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  1. Protein diffusion in mammalian cell cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Thomas; Ihalainen, Teemu O; Hyväluoma, Jari; Dross, Nicolas; Willman, Sami F; Langowski, Jörg; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new method for mesoscopic modeling of protein diffusion in an entire cell. This method is based on the construction of a three-dimensional digital model cell from confocal microscopy data. The model cell is segmented into the cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, and nuclear envelope, in which environment protein motion is modeled by fully numerical mesoscopic methods. Finer cellular structures that cannot be resolved with the imaging technique, which significantly affect protein motion, are accounted for in this method by assigning an effective, position-dependent porosity to the cell. This porosity can also be determined by confocal microscopy using the equilibrium distribution of a non-binding fluorescent protein. Distinction can now be made within this method between diffusion in the liquid phase of the cell (cytosol/nucleosol) and the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. Here we applied the method to analyze fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP) experiments in which the diffusion coefficient of a freely-diffusing model protein was determined for two different cell lines, and to explain the clear difference typically observed between conventional FRAP results and those of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A large difference was found in the FRAP experiments between diffusion in the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm and in the cytosol/nucleosol, for all of which the diffusion coefficients were determined. The cytosol results were found to be in very good agreement with those by FCS.

  2. Protein diffusion in mammalian cell cytoplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kühn

    Full Text Available We introduce a new method for mesoscopic modeling of protein diffusion in an entire cell. This method is based on the construction of a three-dimensional digital model cell from confocal microscopy data. The model cell is segmented into the cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, and nuclear envelope, in which environment protein motion is modeled by fully numerical mesoscopic methods. Finer cellular structures that cannot be resolved with the imaging technique, which significantly affect protein motion, are accounted for in this method by assigning an effective, position-dependent porosity to the cell. This porosity can also be determined by confocal microscopy using the equilibrium distribution of a non-binding fluorescent protein. Distinction can now be made within this method between diffusion in the liquid phase of the cell (cytosol/nucleosol and the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. Here we applied the method to analyze fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP experiments in which the diffusion coefficient of a freely-diffusing model protein was determined for two different cell lines, and to explain the clear difference typically observed between conventional FRAP results and those of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS. A large difference was found in the FRAP experiments between diffusion in the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm and in the cytosol/nucleosol, for all of which the diffusion coefficients were determined. The cytosol results were found to be in very good agreement with those by FCS.

  3. Nuclear reprogramming by interphase cytoplasm of 2-cell mouse embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Enugu; Wu, Guangming; Ma, Hong; Li, Ying; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Wolf, Don P.; Schöler, Hans; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2014-01-01

    Summary Successful mammalian cloning employing somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) into unfertilized, metaphase II-arrested (MII) oocytes attests to the cytoplasmic presence of reprogramming factors capable of inducing pluripotency in somatic cell nuclei1-3. However, these poorly defined maternal factors presumably decline sharply after fertilization since cytoplasm of pronuclear stage zygotes is reportedly inactive4, 5. Recent evidence suggests that zygotic cytoplasm, if maintained at metaphase (M-phase) can also support derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) following SCNT6-8, albeit at low efficiency. This led to the conclusion that critical oocyte reprogramming factors present in M-phase but not in interphase cytoplasm are “trapped” inside the nucleus during interphase and effectively removed during enucleation9. Here, we investigated the presence of reprogramming activity in the interphase cytoplasm of 2-cell mouse embryos (I2C). First, the presence of candidate reprogramming factors was documented in both intact and enucleated M-phase and interphase zygotes and 2-cell embryos. Consequently, enucleation did not provide a likely explanation for the inability of interphase cytoplasm to induce reprogramming. Then, when we carefully synchronized the cell cycle stage between the transplanted nucleus (ESC, fetal fibroblast or terminally differentiated cumulus cell) and the recipient I2C cytoplasm, the reconstructed SCNT embryos developed into blastocysts and ESCs capable of contributing to traditional germline and tetraploid chimeras. In addition, direct transfer of cloned embryos, reconstructed with ESC nuclei, into recipients resulted in live offspring. Thus, the cytoplasm of I2C supports efficient reprogramming with cell cycle synchronization between the donor nucleus and recipient cytoplasm as the most critical parameter determining success. The ability to utilize interphase cytoplasm in SCNT could impact efforts to generate autologous human ESCs for

  4. Regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by the cadherin cytoplasmic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, C

    1992-04-17

    Differential adhesion between embryonic cells has been proposed to be mediated by a family of closely related glycoproteins called the cadherins. The cadherins mediate adhesion in part through an interaction between the cadherin cytoplasmic domain and intracellular proteins, called the catenins. To determine whether these interactions could regulate cadherin function in embryos, a form of N-cadherin was generated that lacks an extracellular domain. Expression of this mutant in Xenopus embryos causes a dramatic inhibition of cell adhesion. Analysis of the mutant phenotype shows that at least two regions of the N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain can inhibit adhesion and that the mutant cadherin can inhibit catenin binding to E-cadherin. These results suggest that cadherin-mediated adhesion can be regulated by cytoplasmic interactions and that this regulation may contribute to morphogenesis when emerging tissues coexpress several cadherin types.

  5. Mechanodelivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Nyssa T.; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Yang, Haw

    2014-04-01

    Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials.Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials

  6. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells: the role of wall slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, K; Marenduzzo, D; Cates, M E

    2012-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study, via lattice Boltzmann simulations, of a microscopic model for cytoplasmic streaming in algal cells such as those of Chara corallina. We modelled myosin motors tracking along actin lanes as spheres undergoing directed motion along fixed lines. The sphere dimension takes into account the fact that motors drag vesicles or other organelles, and, unlike previous work, we model the boundary close to which the motors move as walls with a finite slip layer. By using realistic parameter values for actin lane and myosin density, as well as for endoplasmic and vacuole viscosity and the slip layer close to the wall, we find that this simplified view, which does not rely on any coupling between motors, cytoplasm and vacuole other than that provided by viscous Stokes flow, is enough to account for the observed magnitude of streaming velocities in intracellular fluid in living plant cells.

  7. Mitochondrial Extrusion through the cytoplasmic vacuoles during cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Akihito; Kurihara, Hidetake; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Nakano, Hiroyasu

    2008-08-29

    Under various conditions, noxious stimuli damage mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial fragmentation; however, the mechanisms by which fragmented mitochondria are eliminated from the cells remain largely unknown. Here we show that cytoplasmic vacuoles originating from the plasma membrane engulfed fragmented mitochondria and subsequently extruded them into the extracellular spaces in undergoing acute tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced cell death in a caspase-dependent fashion. Notably, upon fusion of the membrane encapsulating mitochondria to the plasma membrane, naked mitochondria were released into the extracellular spaces in an exocytotic manner. Mitochondrial extrusion was specific to tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced cell death, because a genotoxic stress-inducing agent such as cisplatin did not elicit mitochondrial extrusion. Moreover, intact actin and tubulin cytoskeletons were required for mitochondrial extrusion as well as membrane blebbing. Furthermore, fragmented mitochondria were engulfed by cytoplasmic vacuoles and extruded from hepatocytes of mice injected with anti-Fas antibody, suggesting that mitochondrial extrusion can be observed in vivo under pathological conditions. Mitochondria are eliminated during erythrocyte maturation under physiological conditions, and anti-mitochondrial antibody is detected in some autoimmune diseases. Thus, elucidating the mechanism underlying mitochondrial extrusion will open a novel avenue leading to better understanding of various diseases caused by mitochondrial malfunction as well as mitochondrial biology.

  8. Molecular morphology and toxicity of cytoplasmic prion protein aggregates in neuronal and non‐neuronal cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grenier, Catherine; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Volkov, Leonid; Roucou, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    .... The mechanism of cytoplasmic PrP neurotoxicity is not known. In this report, we determined the molecular morphology of cytoplasmic PrP aggregates by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, in neuronal and non‐neuronal cells...

  9. Primary observations of the existence of Fas-like cytoplasmic death factor in plant cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The main activity of Fas is to trigger cytoplasm death program in animal cells. In G2 pea, vacuole plays a pivotal role in inducing cell death in the cytoplasm of longday (LD) grown apical meristem cells. Expression patterns of the Fas in G2 pea cells revealed that the Fas is mainly localized in the vacuole of cells undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). The Fas expression is corresponding to the initiation of menadione-induced PCD in tobacco protoplasts.The results suggest the existence of the Fas-like mediated cytoplasmic death pathway in plant cells.``

  10. Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Vacuolar Volumes by Plant Cells in Suspension Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Poole, Ronald J

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative microscopical measurements have been made of the proportion of cell volume occupied by cytoplasm in a cell suspension culture derived from cotyledons of bush bean (cv. Contender). On a 7-day culture cycle, the content of cytoplasm varies from 25% at the time of transfer to 45......% at the start of the phase of rapid cell division. If the culture is continued beyond 7 days, the vacuole volume reaches 90% of cell volume by day 12.Attempts to measure relative cytoplasmic volumes by compartmental analysis of nonelectrolyte efflux were unsuccessful. The proportion of cell volume occupied...... by cytoplasm is roughly correlated with protein content, but shows no correlation with cell size or with intracellular concentrations of K or Na. The most striking observation is that the growth of cytoplasmic volume for the culture as a whole appears to be constant throughout the culture cycle, despite...

  11. Sequential closure of the cytoplasm and then the periplasm during cell division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Karl; Söderström, Bill; Widengren, Jerker; von Heijne, Gunnar; Daley, Daniel O

    2012-02-01

    To visualize the latter stages of cell division in live Escherichia coli, we have carried out fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on 121 cells expressing cytoplasmic green fluorescent protein and periplasmic mCherry. Our data show conclusively that the cytoplasm is sealed prior to the periplasm during the division event.

  12. Nuclear reprogramming by interphase cytoplasm of two-cell mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunju; Wu, Guangming; Ma, Hong; Li, Ying; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Wolf, Don P; Schöler, Hans R; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2014-05-01

    Successful mammalian cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) into unfertilized, metaphase II (MII)-arrested oocytes attests to the cytoplasmic presence of reprogramming factors capable of inducing totipotency in somatic cell nuclei. However, these poorly defined maternal factors presumably decline sharply after fertilization, as the cytoplasm of pronuclear-stage zygotes is reportedly inactive. Recent evidence suggests that zygotic cytoplasm, if maintained at metaphase, can also support derivation of embryonic stem (ES) cells after SCNT, albeit at low efficiency. This led to the conclusion that critical oocyte reprogramming factors present in the metaphase but not in the interphase cytoplasm are 'trapped' inside the nucleus during interphase and effectively removed during enucleation. Here we investigated the presence of reprogramming activity in the cytoplasm of interphase two-cell mouse embryos (I2C). First, the presence of candidate reprogramming factors was documented in both intact and enucleated metaphase and interphase zygotes and two-cell embryos. Consequently, enucleation did not provide a likely explanation for the inability of interphase cytoplasm to induce reprogramming. Second, when we carefully synchronized the cell cycle stage between the transplanted nucleus (ES cell, fetal fibroblast or terminally differentiated cumulus cell) and the recipient I2C cytoplasm, the reconstructed SCNT embryos developed into blastocysts and ES cells capable of contributing to traditional germline and tetraploid chimaeras. Last, direct transfer of cloned embryos, reconstructed with ES cell nuclei, into recipients resulted in live offspring. Thus, the cytoplasm of I2C supports efficient reprogramming, with cell cycle synchronization between the donor nucleus and recipient cytoplasm as the most critical parameter determining success. The ability to use interphase cytoplasm in SCNT could aid efforts to generate autologous human ES cells for regenerative

  13. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 2 Promotes Cell Death in Cells with Cytoplasmic TDP-43 Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Eiichiro; Nonaka, Takashi; Moriya, Yusuke; Fujii, Natsuko; Okada, Yoshinori; Tsukamoto, Hideo; Itoh, Johbu; Okada, Chisa; Satoh, Tadayuki; Arai, Tetsuaki; Hasegawa, Masato; Takizawa, Shunya

    2016-10-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been identified as a major component of ubiquitin-positive inclusions in the brains and spinal cords of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U) or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The phosphorylated C-terminal fragment of TDP-43 forms aggregates in the neuronal cytoplasm, possibly resulting in neuronal cell death in patients with FTLD-U or ALS. The inositol pyrophosphate known as diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (InsP7) contains highly energetic pyrophosphate bonds. We previously reported that inositol hexakisphosphate kinase type 2 (InsP6K2), which converts inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) to InsP7, mediates cell death in mammalian cells. Moreover, InsP6K2 is translocated from the nucleus to the cytosol during apoptosis. In this study, we verified that phosphorylated TDP-43 co-localized and co-bound with InsP6K2 in the cytoplasm of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord. Furthermore, we verified that cell death was augmented in the presence of cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregations and activated InsP6K2. However, cells with only cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregation survived because Akt activity increased. In the presence of both TDP-43 aggregation and activated InsP6K2 in the cytoplasm of cells, the expression levels of HSP90 and casein kinase 2 decreased, as the activity of Akt decreased. These conditions may promote cell death. Thus, InsP6K2 could cause neuronal cell death in patients with FTLD-U or ALS. Moreover, InsP6K2 plays an important role in a novel cell death pathway present in FTLD-U and ALS.

  14. Relative Roles of Gap Junction Channels and Cytoplasm in Cell-to-Cell Diffusion of Fluorescent Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranyos, Richard G. A.; Caveney, Stanley; Miller, James G.; Petersen, Nils O.

    1987-04-01

    Intercellular (tissue) diffusion of molecules requires cytoplasmic diffusion and diffusion through gap junctional (or cell-to-cell) channels. The rates of tissue and cytoplasmic diffusion of fluorescent tracers, expressed as an effective diffusion coefficient, De, and a cytoplasmic diffusion coefficient, Dcyt, have been measured among the developing epidermal cells of a larval beetle, Tenebrio molitor L., to determine the contribution of the junctional channels to intercellular diffusion. Tracer diffusion was measured by injecting fluorescent tracers into cells and quantitating the rate of subsequent spread into adjacent cells. Cytoplasmic diffusion was determined by fluorescence photobleaching. These experiments show that gap junctional channels constitute approximately 70-80% of the total cell-to-cell resistance to the diffusion of organic tracers at high concentrations in this tissue. At low concentrations, however, the binding of tracer to cytoplasm slows down the cytoplasmic diffusion, which may limit intercellular diffusion.

  15. Actin and myosin regulate cytoplasm stiffness in plant cells: a study using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Honing, Hannie S; de Ruijter, Norbert C A; Emons, Anne Mie C; Ketelaar, Tijs

    2010-01-01

    Here, we produced cytoplasmic protrusions with optical tweezers in mature BY-2 suspension cultured cells to study the parameters involved in the movement of actin filaments during changes in cytoplasmic organization and to determine whether stiffness is an actin-related property of plant cytoplasm. Optical tweezers were used to create cytoplasmic protrusions resembling cytoplasmic strands. Simultaneously, the behavior of the actin cytoskeleton was imaged. After actin filament depolymerization, less force was needed to create cytoplasmic protrusions. During treatment with the myosin ATPase inhibitor 2,3-butanedione monoxime, more trapping force was needed to create and maintain cytoplasmic protrusions. Thus, the presence of actin filaments and, even more so, the deactivation of a 2,3-butanedione monoxime-sensitive factor, probably myosin, stiffens the cytoplasm. During 2,3-butanedione monoxime treatment, none of the tweezer-formed protrusions contained filamentous actin, showing that a 2,3-butanedione monoxime-sensitive factor, probably myosin, is responsible for the movement of actin filaments, and implying that myosin serves as a static cross-linker of actin filaments when its motor function is inhibited. The presence of actin filaments does not delay the collapse of cytoplasmic protrusions after tweezer release. Myosin-based reorganization of the existing actin cytoskeleton could be the basis for new cytoplasmic strand formation, and thus the production of an organized cytoarchitecture.

  16. Heterogeneous anomalous diffusion of virus in cytoplasm of a living cell

    CERN Document Server

    Itto, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    The infection pathway of virus in cytoplasm of a living cell is studied from the viewpoint of diffusion theory. The cytoplasm plays a role of a medium for stochastic motion of the virus contained in the endosome as well as the free virus. It is experimentally known that the exponent of anomalous diffusion fluctuates in localized areas of the cytoplasm. Here, generalizing fractional kinetic theory, such fluctuations are described in terms of the exponent locally distributed over the cytoplasm, and a theoretical proposition is presented for its statistical form. The proposed fluctuations may be examined in an experiment of heterogeneous diffusion in the infection pathway.

  17. Experimental Analysis of Cell Function Using Cytoplasmic Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Peter; Waldhuber, Megan

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory exercise investigates the phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming in the fresh water alga "Nitella". Students use the fungal toxin cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, to investigate the mechanism of streaming. Students use simple statistical methods to analyze their data. Typical student data are provided. (Contains 3…

  18. Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    energy numbers are 2.3X and 5.7X the theoretical values for lithium thionyl chloride respectively (1100 Whr/liter and 590 Whr/kg), which has the...REPORT Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Advances in lithium primary battery technology, which serves as the...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 16-Aug-2010 Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell Report Title ABSTRACT Advances in lithium primary battery technology

  19. The peripheral cytoplasm of adrenocortical cells: zone-specific responses to ACTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesser, K E; Cain, L D; Malamed, S

    1994-05-01

    Differences in the cytoskeletal protein actin in cells from the zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata would be of considerable interest because there is persuasive evidence that rat corticosteroids are secreted by mechanisms that are somewhat zone-specific. We have previously shown evidence that actin may be involved in steroid secretion, possibly in connection with changes in adrenocortical microvilli. However, the cells upon which the data were based were not separated according to zone of origin. Immunogold electron microscopy and morphometric procedures were used to determine whether ACTH-induced changes in the peripheral cytoplasm of isolated adrenocortical cells occur in both zona fasciculata and zona glomerulosa cells. Actin immunoreactivity was more concentrated in the cytoplasm adjacent to the plasma membrane (including the cytoplasm within the microvilli) than it was in the internal cytoplasm in cells from both zones (4-6 times more concentrated in zona glomerulosa cells and 3-6 times more concentrated in zona fasciculata cells). However, the mean aggregate microvillar surface length (microvillar index) of untreated zona fasciculata cells (previously reported (Loesser and Malamed, 1987)) was 23% greater than that of untreated zona glomerulosa cells. Although ACTH (at a maximal steroidogenic concentration) had no effect on the peripheral cytoplasmic actin concentration of zona glomerulosa cells, there was a 24% increase in the aggregate microvillar length. In contrast, in zona fasciculata cells, ACTH treatment was accompanied by an increase in peripheral cytoplasmic actin concentration of 58-64% and an increase in aggregate microvillar surface length of 40% (previously reported (Loesser and Malamed, 1987)), almost twice that for zona glomerulosa cells. The results suggest that ACTH-induced hormone release from zona fasciculata cells is mediated by increases in peripheral cytoplasmic actin and aggregate microvillar length; in zona glomerulosa cells such

  20. Organization of the cytoplasmic reticulum in the central vacuole of parenchyma cells in Allium cepa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz J. Wodzicki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An elaborate and complex cytoplasmic reticulum composed of fine filaments and lamellae ranging from 0.1 to 4 microns in size is revealed by viewing the central vacuole of onion bulb parenchyma cells with the scanning election microscope. The larger cytoplasmic strands, visible with the light microscope, are composed of numerous smaller filaments (some tubular which might explain the observed bidirectional movement of particles in these larger strands. The finely divided cytoplasmic network of filaments is continuous with the parietal cytoplasm inclosing the vacuolar sap. In these highly vacuolated cells the mass of the protoplast is in the form of an intravacuolar reticulum immersed in the cell sap. The probable significance of the vacuolar sap in relation to physiological processes of the cell is discussed.

  1. Cells on foam and fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clyde, R. [Clyde Engineering, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Cells grow on high area foam and, when a screen is put around the foam, it is made heavier so it can be fluidized. When foam is rotated in a half full RBC (rotary biological contactor), drops are formed and mass transfer of oxygen to drops is much faster. Most fungi and some mammalian cells need oxygen. Corrugated fibers with holes in the valleys also produce drops. White rot fungus needs oxygen and it degrades many chlorine compounds, azo dyes, PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and TNT. Old cardboard boxes are readily available and when buried in soil, oxygen is entrapped. In a lake, the boxes expose high area. Celite entrapped in fibers provides even more area. Fibers have high surface area for immobilizing cells and, when the fibers are rotated, fast reactions occur, converting one chemical to another. Sugar has been fermented to alcohol in 10--15 minutes. Ethanol has high octane and does not need lead. Old cars and trucks still use lead, and high levels have been found in the drinking water of several large cities. Bacteria on fibers can remove lead in a few seconds. When an RBC of plain fiber discs is rotated and a light shone in the tope, the light hits a thin moving film to degrade chlorine compounds and sterilize water. Titania can be fused to the fiberglass discs. Microbes and light remove sulfur from oil. Calcium magnesium acetate is a non-corrosive road deicer. Salt on roads causes millions of dollars damage to bridges and cars.

  2. Perturbation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport affects size of nucleus and nucleolus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharjee, Chumki; Bhave, Madhura; Kailaje, Vaishali; Jain, Bhawik K; Sengupta, Isha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2016-03-01

    Size regulation of human cell nucleus and nucleolus are poorly understood subjects. 3D reconstruction of live image shows that the karyoplasmic ratio (KR) increases by 30-80% in transformed cell lines compared to their immortalized counterpart. The attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes the KR value to increase by 30-50% in immortalized cell lines. Nucleolus volumes are significantly increased in transformed cell lines and the attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes a significant increase in the nucleolus volume of immortalized cell lines. A cytosol and nuclear fraction swapping experiment emphasizes the potential role of unknown cytosolic factors in nuclear and nucleolar size regulation.

  3. Cell cycle-dependent microtubule-based dynamic transport of cytoplasmic dynein in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic dynein complex is a large multi-subunit microtubule (MT-associated molecular motor involved in various cellular functions including organelle positioning, vesicle transport and cell division. However, regulatory mechanism of the cell-cycle dependent distribution of dynein has not fully been understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report live-cell imaging of cytoplasmic dynein in HeLa cells, by expressing multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP-tagged 74-kDa intermediate chain (IC74. IC74-mfGFP was successfully incorporated into functional dynein complex. In interphase, dynein moved bi-directionally along with MTs, which might carry cargos such as transport vesicles. A substantial fraction of dynein moved toward cell periphery together with EB1, a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs, suggesting +TIPs-mediated transport of dynein. In late-interphase and prophase, dynein was localized at the centrosomes and the radial MT array. In prometaphase and metaphase, dynein was localized at spindle MTs where it frequently moved from spindle poles toward chromosomes or cell cortex. +TIPs may be involved in the transport of spindle dyneins. Possible kinetochore and cortical dyneins were also observed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cytoplasmic dynein is transported to the site of action in preparation for the following cellular events, primarily by the MT-based transport. The MT-based transport may have greater advantage than simple diffusion of soluble dynein in rapid and efficient transport of the limited concentration of the protein.

  4. Cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs are frequently bound to and degraded at ribosomes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlevaro-Fita, Joana; Rahim, Anisa; Guigó, Roderic; Vardy, Leah A; Johnson, Rory

    2016-06-01

    Recent footprinting studies have made the surprising observation that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) physically interact with ribosomes. However, these findings remain controversial, and the overall proportion of cytoplasmic lncRNAs involved is unknown. Here we make a global, absolute estimate of the cytoplasmic and ribosome-associated population of stringently filtered lncRNAs in a human cell line using polysome profiling coupled to spike-in normalized microarray analysis. Fifty-four percent of expressed lncRNAs are detected in the cytoplasm. The majority of these (70%) have >50% of their cytoplasmic copies associated with polysomal fractions. These interactions are lost upon disruption of ribosomes by puromycin. Polysomal lncRNAs are distinguished by a number of 5' mRNA-like features, including capping and 5'UTR length. On the other hand, nonpolysomal "free cytoplasmic" lncRNAs have more conserved promoters and a wider range of expression across cell types. Exons of polysomal lncRNAs are depleted of endogenous retroviral insertions, suggesting a role for repetitive elements in lncRNA localization. Finally, we show that blocking of ribosomal elongation results in stabilization of many associated lncRNAs. Together these findings suggest that the ribosome is the default destination for the majority of cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs and may play a role in their degradation.

  5. Making it big : how characean algae use cytoplasmic streaming to enhance transport in giant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meent, Jan Willem van de

    2010-01-01

    Organisms show a remarkable variation in sizes, yet cell sizes are surprisingly similar across species, typically ranging from 10 μm to 100 μm. A striking exception are the giant cells of the algal weed Chara, which can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. A circulation known as cytoplasmic

  6. Cells on foam and fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clyde, R. [Clyde Engineering, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Cells growing on high area foam and when a screen is put around the foam, it is made heavier so it can be fluidized. When foam is rotated in a half full RBC, drops are formed and mass transfer of oxygen to drops in much faster. Most fungi and some mammalian cells need oxygen. Corrugated fibers with holes in the valleys also produce drops. White rot fungus needs oxygen and it degrades many chlorine compounds, azo dyes, and TNT. Old cardboard boxes are readily available and when buried in soil, oxygen is entrapped. In a lake, the boxes expose high area. Fibers have high surface area for immobilizing cells and when the fibers are rotated, fast reactions occur, converting one chemical to another. Sugar has been fermented to alcohol in 10-15 minutes. Ethanol has high octane and does not need lead. Old cars and trucks still use lead and high levels have been found in the drinking water of several large cities. Bacteria on fibers can remove lead in a few seconds. When an RBC of plain fiber discs is rotated and a light shone in the top the light hits a thin moving film to degrade chlorine compounds. Microbes and light remove sulfur from oil. Calcium magnesium acetate is a non corrosive road deicer. Salt on roads causes millions of dollars damage to bridges and cars. An inexpensive reactor has been made for organization studies of mammalian and plant cells. A magnet is near the bottom but not touching and oxygen is put on the top where there is no seal that can leak.

