and Experimental Characterization of Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composite Structures with Embedded Piezoelectric Sensor-Actuator Arrays for Ultrasonic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudiusz Holeczek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents preliminary numerical and experimental studies of active textile-reinforced thermoplastic composites with embedded sensor-actuator arrays. The goal of the investigations was the assessment of directional sound wave generation capability using embedded sensor-actuator arrays and developed a wave excitation procedure for ultrasound measurement tasks. The feasibility of the proposed approach was initially confirmed in numerical investigations assuming idealized mechanical and geometrical conditions. The findings were validated in real-life conditions on specimens of elementary geometry. Herein, the technological aspects of unique automated assembly of thermoplastic films containing adapted thermoplastic-compatible piezoceramic modules and conducting paths were described.

  11. Design Guidelines for In-Plane Mechanical Properties of SiC Fiber-Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay V.

    2008-01-01

    In-plane tensile stress-strain, tensile creep, and after-creep retained tensile properties of melt-infiltrated SiC-SiC composites reinforced with different fiber types were evaluated with an emphasis on obtaining simple or first-order microstructural design guidelines for these in-plane mechanical properties. Using the mini-matrix approach to model stress-strain behavior and the results of this study, three basic general design criteria for stress and strain limits are formulated, namely a design stress limit, a design total strain limit, and an after-creep design retained strength limit. It is shown that these criteria can be useful for designing components for high temperature applications.

  12. Simulation of Post Failure Response in Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the compressive failure mechanism in the form of kinkband formation in fiber composites. Taking into account the non-linearties of the constituents, a constitutive model for unidirectional layered materials has been developed and incorporated as a user material...... in a commercially available finite element code to study effects of kinkband inclination angle and micro-geometry on kinkband formation. The localization of deformation into a single kinkband is studied. In the post failure regime a state is reached where deformation in the kinkband gets stabilized and the kinkband...

  13. Fracture Strength of Endodontically-treated Teeth Restored with Post and Cores and Composite Cores Only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Valandro, L. F.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the fracture strength of different conditioned metallic posts, fiber-reinforced-composite posts and composite cores only in teeth without coronal tooth structure and determined failure modes after the fracture test. Post spaces were prepared in the root canals, and the teeth were

  14. Modal analysis of pre and post impacted nano composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Velmurugan

    Full Text Available Modal analysis is carried out on pre and post impacted nano composite laminates. The laminates are prepared using 3, 5 and 8 layers of 610gsm glass woven roving mats(WRM with epoxy resin and montmorillonite(MMT clay content is varied from 1% to 5%. Impulse hammer technique is used to find natural frequency and damping factor of laminates. Medium velocity impact tests are conducted by using a gas gun. The vibration responses of natural frequency and damping factor are obtained and are studied for laminates with all edges clamped boundary conditions. Results show considerable improvement in natural frequency and damping factor due to nano clay addition. It is also seen that the nano clay controls the delamination due to impact loading.

  15. Influence of increment thickness on dentin bond strength and light transmission of composite base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Tarek A; Garoushi, Sufyan; Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Lassila, Lippo V; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2017-06-01

    Bulk-fill resin composites (BFCs) are gaining popularity in restorative dentistry due to the reduced chair time and ease of application. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of increment thickness on dentin bond strength and light transmission of different BFCs and a new discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite. One hundred eighty extracted sound human molars were prepared for a shear bond strength (SBS) test. The teeth were divided into four groups (n = 45) according to the resin composite used: regular particulate filler resin composite: (1) G-ænial Anterior [GA] (control); bulk-fill resin composites: (2) Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill [TEBF] and (3) SDR; and discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite: (4) everX Posterior [EXP]. Each group was subdivided according to increment thickness (2, 4, and 6 mm). The irradiance power through the material of all groups/subgroups was quantified (MARC® Resin Calibrator; BlueLight Analytics Inc.). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. SBS and light irradiance decreased as the increment's height increased (p composite used. EXP presented the highest SBS in 2- and 4-mm-thick increments when compared to other composites, although the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Light irradiance mean values arranged in descending order were (p composites. Discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite showed the highest value of curing light transmission, which was also seen in improved bonding strength to the underlying dentin surface. Discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite can be applied safely in bulks of 4-mm increments same as other bulk-fill composites, although, in 2-mm thickness, the investigated composites showed better performance.

  16. The effects of composition, diameter and post-curing methods on the flexural properties of fiber posts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ereifej.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the influence of fiber composition, diameter and post-curing treatments performed at relining on flexural strength and modulus of fiber-posts. Materials and methods: Sixty posts of Reforpost® Glass Fiber [GF] and Reforpost® Carbon Fiber [CF] (Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil with diameters of 1.0mm and 1.4mm were used. Each group was further subdivided into three subgroups (n=5 according to treatment received: dry-stored control group (C, oven-cured (Ov or autoclaved (Ac. A universal testing machine measured flexural strength and modulus of all specimens. Results: Post composition and post-curing treatments had no significant effects on flexural properties of specimens while post diameter had significant effects (p<0.05. The highest flexural strength and modulus (MPa (1331±95.8 and 21532±1550, respectively were obtained with Ov/GF/1.1, while lowest values (890±79.4 and 10675±952, respectively were for Ac/GF/1.5. Conclusions: 1.1mm diameter posts had better mechanical properties than 1.5mm thick posts. Neither post composition nor post-curing procedures affected the mechanical properties of relined posts.

  17. Fracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, Jeffery; Bordelon, Amanda; Gaedicke, Cristian; Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio

    2008-01-01

    In concrete pavements, a single concrete mixture design is selected to resist mechanical loading without attempting to adversely affect the concrete pavement shrinkage, ride quality, or noise attenuation. An alternative approach is to design distinct layers within the concrete pavement surface which have specific functions thus achieving higher performance at a lower cost. The objective of this research was to address the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials (FGCM) for rigid pavements by testing and modeling the fracture behavior of different combinations of layered plain and synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete materials. Fracture parameters and the post-peak softening behavior were obtained for each FGCM beam configuration by the three point bending beam test. The peak loads and initial fracture energy between the plain, fiber-reinforced, and FGCM signified similar crack initiation. The total fracture energy indicated improvements in fracture behavior of FGCM relative to full-depth plain concrete. The fracture behavior of FGCM depended on the position of the fiber-reinforced layer relative to the starter notch. The fracture parameters of both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete were embedded into a finite element-based cohesive zone model. The model successfully captured the experimental behavior of the FGCMs and predicted the fracture behavior of proposed FGCM configurations and structures. This integrated approach (testing and modeling) demonstrates the viability of FGCM for designing layered concrete pavements system

  18. Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Mortars Incorporating Nano-Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ghazy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Repair and rehabilitation of deteriorating concrete elements are of significant concern in many infrastructural facilities and remain a challenging task. Concerted research efforts are needed to develop repair materials that are sustainable, durable, and cost-effective. Research data show that fiber-reinforced mortars/concretes have superior performance in terms of volume stability and toughness. In addition, it has been recently reported that nano-silica particles can generally improve the mechanical and durability properties of cement-based systems. Thus, there has been a growing interest in the use of nano-modified fiber-reinforced cementitious composites/mortars (NFRM in repair and rehabilitation applications of concrete structures. The current study investigates various mechanical and durability properties of nano-modified mortar containing different types of fibers (steel, basalt, and hybrid (basalt and polypropylene, in terms of compressive and flexural strengths, toughness, drying shrinkage, penetrability, and resistance to salt-frost scaling. The results highlight the overall effectiveness of the NFRM owing to the synergistic effects of nano-silica and fibers.

  19. Life Prediction for FRP composites with Data Fusion & Machine Learning

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-fidelity, probabilistic predictions of damage evolution in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite structures could accelerate development and certification of...

  20. Microleakage of Different Post Systems and a Custom Adapted Fiber Post

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Geramipanah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The effects of closely adapting a prefabricated fiber to the post space remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to quantify the microleakages of a custom adapted fiber-reinforced post, a prefabricated quartz fiber post and a cast post using nondestructive methods.Materials and Methods: Sixty-five extracted human premolars were endodontically treated and randomly divided into three groups (n=15, which were restored using a cast post-and-core, a custom adapted fiber post (Refropost with a microhybrid microfiller resin composite (Gradia, or a prefabricated quartz fiber post (DT light post and two groups of control ( n=10. All groups were cemented using a dual polymerizing resin cement (Panavia F2.0. A composite core (Z100 was used for the fiber posts. The microleakage was calculated for the experimental and control groups before and after thermal cycling and cycling loading using a radiotracer solution (thallium 201 chloride and a gamma counter device. Data were subjected to statistical analysis of ANOVA and Tukey HSD at significant level of P< 0.05.Results: Significantly lower microleakage values were found for the cast post-and-core (mean value =16.04 ×104 and custom adapted fiber post groups (mean value=14.36×104. Thermal cycling and cyclic loading had no significant effect on the microleakage value of any tested group.Conclusion: Post systems with improved adaptation showed similar microleakage to casting post

  1. Thermal post-buckling of slender composite and FGM columns ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Venkateswara Rao

    linear post-buckling problem is obtained by treating it as a linear eigenvalue problem using the concept of effective stiffness. Here, the total degrees of freedom ... In these studies, the thermal buckling load and the corresponding nonlinear ..... Noordhoff International, Leyden. [3] Rao G V and Raju P C 1977 Post-buckling of ...

  2. Challenges and Opportunities for Nanotechnology in Multi-Functional Composite Structures (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baur, Jeff; Silverman, Edward

    2006-01-01

    .... Of the wide variety of structural applications, fiber-reinforced composites for aerospace structures have some of the most demanding applications with extreme requirements in physical, chemical...

  3. Flexural behaviour of post-cured composites at oral-simulating temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C T; Vijayaraghavan, T V; Lee, S Y; Tsai, A; Huang, H M; Pan, L C

    2001-07-01

    Post-curing treatments have been known to improve the mechanical stability of visible light-cured composites. After individual post-curing treatment, the flexural strength (FS) of four commercial direct/indirect placement composite materials which differ greatly in composition [oligocarbonate dimethacrylate (OCDMA)-based Conquest C & B (CQT), Bisphenol-A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA)-based Charisma, urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)-based Concept (CCT), and BisGMA/UDMA-based Dentacolor] was evaluated under water in the temperature range of 12-50 degrees C. A control series was tested in air at room temperature (25 +/- 1 degrees C). Data were analysed using ANOVA and Duncan's test. Flexural strengths overall decreased (20-40%, P OCDMA-based materials. Post-cured composites can be significantly affected by exposure to oral environments. Different composition determines the degree of influence.

  4. Detecting moisture in composite honeycomb panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, J. D.; Sapp, J. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Radiographic inspection technique detects liquids trapped in cells of honeycomb composite panels constructed with porous fiber-reinforced plastic skins. Procedure is of use in industries such as aerospace or automotive engineering where honeycomb composites are being used or studied.

  5. Chemical composition changes of post-harvest coconut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coconut inflorescence sap (CIS) is sweet, oyster-white and translucent and was reported to be highly nutritive and a good digestive agent. The chemical composition changes including total sugar, reducing sugar, ethanol, total acidity, volatile acid, amino acid, vitamin C and total phenolic contents of postharvest coconut ...

  6. Stress distribution in roots restored with different types of post systems with composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Daizo; Miura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Chikako; Komada, Wataru; Shin, Chiharu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Masuoka, David

    2008-07-01

    Although composite resin core is used with various types of prefabricated posts, it remains unclear which kind of material is most suitable for the post. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of prefabricated posts on the stress distribution within the root by finite element analysis. Posts and cores were built up with composite resin and four types of prefabricated posts: two types of glass fiber posts (GFP1, GFP2) with low and high Young's moduli, a titanium post (TIP), and a stainless steel post (SSP). In all models, stress distribution during function was calculated. There were differences in stress concentration at the root around the end of posts. The magnitudes of stress for GFP1, GFP2, TIP, and STP were 8.7, 9.3, 11.7, and 13.9 MPa respectively. Given the results obtained, GFP1 was the most suitable material for post fabrication since this model showed a lower stress value. It would therefore mean a lower possibility of root fracture.

  7. Reinforced concrete T-beams externally prestressed with unbonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennitz, Anders; Nilimaa, Jonny; Täljsten, Björn

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a series of experiments examining the behavior of seven beams prestressed with unbonded external carbon fiberreinforced polymer (CFRP) tendons anchored using a newly developed anchorage and post-tensioning system. The effects of varying the initial tendon depth, prestressing...... force, and the presence of a deviator were investigated. The results were compared to those observed with analogous beams prestressed with steel tendons, common beam theory, and predictions made using an analytical model adapted from the literature. It was found that steel and CFRP tendons had very...

  8. Bond Strength between Hybrid Fiber-Reinforced Lightweight Aggregate Concrete Substrate and Self-Compacting Concrete as Topping Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Widodo, Slamet

    2017-01-01

    Structural performance evaluation of composite concrete slabs that were constructed using partially precast concreting system which utilized Hybrid Fiber-Reinforced Lightweight Aggregate Concrete (HyFRLWAC) as stay in-place formwork and self-compacting concrete (SCC) as topping layer was conducted in this research. This paper focused on determining the appropriate strength limit criteria of interface between two different concrete layers. The tensile strength was tested using pull-off test, w...

  9. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    OpenAIRE

    PANITIWAT, Prapaporn; SALIMEE, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2...

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of a Polyimide-Epoxy Composite for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, An; Xu, Chun

    2018-03-01

    Epoxy (EP) resins have been employed in dentistry for years, but their intrinsic brittleness demands a reinforcement to make them an ideal dental material that combines strength, toughness, and aesthetics. In this study, an EP resin was reinforced with a low-molecular-weight polyimide (PI). The PI/EP composites were subjected to three-point bending tests and examined by the scanning electron microscopy. It was found that blending PI with EP in proper proportions strengthened EP without sacrificing its toughness. The PI/EP composite could be employed in dentistry as the matrix of fiber-reinforced dental root canal posts.

  11. Fast Cure Repair Kit for Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has a need for technologies that will enable them to repair damage to composite structures. Fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials are fast gaining ground...

  12. Development of Abaca Fiber-reinforced Foamed Fly Ash Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Pauline S. Ngo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental and economic concerns have led to the need for more sustainable construction materials. The development of foamed geopolymer combines the benefit of reduced environmental footprint and attractive properties of geopolymer technology with foam concrete’s advantages of being lightweight, insulating and energy-saving. In this study, alkali-treated abaca fiber-reinforced geopolymer composites foamed with H2O2 were developed using fly ash as the geopolymer precursor. The effects of abaca fiber loading, foaming agent dosage, and curing temperature on mechanical strength were evaluated using Box-Behken design of experiment with three points replicated. Volumetric weight of samples ranged from 1966 kg/m3 to 2249 kg/m3. Measured compressive strength and flexural ranged from 19.56 MPa to 36.84 MPa, and 2.41 MPa to 6.25 MPa, respectively. Results suggest enhancement of compressive strength by abaca reinforcement and elevated temperature curing. Results, however, indicate a strong interaction between curing temperature and foaming agent dosage, which observably caused the composite’s compressive strength to decline when simultaneously set at high levels. Foaming agent dosage was the only factor detected to significantly affect flexural strength.

  13. Crown vs. composite for post-retained restorations: A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skupien, J.A.; Cenci, M.S.; Opdam, N.J.; Kreulen, C.M.; Huysmans, M.C.; Pereira-Cenci, T.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This randomized clinical trial compared the survival of composite resin restorations and metal-ceramic crowns on endodontically treated teeth that received a glass fiber post using 2 different cementation methods. METHODS: Forty-seven patients (age 42.5+/-11.5) with fifty-seven

  14. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, Deepa; Pandey, Swapnil; Kubde, Rajesh; Rathod, Yogesh; Atara, Rahul; Rathi, Shravan

    2013-10-01

    Fiber posts are widely used for restoration of mutilated teeth that lack adequate coronal tooth structure to retain a core for definitive restoration, bond between the fiber post and composite material depends upon the chemical reaction between the post surface and the resin material used for building up the core. In attempt to maximize the resin bonding with fiber post, different post surface conditioning is advocated. Therefore the purpose of the study is to examine the interfacial strength between fiber post and composite, as core build-up material after different surface treatments of fiber posts. Twenty fiber posts were split into four groups off five each according to different surface treatments viz. Group I-(Negative Control), Group II-Silanization (Positive control), Group III-(37% Phosphoric Acid & Silanization) ,Group IV- (10% Hydrogen Peroxide and Silanization). With the preformed plastic mould, a core of dual cure composite resin around the fiber post having the uniform thickness was created. Tensile bond strength of each specimen was measured under Universal Testing Machine (UTM) at the cross head speed of 3mm/min. The results achieved with 10% Hydrogen peroxide had a marked effect on micro tensile bond strength values between the tested materials. Immense enhancement in the silanization efficiency of quartz fiber phase was observed with different surface chemical treatment of the resin phase of fiber posts with the marked increase in the micro-tensile bond strength between fiber post and composite core. Shori D, Pandey S, Kubde R, Rathod Y, Atara R, Rathi S. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):27-32.

  15. Cryogenic Cycling Behavior of Polymeric Composite Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seferis, James

    2002-01-01

    The basis of this research was an exploration of the fundamental phenomena that determine the response of fiber-reinforced composite materials to thermal cycling between cryogenic and ambient temperatures...

  16. Radiation processing for PTFE composite reinforced with carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akihiro Oshima; Akira Udagawa; Yousuke Morita

    1999-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of crosslinked PTFE as a polymer matrix for carbon fiber-reinforced composite materials. The carbon fiber-reinforced PTFE pre-composite, which is laminated with PTFE fine powder, is crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. Mechanical and frictional properties of the crosslinked PTFE composite obtained are higher than those of PTFE resin. The crosslinked PTFE composite with high mechanical and radiation resistant performance is obtained by radiation crosslinking process

  17. Post-impact performance of composites; Predicting Compression after Impact (CAI) in composite laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esrall, F.

    2013-01-01

    Impact damage has been known to seriously limit the performance of composite aircraft structures. In the preliminary design phase, tens of thousands of subparts need to be analyzed for impact. Over the years, many approaches have been proposed to study the creation of impact damage and to determine

  18. Esthetic recovery of smile using composite resin and "biological posts" and crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Andrade, Raquel Gonçalves; Ribondi, Juliano Rodrigues; Botelho, Adriana Maria; Fernandes, Anacélia Mendes; Tavano, Karine Taís Aguiar

    2012-01-01

    The recovery of teeth that have been extensively destroyed by dental caries can be achieved through direct and indirect restorative procedures. This paper presents a case of the esthetic and functional recovery of permanent maxillary incisors with extensive dental caries in an adolescent patient through the use of a composite resin and "biological posts and crowns". A case report was drafted to describe the direct restoration of central maxillary incisors using composite resin and endodontic treatment of the lateral maxillary incisors, the construction of dentinal posts, the adaptation and cementing of the posts to the root canals, preparation and molding of crown portions, model construction, the choice of extracted teeth and the making and cementing of "biological crowns". The use of a composite resin and the cementing of "biological posts and crowns" reestablish dental esthetics and function. Biological restorations maintain all the characteristics of natural teeth and have a significant psychosocial impact on the patient's quality of life. However it should be stressed that this technique was only indicated in the present case after the determination of a significant improvement in oral hygiene.

  19. Enhanced Schapery Theory Software Development for Modeling Failure of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive damage and failure analysis (PDFA) tools are needed to predict the nonlinear response of advanced fiber-reinforced composite structures. Predictive tools should incorporate the underlying physics of the damage and failure mechanisms observed in the composite, and should utilize as few input parameters as possible. The purpose of the Enhanced Schapery Theory (EST) was to create a PDFA tool that operates in conjunction with a commercially available finite element (FE) code (Abaqus). The tool captures the physics of the damage and failure mechanisms that result in the nonlinear behavior of the material, and the failure methodology employed yields numerical results that are relatively insensitive to changes in the FE mesh. The EST code is written in Fortran and compiled into a static library that is linked to Abaqus. A Fortran Abaqus UMAT material subroutine is used to facilitate the communication between Abaqus and EST. A clear distinction between damage and failure is imposed. Damage mechanisms result in pre-peak nonlinearity in the stress strain curve. Four internal state variables (ISVs) are utilized to control the damage and failure degradation. All damage is said to result from matrix microdamage, and a single ISV marks the micro-damage evolution as it is used to degrade the transverse and shear moduli of the lamina using a set of experimentally obtainable matrix microdamage functions. Three separate failure ISVs are used to incorporate failure due to fiber breakage, mode I matrix cracking, and mode II matrix cracking. Failure initiation is determined using a failure criterion, and the evolution of these ISVs is controlled by a set of traction-separation laws. The traction separation laws are postulated such that the area under the curves is equal to the fracture toughness of the material associated with the corresponding failure mechanism. A characteristic finite element length is used to transform the traction-separation laws into stress-strain laws

  20. Preparation of microgel composite hydrogels by polymer post-crosslinking method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel post-crosslinking method by heating the composite polymer with dispersed reactive microgels was used to prepare microgel composite (MC hydrogels. This MC hydrogels were crosslinked by reactive microgels instead of traditional crosslinkers. The reactive microgels contained hydroxymethyl groups, which acted as post-crosslinkers. They were prepared by inverse emulsion polymerization. The formed MC hydrogels at appropriate conditions had high equilibrium swelling ratio and excellent mechanical properties. The heating conditions and the polymer water content influenced the hydrogel properties. For MC hydrogels prepared by direct heating the as-prepared composite polymers with 75% water content, their properties were influenced by heating conditions. When the heating conditions were 90°C for 4 h, the MC hydrogel had a tensile strength of 32 kPa and a high elongation of 960%. In addition, for MC hydrogels prepared by heating the partly evaporated composite polymers, their properties can be adjusted by the polymer water content. Appropriate reduction of the polymer water content was beneficial to improve the mechanical strength of the MC hydrogels. The appropriate polymer water content was important to prepare MC hydrogels with excellent mechanical properties. When the composite polymer with 50% water content was heated at 90°C for 3 h, the MC hydrogel had high tensile strength of 130 kPa and high tensile elongation of 503%.

  1. Development of the experimental procedure to examine the response of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J; Zhupanska, Olesya I

    2016-01-01

    A new fully automated experimental setup has been developed to study the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact. The experimental setup allows for real-time measurements of the pulsed electric current, voltage, impact load, and displacements on the CFRP composite specimens. The setup includes a new custom-built current pulse generator that utilizes a bank of capacitor modules capable of producing a 20 ms current pulse with an amplitude of up to 2500 A. The setup enabled application of the pulsed current and impact load and successfully achieved coordination between the peak of the current pulse and the peak of the impact load. A series of electrical, impact, and coordinated electrical-impact characterization tests were performed on 32-ply IM7/977-3 unidirectional CFRP composites to assess their ability to withstand application of a pulsed electric current and determine the effects of the pulsed current on the impact response. Experimental results revealed that the electrical resistance of CFRP composites decreased with an increase in the electric current magnitude. It was also found that the electrified CFRP specimens withstood higher average impact loads compared to the non-electrified specimens.

  2. Polishing and coating carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites with a carbon-titanium layer enhances adhesion and growth of osteoblast-like MG63 cells and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Lucie; Starý, V.; Kofroňová, Olga; Lisá, Věra

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2001), s. 567-578 ISSN 0021-9304 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/0626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : surface roughness * carbon particles * bone-derived cells Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.105, year: 2001

  3. Development of the experimental procedure to examine the response of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J.; Zhupanska, Olesya I.

    2016-01-01

    A new fully automated experimental setup has been developed to study the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact. The experimental setup allows for real-time measurements of the pulsed electric current, voltage, impact load, and displacements on the CFRP composite specimens. The setup includes a new custom-built current pulse generator that utilizes a bank of capacitor modules capable of producing a 20 ms current pulse with an amplitude of up to 2500 A. The setup enabled application of the pulsed current and impact load and successfully achieved coordination between the peak of the current pulse and the peak of the impact load. A series of electrical, impact, and coordinated electrical-impact characterization tests were performed on 32-ply IM7/977-3 unidirectional CFRP composites to assess their ability to withstand application of a pulsed electric current and determine the effects of the pulsed current on the impact response. Experimental results revealed that the electrical resistance of CFRP composites decreased with an increase in the electric current magnitude. It was also found that the electrified CFRP specimens withstood higher average impact loads compared to the non-electrified specimens.

  4. Automobile materials competition: energy implications of fiber-reinforced plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings-Saxton, J.

    1981-10-01

    The embodied energy, structural weight, and transportation energy (fuel requirement) characteristics of steel, fiber-reinforced plastics, and aluminum were assessed to determine the overall energy savings of materials substitution in automobiles. In body panels, a 1.0-lb steel component with an associated 0.5 lb in secondary weight is structurally equivalent to a 0.6-lb fiber-reinforced plastic component with 0.3 lb in associated secondary weight or a 0.5-lb aluminum component with 0.25 lb of secondary weight. (Secondary weight refers to the combined weight of the vehicle's support structure, engine, braking system, and drive train, all of which can be reduced in response to a decrease in total vehicle weight.) The life cycle transportation energy requirements of structurally equivalent body panels (including their associated secondary weights) are 174.4 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 104.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. The embodied energy requirements are 37.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 22.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. These results can be combined to yield total energy requirements of 211.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 126.7 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 174.3 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. Fiber-reinforced plastics offer the greatest improvements over steel in both embodied and total energy requirements. Aluminum achieves the greatest savings in transportation energy.

  5. A comparison of the survival of fibre posts cemented with two different composite resin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S B; Millar, B J

    2008-12-13

    To evaluate the outcomes of a fibre post cemented with two different luting agents. A single type of tooth coloured fibre post (Fibre-White Parapost, Coltene Whaledent) was used along with two different types of luting cement. A total of 129 teeth were treated in this retrospective audit: 79 treated were luted with Calibra Aesthetic Dental Resin Cement (Dentsply) and 50 with Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray). All teeth were treated by the same operator and had a minimum ferrule of 2 mm and a ParaCore (Coltene Whaledent) composite core placed over the post. Where Calibra Aesthetic Dental Resin Cement was used, all the restorations were undertaken between June 2002 and October 2003 and were reviewed for a period of 38 to 54 months. Where Panavia had been used, all restorations were placed between February 2004 and December 2005 and reviewed for a period of 28 to 50 months. The results for the Calibra cemented posts were: 64 returned for recall and of these 23 were classed as failed. The causes were: root fracture (2), decementation (3), fracture at post-core interface (6), endodontic failure (8) and marginal caries (4). The results for the Panavia cemented posts were: 44 returned for recall and 9 were classed as failed; the causes of failure were fracture at post-core interface (6), endodontic failure (1) and marginal caries (2). For posts cemented with Calibra, a success rate of 64.1% was determined over a period of 38 to 54 months. The use of Panavia resulted in fewer post failures with a reported success rate of 79.5% over an evaluation period of 28 to 50 months. Mechanical failures by means of fractures occurring anywhere along the length of the post-core complex were the major cause of lack of success. Significantly higher failure rates were observed to occur in partially dentate patients, in those with parafunctional habits and also amongst anterior teeth. While the majority of the mechanical failures were amenable to repair, the latter mode of failure appears to be a

  6. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution in composite resin cores with fiber posts of varying diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kazuhiko; Ino, Teruno; Iwase, Naoki; Shimizu, Eitaroh; Suzuki, Megumi; Satoh, Goh; Ohkawa, Shuji; Fujisawa, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA), stress distributions in the remaining radicular tooth structure were investigated under the condition of varying diameters of fiber post for fiber post-reinforced composite resin cores (fiber post and core) in maxillary central incisors. Four 3D-FEA models were constructed: (1) fiber post (ø1.2, ø1.4, and ø1.6 mm) and composite resin core; and (2) gold-cast post and core. Maximum stresses in the tooth structure for fiber post and core were higher than that for gold-cast post and core. In the former models, stresses in the tooth structure as well as in the composite resin were slightly reduced with increase in fiber post diameter. These results thus suggested that to reduce stress in the remaining radicular tooth with a large coronal defect, it is recommended to accompany a composite resin core with a fiber post of a large diameter.

  7. Effects of programmed physical activity on body composition in post-pubertal schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Edson Dos Santos; Gonçalves, Ezequiel Moreira; Morcillo, André Moreno; Guerra-Júnior, Gil; Amancio, Olga Maria Silverio

    2015-01-01

    To assess body composition modifications in post-pubertal schoolchildren after practice of a physical activity program during one school year. The sample consisted of 386 students aged between 15 and 17 years and divided into two groups: the study group (SG) comprised 195 students and the control group (CG), 191. The SG was submitted to a physical activity program and the CG attended conventional physical education classes. Body composition was assessed using body mass index (BMI), percentage of body fat (%BF), fat mass (FM), and lean mass (LM). A positive effect of the physical activity program on body composition in the SG (p<0.001) was observed, as well as on the interaction time x group in all the variables analyzed in both genders. A reduction in %BF (mean of differences = -5.58%) and waist circumference (-2.33 cm), as well as an increase in LM (+2.05 kg) were observed in the SG for both genders, whereas the opposite was observed in the CG. The practice of programmed physical activity promotes significant reduction of body fat in post-pubertal schoolchildren. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation-induced crosslinking and post-processing of poly(L-lactic acid) composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kasai, Noboru; Yagi, Toshiaki; Yoshii, Fumio; Tamada, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Poly(L-lactic acid), PLLA, was irradiated using electron beams (EBs) in the presence of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) at 5% concentration as crosslinking agent. The crosslinked PLLA obtained has heat resistance, as demonstrated by retention of its original shape at glass transition temperature or even higher than 200 o C. As an application of this fact, crosslinked PLLA is applied in spectacle lens to prevent shape deformation of eyeglass frames in displaying and transporting. However, in this application to lens, it is not enough to improve the thermal deformation of PLLA under stress at 70 o C. Radiation-induced crosslinking of a PLLA/silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) composite with TAIC and post-processing of the crosslinked PLLA composite by heating were further investigated from the viewpoint of thermal deformation. The PLLA materials have several advantages such as high heat resistance and transparency. It is therefore proved that the combination of radiation-induced crosslinking, composition of SiO 2 and post-heating is beneficial for expanding the applications of PLLA.

  9. Environmental Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Fasteners in Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the durability of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) nails in treated wood. The FRP nails were exposed to four conditions: (1) accelerated weathering, consisting of exposure to ultraviolet light and condensation; (2) 100% relative humidity (RH); (3) being driven into untreated wood and exposed to 100% RH; and (4) being driven into wood treated with...