  7. An FNA pitfall: Mammary analog secretory carcinoma mistaken for acinic cell carcinoma due to cytoplasmic granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouf Hijazi, MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the salivary gland, a key differential feature of Mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC from acinic cell carcinoma (ACC is the lack of cytoplasmic granules. We report a case of a parotid mass incorrectly diagnosed on fine needle aspirate as acinic cell carcinoma due to many cells with basophilic granules suggesting serous acinar differention. Tumor resection revealed a tumor consistent with low grade adenocarcinoma that had eosinophilic, microvacuolar cytoplasm with distinct basophilic granules staining with PASD and mucicarmine. The diagnosis of MASC was confirmed with stains for GCDF-15, mammoglobin, and S100 and FISH consistent with a t(12;15 translocation. Relying on the absence of cytoplasmic granules as a feature to distinguish ACC from MASC is a diagnostic pitfall.

  8. Magnetic particle motions within living cells. Measurement of cytoplasmic viscosity and motile activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valberg, P A; Feldman, H A

    1987-01-01

    Submicrometer magnetic particles, ingested by cells and monitored via the magnetic fields they generate, provide an alternative to optical microscopy for probing movement and viscosity of living cytoplasm, and can be used for cells both in vitro and in vivo. We present methods for preparing lung macrophages tagged with magnetic particles for magnetometric study. Interpretation of the data involves fitting experimental remanent-field decay curves to nonlinear mechanistic models of intracellular particle motion. The model parameters are sensitive to mobility and apparent cytoplasmic viscosity experienced by particle-containing organelles. We present results of parameter estimation for intracellular particle behavior both within control cells and after (a) variable magnetization duration, (b) incubation with cytochalasin D, and (c) particle twisting by external fields. Magnetometric analysis showed cytoplasmic elasticity, dose-dependent motion inhibition by cytochalasin D, and a shear-thinning apparent viscosity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:3676436

  9. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijazhuang (China); Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); Wen, Jin-kun, E-mail: wjk@hebmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  10. Ultrastructural transformations in the cytoplasm of differentiating Hyacinthus orientalis L. pollen cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Bednarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sequence of ultrastructural changes in the cytoplasm during the successive stages of pollen grain development in Hyacinthus orientulis pollen cells was studied. The cytoplasmic transformations of the generative cell included the elimination of plastids, increase in the number of mitochondria, assumption of a spindle shape with the aid of microtubules and the characteristic development of the vacuole system with the formation of so-called colored bodies. The cytoplasmic transformations of the generative cell encompassed changes in the plastids, which began to accumulate starch soon after the cell was formed, then released it shortly before anthesis, an increase in the number of mitochondria and an increase in the number of highly active dictyosomes just before anthesis. Changes in the structure of the border region between the differentiating pollen cells were associated mainly with the periodical appearance of a callose wall and the presence of lysosome-like bodies in the cytoplasm of the vegetative cell surrounding the generative cell. They arose soon after the disappearance of the callose wall and disappeared shortly before anthesis.

  11. Particle-Rich Cytoplasmic Structure (PaCS): Identification, Natural History, Role in Cell Biology and Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic structures showing a selective concentration of both polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome have been described in various epithelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural cells in vitro or in fetal tissues, as well as in chronically-infected, mutated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues. These cytoplasmic structures differ from other ubiquitin-reactive cytoplasmic bodies, like sequestosomes, aggresome-like-induced structures in dendritic cells (DALIS)/non-dendritic cells (AL...

  12. Speciation of mercury in salmon egg cell cytoplasm in relation with metallomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takuya; Asano, Motoki; Takatani, Kohei; Matsuura, Hirotaka; Umemura, Tomonari; Haraguchi, Hiroki

    2005-12-15

    Speciation of mercury in salmon egg cell cytoplasm was investigated by surfactant-mediated high-performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP-MS), where an ODS (octadecylsilica) column coated with a bile acid derivative, CHAPS (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate), was used for species separation. Prior to the speciation analysis, total Hg in the cell cytoplasm was determined by ICP-MS at m/z 202 in a flow injection mode. For the precise measurement, salmon egg cell cytoplasm was diluted five-fold with 0.1M Tris (Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane)-HNO(3) buffer solution, and the standard addition method was employed. Thus, the total concentration of Hg in cell cytoplasm was estimated to be 12.4ngg(-1) on the wet weight basis. Next, the cell cytoplasm diluted five-fold with 0.1M Tris-HNO(3) buffer solution was analyzed by surfactant-mediated HPLC with the dual detection system of a UV absorption detector and an ICP-MS instrument. Two peaks corresponding to some proteins and small molecules were mainly observed in those chromatograms. When salmon egg cell cytoplasm was diluted five-fold with 0.01M Tris buffer solution or pure water, some precipitates appeared probably because of precipitation of hydrophobic proteins in cytoplasm. After the precipitates were eliminated with a membrane filter, the filtrate was subjected to the analysis by surfactant-mediated HPLC/UV/ICP-MS. As a result, the peaks for small molecular species of Hg were clearly observed at the retention time near 4.0min (corresponding to low-molecular weight zone) in the chromatograms with UV absorption detection as well as with Hg- and S-specific ICP-MS detections. The small molecule bound with Hg was identified as cysteine through the cysteine-spiked experiment. In addition, the protein fraction on the chromatogram obtained by using the CHAPS-coated ODS column was further analyzed by SEC (size exclusion chromatography). Consequently

  13. Bacterial conjugation in the cytoplasm of mouse cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Y.M.; Groof, A.J.C. de; Bhattacharjee, M.K.; Figurski, D.H.; Schon, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Intracellular pathogenic organisms such as salmonellae and shigellae are able to evade the effects of many antibiotics because the drugs are not able to penetrate the plasma membrane. In addition, these bacteria may be able to transfer genes within cells while protected from the action of drugs. The

  14. Why Do Some T Cell Receptor Cytoplasmic Domains Associate with the Plasma Membrane?

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Anton evan der Merwe; Hao eZhang; Shaun-Paul eCordoba

    2012-01-01

    Based on studies in model systems it has been proposed that the cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits that have polybasic motifs associate with the plasma membrane, and that this regulates their phosphorylation. Recent experiments in more physiological systems have confirmed membrane association but raised questions as to its function.

  15. Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Arai, Naoko; Tanaka, Keiji, E-mail: tanaka-kj@igakuken.or.jp; Saeki, Yasushi, E-mail: saeki-ys@igakuken.or.jp

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We succeeded to control the proteasome localization by the anchor-away technique. •Nuclear proteasome-depleted cells showed a lethal phenotype. •Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in dividing cells. -- Abstract: The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. In rapidly proliferating yeast cells, proteasomes are mainly localized in the nucleus, but the biological significance of the proteasome localization is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the proteasome localization and the functions by the anchor-away technique, a ligand-dependent sequestration of a target protein into specific compartment(s). Anchoring of the proteasome to the plasma membrane or the ribosome resulted in conditional depletion of the nuclear proteasomes, whereas anchoring to histone resulted in the proteasome sequestration into the nucleus. We observed that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in all the proteasome-targeted cells, suggesting that both the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes have proteolytic functions and that the ubiquitinated proteins are produced and degraded in each compartment. Consistent with previous studies, the nuclear proteasome-depleted cells exhibited a lethal phenotype. In contrast, the nuclear sequestration of the proteasome resulted only in a mild growth defect, suggesting that the cytoplasmic proteasomes are not basically indispensable for cell growth in rapidly growing yeast cells.

  16. Actin based processes that could determine the cytoplasmic architecture of plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Honing, Hannie S; Emons, Anne Mie C; Ketelaar, Tijs

    2007-05-01

    Actin polymerisation can generate forces that are necessary for cell movement, such as the propulsion of a class of bacteria, including Listeria, and the protrusion of migrating animal cells. Force generation by the actin cytoskeleton in plant cells has not been studied. One process in plant cells that is likely to depend on actin-based force generation is the organisation of the cytoplasm. We compare the function of actin binding proteins of three well-studied mammalian models that depend on actin-based force generation with the function of their homologues in plants. We predict the possible role of these proteins, and thus the role of actin-based force generation, in the production of cytoplasmic organisation in plant cells.

  17. Satellite cell depletion prevents fiber hypertrophy in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, Ingrid M; Bruusgaard, Jo C; Gundersen, Kristian

    2016-08-15

    The largest mammalian cells are the muscle fibers, and they have multiple nuclei to support their large cytoplasmic volumes. During hypertrophic growth, new myonuclei are recruited from satellite stem cells into the fiber syncytia, but it was recently suggested that such recruitment is not obligatory: overload hypertrophy after synergist ablation of the plantaris muscle appeared normal in transgenic mice in which most of the satellite cells were abolished. When we essentially repeated these experiments analyzing the muscles by immunohistochemistry and in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we found that overload hypertrophy was prevented in the satellite cell-deficient mice, in both the plantaris and the extensor digitorum longus muscles. We attribute the previous findings to a reliance on muscle mass as a proxy for fiber hypertrophy, and to the inclusion of a significant number of regenerating fibers in the analysis. We discuss that there is currently no model in which functional, sustainable hypertrophy has been unequivocally demonstrated in the absence of satellite cells; an exception is re-growth, which can occur using previously recruited myonuclei without addition of new myonuclei. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Mitochondrial Extrusion through the Cytoplasmic Vacuoles during Cell Death*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Akihito; Kurihara, Hidetake; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Nakano, Hiroyasu

    2008-01-01

    Under various conditions, noxious stimuli damage mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial fragmentation; however, the mechanisms by which fragmented mitochondria are eliminated from the cells remain largely unknown. Here we show that cytoplasmic vacuoles originating from the plasma membrane engulfed fragmented mitochondria and subsequently extruded them into the extracellular spaces in undergoing acute tumor necrosis factor α-induced cell death in a caspase-dependent f...

  19. Autophagy regulates cytoplasmic remodeling during cell reprogramming in a zebrafish model of muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kish, Phillip E; Louie, Ke'ale W; Grzegorski, Steven J; Klionsky, Daniel J; Kahana, Alon

    2016-10-02

    Cell identity involves both selective gene activity and specialization of cytoplasmic architecture and protein machinery. Similarly, reprogramming differentiated cells requires both genetic program alterations and remodeling of the cellular architecture. While changes in genetic and epigenetic programs have been well documented in dedifferentiating cells, the pathways responsible for remodeling the cellular architecture and eliminating specialized protein complexes are not as well understood. Here, we utilize a zebrafish model of adult muscle regeneration to study cytoplasmic remodeling during cell dedifferentiation. We describe activation of autophagy early in the regenerative response to muscle injury, while blocking autophagy using chloroquine or Atg5 and Becn1 knockdown reduced the rate of regeneration with accumulation of sarcomeric and nuclear debris. We further identify Casp3/caspase 3 as a candidate mediator of cellular reprogramming and Fgf signaling as an important activator of autophagy in dedifferentiating myocytes. We conclude that autophagy plays a critical role in cell reprogramming by regulating cytoplasmic remodeling, facilitating the transition to a less differentiated cell identity.

  20. Oriented collagen fibers direct tumor cell intravasation

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Weijing

    2016-09-24

    In this work, we constructed a Collagen I-Matrigel composite extracellular matrix (ECM). The composite ECM was used to determine the influence of the local collagen fiber orientation on the collective intravasation ability of tumor cells. We found that the local fiber alignment enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Specifically, metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed the local fiber alignment direction during the intravasation into rigid Matrigel (∼10 mg/mL protein concentration).

  1. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valera V Peremyslov

    Full Text Available Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI, cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  2. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peremyslov, Valera V; Cole, Rex A; Fowler, John E; Dolja, Valerian V

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  3. Overexpressed cyclin D3 contributes to retaining the growth inhibitor p27 in the cytoplasm of thyroid tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Gustavo; Belletti, Barbara; Bruni, Paola; Boccia, Angelo; Trapasso, Francesco; Pentimalli, Francesca; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Vento, Maria Teresa; Spiezia, Stefania; Fusco, Alfredo; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    The majority of thyroid carcinomas maintain the expression of the cell growth suppressor p27, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (Cdk2). However, we find that 80% of p27-expressing tumors show an uncommon cytoplasmic localization of p27 protein, associated with high Cdk2 activity. To reproduce such a situation, a mutant p27 devoid of its COOH-terminal nuclear-localization signal was generated (p27-NLS). p27-NLS accumulates in the cytoplasm and fails to induce growth arrest in 2 different cell lines, indicating that cytoplasm-residing p27 is inactive as a growth inhibitor, presumably because it does not interact with nuclear Cdk2. Overexpression of cyclin D3 may account in part for p27 cytoplasmic localization. In thyroid tumors and cell lines, cyclin D3 expression was associated with cytoplasmic localization of p27. Moreover, expression of cyclin D3 in thyroid carcinoma cells induced cytoplasmic retention of cotransfected p27 and rescued p27-imposed growth arrest. Endogenous p27 also localized prevalently to the cytoplasm in normal thyrocytes engineered to stably overexpress cyclin D3 (PC-D3 cells). In these cells, cyclin D3 induced the formation of cytoplasmic p27–cyclin D3–Cdk complexes, which titrated p27 away from intranuclear complexes that contain cyclins A–E and Cdk2. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism that may contribute to overcoming the p27 inhibitory threshold in transformed thyroid cells. PMID:10510327

  4. Cytoplasmic expression of C-MYC protein is associated with risk stratification of mantle cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Gong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate the association of C-MYC protein expression and risk stratification in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL, and to evaluate the utility of C-MYC protein as a prognostic biomarker in clinical practice. Methods We conducted immunohistochemical staining of C-MYC, Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1, CD8, Ki-67, p53 and SRY (sex determining region Y -11 (SOX11 to investigate their expression in 64 patients with MCL. The staining results and other clinical data were evaluated for their roles in risk stratification of MCL cases using ANOVA, Chi-square, and Spearman’s Rank correlation coefficient analysis. Results Immunohistochemical staining in our study indicated that SOX11, Ki-67 and p53 presented nuclear positivity of tumor cells, CD8 showed membrane positivity in infiltrating T lymphocytes while PD-L1 showed membrane and cytoplasmic positivity mainly in macrophage cells and little in tumor cells. We observed positive staining of C-MYC either in the nucleus or cytoplasm or in both subcellular locations. There were significant differences in cytoplasmic C-MYC expression, Ki-67 proliferative index of tumor cells, and CD8 positive tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (CD8+TIL among three risk groups (P = 0.000, P = 0.037 and P=0.020, respectively. However, no significant differences existed in the expression of nuclear C-MYC, SOX11, p53, and PD-L1 in MCL patients with low-, intermediate-, and high risks. In addition, patient age and serum LDH level were also significantly different among 3 groups of patients (P = 0.006 and P = 0.000, respectively. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient analysis indicated that cytoplasmic C-MYC expression, Ki-67 index, age, WBC, as well as LDH level had significantly positive correlations with risk stratification (P = 0.000, 0.015, 0.000, 0.029 and 0.000, respectively, while CD8+TIL in tumor microenvironment negatively correlated with risk stratification of patients (P = 0.006. Patients with

  5. Cytoplasmic pH dynamics in maize pulvinal cells induced by gravity vector changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, E.; Collings, D. A.; Rink, J. C.; Allen, N. S.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, changes in orientation of stems are perceived by pulvinal tissue, which responds to the stimulus by differential growth resulting in upward bending of the stem. The amyloplast-containing bundle sheath cells are the sites of gravity perception, although the initial steps of gravity perception and transmission remain unclear. In columella cells of Arabidopsis roots, we previously found that cytoplasmic pH (pH(c)) is a mediator in early gravitropic signaling (A.C. Scott, N.S. Allen [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1291-1298). The question arises whether pH(c) has a more general role in signaling gravity vector changes. Using confocal ratiometric imaging and the fluorescent pH indicator carboxy seminaphtorhodafluor acetoxymethyl ester acetate, we measured pH(c) in the cells composing the maize pulvinus. When stem slices were gravistimulated and imaged on a horizontally mounted confocal microscope, pH(c) changes were only apparent within the bundle sheath cells, and not in the parenchyma cells. After turning, cytoplasmic acidification was observed at the sides of the cells, whereas the cytoplasm at the base of the cells where plastids slowly accumulated became more basic. These changes were most apparent in cells exhibiting net amyloplast sedimentation. Parenchyma cells and isolated bundle sheath cells did not show any gravity-induced pH(c) changes although all cell types responded to external stimuli in the predicted way: Propionic acid and auxin treatments induced acidification, whereas raising the external pH caused alkalinization. The results suggest that pH(c) has an important role in the early signaling pathways of maize stem gravitropism.

  6. Critical amino acids in syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain modulation of turkey satellite cell growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; McFarland, Douglas C; Velleman, Sandra G

    2012-02-01

    Syndecan-4 is composed of a core protein and covalently attached glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and N-linked glycosylated (N-glycosylated) chains. The core protein is divided into extracellular, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic domains. The cytoplasmic domain has two conserved regions and a variable region in the middle. The Ser residue in the conserved region 1 and the Tyr residue in the variable region are important in regulating protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) membrane localization and focal adhesion formation. The objective of the current study was to investigate the role of syndecan-4 Ser and Tyr residues in combination with the GAG and N-glycosylated chains in turkey satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) responsiveness, and PKCα membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate Ser and Tyr mutants with or without GAG and N-glycosylated chains. The wild type and mutant syndecan-4 constructs were transfected into turkey satellite cells. The over-expression of Ser and Tyr mutants increased cell proliferation and differentiation and decreased membrane localization of PKCα. Furthermore, Ser mutants enhanced cellular responsiveness to FGF2. The results from this study are the first demonstration of a role of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain Ser and Tyr residues in regulating satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, and the modulation of cellular responsiveness to FGF2.

  7. Flow-induced channel formation in the cytoplasm of motile cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Robert D.; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Wright, Grady B.

    2011-07-01

    A model is presented to explain the development of flow channels within the cytoplasm of the plasmodium of the giant amoeba Physarum polycephalum. The formation of channels is related to the development of a self-organizing tubular network in large cells. Experiments indicate that the flow of cytoplasm is involved in the development and organization of these networks, and the mathematical model proposed here is motivated by recent experiments involving the observation of development of flow channel in small cells. A model of pressure-driven flow through a polymer network is presented in which the rate of flow increases the rate of depolymerization. Numerical solutions and asymptotic analysis of the model in one spatial dimension show that under very general assumptions this model predicts the formation of channels in response to flow.

  8. Differential localization of cytoplasmic myosin II isoforms A and B in avian interphase and dividing embryonic and immortalized cardiomyocytes and other cell types in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, A. H.; Jaffredo, T.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Two principal isoforms of cytoplasmic myosin II, A and B (CMIIA and CMIIB), are present in different proportions in different tissues. Isoform-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to avian CMIIA and CMIIB reveal the cellular distributions of these isoforms in interphase and dividing embryonic avian cardiac, intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia cells in primary cell culture. Embryonic cardiomyocytes react with antibodies to CMIIB but not to CMIIA, localize CMIIB in stress-fiber-like-structures during interphase, and markedly concentrate CMIIB in networks in the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. In contrast, cardiac fibroblasts localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks during interphase, and demonstrate slight and independently regulated concentration of CMIIA and CMIIB in networks in their cleavage furrows. V-myc-immortalized cardiomyocytes, an established cell line, have regained the ability to express CMIIA, as well as CMIIB, and localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks in interphase cells and in cleavage furrows in dividing cells. Conversely, some intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia interphase cells express only CMIIA, organized primarily in networks. Of these, intestinal epithelial cells express both CMIIA and CMIIB when they divide, whereas some dividing cells from both spleen and dorsal root ganglia express only CMIIA and concentrate it in their cleavage furrows. These results suggest that within a given tissue, different cell types express different isoforms of CMII, and that cells expressing either CMIIA or CMIIB alone, or simultaneously, can form a cleavage furrow and divide.

  9. A cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication is involved in signal transduction in antigen-specific T cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, R L; Clark, R B; Gutowski, J K; Katz, M E; Fresa, K L; Cohen, S

    1990-05-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from T cell lines undergoing antigen-specific, interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent proliferation were tested for their ability to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. A tetanus toxoid (TET)-specific T cell line, established from peripheral blood of a normal human volunteer, was stimulated in the presence of relevant antigen and 1 unit/ml IL-2. Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells were capable of inducing DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei correlated positively with the degree of proliferation induced in these cells. In contrast, incubation of this T cell line in the absence of antigen failed to induce proliferation and cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells induced little to no DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The factor present in the cytoplasm of T cells stimulated with relevant antigen in the presence of IL-2 is similar, if not identical, to a factor which we have previously demonstrated in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and from mitogenically stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This factor, which we have called activator of DNA replication (ADR) is a heat-labile protein, and is inactivated by treatment with protease inhibitors, including aprotinin. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts from T cells undergoing antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent proliferation to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei was markedly inhibited in the presence of aprotinin, providing strong evidence that a cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication, ADR, is involved in the signal transduction process for antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation. ADR may represent a common intracellular mediator of DNA synthesis in activated and transformed lymphocytes.

  10. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxPhi domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1(NL4.3) compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of

  11. Particle-Rich Cytoplasmic Structure (PaCS: Identification, Natural History, Role in Cell Biology and Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Solcia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic structures showing a selective concentration of both polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome have been described in various epithelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural cells in vitro or in fetal tissues, as well as in chronically-infected, mutated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues. These cytoplasmic structures differ from other ubiquitin-reactive cytoplasmic bodies, like sequestosomes, aggresome-like-induced structures in dendritic cells (DALIS/non-dendritic cells (ALIS and aggresomes in showing distinctive ultrastructural organization (particle-rich cytoplasmic structure or PaCS, a cytochemical pattern and a functional profile. Their formation can be induced in vitro in dendritic or natural killer cells by trophic factors and interleukin treatment. They originate in close connection with ribosomes, while, as a result of their growth, the cytoskeleton and other surrounding organelles are usually dislocated outside their core. Interestingly, these particulate cytoplasmic structures are often found to fill cytoplasmic blebs forming proteasome- and polyubiquitinated protein-discharging vesicles, called ectosomes, which are found to detach from the cell and freely float in the extracellular space. To clearly point out the importance of the polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome containing cytoplasmic structures, their role in cell biology and pathology has been carefully analyzed.

  12. Particle-rich cytoplasmic structure (PaCS): identification, natural history, role in cell biology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solcia, Enrico; Sommi, Patrizia; Necchi, Vittorio; Vitali, Agostina; Manca, Rachele; Ricci, Vittorio

    2014-09-22

    Cytoplasmic structures showing a selective concentration of both polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome have been described in various epithelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural cells in vitro or in fetal tissues, as well as in chronically-infected, mutated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues. These cytoplasmic structures differ from other ubiquitin-reactive cytoplasmic bodies, like sequestosomes, aggresome-like-induced structures in dendritic cells (DALIS)/non-dendritic cells (ALIS) and aggresomes in showing distinctive ultrastructural organization (particle-rich cytoplasmic structure or PaCS), a cytochemical pattern and a functional profile. Their formation can be induced in vitro in dendritic or natural killer cells by trophic factors and interleukin treatment. They originate in close connection with ribosomes, while, as a result of their growth, the cytoskeleton and other surrounding organelles are usually dislocated outside their core. Interestingly, these particulate cytoplasmic structures are often found to fill cytoplasmic blebs forming proteasome- and polyubiquitinated protein-discharging vesicles, called ectosomes, which are found to detach from the cell and freely float in the extracellular space. To clearly point out the importance of the polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome containing cytoplasmic structures, their role in cell biology and pathology has been carefully analyzed.

  13. Early cytoplasmic vacuolization of African green monkey kidney cells by SV40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamura, T; Kitahara, T

    1975-01-01

    As early as 3--4 hours after infection with SV40 at a high input multiplicity, African green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) kidney (AGMK) cells developed cytoplasmic vacuolization. At 10--20 hours after infection, the vacuolization reached its maximal level, then disappeared and SV40 specific cytopathic change followed. This vacuolization developed before the synthesis of the specific T and V antigens. This early cytoplasmic vacuolization (ECV) was prevented by preincubating the virus with specific antiserum, or by heating the virus with MgCl2. The ECV could be induced by UV-irradiated SV40. Addition of metabolic inhibitors had no effect on the induction of the ECV. These results suggest that the capacity to induce the ECV resides in a structural component(s) of SV40 virion and the vacuolization is not associated with the replication of SV40.

  14. Early cytoplasmic vacuolization of African green monkey kidney cells by SV40. [uv radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamura, T.; Kitahara, T.

    1975-01-01

    As early as 3 to 4 hours after infection with SV 40 at a high input multiplicity, African green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) kidney (AGMK) cells developed cytoplasmic vacuolization. At 10 to 20 hours after infection, the vacuolization reached its maximal level, then disappeared and SV 40 specific cytopathic change followed. This vacuolization developed before the synthesis of the specific T and V antigens. This early cytoplasmic vacuolization (ECV) was prevented by pre-incubating the virus with specific antiserum, or by heating the virus with MgCl/sub 2/. The ECV could be induced by uv-irradiated SV 40. Addition of metabolic inhibitors had no effect on the induction of the ECV. These results suggest that the capacity to induce the ECV resides in a structural component(s) of SV 40 virion and the vacuolization is not associated with the replication of SV 40.

  15. Loss of γ-cytoplasmic actin triggers myofibroblast transition of human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Li, Chao; Naydenov, Nayden G; Kuemmerle, John F; Dugina, Vera; Chaponnier, Christine; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2014-10-15

    Transdifferentiation of epithelial cells into mesenchymal cells and myofibroblasts plays an important role in tumor progression and tissue fibrosis. Such epithelial plasticity is accompanied by dramatic reorganizations of the actin cytoskeleton, although mechanisms underlying cytoskeletal effects on epithelial transdifferentiation remain poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that selective siRNA-mediated knockdown of γ-cytoplasmic actin (γ-CYA), but not β-cytoplasmic actin, induced epithelial-to-myofibroblast transition (EMyT) of different epithelial cells. The EMyT manifested by increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin and other contractile proteins, along with inhibition of genes responsible for cell proliferation. Induction of EMyT in γ-CYA-depleted cells depended on activation of serum response factor and its cofactors, myocardial-related transcriptional factors A and B. Loss of γ-CYA stimulated formin-mediated actin polymerization and activation of Rho GTPase, which appear to be essential for EMyT induction. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated, unique role of γ-CYA in regulating epithelial phenotype and suppression of EMyT that may be essential for cell differentiation and tissue fibrosis.

  16. Calmodulin antagonists effect on Ca(2+ level in the mitochondria and cytoplasm of myometrium cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Shlykov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Са2+-dependent regulation of this cation exchange in mitochondria is carried out with participation of calmodulin. We had shown in a previous work using two experimental models: isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, that calmodulin antagonists reduce the level of mitochondrial membrane polarization. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of calmodulin antagonists on the level of ionized Са in mitochondria and cytoplasm of uterine smooth muscle cells using spectrofluorometry and confocal microscopy. It was shown that myometrium mitochondria, in the presence of АТР and MgCl2 in the incubation medium, accumulate Са ions in the matrix. Incubation of mitochondria in the presence of СССР inhibited cation accumulation, but did not cease it. Calmodulin antagonist such as trifluoperazine (100 µМ considerably increased the level of ionized Са in the mitochondrial matrix. Preliminary incubation of mitochondria with 100 µМ Са2+, before adding trifluoperazine to the incubation medium, partly prevented influence of the latter on the cation level in the matrix. Incubation of myometrium cells (primary culture with another calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium (10 µМ was accompanied by depolarization of mitochondrial membrane and an increase in the concentration of ionized Са in cytoplasm. Thus, using two models, namely, isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, it has been shown that calmodulin antagonists cause depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and an increase of the ionized Са concentration in both the mitochondrial matrix and the cell cytoplasm.

  17. Excretion of cytoplasmic proteins in Staphylococcus is most likely not due to cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Patrick; Rinker, Janina; Götz, Friedrich

    2016-02-01

    The excretion of cytoplasmic proteins (ECP) is a long-known phenomenon in bacteria and eukaryotes. So far, it was not possible to associate either a signal peptide-dependent or a signal peptide-independent pathway to ECP. Nevertheless 25% of the proteins found in Staphylococcus aureus supernatants were cytoplasmic proteins. Because the excreted proteins do not possess a common motive, the most widespread opinion is that ECP is due to cell lysis. This explanation seems to be too easy since several indications imply that there exists a yet unknown mechanism for ECP. Certainly, the up-regulation of autolysins as well as decreased peptidoglycan cross-linking increased ECP. However, in recent years, several evidences arose that cell lysis is not the only reason for ECP. It seems that ECP is a part of the normal cell cycle of S. aureus as it turned out that ECP with several model proteins occurs mainly during cell growth. It has common features as proteins secreted via the Sec translocon and finally the excretion site is the cross wall of dividing cells.

  18. Role of kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein in endoplasmic reticulum movement in VERO cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Marcin J.; Bola, Becky; Brownhill, Kim; Yang, Yen-Ching; Levakova, Vesselina; Allan, Victoria J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Generating the extended endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network depends on microtubules, which act as tracks for motor-driven ER tubule movement, generate the force to extend ER tubules by means of attachment to growing microtubule plus-ends and provide static attachment points. We have analysed ER dynamics in living VERO cells and find that most ER tubule extension is driven by microtubule motors. Surprisingly, we observe that ∼50% of rapid ER tubule movements occur in the direction of the centre of the cell, driven by cytoplasmic dynein. Inhibition of this movement leads to an accumulation of lamellar ER in the cell periphery. By expressing dominant-negative kinesin-1 constructs, we show that kinesin-1 drives ER tubule extension towards the cell periphery and that this motility is dependent on the KLC1B kinesin light chain splice form but not on KLC1D. Inhibition of kinesin-1 promotes a shift from tubular to lamellar morphology and slows down the recovery of the ER network after microtubule depolymerisation and regrowth. These observations reconcile previous conflicting studies of kinesin-1 function in ER motility in vivo. Furthermore, our data reveal that cytoplasmic dynein plays a role in ER motility in a mammalian cultured cell, demonstrating that ER motility is more complex than previously thought. PMID:19454478

  19. Cytoplasmic localization of p21 protects trophoblast giant cells from DNA damage induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Renty, Christelle; DePamphilis, Melvin L; Ullah, Zakir

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) can differentiate into nonproliferating but viable trophoblast giant cells (TGCs) that are resistant to DNA damage induced apoptosis. Differentiation is associated with selective up-regulation of the Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p57 and p21; expression of p27 remains constant. Previous studies showed that p57 localizes to the nucleus in TGCs where it is essential for endoreplication. Here we show that p27 also remains localized to the nucleus during TSC differentiation where it complements the role of p57. Unexpectedly, p21 localized to the cytoplasm where it was maintained throughout both the G- and S-phases of endocycles, and where it prevented DNA damage induced apoptosis. This unusual status for a Cip/Kip protein was dependent on site-specific phosphorylation of p21 by the Akt1 kinase that is also up-regulated in TGCs. Although cytoplasmic p21 is widespread among cancer cells, among normal cells it has been observed only in monocytes. The fact that it also occurs in TGCs reveals that p57 and p21 serve nonredundant functions, and suggests that the role of p21 in suppressing apoptosis is restricted to terminally differentiated cells.

  20. Cytoplasmic localization of p21 protects trophoblast giant cells from DNA damage induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle de Renty

    Full Text Available Proliferating trophoblast stem cells (TSCs can differentiate into nonproliferating but viable trophoblast giant cells (TGCs that are resistant to DNA damage induced apoptosis. Differentiation is associated with selective up-regulation of the Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p57 and p21; expression of p27 remains constant. Previous studies showed that p57 localizes to the nucleus in TGCs where it is essential for endoreplication. Here we show that p27 also remains localized to the nucleus during TSC differentiation where it complements the role of p57. Unexpectedly, p21 localized to the cytoplasm where it was maintained throughout both the G- and S-phases of endocycles, and where it prevented DNA damage induced apoptosis. This unusual status for a Cip/Kip protein was dependent on site-specific phosphorylation of p21 by the Akt1 kinase that is also up-regulated in TGCs. Although cytoplasmic p21 is widespread among cancer cells, among normal cells it has been observed only in monocytes. The fact that it also occurs in TGCs reveals that p57 and p21 serve nonredundant functions, and suggests that the role of p21 in suppressing apoptosis is restricted to terminally differentiated cells.

  1. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells emerges naturally by microfilament self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-08-27

    Many cells exhibit large-scale active circulation of their entire fluid contents, a process termed cytoplasmic streaming. This phenomenon is particularly prevalent in plant cells, often presenting strikingly regimented flow patterns. The driving mechanism in such cells is known: myosin-coated organelles entrain cytoplasm as they process along actin filament bundles fixed at the periphery. Still unknown, however, is the developmental process that constructs the well-ordered actin configurations required for coherent cell-scale flow. Previous experimental works on streaming regeneration in cells of Characean algae, whose longitudinal flow is perhaps the most regimented of all, hint at an autonomous process of microfilament self-organization driving the formation of streaming patterns during morphogenesis. Working from first principles, we propose a robust model of streaming emergence that combines motor dynamics with both microscopic and macroscopic hydrodynamics to explain how several independent processes, each ineffectual on its own, can reinforce to ultimately develop the patterns of streaming observed in the Characeae and other streaming species.

  2. Cell surface expression of glycosylated, nonglycosylated, and truncated forms of a cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1988-09-01

    The soluble cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase (PK) has been expressed at the cell surface in a membrane-anchored form (APK). The hybrid protein contains the NH2-terminal signal/anchor domain of a class II integral membrane protein (hemagglutinin/neuraminidase, of the paramyxovirus SV5) fused to the PK NH2 terminus. APK contains a cryptic site that is used for N-linked glycosylation but elimination of this site by site-specific mutagenesis does not prevent cell surface localization. Truncated forms of the APK molecule, with up to 80% of the PK region of APK removed, can also be expressed at the cell surface. These data suggest that neither the complete PK molecule nor its glycosylation are necessary for intracellular transport of PK to the cell surface, and it is possible that specific signals may not be needed in the ectodomain of this hybrid protein to specify cell surface localization.

  3. A Cytoplasmic RNA Virus Alters the Function of the Cell Splicing Protein SRSF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Serrano, Efraín E; Fritch, Ethan J; Scholl, Elizabeth H; Sherry, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    To replicate efficiently, viruses must create favorable cell conditions and overcome cell antiviral responses. We previously reported that the reovirus protein μ2 from strain T1L, but not strain T3D, represses one antiviral response: alpha/beta interferon signaling. We report here that T1L, but not T3D, μ2 localizes to nuclear speckles, where it forms a complex with the mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 and alters its subnuclear localization. Reovirus replicates in cytoplasmic viral factories, and there is no evidence that reovirus genomic or messenger RNAs are spliced, suggesting that T1L μ2 might target splicing of cell RNAs. Indeed, RNA sequencing revealed that reovirus T1L, but not T3D, infection alters the splicing of transcripts for host genes involved in mRNA posttranscriptional modifications. Moreover, depletion of SRSF2 enhanced reovirus replication and cytopathic effect, suggesting that T1L μ2 modulation of splicing benefits the virus. This provides the first report of viral antagonism of the splicing factor SRSF2 and identifies the viral protein that determines strain-specific differences in cell RNA splicing.IMPORTANCE Efficient viral replication requires that the virus create favorable cell conditions. Many viruses accomplish this by repressing specific antiviral responses. We demonstrate here that some mammalian reoviruses, RNA viruses that replicate strictly in the cytoplasm, express a protein variant that localizes to nuclear speckles, where it targets a cell mRNA splicing factor. Infection with a reovirus strain that targets this splicing factor alters splicing of cell mRNAs involved in the maturation of many other cell mRNAs. Depletion of this cell splicing factor enhances reovirus replication and cytopathic effect. Our results provide the first evidence of viral antagonism of this splicing factor and suggest that downstream consequences to the cell are global and benefit the virus. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Proteomics Study of Cotton Fiber Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-yuan

    2008-01-01

    @@ A comparative proteomic analysis was applied to explore the mechanism of fiber cell development in cotton.Initially,an efficient protein preparation method was established for proteomic analysis of developing cotton fibers by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis,and a microwave enhanced ink staining technique also was created for fast and sensitive protein quantification in proteomic studies.

  5. Isolation of cell nuclei using inert macromolecules to mimic the crowded cytoplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hancock

    Full Text Available Cell nuclei are commonly isolated and studied in media which include millimolar concentrations of cations, which conserve the nuclear volume by screening the negative charges on chromatin and maintaining its compaction. However, two factors question if these ionic conditions correctly reproduce the environment of nuclei in vivo: the small-scale motion and conformation of chromatin in vivo are not reproduced in isolated nuclei, and experiments and theory suggest that small ions in the cytoplasm are not free in the soluble phase but are predominantly bound to macromolecules. We studied the possible role in maintaining the structure and functions of nuclei in vivo of a further but frequently overlooked property of the cytoplasm, the crowding or osmotic effects caused by diffusible macromolecules whose concentration, measured in several studies, is in the range of 130 mg/ml. Nuclei which conserved their volume in the cell and their ultrastructure seen by electron microscopy were released from K562 cells in media containing the inert polymer 70 kDa Ficoll (50% w/v or 70 kDa dextran (35% w/v to replace the diffusible cytoplasmic molecules which were dispersed on cell lysis with digitonin, with 100 microM K-Hepes buffer as the only source of ions. Immunofluorescence labelling and experiments using cells expressing GFP-fusion proteins showed that internal compartments (nucleoli, PML and coiled bodies, foci of RNA polymerase II were conserved in these nuclei, and nascent RNA transcripts could be elongated. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that crowding by diffusible cytoplasmic macromolecules is a crucial but overlooked factor which supports the nucleus in vivo by equilibrating the opposing osmotic pressure cause by the high concentration of macromolecules in the nucleus, and suggest that crowded media provide more physiological conditions to study nuclear structure and functions. They may also help to resolve the long-standing paradox

  6. The Use of Living Cancer Cells Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein in the Nucleus and Red Fluorescence Protein in the Cytoplasm for Real-time Confocal Imaging of Chromosome and Cytoplasmic Dynamics During Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Meng; Yamamoto, Norio; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saji, Shigetoyo; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-05-01

    A library of dual-color fluorescent cancer cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP), linked to histone H2B, expressed in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) expressed in the cytoplasm was previously genetically engineered. The aim of the current study was to use the dual-color cancer cells to visualize chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Using an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope, a library of dual-color cells from the major cancer types was cultured on plastic. The cells were imaged by confocal microscopy to demonstrate chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Nuclear GFP expression enabled visualization of chromosomes behavior, whereas simultaneous cytoplasmic RFP expression enabled visualization of cytoplasmic behavior during mitosis. Thus, total cellular dynamics can be visualized at high resolution, including individual chromosomes in some cases, in living dual-color cells in real time. Dual-color cancer cells expressing H2B-GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm provide unique tools for visualizing subcellular nuclear and cytoplasm dynamics, including the behavior of individual chromosomes during mitosis. The dual-color cells can be used to evaluate chromosomal loss or gain in real time during treatment with a variety of agents or as the cells are selected for increased or decreased malignancy in culture or in vivo. The dual color cells will be a useful tool to discover and evaluate novel strategies for killing cancer cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Hepatocyte-derived cultured cells with unusual cytoplasmic keratin-rich spheroid bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delavalle, Pierre-Yves; Alsaleh, Khaled; Pillez, Andre; Cocquerel, Laurence [INSERM U1019, CNRS UMR 8204, CIIL, F-59021 Lille (France); Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Allet, Cecile [INSERM U837-JPARC, 59045 Lille (France); Dumont, Patrick [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); CNRS UMR 8161, F-59021 Lille (France); Loyens, Anne [INSERM U837-JPARC, 59045 Lille (France); Leteurtre, Emmanuelle [Service d' Anatomie et de Cytologie Pathologiques, Centre de Biologie Pathologie, CHRU de Lille, Avenue Oscar-Lambret, Lille cedex (France); Omary, M. Bishr [Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America (United States); Dubuisson, Jean; Rouille, Yves [INSERM U1019, CNRS UMR 8204, CIIL, F-59021 Lille (France); Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Wychowski, Czeslaw, E-mail: czeslaw.wychowski@ibl.fr [INSERM U1019, CNRS UMR 8204, CIIL, F-59021 Lille (France); Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France)

    2011-11-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusions are found in a variety of diseases that are characteristic morphological features of several hepatic, muscular and neurodegenerative disorders. They display a predominantly filamentous ultrastructure that is also observed in malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT). A cellular clone containing an intracytoplasmic body was isolated from hepatocyte cell culture, and in the present study we examined whether this body might be related or not to Mallory-Denk body (MDB), a well characterized intracytoplasmic inclusion, or whether this cellular clone was constituted by malignant rhabdoid tumor cells. The intracytoplasmic body was observed in electron microscopy (EM), confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and several proteins involved in the formation of its structure were identified. Using light microscopy, a spheroid body (SB) described as a single regular-shaped cytoplasmic body was observed in cells. During cytokinesis, the SB was disassembled and reassembled in a way to reconstitute a unique SB in each progeny cell. EM examination revealed that the SB was not surrounded by a limiting membrane. However, cytoplasmic filaments were concentrated in a whorled array. These proteins were identified as keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18), which formed the central core of the SB surrounded by a vimentin cage-like structure. This structure was not related to Mallory-Denk body or aggresome since no aggregated proteins were located in SB. Moreover, the structure of SB was not due to mutations in the primary sequence of K8/K18 and vimentin since no difference was observed in the mRNA sequence of their genes, isolated from Huh-7 and Huh-7w7.3 cells. These data suggested that cellular factor(s) could be responsible for the SB formation process. Aggregates of K18 were relocated in the SB when a mutant of K18 inducing disruption of K8/K18 IF network was expressed in the cellular clone. Furthermore, the INI1 protein, a remodeling-chromatin factor deficient in rhabdoid cells, which

  8. Hepatocyte-derived cultured cells with unusual cytoplasmic keratin-rich spheroid bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavalle, Pierre-Yves; Alsaleh, Khaled; Pillez, André; Cocquerel, Laurence; Allet, Cécile; Dumont, Patrick; Loyens, Anne; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Omary, M Bishr; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves; Wychowski, Czeslaw

    2011-11-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusions are found in a variety of diseases that are characteristic morphological features of several hepatic, muscular and neurodegenerative disorders. They display a predominantly filamentous ultrastructure that is also observed in malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT). A cellular clone containing an intracytoplasmic body was isolated from hepatocyte cell culture, and in the present study we examined whether this body might be related or not to Mallory-Denk body (MDB), a well characterized intracytoplasmic inclusion, or whether this cellular clone was constituted by malignant rhabdoid tumor cells. The intracytoplasmic body was observed in electron microscopy (EM), confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and several proteins involved in the formation of its structure were identified. Using light microscopy, a spheroid body (SB) described as a single regular-shaped cytoplasmic body was observed in cells. During cytokinesis, the SB was disassembled and reassembled in a way to reconstitute a unique SB in each progeny cell. EM examination revealed that the SB was not surrounded by a limiting membrane. However, cytoplasmic filaments were concentrated in a whorled array. These proteins were identified as keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18), which formed the central core of the SB surrounded by a vimentin cage-like structure. This structure was not related to Mallory-Denk body or aggresome since no aggregated proteins were located in SB. Moreover, the structure of SB was not due to mutations in the primary sequence of K8/K18 and vimentin since no difference was observed in the mRNA sequence of their genes, isolated from Huh-7 and Huh-7w7.3 cells. These data suggested that cellular factor(s) could be responsible for the SB formation process. Aggregates of K18 were relocated in the SB when a mutant of K18 inducing disruption of K8/K18 IF network was expressed in the cellular clone. Furthermore, the INI1 protein, a remodeling-chromatin factor deficient in rhabdoid cells, which

  9. Analytical And Numerical Approximation of Effective Diffusivities in The Cytoplasm of Biological Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Hanke, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The simulation of the metabolism in mammalian cells becomes a severe problem if spatial distributions must be taken into account. Especially the cytoplasm has a very complex geometric structure which cannot be handled by standard discretization techniques. In the present paper we propose a homogenization technique for computing effective diffusion constants. This is accomplished by using a two-step strategy. The first step consists of an analytic homogenization from the smallest to an intermediate scale. The homogenization error is estimated by comparing the analytic diffusion constant with a numerical estimate obtained by using real cell geometries. The second step consists of a random homogenization. Since no analytical solution is known to this homogenization problem, a numerical approximation algorithm is proposed. Although rather expensive this algorithm provides a reasonable estimate of the homogenized diffusion constant.

  10. Heterotrimeric G protein participated in modulation of cytoplasmic calcium concentration in pollen cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Zhonglin; MA Ligeng; WANG Xuechen; SUN Daye

    2003-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium concentration([Ca2+]c) in pollen cells of Lilium daviddi is measured with confocal laser scanning microscopy to investigate the effect of heterotrimeric G protein (G protein) on [Ca2+]c and the possible signal transduction pathway of G protein triggering cellular calcium signal. After application, cholera toxin (CTX), an agonist of G protein, triggers a transient increase of [Ca2+]c in pollen cells, and evokes a spatial-temporal characteristic calcium dynamics; while pertussis toxin (PTX), a G protein antagonist, leads to the decrease of [Ca2+]c. Both L-type Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil and inhibitor of IP3 receptor heparin inhibit CTX-induced [Ca2+]c increase. The results show that G protein may play a role in the modulation of [Ca2+]c through enhancing the extracellular Ca2+ influx and releasing of Ca2+ from intracellular stores.

  11. Fluorescence imaging analysis of taxol-induced ASTC-a-1 cell death with cell swelling and cytoplasmic vacuolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong-sheng; Sun, Lei; Wang, Longxiang; Wang, Huiying

    2008-02-01

    Taxol (Paclitaxel), an isolated component from the bark of the Pacific yew Taxus brevifolia, exhibits a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. Taxol can promote microtubule (MT) assembly, inhibit depolymerization, and change MT dynamics, resulting in disruption of the normal reorganization of the microtubule network required for mitosis and cell proliferation. However, the molecular mechanism of taxol-induced cell death is still unclear. In this report, CCK-8 was used to assay the inhibition of taxol on the human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells viability, confocal fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the morphology changes of cells with taxol treatment. We for the first time describe the characteristics of taxol-induced cells swelling, cytoplasmic vacuolization and cell death. Taxol induced swelling, cytoplasmatic vacuolization and cell death without cell shrinkage and membrane rupture. These features differ from those of apoptosis and resemble the paraptosis, a novel nonapoptotic PCD.

  12. Continual Cell Deformation Induced via Attachment to Oriented Fibers Enhances Fibroblast Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Sisi; Ricotta, Vincent; Simon, Marcia; Clark, Richard A. F.; Rafailovich, Miriam H.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast migration is critical to the wound healing process. In vivo, migration occurs on fibrillar substrates, and previous observations have shown that a significant time lag exists before the onset of granulation tissue. We therefore conducted a series of experiments to understand the impact of both fibrillar morphology and migration time. Substrate topography was first shown to have a profound influence. Fibroblasts preferentially attach to fibrillar surfaces, and orient their cytoplasm for maximal contact with the fiber edge. In the case of en-mass cell migration out of an agarose droplet, fibroblasts on flat surfaces emerged with an enhanced velocity, v = 52μm/h, that decreases to the single cell value, v = 28μm/h within 24 hours and remained constant for at least four days. Fibroblasts emerging on fibrillar surfaces emerged with the single cell velocity, which remained constant for the first 24 hours and then increased reaching a plateau with more than twice the initial velocity within the next three days. The focal adhesions were distributed uniformly in cells on flat surfaces, while on the fibrillar surface they were clustered along the cell periphery. Furthermore, the number of focal adhesions for the cells on the flat surfaces remained constant, while it decreased on the fibrillar surface during the next three days. The deformation of the cell nuclei was found to be 50% larger on the fiber surfaces for the first 24 hours. While the mean deformation remained constant on the flat surface, it increased for the next three days by 24% in cells on fibers. On the fourth day, large actin/myosin fibers formed in cells on fibrillar surfaces only and coincided with a change from the standard migration mechanism involving extension of lamellipodia, and retraction of the rear, to one involving strong contractions oriented along the fibers and centered about the nucleus. PMID:25774792

  13. Continual cell deformation induced via attachment to oriented fibers enhances fibroblast cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisi Qin

    Full Text Available Fibroblast migration is critical to the wound healing process. In vivo, migration occurs on fibrillar substrates, and previous observations have shown that a significant time lag exists before the onset of granulation tissue. We therefore conducted a series of experiments to understand the impact of both fibrillar morphology and migration time. Substrate topography was first shown to have a profound influence. Fibroblasts preferentially attach to fibrillar surfaces, and orient their cytoplasm for maximal contact with the fiber edge. In the case of en-mass cell migration out of an agarose droplet, fibroblasts on flat surfaces emerged with an enhanced velocity, v = 52μm/h, that decreases to the single cell value, v = 28μm/h within 24 hours and remained constant for at least four days. Fibroblasts emerging on fibrillar surfaces emerged with the single cell velocity, which remained constant for the first 24 hours and then increased reaching a plateau with more than twice the initial velocity within the next three days. The focal adhesions were distributed uniformly in cells on flat surfaces, while on the fibrillar surface they were clustered along the cell periphery. Furthermore, the number of focal adhesions for the cells on the flat surfaces remained constant, while it decreased on the fibrillar surface during the next three days. The deformation of the cell nuclei was found to be 50% larger on the fiber surfaces for the first 24 hours. While the mean deformation remained constant on the flat surface, it increased for the next three days by 24% in cells on fibers. On the fourth day, large actin/myosin fibers formed in cells on fibrillar surfaces only and coincided with a change from the standard migration mechanism involving extension of lamellipodia, and retraction of the rear, to one involving strong contractions oriented along the fibers and centered about the nucleus.