  10. The effect of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy resin dowel diameter on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Kuan Chuan; Lui, Joo Loon

    2014-10-01

    To determine the effect of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy resin (FRC) dowels of different diameters on the failure load of endodontically treated teeth with different remaining dentine and reinforcing resin composite (RRC) thicknesses and the mode of failure in each group. Fifty extracted intact human maxillary central incisors were decoronated 2 mm incisal to the buccal cementoenamel junction and endodontically treated. The teeth were randomly assigned to one of five groups (n = 10): group B, dowel space prepared with size 0 dowel drill/size 0 FRC dowel/no RRC; group W, size 1 dowel space/size 1 FRC dowel/no RRC; group R, size 3 dowel space/size 3 FRC dowel/no RRC; group WR, size 3 dowel space/size 1 FRC dowel/RRC; group BR, size 3 dowel space/size 0 FRC dowel/RRC. Ferrules of 2 and 0.5 mm were prepared at the facio-lingual and proximal margin respectively. All specimens were restored with a Ni-Cr crown, thermocycled and loaded at 135° from the long axis in a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by post hoc comparisons (Bonferroni) with α = 0.05. Mean failure loads (N) for groups B, W, R, WR, and BR were as follows: 1406 (SD = 376), 1259 (379), 1085 (528), 959 (200), and 816 (298). Significant differences were found between groups B and BR. Group B had the highest favorable failure mode. Within the limitations of this study, the use of a smaller FRC dowel and RRC is recommended rather than enlargement of dowel spaces to accurately fit larger FRC dowels, as the enlargement of dowel space may increase the risk of unfavorable failure. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Simulated Immature Teeth Restored with Glass Fiber Posts, Intracanal Composite Resin, and Experimental Dentine Posts

    OpenAIRE

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jha, Padmanabh; Aggarwal, Akarshak

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with gutta-percha, glass fiber posts (GFP), experimental dentine posts (DP) or Intracanal composite Resin (ICR). Materials and Methods. Fifty maxillary canines were decoronated, standardized and enlarged until, number 5 Peeso reamers were allowed to simulate immature teeth. After placement of 5?mm of MTA, the canals were divided into 5 groups and filled as follows: Group 1: AH Plus + gutta-p...

  12. Influence of body composition on physiological responses to post-exercise hydrotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jessica M; Halson, Shona L; Miller, Joanna; Slater, Gary J; Askew, Christopher D

    2018-05-01

    This study examined the influence of body composition on temperature and blood flow responses to post-exercise cold water immersion (CWI), hot water immersion (HWI) and control (CON). Twenty-seven male participants were stratified into three groups: 1) low mass and low fat (LM-LF); 2) high mass and low fat (HM-LF); or 3) high mass and high fat (HM-HF). Experimental trials involved a standardised bout of cycling, maintained until core temperature reached 38.5°C. Participants subsequently completed one of three 15-min recovery interventions (CWI, HWI, or CON). Core, skin and muscle temperatures, and limb blood flow were recorded at baseline, post-exercise, and every 30 min following recovery for 240 min. During CON and HWI there were no differences in core or muscle temperature between body composition groups. The rate of fall in core temperature following CWI was greater in the LM-LF (0.03 ± 0.01°C/min) group compared to the HM-HF (0.01 ± 0.001°C/min) group (P = 0.002). Muscle temperature decreased to a greater extent during CWI in the LM-LF and HM-LF groups (8.6 ± 3.0°C) compared with HM-HF (5.1 ± 2.0°C, P < 0.05). Blood flow responses did not differ between groups. Differences in body composition alter the thermal response to post-exercise CWI, which may explain some of the variance in the responses to CWI recovery.

  13. Fibre reinforced composites '84; Proceedings of the International Conference, University of Liverpool, England, April 3-5, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are phenolic resin matrix composites for high temperature and fire-exposure applications, novel resins for fiber-reinforced composite productivity improvement, the use of engineering textiles for mechanical property improvement in composites, the significance of aramid fiber reinforcement in composites, the energy absorption properties of Sheet Metal Compounds (SMCs) under crash conditions, and SMC impact behavior variations with temperature. Also covered are CFRP applications in high performance structures, composite helicopter main rotor blade technology, composite vehicular leaf springs, carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastics, filament winding development status, the injection processing of fiber-reinforced thermoplastics, civil aircraft composite structure certification, composite radomes, design procedures for short fiber-reinforced thermoplastics, the strength limitations of mechanically fastened lap joints, environmental fatigue and creep in glass-reinforced materials, the effects of moisture on high performance laminates, the environmental behavior of SMC, and corrugated composites.

  14. Films of post-consumer polypropylene composites for the support layer in synthetic paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano R. de Santi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Composite films were studied as possible candidates for the central or support layer of synthetic paper in a multilayer structure. Recycled post-consumer polypropylene films were reinforced with inorganic fillers at various compositions and under several processing conditions, with the aim of optimizing the physical and mechanical properties of rigidity and low density. Three types of CaCO3, with and without surface treatment of the particles, were used, but only the treated ones were suitable for use in paper films. These samples were then used to analyze possible correlations of properties with composition and processing conditions, varying the CaCO3 particle size distribution and the film processing method, from casting extrusion (flat die to blown-film extrusion (tubular die. An increase in film stiffness was observed as a function of CaCO3 content and a concentration of 30% CaCO3 was found to be best for the specific application. The flat films were stiffer than the tubular ones. The densities of all the composite films were considered high, compared to a pulp-based paper and a commercial synthetic paper. No significant effect on the physical-mechanical properties analyzed was observed when the CaCO3 particle size distribution was varied. Microcavities were found to form at the surface of flat films submitted to a bi-orientation process performed at laboratory scale; no other sample showed this surface morphology.

  15. Change in the structure and properties of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic with a polysulfone matrix under the effect of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, A.A.; Korkhov, V.P.; Pudnik, V.V.; Rodin, Yu.P.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the results of studying the change in the structure and properties of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic with a thermoplastic matrix -- aromatic polysulfone -- as a function of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation. In view of the presence in the polysulfone macromolecules and in carbon fibers of a large number of aromatic rings and double bonds providing high radiation resistance of the composite, irradiation was carried out up to large values of absorbed doses (10 9 rad). Specimens of orthogonally reinforced composite KTMU-1 with a thickness of 1.3 mm made from aromatic polysulfone PSF-150 and carbon ribbon that absorbed various gamma radiation dosages were used. It was found that structural transformations under the effect of gamma radiation did not have a substantial effect on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic. 2 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Various Surface Treatments of Fiber Posts on the Bond Strength to Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Nadalizadeh

    Full Text Available Introduction: The reliable bond at the root-post-core interface is critical for the clinical success of post-retained restorations. To decrease the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, various post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of fiber posts on the bond strength to composite core. Materials & Methods: In this study, 40 fiber reinforced posts were used. After preparing and sectioning them, resulting specimens were divided into four groups (N=28. The posts received different surface treatments such as no surface treatment (control group, preparing with hydrogen peroxide 10%, preparing with silane, preparing with HF and silane. Then, posts were tested in micro tensile testing machine. The results were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Results: The greatest bond strength observed was in treatment with hydrogen peroxide 10% (19.84±8.95 MPa, and the lowest strength was related to the control group (12.44±3.40 MPa. The comparison of the groups with Dunnett T3 test showed that the differences between the groups was statistically significant (α=0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, preparing with H2O2 -10 % and silane increases the bond strength of FRC posts to the composite core more than the other methods. Generally, the bond strength of posts to the composite core increases by surface treatment.

  17. A Comparison of the Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth using Three Different Post Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sadeghi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: It is yet unclear whether fiber-reinforced composite posts can enhance the mechanical properties and prevent vertical fractures of teeth under chewing loads.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture resistance and failure mode of endodontically treated teeth restored with three different post systems.Materials and Methods: Thirty-six maxillary canines were randomly divided into three groups (n=12. All teeth received endodontic therapy and one of three post systems of cast post-and-core, zirconia fiber post, and quartz fiber post. Cast posts-andcoreswere cemented using zinc phosphate cement, fiber posts were luted with dualcured resin cement, and composite cores were prepared. Compressive load was applied at a 135° angle to the long axis of the tooth at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min until fracture occurred. One-way ANOVA and Tukey-Karmer test were used to determine the difference of the failure loads between the groups (α=0.05.Results: The mean values (SD for fracture resistance were 1631(803, 513(348 and 789(390 N in the cast post-and-core, zirconia fiber post and quartz fiber post groups,respectively. Teeth restored with cast posts-and-cores exhibited significantly higher resistance to fracture (P<0.01; however, 92% of the fractures occurred in the tooth structure. There was no statistically significant difference in fracture resistance between the zirconia fiber and quartz fiber post groups. Fracture mainly occurred in the composite cores of these groups.Conclusion: This study showed that the fracture resistance of cast post-and-core was significantly higher than zirconia and quartz fiber posts; however, the failure mode was more favorable in teeth restored with fiber posts.

  18. Effect of silane type and air-drying temperature on bonding fiber post to composite core and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of silane type and temperature of silane application on push-out bond strength between fiberglass posts with composite resin core and resin cement. One hundred and sixty fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) had the surface treated with hydrogen peroxide 24%. Posts were divided in 8 groups according to two study factors: air-drying temperature after silane application (room temperature and 60 ºC) and silane type: three pre-hydrolyzed--Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE) and one two-component silane--Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply). The posts (n=10) for testing the bond strength between post and composite core were centered on a cylindrical plastic matrix and composite resin (Filtek Z250 XT, 3M ESPE) that was incrementally inserted and photoactivated. Eighty bovine incisor roots (n=10) were prepared for testing the bond strength between post and resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) and received the fiberglass posts. Push-out test was used to measure the bond strength. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed that temperature and silane had no influence on bond strength between composite core and post. However, for bond strength between post and resin cement, the temperature increase resulted in a better performance for Silane Coupling Agent, Silano and RelyX Ceramic Primer. At room temperature Silane Coupling Agent showed the lowest bond strength. Effect of the warm air-drying is dependent on the silane composition. In conclusion, the use of silane is influenced by wettability of resinous materials and pre-hydrolyzed silanes are more stable compared with the two-bottle silane.

  19. Microhardness of composite resins at different depths varying the post-irradiation time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Cristina Ciccone-Nogueira

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the microhardness of posterior composite resins at different depths varying the post-irradiation time. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For each composite resin [Solitaire 2 (SO - Heraus Kulzer, P60 (P - 3M, Prodigy Condesable (PC - Kerr, Surefil (S - Dentsply and Alert (A - Pentron], 6 specimens (3 mm in diameter; 4mm high were prepared using a black polyurethane cylindrical matrix. The resins were inserted in a bulk increment and light cured for 40 seconds. Microhardness was analyzed at different depths (top, 0.4 mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0mm, 3.0 mm and 4.0 mm and at two moments (20 minutes and 24 hours after light-curing. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Overall, microhardness means decreased significantly with the increase of depth, being lower in the first moment tested. P, S and PC showed the highest microhardness means. CONCLUSION: It may be concluded that the tested composite resins presented a gradual decrease of microhardness as depth increased and this drop was more accentuated for depths beyond 2 mm. For all materials, higher microhardness means were recorded 24 hours after light activation. P60 yielded the best results at the different depths evaluated.

  20. An historical mullite fiber-reinforced ceramic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, T.L.; Merk, N.; Thomas, G.

    1991-01-01

    Since at least the sixteenth century, the wootz ultra-high carbon white cast-iron ingot was produced in India by melting or carburizing iron in a crucible. This ingot was forged into sword blades of so-called Damascus steel. The charged crucible was fired in a long (24 hour) single cycle at high temperature (1150-1250 degrees C) in a strongly reducing atmosphere. Raw materials for the refractory vessel are clay and coked rice husks. At high temperatures, two phases reinforce the glassy matrix cristobalite relics of rice husks and a network of mullite crystals. This paper characterizes the microstructure and chemistry of the mullite network in the glassy matrix by means of a combination of technique: optical microscopy, XRD, SEM, TEM with EDS, and HREM

  1. Partial elastodynamic cloaking by means of fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, P; Wall, David J N

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we show that if inextensible fibers are embedded in an elastic material (or the material is by some other means made considerably stiffer in a particular but possibly variable direction), one may obtain equations of motion which are form invariant under certain diffeomorphism, allowing for partial cloaking (or 'illusion optics') schemes in both 2D and 3D. The schemes are valid at all frequencies without requiring any active material properties, and will thus work in the time domain without requiring active materials. While being mathematically exact at all frequencies, the applicability is of course limited to where the continuum approximation holds. Additional limits, set by idealization in the modeling of fibers and core material, are also present. However, contrary to some other approaches, the solution does not require metamaterials with non-scalar mass densities, nor does it require the breaking of the supersymmetry of the elasticity tensor

  2. Partial elastodynamic cloaking by means of fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, P.; Wall, David J. N.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we show that if inextensible fibers are embedded in an elastic material (or the material is by some other means made considerably stiffer in a particular but possibly variable direction), one may obtain equations of motion which are form invariant under certain diffeomorphism, allowing for partial cloaking (or 'illusion optics') schemes in both 2D and 3D. The schemes are valid at all frequencies without requiring any active material properties, and will thus work in the time domain without requiring active materials. While being mathematically exact at all frequencies, the applicability is of course limited to where the continuum approximation holds. Additional limits, set by idealization in the modeling of fibers and core material, are also present. However, contrary to some other approaches, the solution does not require metamaterials with non-scalar mass densities, nor does it require the breaking of the supersymmetry of the elasticity tensor.

  3. Fiber-reinforced composite hot-gas filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, D. P.; Lowden, R. A.; Chang, R.

    1987-05-01

    A chemical vapor deposition process was developed for the fabrication of high-temperature particulate filters. Fibrous materials such as Nicalon (SiC) felt and aluminosilicate papers were used as the filter material. Preliminary evaluation of filter specimens fabricated from Nicalon revealed extremely encouraging results. Cleanable filters with collection efficiencies of greater than 99.9% were recorded for both PFBC flyash and gasifier char.

  4. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  5. Compressive strength differences between hybrid composites using post curing light box with LED and dry heating, in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Krisnawaty

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid type of composite resins is used as dental restorative materials in a wide cavity directly or indirectly. The mechanical properties of the composite resin would increase post-curing. The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between the compressive strength of hybrid type composite resin post-curing using LED light box and dry heating. This type of research was a quasi-experimental in vitro with the sample size of 30 samples which were divided into two groups. Each sample was tested using a Universal Testing Machine (Lloyd at a speed of 1 mm/minute to test the compressive strength. Compressive strength values were recorded when the sample broke. The average value of compressive strength of the two treatment groups was statistically calculated using t-test. The results, of this study, showed that a hybrid composite resin with post curing using a light box with LED was at 194.138 Mpa which was lower than using the dry heat of 227.339 Mpa. It showed the statistically significant difference. The conclusion of this study was that the compressive strength of post-cured hybrid composites using a light box with LED was significantly lower than the post-curing using dry heat.

  6. Fracture resistance of upper central incisors restored with different posts and cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rezaei Dastjerdi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors restored with different posts and cores. Materials and Methods Forty-eight upper central incisors were randomly divided into four groups: cast post and core (group 1, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC post and composite core (group 2, composite post and core (group 3, and controls (group 4. Mesio-distal and bucco-lingual dimensions at 7 and 14 mm from the apex were compared to ensure standardization among the groups. Twelve teeth were prepared for crown restoration (group 4. Teeth in other groups were endodontically treated, decoronated at 14 mm from the apex, and prepared for posts and cores. Resin-based materials were used for cementation in groups 1 and 2. In group 3, composite was used directly to fill the post space and for core build-up. All samples were restored by standard metal crowns using glass ionomer cement, mounted at 135° vertical angle, subjected to thermomechanical aging, and then fractured using a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to analyze the data. Results Fracture resistance of the groups was as follows: Control (group 4 > cast post and core (group 1 > fiber post and composite core (group 2 > composite post and core (group 3. All samples in groups 2 and 3 fractured in restorable patterns, whereas most (58% in group 1 were non-restorable. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, FRC posts showed acceptable fracture resistance with favorable fracture patterns for reconstruction of upper central incisors.

  7. Shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Lima Araújo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the mechanical behavior of shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams. Six beams subjected to shear loading were tested until failure. Additionally, prisms were tested to evaluate fiber contribution to the concrete shear strength. Steel fibers were straight, hook-ended,35 mmlong and aspect ratio equal to 65. Volumetric fractions used were 1.0 and 2.0%. The results demonstrated a great contribution from steel fibers to shear strength of reinforced concrete beams and to reduce crack width, which can reduce the amount of stirrups in reinforced concrete structures. Beam capacity was also evaluated by empirical equations, and it was found that these equations provided a high variability, while some of them have not properly predicted the ultimate shear strength of the steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams.

  8. The effect of glass fiber posts and ribbons on the fracture strength of teeth with flared root canals restored using composite resin post and cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Mariko; Komada, Wataru; Otake, Shiho; Inagaki, Tasuku; Omori, Satoshi; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture strength and mode of failure of structurally compromised teeth with flared root canals restored using composite resin with four different systems. Sixty endodontically treated bovine teeth were uniformly shaped to simulate human mandibular premolars with flared root canals. The roots were divided into four groups of 15 specimens each based on the type of restoration: composite resin core only (control), glass fiber post, cylindroid glass fiber ribbons, and glass fiber post and ribbons. All specimens were loaded until fracture occurred using a universal testing machine. Average fracture loads were compared with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The modes of failure were observed and the Fisher exact test and Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analysis. The fiber post and ribbon group (1035.70N) and the fiber ribbon group (881.77N) showed significantly higher fracture strength than the controls (567.97N) (pcomposite resin post and cores in the case of the dentin within the thin root canal wall. Based on the results, this study recommends the combined use of glass fiber post and ribbons. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Engineering Properties of Treated Natural Hemp Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangming Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the construction industry has seen a significant rise in the use of natural fibers, for producing building materials. Research has shown that treated hemp fiber-reinforced concrete (THFRC can provide a low-cost building material for residential and low-rise buildings, while achieving sustainable construction and meeting future environmental targets. This study involved enhancing the mechanical properties of hemp fiber-reinforced concrete through the Ca(OH2 solution pretreatment of fibers. Both untreated (UHFRC and treated (THFRC hemp fiber-reinforced concrete were tested containing 15-mm length fiber, at a volume fraction of 1%. From the mechanical strength tests, it was observed that the 28-day tensile and compressive strength of THFRC was 16.9 and 10% higher, respectively, than UHFRC. Based on the critical stress intensity factor (KICs and critical strain energy release rate (GICs, the fracture toughness of THFRC at 28 days was also found to be 7–13% higher than UHFRC. Additionally, based on the determined brittleness number (Q and modulus of elasticity, the THFRC was found to be 11% less brittle and 10.8% more ductile. Furthermore, qualitative analysis supported many of the mechanical strength findings through favorable surface roughness observed on treated fibers and resistance to fiber pull-out.

  10. Enhanced Performance of Thin Film Composite Forward Osmosis Membrane by Chemical Post-Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Chen, Jiangrong; Cao, Zhen; Wang, Jian; Guo, Chungang

    2018-01-01

    Forward osmosis is an attractive technique in water purification and desalination fields. Enhancement of the forward osmosis membrane performance is essential to the application of this technique. In this study, an optimized chemical post-treatment approach which was used to improve RO membrane performance was employed for enhancing water flux of thin film composite forward osmosis membrane. Home-made polysulfide-based forward osmosis membrane was prepared and nitric acid, sulfuric acid, ethanol, 2-propanol were employed as post-treatment solutions. After a short-term treatment, all the membrane samples manifested water flux enhancement compared with their untreated counterparts. Over 50% increase of water flux had been obtained by ethanol solution treatment. The swelling, changes of hydrophobicity and solvency in both active layer and substrate were verified as the major causes for the enhancement of the water flux. It is noted that the treatment time and solution concentration should be controlled to get both appropriate water flux and reverse salt flux. The results obtained in this study will be useful for further FO membrane development and application.

  11. Flexural properties of endodontic posts and human root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola M; Bedini, Rossella; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Somma, Francesco

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the flexural modulus and flexural strength of different types of endodontic post in comparison with human root dentin. Three different types of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts and three metal posts each comprising 10 specimens (n=10) and 20 dentin bars were loaded to failure in a three-point bending test to determine the flexural modulus (GPa) and the flexural strength (MPa). Three randomly selected fiber posts of each group were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to illustrate the differences in mode of fracture. Data were subjected to a one-way ANOVA to determine significant differences between groups and the Bonferroni t-test multiple comparison was applied to investigate which mean values differed from one another with significance levels of P<0.05. The flexural modulus recorded for the dentin bars was 17.5+/-3.8 GPa. The values for posts ranged from 24.4+/-3.8 GPa for silica fiber posts to 108.6+/-10.7 GPa for stainless steel posts. The flexural strength for dentin was 212.9+/-41.9 MPa, while the posts ranged from 879.1+/-66.2 MPa for silica fiber posts to 1545.3+/-135.9 MPa for cast gold posts. The ANOVA test analysis revealed significant differences between groups (P<0.05) for flexural modulus and flexural strength mean values. FRC posts have an elastic modulus that more closely approaches that of dentin while that for metal posts was much higher. The flexural strength of fiber and metal posts was respectively four and seven times higher than root dentin.

  12. Effect of carbon and glass fiber posts on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of a composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; de Oliveira, Jonas Alves; do Valle, Accacio Lins; Zogheib, Lucas Villaca; Ferreira, Paulo Martins; Bastos, Luiz Gustavo Cavalcanti

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prefabricated fiber posts on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of a composite resin. Thirty bar-shaped specimens measuring 25 x 2.0 x 2.0 mm were made, containing posts that were 1.3 mm in diameter and 20 mm long. Each group contained 10 specimens: Group 1, resin without post; Group 2, resin with carbon fiber post; Group 3, resin with glass fiber post. The samples were immersed in water at 37 degrees C until the three-point loading test was performed at a speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = 0.05). Both fiber posts were similar in strength and both were stronger than the control. Group 3 obtained a higher mean modulus of elasticity than Groups 1 and 2, which were similar. The results of this study demonstrated that the presence of a fiber post significantly raised flexural strength values and the glass fiber post significantly increased the modulus of elasticity of the evaluated composite resin.

  13. Bench Scale Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Bhandari, Dhaval [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Narang, Kristi [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); McCloskey, Pat [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Ananthasayanam, Balajee [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Howson, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Lee, Julia [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wroczynski, Ron [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Stewart, Frederick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klaehn, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McNally, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rownaghi, Ali [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lu, Liu [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Koros, William [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Goizueta, Roberto [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sethi, Vijay [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    GE Global Research, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and Western Research Institute (WRI) proposed to develop high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project sought to develop and then optimize new gas separations membrane systems at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel polyphosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project also sought to define the processes needed to coat the fiber support to manufacture composite hollow fiber membranes with high performance, ultra-thin separation layers. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components was considered via exposure and performance tests. Preliminary design, technoeconomic, and economic feasibility analyses were conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE) for a coal-fired plant including capture technologies. At the onset of the project, Membranes based on coupling a novel selective material polyphosphazene with an engineered hollow fiber support was found to have the potential to capture greater than 90% of the CO2 in flue gas with less than 35% increase in COE, which would achieve the DOE-targeted performance criteria. While lab-scale results for the polyphosphazene materials were very promising, and the material was incorporated into hollow-fiber modules, difficulties were encountered relating to the performance of these membrane systems over time. Performance, as measured by both flux of and selectivity for CO2 over other flue gas constituents was found to deteriorate over time, suggesting a system that was

  14. Assessment of the post-impact damage propagation in a carbon-fibre composite under cyclic loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kytýř, Daniel; Fíla, T.; Šleichrt, J.; Doktor, Tomáš; Šperl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 5 (2014), s. 777-780 ISSN 1580-2949 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010209 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : carbon-fibre composites * post-impact damage * laser profilometry Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.548, year: 2014 http://mit.imt.si/Revija/izvodi/mit145/kytyr.pdf

  15. An Energy-Based Prognostic Framework to Predict Fatigue Damage Evolution in Composites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this work, a prognostics framework to predict the evolution of damage in fiber-reinforced composites materials under fatigue loads is proposed. The assessment of...

  16. Effect of length and diameter of fiber reinforced composite post (FRC on fracture resistance of remaining tooth structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiyeh seifi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Post and core has been considered for endodontically treated tooth, especially in cases with severe damage crowns. Recently fiber reinforced composite posts (FRC post have been used in the treatment of endodontically treated teeth. Because the length and diameter of posts are effective in stress distribution, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of length and diameter of FRC post on fracture resistance. Methods: In this experimental study, 36 glass fiber posts with combination of 7mm, 9mm, and 12mm length and 1.1mm, 1.3mm and 1.5mm diameter were divided into 9 groups of 4. These posts were cemented in root canals by Panavia. Samples were tested with 45° compressive forces for the evaluation of fracture resistance. Datas were analyzed using SPSS soft ware and One- way and Two-way ANOVA analyses. Results: Fracture resistance did not increase significantly with the effect of length and diameter simultaneously (P=0.85. Samples with 12mm length and 1.5mm diameter had the greatest fracture resistance (1023/33N±239/22. The minimum fracture resistance had occurred in post with 7mm length and 1.5mm diameter (503/13N ±69/18. Fracture resistance increased significantly by increasing the length and the same diameter. Conclusion: It can be concluded that fracture resistance is affected by the length and not the diameter of FRC post.

  17. Effect of Length and Diameter of Fiber Reinforced Composite Post on Fracture Resistance of Remaining Tooth Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Ebrahimzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Post and core has been considered for endodontically treated tooth, especially in cases with severe damage crowns. Recently fiber reinforced composite posts (FRC post have been used in the treatment of endodontically treated teeth. Because the length and diameter of posts are effective in stress distribution, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of length and diameter of FRC post on fracture resistance. Methods: In this experimental study, 36 glass fiber posts with combination of 7mm, 9mm, and 12mm length and 1.1mm, 1.3mm and 1.5mm diameter were divided into 9 groups of 4. These posts were cemented in root canals by Panavia. Samples were tested with 45° compressive forces for the evaluation of fracture resistance. Datas were analyzed using SPSS soft ware and One- way and Two-way ANOVA analyses. Results: Fracture resistance did not increase significantly with the effect of length and diameter simultaneously (P=0.85. Samples with 12mm length and 1.5mm diameter had the greatest fracture resistance (1023/33N±239/22. The minimum fracture resistance had occurred in post with 7mm length and 1.5mm diameter (503/13N ±69/18. Fracture resistance increased significantly by increasing the length and the same diameter. Conclusion: It can be concluded that fracture resistance is affected by the length and not the diameter of FRC post.

  18. The flexural properties of endodontic post materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, Dominic A; Shortall, Adrian C; Marquis, Peter M; Lumley, Philip J

    2010-08-01

    To measure the flexural strengths and moduli of endodontic post materials and to assess the effect on the calculated flexural properties of varying the diameter/length (D/L) ratio of three-point bend test samples. Three-point bend testing of samples of 2mm diameter metal and fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) rods was carried out and the mechanical properties calculated at support widths of 16 mm, 32 mm and 64 mm. Weibull analysis was performed on the strength data. The flexural strengths of all the FRC post materials exceeded the yield strengths of the gold and stainless steel samples; the flexural strengths of two FRC materials were comparable with the yield strength of titanium. Stainless steel recorded the highest flexural modulus while the titanium and the two carbon fiber materials exhibited similar values just exceeding that of gold. The remaining glass fiber materials were of lower modulus within the range of 41-57 GPa. Weibull modulus values for the FRC materials ranged from 16.77 to 30.09. Decreasing the L/D ratio produced a marked decrease in flexural modulus for all materials. The flexural strengths of FRC endodontic post materials as new generally exceed the yield strengths of metals from which endodontic posts are made. The high Weibull modulus values suggest good clinical reliability of FRC posts. The flexural modulus values of the tested posts were from 2-6 times (FRC) to 4-10 times (metal) that of dentin. Valid measurement of flexural properties of endodontic post materials requires that test samples have appropriate L/D ratios. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mild hypothermic culture conditions affect residual host cell protein composition post-Protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goey, Cher Hui; Bell, David; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2018-01-30

    Host cell proteins (HCPs) are endogenous impurities, and their proteolytic and binding properties can compromise the integrity, and, hence, the stability and efficacy of recombinant therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Nonetheless, purification of mAbs currently presents a challenge because they often co-elute with certain HCP species during the capture step of protein A affinity chromatography. A Quality-by-Design (QbD) strategy to overcome this challenge involves identifying residual HCPs and tracing their source to the harvested cell culture fluid (HCCF) and the corresponding cell culture operating parameters. Then, problematic HCPs in HCCF may be reduced by cell engineering or culture process optimization. Here, we present experimental results linking cell culture temperature and post-protein A residual HCP profile. We had previously reported that Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures conducted at standard physiological temperature and with a shift to mild hypothermia on day 5 produced HCCF of comparable product titer and HCP concentration, but with considerably different HCP composition. In this study, we show that differences in HCP variety at harvest cascaded to downstream purification where different residual HCPs were present in the two sets of samples post-protein A purification. To detect low-abundant residual HCPs, we designed a looping liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method with continuous expansion of a preferred, exclude, and targeted peptide list. Mild hypothermic cultures produced 20% more residual HCP species, especially cell membrane proteins, distinct from the control. Critically, we identified that half of the potentially immunogenic residual HCP species were different between the two sets of samples.