  14. Mapping of ESE-1 subdomains required to initiate mammary epithelial cell transformation via a cytoplasmic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tentler John J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ETS family transcription factor ESE-1 is often overexpressed in human breast cancer. ESE-1 initiates transformation of MCF-12A cells via a non-transcriptional, cytoplasmic process that is mediated by a unique 40-amino acid serine and aspartic acid rich (SAR subdomain, whereas, ESE-1's nuclear transcriptional property is required to maintain the transformed phenotype of MCF7, ZR-75-1 and T47D breast cancer cells. Results To map the minimal functional nuclear localization (NLS and nuclear export (NES signals, we fused in-frame putative NLS and NES motifs between GFP and the SAR domain. Using these GFP constructs as reporters of subcellular localization, we mapped a single NLS to six basic amino acids (242HGKRRR247 in the AT-hook and two CRM1-dependent NES motifs, one to the pointed domain (NES1: 102LCNCALEELRL112 and another to the DNA binding domain (DBD, (NES2: 275LWEFIRDILI284. Moreover, analysis of a putative NLS located in the DBD (316GQKKKNSN323 by a similar GFP-SAR reporter or by internal deletion of the DBD, revealed this sequence to lack NLS activity. To assess the role of NES2 in regulating ESE-1 subcellular localization and subsequent transformation potency, we site-specifically mutagenized NES2, within full-length GFP-ESE-1 and GFP-NES2-SAR reporter constructs. These studies show that site-specific mutation of NES2 completely abrogates ESE-1 transforming activity. Furthermore, we show that exclusive cytoplasmic targeting of the SAR domain is sufficient to initiate transformation, and we report that an intact SAR domain is required, since block mutagenesis reveals that an intact SAR domain is necessary to maintain its full transforming potency. Finally, using a monoclonal antibody targeting the SAR domain, we demonstrate that the SAR domain contains a region accessible for protein - protein interactions. Conclusions These data highlight that ESE-1 contains NLS and NES signals that play a critical role in

  15. Coulomb interactions between cytoplasmic electric fields and phosphorylated messenger proteins optimize information flow in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Gatenby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal cell function requires timely and accurate transmission of information from receptors on the cell membrane (CM to the nucleus. Movement of messenger proteins in the cytoplasm is thought to be dependent on random walk. However, Brownian motion will disperse messenger proteins throughout the cytosol resulting in slow and highly variable transit times. We propose that a critical component of information transfer is an intracellular electric field generated by distribution of charge on the nuclear membrane (NM. While the latter has been demonstrated experimentally for decades, the role of the consequent electric field has been assumed to be minimal due to a Debye length of about 1 nanometer that results from screening by intracellular Cl- and K+. We propose inclusion of these inorganic ions in the Debye-Huckel equation is incorrect because nuclear pores allow transit through the membrane at a rate far faster than the time to thermodynamic equilibrium. In our model, only the charged, mobile messenger proteins contribute to the Debye length. FINDINGS: Using this revised model and published data, we estimate the NM possesses a Debye-Huckel length of a few microns and find this is consistent with recent measurement using intracellular nano-voltmeters. We demonstrate the field will accelerate isolated messenger proteins toward the nucleus through Coulomb interactions with negative charges added by phosphorylation. We calculate transit times as short as 0.01 sec. When large numbers of phosphorylated messenger proteins are generated by increasing concentrations of extracellular ligands, we demonstrate they generate a self-screening environment that regionally attenuates the cytoplasmic field, slowing movement but permitting greater cross talk among pathways. Preliminary experimental results with phosphorylated RAF are consistent with model predictions. CONCLUSION: This work demonstrates that previously unrecognized Coulomb interactions

  16. The molecular biology of rotaviruses X: intercellular dissemination of rotavirus NSP4 requires glycosylation and is mediated by direct cell-cell contact through cytoplasmic extrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiming; McCrae, Malcolm A

    2012-02-01

    The effect of expressing the NSP4 protein of group A rotaviruses in cells has been studied. It led to the rapid appearance of long cytoplasmic extrusions, which, through site-directed mutagenesis of the N-linked glycosylation sites near the amino terminus of the protein, were shown to be dependent on its ability to become fully glycosylated. Real-time confocal microscopy was used to follow the appearance of similar cytoplasmic extrusions in virus-infected cells and revealed them to grow at a rate of ~2 microns/min to more than three cell diameters and to have a lifespan of 30-60 minutes. CellTracker dyes were used to label cell populations and facilitate the monitoring of the transfer of cytoplasm from virus-infected to surrounding uninfected cells through cytoplasmic extrusions that broke down to vesicles, seen both on the surface of and within uninfected cells in mixed cell populations. Staining of these tagged cell mixtures with monospecific antibody to NSP4 revealed the presence of the protein on uninfected cells, suggesting that the cytoplasmic extrusions formed by virus-infected cells facilitates the direct cell-cell spread of NSP4. This direct cell-cell transfer of infected cell material triggered by expression of glycosylated NSP4 in virus-infected cells may contribute to viral pathogenesis and facilitate host invasion by rotaviruses.

  17. Hybrid solar cell on a carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynko, Dmytro A.; Fedoryak, Alexander N.; Smertenko, Petro S.; Dimitriev, Oleg P.; Ogurtsov, Nikolay A.; Pud, Alexander A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a method to assemble nanoscale hybrid solar cells in the form of a brush of radially oriented CdS nanowire crystals around a single carbon fiber is demonstrated for the first time. A solar cell was assembled on a carbon fiber with a diameter of ~5-10 μm which served as a core electrode; inorganic CdS nanowire crystals and organic dye or polymer layers were successively deposited on the carbon fiber as active components resulting in a core-shell photovoltaic structure. Polymer, dye-sensitized, and inverted solar cells have been prepared and compared with their analogues made on the flat indium-tin oxide electrode.

  18. Regulation of T cell receptor activation by dynamic membrane binding of the CD3epsilon cytoplasmic tyrosine-based motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenqi; Gagnon, Etienne; Call, Matthew E; Schnell, Jason R; Schwieters, Charles D; Carman, Christopher V; Chou, James J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W

    2008-11-14

    Many immune system receptors signal through cytoplasmic tyrosine-based motifs (ITAMs), but how receptor ligation results in ITAM phosphorylation remains unknown. Live-cell imaging studies showed a close interaction of the CD3epsilon cytoplasmic domain of the T cell receptor (TCR) with the plasma membrane through fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a C-terminal fluorescent protein and a membrane fluorophore. Electrostatic interactions between basic CD3epsilon residues and acidic phospholipids enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane were required for binding. The nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the lipid-bound state of this cytoplasmic domain revealed deep insertion of the two key tyrosines into the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer. Receptor ligation thus needs to result in unbinding of the CD3epsilon ITAM from the membrane to render these tyrosines accessible to Src kinases. Sequestration of key tyrosines into the lipid bilayer represents a previously unrecognized mechanism for control of receptor activation.

  19. Cytoplasmic p21 induced by p65 prevents doxorubicin-induced cell death in pancreatic carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou YingQi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown the existence of p21 induction in a p53-dependent and -independent pathway. Our previous study indicates that DOX-induced p65 is able to bind the p21 promoter to activate its transactivation in the cells. Methods Over-expression and knock-down experiments were performed in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma (PANC1 cells. Cell cycle and cell death related proteins were assessed by Western Blotting. Cytotoxicity assay was checked by CCK-8 kit. Cell growth was analyzed by flow cytometers. Results Here we showed that over-expression of p65 decreased the cytotoxic effect of DOX on PANC1 cells, correlating with increased induction of cytoplasmic p21. We observed that pro-caspase-3 physically associated with cytoplasmic p21, which may be contribution to prevent p21 translocation into the nucleus. Our data also suggested that no clear elevation of nuclear p21 by p65 provides a survival advantage by progression cell cycle after treatment of DOX. Likewise, down-regulation of p65 expression enhanced the cytotoxic effect of DOX, due to a significant decrease of mRNA levels of anti-apoptotic genes, such as the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis-1 (c-IAP1, and the long isoform of B cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2, leading to efficient induction of caspase-3 cleavage in the cells. More, we present evidence that over-expression of p53 or p53/p65 in the PANC1 cells were more sensitive to DOX treatment, correlated with activation of caspase-3 and clear elevation of nuclear p21 level. Our previous data suggested that expression of p21 increases Gefitinib-induced cell death by blocking the cell cycle at the G1 and G2 phases. The present findings here reinforced this idea by showing p21's ability of potentiality of DOX-induced cell death correlated with its inhibition of cell cycle progression after over-expression of p53 or p53/p65. Conclusion Our data suggested p65 could increase p53-mediated cell death in response to DOX in PANC1 cells

  20. The effect of cytoplasmic regions of LIF receptor on activating MAPK p42/44 in HL-60 cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hou-qi; SHAN Ji-kuan; TANG Shu-ping; LIU Shan-rong; JI Kai-hong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the relation between the cytoplasmic region of each subunit of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in human leukemia line HL-60 for studying the mechanism of leukemia cell proliferation disorder. Methods: We prepared the chimerical receptor with exchanged cytoplasmic domain (190/130,130/190), expressed it on the membrane of HL-60, and then bound LIF with the wild type receptor competitively. The cytoplasmic region homodimerization (190cyt- 190cyt, 130cyt- 130cyt) initiated intracellular signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation. MAPK phosphorylation level was observed by means of immunoblotting and immunobiochemistry. Results: Higher level ofMAPK p42/p44 phosphorylation (Thr202Tyr204) and faster cell proliferation were determined in group 190/130 compared with the wild type receptor. Those in group 130/190 were lower than the others. Conclusion: The cytoplasmic domain ofgpl30 involves in the induction of MAPK activation and the cell proliferation of HL-60.

  1. DGCR8 Localizes to the Nucleus as well as Cytoplasmic Structures in Mammalian Spermatogenic Cells and Epididymal Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akane Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The localization of DGCR8 in spermatogenic cells and sperm from rat and mouse was studied by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Spermatogenic cells from these species yielded similar DGCR8 localization pattern. Immunofluorescence microscopy results showed that DGCR8 localized to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. In the cytoplasm, diffuse cytosolic and discrete granular staining was observed. Dual staining showed that DGCR8 colocalized to the granules with MAEL (a nuage marker. In the nucleus of spermatocytes, both the nucleoli and nucleoplasm were stained, whereas in the nucleus of early spermatids small spots were stained. In late spermatids, DGCR8 localized to the tip of their head and to small granules (neck granules of the neck cytoplasm. The neck granules were also observed in the neck of epididymal sperm. Immunoelectron microscopy results showed that DGCR8 localized to nuage structures. Moreover, DGCR8 localized to nonnuage structures in late spermatids. DGCR8 also localized to the nucleolus and euchromatin in spermatocytes and round spermatids and to small granules in the nucleus of late spermatids. The results suggest that in spermatogenic cells DGCR8 localizes not only to the nuclei but also to the cytoplasmic structures such as nuage and nonnuage structures. Furthermore, DGCR8 seems to be imported into the egg with neck granules in sperm during fertilization.

  2. Developmental potential of embryonic cells in a nucleocytoplasmic hybrid formed using a goldfish haploid nucleus and loach egg cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Takafumi; Saito, Taiju; Sakao, Suzu; Arai, Katsutoshi; Yamaha, Etsuro

    2010-01-01

    In teleosts, viable nucleocytoplasmic hybrids, formed by combining a nucleus from one species with the egg cytoplasm of another, have been used as one of the methods for breed improvement in aquaculture, but have been little exploited for developmental biology studies. Here, we used an artificial androgenesis technique to form nucleocytoplasmic hybrids comprising a goldfish haploid nucleus and loach egg cytoplasm. These hybrids were used to investigate interactions between the nucleus and cytoplasm during embryonic development. Additionally, the developmental characteristics of embryonic cells of nucleocytoplasmic hybrids were examined in chimeras produced by transplantation of blastomeres into recipient loach or goldfish embryos. We found that the nucleocytoplasmic hybrids arrested at the dome stage of embryonic development and did not form any gastrula structures. The goosecoid (gsc) and no tail (ntl) genes were expressed normally before gastrulation in nucleocytoplasmic hybrids, similar to diploid loach. However, expression of the gsc and ntl genes was not maintained in nucleocytoplasmic hybrids. In chimeric embryos, blastomeres derived from nucleocytoplasmic hybrids were found to mix with the cells of recipient loach embryos at the gastrula stage. The transplanted blastomeres formed small clusters at the somitogenesis stage and, finally, small spots at the hatching stage. In contrast, when the blastomeres were transplanted into goldfish embryos, the transplanted blastomeres aggregated in the chimeric embryos. Thus, embryonic cells from nucleocytoplasmic hybrids that arrest before gastrulation could survive beyond the somitogenesis stage depending on the cytoplasmic environment in the recipient embryos.

  3. Serum B-cell activating factor in myeloperoxiase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Gang; Chen, Min; Su, Yun; Xu, Li-Xia; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Li, Kang-Sheng

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the serum B-cell activating factor belonging to tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) levels in patients with myeloperoxidase (MPO)-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) were measured, and their clinical significance was further analyzed. One hundred twenty-one patients with MPO-AAV were enrolled in this study. Eighty-three patients had active vasculitis and 38 were in remission. Fifty-five healthy individuals were used as healthy controls. The levels of serum BAFF were assessed using commercial available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The correlations between serum BAFF and Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and MPO-ANCA were further evaluated. The levels of serum BAFF of patients with MPO-AAV in both active (6.06±5.02 ng/mL) and remission phases (3.60±3.83 ng/mL) were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (0.87±0.31 ng/mL) (Pvasculitis were significantly higher than those in remission (PVasculitis Activity Score (r=0.320, Pvasculitis were 1.58 and 4.20 ng/mL, respectively. The levels of serum BAFF were elevated in patients with MPO-AAV and associated with disease activity, but they were not related with the levels of MPO-ANCA.

  4. Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (anti-Yo) autoimmunity in a child with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, Guillermo; Alisanski, Susan B; Pranzatelli, Michael; Clardy, Stacey L; Lennon, Vanda A; McKeon, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA-1)-IgG (or anti-Yo) is characteristically detected in women with gynecological or breast adenocarcinoma. We describe 2 unique scenarios occurring in 1 patient: PCA-1 paraneoplastic autoimmunity in a child, and a paraneoplastic neurological disorder in the context of Down syndrome. A child with Down syndrome and a history of adrenocortical carcinoma resected at age 1 year presented at age 7 years with cerebellar ataxia of subacute onset. Paraneoplastic serological and cerebrospinal fluid evaluations revealed PCA-1. Serological and biochemical studies also supported a diagnosis of subclinical autoimmune hypothyroidism. Extensive serum, urine, and radiological testing did not reveal a new or recurrent neoplasm. Neurological improvements after standard immunotherapy were lacking. Solid organ neoplasms are uncommon among patients with Down syndrome, but organ-specific autoimmune diseases are common. In our patient, Down syndrome-related impaired T regulatory lymphocyte function (previously reported) may have resulted in both enhanced immunity against an undetected solid neoplasm and paraneoplastic neurological (PCA-1) autoimmunity.

  5. The Hagfish Gland Thread Cell: A Fiber-Producing Cell Involved in Predator Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S. Fudge

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibers are ubiquitous in biology, and include tensile materials produced by specialized glands (such as silks, extracellular fibrils that reinforce exoskeletons and connective tissues (such as chitin and collagen, as well as intracellular filaments that make up the metazoan cytoskeleton (such as F-actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments. Hagfish gland thread cells are unique in that they produce a high aspect ratio fiber from cytoskeletal building blocks within the confines of their cytoplasm. These threads are elaborately coiled into structures that readily unravel when they are ejected into seawater from the slime glands. In this review we summarize what is currently known about the structure and function of gland thread cells and we speculate about the mechanism that these cells use to produce a mechanically robust fiber that is almost one hundred thousand times longer than it is wide. We propose that a key feature of this mechanism involves the unidirectional rotation of the cell’s nucleus, which would serve to twist disorganized filaments into a coherent thread and impart a torsional stress on the thread that would both facilitate coiling and drive energetic unravelling in seawater.

  6. The physical chemistry of cytoplasm and its influence on cell function: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby-Phelps, Kate

    2013-09-01

    From the point of view of intermolecular interactions, the cytoplasmic space is more like a crowded party in a house full of furniture than a game of tag in an empty field. Understanding the physical chemical properties of cytoplasm is thus of key importance for understanding cellular function. This article attempts to provide an entrée into the current literature on this subject and offers some general guidelines for thinking about intracellular biochemistry.

  7. Thin gas cell with GRIN fiber lens for intra-cavity fiber laser gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo; Dai, Jing-min; Peng, Gang-ding

    2009-07-01

    Fiber laser gas sensors based on the intra-cavity absorption spectroscopy require the use of gas cells. We propose a simple and reliable gas cell using graded-index fiber lens (GFL) based all-fiber collimator. Conventional gas cells usually utilize direct fiber-to-fiber coupling without collimators or graded-index (GRIN) lens as collimators. Direct fiberto- fiber gas cell has simple configuration, but it suffers from high coupling loss and stray light interference. Gas cells applying fiber pigtailed GRIN lens are advantageous to achieve low coupling loss. However, fiber pigtailed GRIN lens requires accurate and complicated alignment and glue packaging which could compromise long term reliability and thermal stability. The proposed technique fabricates all-fiber collimators by simply splicing a short section of gradedindex fiber to single mode fiber which is both compact and durable. With that collimator, the gas cell can be fabricated very thin and are suitable for extreme environments with high temperature and vibration. In this paper, we have carried out experiment and analysis to evaluate the proposed technique. The coupling efficiency is studied versus different GFL gradient parameter profiles using ray matrix transformation of the complex beam parameter. Experiments are also done to prove the practical feasibility of the collimator. The analysis indicates that gas cell using GFLs can overcome the disadvantages of traditional design; it may replace the conventional gas cells in practical applications.

  8. Stringent control of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in guard cells of intact plants compared to their counterparts in epidermal strips or guard cell protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, V; Guinot, D R; Klein, M; Roelfsema, M R G; Hedrich, R; Dietrich, P

    2008-01-01

    Cytoplasmic calcium elevations, transients, and oscillations are thought to encode information that triggers a variety of physiological responses in plant cells. Yet Ca(2+) signals induced by a single stimulus vary, depending on the physiological state of the cell and experimental conditions. We compared Ca(2+) homeostasis and stimulus-induced Ca(2+) signals in guard cells of intact plants, epidermal strips, and isolated protoplasts. Single-cell ratiometric imaging with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye Fura 2 was applied in combination with electrophysiological recordings. Guard cell protoplasts were loaded with Fura 2 via a patch pipette, revealing a cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentration of around 80 nM at -47 mV. Upon hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane to -107 mV, the Ca(2+) concentration increased to levels exceeding 400 nM. Intact guard cells were able to maintain much lower cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentrations at hyperpolarized potentials, the average concentration at -100 mV was 183 and 90 nM in epidermal strips and intact plants, respectively. Further hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane to -160 mV induced a sustained rise of the guard cell cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration, which slowly returned to the prestimulus level in intact plants but not in epidermal strips. Our results show that cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations are stringently controlled in guard cells of intact plants but become increasingly more sensitive to changes in the plasma membrane potential in epidermal strips and isolated protoplasts.

  9. Cell line OCI/AML3 bears exon-12 NPM gene mutation-A and cytoplasmic expression of nucleophosmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentmeier, H; Martelli, M P; Dirks, W G; Bolli, N; Liso, A; Macleod, R A F; Nicoletti, I; Mannucci, R; Pucciarini, A; Bigerna, B; Martelli, M F; Mecucci, C; Drexler, H G; Falini, B

    2005-10-01

    We recently identified a new acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtype characterized by mutations at exon-12 of the nucleophosmin (NPM) gene and aberrant cytoplasmic expression of NPM protein (NPMc+). NPMc+ AML accounts for about 35% of adult AML and it is associated with normal karyotype, wide morphological spectrum, CD34-negativity, high frequency of FLT3-ITD mutations and good response to induction therapy. In an attempt to identify a human cell line to serve as a model for the in vitro study of NPMc+ AML, we screened 79 myeloid cell lines for mutations at exon-12 of NPM. One of these cell lines, OCI/AML3, showed a TCTG duplication at exon-12 of NPM. This mutation corresponds to the type A, the NPM mutation most frequently observed in primary NPMc+ AML. OCI/AML3 cells also displayed typical phenotypic features of NPMc+ AML, that is, expression of macrophage markers and lack of CD34, and the immunocytochemical hallmark of this leukemia subtype, that is, the aberrant cytoplasmic expression of NPM. The OCI/AML3 cell line easily engrafts in NOD/SCID mice and maintains in the animals the typical features of NPMc+ AML, such as the NPM cytoplasmic expression. For all these reasons, the OCI/AML3 cell line represents a remarkable tool for biomolecular studies of NPMc+ AML.

  10. Retention of prolyl hydroxylase PHD2 in the cytoplasm prevents PHD2-induced anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokilehto, Terhi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Turku Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Hoegel, Heidi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Heikkinen, Pekka [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Turku Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Rantanen, Krista [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Elenius, Klaus [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Medical Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Sundstroem, Jari [Department of Pathology, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Jaakkola, Panu M. [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland)

    2010-04-15

    Cellular oxygen tension is sensed by a family of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) that regulate the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1{alpha} and -2{alpha}). The PHD2 isoform is considered as the main downregulator of HIF in normoxia. Our previous results have shown that nuclear translocation of PHD2 associates with poorly differentiated tumor phenotype implying that nuclear PHD2 expression is advantageous for tumor growth. Here we show that a pool of PHD2 is shuttled between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In line with this, accumulation of wild type PHD2 in the nucleus was detected in human colon adenocarcinomas and in cultured carcinoma cells. The PHD2 isoforms showing high nuclear expression increased anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth. However, retention of PHD2 in the cytoplasm inhibited the anchorage-independent cell growth. A region that inhibits the nuclear localization of PHD2 was identified and the deletion of the region promoted anchorage-independent growth of carcinoma cells. Finally, the cytoplasmic PHD2, as compared with the nuclear PHD2, less efficiently downregulated HIF expression. Forced HIF-1{alpha} or -2{alpha} expression decreased and attenuation of HIF expression increased the anchorage-independent cell growth. However, hydroxylase-inactivating mutations in PHD2 had no effect on cell growth. The data imply that nuclear PHD2 localization promotes malignant cancer phenotype.

  11. From oocyte to 16-cell stage: cytoplasmic and cortical reorganizations that pattern the ascidian embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardet, Christian; Paix, Alexandre; Prodon, François; Dru, Philippe; Chenevert, Janet

    2007-07-01

    The dorsoventral and anteroposterior axes of the ascidian embryo are defined before first cleavage by means of a series of reorganizations that reposition cytoplasmic and cortical domains established during oogenesis. These domains situated in the periphery of the oocyte contain developmental determinants and a population of maternal postplasmic/PEM RNAs. One of these RNAs (macho-1) is a determinant for the muscle cells of the tadpole embryo. Oocytes acquire a primary animal-vegetal (a-v) axis during meiotic maturation, when a subcortical mitochondria-rich domain (myoplasm) and a domain rich in cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) and maternal postplasmic/PEM RNAs (cER-mRNA domain) become polarized and asymmetrically enriched in the vegetal hemisphere. Fertilization at metaphase of meiosis I initiates a series of dramatic cytoplasmic and cortical reorganizations of the zygote, which occur in two major phases. The first major phase depends on sperm entry which triggers a calcium wave leading in turn to an actomyosin-driven contraction wave. The contraction concentrates the cER-mRNA domain and myoplasm in and around a vegetal/contraction pole. The precise localization of the vegetal/contraction pole depends on both the a-v axis and the location of sperm entry and prefigures the future site of gastrulation and dorsal side of the embryo. The second major phase of reorganization occurs between meiosis completion and first cleavage. Sperm aster microtubules and then cortical microfilaments cause the cER-mRNA domain and myoplasm to reposition toward the posterior of the zygote. The location of the posterior pole depends on the localization of the sperm centrosome/aster attained during the first major phase of reorganization. Both cER-mRNA and myoplasm domains localized in the posterior region are partitioned equally between the first two blastomeres and then asymmetrically over the next two cleavages. At the eight-cell stage the cER-mRNA domain compacts and gives rise to

  12. Giemsa-based cytological assessment of area, shape and nucleus:cytoplasm ratio of goblet cells of rabbit bulbar conjunctiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, M J

    2016-11-01

    Goblet cells were visualized in impression cytology specimens from bulbar conjunctiva of the rabbit eye using Giemsa staining. Highly magnified images were used to generate outlines of the goblet cells and their characteristic eccentric nuclei. Using sets of 10 cells from 15 cytology specimens, I found that the longest dimension of the goblet cells averaged 16.7 ± 2.3 μm, the shortest dimension averaged 14.4 ± 1.8 μm and the nucleus averaged 6.3 ± 0.8 μm. The goblet cells were ellipsoid in shape and the longest:shortest cell dimension ratio averaged 1.169 ± 0.091. The goblet cell areas ranged from 108 to 338 μm(2) (average 193 ± 50 μm(2)). The area could be predicted reliably from the longest and shortest dimensions (r(2) = 0.903). The areas of goblet cell nuclei were 15-58 μm(2) (average 33 ± μm(2)) and the nucleus:cytoplasm area fraction was predictably greater in smaller goblet cells and less in the larger goblet cells (Spearman correlation = 0.817). The nuclei were estimated to occupy an average of 9.5% of the cell volume. The differences in size, shape and nucleus:cytoplasm ratio may reflect differences in goblet cell maturation.

  13. Microarray analysis of cytoplasmic versus whole cell RNA reveals a considerable number of missed and false positive mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, Heidi W; Cowper-Sal-lari, Richard; Sartor, Maureen A; Gui, Jiang; Heath, Catherine V; Renuka, Janhavi; Higgins, Azara-Jane; Andrews, Peter; Korc, Murray; Moore, Jason H; Tomlinson, Craig R

    2009-10-01

    With no known exceptions, every published microarray study to determine differential mRNA levels in eukaryotes used RNA extracted from whole cells. It is assumed that the use of whole cell RNA in microarray gene expression analysis provides a legitimate profile of steady-state mRNA. Standard labeling methods and the prevailing dogma that mRNA resides almost exclusively in the cytoplasm has led to the long-standing belief that the nuclear RNA contribution is negligible. We report that unadulterated cytoplasmic RNA uncovers differentially expressed mRNAs that otherwise would not have been detected when using whole cell RNA and that the inclusion of nuclear RNA has a large impact on whole cell gene expression microarray results by distorting the mRNA profile to the extent that a substantial number of false positives are generated. We conclude that to produce a valid profile of the steady-state mRNA population, the nuclear component must be excluded, and to arrive at a more realistic view of a cell's gene expression profile, the nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA fractions should be analyzed separately.