  20. A resin composite material containing an eugenol derivative for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaroof, A; Rojo, L; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2016-02-01

    To formulate and evaluate new dual cured resin composite based on the inclusion of eugenyl methacrylate monomer (EgMA) with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin systems for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration of endodontically treated teeth. EgMA was synthesized and incorporated at 5% (BTEg5) or 10% (BTEg10) into dual-cure formulations. Curing properties, viscosity, Tg, radiopacity, static and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined and compared with Clearfil™DC Core-Plus, a commercial dual-cure, two-component composite. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey's post-hoc test. The experimental composites were successfully prepared, which exhibited excellent curing depths of 4.9, 4.7 and 4.2 mm for BTEg0, BTEg5 and BTEg10 respectively, which were significantly higher than Clearfil™DC. However, the inclusion of EgMA initially led to a lower degree of cure, which increased when measured at 24 h with values comparable to formulations without EgMA, indicating post-curing. The inclusion of EgMA also lowered the polymerization exotherm thereby reducing the potential of thermal damage to host tissue. Both thermal and viscoelastic analyses confirmed the ability of the monomer to reduce the stiffness of the composites by forming a branched network. The compressive strength of BTEg5 was significantly higher than the control whilst flexural strength increased significantly from 95.9 to 114.8 MPa (BTEg5) and 121.9 MPa (BTEg10). Radiopacity of the composites was equivalent to ∼3 mm Al allowing efficient diagnosis. The incorporation of EgMA within polymerizable formulations provides a novel approach to prepare reinforced resin composite material for intracanal post cementation and core build-up and the potential to impart antibacterial properties of eugenol to endodontic restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ex vivo fracture resistance of direct resin composite complete crowns with and without posts on maxillary premolars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Bell, A.M. Le; Kreulen, C.M.; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ex vivo the fracture resistance and failure mode of direct resin composite complete crowns with and without various root canal posts made on maxillary premolars. METHODOLOGY: The clinical crowns of 40 human extracted single-rooted maxillary premolars were sectioned at the

  2. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitiwat, Prapaporn; Salimee, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers' instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05), but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (paligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  3. Compressive strength measurements of hybrid dental composites treated with dry heat and light emitting diodes (LED post cure treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Krisnawaty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites are mostly used on large cavities as restorative dental materials, whether it is used directly or indirectly. The mechanical properties of composite resin shall increase if it is treated with post cure treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate compressive strength differences between dry heat and Light Emitting Diodes (LED treatment on the hybrid dental composite. A quasi-experimental was applied on this research with a total of 30 samples that were divided into two groups. Each sample was tested using LLOYD Universal Testing Machine with 1 mm/min speed to evaluate the compressive strength. The compressive strength results were marked when the sample was broken. The results of two groups were then analyzed using t-test statistical calculation. The results of this study show that post cure treatment on hybrid composite using LED light box (194.138 MPa was lower than dry heat treatment (227.339 MPa, which was also significantly different from statistical analysis. It can be concluded that compressive strength of LED light box was lower than dry heat post-cure treatment on the hybrid composite resin.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of stress state and bond strength of fiber-reinforced polymer/concrete interface to boundary conditions in single shear pull-out test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebeh Mohammadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The bond between fiber-reinforced polymer and concrete substrate plays a key role in the performance of concrete structures after strengthened by externally bonded fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials. The single shear pull-out test is generally used to determine the interface characteristics, and various bond–slip models have been proposed based on the results of this test. However, the sensitivity of the bond strength to the boundary conditions has not yet been considered in the available models in the literatures. This article presents an experimental and numerical study targeted at understanding the influence of the boundary conditions on the bond strength of the fiber-reinforced polymer/concrete interface in the single shear pull-out test. The validated finite element analysis by experimental results is used for the sensitivity study of the bond strength and stress state of the interface to the boundary conditions of the concrete block. It is found that the constraint height of the concrete block at the loaded side is an influential parameter on the stress state of the interface and the bond strength.

  5. Glass Fibre-Reinforced Composite Post and Core Used in Decayed Primary Anterior Teeth: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Verma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic requirement of severely mutilated primary anterior teeth in the case of early childhood caries has been a challenge to pediatric dentist. Among restorative treatment options, prefabricated crown and biological and resin composite restoration either by means of direct or indirect technique are mentioned in the literature. This paper presents the clinical sequence of rehabilitation of maxillary anterior primary teeth. Endodontic treatment was followed by the placement of a glass fibre-reinforced composite resin post. The crown reconstruction was done with composite restoration. Resin glass fibre post has best properties in elasticity, translucency, adaptability, tenaciousness, and resistance to traction and to impact. Along with ease of application, fiber can be used as an alternative to traditionally used materials in the management of early childhood caries.

  6. Hydrogen-assisted post-growth substitution of tellurium into molybdenum disulfide monolayers with tunable compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guoli; Zhu, Dancheng; Lv, Danhui; Hashemi, Arsalan; Fei, Zhen; Lin, Fang; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Zhang, Ze; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Jin, Chuanhong

    2018-04-01

    Herein we report the successful doping of tellurium (Te) into molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayers to form MoS2x Te2(1-x) alloy with variable compositions via a hydrogen-assisted post-growth chemical vapor deposition process. It is confirmed that H2 plays an indispensable role in the Te substitution into as-grown MoS2 monolayers. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy allows us to determine the lattice sites and the concentration of introduced Te atoms. At a relatively low concentration, tellurium is only substituted in the sulfur sublattice to form monolayer MoS2(1-x)Te2x alloy, while with increasing Te concentration (up to ˜27.6% achieved in this study), local regions with enriched tellurium, large structural distortions, and obvious sulfur deficiency are observed. Statistical analysis of the Te distribution indicates the random substitution. Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the stability of the alloy structures and their electronic properties. Comparison with experimental results indicate that the samples are unstrained and the Te atoms are predominantly substituted in the top S sublattice. Importantly, such ultimately thin Janus structure of MoS2(1-x)Te2x exhibits properties that are distinct from their constituents. We believe our results will inspire further exploration of the versatile properties of asymmetric 2D TMD alloys.

  7. Suppression of electromechanical instability in fiber-reinforced dielectric elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The electromechanical instability of dielectric elastomers has been a major challenge for the application of this class of active materials. In this work, we demonstrate that dielectric elastomers filled with soft fiber can suppress the electromechanical instability and achieve large deformation. Specifically, we developed a constitutive model to describe the dielectric and mechanical behaviors of fiber-reinforced elastomers. The model was applied to study the influence of stiffness, nonlinearity properties and the distribution of fiber on the instability of dielectric membrane under an electric field. The results show that there exists an optimal fiber distribution condition to achieve the maximum deformation before failure.

  8. Metal matrix composites: Testing, analysis, and failure modes; Proceedings of the Symposium, Sparks, NV, Apr. 25, 26, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses the tension and compression testing of MMCs, the measurement of advanced composites' thermal expansion, plasticity theory for fiber-reinforced composites, a deformation analysis of boron/aluminum specimens by moire interferometry, strength prediction methods for MMCs, and the analysis of notched MMCs under tensile loading. Also discussed are techniques for the mechanical and thermal testing of Ti3Al/SCS-6 MMCs, damage initiation and growth in fiber-reinforced MMCs, the shear testing of MMCs, the crack growth and fracture of continuous fiber-reinforced MMCs in view of analytical and experimental results, and MMC fiber-matrix interface failures.

  9. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Latex-Modified Fiber-Reinforced Concrete: A Tunnel Liner Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo-Ha Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the mechanical properties and durability of latex-modified fiber-reinforced segment concrete (polyolefin-based macrosynthetic fibers and hybrid fiber-macrosynthetic fiber and polypropylene fiber for a tunnel liner application. The tested macrosynthetic fiber-reinforced concrete has a better strength than steel fiber-reinforced concrete. The tested concrete with blast furnace slag has a higher chloride ion penetration resistance (less permeable, but its compressive and flexural strengths can be reduced with blast furnace slag content increase. Also, the hybrid fiber-reinforced concrete has higher compressive strength, flexural strength, chloride ion water permeability resistance, impact resistance, and abrasion resistance than the macrosynthetic fiber-reinforced concrete. The modified fiber improved the performance of concrete, and the hybrid fiber was found to control the formation of micro- and macrocracks more effectively. Therefore, overall performance of the hybrid fiber-reinforced concrete was found superior to the other fiber-reinforced concrete mixes tested for this study. The test results also indicated that macrosynthetic fiber could replace the steel fiber as a concrete reinforcement.

  10. INFLUENCE OF POST-CURE TREATMENTS ON HARDNESS AND MARGINAL ADAPTATION OF COMPOSITE RESIN INLAY RESTORATIONS: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; Latempa, Antonio Marcelo Accetta; Chagas, Maurício Alves; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Leal, Mariana Pareira da Silva; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Vickers hardness number (VHN) and the in vitro marginal adaptation of inlay restorations of three hybrid composite resins (Filtek Z250, Opallis and Esthet-X) subjected to two post-cure treatments. Material and Methods: For the microhardness test, three different groups were prepared in accordance with the post-cure treatments: control group (only light cure for 40 s), autoclave group (light cure for 40 s + autoclave for 15 min at 130°C); and microwave group (light cure for 40 s + microwave for 3 min at 450 W). To assess the marginal adaptation, the composite resin was inserted incrementally into a mesial-occlusal-distal cavity brass mold and each increment light-cured for 40 s. A previous reading in micrometers was taken at the cervical wall, using a stereomicroscope magnifying glass equipped with a digital video camera and image-analysis software. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to the post-cure treatments (autoclave and microwave) and a reading was taken again at the cervical wall. Data were compared using ANOVA for the hardness test, split-plot ANOVA for the adaptation assessment and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. A significance level of 5% was adopted for all analyses. Results: The post-cure treatments increased the hardness of conventional composites (pinlay restorations (pinlays. Moreover, Filtek Z250 showed the best results, with higher hardness and lower gap values. PMID:20027437

  11. Effect of Silane Solvent on Microtensile Bond Strength of Hy-drogen Peroxide-Treated Fiber Post and Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Kasraei

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitrostudy was to evaluate the effect of the type of solvent in silane solution on microtensile bond strength of fiber posts to composite resin cores af-ter application of 24% hydrogen peroxide.Materials and Methods: Eighteen white fiber posts, immersed in 24% hydrogen peroxide were divided into three groups (n=6. In the group A post surfaces were silanized with an ethanol based solution, in group B with an acetone based solution, in the group C with and un-diluted methacryloxytrimethoxysilane (as the control group. The cores were built up using flowable composite. Microtensile bond strength test and evaluations using stereomi-croscope were performed on the samples and the data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests.Results: A significant difference was observed between the amounts of microtensile bond strength of fiber poststo composite cores in the groups A and B, and the ones in group C (P0.05.Conclusion: The type of solvent in silane solution has no effect on microtensile bond strength between fiber post andcomposite resin core after application of 24% Hydrogen Peroxide.

  12. A thermo-viscoelastic approach for the characterization and modeling of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composites – Part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ropers, Steffen; Sachs, Ulrich; Kardos, Marton; Osswald, Tim A.

    2017-01-01

    A proper description of the bending behavior is crucial to obtain accurate forming simulations, especially for continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites. These materials exhibit a highly temperature and bending-curvature dependent bending stiffness. These dependencies make the property

  13. Electromechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced dielectric elastomer membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on its large deformation, light weight, and high energy density, dielectric elastomer (DE has been used as driven muscle in many areas. We design the fiber-reinforced DE membrane by adding fibers in the membrane. The deformation and driven force direction of the membrane can be tuned by changing the fiber arrangements. The actuation in the perpendicular direction of the DE membrane with long fibers first increases and then decreases by the increasing of the fiber spacing in the perpendicular direction. The horizontal actuation of the membrane decreases by decreasing the spacing of short fibers. In the membrane-inflating structure, the radially arranged fibers will break the axisymmetric behavior of the structure. The top area of the inflated balloon without fiber will buckle up when the voltage reaches a certain level. Finite element simulations based on nonlinear field theory are conducted to investigate the effects of fiber arrangement and verify the experimental results. This work can guide the design of fiber-reinforced DE.

  14. Double-Sided Terahertz Imaging of Multilayered Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw Lopato

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymer matrix composites (PMC play important roles in modern industry. Increasing the number of such structures in aerospace, construction, and automotive applications enforces continuous monitoring of their condition. Nondestructive inspection of layered composite materials is much more complicated process than evaluation of homogenous, (mostly metallic structures. Several nondestructive methods are utilized in this case (ultrasonics, shearography, tap testing, acoustic emission, digital radiography, infrared imaging but none of them gives full description of evaluated structures. Thus, further development of NDT techniques should be studied. A pulsed terahertz method seems to be a good candidate for layered PMC inspection. It is based on picosecond electromagnetic pulses interacting with the evaluated structure. Differences of dielectric parameters enables detection of a particular layer in a layered material. In the case of multilayered structures, only layers close to surface can be detected. The response of deeper ones is averaged because of multiple reflections. In this paper a novel inspection procedure with a data processing algorithm is introduced. It is based on a double-sided measurement, acquired signal deconvolution, and data combining. In order to verify the application of the algorithm stress-subjected glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP was evaluated. The obtained results enabled detection and detailed analysis of delaminations introduced by stress treatment and proved the applicability of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Morphology of root canal surface: A reflection on the process of cementation of the composite relined glass fiber post

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine Mendes Pupo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was conducted to evaluate the bond strength in the different root thirds (premolars and maxillary central incisors of composite relined glass fiber posts compared to untreated glass fiber posts cemented with dual- or chemical-cure cements. Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted premolars (flat canal (n = 15 and 12 maxillary central incisors were used (round canal (n = 3. The teeth were sectioned, and the roots received endodontic treatment. The standardized preparation of the canals was carried out, and the roots were randomly divided into four groups according to the cementation systems: G1: cemented posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G2: relined posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G3: cemented posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post; and G4: relined posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post. The roots were cut to give two slices of each third of the root canal per specimen. Push-out test was conducted at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups for the premolars (flat canal (P = 0.959. There was a significant difference in the central incisors between the middle and apical thirds in the cemented group when using the dual system (P = 0.04 and between the middle and apical thirds (P = 0.003 and cervical and apical thirds (P = 0.033 when using the chemical system. Conclusion: Due to the anatomy of the root canal, flat canal of the premolars does not require relining, but round canal of the maxillary central incisors demands it for more secure in the bond strength.

  16. Morphology of root canal surface: A reflection on the process of cementation of the composite relined glass fiber post.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupo, Yasmine Mendes; Casacqui, Elaine; de Lima, Paola Andressa Barbosa; Michél, Milton Domingos; Bueno, Albano Luis Novaes; Michelotto, André Luiz da Costa

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the bond strength in the different root thirds (premolars and maxillary central incisors) of composite relined glass fiber posts compared to untreated glass fiber posts cemented with dual- or chemical-cure cements. Sixty human single-rooted premolars (flat canal) (n = 15) and 12 maxillary central incisors were used (round canal) (n = 3). The teeth were sectioned, and the roots received endodontic treatment. The standardized preparation of the canals was carried out, and the roots were randomly divided into four groups according to the cementation systems: G1: cemented posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem); G2: relined posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem); G3: cemented posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post); and G4: relined posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post). The roots were cut to give two slices of each third of the root canal per specimen. Push-out test was conducted at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between groups for the premolars (flat canal) (P = 0.959). There was a significant difference in the central incisors between the middle and apical thirds in the cemented group when using the dual system (P = 0.04) and between the middle and apical thirds (P = 0.003) and cervical and apical thirds (P = 0.033) when using the chemical system. Due to the anatomy of the root canal, flat canal of the premolars does not require relining, but round canal of the maxillary central incisors demands it for more secure in the bond strength.

  17. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prapaporn PANITIWAT

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC, MultiCore Flow (MCF, and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ, and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC. Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10. Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers’ instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. Results One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05, but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (p<0.05. In terms of the flexural modulus, the ranking from the highest values of the materials was aligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Conclusion Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  18. Polyurethane foam infill for fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bridge deck panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Although still in their infancy, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bridges have shown great promise in eliminating corrosion : concerns and meeting (or exceeding) FHWAs goal of 100-year life spans for bridges. While FRP bridges are cost-effective in ...

  19. Mesoscale Characterization of Fracture Properties of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using a Lattice–Particle Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Montero-Chacón

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a lattice–particle model for the analysis of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC. In this approach, fibers are explicitly modeled and connected to the concrete matrix lattice via interface elements. The interface behavior was calibrated by means of pullout tests and a range for the bond properties is proposed. The model was validated with analytical and experimental results under uniaxial tension and compression, demonstrating the ability of the model to correctly describe the effect of fiber volume fraction and distribution on fracture properties of SFRC. The lattice–particle model was integrated into a hierarchical homogenization-based scheme in which macroscopic material parameters are obtained from mesoscale simulations. Moreover, a representative volume element (RVE analysis was carried out and the results shows that such an RVE does exist in the post-peak regime and until localization takes place. Finally, the multiscale upscaling strategy was successfully validated with three-point bending tests.

  20. Mesoscale Characterization of Fracture Properties of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using a Lattice–Particle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Chacón, Francisco; Cifuentes, Héctor; Medina, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a lattice–particle model for the analysis of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC). In this approach, fibers are explicitly modeled and connected to the concrete matrix lattice via interface elements. The interface behavior was calibrated by means of pullout tests and a range for the bond properties is proposed. The model was validated with analytical and experimental results under uniaxial tension and compression, demonstrating the ability of the model to correctly describe the effect of fiber volume fraction and distribution on fracture properties of SFRC. The lattice–particle model was integrated into a hierarchical homogenization-based scheme in which macroscopic material parameters are obtained from mesoscale simulations. Moreover, a representative volume element (RVE) analysis was carried out and the results shows that such an RVE does exist in the post-peak regime and until localization takes place. Finally, the multiscale upscaling strategy was successfully validated with three-point bending tests. PMID:28772568

  1. State-of-the-art of fiber-reinforced polymers in additive manufacturing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Pedersen, David Bue; Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have received a lot of attention in recent years for their use in multiple materials such as metals, ceramics, and polymers. The aim of this review article is to analyze the technology of fiber-reinforced polymers and its implementation with additive...... manufacturing. This article reviews recent developments, ideas, and state-of-the-art technologies in this field. Moreover, it gives an overview of the materials currently available for fiber-reinforced material technology....

  2. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, A.U.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37 o C. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  3. Mechanical and Morphology Properties of Feather Fiber Composite for Dental Post Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Maizatul Farhain Salehuddin; Mohammed Rafiq Abdul Kadir; Eshamsul Sulaiman; Noor Hayaty Abu Kasim

    2014-01-01

    Feather/plastic composite material was fabricated from polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), feather fiber (FF) and montmorillonite (MMT) using brabender internal mixer. PMMA based composites were produced with 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 phr composite of mass feather fiber with and without 4 % of montmorillonite (MMT). Alkali treatment was used to improve the interfacial adhesion among the feather fiber (FF) and the PMMA. Flexural properties of FF/ PMMA and FF/ PMMA/ MMT composites were investigated. Composites were analyzed by Scanning Electron (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy techniques. The result showed that, the addition of FF significantly increased the flexural strength of the composites. The hydrophobic nature of feather fiber displayed an excellent compatibility among fibers and PMMA matrix. (author)

  4. Post-Impact and Open Hole Tensile Of Kenaf Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, S.; Salleh, Z.; Masdek, N. R. N. M.; Taib, Y. M.; Azhar, I. I. S.; Hyie, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, kenaf hybrid glass composites has been used for a vast field of study throughout the globe. There are several compositions and orientation of kenaf hybrid glass composites that has been studied. With regards to the study that has been done, this study will be focussing on a 90FG/0/90/90/0/90FG orientation of kenaf hybrid glass composites. Polyester resin is used as a matrix to these hybrid composites. Impacted and open hole specimens were then analyzed through tensile test. All specimens were fabricated by using the cold press hand lay-up technique. The results revealed that the hybrid composites were hardly affected by the impact up to 6J. After 6J the impacted specimens experienced a significant damage for both strength and modulus. The same goes to open hole specimens where the same trend of tensile properties were observed as impacted specimens.

  5. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hua Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  6. Effect of cure cycle on enthalpy relaxation and post shrinkage in neat epoxy and epoxy composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Jakobsen, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    The effect of cure cycle on enthalpy relaxation and warpage is studied for both neat epoxy and glass/epoxy composites. An approach for determining the enthalpy relaxation in the matrix of composite materials combining modulated differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry is presented...

  7. Fiber-reinforced framework and Ceromer restorations: a technical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanghellini, G

    1997-01-01

    The utilization of synthetic resins and ceramics in combination with metal frameworks continues to be the mainstay of crown and bridge prosthetics. Although most of these systems have resulted in years of clinical success, each material when used in combination has inherent properties that induce stresses to the system. The combination of ceramic technology and polymer research, in addition to fiber integration, has resulted in the development and introduction of a new category of crown and bridge materials--a ceromer and fiber-reinforced restorative system. This article examines the history of polymer and ceramic technology, and reports the clinical and research data currently available on one indirect ceromer system (Targis System, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY).

  8. Post-Weaning Diet Affects Faecal Microbial Composition but Not Selected Adipose Gene Expression in the Cat (Felis catus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Kittelmann, Sandra; Young, Wayne; Kerr, Katherine R.; Swanson, Kelly S.; Roy, Nicole C.; Thomas, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pre- (i.e., gestation and during lactation) and post-weaning diet on the composition of faecal bacterial communities and adipose expression of key genes in the glucose and insulin pathways were investigated in the cat. Queens were maintained on a moderate protein:fat:carbohydrate kibbled (“Diet A”; 35:20:28% DM; n  =  4) or high protein:fat:carbohydrate canned (“Diet B”; 45:37:2% DM; n = 3) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. Offspring were weaned onto these diets in a nested design (n  =  5 per treatment). Faecal samples were collected at wk 8 and 17 of age. DNA was isolated from faeces and bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons were analysed by pyrosequencing. RNA was extracted from blood (wk 18) and adipose tissue and ovarian/testicular tissues (wk 24) and gene expression levels determined using RT-qPCR. Differences (PDiet A or B. However, pre-weaning diet had little effect on faecal bacterial composition in weaned kittens. In contrast, post-weaning diet altered bacterial population profiles in the kittens. Increased (PDiet A compared to those fed Diet B post-weaning. Feeding Diet B pre-weaning increased (PDiet A pre-weaning. Post-weaning diet had no effect on expression levels of target genes. Correlations between the expression levels of genes involved in glucose and insulin pathways and faecal Bacteriodetes and Firmicutes phyla were identified. The reasons for why post-weaning diet affects microbial populations and not gene expression levels are of interest. PMID:24312255

  9. Use of fiber reinforced polymer composite cable for post-tensioning application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of this research project was to assess the feasibility of the use of innovative carbon fiber reinforced : polymer (CFRP) tendons and to develop guidelines for CFRP in post-tensioned bridge applications, including segmental : bri...

  10. An Overview of Clinical Studies on Fiber Post Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idil Dikbas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraradicular posts are useful adjuncts in the restoration of endodontically treated teeth. These systems have undergone a significant evolution in recent years, and fiber-reinforced systems have started to be incorporated into routine clinical care more frequently. Despite the high number of laboratory studies pertaining to the characteristics of fiber posts, clinical studies evaluating their general success rates are rather limited. Since clinical investigations are reliable means to achieve information about the general behavior pattern of materials or techniques, assessment of this data will be beneficial to have a better understanding of fiber-reinforced intraradicular post systems. The purpose of this paper was to make a summary of clinical studies regarding various fiber posts. A PubMed search was conducted and articles dating back to 1990 were retrieved. The paper provides an overview of clinical studies on fiber posts specifically in the last decade as well as commentary analysis.

  11. Comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with glass fiber posts, intracanal composite resin, and experimental dentine posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jha, Padmanabh; Aggarwal, Akarshak

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with gutta-percha, glass fiber posts (GFP), experimental dentine posts (DP) or Intracanal composite Resin (ICR). Fifty maxillary canines were decoronated, standardized and enlarged until, number 5 Peeso reamers were allowed to simulate immature teeth. After placement of 5 mm of MTA, the canals were divided into 5 groups and filled as follows: Group 1: AH Plus + gutta-percha, lateral compaction; Group 2: GFP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 3: DP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 4: PARACORE dual cure resin. A standardized core was built in all groups except in Group 5. Each of the specimens was tested for fracture resistance by universal testing machine. The mean fracture resistance were 817 ± 27.753, 1164.6 ± 21.624, 994.4 ± 96.8747, 873.8 ± 105.446 and 493.7 ± 6.945 newtons for Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively. Independent "t" test revealed statistically significant discrepancies, in the fracture resistance among the 4 groups except Group 1 and Group 4 (P < 0.05). This study suggests that GFP and DP may be preferred for additional reinforcement of immature teeth.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Simulated Immature Teeth Restored with Glass Fiber Posts, Intracanal Composite Resin, and Experimental Dentine Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeta Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with gutta-percha, glass fiber posts (GFP, experimental dentine posts (DP or Intracanal composite Resin (ICR. Materials and Methods. Fifty maxillary canines were decoronated, standardized and enlarged until, number 5 Peeso reamers were allowed to simulate immature teeth. After placement of 5 mm of MTA, the canals were divided into 5 groups and filled as follows: Group 1: AH Plus + gutta-percha, lateral compaction; Group 2: GFP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 3: DP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 4: PARACORE dual cure resin. A standardized core was built in all groups except in Group 5. Each of the specimens was tested for fracture resistance by universal testing machine. Results. The mean fracture resistance were 817 ± 27.753, 1164.6 ± 21.624, 994.4 ± 96.8747, 873.8 ± 105.446 and 493.7 ± 6.945 newtons for Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively. Independent “t” test revealed statistically significant discrepancies, in the fracture resistance among the 4 groups except Group 1 and Group 4 (P<0.05. Conclusions. This study suggests that GFP and DP may be preferred for additional reinforcement of immature teeth.

  13. Valorization of post-consumer waste plastic in cementitious concrete composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzouk, O. Yazoghli; Dheilly, R.M.; Queneudec, M.

    2007-01-01

    The sheer amount of disposable bottles being produced nowadays makes it imperative to identify alternative procedures for recycling them since they are non-biodegradable. This paper describes an innovative use of consumed plastic bottle waste as sand-substitution aggregate within composite materials for building application. Particularly, bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have been used as partial and complete substitutes for sand in concrete composites. Various volume fractions of sand varying from 2% to 100% were substituted by the same volume of granulated plastic, and various sizes of PET aggregates were used. The bulk density and mechanical characteristics of the composites produced were evaluated. To study the relationship between mechanical properties and composite microstructure, scanning electron microscopy technique was employed. The results presented show that substituting sand at a level below 50% by volume with granulated PET, whose upper granular limit equals 5 mm, affects neither the compressive strength nor the flexural strength of composites. This study demonstrates that plastic bottles shredded into small PET particles may be used successfully as sand-substitution aggregates in cementitious concrete composites. These new composites would appear to offer an attractive low-cost material with consistent properties; moreover, they would help in resolving some of the solid waste problems created by plastics production and in saving energy

  14. Vancomycin–chitosan composite deposited on post porous hydroxyapatite coated Ti6Al4V implant for drug controlled release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chi-Chuan; Lin, Chien-Chung; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Yen, Shiow-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Through the hydrogen bonds and the deprotonation, the vancomycin–chitosan composite has been originally deposited on Ti4Al4V by electrochemical technology. However, the rapid destruction of the hydrogen bonding between them by polar water molecules during immersion tests revealed 80% drug burst in a few hours. In this study, the post porous hydroxyapatite (HA) coated Ti4Al4V is prepared for the subsequent electrolytic deposition of vancomycin–chitosan composite to control the drug release. As expected, the initial burst is reduced to 55%, followed by a steady release about 20% from day 1 to day 5 and a slower release of the retained 25% after day 6, resulting in bacterial inhibition zone diameter of 30 mm which can last for more than a month in antibacterial tests, compared with the coated specimen without HA gradually loosing inhibition zone after 21 days. Besides, the cell culture indicates that the vancomycin–chitosan/HA composite coated has enhanced the proliferation, the differentiation and the mineralization of the osteoblast-like cell. In general, it is helpful for the osteointegration on permanent implants. Consistently, it effectively provides the prophylaxis and therapy of osteomyelitis according to the results of the rabbit infection animal model. - Highlights: ► The releasing curve of the vancomycin–chitosan/HA composite revealed three periods. ► The drug release sustained one month due to the effect of post porous HA coating. ► The composite coating could treat the osteomyelitis in the rabbit infection model

  15. Vancomycin–chitosan composite deposited on post porous hydroxyapatite coated Ti6Al4V implant for drug controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chi-Chuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing, University 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chien-Chung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing, University 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Taichung Armed Force General Hospital, 348, Sec. 2, Jhongshan Road, Taiping City, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Liao, Jiunn-Wang [Graduate Institute of Veterinary Pathobiology, National Chung Hsing, University 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Yen, Shiow-Kang, E-mail: skyen@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing, University 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-01

    Through the hydrogen bonds and the deprotonation, the vancomycin–chitosan composite has been originally deposited on Ti4Al4V by electrochemical technology. However, the rapid destruction of the hydrogen bonding between them by polar water molecules during immersion tests revealed 80% drug burst in a few hours. In this study, the post porous hydroxyapatite (HA) coated Ti4Al4V is prepared for the subsequent electrolytic deposition of vancomycin–chitosan composite to control the drug release. As expected, the initial burst is reduced to 55%, followed by a steady release about 20% from day 1 to day 5 and a slower release of the retained 25% after day 6, resulting in bacterial inhibition zone diameter of 30 mm which can last for more than a month in antibacterial tests, compared with the coated specimen without HA gradually loosing inhibition zone after 21 days. Besides, the cell culture indicates that the vancomycin–chitosan/HA composite coated has enhanced the proliferation, the differentiation and the mineralization of the osteoblast-like cell. In general, it is helpful for the osteointegration on permanent implants. Consistently, it effectively provides the prophylaxis and therapy of osteomyelitis according to the results of the rabbit infection animal model. - Highlights: ► The releasing curve of the vancomycin–chitosan/HA composite revealed three periods. ► The drug release sustained one month due to the effect of post porous HA coating. ► The composite coating could treat the osteomyelitis in the rabbit infection model.

  16. Fruit cuticle lipid composition and fruit post-harvest water loss in an advanced backcross generation of pepper (Capsicum sp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Parsons, Eugene P.

    2012-03-05

    To understand the role of fruit cuticle lipid composition in fruit water loss, an advanced backcross population, the BC2F2, was created between the Capsicum annuum (PI1154) and the Capsicum chinense (USDA162), which have high and low post-harvest water loss rates, respectively. Besides dramatic differences in fruit water loss, preliminary studies also revealed that these parents exhibited significant differences in both the amount and composition of their fruit cuticle. Cuticle analysis of the BC2F2 fruit revealed that although water loss rate was not strongly associated with the total surface wax amount, there were significant correlations between water loss rate and cuticle composition. We found a positive correlation between water loss rate and the amount of total triterpenoid plus sterol compounds, and negative correlations between water loss and the alkane to triterpenoid plus sterol ratio. We also report negative correlations between water loss rate and the proportion of both alkanes and aliphatics to total surface wax amount. For the first time, we report significant correlations between water loss and cutin monomer composition. We found positive associations of water loss rate with the total cutin, total C16 monomers and 16-dihydroxy hexadecanoic acid. Our results support the hypothesis that simple straight-chain aliphatic cuticle constituents form more impermeable cuticular barriers than more complex isoprenoid-based compounds. These results shed new light on the biochemical basis for cuticle involvement in fruit water loss. © 2012 Physiologia Plantarum.

  17. Chapter 15: Characterization and Processing of Nanocellulose Thermosetting Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald C. Sabo; Rani F. Elhajjar; Craig M. Clemons; Krishna M. Pillai

    2015-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites have gained popularity through their advantages over conventional metallic materials. Most polymer composites are traditionally made with reinforcing fibers such as carbon or glass. However, there has been recent interest in sourcing these reinforcing fibers from renewable, natural resources. Nanocellulose-based reinforcements...

  18. Fibre reinforced composite: post and core material in a pediatric patient - an alternative to usual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sonu; Tandon, Shobha

    2014-11-01

    Fractured teeth are always a challenge to the dentist. The root canal therapy today can retain even very badly broken teeth. One of the most accepted techniques involve restoration of extensively carious or badly fractured teeth by the fabrication of a post and core while utilizing the root canal space for anchorage. So far, the only materials that are available to the dentist for this procedure have been a variety of metallic alloys. These materials are hard and need to be cast precisely so that they can fit the canals. Today materials are available which usually eliminates all the intermediate steps which are done in laboratories and the total control is rendered in the hands of the dentist, to fabricate on the chair, a resilient, aesthetic and bonded post and core. One such material is discussed here in a pediatric permanent anterior tooth.

  19. Fracture Resistance of Composite Fixed Partial Dentures Reinforced with Pre-impregnated and Non-impregnated Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mosharraf

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FPDs are affected by fiber impregnation. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture resistance of composite fixed partial dentures reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and methods. Groups (n=5 of three-unit fiber-reinforced composite FPDs (23 mm in length from maxillary second premolar to maxillary second molar were fabricated on two abutments with pontic width of 12 mm. One group was fabricated as the control group with composite (Gradia and the other two groups were fabricated with composite (Gradia reinforced with pre-impregnated fiber (Fibrex ribbon and non-impregnated fiber (Fiber braid, respectively. The specimens were stored in distilled water for one week at 37°C and then tested in a universal testing machine by means of a three-point bending test. Statistical analysis consisted of one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Scheffé’s test for the test groups (α=0.05. Results. Fracture resistance (N differed significantly between the control group and the other two groups (P<0.001, but there were no statistically significant differences between the pre-impregnated and non-impregnated groups (P=0.565. The degree of deflection measured (mm did not differ significantly between the three groups (P=0.397, yet the mean deflection measured in pre-impregnated group was twice as that in the other two groups. Conclusion. Reinforcement of composite with fiber might considerably increase the fracture resistance of FPDs; however, the type of the fiber used resulted in no significant difference in fracture resistance of FPD specimens.

  20. Post-irradiation hardness development, chemical softening, and thermal stability of bulk-fill and conventional resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshali, Ruwaida Z; Salim, Nesreen A; Satterthwaite, Julian D; Silikas, Nick

    2015-02-01

    To measure bottom/top hardness ratio of bulk-fill and conventional resin-composite materials, and to assess hardness changes after dry and ethanol storage. Filler content and kinetics of thermal decomposition were also tested using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Six bulk-fill (SureFil SDR, Venus bulk fill, X-tra base, Filtek bulk fill flowable, Sonic fill, and Tetric EvoCeram bulk-fill) and eight conventional resin-composite materials (Grandioso flow, Venus Diamond flow, X-flow, Filtek Supreme Ultra Flowable, Grandioso, Venus Diamond, TPH Spectrum, and Filtek Z250) were tested (n=5). Initial and 24h (post-cure dry storage) top and bottom microhardness values were measured. Microhardness was re-measured after the samples were stored in 75% ethanol/water solution. Thermal decomposition and filler content were assessed by TGA. Results were analysed using one-way ANOVA and paired sample t-test (α=0.05). All materials showed significant increase of microhardness after 24h of dry storage which ranged from 100.1% to 9.1%. Bottom/top microhardness ratio >0.9 was exhibited by all materials. All materials showed significant decrease of microhardness after 24h of storage in 75% ethanol/water which ranged from 14.5% to 74.2%. The extent of post-irradiation hardness development was positively correlated to the extent of ethanol softening (R(2)=0.89, pTGA was variable and was correlated to ethanol softening. Bulk-fill resin-composites exhibit comparable bottom/top hardness ratio to conventional materials at recommended manufacturer thickness. Hardness was affected to a variable extent by storage with variable inorganic filler content and initial thermal decomposition shown by TGA. The manufacturer recommended depth of cure of bulk-fill resin-composites can be reached based on the microhardness method. Characterization of the primary polymer network of a resin-composite material should be considered when evaluating its stability in the aqueous oral environment. Copyright

  1. Scanning electron microscopic study of teeth restored with fiber posts and composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Sridhara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the thickness of resin dentin interface zones (RDIZ obtained by luting carbon fiber post to intra-radicular dentin, either with All-Bond 2 bonding agent and C and B composite cement or Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. Materials and Methods: Twenty single rooted mandibular premolars of similar sizes were prepared for the carbon fiber post after biomechanical preparation and obturation. They were divided into two groups, Group 1 and 2 of 10 samples each. Carbon fiber posts used for Group 1 samples were luted using All-Bond 2 and C and B cement. For Group 2 carbon fiber posts were luted using Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. All the 20 samples were sectioned longitudinally and marked at three points on the length of the tooth from the dentin-core interface to the apex at 2 mm, 5 mm, and 8 mm to get coronal, middle, and apical areas, respectively. The formation and thickness (width of the RDIZ at the marked areas was evaluated by scanning electron microscope using ×1000 magnification. The results were statistical analyzed. Results: Irrespective of the adhesive systems used all specimens showed a RDIZ formation. Microscopic examination of Group 1 showed significantly higher percentage of RDIZ (P < 0.05 than Group 2. RDIZ morphology was easily detectable at coronal and middle areas of all specimens. Conclusion: All-Bond 2 showed denser and wider RDIZ compared with the Panavia F.

  2. Study on shear resistance of fiberreinforced polymer–reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juozas Valivonis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed to investigate the shear resistance of the beams reinforced with fiber-reinforced polymer stirrups. Together with theoretical analysis of the existing shear resistance provisions in design codes and literature, an experimental research was performed. During the experimental investigation, four doubly reinforced rectangular concrete beams were designed, produced, and tested to failure. A new analytical calculation method (including, but not limited to statistical validation to investigate the shear response of fiber-reinforced polymer–reinforced concrete beams has been developed. A database with 102 beams was compiled, in order to evaluate the guideline provisions and proposed analytical calculation method. The experimental results were compared with theoretical results obtained by the proposed analytical calculation method. Correlation between analytical and experimental results is more accurate than using the existing provisions in design codes and literature for fiber-reinforced polymer–reinforced concrete beams.

  3. Assessment of the mechanical properties of sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay using triaxial shear tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yankai; Li, Yanbin; Niu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil's strength and improves the soil's mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment.

  4. Load fatigue of teeth with different ferrule lengths, restored with fiber posts, composite resin cores, and all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Polly S; Nicholls, Jack I; Junge, Thomas; Phillips, Keith M

    2009-10-01

    There is no evidence to suggest that the ferrule length needed for an all-ceramic crown is different from that needed for a cast metal or metal ceramic crown. The purpose of this study was to relate different ferrule lengths with the number of fatigue cycles needed for failure of the crown cement for an all-ceramic crown cemented with a resin cement. Fifteen maxillary central incisors were divided into 3 groups (n=5), with ferrules of 0.0 mm (no-ferrule group), 0.5 mm (0.5-mm ferrule group), and 1.0 mm (1.0-mm ferrule group), respectively. Each tooth was restored with a 0.050-inch glass-filled composite post (ParaPost FiberWhite) and a composite resin core (ParaCore). The posts were cemented with resin cement (ParaPost Cement), and the composite resin cores were bonded to dentin using a dentin bonding agent (ParaPost Cement, Conditioner A & B). Each specimen was prepared with a 7-mm total preparation height, a 1.5-mm lingual axial wall, and a 1.0-mm shoulder around the tooth. The crowns for all specimens were pressed with a pressable ceramic material (IPS Empress 2) and cemented with resin cement (Variolink II). A 6-kg cyclic test load was applied to each specimen at 135 degrees to the long axis of the tooth. The independent variable measured was the number of load fatigue cycles required for failure of the crown cement. The data were subjected to the Kruskal-Wallis test to detect overall significance and the Mann-Whitney U test for pairwise comparisons with Bonferroni correction (alpha=.017). The mean (SD) number of cycles to failure for each group was: no-ferrule group, 213 (317); 0.5-mm ferrule group, 155,137 (68,991); and 1.0-mm ferrule group, 262,872 (21,432). None of the specimens in the 1.0-mm ferrule group failed. Significant differences were found between the no-ferrule group and the 0.5-mm ferrule group, and the no-ferrule group and the 1.0-mm ferrule group (P.017). Specimens with a 0.0-mm ferrule survived few fatigue cycles despite the fact that both the

  5. Effect of post-curing treatment on mechanical properties of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Chetti, Verónica A; Macchi, Ricardo L; Iglesias, María E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of additional curing procedures on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of indirect and direct composite materials. Twenty-four rectangular prism-shaped 2 mm x 2 mm x 25 mm samples of Belleglass, Premisa (Kerr), Adoro and Heliomolar (Ivoclar Vivadent) were prepared. Each composite was packed in an ad-hoc stainless steel device with a TeflonR instrument. A mylar strip and a glass slab were placed on top to obtain a flat surface. Polymerization was activated for 20 seconds with a halogen unit (Astralis 10, Ivoclar - Vivadent) with soft start regime and an output with a 350 to 1200 mw/cm2 range at four different points according to the diameter of the end of the guide. The specimens obtained were then randomly divided into two different groups: with and without additional treatment. In the group with additional treatment, the samples adorro were submitted to 25 minutes in Lumamat 100 (Ivoclar Vivadent) and the rest to 20 minutes in BelleGlass HP (Kerr). After the curing procedures, all samples were treated with sandpapers of decreasing grain size under water flow, and stored in distilled water for 24 h. Flexural strength was measured according to the ISO 404920 recommendations and elastic modulus was determined following the procedures of ANSI/ADA standard No. 27. Statistical differences were found among the different materials and curing procedures employed (Pcomposites, and its clinical relevance.

  6. Determining the Chemical Composition of Corrosion Inhibitor/Metal Interfaces with XPS: Minimizing Post Immersion Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Monika S; Morales-Gil, Perla; Belashehr, Turia; Kousar, Kiran; Arellanes Lozada, Paulina; Lindsay, Robert

    2017-03-15

    An approach for acquiring more reliable X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data from corrosion inhibitor/metal interfaces is described. More specifically, the focus is on metallic substrates immersed in acidic solutions containing organic corrosion inhibitors, as these systems can be particularly sensitive to oxidation following removal from solution. To minimize the likelihood of such degradation, samples are removed from solution within a glove box purged with inert gas, either N2 or Ar. The glove box is directly attached to the load-lock of the ultra-high vacuum X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy instrument, avoiding any exposure to the ambient laboratory atmosphere, and thus reducing the possibility of post immersion substrate oxidation. On this basis, one can be more certain that the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy features observed are likely to be representative of the in situ submerged scenario, e.g. the oxidation state of the metal is not modified.

  7. A numerical investigation on the size effect of fiber-reinforced concrete specimens in crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggi, Matteo; Venini, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    The paper addresses a numerical investigation on the size effect in fiber-reinforced concrete specimens that is based on an alternative approach for cohesive crack propagation. A discrete version of the Hellinger-Reissner variational principle manages mode I crack growth in the case of piece-wise linear cohesive softening equations. A three-point bending test is investigated according to the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced mixtures that have been characterized in the experimental literature. The achieved results point out that each segment of the considered cohesive laws plays an important role in the control of the size effect, depending on the dimension of the specimen.

  8. Prediction of Skid Resistance Value of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Tiling Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadik Alper Yildizel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the use of adaptive artificial neural network system for evaluating the skid resistance value (British Pendulum Number; BPN of the glass fiber-reinforced tiling materials. During the creation of the neural model, four main factors were considered: fiber, calcium carbonate content, sand blasting, and polishing properties of the specimens. The model was trained, tested, and compared with the on-site test results. As per the comparison of the outcomes of the study, the analysis and on-site test results showed that there is a great potential for the prediction of BPN of glass fiber-reinforced tiling materials by using developed neural system.

  9. Mechanical and physical properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers intended for implant suprastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2007-09-01

    Mechanical properties and quality of fiber/matrix adhesion of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based materials, reinforced with carbon-graphite (CG) fibers that are able to remain in a plastic state until polymerization, were examined. Tubes of cleaned braided CG fibers were treated with a sizing resin. Two resin mixtures, resin A and resin B, stable in the fluid state and containing different cross-linking agents, were reinforced with CG fiber loadings of 24, 36, and 47 wt% (20, 29, and 38 vol.%). In addition, resin B was reinforced with 58 wt% (47 vol.%). After heat-polymerization, flexural strength and modulus were evaluated, both dry and after water storage. Coefficient of thermal expansion, longitudinally and in the transverse direction of the specimens, was determined. Adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties and linear coefficient of thermal expansion were similar for both fiber composites. With increased fiber loading, flexural properties increased. For 47 wt% fibers in polymer A the flexural strength was 547.7 (28.12) MPa and for polymer B 563.3 (89.24) MPa when water saturated. Linear coefficient of thermal expansion was for 47 wt% CG fiber-reinforced polymers; -2.5 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 longitudinally and 62.4 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 in the transverse direction of the specimens. SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix. More porosity was observed with fiber loading of 58 wt%. The fiber treatment and the developed resin matrices resulted in good adhesion between CG fibers and matrix. The properties observed indicate a potential for implant-retained prostheses.

  10. Feasibility of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Rubberized Concrete in Cold Regions for High Volume Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Eid, Mahear A.

    There are many challenges faced with the use of Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) in cold regions, but with the inclusion of new technologies such as steel fibers and recycled tire crumb rubber efficient construction may be possible. Research was conducted on a modified concrete material that included both steel fibers and crumb rubber. The composite material was called Steel Fiber-Reinforced Rubberized Concrete (SFRRC). The objective of this investigation was to provide evidence showing that SFRRC can reduce tire rutting compared to asphaltic pavement. In addition, the research showed that the SFRRC could withstand freeze-thaw cycles and increase service life of roadways. Several tests were performed to determine the characteristics of the material. Freeze-thaw testing was performed to determine compressive strength loss and visual deterioration of the material. Wheel tracker rut testing was performed both with the standard steel wheel and with a modified studded rubber tire to determine plastic deformation and rut resistance. An experimental test slab was cast in place on a public approach to observe the construction procedures, the effects of studded tire wear and the frost actions in cold region conditions. Based on freeze-thaw and wheel tracker test results and observations of the experimental test slab, the SFRRC material shows viability in cold regions for resisting freeze-thaw actions. The freeze-thaw testing resulted in increased compressive strength after 300 freeze-thaw cycles and very low deterioration of material compared to standard PCC. The wheel tracker testing resulted in very low plastic deformation and minor material rutting with use of the studded rubber tire. The test slab showed very minor surface wear, no freeze-thaw cracking and no rutting after one winter of use. It is recommended that further testing of the material be conducted by means of a large-scale trial section. This would provide information with respect to cost analysis and

  11. Improvement of post-harvest quality of pear fruit with optimized composite edible coating formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Rudri K; Ramana Rao, T V; Nandane, A S

    2017-11-01

    Application of edible coatings is a suitable method to maintain the quality and reduce post-harvest losses in fresh vegetables and fruits. Pear fruits being climacteric have a short shelf life, and coating is considered as one of the most popular techniques to prolong its shelf life.The present study evaluates the effect of optimized edible coatings containing soy protein isolate (SPI) in combination with additives like hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and olive oil on 'Babughosha' Pears ( Pyrus communis L.) stored at ambient temperature (28 ± 5 °C and 60 ± 10% RH). Four different coatings optimized by response surface methodology study were used in the present experiment. The results of the present study shows that the optimized edible coatings help retain the firmness of fruits and lowered the moisture loss. The tested combination of coating could also withhold the levels of ascorbic acid, chlorophyll and sugar contents in the treated fruits. Activities of enzymes associated with fruit softening (β-galactosidase, polygalacturonase, pectin methyl esterase) showed delayed peaks. Amongst all treatments, T1 (SPI 5.0%, HPMC 0.40%, Olive oil 1%, Potassium sorbate 0.22%) and T2 (SPI 5.0%, HPMC 0.40%, Olive oil 0.98% Potassium sorbate 0.20%) were found to have pronounced effect on retention of nutritional quality in pears. Observations of shelf-life extension established that T2 (SPI 5.0%, HPMC 0.40%, Olive oil 0.98% Potassium sorbate 0.20%) was successful in extending shelf-life of pear fruits up to 15 days, as compared to 8 days for untreated pear fruits.

  12. Relationships between anthropometric features, body composition, and anaerobic alactic power in elite post-pubertal and mature male taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boraczyński Michał

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper describes the relationships between anthropometric features, body composition, and anaerobic alactic power (AAP in elite post-pubertal and mature male taekwondo athletes. Methods. The sample of 41 taekwondo athletes was divided into two groups: post-pubertal (P-P, n = 19, Mage = 15.6 ± 1.1 years and mature (M, n = 22, Mage = 20.7 ± 2.8 years. Anthropometric features (WB-150, ZPU Tryb-Wag, Poland, body composition (BC-418 MA, Tanita, Japan, maturational status (Pubertal Maturational Observational Scale, and AAP (10-s version of the Wingate Anaerobic Test were assessed. Results. Post-hoc testing revealed significant between-group differences (3.2-20.4%, p < 0.01 in all anthropometric and body composition measures, with effect sizes (ES between −0.79 and −1.25 (p < 0.001, except for fat content and percentage of skeletal muscle mass (SMM (p ≥ 0.05. In group M, the maximal power output (Pmax was greater (ES = −1.15, p < 0.001 and the time of its attainment shorter (ES = 0.59, p < 0.001 than in group P-P. Correlation analyses indicated notably strong associations between body mass (BM and Pmax in group P-P (r = 0.950 [95% CI, 0.85-0.98], p < 0.001 and M (r = 0.926 [95% CI, 0.81-0.97], p < 0.001, and similar-sized strong correlations between fat-free mass (FFM and Pmax in group P-P (r = 0.955 [95% CI, 0.86-0.99], p < 0.001 and M (r = 0.924 [95% CI, 0.82-0.96], p < 0.001. Additionally, a strong correlation was found between body height and Pmax in groups P-P and M (r = 0.805 [95% CI, 0.54-0.92], p < 0.001 and r = 0.819 [95% CI, 0.58-0.93], p < 0.001, respectively. Linear regression analyses demonstrated that FFM, BM, and absolute SMM best explained the variance in Pmax in both groups (r, 0.939-0.951; r2, 0.882-0.909. Conclusions. The strong correlations observed in both groups between BM, FFM, SMM, and Pmax demonstrate the significant effects of body size and composition on AAP. By determining the current levels of these

  13. Infants' Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Composition Reflects Both Maternal and Post-Natal Infection with Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odilon Nouatin

    Full Text Available Maternal parasitoses modulate fetal immune development, manifesting as altered cellular immunological activity in cord blood that may be linked to enhanced susceptibility to infections in early life. Plasmodium falciparum typifies such infections, with distinct placental infection-related changes in cord blood exemplified by expanded populations of parasite antigen-specific regulatory T cells. Here we addressed whether such early-onset cellular immunological alterations persist through infancy. Specifically, in order to assess the potential impacts of P. falciparum infections either during pregnancy or during infancy, we quantified lymphocyte subsets in cord blood and in infants' peripheral blood during the first year of life. The principal age-related changes observed, independent of infection status, concerned decreases in the frequencies of CD4+, NKdim and NKT cells, whilst CD8+, Treg and Teff cells' frequencies increased from birth to 12 months of age. P. falciparum infections present at delivery, but not those earlier in gestation, were associated with increased frequencies of Treg and CD8+ T cells but fewer CD4+ and NKT cells during infancy, thus accentuating the observed age-related patterns. Overall, P. falciparum infections arising during infancy were associated with a reversal of the trends associated with maternal infection i.e. with more CD4+ cells, with fewer Treg and CD8+ cells. We conclude that maternal P. falciparum infection at delivery has significant and, in some cases, year-long effects on the composition of infants' peripheral blood lymphocyte populations. Those effects are superimposed on separate and independent age- as well as infant infection-related alterations that, respectively, either match or run counter to them.

  14. Effects of reduced in utero and post-weaning nutrition on milk yield and composition in primiparous beef cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, R C; Geary, T W; Petersen, M K; MacNeil, M D

    2017-01-01

    Development and long-term retention of replacement beef females in a semi-arid environment are of a major concern for extensive livestock producers. Furthermore, the demand of not only producing a thriving, healthy calf, but having sufficient milk to support that first calf is essential. To address this issue, we conducted a 3-year study measuring milk production and milk constituent yields in primiparous beef heifers (n=48; 16/year reared under two different feeding regimens) raising steer calves. Cows received 1.8 or 1.2 kg/day winter supplementation for ~80 day before parturition and their heifer calves were then randomly assigned to heifer development treatments that provided ad libitum (AL) or 80% (less than ad libitum (LAL)) of ad libitum feed post weaning. Heifers developed on the AL treatment also received 1.8 kg/day winter supplementation for life, whereas heifers developed on the LAL treatment received 1.2 kg/day winter supplementation for life. Milk production of primiparous cows was measured with a portable milking machine every other week from days 27 to 125 postpartum. Milk yield for the 125-day lactation period was calculated from area under the lactation curve approximated by trapezoidal summation. The ANOVA model included in utero winter nutrition, post-weaning heifer development treatment, year and their interaction. Heifers subjected to the AL treatment reached peak milk yield ~12.3 day later (P=0.02) than heifers receiving LAL treatment. In addition, an in utero nutrition×post-weaning heifer treatment×year interaction existed (P⩽0.04) for milk peak yield, average daily milk yield (kg/day) and nutrient composition (protein, lactose, fat, solids non-fat, g/day). These interactions manifest as changes in magnitude and rank across the 3 years of the study. Livestock production in extensive environments is subject to variations in seasonal precipitation patterns and quality and quantity of grazeable forage and these fluctuations have a large

  15. Laser surface treatment for enhanced titanium to carbon fiber-reinforced polymer adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palavra, Armin; Coelho, Bruno N.; de Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Lima, Milton S. F.; Carvalho, Sheila M.; Costa, Adilson R.

    The adhesion between carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) and titanium parts can be improved by laser surface texturing before gluing them together. Here, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser was employed before bonding of the textured surfaces using an epoxy paste adhesive. To investigate the influence of the

  16. Application of neutron diffraction to measure residual strains in high temperature composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigal, A.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental neutron diffraction technique was used to measure residual thermal strains developed in high temperature composites during postfabrication cooling. Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide (over the temperature range 20--950 degree C) and tungsten and saphikon fiber-reinforced nickel aluminide composites (at room temperature) were investigated. As a result of thermal expansion mismatch, compressive residual strains and stresses were generated in the silicon carbide fibers during cooldown. The axial residual strains were tensile in the matrix and were lower in nickel aluminide matrix as compared to those in titanium aluminide matrix. The average transverse residual strains in the matrix were compressive. Liquid-nitrogen dipping and thermal-cycling tend to reduce the fabrication-induced residual strains in silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composite. However, matrix cracking can occur as a result of these processes. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Antibacterial properties of amalgam and composite resin materials used as cores under crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghadban, A; Al Shaarani, F

    2012-06-01

    The Aim of this Study was to compare the bacterial growth in the bulk of both amalgam and fluoridated composite resin materials used as cores under crowns at core's surface (in the superficial area of the bulk) and depth levels. With 24 lower premolars, 12 of them were restored with metal posts and amalgam cores (group 1). The rest were restored with glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC) posts and fluoridated composite resin cores (group 2). All specimens were covered with aluminium crowns cemented with resin cement, and then they were soaked in natural saliva for three months. Excoriations abraded from the superficial and the depth areas of the core materials were cultured under aerobic conditions on blood agar plates. After incubation for 2 days, colonies formed on the plates were identified, and the CFU mg(-1) counts were recorded accordingly. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent sample T test. The mean values of CFU mg(-1) counts in group 2 excoriations (surface 39.75, and depth 9.75) were higher than the group 1 excoriations (surface 1.67, and depth 0.42). This study supports the use of amalgam for building up cores due to its antibacterial properties. Composite resin, however, enhanced sizable bacterial growth despite the presence of fluoride.

  18. Realtime chemical characterization of post monsoon organic aerosols in a polluted urban city: Sources, composition, and comparison with other seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Mandariya, Anil Kumar; Chakraborti, Ruparati; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, S N

    2018-01-01

    Real time chemical characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM 1 ) was carried out during post monsoon (September-October) via Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) at a polluted urban location of Kanpur, India. Organic aerosol (OA) was found to be the dominant species with 58% contribution to total NR-PM 1 mass, followed by sulfate (16%). Overall, OA was highly oxidized (average O/C = 0.66) with the dominance of oxidized OAs (60% of total OA) as revealed by source apportionment. Oxidized nature of OA was also supported by very high OC/EC ratios (average = 8.2) obtained from simultaneous offline filter sampling. High and low OA loading periods have very dramatic effects on OA composition and oxidation. OA O/C ratios during lower OA loading periods were on average 30% higher than the same from high loading periods with significant changes in types and relative contribution from oxidized OAs (OOA). Comparison of OA sources and chemistry among post monsoon and other seasons revealed significant differences. Characteristics of primary OAs remain very similar, but features of OOAs showed substantial changes from one season to another. Winter had lowest OOA contribution to total OA but similar overall O/C ratios as other seasons. This reveals that processing of primary OAs, local atmospheric chemistry, and regional contributions can significantly alter OA characteristics from one season to another. This study provides interesting insights into the seasonal variations of OA sources and evolution in a very polluted and complex environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative study of adhesive joint designs for composite trusses based on numerical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavalette, N.P.; Bergsma, O.K.; Zarouchas, D.; Benedictus, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of lightweight structure design for the transportation and robotics industries, new types of composite structures are being developed, in the form of trusses made of fiber-reinforced polymer composite members of small diameter (a few millimeters thick at most). Some concepts of

  20. Structural Performance of Fiber-Placed, Variable-Stiffness Composite Conical and Cylindrical Shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced composites in aerospace structures has increased dramatically over the past decades. The high specific strength and stiffness, the tailorability, and the possibilities to integrate parts and reduce the number of fasteners give composites an advantage over metals.

  1. Experimental and numerical study of the micro-mechanical failure in composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial; Martyniuk, Karolina; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2013-01-01

    The fibre/matrix interfacial debonding is found to be the first microscale failure mechanism leading to subsequent macroscale transverse cracks in composite materials under tensile load. In this paper, the micromechanical interface failure in fiber-reinforced composites is studied experimentally...

  2. Fracture strength and fatigue resistance of dental resin-based composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; Palav, P.; Aboushelib, M.M.N.; van Dalen, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber-reinforcement on the fracture strength and fatigue resistance of resin-based composites. Methods: One hundred rectangular bar-shaped specimens (2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm) made of resin-based composite were prepared in a

  3. A study on EMI shielding enhancement behaviors of Ni-plated CFs-reinforced polymer matrix composites by post heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwan-Woo; Han, Woong; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Kim, Byung-Joo; An, Kay-Hyeok

    2017-09-01

    In order to develop the high quality electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency (EMI-SE) materials, Ni-plated carbon fiber fabrics (Ni-CFFs) were prepared by an electroless method. Effects of post heat-treatment conditions on EMI-SE and electrical conductivity of Ni-CFFs/epoxy composites were also investigated. The morphologies and structural properties of Ni-CFFs were measured by a SEM and a XRD. It was found that all the Ni peaks increased with increasing post-heat treatment temperature, indicating that some impurities were removed and nickel particle sharp crystalline peaks. Also, It was found that the EMI-SE of composites enhanced was increased after post heat-treatment. In the frequency range of electromagnetic wave occurred from appliances (3.0 × 107-6.0 × 108), EMI-SE of post-heat treatment Ni-CFs was increased. This result concludes that the EMI-SE of the composites can be enhanced according to the microstructure of Ni in the Ni-CFFs/epoxy composites.

  4. Effects of post-heat treatment on microstructure and properties of laser cladded composite coatings on titanium alloy substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. J.; Li, J.; Luo, X.

    2015-01-01

    The composite coatings were produced on the Ti6Al4V alloy substrate by laser cladding. Subsequently, the coatings were heated at 500 °C for 1 h and 2 h and then cooled in air. Effects of post-heat treatment on microstructure, microhardness and fracture toughness of the coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), optical microscopy (OM). Wear resistance of the coatings was evaluated under the dry sliding reciprocating friction condition at room temperature. The results indicated that the coatings mainly consist of a certain amount of coarse white equiaxed WC particles surrounded by the white-bright W2C, a great deal of fine dark spherical TiC particles and the matrix composed of the α(Ti), Ti2Ni and TiNi phases. Effects of the post-heat treatment on phase constituents and microstructure of the coatings were almost negligible due to the low temperature. However, the post-heat treatment could decrease the residual stress and increase fracture toughness of the coatings, and fracture toughness of the coatings was improved from 2.77 MPa m1/2 to 3.80 MPa m1/2 and 4.43 MPa m1/2 with the heat treatment for 1 h and 2 h, respectively. The mutual role would contribute to the reduction in cracking susceptibility. Accompanied with the increase in fracture toughness, microhardness of the coatings was reduced slightly. The dominant wear mechanism for all the coatings was abrasive wear, characterized by micro-cutting or micro-plowing. The heat treatment could significantly decrease the average friction coefficient and reduce the fluctuation of the friction coefficient with the change in sliding time. The appropriate heat treatment time (approximately 1 h) had a minimal effect on wear mass loss and volume loss. Moreover, the improvement in fracture toughness will also be beneficial to wear resistance of the coatings under the long service.

  5. Synthesis and characterization polymer composites prepared by low-temperature post-irradiation polymerization of C2F4 in the presence of graphene-like material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulga, Y.M.; Kiryukhin, D.P.; Vasilets, V.N.