  14. Comparison of the contributions of the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments to global gene expression in human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Ronald M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the most general sense, studies involving global analysis of gene expression aim to provide a comprehensive catalog of the components involved in the production of recognizable cellular phenotypes. These studies are often limited by the available technologies. One technology, based on microarrays, categorizes gene expression in terms of the abundance of RNA transcripts, and typically employs RNA prepared from whole cells, where cytoplasmic RNA predominates. Results Using microarrays comprising oligonucleotide probes that represent either protein-coding transcripts or microRNAs (miRNA, we have studied global transcript accumulation patterns for the HepG2 (human hepatoma cell line. Through subdividing the total pool of RNA transcripts into samples from nuclei, the cytoplasm, and whole cells, we determined the degree of correlation of these patterns across these different subcellular locations. The transcript and miRNA abundance patterns for the three RNA fractions were largely similar, but with some exceptions: nuclear RNA samples were enriched with respect to the cytoplasm in transcripts encoding proteins associated with specific nuclear functions, such as the cell cycle, mitosis, and transcription. The cytoplasmic RNA fraction also was enriched, when compared to the nucleus, in transcripts for proteins related to specific nuclear functions, including the cell cycle, DNA replication, and DNA repair. Some transcripts related to the ubiquitin cycle, and transcripts for various membrane proteins were sorted into either the nuclear or cytoplasmic fractions. Conclusion Enrichment or compartmentalization of cell cycle and ubiquitin cycle transcripts within the nucleus may be related to the regulation of their expression, by preventing their translation to proteins. In this way, these cellular functions may be tightly controlled by regulating the release of mRNA from the nucleus and thereby the expression of key rate limiting

  15. Induction of cytoplasmic rods and rings structures by inhibition of the CTP and GTP synthetic pathway in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy C Carcamo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic filamentous rods and rings (RR structures were identified using human autoantibodies as probes. In the present study, the formation of these conserved structures in mammalian cells and functions linked to these structures were examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Distinct cytoplasmic rods (∼3-10 µm in length and rings (∼2-5 µm in diameter in HEp-2 cells were initially observed in immunofluorescence using human autoantibodies. Co-localization studies revealed that, although RR had filament-like features, they were not enriched in actin, tubulin, or vimentin, and not associated with centrosomes or other known cytoplasmic structures. Further independent studies revealed that two key enzymes in the nucleotide synthetic pathway cytidine triphosphate synthase 1 (CTPS1 and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2 were highly enriched in RR. CTPS1 enzyme inhibitors 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine and Acivicin as well as the IMPDH2 inhibitor Ribavirin exhibited dose-dependent induction of RR in >95% of cells in all cancer cell lines tested as well as mouse primary cells. RR formation by lower concentration of Ribavirin was enhanced in IMPDH2-knockdown HeLa cells whereas it was inhibited in GFP-IMPDH2 overexpressed HeLa cells. Interestingly, RR were detected readily in untreated mouse embryonic stem cells (>95%; upon retinoic acid differentiation, RR disassembled in these cells but reformed when treated with Acivicin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RR formation represented response to disturbances in the CTP or GTP synthetic pathways in cancer cell lines and mouse primary cells and RR are the convergence physical structures in these pathways. The availability of specific markers for these conserved structures and the ability to induce formation in vitro will allow further investigations in structure and function of RR in many biological systems in health and diseases.

  16. Vesicular Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport—Herpesviruses as Pioneers in Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Mettenleiter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses use a vesicle-mediated transfer of intranuclearly assembled nucleocapsids through the nuclear envelope (NE for final maturation in the cytoplasm. The molecular basis for this novel vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is beginning to be elucidated in detail. The heterodimeric viral nuclear egress complex (NEC, conserved within the classical herpesviruses, mediates vesicle formation from the inner nuclear membrane (INM by polymerization into a hexagonal lattice followed by fusion of the vesicle membrane with the outer nuclear membrane (ONM. Mechanisms of capsid inclusion as well as vesicle-membrane fusion, however, are largely unclear. Interestingly, a similar transport mechanism through the NE has been demonstrated in nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein complexes during Drosophila neuromuscular junction formation, indicating a widespread presence of a novel concept of cellular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport.

  17. Vesicular Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport—Herpesviruses as Pioneers in Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses use a vesicle-mediated transfer of intranuclearly assembled nucleocapsids through the nuclear envelope (NE) for final maturation in the cytoplasm. The molecular basis for this novel vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is beginning to be elucidated in detail. The heterodimeric viral nuclear egress complex (NEC), conserved within the classical herpesviruses, mediates vesicle formation from the inner nuclear membrane (INM) by polymerization into a hexagonal lattice followed by fusion of the vesicle membrane with the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). Mechanisms of capsid inclusion as well as vesicle-membrane fusion, however, are largely unclear. Interestingly, a similar transport mechanism through the NE has been demonstrated in nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein complexes during Drosophila neuromuscular junction formation, indicating a widespread presence of a novel concept of cellular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. PMID:27690080

  18. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilby, Mary J.

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology. PMID:27504112

  19. Multi-scale characean experimental system: from electrophysiology of membrane transporters to cell-to-cell connectivity, cytoplasmic streaming and auxin metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Beilby

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology.

  20. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilby, Mary J

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology.

  1. Cobalt protoporphyrin induces differentiation of monocytic THP-1 cells through regulation of cytoplasmic Ref-1-related NADPH oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ju Dong; Lee, Sang Kwon; Park, Si Eun; Kim, Kang Mi; Kim, Koanhoi; Park, Yeong Min; Park, Young Chul

    2011-11-01

    Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) is a potent and effective metalloporphyrin inducer of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) activity in many tissues. Here, we report that CoPP induces differentiation of monocytic THP-1 cells into macrophage-like cells. CoPP induced a marked growth inhibition with a slight reduction in viability, and increased adhesion and spreading of THP-1 cells. However, other protoporphyrins did not. CoPP also resulted in expression of CD11b, MMP9, MSR1, CD14 and ICAM-1, which are differentiation markers for macrophages. Interestingly, we observed a decrease of cytoplasmic redox factor-1 (Ref-1) levels in the process of CoPP-induced differentiation of THP-1 cells. In addition, knockdown of Ref-1 by siRNA enhanced cell adhesion induced by CoPP. Furthermore, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), completely abolished CoPP-induced adhesion of Ref-1-deficient cells using an siRNA. A cytosolic factor for NADPH oxidase activity, p47phox, was significantly increased in THP-1 cells by CoPP treatment. Κnockdown of Ref-1 increased CoPP-induced p47phox expression in THP-1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CoPP induces differentiation of monocytic THP-1 cells, and that the CoPP-induced differentiation is associated with cytoplasmic Ref-1-related NADPH oxidase activity.

  2. Polyubiquitinated proteins, proteasome, and glycogen characterize the particle-rich cytoplasmic structure (PaCS) of neoplastic and fetal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necchi, Vittorio; Sommi, Patrizia; Vitali, Agostina; Vanoli, Alessandro; Savoia, Anna; Ricci, Vittorio; Solcia, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    A particle-rich cytoplasmic structure (PaCS) concentrating ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) components and barrel-like particles in clear, cytoskeleton- and organelle-free areas has recently been described in some neoplasms and in genetic or infectious diseases at risk of neoplasia. Ultrastructurally similar particulate cytoplasmic structures, interpreted as glycogen deposits, have previously been reported in clear-cell neoplasms and some fetal tissues. It remains to be investigated whether the two structures are the same, colocalize UPS components and polysaccharides, and have a role in highly proliferative cells such as fetal and neoplastic cells. We used immunogold electron microscopy and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy to examine human and mouse fetal tissues and human neoplasms. Fetal and neoplastic cells both showed colocalization of polyubiquitinated proteins, 19S and 20S proteasomes, and polysaccharides, both glycogen and chondroitin sulfate, inside cytoplasmic structures showing all distinctive features of PaCSs. Poorly demarcated and/or hybrid (ribosomes admixed) UPS- and glycogen-enriched areas, likely stages in PaCS development, were also seen in some fetal cells, with special reference to those, like primary alveolar pulmonary cells or pancreatic centroacinar cells, having a crucial role in organogenesis. UPS- and glycogen-rich PaCSs developed extensively in clear-cell neoplasms of the kidney, ovary, pancreas, and other organs, as well as, in infantile, development-related tumors replicating fetal patterns, such as choroid plexus papilloma. UPS-mediated, ATP-dependent proteolysis and its potential energy source, glycogen metabolism, may have a crucial, synergic role in embryo-/organogenesis and carcinogenesis.

  3. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  4. T Cell Receptor Activation of NF-κB in Effector T Cells: Visualizing Signaling Events Within and Beyond the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Immunological Synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traver, Maria K; Paul, Suman; Schaefer, Brian C

    2017-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) to NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation and effector T cell differentiation and function. In naïve T cells, data suggest that most or all key cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling occurs in a TCR-proximal manner at the immunological synapse (IS). However, the subcellular organization of cytoplasmic NF-κB-activating complexes in effector T cells is more complex, involving signaling molecules and regulatory mechanisms beyond those operative in naïve cells. Additionally, in effector T cells, much signaling occurs at cytoplasmic locations distant from the IS. Visualization of these cytoplasmic signaling complexes has provided key insights into the complex and dynamic regulation of NF-κB signal transduction in effector T cells. In this chapter, we provide in-depth protocols for activating and preparing effector T cells for fluorescence imaging, as well as a discussion of the effective application of distinct imaging methodologies, including confocal and super-resolution microscopy and imaging flow cytometry.

  5. Regulation of T cell Receptor Activation by Dynamic Membrane Binding of the CD3ε Cytoplasmic Tyrosine-Based Motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenqi; Gagnon, Etienne; Call, Matthew E.; Schnell, Jason R.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Carman, Christopher V.; Chou, James J.; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Many immune system receptors signal through cytoplasmic tyrosine-based motifs (ITAMs), but how receptor ligation results in ITAM phosphorylation remains unknown. Live cell imaging studies showed a close interaction of the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain of the T cell receptor (TCR) with the plasma membrane through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a C-terminal fluorescent protein and a membrane fluorophore. Electrostatic interactions between basic CD3ε residues and acidic phospholipids enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane were required for binding. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the lipid-bound state of this cytoplasmic domain revealed deep insertion of the two key tyrosines into the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer. Receptor ligation thus needs to result in unbinding of the CD3ε ITAM from the membrane to render these tyrosines accessible to Src kinases. Sequestration of key tyrosines into the lipid bilayer represents a previously unrecognized mechanism for control of receptor activation. PMID:19013279

  6. Cytoplasmic localization and redox cysteine residue of APE1/Ref-1 are associated with its anti-inflammatory activity in cultured endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung Soo; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Gun; Kim, Soo Jin; Choi, Sunga; Lee, Sang Do; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2013-11-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein involved in base excision DNA repair and transcriptional regulation of gene expression. APE1/Ref-1 is mainly localized in the nucleus, but cytoplasmic localization has also been reported. However, the functional role of cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 and its redox cysteine residue are still unknown. We investigated the role of cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions in endothelial cells. Endogenous APE1/Ref-1 was mainly observed in the nucleus, however, cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 was increased by TNF-α. Cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 expression was not blunted by cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, suggesting cytoplasmic translocation of APE1/Ref-1. Transfection of an N-terminus deletion mutant APE1/Ref-1(29-318) inhibited TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression, indicating an anti-inflammatory role for APE1/Ref-1 in the cytoplasm. In contrast, redox mutant of APE1/Ref-1 (C65A/C93A) transfection led to increased TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression. Our findings suggest cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 localization and redox cysteine residues of APE1/Ref-1 are associated with its anti-inflammatory activity in endothelial cells.

  7. Dynamic distribution of Ser-10 phosphorylated histone H3 in cytoplasm of MCF-7 and CHO cells during mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Wen LI; Qin YANG; Jia Tong CHEN; Hao ZHOU; Ru Ming LIU; Xi Tai HUANG

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic distribution of phosphorylated Histone H3 on Ser10 (phospho-H3) in cells was investigated to determine its function during mitosis. Human breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7, and Chinese hamster cells CHO were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence staining with an antibody against phospho-H3. We found that the phosphorylation begins at early prophase, and spreads throughout the chromosomes at late prophase. At metaphase, most of the phosphoH3 aggregates at the end of the condensed entity of chromosomes at equatorial plate. During anaphase and telophase,the fluorescent signal of phospho-H3 is detached from chromosomes into cytoplasm. At early anaphase, phospho-H3shows ladder bands between two sets of separated chromosome, and forms "sandwich-like structure" when the chromosomes condensed. With the cleavage progressing, the "ladders" of the histone contract into a bigger bright dot. Then the histone aggregates and some of compacted microtubules in the midbody region are composed into a "bar-like"complex to separate daughter cells. The daughter cells seal their plasma membrane along with the ends of the "bar",inside which locates microtubules and modified histones, to finish the cytokinesis and keep the "bar complex" out of the cells. The specific distribution and kinetics of phospho-H3 in cytoplasm suggest that the modified histones may take part in the formation of midbody and play a crucial role in cytokinesis.

  8. E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain inhibits cell surface localization of endogenous cadherins and fusion of C2C12 myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Ozawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Myoblast fusion is a highly regulated process that is essential for skeletal muscle formation during muscle development and regeneration in mammals. Much remains to be elucidated about the molecular mechanism of myoblast fusion although cadherins, which are Ca2+-dependent cell–cell adhesion molecules, are thought to play a critical role in this process. Mouse myoblasts lacking either N-cadherin or M-cadherin can still fuse to form myotubes, indicating that they have no specific function in this process and may be functionally replaced by either M-cadherin or N-cadherin, respectively. In this study, we show that expressing the E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain ectopically in C2C12 myoblasts inhibits cell surface localization of endogenous M-cadherin and N-cadherin, as well as cell–cell fusion. This domain, however, does not inhibit myoblast differentiation according to microarray-based gene expression analysis. In contrast, expressing a dominant-negative β-catenin mutant ectopically, which suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signaling, did not inhibit cell–cell fusion. Therefore, the E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain inhibits cell–cell fusion by inhibiting cell surface localization of endogenous cadherins and not by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  9. Microarray analysis of cytoplasmic versus whole cell RNA reveals a considerable number of missed and false positive mRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Trask, Heidi W.; Cowper-Sal-lari, Richard; Sartor, Maureen A.; Gui, Jiang; Heath, Catherine V.; Renuka, Janhavi; Higgins, Azara-Jane; Andrews,Peter; Korc, Murray; Moore, Jason H; Craig R Tomlinson

    2009-01-01

    With no known exceptions, every published microarray study to determine differential mRNA levels in eukaryotes used RNA extracted from whole cells. It is assumed that the use of whole cell RNA in microarray gene expression analysis provides a legitimate profile of steady-state mRNA. Standard labeling methods and the prevailing dogma that mRNA resides almost exclusively in the cytoplasm has led to the long-standing belief that the nuclear RNA contribution is negligible. We report that unadulte...

  10. Identification of a paternal developmental effect on the cytoplasm of one-cell-stage mouse embryos.

    OpenAIRE

    Renard, J P; Babinet, C.

    1986-01-01

    Matings of female DDK mice with males of the BALB/c strain are sterile, whereas reciprocal crosses are normally fertile. We used nuclear transplantation between the hybrid eggs of these two strains to investigate the basis of this effect. We demonstrate that the observed sterility results from early embryonic mortality, that the mortality is due to a modification of the egg cytoplasm, and that the modification is mediated by the male pronucleus. Once established, this modification may affect ...

  11. Transcytosis of Aminopeptidase N in caco-2 cells is mediated by a Non-cytoplasmic Signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, L K; Norén, Ove; Sjöström, H

    1995-01-01

    transported to the basolateral plasma membrane in proportions equivalent to the wild type enzyme. This shows that no cytoplasmic basolateral sorting signal is involved in directing aminopeptidase N to the basolateral plasma membrane. Both the wild type and the tail-less aminopeptidase N were transcytosed from...... was observed. This indicates that transcytosis of aminopeptidase N from the basolateral to the apical membrane does not occur by default transport but involves an active sorting mechanism....

  12. On the nucleolar and cytoplasmic RNA density during "cell dedifferentiation" represented by blastic transformation of human mature T lymphocytes - a cytochemical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra OtevrelovĂĄ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to provide information on the nucleolar and cytoplasmic density in specimens stained for RNA during "cell dedifferentiation" represented by blastic transformation of mature T lymphocytes. Nucleolar and cytoplasmic RNA's were visualized using a simple cytochemical method followed by computer assisted densitometry and size measurements of digitised images. An increased nucleolar and cytoplasmic RNA density accompanying the blastic transformation was significant after 48 hours of cultivation with phytohemaglutinin (PHA when stimulated cells were characterized the largest nucleolar size reflecting S or G2 phase of the cell cycle. On the other hand, significantly larger ratio of the nucleolar to cytoplasmic density was noted only after a shorter cultivation when stimulated cells were presumably in the G1 phase. Thus the increased nucleolar and cytoplasmic RNA density together represented an accompanying phenomenon of the cell proliferation and cycling state. From the methodical point of view, the nucleolar and cytoplasmic RNA densitometry appeared as a simple as well as useful additional method to study "dedifferentiation" or various cell states at the single cell level. In addition, it was also interesting that the increase of the nucleolar diameter in stimulated cells was much larger than that of the nucleolar density. Such difference suggested that the RNA content in nucleoli was related mainly to their size.

  13. Lacking deoxygenation-linked interaction between cytoplasmic domain of band 3 and HbF from fetal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Several of the red blood cell's metabolic and membrane functions display dependence on haemoglobin oxygenation. In adult human red cells, the increased glycolytic rate at low O2 tension results from binding of deoxygenated HbA at negatively charged, N-terminal, cytoplasmic domain...... of the membrane protein band 3, which liberates glycolytic enzymes from this site. This study aims to investigate the role of fetal HbF (that has lower anion-binding capacity than HbA) in fetal red cells (that are subjected to low O2 tensions), and to elucidate possible linkage (e.g. via the major red cell...... membrane organising centre, band 3) between the individual oxygenation-linked reactions encountered in red cells. Methods: The interaction between band 3 and Hb is analysed in terms of the effects, measured under different conditions, of a 10-mer peptide that corresponds to the N-terminus of human band 3...

  14. Selective eicosanoid-generating capacity of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Bryan P; Pirzai, Waheed; Mumy, Karen L; Gronert, Karsten; McCormick, Beth A

    2011-02-01

    Airway neutrophil infiltration is a pathological hallmark observed in multiple lung diseases including pneumonia and cystic fibrosis. Bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa instigate neutrophil recruitment to the air space. Excessive accumulation of neutrophils in the lung often contributes to tissue destruction. Previous studies have unveiled hepoxilin A(3) as the key molecular signal driving neutrophils across epithelial barriers. The eicosanoid hepoxilin A(3) is a potent neutrophil chemoattractant produced by epithelial cells in response to infection with P. aeruginosa. The enzyme phospholipase A(2) liberates arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids, the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of all eicosanoids, including hepoxilin A(3). Once generated, aracidonic acid is acted upon by multiple cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases producing an array of functionally diverse eicosanoids. Although there are numerous phospholipase A(2) isoforms capable of generating arachidonic acid, the isoform most often associated with eicosanoid generation is cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2)α. In the current study, we observed that the cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2)α isoform is required for mediating P. aeruginosa-induced production of certain eicosanoids such as prostaglandin E(2). However, we found that neutrophil transepithelial migration induced by P. aeruginosa does not require cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2)α. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa-induced hepoxilin A(3) production persists despite cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2)α suppression and generation of the 12-lipoxygenase metabolite 12-HETE is actually enhanced in this context. These results suggest that alterative phospholipase A(2) isoforms are utilized to synthesize 12-lipoxygenase metabolites. The therapeutic implications of these findings are significant when considering anti-inflammatory therapies based on targeting eicosanoid synthesis pathways.

  15. Inhibition of neutrophil-mediated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by endothelial cells is not impaired in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Laham, F.; Kaelsch, A. -I.; Heinrich, L.; Birck, R.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Heeringa, P.; Yard, B.

    2010-01-01

    P>Leucocyte transendothelial migration is strictly regulated to prevent undesired inflammation and collateral damage of endothelial cells by activated neutrophils/monocytes. We hypothesized that in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) patients' dysregulation

  16. Glassy droplet inclusions within the cytoplasm of Kupffer cells: A novel ultrastructural feature for the diagnosis of pediatric autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotowska, Joanna Maria; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria Elzbieta; Daniluk, Urszula; Lebensztejn, Dariusz Marek

    2017-08-01

    Since Kupffer cells/macrophages (KCs/MPs) may be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), this pioneer study was undertaken to evaluate KCs/MPs in pediatric AIH in transmission-electron microscope. Ultrastructural analyses were performed using liver biopsies from 14 children with clinicopathologically diagnosed AIH. In all AIH children, ultrastructural findings revealed changes in the cells lining sinusoidal vessels, especially KCs/MPs and endothelial cells. KCs/MPs showed increased phagocytic activity and damaged mitochondria, frequently with accompanying intense fibrosis. In 10/14 AIH patients, the cytoplasm of sinusoidal KCs/MPs contained characteristic glassy droplet inclusions. They were round, sharply circumscribed, and contained homogeneous material and distinct translucent fields. Their ultrastructure was identical with the Russel bodies of plasma cells, which were also found in liver biopsies in the same patients. Ultrastructural identification of characteristic cytoplasmic droplets with glassy appearance in KCs/MPs, never before described in AIH, provides a useful novel morphological feature in the diagnosis of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Immunohistological analysis in diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma based on cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Hirata, Yuji; Iwaki, Kazuki; Akioka, Toshikazu; Miyoshi, Takuji; Nishiwaki, Uta; Masuda, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuya; Takayama, Ayami; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Tsuji, Motomu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2012-11-01

    The accurate determination of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) light chain (LC) expression is important to differentiate reactive plasmacytosis from a clonal plasma cell neoplasm such as plasma cell myeloma (PCM). Through retrospective analysis, we studied the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells in the bone marrow from 19 PCM patients and 19 controls. To demonstrate cIg LC expression, the bone marrow was immunostained for IgA, IgG, IgM, kappa, and lambda. The kappa/lambda ratio was defined as the ratio of the kappa-positive cell to the lambda-positive cell in plasma cells. PCM cells were distinguished from normal plasma cells by cut-off levels between 0.59 and 4.0, a sensitivity of 94.7%, and a specificity of 94.7%. The detection of the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells may be a useful tool in the diagnosis of PCM and the correct diagnosis of PCM may be achieved more simply.

  18. Aberrant Cytoplasm Localization and Protein Stability of SIRT1 is Regulated by PI3K/IGF-1R Signaling in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Byles, Laura K. Chmilewski, Joyce Wang, Lijia Zhu, Lora W. Forman, Douglas V. Faller, Yan Dai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available SIRT1, an NAD-dependent histone/protein deacetylase, has classically been thought of as a nuclear protein. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT1 is mainly localized in the nucleus of normal cells, but is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm of the cancer / transformed cells we tested. We found this predominant cytoplasmic localization of SIRT1 is regulated by elevated mitotic activity and PI3K/IGF-1R signaling in cancer cells. We show that aberrant cytoplasmic localization of SIRT1 is due to increased protein stability and is regulated by PI3K/IGF-1R signaling. In addition, we determined that SIRT1 is required for PI3K-mediated cancer cell growth. Our study represents the first identification that aberrant cytoplasm localization is one of the specific alternations to SIRT1 that occur in cancer cells, and PI3K/IGF-1R signaling plays an important role in the regulation of cytoplasmic SIRT1 stability. Our findings suggest that the over-expressed cytoplasmic SIRT1 in cancer cells may greatly contribute to its cancer-specific function by working downstream of the PI3K/IGF-1R signaling pathway.

  19. Segmentation of nucleus and cytoplasm of a single cell in three-dimensional tomogram using optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Kai; Tsai, Chien-Chung; Hsu, Wan-Yi; Chen, Jau-Shiuh; Liao, Yi-Hua; Sheen, Yi-Shuan; Hong, Jin-Bon; Lin, Ming-Yi; Tjiu, Jeng-Wei; Huang, Sheng-Lung

    2017-03-01

    A random rayburst sampling (RRBS) framework was developed to detect the nucleus and cell membrane boundaries in three-dimensional (3-D) space. Raw images were acquired through a full-field optical coherence tomography system with submicron resolution—i.e., 0.8 ?? ? m in lateral and 0.9 ?? ? m in axial directions. The near-isometric resolution enables 3-D segmentation of a nucleus and cell membrane for determining the volumetric nuclear-to-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio of a single cell. The RRBS framework was insensitive to the selection of seeds and image pixel noise. The robustness of the RRBS framework was verified through the convergence of the N/C ratio searching algorithm. The relative standard deviation of the N/C ratio between different randomly selected seed sets was only 2%. This technique is useful for various in vitro assays on single-cell analyses.

  20. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestl, Erin E., E-mail: egestl@wcupa.edu [Department of Biology, West Chester University, 750 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States); Anne Boettger, S., E-mail: aboettger@wcupa.edu [Department of Biology, West Chester University, 750 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  1. Cytoplasmic location of α1A voltage-gated calcium channel C-terminal fragment (Cav2.1-CTF aggregate is sufficient to cause cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Takahashi

    Full Text Available The human α1A voltage-dependent calcium channel (Cav2.1 is a pore-forming essential subunit embedded in the plasma membrane. Its cytoplasmic carboxyl(C-tail contains a small poly-glutamine (Q tract, whose length is normally 4∼19 Q, but when expanded up to 20∼33Q, the tract causes an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6. A recent study has shown that a 75-kDa C-terminal fragment (CTF containing the polyQ tract remains soluble in normal brains, but becomes insoluble mainly in the cytoplasm with additional localization to the nuclei of human SCA6 Purkinje cells. However, the mechanism by which the CTF aggregation leads to neurodegeneration is completely elusive, particularly whether the CTF exerts more toxicity in the nucleus or in the cytoplasm. We tagged recombinant (rCTF with either nuclear-localization or nuclear-export signal, created doxycyclin-inducible rat pheochromocytoma (PC12 cell lines, and found that the CTF is more toxic in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus, the observations being more obvious with Q28 (disease range than with Q13 (normal-length. Surprisingly, the CTF aggregates co-localized both with cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB and phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB in the cytoplasm, and Western blot analysis showed that the quantity of CREB and p-CREB were both decreased in the nucleus when the rCTF formed aggregates in the cytoplasm. In human brains, polyQ aggregates also co-localized with CREB in the cytoplasm of SCA6 Purkinje cells, but not in other conditions. Collectively, the cytoplasmic Cav2.1-CTF aggregates are sufficient to cause cell death, and one of the pathogenic mechanisms may be abnormal CREB trafficking in the cytoplasm and reduced CREB and p-CREB levels in the nuclei.

  2. The cytoplasmic nuclear receptor RARγ controls RIP1 initiated cell death when cIAP activity is inhibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing; Jitkaew, Siriporn; Choksi, Swati; Kadigamuwa, Chamila; Qu, Jianhui; Choe, Moran; Jang, Jonathan; Liu, Chengyu; Liu, Zheng-Gang

    2017-09-04

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has a critical role in diverse cellular events including inflammation, apoptosis and necroptosis through different signaling complexes. However, little is known about how the transition from inflammatory signaling to the engagement of death pathways is modulated. Here we report that the cytoplasmic retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARγ) controls receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1)-initiated cell death when cellular inhibitor of apoptosis (cIAP) activity is blocked. Through screening a short hairpin RNA library, we found that RARγ was essential for TNF-induced RIP1-initiated apoptosis and necroptosis. Our data suggests that RARγ initiates the formation of death signaling complexes by mediating RIP1 dissociation from TNF receptor 1. We demonstrate that RARγ is released from the nucleus to orchestrate the formation of the cytosolic death complexes. In addition, we demonstrate that RARγ has a similar role in TNF-induced necroptosis in vivo. Thus, our study suggests that nuclear receptor RARγ provides a key checkpoint for the transition from life to death.The molecular switch between how tumour necrosis factor (TNF) controls inflammation versus cell death is less well defined. Here, the authors show that the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor gamma is released from the nucleus to disrupt TNF initiated cell death complexes in the cytoplasm.

  3. Cytoplasmic Travels of the Ecdysteroid Receptor in Target Cells: Pathways for both Genomic and Non-Genomic Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthe eVafopoulou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTSignal transduction of the insect steroid hormones, ecdysteroids, is mediated by the ecdysteroid receptor, EcR. In various cells of the insect Rhodnius prolixus, EcR is present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, where it undergoes daily cycling in abundance and cellular location at particular developmental times of the last larval instar that are specific to different cell types. EcR favors a cytoplasmic location in the day and a nuclear location in the night. In double and triple labels using several antibodies, immunohistochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we identified intimate associations of EcR with the microtubules (MTs. Treatments with either the MT stabilizing agent taxol or with colchicine which depolymerises MTs, resulted in considerable reduction in nuclear EcR with a concomitant increase in cytoplasmic EcR suggesting that MT disruption inhibits receptor accumulation in the nucleus. EcR also forms intimate associations with the chaperone Hsp90, the immunophilin FKBP52 and the light chain 1 of the motor protein dynein. All these factors also associate with MTs. We propose that in Rhodnius, EcR exerts its genomic effects by forming a complex with Hsp90 and FKBP52 which uses dynein on MTs as a mechanism for daily nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. The complex is transported intact to the nucleus and dissociates within it. We conclude that EcR utilizes the cytoskeletal tracks for movement in a manner closely similar to that used by the glucocorticoid receptor. This is the first study to examine the mechanism of intracellular transport of EcR and reveals close similarities with some of its mammalian counterparts. We also observed close associations of EcR with mitochondria which raise the possibility that EcR, like its mammalian counterparts, may be involved in the coordination of non-genomic responses of ecdysteroids in mitochondria.

  4. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  5. Hollow fiber clinostat for simulating microgravity in cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A clinostat for simulating microgravity on cell systems carried in a fiber fixedly mounted in a rotatable culture vessel is disclosed. The clinostat is rotated horizontally along its longitudinal axis to simulate microgravity or vertically as a control response. Cells are injected into the fiber and the ends of the fiber are sealed and secured to spaced end pieces of a fiber holder assembly which consists of the end pieces, a hollow fiber, a culture vessel, and a tension spring with three alignment pins. The tension spring is positioned around the culture vessel with its ends abutting the end pieces for alignment of the spring. After the fiber is secured, the spring is decompressed to maintain tension on the fiber while it is being rotated. This assures that the fiber remains aligned along the axis of rotation. The fiber assembly is placed in the culture vessel and culture medium is added. The culture vessel is then inserted into the rotatable portion of the clinostat and subjected to rotate at selected rpms. The internal diameter of the hollow fiber determines the distance the cells are from the axis of rotation.

  6. Interferometric measurements of dry mass content in nuclei and cytoplasm in the life cycle of antheridial filaments cells of Chara vulgaris L. in their successive developmental stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kuran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric measurements of the nucleus and cytoplasm dry mass during interphase in the successive stages of development of antheridial filaments of Chara vulgaris demonstrated that the dry mass and surface area of cell nuclei double in size in each of the successive generations of the filaments, whereas neither the surface nor the dry mass of the cytoplasm increase in such proportion in the same period. In the successive stages of development of the antheridial filaments the dry mass and surface area of the nuclei and cytoplasm gradually diminish.

  7. Multi-scale characean experimental system: from electrophysiology of membrane transporters to cell-to-cell connectivity, cytoplasmic streaming and auxin metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Jane Beilby

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placeme...

  8. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Beilby, Mary J.

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placeme...

  9. The Cell Wall Teichuronic Acid Synthetase (TUAS Is an Enzyme Complex Located in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Micrococcus luteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyi Lynn Deng

    2010-01-01

    composed of disaccharide repeating units [-4-β-D-ManNAcAp-(1→6α-D-Glcp−1-]n, which is covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan on the inner cell wall and extended to the outer surface of the cell envelope. An enzyme complex responsible for the TUA chain biosynthesis was purified and characterized. The 440 kDa enzyme complex, named teichuronic acid synthetase (TUAS, is an octomer composed of two kinds of glycosyltransferases, Glucosyltransferase, and ManNAcA-transferase, which is capable of catalyzing the transfer of disaccharide glycosyl residues containing both glucose and the N-acetylmannosaminuronic acid residues. TUAS displays hydrophobic properties and is found primarily associated with the cytoplasmic membrane. The purified TUAS contains carotinoids and lipids. TUAS activity is diminished by phospholipase digestion. We propose that TUAS serves as a multitasking polysaccharide assembling station on the bacterial membrane.

  10. A low-toxic artificial fluorescent glycoprotein can serve as an efficient cytoplasmic labeling in living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jiangju; Liang, Dawei; Kong, Dan; Wu, Sufang; Yuan, Lan; Xiang, Yan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-06

    To maintain the virtue of good optical property and discard the dross of conventional fluorescent staining dyes, we provide a strategy for designing new fluorescent scaffolds. In this study, a novel fluorescent labeling glycoprotein (chitosan-poly-L-cysteine, CPC) was synthesized through graft copolymerization. CPC gives emission peak at 465-470 nm when excited at 386 nm. The submicro-scale CPC microspheres could be localized and persisted specifically in the cytoplasm of living cells, with strong blue fluorescence. Moreover, CPC was highly resistant to photo bleaching, the fluorescence was remained stable for up to 72 h as the cells grew and developed. The glycoprotein CPC was bio-compatible and in zero grade cytotoxicity as quantified by MTT assay. The fluorescent labeling process with our newly designed glycoprotein CPC is exceptionally efficient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interference Cancellation for Hollow-Core Fiber Reference Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Merimaa, Mikko; Manninen, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Doppler-free saturated absorption spectroscopy of gases in hollow-core fiber (HCF)-based cells can be used for realizing new compact, robust, and portable frequency standards. In this paper, methods for cancelling interferences resulting from the optical connections between standard fiber and HCF...

  12. Cytoplasmic and nuclear anti-apoptotic roles of αB-crystallin in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Jin Jeong

    Full Text Available In addition to its well-characterized role in the lens, αB-crystallin performs other functions. Methylglyoxal (MGO can alter the function of the basement membrane of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells. Thus, if MGO is not efficiently detoxified, it can induce adverse reactions in RPE cells. In this study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the anti-apoptotic activity of αB-crystallin in the human retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE-19 following MGO treatment using various assays, including nuclear staining, flow cytometry, DNA electrophoresis, pulse field gel electrophoresis, western blot analysis, confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation assays. To directly assess the role of phosphorylation of αB-crystallin, we used site-directed mutagenesis to convert relevant serine residues to alanine residues. Using these techniques, we demonstrated that MGO induces apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. Silencing αB-crystallin sensitized ARPE-19 cells to MGO-induced apoptosis, indicating that αB-crystallin protects ARPE-19 cells from MGO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that αB-crystallin interacts with the caspase subtypes, caspase-2L, -2S, -3, -4, -7, -8, -9 and -12 in untreated control ARPE-19 cells and that MGO treatment caused the dissociation of these caspase subtypes from αB-crystallin; transfection of S19A, S45A or S59A mutants caused the depletion of αB-crystallin from the nuclei of untreated control RPE cells leading to the release of caspase subtypes. Additionally, transfection of these mutants enhanced MGO-induced apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells, indicating that phosphorylation of nuclear αB-crystallin on serine residues 19, 45 and 59 plays a pivotal role in preventing apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that αB-crystallin prevents caspase activation by physically interacting with caspase subtypes in the cytoplasm and nucleus, thereby protecting RPE cells from MGO-induced apoptosis.

  13. Targeted liposomes for delivery of protein-based drugs into the cytoplasm of tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrobattista, E; Crommelin, DJA; Wilschut, J; Storm, G

    2002-01-01

    Our goal was to deliver therapeutically active macromolecules into the cytosol of target cells. First, attempts were made to prepare virosomes that specifically interact with OVCAR-3 cells (human ovarian cancer cells). Detergent solubilized influenza virus envelopes were reconstituted forming viroso

  14. Photoreactivation of a Cytoplasmic Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, E. R.; Boyle, Mary K.

    1972-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-inactivated frog virus 3 is efficiently photoreactivated by chick embryo cells. A cellular enzyme is presumably responsible for this repair of viral deoxyribonucleic acid, for the phenomenon is insensitive to an inhibitor of protein synthesis and is not seen in mammalian cells that are known to lack photoreactivating enzyme. Since frog virus 3 is a cytoplasmic virus, functionally significant amounts of photoreactivating enzyme are probably present in the cytoplasm of chick embryo cells. PMID:5062749

  15. Cytoplasmic Overexpression of CD95L in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells Overcomes Resistance to CD95-Mediated Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Watson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The CD95/CD95L pathway plays a critical role in tissue homeostasis and immune system regulation; however, the function of this pathway in malignancy remains poorly understood. We hypothesized that CD95L expression in esophageal adenocarcinoma confers advantages to the neoplasm other than immune privilege. Methods: CD95L expression was characterized in immortalized squamous esophagus (HET-1A and Barrett esophagus (BAR-T cells; adenocarcinoma cell lines FLO-1, SEG-1, and BIC-1, and MDA468 (- control; and KFL cells (+ control. Analyses included reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblots of whole cell and secretory vesicle lysates, FACScan analysis, laser scanning confocal microscopy of native proteins and fluorescent constructs, and assessment of apoptosis and ERK1/2 pathways. Results: Cleaved, soluble CD95L is expressed at both the RNA and protein levels in these cell lines derived from esophageal adenocarcinoma and other human tissues. CD95L was neither trafficked to the cell membrane nor secreted into the media or within vesicles, rather the protein seems to be sequestered in the cytoplasm. CD95 and CD95L colocalize by immunofluorescence, but an interaction was not proven by immunoprecipitation. Overexpression of CD95L in the adenocarcinoma cell lines induced robust apoptosis and, under conditions of pan-caspase inhibition, resulted in activation of ERK signaling. Conclusions: CD95L localization in EA cells is inconsistent with the conference of immune privilege and is more consistent with a function that promotes tumor growth through alternative CD95 signaling. Reduced cell surface expression of CD95 affects cell sensitivity to extracellular apoptotic signals more significantly than alterations in downstream modulators of apoptosis.

  16. TNPO3 protects HIV-1 replication from CPSF6-mediated capsid stabilization in the host cell cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Iaco, Alberto; Santoni, Federico; Vannier, Anne; Guipponi, Michel; Antonarakis, Stylianos; Luban, Jeremy

    2013-02-15

    Despite intensive investigation the mechanism by which HIV-1 reaches the host cell nucleus is unknown. TNPO3, a karyopherin mediating nuclear entry of SR-proteins, was shown to be required for HIV-1 infectivity. Some investigators have reported that TNPO3 promotes HIV-1 nuclear import, as would be expected for a karyopherin. Yet, an equal number of investigators have failed to obtain evidence that supports this model. Here, a series of experiments were performed to better elucidate the mechanism by which TNPO3 promotes HIV-1 infectivity. To examine the role of TNPO3 in HIV-1 replication, the 2-LTR circles that are commonly used as a marker for HIV-1 nuclear entry were cloned after infection of TNPO3 knockdown cells. Potential explanation for the discrepancy in the literature concerning the effect of TNPO3 was provided by sequencing hundreds of these clones: a significant fraction resulted from autointegration into sites near the LTRs and therefore were not bona fide 2-LTR circles. In response to this finding, new techniques were developed to monitor HIV-1 cDNA, including qPCR reactions that distinguish 2-LTR circles from autointegrants, as well as massive parallel sequencing of HIV-1 cDNA. With these assays, TNPO3 knockdown was found to reduce the levels of 2-LTR circles. This finding was puzzling, though, since previous work has shown that the HIV-1 determinant for TNPO3-dependence is capsid (CA), an HIV-1 protein that forms a mega-dalton protein lattice in the cytoplasm. TNPO3 imports cellular splicing factors via their SR-domain. Attention was therefore directed towards CPSF6, an SR-protein that binds HIV-1 CA and inhibits HIV-1 nuclear import when the C-terminal SR-domain is deleted. The effect of 27 HIV-1 capsid mutants on sensitivity to TNPO3 knockdown was then found to correlate strongly with sensitivity to inhibition by a C-terminal deletion mutant of CPSF6 (R2 = 0.883, p HIV-1 replication. Additionally, targeting CPSF6 to the nucleus by fusion to a

  17. Influence of recipient cytoplasm cell stage on transcription in bovine nucleus transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Steven D.; Soloy, Eva; Kanka, Jiri

    1996-01-01

    relies upon maternally derived RNA transcripts up to the 8-cell stage, at which time it begins to transcribe its own RNA. In this experiment, RNA synthesis was detected in nucleus transfer embryos (NTE) and control embryos by pulsing with 3H-uridine, fixation, and autoradiography on semithin sections...... of maturation. Control in-vitro-produced embryos were 3H-uridine-labelled and fixed at the 2-, 4-, early 8-, and late 8-cell stages. NTE were similarly prepared at 1, 3, and 20 hr postfusion and at the 2-, 4-, and 8-cell stages. In the control embryos, RNA synthesis was absent in the 2-, 4-, and early 8-cell...

  18. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John J; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S; Esser, Karyn A; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2011-09-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca(2+) sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells.

  19. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John J.; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B.; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A.; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2011-01-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca2+ sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells. PMID:21828094

  20. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  1. Pediocin PA-1, a Bacteriocin from Pediococcus acidilactici PAC1.0, Forms Hydrophilic Pores in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Target Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikindas, Michael L.; García-Garcerá, Maria J.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Ledeboer, Aat M.; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Nes, Ingolf F.; Abee, Tjakko; Konings, Wilhelmus; Venema, Gerhardus

    1993-01-01

    Pediocin PA-1 is a bacteriocin which is produced by Pediococcus acidilactici PAC1.0. We demonstrate that pediocin PA-1 kills sensitive Pediococcus cells and acts on the cytoplasmic membrane. In contrast to its lack of impact on immune cells, pediocin PA-1 dissipates the transmembrane electrical

  2. Pediocin PA-1, a Bacteriocin from Pediococcus acidilactici PAC1.0, Forms Hydrophilic Pores in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Target Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikindas, Michael L.; García-Garcerá, Maria J.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Ledeboer, Aat M.; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Nes, Ingolf F.; Abee, Tjakko; Konings, Wilhelmus; Venema, Gerhardus

    1993-01-01

    Pediocin PA-1 is a bacteriocin which is produced by Pediococcus acidilactici PAC1.0. We demonstrate that pediocin PA-1 kills sensitive Pediococcus cells and acts on the cytoplasmic membrane. In contrast to its lack of impact on immune cells, pediocin PA-1 dissipates the transmembrane electrical pote

  3. Ontogeny of nuclear and cytoplasmic myoepithelial cell markers in pre-weaning Holstein heifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoepithelial cells (MC) have roles in cell proliferation and differentiation and hence, may impact mammary parenchymal morphogenesis. Because MC can limit parenchymal growth in other species, it is important to understand MC-related mechanisms involved in early bovine mammary development. We previo...

  4. Integrating perovskite solar cells into a flexible fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Longbin; Deng, Jue; Lu, Xin; Yang, Zhibin; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-09-22

    Perovskite solar cells have triggered a rapid development of new photovoltaic devices because of high energy conversion efficiencies and their all-solid-state structures. To this end, they are particularly useful for various wearable and portable electronic devices. Perovskite solar cells with a flexible fiber structure were now prepared for the first time by continuously winding an aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube sheet electrode onto a fiber electrode; photoactive perovskite materials were incorporated in between them through a solution process. The fiber-shaped perovskite solar cell exhibits an energy conversion efficiency of 3.3%, which remained stable on bending. The perovskite solar cell fibers may be woven into electronic textiles for large-scale application by well-developed textile technologies.

  5. Thymic Nurse Cells Exhibit Epithelial Progenitor Phenotype and Create Unique Extra-Cytoplasmic Membrane Space for Thymocyte Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Tonya M.; Chilukuri, Rajendra V.E.; Martinez, Marcia; Olushoga, Zachariah; Blake, Andrew; Brohi, Moazzam; Walker, Christopher; Samms, Michael; Guyden, Jerry C.

    2010-01-01

    Thymic nurse cells (TNCs) are epithelial cells in the thymic cortex that contain as many as fifty thymocytes within specialized cytoplasmic vacuoles. The function of this cell-in-cell interaction has created controversy since their discovery in 1980. Further, some skepticism exists about the idea that apoptotic thymocytes within the TNC complex result from negative selection, a process believed to occur exclusively within the medulla. In this report, we have microscopic evidence that defines a unique membranous environment wherein lipid raft aggregates around the αβTCR expressed on captured thymocytes and class II MHC molecules expressed on TNCs. Further, immunohistological examination of thymic sections show TNCs located within the cortico-medullary junction to express cytokeratins five and eight (K5 and K8), and the transcription factor Trp-63, the phenotype defined elsewhere as the thymic epithelial progenitor subset. Our results suggest that the microenvironment provided by TNCs plays an important role in thymocyte selection as well as the potential for TNCs to be involved in the maintenance of thymic epithelia. PMID:20035931

  6. Cellular Subcompartments through Cytoplasmic Streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieuchot, Laurent; Lai, Julian; Loh, Rachel Ann; Leong, Fong Yew; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Stajich, Jason; Jedd, Gregory

    2015-08-24

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs in diverse cell types, where it generally serves a transport function. Here, we examine streaming in multicellular fungal hyphae and identify an additional function wherein regimented streaming forms distinct cytoplasmic subcompartments. In the hypha, cytoplasm flows directionally from cell to cell through septal pores. Using live-cell imaging and computer simulations, we identify a flow pattern that produces vortices (eddies) on the upstream side of the septum. Nuclei can be immobilized in these microfluidic eddies, where they form multinucleate aggregates and accumulate foci of the HDA-2 histone deacetylase-associated factor, SPA-19. Pores experiencing flow degenerate in the absence of SPA-19, suggesting that eddy-trapped nuclei function to reinforce the septum. Together, our data show that eddies comprise a subcellular niche favoring nuclear differentiation and that subcompartments can be self-organized as a consequence of regimented cytoplasmic streaming.

  7. Coupling of cytoplasm and adhesion dynamics determines cell polarization and locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Martin; Möhl, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Observations of single epidermal cells on flat adhesive substrates have revealed two distinct morphological and functional states, namely a non-migrating symmetric unpolarized state and a migrating asymmetric polarized state. These states are characterized by different spatial distributions and dynamics of important biochemical cell components: F-actin and myosin-II form the contractile part of the cytoskeleton, and integrin receptors in the plasma membrane connect F-actin filaments to the substratum. In this way, focal adhesion complexes are assembled, which determine cytoskeletal force transduction and subsequent cell locomotion. So far, physical models have reduced this phenomenon either to gradients in regulatory control molecules or to different mechanics of the actin filament system in different regions of the cell. Here we offer an alternative and self-organizational model incorporating polymerization, pushing and sliding of filaments, as well as formation of adhesion sites and their force dependent ki...

  8. Alternative Splicing of the RAGE Cytoplasmic Domain Regulates Cell Signaling and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Joel; Maiguel, Dony; Hudson, Barry I.

    2013-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) is a multi-ligand receptor present on most cell types. Upregulation of RAGE is seen in a number of pathological states including, inflammatory and vascular disease, dementia, diabetes and various cancers. We previously demonstrated that alternative splicing of the RAGE gene is an important mechanism which regulates RAGE signaling through the production of soluble ligand decoy isoforms. However, no studies have identified any alternative splice variants within the intracellular region of RAGE, a region critical for RAGE signaling. Herein, we have cloned and characterized a novel splice variant of RAGE that has a truncated intracellular domain (RAGEΔICD). RAGEΔICD is prevalent in both human and mouse tissues including lung, brain, heart and kidney. Expression of RAGEΔICD in C6 glioma cells impaired RAGE-ligand induced signaling through various MAP kinase pathways including ERK1/2, p38 and SAPK/JNK. Moreover, RAGEΔICD significantly affected tumor cell properties through altering cell migration, invasion, adhesion and viability in C6 glioma cells. Furthermore, C6 glioma cells expressing RAGEΔICD exhibited drastic inhibition on tumorigenesis in soft agar assays. Taken together, these data indicate that RAGEΔICD represents a novel endogenous mechanism to regulate RAGE signaling. Significantly, RAGEΔICD could play an important role in RAGE related disease states through down regulation of RAGE signaling. PMID:24260107

  9. Dynamic expression of srGAP2 in cell nuclei and cytoplasm during the differentiation of rat neural stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qian; Wang, Li; Zhang, Zhichao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yan, Hanqi; Ma, Wen; Jin, Weilin; Lu, Haixia; Liu, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Different SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase-activating proteins (srGAPs) have different levels of expression and diverse functions during neural development. Although srGAP2 is expressed in developmental brain tissue, little is known about its influence on cellular development of the nervous system. In the current study, dynamic expression of endogenous srGAP2 during neural stem cell/progenitor cell (NSC/NPC) differentiation in vitro was investigated in order to elucidate the association between the dynamic expression of srGAP2 and neural development. srGAP2 was expressed in undifferentiated NSCs/NPCs, and differentiated neurons and astrocytes with distinct expression patterns. In conjunction with the differentiation of NSCs/NPCs in vitro, the number of srGAP2+ cells markedly reduced. The percentage of srGAP2+ cells in the population of nestin+ and β‑tubulin III+ cells was significantly downregulated while in the population of glial fibrillary acidic protein‑positive cells, almost all cells were srGAP2+. srGAP2 was predominantly expressed in the cell nucleus in all cell types. srGAP2 was also weakly expressed in the cytoplasm of nestin+ and β‑tubulin III+ cells at 3 and 7 days in vitro. However levels were gradually downregulated during the process of differentiation and almost disappeared in β‑tubulin III+ cells at 14 days. The results from the present study suggest that srGAP2 is involved in regulating NSC/NPC differentiation during neural development. The translocation of srGAP2 in the cytoplasm and cell nucleus in different cell types may function as a director in decisions regarding cell fate.

  10. Influence of recipient cytoplasm cell stage on transcription in bovine nucleus transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Steven D.; Soloy, Eva; Kanka, Jiri

    1996-01-01

    relies upon maternally derived RNA transcripts up to the 8-cell stage, at which time it begins to transcribe its own RNA. In this experiment, RNA synthesis was detected in nucleus transfer embryos (NTE) and control embryos by pulsing with 3H-uridine, fixation, and autoradiography on semithin sections...... of maturation. Control in-vitro-produced embryos were 3H-uridine-labelled and fixed at the 2-, 4-, early 8-, and late 8-cell stages. NTE were similarly prepared at 1, 3, and 20 hr postfusion and at the 2-, 4-, and 8-cell stages. In the control embryos, RNA synthesis was absent in the 2-, 4-, and early 8-cell...... stages, whereas in all late 8-cell stages, it was present. In NTE from nonactivated (MII phase) cytoplasts, there was a sharp decline in RNA synthesis at 1 hr and 3 hr after fusion and a total absence by 20 hr after fusion. In contrast, NTE from activated (S phase) cytoplasts exhibited continued high...

  11. Probing short-range protein Brownian motion in the cytoplasm of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Rienzo, Carmine; Piazza, Vincenzo; Gratton, Enrico; Beltram, Fabio; Cardarelli, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    The translational motion of molecules in cells deviates from what is observed in dilute solutions. Theoretical models provide explanations for this effect but with predictions that drastically depend on the nanoscale organization assumed for macromolecular crowding agents. A conclusive test of the nature of the translational motion in cells is missing owing to the lack of techniques capable of probing crowding with the required temporal and spatial resolution. Here we show that fluorescence-fluctuation analysis of raster scans at variable timescales can provide this information. By using green fluorescent proteins in cells, we measure protein motion at the unprecedented timescale of 1 μs, unveiling unobstructed Brownian motion from 25 to 100 nm, and partially suppressed diffusion above 100 nm. Furthermore, experiments on model systems attribute this effect to the presence of relatively immobile structures rather than to diffusing crowding agents. We discuss the implications of these results for intracellular processes.

  12. Probing short-range protein Brownian motion in the cytoplasm of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Carmine; Piazza, Vincenzo; Gratton, Enrico; Beltram, Fabio; Cardarelli, Francesco

    2014-12-23

    The translational motion of molecules in cells deviates from what is observed in dilute solutions. Theoretical models provide explanations for this effect but with predictions that drastically depend on the nanoscale organization assumed for macromolecular crowding agents. A conclusive test of the nature of the translational motion in cells is missing owing to the lack of techniques capable of probing crowding with the required temporal and spatial resolution. Here we show that fluorescence-fluctuation analysis of raster scans at variable timescales can provide this information. By using green fluorescent proteins in cells, we measure protein motion at the unprecedented timescale of 1 μs, unveiling unobstructed Brownian motion from 25 to 100 nm, and partially suppressed diffusion above 100 nm. Furthermore, experiments on model systems attribute this effect to the presence of relatively immobile structures rather than to diffusing crowding agents. We discuss the implications of these results for intracellular processes.