    2015-01-01

    Polymer polytetrafluoroethylene (Ptfe)-microwave exfoliated graphene oxide (MEGO) composites containing up to 80 wt.% PTFE were prepared by low-temperature post-irradiation polymerization of C 2 F 4 in the presence of the graphene-like material. Composites were characterized by elemental analysis, XPS, NMR, and DSC techniques. The melting point of PTFE in the composite (332.5°C) was higher than that of pure PTFE by 8.8°C. The measured values of the melting enthalpy (ΔHm=51.5 and 45.4 J/g) were used to calculate the extent of crystallinity in the PTFE and PTFE-MEGO composite (0.63 and 0.55, respectively). No - CF 3 end groups typical of commercial PTFE have been detected in the PTFE-MEGO composites. (authors)

  6. New functional and aesthetic composite materials used as an alternative to traditional post materials for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaroof, A; Alhashimi, R; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2015-11-01

    To tailor composites of polyethylene-hydroxyapatite to function as a new intracanal post for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth (ETT). Silanated hydroxyapatite (HA) and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) filled low-density polyethylene (LDPE) composites were fabricated by a melt extrusion process and characterised using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The flexural strength and modulus were determined in dry state and post ageing in simulated body fluid and fractured surfaces analysed by SEM. The water uptake and radiographic appearance of the experimental composites were also measured and compared with a commercially known endodontic fibre post. Data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey multiple comparison tests at a level of significance Pcomposites were structurally flexible and the HA content had a significant effect on the flexural strength and modulus. A univariate analysis of variance showed no significant differences in modulus and strength (Pcomposites ranged between 135 and 136°C, which would facilitate removal in case of retreatment using conventional dental heating devices. The inclusion of HA reduced the damping thereby enhancing dimensional stability, whilst the addition of zirconia yielded a semi-translucent material that was sufficiently radiopaque, comparable to commercial posts, thus yielding aesthetic materials. Innovative materials for restoration of ETT were developed; offering considerable benefits over the currently available material in terms of biomechanical and thermal properties. This study provided a new option for the development of a new intracanal post made up of functional and aesthetic composites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Substitution potentials of recycled HDPE and wood particles from post-consumer packaging waste in Wood-Plastic Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerhuber, Philipp F; Welling, Johannes; Krause, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The market share of Wood-Plastic Composites (WPC) is small but expected to grow sharply in Europe. This raises some concerns about suitable wood particles needed in the wood-based panels industry in Europe. Concerns are stimulated by the competition between the promotion of wooden products through the European Bioeconomy Strategy and wood as an energy carrier through the Renewable Energy Directive. Cascade use of resources and valorisation of waste are potential strategies to overcome resource scarcity. Under experimental design conditions, WPC made from post-consumer recycled wood and plastic (HDPE) were compared to WPC made from virgin resources. Wood content in the polymer matrix was raised in two steps from 0% to 30% and 60%. Mechanical and physical properties and colour differences were characterized. The feasibility of using cascaded resources for WPC is discussed. Results indicate the technical and economic feasibility of using recycled HDPE from packaging waste for WPC. Based on technical properties, 30% recycled wood content for WPC is feasible, but economic and political barriers of efficient cascading of biomass need to be overcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hybrid fiber and nanopowder reinforced composites for wind turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoloz M. Chikhradze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation into the production of wind turbine blades manufactured using polymer composites reinforced by hybrid (carbon, basalt, glass fibers and strengthened by various nanopowders (oxides, carbides, borides are presented. The hybrid fiber-reinforced composites (HFRC were manufactured with prepreg technology by molding pre-saturated epoxy-strengthened matrix-reinforced fabric. Performance of the manufactured composites was estimated with values of the coefficient of operating condition (COC at a moderate and elevated temperature.

  9. A Thermodynamically-Based Mesh Objective Work Potential Theory for Predicting Intralaminar Progressive Damage and Failure in Fiber-Reinforced Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    A thermodynamically-based work potential theory for modeling progressive damage and failure in fiber-reinforced laminates is presented. The current, multiple-internal state variable (ISV) formulation, enhanced Schapery theory (EST), utilizes separate ISVs for modeling the effects of damage and failure. Damage is considered to be the effect of any structural changes in a material that manifest as pre-peak non-linearity in the stress versus strain response. Conversely, failure is taken to be the effect of the evolution of any mechanisms that results in post-peak strain softening. It is assumed that matrix microdamage is the dominant damage mechanism in continuous fiber-reinforced polymer matrix laminates, and its evolution is controlled with a single ISV. Three additional ISVs are introduced to account for failure due to mode I transverse cracking, mode II transverse cracking, and mode I axial failure. Typically, failure evolution (i.e., post-peak strain softening) results in pathologically mesh dependent solutions within a finite element method (FEM) setting. Therefore, consistent character element lengths are introduced into the formulation of the evolution of the three failure ISVs. Using the stationarity of the total work potential with respect to each ISV, a set of thermodynamically consistent evolution equations for the ISVs is derived. The theory is implemented into commercial FEM software. Objectivity of total energy dissipated during the failure process, with regards to refinements in the FEM mesh, is demonstrated. The model is also verified against experimental results from two laminated, T800/3900-2 panels containing a central notch and different fiber-orientation stacking sequences. Global load versus displacement, global load versus local strain gage data, and macroscopic failure paths obtained from the models are compared to the experiments.

  10. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eberle, Cliff C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pastore, Christopher M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sudbury, Thomas Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartman, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  11. Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hanqing; Guo, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was a literature study concerning composites. With composites becoming increasingly popular in various areas such as aerospace industry and construction, the research about composites has a significant meaning accordingly. This thesis was aim at introducing some basic information of polymer matrix composites including raw mate-rial, processing, testing, applications and recycling to make a rough understanding of this kind of material for readers. Polymeric matrices, fillers,...

  12. Bond Strength between Hybrid Fiber-Reinforced Lightweight Aggregate Concrete Substrate and Self-Compacting Concrete as Topping Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slamet Widodo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural performance evaluation of composite concrete slabs that were constructed using partially precast concreting system which utilized Hybrid Fiber-Reinforced Lightweight Aggregate Concrete (HyFRLWAC as stay in-place formwork and self-compacting concrete (SCC as topping layer was conducted in this research. This paper focused on determining the appropriate strength limit criteria of interface between two different concrete layers. The tensile strength was tested using pull-off test, while concrete cohesion was investigated based on modified bisurface shear test, and dual L-shaped shear test was used to determine the effect of normal force on the shear strength of concrete interface. Sample variants were designed based on the substrate surface conditions, compressive strength of the topping layer, and magnitude of perpendicular normal force acting on interface area. The substrate surfaces were prepared in as-placed and grooved conditions for tensile test, cohesion, and shear strength test. Test results indicate that tensile strength, cohesion, and shear strength of the concrete interface are affected by surface condition of the substrate, compressive strength of the topping layer, and the normal force acting perpendicularly on the concrete interface area. Proposed formulation for bond strength prediction between HyFRLWAC as substrate and SCC as topping layer is also presented in this paper.

  13. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  14. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Memory Pieces are open compositions to be realised solo by an improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them...

  15. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    New Year is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. It is included in "From the Danish Seasons" (see under this title). See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You...

  16. Clinical evaluation of an oval-shaped prefabricated glass fiber post in endodontically treated premolars presenting an oval root canal cross-section: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Antonio; Kaitsas, Vassilios; Ravera, Giambattista; Angiero, Francesca; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the clinical effectiveness of preformed oval-shaped glass fiber posts in combination with a dual-curing composite resin core material in endodontically treated premolars presenting an oval root canal cross-section and restored with all-ceramic crowns over up to 45 months. The study population comprised 134 patients and 154 endodontically treated premolars, with varying degrees of hard tissue loss, restored by means of oval-shaped fiber-reinforced posts. Inclusion criteria were premolars presenting an oval-shaped root canal, symptom-free endodontic therapy, root canal treatment with a minimum apical seal of 4 mm, application of rubber dam, and the need for a post and core complex because of coronal tooth loss. Four groups were defined based on the number of preserved coronal walls after endodontic treatment and before core buildup. Survival rate of the post and core restorations was determined using Kaplan-Meier analysis, and statistical analysis was performed using the log-rank test (P wall retention and premolars that had maintained one to four coronal walls was statistically significant (P = .0006). On the contrary, comparison between premolars with one and two residual walls was found to be not significant for the overall survival rate (P = .0698). A satisfactory clinical performance was observed for preformed oval-shaped glass fiber posts. Survival was higher for teeth retaining three and four coronal walls.

  17. Development and Characterization of UHMWPE Fiber-Reinforced Hydrogels For Meniscal Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Julianne Leigh

    Meniscal tears are the most common orthopedic injuries to the human body. The current treatment of choice, however, is a partial meniscectomy that leads to osteoarthritis proportional to the amount of tissue removed. As a result, there is a significant clinical need to develop materials capable of restoring the biomechanical contact stress distribution to the knee after meniscectomy and preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. In this work, a fiber-reinforced hydrogel-based synthetic meniscus was developed that allows for tailoring of the mechanical properties and molding of the implant to match the size, shape, and property distribution of the native tissue. Physically cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels were reinforced with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers and characterized in compression (0.1-0.8 MPa) and tension (0.1-250 MPa) showing fine control over mechanical properties within the range of the human meniscus. Morphology and crystallinity analysis of PVA hydrogels showed increases in crystallinity and PVA densification, or phase separation, with freeze-thaw cycles. A comparison of freeze-thawed and aged, physically cross-linked hydrogels provided insight on both crystallinity and phase separation as mechanisms for PVA gelation. Results indicated both mechanisms independently contributed to hydrogel modulus for freeze-thawed hydrogels. In vitro swelling studies were performed using osmotic solutions to replicate the swelling pressure present in the knee. Minimal swelling was observed for hydrogels with a PVA concentration of 30-35 wt%, independently of hydrogel freeze-thaw cycles. This allows for independent tailoring of hydrogel modulus and pore structure using freeze-thaw cycles and swelling behavior using polymer concentration to match a wide range of properties needed for various soft tissue applications. The UHMWPE-PVA interface was identified as a significant weakness. To improve interfacial adhesion, a novel

  18. Effects of management intervention on post-disturbance community composition: an experimental analysis using bayesian hierarchical models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Giovanini

    Full Text Available As human demand for ecosystem products increases, management intervention may become more frequent after environmental disturbances. Evaluations of ecological responses to cumulative effects of management interventions and natural disturbances provide critical decision-support tools for managers who strive to balance environmental conservation and economic development. We conducted an experiment to evaluate the effects of salvage logging on avian community composition in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta forests affected by beetle outbreaks in Oregon, USA, 1996-1998. Treatments consisted of the removal of lodgepole pine snags only, and live trees were not harvested. We used a bayesian hierarchical model to quantify occupancy dynamics for 27 breeding species, while accounting for variation in the detection process. We examined how magnitude and precision of treatment effects varied when incorporating prior information from a separate intervention study that occurred in a similar ecological system. Regardless of which prior we evaluated, we found no evidence that the harvest treatment had a negative impact on species richness, with an estimated average of 0.2-2.2 more species in harvested stands than unharvested stands. Estimated average similarity between control and treatment stands ranged from 0.82-0.87 (1 indicating complete similarity between a pair of stands and suggested that treatment stands did not contain novel assemblies of species responding to the harvesting prescription. Estimated treatment effects were positive for twenty-four (90% of the species, although the credible intervals contained 0 in all cases. These results suggest that, unlike most post-fire salvage logging prescriptions, selective harvesting after beetle outbreaks may meet multiple management objectives, including the maintenance of avian community richness comparable to what is found in unharvested stands. Our results provide managers with prescription alternatives to

  19. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with different heights of crown ferrule restored with prefabricated carbon fiber post and composite resin core by intermittent loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Jonas Alves; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Zogheib, Lucas Villaça

    2008-11-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with prefabricated carbon fiber posts and varying quantities of coronal dentin. Sixty freshly extracted upper canines were randomly divided into groups of 10 teeth each. The specimens were exposed to 250,000 cycles in a controlled chewing simulator. All intact specimens were subjected to a static load (N) in a universal testing machine at 45 degrees to the long axis. Data were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (alpha = .05). Significant differences (P carbon fiber post and composite resin core.

  20. Influence of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgungor, Gokhan; Sen, Deniz; Aydin, Murat

    2008-05-01

    Reliable bonding between zirconia posts and composite resin core materials is difficult to achieve because of the smooth surface texture and lack of silica content of zirconia posts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material. Eighty zirconia posts were divided into 4 groups (n=20). Specimens received 1 of 4 different surface treatments: group AIRB, airborne-particle abrasion; group TSC-SIL, tribochemical silica coating (CoJet system) and silanization (ESPE Sil); group AIRB-BSIL, airborne-particle abrasion and MDP-containing primer (Clearfil SE Bond Primer)/silane coupling agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator) mixture application; and group TSC-BSIL, tribochemical silica coating and MDP-containing primer/silane coupling agent mixture application. Average surface roughness (Ra) of zirconia posts produced by airborne-particle abrasion or silica coating was measured using an optical profilometer. Composite resin core foundations (Build-it FR) were formed using transparent acrylic resin tubes (12mm in length and 7mm in diameter). Each group was further divided into 2 subgroups of 10 specimens and stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C, either for 24 hours or for 150 days with 37,500 thermal cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with a dwell time of 30 seconds. Following water storage, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 2-mm-thick post-and-core specimens under water cooling. Push-out tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. Debonded post surfaces were examined with SEM. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (alpha=0.05). No significant differences were detected between the Ra values of airborne-particle-abraded and silica-coated specimens (P=.781). The short-term mean bond strengths for

  1. Assessment of the Mechanical Properties of Sisal Fiber-Reinforced Silty Clay Using Triaxial Shear Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankai Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil’s strength and improves the soil’s mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment.

  2. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Aloisio Fleck NEUMANN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1, polyetheretherketone (PEEK screws (Group 2, and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3. The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05. Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  3. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Eduardo Aloisio Fleck; Villar, Cristina Cunha; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) screws (Group 2), and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3). The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load) was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05). Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  4. Programming of composite plates damage calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Dudinsky, Martin; Riecky, Daniel; Zmindak, Milan

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the numerical results of elastic damage of thin unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite plates. The numerical implementation uses a layered shell finite element based on the Kirchhoff plate theory. Newton-Raphson method is used to solve the system of nonlinear equations and evolution of damage has been solved using return-mapping algorithm. The analysis is performed by finite elemen...

  5. Reliability Analysis of a Composite Wind Turbine Blade Section Using the Model Correction Factor Method: Numerical Study and Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Friis-Hansen, Peter; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Reliability analysis of fiber-reinforced composite structures is a relatively unexplored field, and it is therefore expected that engineers and researchers trying to apply such an approach will meet certain challenges until more knowledge is accumulated. While doing the analyses included in the p......Reliability analysis of fiber-reinforced composite structures is a relatively unexplored field, and it is therefore expected that engineers and researchers trying to apply such an approach will meet certain challenges until more knowledge is accumulated. While doing the analyses included...

  6. Randomized clinical comparison of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam or with fiber posts and resin composite: five-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, Francesco; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Worthington, Helen V; Watson, Timothy F; Pitt Ford, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Prospective clinical studies comparing the results of different types of restorations of endodontically treated teeth are lacking. This study compared the clinical success rate of endodontically treated premolars restored with fiber posts and direct composite to the restorations of premolars using amalgam. Premolars with Class II carious lesions were selected and randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (1) restoration with amalgam or (2) restoration with fiber posts and composite. One hundred and nine teeth were included in Group 1 and 110 in Group 2. Patients were recalled after 1, 3 and 5 years. No statistically significant difference was found between the proportion of failed teeth in the two experimental groups. Significant differences were observed between the proportion of root fractures (p=0.029) and caries (p=0.047), with more root fractures and less caries observed in the teeth restored with amalgam at the five-year recall. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that restorations with fiber posts and composite were found to be more effective than amalgam in preventing root fractures but less effective in preventing secondary caries.

  7. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY/CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E; Eric Skidmore, E

    2008-12-12

    The Department of Energy Savannah River Site vitrifies nuclear waste incident to defense programs through its Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The piping in the DWPF seal pot jumper configuration must withstand the stresses during an unlikely but potential deflagration event, and maintain its safety function for a 20-year service life. Carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites (CFR) were proposed for protection and reinforcement of piping during such an event. The proposed CFR materials have been ASME-approved (Section XI, Code Case N-589-1) for post-construction maintenance and is DOT-compliant per 49CFR 192 and 195. The proposed carbon fiber/epoxy composite reinforcement system was originally developed for pipeline rehabilitation and post-construction maintenance in petrochemical, refineries, DOT applications and other industries. The effects of ionizing radiation on polymers and organic materials have been studied for many years. The majority of available data are based on traditional exposures to gamma irradiation at high dose rates ({approx}10,000 Gy/hr) allowing high total dose within reasonable test periods and general comparison of different materials exposed at such conditions. However, studies in recent years have shown that degradation of many polymers are sensitive to dose rate, with more severe degradation often observed at similar or even lower total doses when exposed to lower dose rates. This behavior has been primarily attributed to diffusion-limited oxidation which is minimized during very high dose rate exposures. Most test standards for accelerated aging and nuclear qualification of components acknowledge these limitations. The results of testing to determine the radiation resistance and microstructural effects of gamma irradiation exposure on a bisphenol-A based epoxy matrix composite reinforced with carbon fibers are presented. This work provides a foundation for a more extensive evaluation of dose rate effects on advanced epoxy

  8. Comparative in vivo evaluation of restoring severely mutilated primary anterior teeth with biological post and crown preparation and reinforced composite restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grewal N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to compare the success rate of biological and composite restorations when used to replace structural loss of primary anterior teeth using intracanal post for radicular support of the restoration. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients aged between 3-5 years presenting with early childhood caries (ECC received at least one or more composite and biological restorations for comparative evaluation. A total of 150 restorations were done (75 biological restorations and 75 composite restorations. The restorations were evaluated single-blind according to a modified USPHS system. Assessment of the patient′s response in accepting a biological restoration, psychological impact of the restorations, view of the parents, and peer group reviews, etc. were recorded in a response sheet in presence of the child and the parents. Observations and Results: In vivo clinical performance of biological post and crown restorations and intracanal reinforced composite restorations was comparable with respect to shade match, marginal discoloration, marginal integrity, surface finish, gingival health, retention, and recurrent carious lesions. The cost effectiveness of biological restorations was certainly a positive attribute. Conclusion: The biological restoration presented as a cost effective, clinician friendly, less-technique sensitive, and esthetic alternative to commercially available restorative materials used for restoring deciduous teeth affected by ECC.

  9. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  10. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  11. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Cue Rondo is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound/video files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample, or the visuals will not appear at all....... Please DOWNLOAD them to see/hear them in full length! This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You may for non-commercial purposes use and distribute it, performance instructions as well as specially designated recordings, as long as the author is mentioned. Please see http...

  12. The Evolution of Interfacial Sliding Stresses During Cyclic Push-in Testing of C- and BN-Coated Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced CMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bansal, N. P.; Bhatt, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    Interfacial debond cracks and fiber/matrix sliding stresses in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can evolve under cyclic fatigue conditions as well as with changes in the environment, strongly affecting the crack growth behavior, and therefore, the useful service lifetime of the composite. In this study, room temperature cyclic fiber push-in testing was applied to monitor the evolution of frictional sliding stresses and fiber sliding distances with continued cycling in both C- and BN-coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber-reinforced CMCs. A SiC matrix composite reinforced with C-coated Hi-Nical on fibers as well as barium strontium aluminosilicate (BSAS) matrix composites reinforced with BN-coated (four different deposition processes compared) Hi-Nicalon fibers were examined. For failure at a C interface, test results indicated progressive increases in fiber sliding distances during cycling in room air but not in nitrogen. These results suggest the presence of moisture will promote crack growth when interfacial failure occurs at a C interface. While short-term testing environmental effects were not apparent for failure at the BN interfaces, long-term exposure of partially debonded BN-coated fibers to humid air resulted in large increases in fiber sliding distances and decreases in interfacial sliding stresses for all the BN coatings, presumably due to moisture attack. A wide variation was observed in debond and frictional sliding stresses among the different BN coatings.

  13. Effect of Dietary Protein and Energy Level on Proximate Composition of Breast and Thigh Meat in White Leghorn Layers at Molt and Post Molt Production Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Javaid*, M. I. Anjum1 and M. Akram2

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to explore the effects of varying protein and energy levels in molt diets on meat composition of White Leghorn layers. One hundred and fifty four, 70 weeks old, layers were randomly divided into 18 experimental units of 8 hens each in addition to 10 birds that were slaughtered at pre molt and post fast stages. After 10 days of fasting during molting, 6 experimental diets having 3 levels of crude protein (CP i.e. 14, 16 and 18% and 2 levels of metabolizable energy (ME i.e. 2700 and 2900 kcal/kg were given to the birds at the rate of 45 g/bird for 25 day. There after the birds were offered ad-libitum layer ration during production phase. Two birds per replicate at post molt, at 50% egg production and at the end of experiment were slaughtered and then breast and thigh meat samples were analyzed for proximate composition. Moisture (71.7 and 70.0% content was significantly (P<0.05 higher while, ether extract (2.13 and 3.49% was significantly (P<0.05 lower in both breast and thigh meat, respectively, with 18% CP diet as compared to 14 and 16% CP diets. Medium Protein-High Energy (MPHE molt diet having 16% CP with 2900 kcal/kg ME produced more dry matter and protein content in meat at the expense of ether extract. Results regarding proximate composition of layer meat determined at different stages of molting and post molt production revealed that moisture and protein contents of both breast and thigh meat were significantly increased where as, ether extract and ash contents were significantly decreased at post fast stage with respect to other stages.

  14. Melt rheological properties of natural fiber-reinforced polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrod J. Schemenauer; Tim A. Osswald; Anand R. Sanadi; Daniel F. Caulfield

    2000-01-01

    The melt viscosities and mechanical properties of 3 different natural fiber-polypropylene composites were investigated. Coir (coconut), jute, and kenaf fibers were compounded with polypropylene at 30% by weight content. A capillary rheometer was used to evaluate melt viscosity. The power-law model parameters are reported over a shear rate range between 100 to 1000 s–1...

  15. Fracture strength of direct surface-retained fixed partial dentures : Effect of fiber reinforcement versus the use of particulate filler composites only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Ozcan, Mutlu; User, Atilla

    This study compared the fracture strengths and analyzed the failure types of direct, surface-retained, anterior fixed-partial-dentures (FPD), reinforced with four types of fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) versus non-fiber-reinforced FPDs made of three particulate filler composites (PFC). To this

  16. Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communication: Journalism Education Today, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Considers how photography is more than just pointing a camera in the right direction. Explains that good pictures use elements of composition such as the Rule of Thirds, leading lines, framing and repetition of shapes. Presents 16 photographs from college and secondary school publications, and describes the techniques that makes them effective.…

  17. Bond Behavior of Wet-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Concrete Interface Subjected to Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyan Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP composite materials to strengthen concrete structures has become popular in coastal regions with high humidity levels. However, many concrete structures in these places remain wet as a result of tides and wave-splashing, so they cannot be completely dried before repair. Therefore, it is vital to investigate the effects of moisture on the initial and long-term bond behavior between CFRP and wet concrete. This research assesses the effects of moisture (i during CFRP application and (ii throughout the service life. Before CFRP bonding, the concrete blocks are preconditioned with a water content of 4.73% (termed “wet-bonding”. Three different epoxy resins are applied to study the bond performance of the CFRP-concrete interface when subjected to moisture (95% relative humidity. A total of 45 double-lap shear specimens were tested at the beginning of exposure and again after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. All specimens with normal epoxy resins exhibited adhesive failure. The failure mode of specimens with hydrophobic epoxy resin changed from cohesive failure to mixed cohesive/adhesive failure and to adhesive failure according to the duration of exposure. Under moisture conditioning, the maximum shear stress (τmax and corresponding slip (smax of the bond-slip curve first increased and then decreased or fluctuated over time. The same tendency was seen in the ultimate strain transmitted to the CFRP sheet, the interfacial fracture energy (Gf, and the ultimate load (Pu. Analytical models of Gf and Pu for the CFRP-concrete interface under moisture conditioning are presented.

  18. Mechanics of composite materials - 1983. Proceedings of the Symposium, Boston, MA, November 13-18, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    The present conference discusses plate theories applicable to laminated composites, the analysis of large deformations in layered composite shells, composite plate nonlinear bending effects, hybrid composite constitutive behavior, polymeric material life prediction by means of kinetic fracture mechanics, and crack growth direction in fibrous composites. Also discussed are stress singularities and solution structures, together with the delamination behavior and fracture mechanics parameters, of delamination mechanics in fiber-reinforced composites, followed by the theory and applications of unidirectional composite fracture, impact and fatigue behavior in graphite-epoxy laminates, and the fracture behavior of notched unidirectional boron/aluminum composite laminates

  19. "Choice" and destiny: the substrate composition and mechanical stability of settlement structures can mediate coral recruit fate in post-bleached reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shreya; Rathod, Pooja; Alcoverro, Teresa; Arthur, Rohan

    2016-03-01

    Increasingly frequent and intense ocean warming events seriously test the buffer and recovery capacities of tropical coral reefs. Post-disturbance, available settlement structures on a reef (often dead coral skeletons) vary considerably in their mechanical stability and substrate composition, critically influencing coral recruit settlement choice and fate. In the wake of a coral mass mortality in the Lakshadweep archipelago, we examine (1) the relative availability of recruit settlement structures (from stable to unstable: reef platform, dead massive coral, consolidated rubble, dead corymbose coral, dead tabular coral, and unconsolidated rubble) in 12 recovering reefs across three atolls in the archipelago, (2) the substrate composition [crustose coralline algae (CCA), mixed turf, macroalgae] of these structural forms, and (3) whether the choice and fate of young coral are mediated by the substrate and stability of different structural forms. For this, we measured the abundance and distribution of recruit (<1 cm), juvenile (1-5 cm), and young adult (5-10) corals of 24 common coral genera. Four years after the mass mortality, reefs differed considerably in composition of settlement structures. The structures themselves varied significantly in substrate cover with dead tables largely covered in CCA [60 ± 6.05 % (SE)] and dead corymbose coral dominated by mixed turf (61.83 ± 3.8 %). The youngest visible recruits (<1 cm) clearly preferred CCA-rich structures such as dead massives and tables. However, older size classes were rarely found on unstable structures (strongly "avoiding" tables, Ivlev's electivity index, E = -0.5). Our results indicate that while substrate cover might mediate coral choice, the mechanical stability of settlement structures is critical in determining post-settlement coral survival. The composition and availability of settlement structures on a reef may serve as a characteristic signature of its recovery potential, aiding in assessments of reef

  20. Effect of post-fermentation and packing stages on the volatile composition of Spanish-style green table olives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Antonio Higinio; López-López, Antonio; Cortés-Delgado, Amparo; Beato, Víctor Manuel; Medina, Eduardo; de Castro, Antonio; Montaño, Alfredo

    2018-01-15

    The volatile profile of Spanish-style green table olives after fermentation and the changes in volatile compounds that occurred as a result of the post-fermentation and subsequent packing stage were explored by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three olive cultivars (Manzanilla, Gordal, and Hojiblanca) were processed and olive samples were taken at three different times throughout the elaboration: after fermentation, after post-fermentation, and after packing. A total of 132 volatile compounds were identified, including 10 phenols, 25 alcohols, 11 acids, 39 esters, 8 hydrocarbons, 14 carbonyl compounds, 17 terpenes, and 6 other compounds. A varying number of compounds from each chemical family underwent significant changes because of the post-fermentation and packing stages. Among them, some typical reaction products of lipid oxidation (e.g. (E)-2-decenal and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal) increased with the post-fermentation in Manzanilla cultivar, and also as a result of packing in all three cultivars. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 5 year radar-based rainfall statistics: disturbances analysis and development of a post-correction scheme for the German radar composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A.; Seltmann, J.; Kunstmann, H.

    2015-02-01

    A radar-based rainfall statistic demands high quality data that provide realistic precipitation amounts in space and time. Instead of correcting single radar images, we developed a post-correction scheme for long-term composite radar data that corrects corrupted areas, but preserves the original precipitation patterns. The post-correction scheme is based on a 5 year statistical analysis of radar composite data and its constituents. The accumulation of radar images reveals artificial effects that are not visible in the individual radar images. Some of them are already inherent to single radar data such as the effect of increasing beam height, beam blockage or clutter remnants. More artificial effects are introduced in the process of compositing such as sharp gradients at the boundaries of overlapping areas due to different beam heights and resolution. The cause of these disturbances, their behaviour with respect to reflectivity level, season or altitude is analysed based on time-series of two radar products: the single radar reflectivity product PX for each of the 16 radar systems of the German Meteorological Service (DWD) for the time span 2000 to 2006 and the radar composite product RX of DWD from 2005 through to 2009. These statistics result in additional quality information on radar data that is not available elsewhere. The resulting robust characteristics of disturbances, e.g. the dependency of the frequencies of occurrence of radar reflectivities on beam height, are then used as a basis for the post-correction algorithm. The scheme comprises corrections for shading effects and speckles, such as clutter remnants or overfiltering, as well as for systematic differences in frequencies of occurrence of radar reflectivities between the near and the far ranges of individual radar sites. An adjustment to rain gauges is also included. Applying this correction, the Root-Mean-Square-Error for the comparison of radar derived annual rain amounts with rain gauge data

  2. Magnetoresistance properties of Fe0,2C0,8 composite materials pre and post gamma irradiated at 250 kGy dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunasfi; Setyo Purwanto; Wisnu A A

    2009-01-01

    Research about change of, magnetoresistance properties of Fe 0,2 C 0,8 composite materials pre and post gamma irradiation at a dose of 250 kGy was carried out. Fe 0,2 C 0,8 was prepared by mixing of Fe and C powder with the ratio of Fe : C set on 20:80 in weight %. In this research, the phase structure and magnetic properties of Fe 0,2 C 0,8 composite materials after 250 KGy dose of gamma irradiation have been measured and analyzed. The phase structure of Fe 0,2 C 0,8 was analyzed using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), whole the magnetoresistance properties was characterized using Four Point Probe method. The analyzing results showed the decreasing of X-ray diffraction peak intensity, but also in the same time showed the increasing of magnetoresistance properties after gamma irradiation. The enhancement of magnetoresistance value reached 5 times at 7,5 kOe magnetic field. This enhancement was caused due to structure defect within Fe 0,2 C 0,8 composite initiated by interaction between radiation of gamma ray and composite materials that further causes a change of magnetic interaction intensity in this materials. (author)

  3. Data on post irradiation experiments of heat resistant ceramic composite materials. PIE for 97M-13A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shin-ichi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Souzawa, Shizuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Sekino, Hajime [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The research on the radiation damage mechanism of heat resistant ceramic composite materials is one of the research subjects of the innovative basic research in the field of high temperature engineering, using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Three series of irradiation tests on the heat resistant ceramic composite materials, first to third irradiation test program, were carried out using the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR). This is a summary report on the first irradiation test program; irradiation induced dimensional change, thermal expansion coefficient, X-ray diffraction and {gamma}-ray spectrum are reported. (author)

  4. Detecting post-fire burn severity and vegetation recovery using multitemporal remote sensing spectral indices and field-collected composite burn index data in a ponderosa pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexia; Vogelmann, James E.; Rollins, Matt; Ohlen, Donald; Key, Carl H.; Yang, Limin; Huang, Chengquan; Shi, Hua

    2011-01-01

    It is challenging to detect burn severity and vegetation recovery because of the relatively long time period required to capture the ecosystem characteristics. Multitemporal remote sensing data can providemultitemporal observations before, during and after a wildfire, and can improve the change detection accuracy. The goal of this study is to examine the correlations between multitemporal spectral indices and field-observed burn severity, and to provide a practical method to estimate burn severity and vegetation recovery. The study site is the Jasper Fire area in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota, that burned during August and September 2000. Six multitemporal Landsat images acquired from 2000 (pre-fire), 2001 (post-fire), 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2007 were used to assess burn severity. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), normalized burn ratio (NBR), integrated forest index (IFI) and the differences of these indices between the pre-fire and post-fire years were computed and analysed with 66 field-based composite burn index (CBI) plots collected in 2002. Results showed that differences of NDVI and differences of EVI between the pre-fire year and the first two years post-fire were highly correlated with the CBI scores. The correlations were low beyond the second year post-fire. Differences of NBR had good correlation with CBI scores in all study years. Differences of IFI had low correlation with CBI in the first year post-fire and had good correlation in later years. A CBI map of the burnt area was produced using regression tree models and the multitemporal images. The dynamics of four spectral indices from 2000 to 2007 indicated that both NBR and IFI are valuable for monitoring long-term vegetation recovery. The high burn severity areas had a much slower recovery than the moderate and low burn areas.