  13. Optimal matrix rigidity for stress fiber polarization in stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The shape and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is especially sensitive to the rigidity of their environment; the physical mechanisms involved are unknown. A theoretical model and experiments demonstrate here that the polarization/alignment of stress-fibers within stem cells is a non-monotonic function of matrix rigidity. We treat the cell as an active elastic inclusion in a surrounding matrix whose polarizability, unlike dead matter, depends on the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. The theory correctly predicts the monotonic increase of the cellular forces with the matrix rigidity and the alignment of stress-fibers parallel to the long axis of cells. We show that the anisotropy of this alignment depends non-monotonically on matrix rigidity and demonstrate it experimentally by quantifying the orientational distribution of stress-fibers in stem cells. These findings offer a first physical insight for the dependence of stem cell differentiation on tissue elasticity. PMID:20563235

  14. Cytoplasmic calcium measurement in rotavirus enterotoxin-enhanced green fluorescent protein (NSP4-EGFP) expressing cells loaded with Fura-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkova, Z; Morris, A P; Estes, M K

    2003-07-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its analogs are standard markers of protein expression and intracellular localization of proteins. The fluorescent properties of GFP complicate accurate measurement of intracellular calcium using calcium sensitive fluorophores, which show a great degree of spectral overlap with GFP, or their K(d) values are too high for accurate measurement of subtle changes in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations. Here we describe a simple modification of the standard microscope-based Fura-2 calcium-imaging technique which permits the quantitative measurement of intracellular calcium levels in cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion proteins. Longpass emission filtering of the Fura-2 signal in cells expressing an EGFP fusion protein is sufficient to eliminate the EGFP-Fura-2 emission spectra overlap and allows quantitative calibration of intracellular calcium. To validate this technique, we investigated the ability of rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4-EGFP to elevate intracellular calcium levels in mammalian HEK 293 cells. We show here that inducible intracellular expression of NSP4-EGFP fusion protein elevates basal intracellular calcium more than two-fold by a phospholipase C (PLC) independent mechanism.

  15. Critical importance of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway for Trypanosoma cruzi growth in the mammalian host cell cytoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki, E-mail: muneaki@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Morales, Jorge; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Inoue, Syou [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Inoue, Masayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kita, Kiyoshi [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Harada, Shigeharu [Department of Applied Biology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Tanaka, Akiko [Systems and Structural Biology Center, RIKEN, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Aoki, Takashi [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Nara, Takeshi, E-mail: tnara@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the gene for carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the cpsII gene significantly reduced the growth of epimastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In particular, the CPSII-null mutant severely retarded intracellular growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The de novo pyrimidine pathway is critical for the parasite growth in the host cell. -- Abstract: The intracellular parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In general, pyrimidine nucleotides are supplied by both de novo biosynthesis and salvage pathways. While epimastigotes-an insect form-possess both activities, amastigotes-an intracellular replicating form of T. cruzi-are unable to mediate the uptake of pyrimidine. However, the requirement of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis for parasite growth and survival has not yet been elucidated. Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo biosynthetic pathway, and increased CPSII activity is associated with the rapid proliferation of tumor cells. In the present study, we showed that disruption of the T. cruzicpsII gene significantly reduced parasite growth. In particular, the growth of amastigotes lacking the cpsII gene was severely suppressed. Thus, the de novo pyrimidine pathway is important for proliferation of T. cruzi in the host cell cytoplasm and represents a promising target for chemotherapy against Chagas disease.

  16. NIH 3T3 cells malignantly transformed by mot—2 show inactivation and cytoplasmic sequestration of the p53 protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WADHWA; SYUICHITAKANO; 等

    1999-01-01

    In previous studies we have reported that a high level of expression of mot-2 protein results in malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as analyzed by anchorage independent growth and nude mice assays [Kaul et al.,Oncogene,17,907-11,1998].Mot-2 was found to interact with tumor suppressor protein p53.The transient overexpression of mot-2 was inhibitory to transcriptional activation function of p53 [Wadhwa et al.,J.Biol.Chem.,273,2958691,1998].We demonstrate here that mot-2 transfected stable clone of NIH 3T3 that showed malignant properties indeed show inactivation of p53 function as assayed by exogenous p53 dependent reporter.The expression level of p53 in response to UV-irradiation was lower in NIH 3T3/mot-2 as compared to NIH 3T3 cells and also exhibited delay in reachingpeak.Furthermore,upon serum starvation p53 was seen to translocate to the nucleus in NIH 3T3,but not in its mot-3 derivative.The data suggests that mot-2 mediated cytoplasmic sequestration and inactivation of p53 may operate,at least in part,for malignant phenotype of NIH 3T3/mot-2 cells.

  17. Secretion of Cpn0796 from Chlamydia pneumoniae into the host cell cytoplasm by an autotransporter mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandahl, Brian B S; Stensballe, Allan; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    By comparison of proteome profiles of purified Chlamydia pneumoniae and whole lysates of C. pneumoniae infected HEp-2 cells, an N-terminal fragment of the previously uncharacterized chlamydial protein Cpn0796 was identified as a secreted protein. A 38 kDa cleavage product of Cpn0796 was present i...

  18. The effects and mechanisms of cytoplasmic Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on the proliferation, migration and invasion of HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng-xia; WU Hai-yan; TU Jian; ZHANG Xiao-hong; LE Xiao-yong; TANG Sheng-song

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects and mechanisms of cytoplasmic M-CSF on the proliferation, migration and invasion of HeLa cells. Methods Both pCMV/cyto/myc vector and pCMV/cyto/myc-M-CSF vector was transfected into HeLa-cell by transfectaimine. After screening by G418, the positive clones were amplified and confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunocytochemistry. The effect of cytoplasmic MCSF on the proliferation of HeLa cells were analyzed by cell conuting and antisense oligonucleotides. The migration and invasion of cell was measured by in vitro Transwell assay and Matrigel-coated polycarbonate filters. The expression of cyclinE, cyclinD1/2/3, CDK2/4/6, Rac1, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP2/9) were assayed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. And expression of both α-tubulin and cdc42 were displayed by immunofluorescence. The activity of MMP2 was detected by gelatin zymography. Results Results A cell line (referred as to HeLa-M cell) that highly expresses cytoplasmic M-CSF was successfully established in the test. Our result indicated that HeLa-M cell had a larger volume, faster growth rate and shorter doubling time than either pCMV/cyto/myc transfected HeLa cells (referred as to HeLa-C cell) or untransfected HeLa cells (referred as to HeLa cell). M-CSF-specific antisense oligonucleoside significantly inhibited HeLa-M cell proliferation and had little effect on either HeLa-C cell or HeLa-C cell growth. Cytoplasmic M-CSF up-regulated both the expression of cyclinE, cyclinD1 and cyclinD3, CDK2, CDK 4 and CDK6,a Rho GTPase ralative protein (Rac1), cdc42 and MMP2, but had little effect on expression of MMP9 and cyclin D2. Furthermore, cytoplasmic M-CSF induced the rearrangement of the α-tubulin in HeLa cells and significantly promoted the migration and invasion of HeLa cells in vitro. Conclusions Cytoplasmic M-CSFs up-regulate the expression of cyclinE, cyclinD1 and cyclinD3, CDK2, CDK 4 and CDK6 and induces the proliferation of HeLa cells. Cytoplasmic M

  19. Identification of Cytoplasmic Proteins Interacting with the Mammary Cell Transforming Domain of Ese-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    2005). Additionally, 3’ polymorphisms of Ets1 are associated with different clinical manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (Sullivan et al...of mammary epithelial cell growth [24]. In postnatal mammary glands, ETS factors have been shown to have key roles in pregnancy -induced, PRL- mediated...mammary gland lobuloalveolar development and milk production and in breast tumorigenesis. In the early phase of pregnancy , a proliferative phase of

  20. Dynamics of Cancer Cell near Collagen Fiber Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihan; Sun, Bo

    Cell migration is an integrated process that is important in life. Migration is essential for embryonic development as well as homeostatic processes such as wound healing and immune responses. When cell migrates through connective extracellular matrix (ECM), it applies cellular traction force to ECM and senses the rigidity of their local environment. We used human breast cancer cell (MDA-MB-231) which is highly invasive and applies strong traction force to ECM. As cancer cell applies traction force to type I collage-based ECM, it deforms collagen fibers near the surface. Patterns of deforming collagen fibers are significantly different with pairs of cancer cells compared to a single cancer cell. While a pair of cancer cells within 60 um creates aligned collagen fiber chains between them permanently, a single cancer cell does not form any fiber chains. In this experiment we measured a cellular response and an interaction between a pair of cells through the chain. Finally, we analyzed correlation of directions between cancer cell migration and the collagen chain alignment.

  1. Arachidonic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid, induces cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 in prostate carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Li, Chai-Fei; Sayyah, Sina

    2005-09-01

    For the past 60 years, dietary intake of essential fatty acids has increased. Moreover, the omega-6 fatty acids have recently been found to play an important role in regulation of gene expression. Proliferation of human prostate cells was significantly increased 48 h after arachidonic acid (AA) addition. We have analyzed initial uptake using nile red fluorescence and we found that the albumin conjugated AA is endocytosed into the cells followed by the induction of RNA within minutes, protein and PGE2 synthesis within hours. Here we describe that AA induces expression of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in a dose-dependent manner and that this upregulation is dependent upon downstream synthesis of PGE2. The upregulation of cox-2 and cPLA2 was inhibited by flurbiprofen, a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, making this a second feed-forward enzyme in the eicosanoid pathway. Cox-2 specific inhibitors are known to inhibit colon and prostate cancer growth in humans; however, recent findings show that some of these have cardiovascular complications. Since cPLA2 is upstream in the eicosanoid pathway, it may be a good alternative for a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cancer.

  2. Regulation of auxin on secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis in developing cotton fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers are unicellular trichomes that differentiate from epidermal cells of developing cotton ovules. Mature fibers exhibit thickened secondary walls composed of nearly pure cellulose. Cotton fiber development is divided into four overlapping phases, 1) initiation sta...

  3. Biomimetic spinning of silk fibers and in situ cell encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Park, DoYeun; Jun, Yesl; Lee, JaeSeo; Hyun, Jinho; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    In situ embedding of sensitive materials (e.g., cells and proteins) in silk fibers without damage presents a significant challenge due to the lack of mild and efficient methods. Here, we report the development of a microfluidic chip-based method for preparation of meter-long silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel fibers by mimicking the silkworm-spinning process. For the spinning of SF fibers, alginate was used as a sericin-like material to induce SF phase separation and entrap liquid SFs, making it possible to shape the outline of SF-based fibers under mild physicochemical conditions. L929 fibroblasts were encapsulated in the fibric hydrogel and displayed excellent viability. Cell-laden SF fibric hydrogels prepared using our method offer a new type of SF-based biomedical device with potential utility in biomedicine.

  4. Multi-scale undulations in human aortic endothelial cell fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frketic, Jolie B; DeLaPeña, Abigail; Suaris, Melanie G; Zehnder, Steven M; Angelini, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    Blood vessels often have an undulatory morphology, with excessive bending, kinking, and coiling occuring in diseased vasculature. The underlying physical causes of these morphologies are generally attributed, in combination, to changes in blood pressure, blood flow rate, and cell proliferation or apoptosis. However, pathological vascular morphologies often start during developmental vasculogenesis. At early stages of vasculogenesis, angioblasts (vascular endothelial cells that have not formed a lumen) assemble into primitive vessel-like fibers before blood flow occurs. If loose, fibrous aggregates of endothelial cells can generate multi-cellular undulations through mechanical instabilities, driven by the cytoskeleton, new insight into vasculature morphology may be achieved with simple in vitro models of endothelial cell fibers. Here we study mechanical instabilities in vessel-like structures made from endothelial cells embedded in a collagen matrix. We find that endothelial cell fibers contract radially over time, and undulate at two dominant wavelengths: approximately 1cm and 1mm. Simple mechanical models suggest that the long-wavelength undulation is Euler buckling in rigid confinement, while the short-wavelength buckle may arise from a mismatch between fiber bending energy and matrix deformation. These results suggest a combination of fiber-like geometry, cystoskeletal contractions, and extracellular matrix elasticity may contribute to undulatory blood vessel morphology in the absence of a lumen or blood pressure.

  5. Non-cysteine linked MUC1 cytoplasmic dimers are required for Src recruitment and ICAM-1 binding induced cell invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunasekara Nirosha

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mucin MUC1, a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is overexpressed in breast cancer and has been correlated with increased metastasis. We were the first to report binding between MUC1 and Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, which is expressed on stromal and endothelial cells throughout the migratory tract of a metastasizing breast cancer cell. Subsequently, we found that MUC1/ICAM-1 binding results in pro-migratory calcium oscillations, cytoskeletal reorganization, and simulated transendothelial migration. These events were found to involve Src kinase, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase also implicated in breast cancer initiation and progression. Here, we further investigated the mechanism of MUC1/ICAM-1 signalling, focusing on the role of MUC1 dimerization in Src recruitment and pro-metastatic signalling. Methods To assay MUC1 dimerization, we used a chemical crosslinker which allowed for the detection of dimers on SDS-PAGE. We then generated MUC1 constructs containing an engineered domain which allowed for manipulation of dimerization status through the addition of ligands to the engineered domain. Following manipulation of dimerization, we immunoprecipitated MUC1 to investigate recruitment of Src, or assayed for our previously observed ICAM-1 binding induced events. To investigate the nature of MUC1 dimers, we used both non-reducing SDS-PAGE and generated a mutant construct lacking cysteine residues. Results We first demonstrate that the previously observed MUC1/ICAM-1signalling events are dependent on the activity of Src kinase. We then report that MUC1 forms constitutive cytoplasmic domain dimers which are necessary for Src recruitment, ICAM-1 induced calcium oscillations and simulated transendothelial migration. The dimers are not covalently linked constitutively or following ICAM-1 binding. In contrast to previously published reports, we found that membrane proximal cysteine residues were not involved in

  6. Transcriptome Profiling and Analysis during Cotton Fiber Cell Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yu-xian

    2008-01-01

    @@ In this project,we aim to elucidate the molecular mechanism controlling initiation and elongation of tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum fiber cells by setting up a high throughput custom-designed cDNA microarray and a systematic gene expression profiling during cotton fiber development.We first constructed a microarray consisting of more than 28,000 cotton UniESTs that we obtained by deep-sequencing of several cotton ovule cDNA libraries.

  7. Gene expression pattern in transmitochondrial cytoplasmic hybrid cells harboring type 2 diabetes-associated mitochondrial DNA haplogroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwoo Hwang

    Full Text Available Decreased mitochondrial function plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Recently, it was reported that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups confer genetic susceptibility to T2DM in Koreans and Japanese. Particularly, mtDNA haplogroup N9a is associated with a decreased risk of T2DM, whereas haplogroups D5 and F are associated with an increased risk. To examine functional consequences of these haplogroups without being confounded by the heterogeneous nuclear genomic backgrounds of different subjects, we constructed transmitochondrial cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid cells harboring each of the three haplogroups (N9a, D5, and F in a background of a shared nuclear genome. We compared the functional consequences of the three haplogroups using cell-based assays and gene expression microarrays. Cell-based assays did not detect differences in mitochondrial functions among the haplogroups in terms of ATP generation, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cellular dehydrogenase activity. However, differential expression and clustering analyses of microarray data revealed that the three haplogroups exhibit a distinctive nuclear gene expression pattern that correlates with their susceptibility to T2DM. Pathway analysis of microarray data identified several differentially regulated metabolic pathways. Notably, compared to the T2DM-resistant haplogroup N9a, the T2DM-susceptible haplogroup F showed down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation and up-regulation of glycolysis. These results suggest that variations in mtDNA can affect the expression of nuclear genes regulating mitochondrial functions or cellular energetics. Given that impaired mitochondrial function caused by T2DM-associated mtDNA haplogroups is compensated by the nuclear genome, we speculate that defective nuclear compensation, under certain circumstances, might lead to the development of T2DM.

  8. Fe homeostasis in plant cells: does nicotianamine play multiple roles in the regulation of cytoplasmic Fe concentration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pich, A; Manteuffel, R; Hillmer, S; Scholz, G; Schmidt, W

    2001-10-01

    The cellular and intracellular localization of the non-proteogenic amino acid nicotianamine (NA) in leaves and root elongation zones was immunochemically investigated in pea (Pisum sativum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants grown under various iron regimes and in three mutants defective in the regulation of iron uptake. Strongest immunostaining was observed in the over-accumulating pea mutants brz and dgl, and in iron-loaded wild-type plants. Fe concentration and NA level paralleled staining intensity, indicating that NA synthesis is induced by high iron availability. While label was mainly present in the cytoplasm under normal (10 microM) Fe supply and under Fe deprivation, most of the labeling was present in the vacuole in iron-loaded plants. This pattern resembled the distribution of NA in Fe over-accumulating mutants, indicating the possible importance of vacuolar sequestration in the detoxification of excess Fe. Based on the dependence of the cellular distribution of NA on the iron nutritional status of the plant, a possible role of NA in buffering free Fe in root and leaf cells was inferred. We show here for the first time that the NA concentration is increased in response to iron overload, indicating that, besides other classes of intracellular metal-binding ligands, NA may play an essential role in iron tolerance.

  9. Cancer cell-associated cytoplasmic B7–H4 is induced by hypoxia through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and promotes cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, You-Kyoung [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, Il-Whan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo-Woong [Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Inhak, E-mail: miccih@inje.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Aberrant B7–H4 expression in cancer tissues serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for poor survival in patients with cancer. However, the factor(s) that induce cancer cell-associated B7–H4 remain to be fully elucidated. We herein demonstrate that hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription in primary CD138{sup +} multiple myeloma cells and cancer cell lines. In support of this finding, analysis of the Multiple Myeloma Genomics Portal (MMGP) data set revealed a positive correlation between the mRNA expression levels of B7–H4 and the endogenous hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrogenase 9. Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 expression was detected in the cytoplasm, but not in cancer cell membranes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) to proximal hypoxia-response element (HRE) sites within the B7–H4 promoter. Knockdown of HIF-1α and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α diminished B7–H4 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of cytoplasmic B7–H4 in MCF-7 decreased the S-phase cell population under hypoxia. Finally, MMGP analysis revealed a positive correlation between the transcript levels of B7–H4 and proliferation-related genes including MKI67, CCNA1, and Myc in several patients with multiple myeloma. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms underlying B7–H4 upregulation and its role in cancer cell proliferation in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription and protein expression. • Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 is detected in the cytoplasm, but not on membrane. • ChIP assay reveals a binding of HIF-1α to B7–H4 promoter at HRE site. • Knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α reduce B7–H4 expression. • B7–H4 knockdown decrease the number of cells in S-phase of cell cycle.

  10. Tensile properties of single stress fibers isolated from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Shinji; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki

    2006-01-01

    Stress fibers (SFs), a contractile bundle of actin filaments, play a critical role in mechanotransduction in adherent cells; yet, the mechanical properties of SFs are poorly understood. Here, we measured tensile properties of single SFs by in vitro manipulation with cantilevers. SFs were isolated from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells with a combination of low ionic-strength extraction and detergent extraction and were stretched until breaking. The breaking force and the Young's modulus (assuming that SFs were isotropic) were, on average, 377 nN and 1.45 MPa, which were approximately 600-fold greater and three orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of actin filaments reported previously. Strain-induced stiffening was observed in the force-strain curve. We also found that the extracted SFs shortened to approximately 80% of the original length in an ATP-independent manner after they were dislodged from the substrate, suggesting that SFs had preexisting strain in the cytoplasm. The force required for stretching the single SFs from the zero-stress length back to the original length was approximately 10 nN, which was comparable with the traction force level applied by adherent cells at single adhesion sites to maintain cell integrity. These results suggest that SFs can bear intracellular stresses that may affect overall cell mechanical properties and will impact interpretation of intracellular stress distribution and force-transmission mechanism in adherent cells.

  11. Polymer Solar Cells: Solubility Controls Fiber Network Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Franeker, Jacobus J; Heintges, Gaël H L; Schaefer, Charley; Portale, Giuseppe; Li, Weiwei; Wienk, Martijn M; van der Schoot, Paul; Janssen, René A J

    2015-09-16

    The photoactive layer of polymer solar cells is commonly processed from a four-component solution, containing a semiconducting polymer and a fullerene derivative dissolved in a solvent-cosolvent mixture. The nanoscale dimensions of the polymer-fullerene morphology that is formed upon drying determines the solar cell performance, but the fundamental processes that govern the size of the phase-separated polymer and fullerene domains are poorly understood. Here, we investigate morphology formation of an alternating copolymer of diketopyrrolopyrrole and a thiophene-phenyl-thiophene oligomer (PDPPTPT) with relatively long 2-decyltetradecyl (DT) side chains blended with [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester. During solvent evaporation the polymer crystallizes into a fibrous network. The typical width of these fibers is analyzed by quantification of transmission electron microscopic images, and is mainly determined by the solubility of the polymer in the cosolvent and the molecular weight of the polymer. A higher molecular weight corresponds to a lower solubility and film processing results in a smaller fiber width. Surprisingly, the fiber width is not related to the drying rate or the amount of cosolvent. We have made solar cells with fiber widths ranging from 28 to 68 nm and found an inverse relation between fiber width and photocurrent. Finally, by mixing two cosolvents, we develop a ternary solvent system to tune the fiber width. We propose a model based on nucleation-and-growth which can explain these measurements. Our results show that the width of the semicrystalline polymer fibers is not the result of a frozen dynamical state, but determined by the nucleation induced by the polymer solubility.

  12. Modulation of cell surface transport and lipid raft localization by the cytoplasmic tail of the influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolari, Silvia; Imkeller, Katharina; Jolmes, Fabian; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas; Schwarzer, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Viral glycoproteins are highly variable in their primary structure, but on the other hand feature a high functional conservation to fulfil their versatile tasks during the pathogenic life cycle. Typically, all protein domains are optimized in that indispensable functions can be assigned to small conserved motifs or even individual amino acids. The cytoplasmic tail of many viral spike proteins, although of particular relevance for the virus biology, is often only insufficiently characterized. Hemagglutinin (HA), the receptor-binding protein of the influenza virus comprises a short cytoplasmic tail of 13 amino acids that exhibits three highly conserved palmitoylation sites. However, the particular importance of these modifications and the tail in general for intracellular trafficking and lateral membrane organization remains elusive. In this study, we generated HA core proteins consisting of transmembrane domain, cytoplasmic tail and a minor part of the ectodomain, tagged with a yellow fluorescent protein. Different mutation and truncation variants of these chimeric proteins were investigated using confocal microscopy, to characterize the role of cytoplasmic tail and palmitoylation for the intracellular trafficking to plasma membrane and Golgi apparatus. In addition, we assessed raft partitioning of the variants by Foerster resonance energy transfer with an established raft marker. We revealed a substantial influence of the cytoplasmic tail length on the intracellular distribution and surface exposure of the proteins. A complete removal of the tail hampers a physiological trafficking of the protein, whereas a partial truncation can be compensated by cytoplasmic palmitoylations. Plasma membrane raft partitioning on the other hand was found to imperatively require palmitoylations, and the cysteine at position 551 turned out to be of most relevance. Our data shed further light on the tight interconnection between cytoplasmic elements and intracellular trafficking and

  13. Down-regulation of cytoplasmic PLZF correlates with high tumor grade and tumor aggression in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Li, Faqian; Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer; Hyrien, Ollivier; Unger, Pamela D; Xiao, Lu; Dunne, Richard; Kim, Eric S; Yang, Qi; McMahon, Loralee; Burstein, David E

    2015-11-01

    There are currently no effective prognostic biomarkers for lung cancer. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF), a transcriptional repressor, has a role in cell cycle progression and tumorigenicity in various cancers. The expression and value of PLZF in lung carcinoma, particularly in the subclass of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), has not been studied. Our aim was to study the immunohistochemical expression of PLZF in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma and correlate the alteration of PLZF expression with tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, tumor stage, and overall survival. A total of 296 NSCLCs being mounted on tissue microarray (181 adenocarcinomas and 91 squamous cell carcinomas) were investigated. Moderate to strong expression of PLZF was found in the cytoplasm of all the nonneoplastic respiratory epithelium and most (89.9%) well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. The proportions of moderately differentiated, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, and paired lymph node adenocarcinoma metastases that demonstrated negative or only weak PLZF reactivity were 75.6%, 97.2%, and 89.9%, respectively. The expression of PLZF in squamous cell carcinoma was mostly weak or absent and significantly lower than that in adenocarcinoma of the same grade (P carcinoma and adenocarcinoma (P < .0001). Down-regulation of PLZF also correlated with higher tumor stage and shorter overall survival (P < .05). These results support a prognostic value for loss of cytoplasmic PLZF expression in the stratification of NSCLC and a possible role of cytoplasmic shift and down-regulation of PLZF in the pathogenesis of NSCLC.