  5. The effect of nanoclay filler loading on the flexural strength of fiber-reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2012-01-01

    Results: For groups with the same concentration of nanoparticles, PMMA-grafted filler-loaded group showed significantly higher flexural strength, except for 0.2% wt. For groups that contain PMMA-grafted nanoclay fillers, the 2% wt had the highest flexural strength value with significant difference to other subgroups. 1% wt and 2% wt showed significantly higher values compared to control (P 0.05. Flexural modulus of 2%, 5% wt PMMA-grafted and 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% wt unmodified nanoclay particles-loaded subgroups decreased significantly compared to control group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: PMMA-grafted nanoclay filler loading may enhance the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of unmodified nanoparticles cannot significantly improve the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of both unmodified and PMMA-grafted nanoclay particles in some concentrations decreased the flexural modulus.

  6. CVD apparatus and process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, A.J.; Devore, C.E.; Lowden, R.A.; Moeller, H.H.

    1990-01-23

    An apparatus and process for the chemical vapor deposition of a matrix into a preform having circumferentially wound ceramic fibers, comprises heating one surface of the preform while cooling the other surface thereof. The resulting product may have fibers that are wound on radial planes or at an angle from the radial planes. The fibers can also be precoated with pyrolytic carbon before application of the matrix. The matrix is applied by passing reactant gas through the preform thereof to the other side thereof for the initial deposition of matrix near such other surface of the preform. The matrix fills in the preform from the other side surface thereof to the surface of the side of application thereof until a desired amount of matrix has been deposited. 6 figs.

  7. Preparation, mechanical, and in vitro properties of glass fiber-reinforced polycarbonate composites for orthodontic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Inami, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Nishiyama, Norihiro; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2015-05-01

    Generally, orthodontic treatment uses metallic wires made from stainless steel, cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy, β-titanium alloy, and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) alloy. However, these wires are not esthetically pleasing and may induce allergic or toxic reactions. To correct these issues, in the present study we developed glass-fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP) orthodontic wires made from polycarbonate and E-glass fiber by using pultrusion. After fabricating these GFRP round wires with a diameter of 0.45 mm (0.018 inch), we examined their mechanical and in vitro properties. To investigate how the glass-fiber diameter affected their physical properties, we prepared GFRP wires of varying diameters (7 and 13 µm). Both the GFRP with 13-µm fibers (GFRP-13) and GFRP with 7 µm fibers (GFRP-7) were more transparent than the metallic orthodontic wires. Flexural strengths of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 690.3 ± 99.2 and 938.1 ± 95.0 MPa, respectively; flexural moduli of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 25.4 ± 4.9 and 34.7 ± 7.7 GPa, respectively. These flexural properties of the GFRP wires were nearly equivalent to those of available Ni-Ti wires. GFRP-7 had better flexural properties than GFRP-13, indicating that the flexural properties of GFRP increase with decreasing fiber diameter. Using thermocycling, we found no significant change in the flexural properties of the GFRPs after 600 or 1,200 cycles. Using a cytotoxicity detection kit, we found that the glass fiber and polycarbonate components comprising the GFRP were not cytotoxic within the limitations of this study. We expect this metal-free GFRP wire composed of polycarbonate and glass fiber to be useful as an esthetically pleasing alternative to current metallic orthodontic wire. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Optimization for Tribological Properties of Glass Fiber-Reinforced PTFE Composites with Grey Relational Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firojkhan Pathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most recent history shows that polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE is widely used as antifrictional materials in industry for wide speed range. A high antifriction property of PTFE makes it suitable for dry friction bearing. Main disadvantage of using PTFE is its high wear rate, so extensive research had been carried out to improve the wear resistance with addition of filler material. This study focuses on four input parameters load, sliding speed, sliding distance, and percentage of glass fiber as a filler material. Taguchi method was used for experimentation; each parameter is having 3 levels with L27 orthogonal array. Grey relational analysis is used to convert multiple response parameters, namely, wear and coefficient of friction, into single grey relation grade. The optimal input parameters were selected based on the S/N ratio. It was observed that load 3 kg, sliding speed 5.1836 m/s (900 rpm, sliding distance 2 km, and 15% of glass fiber are optimal input parameters for PTFE without significantly affecting the wear rate and coefficient of friction.

  9. Effects of fiber ellipticity and orientation on dynamic stress concentrations in porous fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M.; Sanaei, Roozbeh

    2007-11-01

    Interaction of time harmonic fast longitudinal and shear incident plane waves with an elliptical fiber embedded in a porous elastic matrix is studied. The novel features of Biot dynamic theory of poroelasticity along with the classical method of eigen-function expansion and the pertinent boundary conditions are employed to develop a closed form series solution involving Mathieu and modified Mathieu functions of complex arguments. The complications arising due to the non-orthogonality of angular Mathieu functions corresponding to distinct wave numbers in addition to the problems associated with appearance of additional angular dependent terms in the boundary conditions are all avoided by expansion of the angular Mathieu functions in terms of transcendental functions and subsequent integration, leading to a linear set of independent equations in terms of the unknown scattering coefficients. A MATHEMATICA code is developed for computing the Mathieu functions in terms of complex Fourier coefficients which are themselves calculated by numerically solving appropriate sets of eigen-systems. The analytical results are illustrated with numerical examples in which an elastic fiber of elliptic cross section is insonified by a plane fast compressional or shear wave at normal incidence. The effects of fiber cross sectional ellipticity, angle of incidence (fiber two-dimensional orientation), and incident wave polarization (P, SV, SH) on dynamic stress concentrations are studied in a relatively wide frequency range. Limiting cases are considered and fair agreements with well-known solutions are established.

  10. Tearing Behaviors of Flexible Fiber-Reinforced Composites for the Stratospheric Airship Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Junhui; Li, Penghui; Ma, Guangyuan; Du, Huafei; Lv, Mingyun

    2017-06-01

    Tearing behaviors of the envelope material is important for the stratospheric airship because it directly decides the service life of the airship. Uniaxial tensile tests of the specimens with different initial damage were performed to study the tear propagation properties of a new kind of envelope material for the stratospheric airship. A Matlab program was developed to simulate the mechanical properties in the tensile process. The interaction forces between warp and weft yarns were considered, and the yarns in the transition region between deformed region and non- deformed region were assumed as hinges in the simulation. It is discovered that the interaction factor, which represents interaction force between different components of the material, and the frictional coefficient between warp and weft yarns are the crucial factors for the tensile curves of the material. The tear strength and the damage mode of the envelope material are determined by the number of the cutoff yarns and the declination of the initial cracks, respectively.

  11. Biaxial Loading and Failure Behavior of Brick Triplets With Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Upgrades

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berman, J

    2002-01-01

    .... Some researchers have conducted simple monoaxial shear tests on brick triplet specimens, but these have tended to be unrealistic because they do not account for the effects of normal gravity loads...

  12. Alumina Fiber-Reinforced 9310 Steel Metal Matrix Composite for Rotorcraft Drive System Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AISI 9310 nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy steel is used extensively in military helicopter rotor shafts and gears. This reliable alloy provides excellent fatigue...

  13. Recent developments in chemical modification and characterization of natural fiber-reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available , tuberculosis, depression, heart conditions, diabetes, skin diseases, and arthritis. The prevalence rate for arthritis and high blood pressure was higher at 14% and 26% respectively. Only 11.7% of the households indicated access to medical aid...

  14. Humus accumulation, humification, and humic acid composition in soils of two post-mining chronosequences after coal mining

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abakumov, E.V.; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Brus, Jiří; Frouz, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2013), s. 491-500 ISSN 1439-0108 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08023; GA MŠk LC06066 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : Humus accumulation * Humic acids composition * Humification Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 2.107, year: 2013

  15. Fire and season of post-fire defoliation effects on biomass, composition and cover in mixed-grass prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    North American prairies are acknowledged to have evolved with grazing following fire. Given this evolutionary fire-grazing interaction, our objective was to determine whether seasonal timing of defoliation following fire alters subsequent productivity and species composition. Following the April 201...

  16. Pre- and post-season dietary intake, body composition, and performance indices of NCAA division I female soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mandy; Reed, Debra B; Crouse, Stephen F; Armstrong, Robert B

    2003-09-01

    Little published data describe the dietary and physiological profiles of intercollegiate female soccer players; therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to report baseline dietary data, anthropometrics, and performance indices of soccer women during rigorous pre-season training (2 sessions/day) and then during the post-competitive season. Members of a NCAA Division I women's soccer squad completed 3-day diet records, anthropometrics, and physical tests, including VO2peak. Average body mass was 62 kg with 16% body fat, and no significant pre to post differences were observed. Total energy, carbohydrate (CHO), protein, and fat intakes were significantly greater during the pre-season. Pre-season energy intake met the DRI for females with an "active" lifestyle (37 kcal/kg). While CHO intake failed to meet minimum recommendations to promote glycogen repletion (7-10 g/kg), protein and fat intakes were above minimum recommendations. Pre- and post-season intakes of several micronutrients were marginal (failed to meet minimum CHO and micronutrient recommendations. Foods higher in protein and fat displaced more CHO-rich and nutrient-dense foods within athletes' energy requirements and satiety limits.

  17. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Cheol Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter. In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress–strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  18. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-03-27

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress-strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  19. Enhancement of osteogenesis on micro/nano-topographical carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone–nanohydroxyapatite biocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Anxiu; Liu, Xiaochen; Gao, Xiang; Deng, Feng; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2015-01-01

    As an FDA-approved implantable material, carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) possesses excellent mechanical properties similar to those of human cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace conventional metallic implants. The bioinertness and inferior osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK, however, limit its clinical application as orthopedic/dental implants. The present work aimed at developing a novel carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone–nanohydroxyapatite (PEEK/CF/n-HA) ternary biocomposite with micro/nano-topographical surface for the enhancement of the osteogenesis as a potential bioactive material for bone grafting and bone tissue-engineering applications. The combined modification of oxygen plasma and sand-blasting could improve the hydrophily and generate micro/nano-topographical structures on the surface of the CFRPEEK-based ternary biocomposite. The results clearly showcased that the micro-/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary biocomposite demonstrated the outstanding ability to promote the proliferation and differentiation of MG-63 cells in vitro as well as to boost the osseointegration between implant and bone in vivo, thereby boding well application to bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel micro/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary biocomposite was developed. • The modified PEEK biocomposite promotes proliferation and differentiation of cells. • In vivo osseointegration of the micro/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF was enhanced

  20. Enhancement of osteogenesis on micro/nano-topographical carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone–nanohydroxyapatite biocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Anxiu [College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Liu, Xiaochen [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gao, Xiang; Deng, Feng [College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Deng, Yi, E-mail: 18210357357@163.com [College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Wei, Shicheng, E-mail: weishicheng99@163.com [College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China)

    2015-03-01

    As an FDA-approved implantable material, carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) possesses excellent mechanical properties similar to those of human cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace conventional metallic implants. The bioinertness and inferior osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK, however, limit its clinical application as orthopedic/dental implants. The present work aimed at developing a novel carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone–nanohydroxyapatite (PEEK/CF/n-HA) ternary biocomposite with micro/nano-topographical surface for the enhancement of the osteogenesis as a potential bioactive material for bone grafting and bone tissue-engineering applications. The combined modification of oxygen plasma and sand-blasting could improve the hydrophily and generate micro/nano-topographical structures on the surface of the CFRPEEK-based ternary biocomposite. The results clearly showcased that the micro-/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary biocomposite demonstrated the outstanding ability to promote the proliferation and differentiation of MG-63 cells in vitro as well as to boost the osseointegration between implant and bone in vivo, thereby boding well application to bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel micro/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary biocomposite was developed. • The modified PEEK biocomposite promotes proliferation and differentiation of cells. • In vivo osseointegration of the micro/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF was enhanced.

  1. Cross-infrastructure learnings for alternative bridge system designs : a case study on the hybrid composite bridge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The hybrid composite beam (HCB) technology has been presented as a system for short and medium span beam bridges as an alternative to traditional materials such as concrete and steel. A HCB consists of a concrete tied arch encased in a fiber-reinforc...

  2. Biomechanical Assessment of Restored Mandibular Molar by Endocrown in Comparison to a Glass Fiber Post-Retained Conventional Crown: 3D Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Mohammed Abu; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-10-25

    To compare equivalent and contact stresses in a mandibular molar restored by all-ceramic crowns through two methods: ceramic endocrowns and ceramic crowns supported by fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts and core, by using 3D finite element analysis during normal masticatory load. Three 3D models of a mandibular first molar were made and labeled as such: intact molar with no restoration (A); ceramic endocrown-restored molar (B); ceramic crown supported by FRC posts and core restored molar (C). By using 3D FE analysis with contact components, normal masticatory load was simulated. The mvM stresses in all models were calculated. Maximal mvM stresses in the ceramic of restorations, dentin, and luting cement were contrasted among models and to values of materials' strength. Contact shear and tensile stresses in the restoration/tooth interface around restorations were also calculated. The highest mvM stress levels in the enamel and dentin for the tooth restored by ceramic endocrown were lower in the crown ceramic than in tooth restored with FRC posts and all-ceramic crowns; however, in the resin adhesive cement interface it was lower for ceramic crown supported by FRC posts than the in ceramic endocrown restoration. The maximum contact shear and tensile stress values along the restoration/tooth interface of ceramic endocrowns were lower than those with ceramic crowns supported by FRC posts. Ceramic endocrown restorations presented a lower mvM stress level in dentin than the conventional ceramic crowns supported by FRC posts and core. Ceramic endocrown restorations in molars are less susceptible to damage than those with conventional ceramic crowns retained by FRC posts. Ceramic endocrowns properly cemented in molars must not be fractured or loosen during normal masticatory load. Therefore, ceramic endocrowns are advised as practicable, minimally invasive, and esthetic restorations for root canal treated mandibular molars. © 2017 by the American College of

  3. Mechanical property evaluation of natural fiber coir composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, S.; Michael, D. Peter; Bensely, A.; Lal, D. Mohan; Rajadurai, A.

    2009-01-01

    The fiber which serves as a reinforcement in reinforced plastics may be synthetic or natural. Past studies show that only artificial fibers such as glass, carbon etc., have been used in fiber-reinforced plastics. Although glass and other synthetic fiber-reinforced plastics possess high specific strength, their fields of application are very limited because of their inherent higher cost of production. In this connection, an investigation has been carried out to make use of coir, a natural fiber abundantly available in India. Natural fibers are not only strong and lightweight but also relatively very cheap. In the present work, coir composites are developed and their mechanical properties are evaluated. Scanning electron micrographs obtained from fractured surfaces were used for a qualitative evaluation of the interfacial properties of coir/epoxy and compared with glass fiber/epoxy. These results indicate that coir can be used as a potential reinforcing material for making low load bearing thermoplastic composites

  4. Surface treatment of CFRP composites using femtosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, V.; Sharma, S. P.; de Moura, M. F. S. F.; Moreira, R. D. F.; Vilar, R.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we investigate the surface treatment of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites by laser ablation with femtosecond laser radiation. For this purpose, unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy matrix composites were treated with femtosecond laser pulses of 1024 nm wavelength and 550 fs duration. Laser tracks were inscribed on the material surface using pulse energies and scanning speeds in the range 0.1-0.5 mJ and 0.1-5 mm/s, respectively. The morphology of the laser treated surfaces was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. We show that, by using the appropriate processing parameters, a selective removal of the epoxy resin can be achieved, leaving the carbon fibers exposed. In addition, sub-micron laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are created on the carbon fibers surface, which may be potentially beneficial for the improvement of the fiber to matrix adhesion in adhesive bonds between CFRP parts.

  5. Comparison of standardized pre- and postoperative functional pelvic cine-MRI in patients with a bulbourethral composite suspension due to post-prostatectomy incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, M; John, H; Horton, K; Graf, N; Reischauer, C; Doert, A; Hergan, K; Gutzeit, A

    2013-08-01

    To compare functional pelvic cine-MRI in patients with post-prostatectomy incontinence before and after implantation of a bulbourethral composite suspension. Functional pelvic 1.5 T cine-MRI was performed at rest, under standardized Valsalva pressure and during micturition in six patients with post-prostatectomy incontinence before and 3 months after a bulbourethral composite suspension. Visibility and positioning of the implant as well as membranous urethral length (MUL) and positioning of the bladder neck (BN) in comparison with the pubococcygeal line (PCL) were evaluated. Clinical outcome was measured by patient-reported pad use and standardized questionnaires (ICIQ-UI SF and I-QOL). Paired data were tested with a Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. Surgery was successfully performed in all patients. All patients returned to complete voiding. The ICIQ-UI SF score decreased significantly from median 16.5 to 5 (p = 0.016). I-QOL increased significantly from 70.5 to 93.5 (p = 0.047). Pad use improved from median 2 pads to 0 pads postoperatively (p = 0.031). Four of six patients were completely pad-free, and 2 were failures with persisting urinary incontinence. MRI revealed significant differences of the MUL at rest with median of 8 mm pre- and 13 mm postoperatively (p = 0.016). BN showed a significant elevation with respect to PCL under Valsalva with in median 0.5 to 5 mm postoperatively (p = 0.016). No significant MRI differences were found between patients showing clinical success or failure. The bulbourethral composite suspension was associated with an increase in urethral length, urethral coaptation zone and bladder neck elevation, implying a non-compressive mode of action.

  6. Post-processor for simulations of the ORIGEN program and calculation of the composition of the activity of a burnt fuel core by a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval V, S.

    2006-01-01

    The composition calculation and the activity of nuclear materials subject to processes of burnt, irradiation and decay periods are of utility for diverse activities inside the nuclear industry, as they are it: the processes design and operations that manage radioactive material, the calculation of the inventory and activity of a core of burnt nuclear fuel, for studies of type Probabilistic Safety Analysis (APS), as well as for regulation processes and licensing of nuclear facilities. ORIGEN is a program for computer that calculates the composition and the activity of nuclear materials subject to periods of burnt, irradiation and decay. ORIGEN generates a great quantity of information whose processing and analysis are laborious, and it requires thoroughness to avoid errors. The automation of the extraction, conditioning and classification of that information is of great utility for the analyst. By means of the use of the post-processor presented in this work it is facilitated, it speeds up and wide the capacity of analysis of results, since diverse consultations with several classification options and filtrate of results can be made. As illustration of the utility of the post-processor, and as an analysis of interest for itself, it is also presented in this work the composition of the activity of a burned core in a BWR type reactor according to the following classification criteria: by type of radioisotope (fission products, activation products and actinides), by specie type (gassy, volatile, semi-volatile and not volatile), by element and by chemical group. The results show that the total activity of the studied core is dominated by the fission products and for the actinides, in proportion four to one, and that the gassy and volatile species conform a fifth part of the total activity of the core. (Author)

  7. External nitrogen input affects pre- and post-harvest cell wall composition but not the enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldwin, Laetitia Andrée; Glazowska, Sylwia Emilia; Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    . To investigate this, we conducted a large scale field experiment in which wheat plants were cultivated at three levels of externally applied N. The plants were harvested at different stages of maturation, spanning green straw at heading (ear emergence) to fully yellow straw at final maturity. Defined parts...... the different N treatments. Nitrogen fertilization partially alters the cell wall composition in wheat straw but is not a limiting factor in wheat biomass refinery....

  8. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists? Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bj?rg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the de...

  9. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  10. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simen E. Kopperud

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%, followed by restoration fractures (25.1%. Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01, employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS (p < 0.01 and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03. There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01. Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations.

  11. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists' Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-04-22

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists' satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists' treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations.

  12. Proteomics analysis reveals a highly heterogeneous proteasome composition and the post-translational regulation of peptidase activity under pathogen signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui H; Fukao, Yoichiro; Ishida, Sakiko; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Maekawa, Shugo; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2013-11-01

    The proteasome is a large multisubunit complex that plays a crucial role in the removal of damaged or selective ubiquitinated proteins, thereby allowing quality control of cellular proteins and restricted regulation of diverse cellular signaling in eukaryotic cells. Proteasome-dependent protein degradation is involved in almost all aspects of plant growth and responses to environmental stresses including pathogen resistance. Although the molecular mechanism for specifying targets by ubiquitin ligases is well understood, the detailed characterization of the plant proteasome complex remains unclear. One of the most important features of the plant proteasome is that most subunits are encoded by duplicate genes, suggesting the highly heterogeneous composition of this proteasome. Here, we performed affinity purification and a combination of 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, which identified the detailed composition of paralogous and modified proteins. Moreover, these proteomics approaches revealed that specific subunit composition and proteasome peptidase activity were affected by pathogen-derived MAMPs, flg22 treatment. Interestingly, flg22 treatment did not alter mRNA expression levels of the peptidase genes PBA, PBB1/2, PBE1/2, and total proteasome levels remained unchanged by flg22 as well. These results demonstrate the finely tuned mechanism that regulates proteasome function via putative post-translational modifications in response to environmental stress in plants.

  13. Altered faecal and mucosal microbial composition in post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome patients correlates with mucosal lymphocyte phenotypes and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, J; Rangel, I; Fuentes, S; Heikamp-de Jong, I; Hultgren-Hörnquist, E; de Vos, W M; Brummer, R J

    2015-02-01

    A subset of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients, denoted post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS), develop symptoms after an enteric infection. Bacterial dysbiosis and mucosal inflammation have been proposed to be involved in the pathophysiology of this entity. To characterise the mucosal and faecal microbiota in PI-IBS, general IBS and healthy controls, and to investigate associations between the microbiota and the mucosal immune system. Mucosal biopsies and faeces were collected from 13 PI-IBS patients, 19 general IBS patients and 16 healthy controls. Global bacterial composition was determined by generating 16S rRNA amplicons that were examined by phylogenetic microarray hybridisation, principal component and redundancy analysis. We correlated previously reported lymphocyte proportions with the microbiota. Faecal microbiota composition of PI-IBS patients differed significantly from both general IBS patients and healthy controls (P intestinal microbiota of PI-IBS patients from that of both general IBS patients and HC. The microbial composition is significantly associated with the HADs score and alterations in lymphocyte subsets proportions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Compositional and weave pattern analyses of glass fibers in dental polymer fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallittu, P K

    1998-09-01

    This study compared weave patterns and glass compositions of five glass fiber materials found in commercial fiber-reinforced dental composites. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the woven structure of five glass fiber products, and an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS) was used to determine the elemental composition of these glass fibers in the bulk and at the surface of the fiber. Five fibers of each product were analyzed. The fiber products were either unidirectional rovings or bidirectional weaves. More precisely, the woven structures were linen weave, twill weave, or twill weave ribbon. SEM/EDS analysis revealed that the composition of the glass fibers was typical for E (electrical)-glass fibers with one exception. One product intended for use in fixed prosthodontics included unidirectional fibers with a composition consistent with a modified high-tensile-strength R-glass. Boron oxide found on the surface of glass fibers would likely contribute to an increased potential for corrosion of fiber-reinforced composite. The predominant fiber composition in these products is E-glass. Because the degree of hydrolytic stability of polymer-fiber composites over time may lead to material failure in permanent restorations, this property should be investigated further.

  15. Post-thermocycling shear bond strength of a gingiva-colored indirect composite layering material to three implant framework materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Futoshi; Koizuka, Mai; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Taguchi, Kohei; Kamio, Shingo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate shear bond strength of a gingiva-colored indirect composite to three implant framework materials, before and after thermocycling, and verify the effect of surface pre-treatment for each framework. Commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti), American Dental Association (ADA) type 4 casting gold alloy (Type IV) and zirconia ceramics (Zirconia) were assessed. For each substrate, 96 disks were divided into six groups and primed with one of the following primers: Alloy Primer (ALP), Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB+Activator), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), Metal Link (MLP) and V-Primer (VPR). The specimens were then bonded to a gingiva-colored indirect composite (Ceramage Concentrate GUM-D). Shear bond strengths were measured at 0 and 20 000 thermocycles and data were analyzed with the Steel-Dwass test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Shear bond strengths were significantly lower after thermocycling, with the exception of Type IV specimens primed with CPB (p = 0.092) or MLP (p = 0.112). For CP-Ti and Zirconia specimens, priming with CPB or CPB+Activator produced significantly higher bond strengths at 0 and 20 000 thermocycles, as compared with the other groups. For Type IV specimens, priming with ALP or MLP produced higher bond strengths at 0 and 20 000 thermocycles. Shear bond strength of a gingiva-colored indirect composite to CP-Ti, gold alloy and zirconia ceramics was generally lower after thermocycling. Application of a hydrophobic phosphate monomer and polymerization initiator was effective in maintaining bond strength of CP-Ti and zirconia ceramics. Combined use of a thione monomer and phosphoric monomer enhanced the durable bond strength of gold alloy.

  16. Influence of post discharge nutrition on body composition at 6 years of age among children born very preterm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftlund, Line Hedegaard; Zachariassen, Gitte; Agertoft, Lone

    if type of nutrition in early life effects the body composition in later life among very preterm born children Method In 2004-08 a birth cohort of very preterm born infants with a gestational age ≤32+0 weeks. At time of hospital discharge, the infants were randomised into 3 different feeding groups...... month corrected age. At 6 years, a dexa scan was performed to evaluate body composition. Results A total number of 277 infants will be invited to follow up at 6 years of age. So far 79 children have had a dexa scan performed (HM 26, HMF: 22 and PF: 31). Fat mass (FM) and muscle mass (MM) was measured.......841 g), but no significant difference between the groups. Conclusion Human milk seems to result in a lower fat mass and higher muscle mass among very preterm born infants. The results are preliminary due to the small number of children. The remaining children in this cohort will be invited to similar...

  17. Effect of post heat-treatment of composition-controlled PdFe nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun Sik; Choi, Kwang-Hyun; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Myeong Jae; Baik, Jaeyoon; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Mi-Ju; Lee, Stanfield Youngwon; Kim, Minhyoung; Shin, Heejong; Lee, Kug-Seung; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Composition-controlled and carbon-supported PdFe nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared via a modified chemical synthesis after heat-treatment at high temperature under a reductive atmosphere. This novel synthesis, which combines the polyol reduction method and hydride method, was used to obtain monodispersed PdFe NPs. In addition, to induce structural modifications, the as-prepared PdFe NPs received heat-treatment under a reductive atmosphere. Structural characterization, including high-resolution powder diffraction (HRPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis, indicated that heat-treated PdFe NPs exhibited a higher degree of alloying and surface Pd atomic composition compared with as-prepared ones. Furthermore, new crystalline phases were detected after heat-treatment. Thanks to the structural alterations, heat-treated PdFe NPs showed ∼3 and ∼18 times higher mass- and area-normalized oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities, respectively than commercial Pt/C. Single cell testing with heat-treated PdFe catalysts exhibited a ∼2.5 times higher mass-normalized maximum power density than the reference cell. Surface structure analyses, including cyclic voltammetry (CV), COad oxidation, and XPS, revealed that, after heat-treatment, a downshift of the Pd d-band center occurred, which led to a decrease in the affinity of Pd for oxygen species, resulting in more favorable ORR kinetics.

  18. The post-Laramide clastic deposits of the Sierra de Guanajuato: Compositional implications on the tectono-sedimentary and paleographic evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Miranda-Avilés

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the study on sedimentation, sedimentary environments, tectono-sedimentary and paleogeographic evolution of post-Laramide clastic deposits and pre-volcanism of the Sierra Madre Occidental in the Sierra de Guanajuato, central Mexico. The Eocene Duarte Conglomerate and Guanajuato Conglomerate were deposited in the middle and distal parts of alluvial fans. The studied rocks are composed of limestone clasts, granite, andesite, metasediments, diorite, and pyroxenite, indicating the erosion of uplifted blocks of the basal complex of the Sierra de Guanajuato (Arperos basin. The petrographic and compositional analysis of limestone shows a textural variation from basin limestones and shallow platform limestones. The shallow platform limestone contain bivalves, brachiopods, gastropods, echinoderms and benthic foraminifera from the Berriasian-Valanginian. The shallow-water limestone corresponds to the boundary of the Arperos basin whose original outcrops currently not outcrop in the Sierra de Guanajuato.

  19. Optique moderne et post-moderne dans la composition d'images transculturelles dans trois films de Woody Allen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Fuchs

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Avec le personnage récurrent juif new-yorkais névrosé plus ou moins autobiographique, les films de Woody Allen ont créé, volontairement ou pas, leur propre mythologie et un genre à part entière composé de codes que le spectateur décrypte instantanément. Pourtant, Woody Allen est surtout un cinéaste post-moderne, analysant et déconstruisant les simulacres de son époque. Il est ainsi un passeur d'images retraçant l'histoire des arts modernes des XXe et XXIe siècles et de leurs stratégies énonciatives et réceptives.With the recurrent persona of the neurotic and more or less autobiographical Jewish New Yorker, Woody Allen's films have created, willingly or not, their own mythology and a specific genre made up of codes readily accessible to the spectator. However, Woody Allen is more than anything else a postmodern filmmaker who analyses and deconstructs the simulacra of his time. He is thus a conveyor of images which retrace the history of modern art of the XXth and XXIth centuries, and of their strategies of enunciation and reception.

  20. Monitoring post-fire changes in species composition and stand structure in boreal forests using high-resolution, 3-D aerial drone data and Landsat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, M.; Morton, D. C.; Cook, B.; Andersen, H. E.; Mack, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    The growing frequency and severity of boreal forest fires has important consequences for fire carbon emissions and ecosystem composition. Severe fires are typically associated with high degrees of both canopy and soil organic layer (SOL) consumption, particularly in black spruce stands. Complete canopy consumption can decrease the likelihood of spruce regeneration due to reduced viability of the aerial seedbank. Deeper burning of the SOL increases fire emissions and can expose mineral soil that promotes colonization by broadleaf species. There is mounting evidence that a disturbance-driven shift from spruce to broadleaf forests may indicate an ecological state change with feedbacks to regional and global climate. If post-fire successional dynamics can be characterized at an ecosystem scale using remote sensing data, we will be better equipped to constrain carbon and energy fluxes from SOL losses and albedo changes. In this study, we used Landsat time series, very high-resolution structure-from-motion (SFM) drone imagery, and field measurements to investigate post-fire regrowth 13 years after the 2004 Taylor Complex (TC) fires in interior Alaska. Twenty-seven TC plots span a gradient of moisture conditions and burn severity as estimated by loss of SOL. A range of variables potentially governing seedling species dominance (e.g., moisture status, distance to seed sources) have been collected systematically over the years following fire. In July 2017, we additionally collected 700 pts/m2) RGB-colored point clouds using SFM techniques. With these point clouds and high resolution orthomosaics, we estimated: 1) snag heights and biomass, 2) remnant snag fine branching, and 3) species and structure of shrubs and groundcover that have regrown since fire. We additionally assembled a dense Landsat time series arranged by day-of-year to monitor pre-fire and post-fire phenology. Our preliminary results illustrate how ultra-fine and moderate-scale remote sensing can be used to

  1. Influence of fiber upon the radiation degradation of fiber-reinforced plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Akira

    1992-01-01

    Influences of fiber upon the radiation degradation of fiber-reinforced plastics were investigated by using 2 MeV electrons. Radiation resistances were evaluated from the three-point bending strength of the fiber laminates which used bisphenol A-type epoxy resin as a matrix. Carbon fiber laminates had higher radiation resistance values than the laminates made of glass fiber. Model laminates using polyethylene as a matrix were prepared in order to examine the differences between carbon fiber and glass fiber filler, the relation between gel fraction and absorbed dose was established. When the polyethylene was filled in the carbon fiber, forming the gel was strikingly delayed. This result suggests that radiation protective action existing in carbon fiber to matrix resin is the main cause of the higher radiation resistance of carbon fiber reinforced plastics. (author)

  2. Mechanical Analysis of Stress Distribution in a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Rod Bonding Anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Feng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an elastic shear stress distribution theoretical model at the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP-adhesive interface of a single-rod and a multi-rod straight-pipe bonding anchor. A comparison between theoretical and finite element analysis results reveals that the accuracy of the theory can be used to guide the preliminary design of CFRP rod bonding anchors. The mechanical performance of the inner cone bonding anchor for multi-rods are evaluated within different coefficients of friction and inner inclined angles. Numerical results indicate that the straight-parabolic inner cone bonding anchor has a significant effect on reducing the shear force at the loading end.

  3. Utilization of power plant bottom ash as aggregates in fiber-reinforced cellular concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H K; Kim, H K; Hwang, E A

    2010-02-01

    Recently, millions tons of bottom ash wastes from thermoelectric power plants have been disposed of in landfills and coastal areas, regardless of its recycling possibility in construction fields. Fiber-reinforced cellular concrete (FRCC) of low density and of high strength may be attainable through the addition of bottom ash due to its relatively high strength. This paper focuses on evaluating the feasibility of utilizing bottom ash of thermoelectric power plant wastes as aggregates in FRCC. The flow characteristics of cement mortar with bottom ash aggregates and the effect of aggregate type and size on concrete density and compressive strength were investigated. In addition, the effects of adding steel and polypropylene fibers for improving the strength of concrete were also investigated. The results from this study suggest that bottom ash can be applied as a construction material which may not only improve the compressive strength of FRCC significantly but also reduce problems related to bottom ash waste.

  4. Fiber-reinforced materials: finite elements for the treatment of the inextensibility constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricchio, Ferdinando; Scalet, Giulia; Wriggers, Peter

    2017-12-01

    The present paper proposes a numerical framework for the analysis of problems involving fiber-reinforced anisotropic materials. Specifically, isotropic linear elastic solids, reinforced by a single family of inextensible fibers, are considered. The kinematic constraint equation of inextensibility in the fiber direction leads to the presence of an undetermined fiber stress in the constitutive equations. To avoid locking-phenomena in the numerical solution due to the presence of the constraint, mixed finite elements based on the Lagrange multiplier, perturbed Lagrangian, and penalty method are proposed. Several boundary-value problems under plane strain conditions are solved and numerical results are compared to analytical solutions, whenever the derivation is possible. The performed simulations allow to assess the performance of the proposed finite elements and to discuss several features of the developed formulations concerning the effective approximation for the displacement and fiber stress fields, mesh convergence, and sensitivity to penalty parameters.

  5. Shift in Buffalo Population and Composition in relation to Cattle during Post Green Revolution period in Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Suhasini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Andhra Pradesh is an agrarian state located in peninsular India with semi-arid tropical climate; divided into three geo-political regions viz. Coastal Andhra, Rayalaseema and Telangana. Regional differences in agro climatic conditions and irrigation potential resulted in regional imbalances in overall development. Agricultural production in Andhra Pradesh is dominated by small and marginal farmers who practice traditional mixed farming system. Major changes that took place during green revolution phase lead to increased irrigation potential, shifts in crops and cropping pattern, farm mechanization and fragmentation of land holding had direct impact on livestock sector. Cattle were predominant in the state during pre-green revolution period except in Coastal Andhra. Among cattle 44% were males, emphasizing their role as draft animal. By 2003, it was reduced to 15 %. Among buffaloes, proportion of females and young stock recorded an increase of about 20% indicating shift in farmer’s preference for milch buffaloes. The increase in proportion of male cattle; female and young buffaloes in Telangana indicate that farmers in this region prefer to keep cattle for draft and buffaloes for milk production. Spatial and temporal trends along with shifts in composition in cattle and buffaloes are discussed.

  6. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: An in vitro and finite element analysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strenght of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Conclusion: A dual-wing retainer is the optimal design for replacement of a single

  7. Effects of a Pilates exercise program on muscle strength, postural control and body composition: results from a pilot study in a group of post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, M; Gobbo, S; Bullo, V; Zanotto, T; Vendramin, B; Duregon, F; Cugusi, L; Camozzi, V; Zaccaria, M; Neunhaeuserer, D; Ermolao, A

    2015-12-01

    Participation in exercise programs is heartily recommended for older adults since the level of physical fitness directly influences functional independence. The aim of this present study was to investigate the effects of supervised Pilates exercise training on the physical function, hypothesizing that a period of Pilates exercise training (PET) can increase overall muscle strength, body composition, and balance, during single and dual-task conditions, in a group of post-menopausal women. Twenty-five subjects, aged 59 to 66 years old, were recruited. Eligible participants were assessed prior and after 3 months of PET performed twice per week. Muscular strength was evaluated with handgrip strength (HGS) test, 30-s chair sit-to-stand test (30CST), and abdominal strength (AST) test. Postural control and dual-task performance were measured through a stabilometric platform while dynamic balance with 8 ft up and go test. Finally, body composition was assessed by means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Statistically significant improvements were detected on HGS (+8.22%), 30CST (+23.41%), 8 ft up and go test (-5.95%), AST (+30.81%), medio-lateral oscillations in open eyes and dual-task condition (-22.03% and -10.37%). Pilates was effective in increasing upper body, lower body, and abdominal muscle strength. No changes on body composition were detected. Results on this investigation indicated also that 12-week of mat Pilates is not sufficient to determine a clinical meaningful improvement on static balance in single and dual-task conditions.

  8. CORRELATION OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVEL WITH BONE MINERAL DENSITY, CARDIO-RESPIRATORY FITNESS AND BODY COMPOSITION IN POST-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyati N Khona

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the hormonal changes in postmenopausal women they are prone for many complications like increased CVD risk factors, osteoporosis, obesity, mood swings and urinary incontinence. Physical inactivity in postmenopausal women leads to higher risk of developing CVD and osteoporosis. The objective was to find out the correlation of physical activity level with BMD, cardio-respiratory fitness and body composition in post-menopausal women Methods: 42 postmenopausal women were included. A detailed clinical evaluation with physical activity level (IPAQ-METS-mins/week, , BMD ( T-Scores, body composition (BMI, waist circumference, BIA & Skin fold calliper for fat %, cardio-respiratory fitness was measured by Balke protocol and VO2peak (ml/kg/min is estimated. Correlation of physical activity level with BMD, cardio-respiratory fitness and body composition were analysed using “Pearson’s product moment correlation co-efficient and Spearman’s rho.” Results: Spearman’s rank correlation rho for IPAQ with VO2 peak was 0.420,BMI was -0.388 and visceral fat was -0.384 indicating moderate positive correlation between IPAQ and cardio-respiratory fitness and weak negative correlation between IPAQ and BMI and visceral fat. Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient of IPAQ with BMD was 0.147, body fat was -0.234 and waist circumference was -0.256 indicating no correlation. P value was significant for correlation of IPAQ with CRF (0.006, BMI (0.011 and Visceral fat (0.012. Conclusion: There is moderate positive correlation between IPAQ and cardio-respiratory fitness, weak negative correlation between IPAQ and BMI and visceral fat and no correlation between IPAQ and BMD, body fat and waist circumference

  9. Maternal insulin resistance, triglycerides and cord blood insulin in relation to post-natal weight trajectories and body composition in the offspring up to 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, S; Schmid, D; Hüttinger, K; Much, D; Heimberg, E; Sedlmeier, E-M; Brüderl, M; Kratzsch, J; Bader, B L; Amann-Gassner, U; Hauner, H

    2013-12-01

    The intrauterine metabolic environment might have a programming effect on offspring body composition. We aimed to explore associations of maternal variables of glucose and lipid metabolism during pregnancy, as well as cord blood insulin, with infant growth and body composition up to 2 years post-partum. Data of pregnant women and their infants came from a randomized controlled trial designed to investigate the impact of nutritional fatty acids on adipose tissue development in the offspring. Of the 208 pregnant women enrolled, 118 infants were examined at 2 years. In the present analysis, maternal fasting plasma insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and serum triglycerides measured during pregnancy, as well as insulin in umbilical cord plasma, were related to infant growth and body composition assessed by skinfold thickness measurements and abdominal ultrasonography up to 2 years of age. Maternal homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance at the 32nd week of gestation was significantly inversely associated with infant lean body mass at birth, whereas the change in serum triglycerides during pregnancy was positively associated with ponderal index at 4 months, but not at later time points. Cord plasma insulin correlated positively with birthweight and neonatal fat mass and was inversely associated with body weight gain up to 2 years after multiple adjustments. Subsequent stratification by gender revealed that this relationship with weight gain was stronger, and significant only in girls. Cord blood insulin is inversely associated with subsequent infant weight gain up to 2 years and this seems to be more pronounced in girls. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  10. The Effects of Pre- and Post-Exercise Whey vs. Casein Protein Consumption on Body Composition and Performance Measures in Collegiate Female Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilborn, Colin D; Taylor, Lem W; Outlaw, Jordan; Williams, Laura; Campbell, Bill; Foster, Cliffa A; Smith-Ryan, Abbie; Urbina, Stacie; Hayward, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Two of the most popular forms of protein on the market are whey and casein. Both proteins are derived from milk but each protein differs in absorption rate and bioavailability, thus it is possible that each type of protein may contribute differently to the adaptations elicited through resistance training. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ingestion of two types of protein in conjunction with a controlled resistance training program in collegiate female basketball players. Sixteen NCAA Division III female basketball players were matched according to body mass and randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to consume 24 g whey protein (WP) (N = 8, 20.0 ± 1.9 years, 1.58 ± 0.27 m, 66. 0 ± 4.9 kg, 27.0 ± 4.9 %BF) or 24 g casein protein (CP) (N = 8, 21.0 ± 2.8 years, 1.53 ± 0.29 m, 68.0 ± 2.9 kg, 25.0 ± 5.7 %BF) immediately pre- and post-exercise for eight weeks. Subjects participated in a supervised 4-day per week undulating periodized training program. At 0 and 8 weeks, subjects underwent DXA body composition analysis, and at 0 and 8 weeks underwent one repetition maximum (1RM) strength, muscle endurance, vertical jump, 5-10-5 agility run, and broad jump testing sessions. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, and presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 60 days. No significant group x time interaction effects were observed among groups in changes in any variable (p > 0.05). A significant time effect was observed for body fat (WP: -2.0 ± 1.1 %BF; CP: -1.0 ± 1.6 %BF, p training program with pre- and post-exercise protein supplementation is capable of inducing significant changes in performance and body composition. There does not appear to be a difference in the performance- enhancing effects between whey and casein proteins. Key pointsFemales can experience and increase in performance makers from consuming protein after resistance training.Females can have a decreased body fat composition

  11. Origin, Bulk Chemical Composition and Physical Structure of the Galilean Satellites of Jupiter: A Post-Galileo Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, A. J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The origin of Jupiter and the Galilean satellite system is examined in the light of the new data that has been obtained by the NASA Galileo Project. In particular, special attention is given to a theory of satellite origin which was put forward at the start of the Galileo Mission and on the basis of which several predictions have now been proven successful. These predictions concern the chemical composition of Jupiter's atmosphere and the physical structure of the satellites. According to the proposed theory of satellite origin, each of the Galilean satellites formed by chemical condensation and gravitational accumulation of solid grains within a concentric family of orbiting gas rings. These rings were cast off equatorially by the rotating proto-Jovian cloud (PJC which contracted gravitationally to form Jupiter some 4 1/2 billion years ago. The PJC formed from the gas and grains left over from the gas ring that had been shed at Jupiter's orbit by the contracting proto-solar cloud (PSC Supersonic turbulent convection provides the means for shedding discrete gas rings. The temperatures T (sub n) of the system of gas rings shed by the PSC and PJC vary with their respective mean orbital radii R (sub n) (n = 0, 1,2,...) according as T (sub n) proportional to R (sub n) (exp -0.9). If the planet Mercury condenses at 1640 K, so accounting for the high density of that planet via a process of chemical fractionation between iron and silicates, then T (sub n) at Jupiter's orbit is 158 K. Only 35% of the water vapour condenses out. Thus fractionation between rock and ice, together with an enhancement in the abundance of solids relative to gas which takes place through gravitational sedimentation of solids onto the mean orbit of the gas ring, ensures nearly equal proportions of rock and ice in each of Ganymede and Callisto. Io and Europa condense above the H20 ice point and consist solely of hydrated rock (h-rock). The Ganymedan condensate consists of h-rock and H20 ice. For

  12. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  13. Bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets viscoelasticity and temperature dependency in the draping process

    CERN Document Server

    Ropers, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Within the scope of this work, Steffen Ropers evaluates the viscoelastic and temperature-dependent nature of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets in order to further enhance the predictability of the draping simulation. This simulation is a useful tool for the development of robust large scale processes for continuously fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP). The bending behavior thereby largely influences the size and position of wrinkles, which are one of the most common processing defects for continuously fiber-reinforced parts. Thus, a better understanding of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets as well as an appropriate testing method along with corresponding material models contribute to a wide-spread application of CFRPs in large scale production. Contents Thermoplastic Prepregs Draping Simulation of Thermoplastic Prepregs Bending Characterization of Textile Composites Modeling of Bending Behavior Target Groups Researchers and students in the field of polymer, lightweight,...

  14. The effect of ferrule height on stress distribution within a tooth restored with fibre posts and ceramic crown: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juloski, Jelena; Apicella, Davide; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate via finite element analysis the effect of different ferrule heights on stress distribution within each part of a maxillary first premolar (MFP) restored with adhesively luted glass fiber-reinforced resin (GFRR) posts and a ceramic crown. The solid models consisted of MFP, periodontal ligament and the corresponding alveolar bone process. Four models were created representing different degrees of coronal tissue loss (0mm, 1mm, 2mm and 3mm of ferrule height). First set of computing runs was performed for in vivo FE-model validation purposes. In the second part, a 200-N force was applied on the buccal cusp directed at 45° to the longitudinal axis of the tooth. Principal stresses values and distribution were recorded within root, abutment, posts, crown and related adhesive interfaces. All FE-models showed similar stress distribution within roots, with highest stress present in the chamfer area. In composite abutments higher stress was observed when no ferrule was present compared to ferruled FE-models. Stress distribution within crown and GFRR posts did not differ among the models. Stress values at the adhesive interfaces decreased with increasing ferrule height. The stress state at abutment-crown and post-root interfaces was very close to their strength, when ferrule was not present. Similarly, higher ferrule produced more favorable stress distribution at post-abutment and abutment-root interfaces. Endodontically treated teeth with higher ferrule exhibit lower stress at adhesive interfaces that may be expected to lower the probability of clinical failure. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrical and Self-Sensing Properties of Ultra-High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    You, Ilhwan; Yoo, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Soonho; Kim, Min-Jae; Zi, Goangseup

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the electrical and self-sensing capacities of ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) with and without carbon nanotubes (CNTs). For this, the effects of steel fiber content, orientation, and pore water content on the electrical and piezoresistive properties of UHPFRC without CNTs were first evaluated. Then, the effect of CNT content on the self-sensing capacities of UHPFRC under compression and flexure was investigated. Test results indicated that higher ...

  16. Role of the polymeric matrix in the processing and structural properties of composite materials. Proceedings of the Joint U.S.-Italy Symposium on Composite Materials, Capri, Italy, June 15-19, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seferis, J.C.; Nicolais, L.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between the polymeric matrix and the reinforcing phase and the effect of the matrix on composite performance are discussed under the following headings: chemical and environmental effects, short-fiber reinforcements, interfacial effects, and continuous fiber reinforcements and design. Papers are presented on the factors affecting the development of new matrix resins for advanced composites creep and fracture initiation in fiber-reinforced plastics dimensional stability of reinforced matrices and internal stresses in fiber-reinforced plastics. Other topics discussed include the use of composites in commercial aircraft, design of continuous-fiber composite structures, and delamination in graphite-epoxy. For individual items see A83-46280 to A83-46308

  17. Long-term effect of exercise on bone mineral density and body composition in post-menopausal ex-elite athletes: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, A; Celi, M; Volpe, S L; Sorge, R; Tarantino, U

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the long-term effect of exercise on bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC) and body composition (BC) in post-menopausal women who were elite athletes during their youth compared with sedentary controls. It is a retrospective study and carried out in an outpatient clinic. A total of 48 post-menopausal women (54-73 years of age) were enrolled. Ex-elite athletes with long-term (>20 years) histories of significant training and performance were divided into two groups: weight-bearing sports (runners, n=12) and non-weight-bearing sports (swimmers, n=12). The athletes were age matched with sedentary controls (n=24). BMD, BMC and BC were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Healthcare and sport activity histories were evaluated using a questionnaire. No significant differences were found with regard to body weight, height, body mass index and hours of activity between the two groups of athletes. There were no significant differences in activity levels between athletes and controls at the time of this study. BMD and BMC were not significantly different between athletes; they were significantly higher in athletes than in controls (Pex-athletes did not significantly differ in BC, left and right lean arm mass and arm BMD were significantly higher in swimmers than in runners (P<0.0001). The high level of physical activity observed in female athletes is associated with improved muscle mass, BMD and BMC, and physical activity during youth seems to have a beneficial effect on bone mass and helps to prevent bone loss due to aging.

  18. Application of cementitious composites in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fediuk, R. S.; Ibragimov, R. A.; Lesovik, V. S.; Akopian, A. K.; Teleshev, A. A.; Khankhabaev, L. R.; Ivanov, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the results of the development of composite fiber-reinforced concrete for use as basic parts of machine-tools and machines. It was revealed that the additions of fly ash and limestone significantly reduce the cracking of concrete. Thus, a clear relationship between the properties of concrete and the features of the structure of cement stone was revealed. The strength and crack resistance of concrete is increased due to an increase in the number of low-basic calcium hydrosilicates, as well as increased gel porosity and reduced capillary porosity (especially at the submicroscopic level).

  19. Damage Characterization of Bio and Green Polyethylene?Birch Composites under Creep and Cyclic Testing with Multivariable Acoustic Emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo, Alencar; Toubal, Lotfi; Koffi, Demagna; Erchiqui, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    Despite the knowledge gained in recent years regarding the use of acoustic emissions (AEs) in ecologically friendly, natural fiber-reinforced composites (including certain composites with bio-sourced matrices), there is still a knowledge gap in the understanding of the difference in damage behavior between green and biocomposites. Thus, this article investigates the behavior of two comparable green and biocomposites with tests that better reflect real-life applications, i.e., load-unloading...

  20. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre surface resin-rich/graphite fibre composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide were fabricated allowing the resin to accumulate at the composite surface. These surface resin-rich composites were then bonded together and tested for lap shear strength both before and after thermal aging. Lap shear strength did not appear to show a significant improvement over that previously recorded for resin-poor samples and was shown to decrease with increasing aging time and temperature.

  1. Accuracy of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 2.1) for diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder according to DSM-IV criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Maria Inês; Mari, Jair de Jesus; Ribeiro, Wagner Silva; Jorge, Miguel Roberto; Andreoli, Sergio Baxter

    2012-07-01

    The objective was to study the accuracy of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) section of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 2.1) DSM-IV diagnosis, using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID) as gold standard, and compare the ICD-10 and DSM IV classifications for PTSD. The CIDI was applied by trained lay interviewers and the SCID by a psychologist. The subjects were selected from a community and an outpatient program. A total of 67 subjects completed both assessments. Kappa coefficients for the ICD-10 and the DSM IV compared to the SCID diagnosis were 0.67 and 0.46 respectively. Validity for the DSM IV diagnosis was: sensitivity (51.5%), specificity (94.1%), positive predictive value (9.5%), negative predictive value (66.7%), misclassification rate (26.9%). The CIDI 2.1 demonstrated low validity coefficients for the diagnosis of PTSD using DSM IV criteria when compared to the SCID. The main source of discordance in this study was found to be the high probability of false-negative cases with regards to distress and impairment as well as to avoidance symptoms.

  2. Modeling of damage evaluation in thin composite plate loaded by pressure loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudinský M.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of numerical analysis of elastic damage of thin laminated long fiber-reinforced composite plate consisting of unidirectional layers which is loaded by uniformly distributed pressure. The analysis has been performed by means of the finite element method (FEM. The numerical implementation uses layered plate finite elements based on the Kirchhoff plate theory. System of nonlinear equations has been solved by means of the Newton- Raphson procedure. Evolution of damage has been solved using the return-mapping algorithm based on the continuum damage mechanics (CDM. The analysis was performed using own program created in MATLAB. Problem of laminated fiber-reinforced composite plate fixed on edges for two different materials and three different laminate stacking sequences (LSS was simulated. Evolution of stresses vs. strains and also evolution of damage variables in critical points of the structure are shown.

  3. Short fiber reinforced composite: a new alternative for direct onlay restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Mangoush, Enas; Vallittu, Mangoush; Lassila, Lippo

    2013-01-01

    To determine the static load-bearing capacity of direct composite onlay restorations made of novel filling composite resin system which combines short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) and conventional particulate filler composite resin (PFC). Three groups of onlay restorations were fabricated (n = 8/group); Group A: made from conventional particulate filler composite resin (Z250, 3M-ESPE, USA, control), Group B: made from short fiber-reinforced composite resin (EverX posterior, StickTeck Ltd, member of GC group, Turku, Finland) as substructure with 1 mm surface layer of PFC, Group C: made from FC composite resin. The specimens were incrementally polymerized with a hand-light curing unit for 80 s before they were statically loaded with two different sizes (3 & 6 mm) of steel ball until fracture. Failure modes were visually examined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p = 0.05). ANOVA revealed that onlay restorations made from FC composite resin had statistically significantly higher load-bearing capacity (1733 N) ( p composite resin (1081 N). Onlays made of FC composite resin with a surface layer of PFC gave force values of 1405 N which was statistically higher than control group ( p composite resin as substructure and surface layer of conventional composite resin displayed promising performance in high load bearing areas.

  4. Metallic-glass-matrix composite structures with benchmark mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Joseph P.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2010-12-01

    Metallic-glass-matrix composites demonstrating unusual combination of high strength, high toughness, and excellent processability are utilized to fabricate cellular structures of egg-box topology. Under compressive loading, the egg-box panels are capable of undergoing extensive plastic collapse at very high plateau stresses enabling absorption of large amounts of mechanical energy. In terms of specific mechanical energy absorbed, the present panels far outperform panels of similar topology made of aluminum or fiber-reinforced polymer composites, and even surpass steel structures of highly buckling-resistant topologies, thus emerging among the highest performance structures of any kind.

  5. Use of Fiber-Reinforced Cements in Masonry Construction and Structural Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Erdogmus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of fiber reinforcement in traditional concrete mixes has been extensively studied and has been slowly finding its regular use in practice. In contrast, opportunities for the use of fibers in masonry applications and structural rehabilitation projects (masonry and concrete structures have not been as deeply investigated, where the base matrix may be a weaker cementitious mixture. This paper will summarize the findings of the author’s research over the past 10 years in these particular applications of fiber reinforced cements (FRC. For masonry, considering both mortar and mortar-unit bond characteristics, a 0.5% volume fraction of micro fibers in type N Portland cement lime mortar appear to be a viable recipe for most masonry joint applications both for clay and concrete units. In general, clay units perform better with high water content fiber reinforced mortar (FRM while concrete masonry units (CMUs perform better with drier mixtures, so 130% and 110% flow rates should be targeted, respectively. For earth block masonry applications, fibers’ benefits are observed in improving local damage and water pressure resistance. The FRC retrofit technique proposed for the rehabilitation of reinforced concrete two-way slabs has exceeded expectations in terms of capacity increase for a relatively low cost in comparison to the common but expensive fiber reinforced polymer applications. For all of these applications of fiber-reinforced cements, further research with larger data pools would lead to further optimization of fiber type, size, and amount.

  6. State-of-the-Art Report on Fiber-Reinforced Lightweight Aggregate Concrete Masonry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Rico

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Masonry construction is the most widely used building method in the world. Concrete masonry is relatively low in cost due to the vast availability of aggregates used within the production process. These aggregate materials are not always reliable for structural use. One of the principal issues associated with masonry is the brittleness of the unit. When subject to seismic loads, the brittleness of the masonry magnifies. In regions with high seismic activity and unspecified building codes or standards, masonry housing has developed into a death trap for countless individuals. A common approach concerning the issue associated with the brittle characteristic of masonry is addition of steel reinforcement. However, this can be expensive, highly dependent on skillfulness of labor, and particularly dependent on the quality of available steel. A proposed solution presented in this investigation consists of introducing steel fibers to the lightweight aggregate concrete masonry mix. Previous investigations in the field of lightweight aggregate fiber-reinforced concrete have shown an increase in flexural strength, toughness, and ductility. The outcome of this research project provides invaluable data for the production of a ductile masonry unit capable of withstanding seismic loads for prolonged periods.

  7. High-Temperature Performance and Multiscale Damage Mechanisms of Hollow Cellulose Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spalling resistance properties and their damage mechanisms under high temperatures are studied in hollow cellulose fiber-reinforced concrete (CFRC used in tunnel structures. Measurements of mass loss, relative dynamic elastic modulus, compressive strength, and splitting tensile strength of CFRC held under high temperatures (300, 600, 800, and 1050°C for periods of 2.5, 4, and 5.5 h were carried out. The damage mechanism was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction phase analysis. The results demonstrate that cellulose fiber can reduce the performance loss of concrete at high temperatures; the effect of holding time on the performance is more noticeable below 600°C. After exposure to high temperatures, the performance of ordinary concrete deteriorates faster and spalls at 700–800°C; in contrast, cellulose fiber melts at a higher temperature, leaving a series of channels in the matrix that facilitate the release of the steam pressure inside the CFRC. Hollow cellulose fibers can thereby slow the damage caused by internal stress and improve the spalling resistance of concrete under high temperatures.

  8. A biologically inspired artificial muscle based on fiber-reinforced and electropneumatic dielectric elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Chi; Luo, Meng; Chen, Xi; Li, Dichen; Chen, Hualing

    2017-08-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have great potential for use as artificial muscles because of the following characteristics: electrical activity, fast and large deformation under stimuli, and softness as natural muscles. Inspired by the traditional McKibben actuators, in this study, we developed a cylindrical soft fiber-reinforced and electropneumatic DE artificial muscle (DEAM) by mimicking the spindle shape of natural muscles. Based on continuum mechanics and variation principle, the inhomogeneous actuation of DEAMs was theoretically modeled and calculated. Prototypes of DEAMs were prepared to validate the design concept and theoretical model. The theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental results; they successfully predicted the evolutions of the contours of DEAMs with voltage. A pneumatically supported high prestretch in the hoop direction was achieved by our DEAM prototype without buckling the soft fibers sandwiched by the DE films. Besides, a continuously tunable prestretch in the actuation direction was achieved by varying the supporting pressure. Using the theoretical model, the failure modes, maximum actuations, and critical voltages were analyzed; they were highly dependent on the structural parameters, i.e., the cylinder aspect ratio, prestretch level, and supporting pressure. The effects of structural parameters and supporting pressure on the actuation performance were also investigated to optimize the DEAMs.

  9. Seismic Performance of High-Ductile Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Short Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingke Deng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study mainly aims to investigate the effectiveness of high-ductile fiber-reinforced concrete (HDC as a means to enhance the seismic performance of short columns. Six HDC short columns and one reinforced concrete (RC short column were designed and tested under lateral cyclic loading. The influence of the material type (concrete or HDC, axial load, stirrup ratio, and shear span ratio on crack patterns, hysteresis behavior, shear strength, deformation capacity, energy dissipation, and stiffness degradation was presented and discussed, respectively. The test results show that the RC short column failed in brittle shear with poor energy dissipation, while using HDC to replace concrete can effectively improve the seismic behavior of the short columns. Compared with the RC short column, the shear strength of HDC specimens was improved by 12.6–30.2%, and the drift ratio and the energy dissipation increases were 56.9–88.5% and 237.7–336.7%, respectively, at the ultimate displacement. Additionally, the prediction model of the shear strength for RC columns based on GB50010-2010 (Chinese code can be safely adopted to evaluate the shear strength of HDC short columns.

  10. A numerical study of the influence of microvoids in the transverse mechanical response of unidirectional composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial; González, Carlos; Llorca, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The effect of porosity on the transverse mechanical properties of unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites is studied by means of computational micromechanics. The composite behavior is simulated by the finite element analysis of a representative volume element of the composite microstructure...... in which the random distribution of fibers and the voids are explicitly included. Two types of voids - interfiber voids and matrix voids - were included in the microstructure and the actual damage mechanisms in the composite, namely matrix and interface failure, were accounted for. It was found...

  11. TiC growth in C fiber/Ti alloy composites during liquid infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, S. G.; Lin, R. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A cylindrical model is developed for predicting the reaction zone thickness of carbon fiber-reinforced Ti-matrix composites, and good agreement is obtained between its predicted values and experimental results. The reaction-rate constant for TiC formation is estimated to be 1.5 x 10 exp -9 sq cm/sec. The model is extended to evaluate the relationship between C-coating thicknesses on SiC fibers and processing times.

  12. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-30

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (00-MM-YYYY) I 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED...presence of pores and manufacturing defects in the intermediately-homogenized model of fiber-reinforced composites. 1S. SUBJECT TERMS Computational ...micromechanics; Cavitation induced cracking; Peridynamics; Porous media 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18. NUMBER OF ABSTRACT OF PAGES a

  13. THE EFFECTS OF PRE-AND POST-EXERCISE WHEY VS. CASEIN PROTEIN CONSUMPTION ON BODY COMPOSITION AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES IN COLLEGIATE FEMALE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    olin D. Wilborn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two of the most popular forms of protein on the market are whey and casein. Both proteins are derived from milk but each protein differs in absorption rate and bioavailability, thus it is possible that each type of protein may contribute differently to the adaptations elicited through resistance training. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ingestion of two types of protein in conjunction with a controlled resistance training program in collegiate female basketball players. Sixteen NCAA Division III female basketball players were matched according to body mass and randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to consume 24 g whey protein (WP (N = 8, 20.0 ± 1.9 years, 1.58 ± 0.27 m, 66. 0 ± 4.9 kg, 27.0 ± 4.9 %BF or 24 g casein protein (CP (N = 8, 21.0 ± 2.8 years, 1.53 ± 0.29 m, 68.0 ± 2.9 kg, 25.0 ± 5.7 %BF immediately pre- and post-exercise for eight weeks. Subjects participated in a supervised 4-day per week undulating periodized training program. At 0 and 8 weeks, subjects underwent DXA body composition analysis, and at 0 and 8 weeks underwent one repetition maximum (1RM strength, muscle endurance, vertical jump, 5-10-5 agility run, and broad jump testing sessions. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, and presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 60 days. No significant group x time interaction effects were observed among groups in changes in any variable (p > 0.05. A significant time effect was observed for body fat (WP: -2.0 ± 1.1 %BF; CP: -1.0 ± 1.6 %BF, p < 0.001, lean mass (WP: 1.5 ± 1.0 kg; CP: 1. 4 ± 1.0 kg, p < 0.001, fat mass (WP: -1.3 ± 1.2 kg; CP: -0.6 ± 1.4 kg, p < 0.001, leg press 1RM (WP: 88.7 ± 43.9 kg; CP: 90.0 ± 48.5 kg, p < 0.001, bench press 1RM (WP: 7.5 ± 4.6 kg; CP: 4.3 ± 4.5 kg, p = 0.01, vertical jump (WP: 4.1 ± 1.8 cm; CP: 3.5 ± 7.6 cm, p < 0.001, 5-10-5 (WP: -0.3 ± 0.2 sec; CP: -0.09 ± 0.42 sec, p < 0.001, and broad jump (WP: 10

  14. Effects of hydrophilic solvent and oxidation resistance post surface treatment on molecular structure and forward osmosis performance of polyamide thin-film composite (TFC) membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qibo; Xu, Yangyu [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen, Jianquan [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Haijun, E-mail: yanghj@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhou, Lu, E-mail: zhoulu@tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • NMP promotes swelling of polyamide, which enhances the TFC FO membrane water flux. • Electron-withdrawing carboxyl groups reduce the activity of polyamide molecules. • TMC and oxalic acid can improve the oxidation resistance properties of the FO membrane. • Oxalic acid and EDC improve the FO membrane separation performance significantly. - Abstract: In this article, novel hydrophilic solvents and antioxidants were used to post-treat aromatic polyamide thin-film composite (TFC) hollow fiber forward osmosis (FO) membranes. The effects of trimesoyl chloride (TMC) and oxalic acid on the structure of polyamide skin layer were investigated using ATR-FTIR and XPS analyses. Pure water flux and rejection of salts were detected using 2 M NaCl solution as draw solutions in FO processes. The results demonstrated that hydrophilic solvent N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) enhanced the water flux and kept a high salt retention of the TFC FO membrane. TMC and oxalic acid were both found to improve the oxidation resistance properties of the skin layer of TFC membrane because the electron-withdrawing carboxyl groups reduced the activity of polyamide molecular. The effects of the oxalic acid and carbodiimide on the molecular structures and the FO water flux of the polyamide TFC membranes were more marked than those of TMC. The novel TFC FO membrane treated by oxalic acid and 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) exhibited a high level of water flux (20.33 L m{sup −2} h{sup −1}), and the rates of salt rejection and salt reverse rejection were higher by 50% and 83%, respectively.

  15. Effects of pre-germinated fenugreek seeds inclusion in low-fiber diets on post-weaned rabbits' health status, growth performances, carcass characteristics, and meat chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouki, Sabah; Chalghoumi, Raja; Abdouli, Hedi

    2017-03-01

    Newly weaned rabbits frequently suffer from digestive disorders particularly when fed low-fiber diets. Fenugreek seeds are rich in dietary fiber and would be suited to moderate such disorders. This study investigated the effect of pre-germinated fenugreek seeds (PGFS) on rabbits' health, digestibility, growth performance, and carcass parameters. Fourteen weaned rabbits were fed one of the following diets: (1) low fiber as negative control (NC), (2) low fiber containing 5% PGFS (F5), (3) low fiber containing 10% PGFS (F10), and (4) adequate fiber as positive control (PC). Each rabbit was reared in an individual cage for 7 weeks. Morbidity and sanitary risk indexes were not different (P > 0.05) between the four diets. Only 20% of the rabbits had a detectable caecal Escherichia Coli (E. coli) count (<10 5  cfu/g), and all rabbits did not show Eimeria oocysts in their feces. Compared to NC, PC gave a lower (P < 0.05) weight gain and a higher (P < 0.05) feed conversion ratio (FCR). It was associated with a lighter (P < 0.05) chilled carcass weight, and its meat had slightly more moisture and ether extract with less protein. Inclusion of PGFS decreased (P < 0.05) feed intake at the 10% level and, consequently, tended to improve FCR, while no effect was detected on carcass characteristics and meat composition. This study suggested that (1) the low-fiber diet was adequate for both health and growth aspects of post-weaned rabbits, and (2) the inclusion of PGFS was without consequence on rabbits' health status and growth performance.

  16. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: an in vitro and finite element analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulemans, Filip; De Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Four retainer designs were tested: a proximal box, a step-box, a dual wing, and a step-box-wing. Of each design on 8 human mandibular molars, FRC-FDPs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin impregnated unidirectional glass fibers (Estenia C&B EG Fiber, Kuraray) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Estenia C&B, Kuraray). Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FDPs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test were used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FDPs (proximal box: 300 +/- 65 N; step-box: 309 +/- 37 N) compared to wing-retained FDPs (p optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FDPs.

  17. Integration of Fiber-Reinforced Polymers in a Life Cycle Assessment of Injection Molding Process Chains with Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Bey, Niki; Mischkot, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies applied to injection molding process chain have acquired an increasingly important role in the context of tool inserts production, especially by vat polymerization. Despite the decreased lifetime during their use in the injection molding process, the inserts come...... with improvements in terms of production time, costs, exibility, as well as potentially improved environmental performance as compared to conventional materials in a life cycle perspective.This contribution supports the development of additively manufactured injection molding inserts with the use of fiber......-reinforced vat polymerization technology. The life cycle assessment of the prototyping process chain for rapid prototyping with high exibility provides a base for industrial applications in injection molding....

  18. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation of irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  19. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1997-05-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation after irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  20. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Seal Glass - BN Nanotubes Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.; Hurst, Janet B.; Garg, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell seal glass G18 composites reinforced with approx.4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated via hot pressing. Room temperature strength and fracture toughness of the composite were determined by four-point flexure and single edge V-notch beam methods, respectively. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90% and 35%, respectively, than those of the glass G18. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces using SEM and TEM showed pullout of the BN nanotubes, similar in feature to fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with weak interfaces. Other mechanical and physical properties of the composite will also be presented.

  1. Impact of lenalidomide-based induction therapy on the mobilization of CD34+ cells, blood graft cellular composition, and post-transplant recovery in myeloma patients: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Anu; Valtola, Jaakko; Silvennoinen, Raija; Ropponen, Antti; Siitonen, Timo; Putkonen, Mervi; Sankelo, Marja; Pelkonen, Jukka; Mäntymaa, Pentti; Varmavuo, Ville; Jantunen, Esa

    2017-10-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug that is also currently used in transplant-eligible patients with multiple myeloma. Previous studies have suggested a negative impact of lenalidomide on the mobilization of CD34 + cells. No data are available regarding the more detailed composition of blood grafts after lenalidomide. In a multicenter, prospective study, we analyzed the mobilization of CD34 + cells, graft cellular composition, and post-transplant hematologic recovery in 26 patients with multiple myeloma after lenalidomide-based induction and in 34 lenalidomide-naive controls with multiple myeloma. All patients were mobilized with low-dose cyclophosphamide plus granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor. The cellular composition of the grafts was analyzed from thawed, cryopreserved samples with flow cytometry. Graft function was evaluated by engraftment data and by complete blood counts until 12 months after the graft infusion. Patients in the lenalidomide arm had lower median peak CD34 + counts and approximately 40% lower CD34 + cell yields from the first apheresis session, but these differences were not significant. The median total number of CD34 + cells collected was comparable (6.4 vs. 7.5 × 10 6 /kg). The number of apheresis sessions was higher in the lenalidomide group (2 vs. 1; p = 0.039). The blood graft composition was comparable between the groups. Hematologic recovery within 12 months post-transplant did not differ between the groups. Lenalidomide-based induction seems to have an impact on the number of aphereses performed, but not on the total yields of the CD34 + cells in the graft. Neither cellular composition of the grafts nor post-transplant recovery was affected by the limited pre-transplant exposure to lenalidomide. © 2017 AABB.

  2. Optics of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics – A theoretical and an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmann, Ansgar; ElMaklizi, Ahmed; Foschum, Florian; Voit, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Simon, Emanuel; Reitzle, Dominik; Kienle, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    Laser processing of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) as well as their design optimization are strongly emerging fields. As the optics of CFRP is still rather unknown, the optical behavior of CFRP was investigated in this study. Different simulation models were implemented to simulate reflectance from CFRP samples as well as distribution and absorption of light within these samples. The methods include an analytical solution of Maxwell's equations and Monte Carlo solutions of the radiative transfer theory. We show that strong inaccurracies occur, if light propagation in CFRP is modeled using the radiative transfer theory. Therefore, the solution of Maxwell's equations is the method of choice for calculation of light propagation in CFRP. Furthermore, measurements of the reflectance of light from CFRP were performed and compared to the simulations for investigation of the optical behavior. Information on the refractive index of carbon fibers was obtained via goniometric measurements. The amount of reflected light was determined as 6.05±0.38% for light polarized parallel to the fiber direction, while it was 3.65±0.41% for light polarized perpendicular to the fiber direction in case of laser-processed CFRP. - Highlights: • The light scattering of CFRP was studied using Maxwell's equations and radiative transfer theory. • The simulations were validated by experiments. • Strong inaccuracies occur if light propagation in CFRP structures is modeled with the RTT. • The Bouguer–Lambert–Beer model with μ a =4πf V Im(n cyl )/λ cannot be used in CFRP samples. • Reflectance values were determined and information on the refractive index was inferred.

  3. Effect of thermal cycling on flexural properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2009-07-01

    To determine flexural strength and modulus after water storage and thermal cycling of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced (CGFR) polymers based on poly(methyl methacrylate) and a copolymer matrix, and to examine adhesion between fiber and matrix by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solvent cleaned carbon-graphite (CG) braided tubes of fibers were treated with a sizing resin. The resin mixture of the matrix was reinforced with 24, 36, 47 and 58wt% (20, 29, 38 and 47vol.%) CG-fibers. After heat polymerization the specimens were kept for 90 days in water and thereafter hydrothermally cycled (12,000 cycles, 5/55 degrees C). Mechanical properties were evaluated by three-point bend testing. After thermal cycling, the adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated by SEM. Hydrothermal cycling did not decrease flexural strength of the CGFR polymers with 24 and 36wt% fiber loadings; flexural strength values after thermocycling were 244.8 (+/-32.33)MPa for 24wt% and 441.3 (+/-68.96)MPa for 36wt%. Flexural strength values after thermal cycling were not further increased after increasing the fiber load to 47 (459.2 (+/-45.32)MPa) and 58wt% (310.4 (+/-52.79)MPa). SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix for all fiber loadings examined. The combination of the fiber treatment and resin matrix described resulted in good adhesion between CG-fibers and matrix. The flexural values for fiber loadings up to 36wt% appear promising for prosthodontic applications such as implant-retained prostheses.

  4. A systematic review of dowel (post) and core materials and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosopoulou, Joanna N; Chochlidakis, Konstantinos M

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine which dowel (post) and core system is the most successful when used in vivo to restore endodontically treated teeth. A MEDLINE, a Cochrane, and an EMBASE search (three specified searches) were conducted to identify randomized (RCT) and nonrandomized controlled clinical trials (CCT), cohort (CS), and case control studies (CCS) until January 2008, conducted on humans, and published in English, German, and French, relating to dowel and core systems for restoring endodontically treated teeth. Also, a hand search was conducted, along with contact with the authors when needed. The MEDLINE, Cochrane, and EMBASE searches identified 997, 141, and 25 published articles, respectively. Ten articles from the MEDLINE and seven articles from the Cochrane search (that were also identified in the MEDLINE search) met the inclusion and validity assessment criteria. Six out of the ten studies were RCTs, two were CCTs, and two CSs. The RCT studies suggest that carbon fiber in resin matrix dowels are significantly better than precious alloy cast dowels (number needed to treat, NNT = 8.30). Tapered gold alloy cast dowels are better than ParaPost gold alloy cast dowels (NNT = 13.15). ParaPost prefabricated dowels are slightly better than ParaPost cast dowels (NNT = 175.4). Glass fiber dowels are significantly better than metal screw dowels (NNT = 5.46), but worse than titanium (NNT =-21.73) (moderately). Carbon fiber dowels are worse than gold alloy cast dowels (significantly) (NNT =-5.81) and than amalgam dowels (NNT =-125) (slightly). The CCT studies suggest that metal dowels are better (NNT = 21.73) but also worse than cast dowels (NNT =-33.33) depending on the remaining amount of coronal hard tissue. Quartz fiber dowels show success rates similar to and worse than glass fiber-reinforced dowels (NNT =-37.03). The results from the CS studies suggest that carbon fiber in resin matrix dowels are better (moderately) than carbon fiber

  5. Early and long term body composition evolution post kidney transplantation influenced by the pre transplant nutritional characteristics: results of the CORPOS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Moreau

    2012-06-01

    We confirm that successful KT is associated with BC modifications; which can be detected very early post KT. These very early changes are strongly associated with energy, protein intake and physical activity level pre KT. Management of post KT weight gain should be anticipated with a special care on nutritional intake and physical activity in patients waiting kidney transplantation.

  6. Engineering on the straight and narrow: the mechanics of nanofibrous assemblies for fiber-reinforced tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, Robert L; Baker, Brendon M; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Burdick, Jason A; Li, Wan-Ju; Tuan, Rocky S; Elliott, Dawn M

    2009-06-01

    Tissue engineering of fibrous tissues of the musculoskeletal system represents a considerable challenge because of the complex architecture and mechanical properties of the component structures. Natural healing processes in these dense tissues are limited as a result of the mechanically challenging environment of the damaged tissue and the hypocellularity and avascular nature of the extracellular matrix. When healing does occur, the ordered structure of the native tissue is replaced with a disorganized fibrous scar with inferior mechanical properties, engendering sites that are prone to re-injury. To address the engineering of such tissues, we and others have adopted a structurally motivated approach based on organized nanofibrous assemblies. These scaffolds are composed of ultrafine polymeric fibers that can be fabricated in such a way to recreate the structural anisotropy typical of fiber-reinforced tissues. This straight-and-narrow topography not only provides tailored mechanical properties, but also serves as a 3D biomimetic micropattern for directed tissue formation. This review describes the underlying technology of nanofiber production and focuses specifically on the mechanical evaluation and theoretical modeling of these structures as it relates to native tissue structure and function. Applying the same mechanical framework for understanding native and engineered fiber-reinforced tissues provides a functional method for evaluating the utility and maturation of these unique engineered constructs. We further describe several case examples where these principles have been put to test, and discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in forwarding this technology toward clinical implementation.

  7. Engineering on the Straight and Narrow: The Mechanics of Nanofibrous Assemblies for Fiber-Reinforced Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Li, Wan-Ju; Tuan, Rocky S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering of fibrous tissues of the musculoskeletal system represents a considerable challenge because of the complex architecture and mechanical properties of the component structures. Natural healing processes in these dense tissues are limited as a result of the mechanically challenging environment of the damaged tissue and the hypocellularity and avascular nature of the extracellular matrix. When healing does occur, the ordered structure of the native tissue is replaced with a disorganized fibrous scar with inferior mechanical properties, engendering sites that are prone to re-injury. To address the engineering of such tissues, we and others have adopted a structurally motivated approach based on organized nanofibrous assemblies. These scaffolds are composed of ultrafine polymeric fibers that can be fabricated in such a way to recreate the structural anisotropy typical of fiber-reinforced tissues. This straight-and-narrow topography not only provides tailored mechanical properties, but also serves as a 3D biomimetic micropattern for directed tissue formation. This review describes the underlying technology of nanofiber production and focuses specifically on the mechanical evaluation and theoretical modeling of these structures as it relates to native tissue structure and function. Applying the same mechanical framework for understanding native and engineered fiber-reinforced tissues provides a functional method for evaluating the utility and maturation of these unique engineered constructs. We further describe several case examples where these principles have been put to test, and discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in forwarding this technology toward clinical implementation. PMID:19207040

  8. A stochastic multiscale method for the elastodynamic wave equation arising from fiber composites

    KAUST Repository

    Babuška, Ivo

    2014-03-21

    We present a stochastic multilevel global–local algorithm for computing elastic waves propagating in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Here, the materials properties and the size and location of fibers may be random. The method aims at approximating statistical moments of some given quantities of interest, such as stresses, in regions of relatively small size, e.g. hot spots or zones that are deemed vulnerable to failure. For a fiber-reinforced cross-plied laminate, we introduce three problems (macro, meso, micro) corresponding to the three natural scales, namely the sizes of laminate, ply, and fiber. The algorithm uses the homogenized global solution to construct a good local approximation that captures the microscale features of the real solution. We perform numerical experiments to show the applicability and efficiency of the method.

  9. A Stochastic Multiscale Method for the Elastic Wave Equations Arising from Fiber Composites

    KAUST Repository

    Babuska, Ivo

    2016-01-06

    We present a stochastic multilevel global-local algorithm [1] for computing elastic waves propagating in fiber-reinforced polymer composites, where the material properties and the size and distribution of fibers in the polymer matrix may be random. The method aims at approximating statistical moments of some given quantities of interest, such as stresses, in regions of relatively small size, e.g. hot spots or zones that are deemed vulnerable to failure. For a fiber-reinforced cross-plied laminate, we introduce three problems: 1) macro; 2) meso; and 3) micro problems, corresponding to the three natural length scales: 1) the sizes of plate; 2) the tickles of plies; and 3) and the diameter of fibers. The algorithm uses a homogenized global solution to construct a local approximation that captures the microscale features of the problem. We perform numerical experiments to show the applicability and efficiency of the method.

  10. An applied investigation of kenaf-based fiber/polymer composites as potential lightweight materials for automotive components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yicheng

    Natural fibers have the potential to replace glass fibers in fiber-reinforced composite applications. However, the natural fibers' intrinsic properties cause these issues: (1) the mechanical property variation; (2) moisture uptake by natural fibers and their composites; (3) lack of sound, cost-effective, environment-friendly fiber-matrix compounding processes; (4) incompatibility between natural fibers and polymer matrices; and (5) low heat-resistance of natural fibers and their composites. This dissertation systematically studied the use of kenaf bast fiber bundles, obtained via a mechanical retting method, as a light-weight reinforcement material for fiber-reinforced thermoset polymer composites for automotive applications. Kenaf bast fiber bundle tensile properties were tested, and the effects of locations in the kenaf plant, loading rates, retting methods, and high temperature treatments and their durations on kenaf bast fiber bundle tensile properties were evaluated. A process has been developed for fabricating high fiber loading kenaf bast fiber bundle-reinforced unsaturated polyester composites. The generated composites possessed high elastic moduli and their tensile strengths were close to specification requirements for glass fiber-reinforced sheet molding compounds. Effects of fiber loadings and lengths on resultant composite's tensile properties were evaluated. Fiber loadings were very important for composite tensile modulus. Both fiber loadings and fiber lengths were important for composite tensile strengths. The distributions of composite tensile, flexural and impact strengths were analyzed. The 2-parameter Weibull model was found to be the most appropriate for describing the composite strength distributions and provided the most conservative design values. Kenaf-reinforced unsaturated polyester composites were also proved to be more cost-effective than glass fiber-reinforced SMCs at high fiber loadings. Kenaf bast fiber bundle-reinforced composite

  11. Experimental design and analysis for irradiation of SiC/SiC composite tubes under a prototypic high heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McDuffee, Joel L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deck, Christian P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-04

    The purpose of this work is to design an irradiation vehicle for testing silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite cladding materials under conditions representative of a light water reactor in order to validate thermo-mechanical models of stress states in these materials due to irradiation swelling and differential thermal expansion. The design allows for a constant tube outer surface temperature in the range of 300–350 °C under a representative high heat flux (~0.66 MW/m2) during one cycle of irradiation in an un-instrumented “rabbit” capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. An engineered aluminum foil was developed to absorb the expansion of the cladding tubes, due to irradiation swelling, without changing the thermal resistance of the gap between the cladding and irradiation capsule. Finite-element analyses of the capsule were performed, and the models used to calculate thermal contact resistance were validated by out-of-pile testing and post-irradiation examination of the foils and passive SiC thermometry. Six irradiated cladding tubes (both monoliths and composites) were irradiated and subsequently disassembled in a hot cell. The calculated temperatures of passive SiC thermometry inside the capsules showed good agreement with temperatures measured post-irradiation, with two calculated temperatures falling within 10 °C of experimental measurements. Furthermore, the success of this design could lead to new opportunities for irradiation applications with materials that suffer from irradiation swelling, creep, or other dimensional changes that can affect the specimen temperature during irradiation.

  12. Experimental design and analysis for irradiation of SiC/SiC composite tubes under a prototypic high heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Christian M.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; McDuffee, Joel L.; Deck, Christian P.; Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to design an irradiation vehicle for testing silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite cladding materials under conditions representative of a light water reactor in order to validate thermo-mechanical models of stress states in these materials due to irradiation swelling and differential thermal expansion. The design allows for a constant tube outer surface temperature in the range of 300-350 °C under a representative high heat flux (∼0.66 MW/m2) during one cycle of irradiation in an un-instrumented ;rabbit; capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. An engineered aluminum foil was developed to absorb the expansion of the cladding tubes, due to irradiation swelling, without changing the thermal resistance of the gap between the cladding and irradiation capsule. Finite-element analyses of the capsule were performed, and the models used to calculate thermal contact resistance were validated by out-of-pile testing and post-irradiation examination of the foils and passive SiC thermometry. Six irradiated cladding tubes (both monoliths and composites) were irradiated and subsequently disassembled in a hot cell. The calculated temperatures of passive SiC thermometry inside the capsules showed good agreement with temperatures measured post-irradiation, with two calculated temperatures falling within 10 °C of experimental measurements. The success of this design could lead to new opportunities for irradiation applications with materials that suffer from irradiation swelling, creep, or other dimensional changes that can affect the specimen temperature during irradiation.

  13. Multifunctional Composites for Future Energy Storage in Aerospace Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Julian Adam

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctionalization of fiber-reinforced composites, especially by adding energy storage capabilities, is a promising approach to realize lightweight structural energy storages for future transport vehicles. Compared to conventional energy storage systems, energy density can be increased by reducing parasitic masses of non-energy-storing components and by benefitting from the composite meso- and microarchitectures. In this paper, the most relevant existing approaches towards multifunctional energy storages are reviewed and subdivided into five groups by distinguishing their degree of integration and their scale of multifunctionalization. By introducing a modified range equation for battery-powered electric aircrafts, possible range extensions enabled by multifunctionalization are estimated. Furthermore, general and aerospace specific potentials of multifunctional energy storages are discussed. Representing an intermediate degree of structural integration, experimental results for a multifunctional energy-storing glass fiber-reinforced composite based on the ceramic electrolyte Li1.4Al0.4Ti1.6(PO43 are presented. Cyclic voltammetry tests are used to characterize the double-layer behavior combined with galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements for capacitance calculation. The capacitance is observed to be unchanged after 1500 charge–discharge cycles revealing a promising potential for future applications. Furthermore, the mechanical properties are assessed by means of four-point bending and tensile tests. Additionally, the influence of mechanical loads on the electrical properties is also investigated, demonstrating the storage stability of the composites.

  14. Influence of Cutting Temperature on the Tensile Strength of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Delahaigue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP have seen a significant increase in use over the years thanks to their specific properties. Despite continuous improvements in the production methods of laminated parts, a trimming operation is still necessary to achieve the functional dimensions required by engineering specifications. Laminates made of carbon fibers are very abrasive and cause rapid tool wear, and require high cutting temperatures. This creates damage to the epoxy matrix, whose glass-transition temperature is often recognized to be about 180 °C. This study aims to highlight the influence of the cutting temperature generated by tool wear on the surface finish and mechanical properties obtained from tensile tests. Trimming operations were performed on a quasi-isotropic 24-ply carbon/epoxy laminate, of 3.6 mm thickness, with a 6 flutes diamond-coated (CVD cutter. The test specimens of 6 mm and 12 mm wide were obtained by trimming. The reduced width of the coupons allowed amplification of the effect of defects on the measured properties by increasing the proportion of coupon cross-section occupied by the defects. A new tool and a tool in an advanced state of wear were used to generate different cutting temperatures. Results showed a cutting temperature of 300 °C for the new tool and 475 °C for the worn tool. The analysis revealed that the specimens machined with the new tool have no thermal damage and the cut is clean. The plies oriented at −45° presented the worst surface finish according to the failure mode of the fiber. For the worn tool, the surface was degraded and the matrix was carbonized. After cutting, observations showed a degraded resin spread on the machined surface, which reduced the surface roughness and hid the cutting defects. In support of these observations, the tensile tests showed no variation of the mechanical properties for the 12 mm-wide specimens, but did show a 10% loss in mechanical properties for the 6 mm

  15. Analysis of Damage in a Ceramic Matrix Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Talreja, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of damage and the associated mechanical response are stud ied for a unidirectionally fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite subjected to uniaxial tensile loading parallel to fibers. A multi-stage development of damage is identified, and for each stage the governing mechanisms...... are discussed. For distributed matrix micro cracking a continuum damage model is used as the basis for describing the associated stress-strain behavior. A simplified analysis of frictional sliding at the fiber/matrix inter face is made to elucidate its effect on the stress-strain response....

  16. Net-Shape Tailored Fabrics For Complex Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed novel looms used to make fabric preforms for complex structural elements, both stiffening elements and skin, from continuous fiber-reinforced composite material. Components of looms include custom reed and differential fabric takeup system. Structural parts made best explained by reference to curved "I" cross-section frame. Technology not limited to these fiber orientations or geometry; fiber angles, frame radius of curvature, frame height, and flange width changed along length of structure. Weaving technology equally applicable to structural skins, such as wing of fuselage skins.

  17. Thermal stresses in composite tubes using complementary virtual work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, M. W.; Cooper, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses the computation of thermally induced stresses in layered, fiber-reinforced composite tubes subjected to a circumferential gradient. The paper focuses on using the principle of complementary virtual work, in conjunction with a Ritz approximation to the stress field, to study the influence on the predicted stresses of including temperature-dependent material properties. Results indicate that the computed values of stress are sensitive to the temperature dependence of the matrix-direction compliance and matrix-direction thermal expansion in the plane of the lamina. There is less sensitivity to the temperature dependence of the other material properties.

  18. Quality Evaluation By Acousto-Ultrasonic Testing Of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, Alex

    1989-01-01

    Promising nondestructive-testing method based on ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. Report reviews acousto-ultrasonic technology for nondestructive testing. Discusses principles, suggests advanced signal-analysis schemes for development, and presents potential applications. Acousto-ultrasonics applied principally to assess defects in laminated and filament-wound fiber-reinforced composite materials. Technique used to determine variations in such properties as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and reductions in strength and toughness caused by defects. Also used to evaluate states of cure, porosities, orientation of fibers, volume fractions of fibers, bonding between fibers and matrices, and qualities of interlaminar bonds.

  19. FIBER ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDED LONG CARBON FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Costa, Franco; Jin, Xiaoshi; Tucker III, Charles L.; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2015-03-23

    A set of edge-gated and center-gated plaques were injection molded with long carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites, and the fiber orientation was measured at different locations of the plaques. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight (ASMI) software was used to simulate the injection molding of these plaques and to predict the fiber orientation, using the anisotropic rotary diffusion and the reduced strain closure models. The phenomenological parameters of the orientation models were carefully identified by fitting to the measured orientation data. The fiber orientation predictions show very good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-02-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.