  14. Dedifferentiated fat cells differentiate into osteoblasts in titanium fiber mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Naotaka; Momota, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Ando, Kayoko; Omasa, Takeshi; Kotani, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells rapidly differentiate into osteoblasts under three-dimensional culture conditions. However, it has not been demonstrated that DFAT cells can differentiate into osteoblasts in a rigid scaffold consisting of titanium fiber mesh (TFM). We examined the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation ability of DFAT cells using TFM as a scaffold. DFAT cells derived from rabbit subcutaneous fat were seeded into TFM and cultured in osteogenic medium containing dexamethasone, L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate and β-glycerophosphate for 14 days. In scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, well-spread cells covered the titanium fibers on day 3, and appeared to increase in number from day 3 to 7. Numerous globular accretions were found and almost completely covered the fibers on day 14. Cell proliferation, as measured by DNA content in the TFM, was significantly higher on day 7 compared with that of day 1. Osteocalcin and calcium content in the TFM were significantly higher on day 14 compared to those of days 1, 3, and 7, indicating DFAT cells differentiated into osteoblasts. We theorize that globular accretions observed in SEM analysis may be calcified matrix resulting from osteocalcin secreted by osteoblasts binding calcium contained in fetal bovine serum. In this study, we demonstrated that DFAT cells differentiate into osteoblasts and deposit mineralized matrices in TFM. Therefore, the combination of DFAT cells and TFM may be an attractive option for bone tissue engineering.

  15. Carbon fiber enhanced bioelectricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Wan, Lili; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-11-15

    The soil microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising biotechnology for the bioelectricity recovery as well as the remediation of organics contaminated soil. However, the electricity production and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC are seriously limited by the tremendous internal resistance of soil. Conductive carbon fiber was mixed with petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil and significantly enhanced the performance of soil MFC. The maximum current density, the maximum power density and the accumulated charge output of MFC mixed carbon fiber (MC) were 10, 22 and 16 times as high as those of closed circuit control due to the carbon fiber productively assisted the anode to collect the electron. The internal resistance of MC reduced by 58%, 83% of which owed to the charge transfer resistance, resulting in a high efficiency of electron transfer from soil to anode. The degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbons enhanced by 100% and 329% compared to closed and opened circuit controls without the carbon fiber respectively. The effective range of remediation and the bioelectricity recovery was extended from 6 to 20cm with the same area of air-cathode. The mixed carbon fiber apparently enhanced the bioelectricity generation and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC by means of promoting the electron transfer rate from soil to anode. The use of conductively functional materials (e.g. carbon fiber) is very meaningful for the remediation and bioelectricity recovery in the bioelectrochemical remediation.

  16. Electrospun fiber membranes enable proliferation of genetically modified cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borjigin M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mandula Borjigin*, Chris Eskridge*, Rohina Niamat, Bryan Strouse, Pawel Bialk, Eric B KmiecDepartment of Chemistry, Delaware State University, Dover, DE, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Polycaprolactone (PCL and its blended composites (chitosan, gelatin, and lecithin are well-established biomaterials that can enrich cell growth and enable tissue engineering. However, their application in the recovery and proliferation of genetically modified cells has not been studied. In the study reported here, we fabricated PCL-biomaterial blended fiber membranes, characterized them using physicochemical techniques, and used them as templates for the growth of genetically modified HCT116-19 colon cancer cells. Our data show that the blended polymers are highly miscible and form homogenous electrospun fiber membranes of uniform texture. The aligned PCL nanofibers support robust cell growth, yielding a 2.5-fold higher proliferation rate than cells plated on standard plastic plate surfaces. PCL-lecithin fiber membranes yielded a 2.7-fold higher rate of proliferation, while PCL-chitosan supported a more modest growth rate (1.5-fold higher. Surprisingly, PCL-gelatin did not enhance cell proliferation when compared to the rate of cell growth on plastic surfaces. Keywords: nanofibers, PCL-biomaterial blends, miscibility, gene editing, cell proliferation

  17. Gypenoside L, Isolated from Gynostemma pentaphyllum, Induces Cytoplasmic Vacuolation Death in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells through Reactive-Oxygen-Species-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Liao, Chenghui; Li, Yan; Fan, Xinmin; Fan, Long; Xu, Hong; Kang, Qiangrong; Zeng, Yong; Wu, Xuli; Wu, Haiqiang; Liu, Lizhong; Xiao, Xiaohua; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yifei; He, Zhendan

    2016-03-02

    Exploring novel anticancer agents that can trigger non-apoptotic or non-autophagic cell death is urgent for cancer treatment. In this study, we screened and identified an unexplored anticancer activity of gypenoside L (Gyp-L) isolated from Gynostemma pentaphyllum. We showed that treatment with Gyp-L induces non-apoptotic and non-autophagic cytoplasmic vacuolation death in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Mechanically, Gyp-L initially increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, which, in turn, triggered protein ubiquitination and unfolded protein response (UPR), resulting in Ca(2+) release from endoplasm reticulum (ER) inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-operated stores and finally cytoplasmic vacuolation and cell death. Interruption of the ROS-ER-Ca(2+) signaling pathway by chemical inhibitors significantly prevented Gyp-L-induced vacuole formation and cell death. In addition, Gyp-L-induced ER stress and vacuolation death required new protein synthesis. Overall, our works provide strong evidence for the anti-HCC activity of Gyp-L and suggest a novel therapeutic option by Gyp-L through the induction of a unconventional ROS-ER-Ca(2+)-mediated cytoplasmic vacuolation death in human HCC.

  18. Fibrin-fiber architecture influences cell spreading and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruekers, Stéphanie M C; Jaspers, Maarten; Hendriks, José M A; Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Kouwer, Paul H J; Rowan, Alan E; T S Huck, Wilhelm

    2016-09-02

    The mechanical and structural properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play an important role in regulating cell fate. The natural ECM has a complex fibrillar structure and shows nonlinear mechanical properties, which are both difficult to mimic synthetically. Therefore, systematically testing the influence of ECM properties on cellular behavior is very challenging. In this work we show two different approaches to tune the fibrillar structure and mechanical properties of fibrin hydrogels. Addition of extra thrombin before gelation increases the protein density within the fibrin fibers without significantly altering the mechanical properties of the resulting hydrogel. On the other hand, by forming a composite hydrogel with a synthetic biomimetic polyisocyanide network the protein density within the fibrin fibers decreases, and the mechanics of the composite material can be tuned by the PIC/fibrin mass ratio. The effect of the changes in gel structure and mechanics on cellular behavior are investigated, by studying human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) spreading and differentiation on these gels. We find that the trends observed in cell spreading and differentiation cannot be explained by the bulk mechanics of the gels, but correlate to the density of the fibrin fibers the gels are composed of. These findings strongly suggest that the microscopic properties of individual fibers in fibrous networks play an essential role in determining cell behavior.

  19. Accumulation of cytoplasmic calcium, but not apamin-sensitive afterhyperpolarization current, during high frequency firing in rat subthalamic nucleus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teagarden, Mark; Atherton, Jeremy F; Bevan, Mark D; Wilson, Charles J

    2008-02-01

    The autonomous firing pattern of neurons in the rat subthalamic nucleus (STN) is shaped by action potential afterhyperpolarization currents. One of these is an apamin-sensitive calcium-dependent potassium current (SK). The duration of SK current is usually considered to be limited by the clearance of calcium from the vicinity of the channel. When the cell is driven to fire faster, calcium is expected to accumulate, and this is expected to result in accumulation of calcium-dependent AHP current. We measured the time course of calcium transients in the soma and proximal dendrites of STN neurons during spontaneous firing and their accumulation during driven firing. We compared these to the time course and accumulation of AHP currents using whole-cell and perforated patch recordings. During spontaneous firing, a rise in free cytoplasmic calcium was seen after each action potential, and decayed with a time constant of about 200 ms in the soma, and 80 ms in the dendrites. At rates higher than 10 Hz, calcium transients accumulated as predicted. In addition, there was a slow calcium transient not predicted by summation of action potentials that became more pronounced at high firing frequency. Spike AHP currents were measured in voltage clamp as tail currents after 2 ms voltage pulses that triggered action currents. Apamin-sensitive AHP (SK) current was measured by subtraction of tail currents obtained before and after treatment with apamin. SK current peaked between 10 and 15 ms after an action potential, had a decay time constant of about 30 ms, and showed no accumulation. At frequencies between 5 and 200 spikes s(-1), the maximal SK current remained the same as that evoked by a single action potential. AHP current did not have time to decay between action potentials, so at frequencies above 50 spikes s(-1) the apamin-sensitive current was effectively constant. These results are inconsistent with the view that the decay of SK current is governed by calcium dynamics. They

  20. Risk stratification of plasma cell neoplasm: insights from plasma cell-specific cytoplasmic immunoglobulin fluorescence in situ hybridization (cIg FISH) vs. conventional FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Henry; Yang, Hai-Su; Jagannath, Sundar; Stephenson, Christine F; Brenholz, Pauline; Mazumder, Amitabha; Chari, Ajai

    2012-10-01

    We directly compared the results of routine fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and plasma cell-specific cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) FISH from 75 paired samples for myeloma risk stratification. CIg FISH improves test specificity and sensitivity and tends to eliminate borderline results. It proves that most plasma cells (PCs) consistently carry the abnormality in myelomas with an IGH translocation, whereas routine FISH detects these cells only at variably low levels. Routine cytogenetic analysis of plasma cell neoplasms (PCNs) has a low sensitivity. Conventional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is not plasma cell (PC) specific and results are diluted by other cells in the sample. Although PC-specific FISH testing has been recommended for multiple myeloma (MM) risk stratification, eg, by combining cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) staining with FISH, the benefits of cIg FISH have never been directly demonstrated in a controlled study. Seventy-five samples from patients with PCNs were analyzed by concomitant conventional FISH and cIg FISH with probes for t(4;14), t(11;14), t(14;16), -13, 17p-, and +3. The results were compared for their reliability, specificity, and consistency. Apart from marginally improving detection threshold in samples with low PC burden, cIg FISH identified more abnormal cases (50 vs. 47 cases) and more chromosome abnormalities (113 vs. 103 events) than did conventional FISH. It differentiated del(13q) in myelodysplasia from MM. Remarkably, cIg FISH consistently identified a high percentage of abnormal PCs in all cases. It detected IGH translocation in 78% to 100% of PCs in all but 2 positive cases, whereas conventional FISH detected 0% to 46% in these cases (median, 91% vs. 9%). The abnormal cells found in patients with 17p- were 19% to 96% by cIg FISH vs. 0% to 13% by conventional FISH (median, 54% vs. 9%). Cases with insufficient PCs for cIg FISH had only normal conventional FISH results. CIg FISH improves reliability of

  1. Three major nucleolar proteins migrate from nucleolus to nucleoplasm and cytoplasm in root tip cells of Vicia faba L. exposed to aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Rong; Zhang, Huaning; Li, Shaoshan; Jiang, Wusheng; Liu, Donghua

    2014-09-01

    Results from our previous investigation indicated that Al could affect the nucleolus and induce extrusion of silver-staining nucleolar particles containing argyrophilic proteins from the nucleolus into the cytoplasm in root tip cells of Vicia faba L. So far, the nucleolar proteins involved have not been identified. It is well known that nucleophosmin (B23), nucleolin (C23), and fibrillarin are three major and multifunctional nucleolar proteins. Therefore, effects of Al on B23, C23, and fibrillarin in root tip cells of V. faba exposed to 100 μM Al for 48 h were observed and analyzed using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. The results from this work demonstrated that after 100 μM of Al treatment for 48 h, B23 and C23 migrated from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm and fibrillarin from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. In some cells, fibrillarin was present only in the cytoplasm. Western blotting data revealed higher expression of the three major nucleolar proteins in Al-treated roots compared with the control and that the B23 content increased markedly. These findings confirmed our previous observations.

  2. The impact of dietary fibers on dendritic cell responses IN VITRO is dependent on the differential effects of the fibers on intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M.; Rosch, Christiane; Schols, Henk A.; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Scope: In the present study, the direct interaction of commonly consumed fibers with epithelial or dendritic cells (DCs) was studied. Methods and results: The fibers were characterized for their sugar composition and chain length profile. When in direct contact, fibers activate DCs only mildly. This

  3. The impact of dietary fibers on dendritic cell responses in vitro is dependent on the differential effects of the fibers on intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bermudez-Brito, M.; Sahasrabudhe, N.M.; Rösch, C.; Schols, H.A.; Faas, M.M.; Vos, de P.

    2015-01-01

    Scope In the present study, the direct interaction of commonly consumed fibers with epithelial or dendritic cells (DCs) was studied. Methods and results The fibers were characterized for their sugar composition and chain length profile. When in direct contact, fibers activate DCs only mildly. This w

  4. Morphological studies on the culture of kidney epithelial cells in a fiber-in-fiber bioreactor design with hollow fiber membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey-Lamprecht, F; Albrecht, W; Groth, T; Weigel, T; Gross, U

    2003-05-01

    A hollow fiber-in-fiber-based bioreactor system was tested for the applicability to host kidney epithelial cells as a model system for a bioartificial kidney. Hollow fibers were prepared from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polysulfone-polyvinylpyrollidinone (PVP) blend (PSU) and poly(acrylonitrile-N-vinylpyrollidinone) copolymer P(AN-NVP). Hollow fibers with smaller and larger diameters were prepared so that the smaller fitted into the larger, with a distance of 50-100 microm in between. The following material combinations as outer and inner fiber were applied: PAN-PAN; PSU-PSU, PSU-P(AN-NVP). Madin-Darby kidney epithelial cells (MDCK) were seeded in the interfiber space and cultured for a period up to 14 days. Light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy were used to follow the adhesion and growth of cells, and to characterize their morphology. As a result, we found that MDCK cells were able to grow in the interfiber space in mono- and multilayers without signs of systemic degeneration. Comparison of the different materials showed that PAN and P(AN-NVP) provided the best growth conditions, indicated by a tight attachment of cells on hollow fiber membrane, and subsequent proliferation and development of structural elements of normal epithelia, such as tight junctions and microvilli. In conclusion, the fiber-in-fiber design seems to be an interesting system for the construction of a bioartificial kidney. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) is associated with microtubules and with mitochondria in the cytoplasm of prothoracic gland cells of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafopoulou, Xanthe

    2009-12-01

    We have shown previously that EcR in larval Rhodnius is present in the cytoplasm of various cell types and undergoes daily cycling in abundance in the cytoplasm (Vafopoulou and Steel, 2006. Cell Tissue Res 323:443-455). It is unknown which organelles are associated with EcR. Here, we report that cytoplasmic EcR in prothoracic gland cells is associated with both microtubules and mitochondria, and discuss the implications for both nuclear and non-genomic actions of EcR. EcR was localized immunohistochemically using several antibodies to EcR of Manduca and Drosophila and a confocal laser scanning microscope. Double labels were made to visualize EcR and (1) microtubules (using an antibody to tyrosylated alpha-tubulin) and (2) mitochondria (using a fluorescent MitoTracker probe), both after stabilization of microtubules with taxol. EcR co-localized with both tubulin and mitochondria. All the different EcR antibodies produced similar co-localization patterns. EcR was seen in the perinuclear aggregation of mitochondria, indicating that mitochondria are targets of ecdysone, which could influence mitochondrial gene transcription. EcR was also distributed throughout the microtubule network. Co-localization of EcR with tubulin or mitochondria was maintained after depolymerization of microtubules with colchicine. Treatment with taxol resulted in accumulation of EcR in the cytoplasm and simultaneous depletion of EcR from the nucleus, suggesting that microtubules may be involved in targeted intracellular transport of EcR to the nucleus (genomic action) or may play a role in rapid ecdysone signal transduction in the extranuclear compartment, i.e., in non-genomic actions of ecdysone. These findings align EcR more closely with steroid hormone receptors in vertebrates.

  6. The Envelope Cytoplasmic Tail of HIV-1 Subtype C Contributes to Poor Replication Capacity through Low Viral Infectivity and Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Morgane; Masquelier, Cécile; Beraud, Cyprien; Rybicki, Arkadiusz; Servais, Jean-Yves; Iserentant, Gilles; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail (gp41CT) of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) mediates Env incorporation into virions and regulates Env intracellular trafficking. Little is known about the functional impact of variability in this domain. To address this issue, we compared the replication of recombinant virus pairs carrying the full Env (Env viruses) or the Env ectodomain fused to the gp41CT of NL4.3 (EnvEC viruses) (12 subtype C and 10 subtype B pairs) in primary CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDMs). In CD4+ T-cells, replication was as follows: B-EnvEC = B-Env>C-EnvEC>C-Env, indicating that the gp41CT of subtype C contributes to the low replicative capacity of this subtype. In MDMs, in contrast, replication capacity was comparable for all viruses regardless of subtype and of gp41CT. In CD4+ T-cells, viral entry, viral release and viral gene expression were similar. However, infectivity of free virions and cell-to-cell transmission of C-Env viruses released by CD4+ T-cells was lower, suggestive of lower Env incorporation into virions. Subtype C matrix only minimally rescued viral replication and failed to restore infectivity of free viruses and cell-to-cell transmission. Taken together, these results show that polymorphisms in the gp41CT contribute to viral replication capacity and suggest that the number of Env spikes per virion may vary across subtypes. These findings should be taken into consideration in the design of vaccines. PMID:27598717

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Cytoplasmic Domain Affects ErbB Protein Degradation by the Lysosomal and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Glogowska

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic domains of EGF-like ligands, including EGF cytoplasmic domain (EGFcyt, have important biological functions. Using specific constructs and peptides of human EGF cytoplasmic domain, we demonstrate that EGFcyt facilitates lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation, and this coincided with growth inhibition of human thyroid and glioma carcinoma cells. EGFcyt and exon 22–23-encoded peptide (EGF22.23 enhanced procathepsin B (procathB expression and procathB-mediated lysosomal degradation of EGFR/ErbB1 as determined by inhibitors for procathB and the lysosomal ATPase inhibitor BafA1. Presence of mbEGFctF, EGFcyt, EGF22.23, and exon 23-encoded peptides suppressed the expression of the deubiqitinating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1. This coincided with hyperubiquitination of total cellular proteins and ErbB1/2 and reduced proteasome activity. Upon small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of endogenously expressed UCH-L1, a similar hyperubiquitinylation phenotype, reduced ErbB1/2 content, and attenuated growth was observed. The exon 23-encoded peptide region of EGFcyt was important for these biologic actions. Structural homology modeling of human EGFcyt showed that this molecular region formed an exposed surface loop. Peptides derived from this EGFcyt loop structure may aid in the design of novel peptide therapeutics aimed at inhibiting growth of cancer cells.

  8. The Glycoprotein B Cytoplasmic Domain Lysine Cluster Is Critical for Varicella-Zoster Virus Cell-Cell Fusion Regulation and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M; Oliver, Stefan L

    2017-01-01

    The conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL are essential for herpesvirus entry and cell-cell fusion induced syncytium formation, a characteristic of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) pathology in skin and sensory ganglia. VZV syncytium formation, which has been implicated in the painful condition of postherpetic neuralgia, is regulated by the cytoplasmic domains of gB (gBcyt) via an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) and gH (gHcyt). A lysine cluster (K894, K897, K898, and K900) in the VZV gBcyt was identified by sequence alignment to be conserved among alphaherpesviruses, suggesting a functional role. Alanine and arginine substitutions were used to determine if the positive charge and susceptibility to posttranslational modifications of these lysines contributed to gB/gH-gL cell-cell fusion. Critically, the positive charge of the lysine residues was necessary for fusion regulation, as alanine substitutions induced a 440% increase in fusion compared to that of the wild-type gBcyt while arginine substitutions had wild-type-like fusion levels in an in vitro gB/gH-gL cell fusion assay. Consistent with these results, the alanine substitutions in the viral genome caused exaggerated syncytium formation, reduced VZV titers (-1.5 log10), and smaller plaques than with the parental Oka (pOka) strain. In contrast, arginine substitutions resulted in syncytia with only 2-fold more nuclei, a -0.5-log10 reduction in titers, and pOka-like plaques. VZV mutants with both an ITIM mutation and either alanine or arginine substitutions had reduced titers and small plaques but differed in syncytium morphology. Thus, effective VZV propagation is dependent on cell-cell fusion regulation by the conserved gBcyt lysine cluster, in addition to the gBcyt ITIM and the gHcyt.

  9. Neuregulin 1 functionalization of organic fibers for Schwann cell guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonazzini, Ilaria; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario; Cecchini, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The repair of peripheral nerve lesions is a clinical problem where the functional recovery is often far from being satisfactory, although peripheral nerves generally retain good potential for regeneration. Here, we develop a novel scaffold approach based on bioactive fibers of poly(ε-caprolactone) where nanotopographical guidance and neuregulin 1 (NRG1) cues are combined. We interface them with rat primary Schwann cells (SCs), the peripheral glial cells that drive initial regeneration of injured nerves, and found that the combination of NRG1 with parallel nano-fibrous topographies is effective in improving SC growth up to 72 h, alignment to fiber topography, and bipolar differentiation, opening original perspectives for nerve repair applications.

  10. Single-molecule imaging of the H-ras membrane-anchor reveals domains in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the cell membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Lommerse, Piet H M; Cognet, Laurent; Harms, Gregory S; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; Spaink, Herman P; Schmidt, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    In the last decade evidence has accumulated that small domains of 50-700 nm in diameter are located in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Most of these domains supposedly consist of specific sets of lipids and proteins, and are believed to coordinate signal transduction cascades. Whether similar domains are also present in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane is unclear so far. To investigate the presence of cytoplasmic leaflet domains, the H-Ras membrane-targeting sequence was fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, trajectories of individual molecules diffusing in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane were recorded. From these trajectories, the diffusion of individual membrane-anchored enhanced yellow fluorescent protein molecules was studied in live cells on timescales from 5 to 200 ms. The results show that the diffusion of 30-40% of the molecules is constrained in domains with a typical size of 200 n...

  11. Cytoplasmic dynein nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, K. Kevin; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Gibbons, Ian R.; Hays, Thomas S.; Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Porter, Mary E.; Schroer, Trina A.; Vaughan, Kevin T.; Witman, George B.; King, Stephen M.; Vallee, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of names has been used in the literature for the subunits of cytoplasmic dynein complexes. Thus, there is a strong need for a more definitive consensus statement on nomenclature. This is especially important for mammalian cytoplasmic dyneins, many subunits of which are encoded by multiple genes. We propose names for the mammalian cytoplasmic dynein subunit genes and proteins that reflect the phylogenetic relationships of the genes and the published studies clarifying the functions of the polypeptides. This nomenclature recognizes the two distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes and has the flexibility to accommodate the discovery of new subunits and isoforms. PMID:16260502

  12. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Gita [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Mahalingam, S., E-mail: mahalingam@iitm.ac.in [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  13. Arrest of cytoplasmic streaming induces algal proliferation in green paramecia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Takahashi

    Full Text Available A green ciliate Paramecium bursaria, bearing several hundreds of endosymbiotic algae, demonstrates rotational microtubule-based cytoplasmic streaming, in which cytoplasmic granules and endosymbiotic algae flow in a constant direction. However, its physiological significance is still unknown. We investigated physiological roles of cytoplasmic streaming in P. bursaria through host cell cycle using video-microscopy. Here, we found that cytoplasmic streaming was arrested in dividing green paramecia and the endosymbiotic algae proliferated only during the arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. Interestingly, arrest of cytoplasmic streaming with pressure or a microtubule drug also induced proliferation of endosymbiotic algae independently of host cell cycle. Thus, cytoplasmic streaming may control the algal proliferation in P. bursaria. Furthermore, confocal microscopic observation revealed that a division septum was formed in the constricted area of a dividing paramecium, producing arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. This is a first report to suggest that cytoplasmic streaming controls proliferation of eukaryotic cells.

  14. The cytoplasmic domain of CD4 plays a critical role during the early stages of HIV infection in T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkirane, M; Jeang, K T; Devaux, C

    1994-01-01

    The role played by the cytoplasmic domain of the CD4 molecule in the process of HIV infection was investigated, using A2.01 cells which express different forms of the CD4 gene. A delay in HIV production was consistently observed in cells expressing a truncated CD4 which lacks the cytoplasmic domain (CD4.401) compared with cells expressing the wild type CD4. The delay was much less in cells expressing a hybrid CD4-CD8 molecule (amino acids 1-177 of CD4 fused to the hinge, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of CD8). Yet the extent of viral entry and reverse transcription, monitored by semi-quantitative PCR, was similar in each cell type studied. For further study of the mechanism responsible for delayed HIV replication in the A2.01/CD4.401 cell line, cells were treated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), 24 h after HIV infection. Under such experimental conditions HIV production was detected at the same time in the culture supernatants of A2.01/CD4 and A2.01/CD4.401 cells. Moreover, we found that CD4 oligomerization by HIV-1 induced NF-kappa B translocation in A2.01/CD4 and A2.01/CD4-CD8 but not in A2.01/CD4.401 cells. This was consistent with CAT assay experiments which provided evidence for Tat-independent NF-kappa B mediated activation of HIV-1 LTR promoter after HIV binding to CD4 in A2.01/CD4 and A2.01/CD4-CD8 but not in A2.01/CD4.401 cells. In contrast to results published recently by Tremblay et al. (1994, EMBO J., 13, 774-783), we propose that a positive cellular signal initiated following oligomerization of the CD4 by the virus itself is involved in NF-kappa B-dependent early HIV transcription in A2.01/CD4 cells. Images PMID:7988553

  15. Ectopic activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in lens fiber cells results in cataract formation and aberrant fiber cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Antosova

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway controls many processes during development, including cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue homeostasis, and its aberrant regulation has been linked to various pathologies. In this study we investigated the effect of ectopic activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling during lens fiber cell differentiation. To activate Wnt/β-catenin signaling in lens fiber cells, the transgenic mouse referred to as αA-CLEF was generated, in which the transactivation domain of β-catenin was fused to the DNA-binding protein LEF1, and expression of the transgene was controlled by αA-crystallin promoter. Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in lens fiber cells of αA-CLEF mice resulted in abnormal and delayed fiber cell differentiation. Moreover, adult αA-CLEF mice developed cataract, microphthalmia and manifested downregulated levels of γ-crystallins in lenses. We provide evidence of aberrant expression of cell cycle regulators in embryonic lenses of αA-CLEF transgenic mice resulting in the delay in cell cycle exit and in the shift of fiber cell differentiation to the central fiber cell compartment. Our results indicate that precise regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity during later stages of lens development is essential for proper lens fiber cell differentiation and lens transparency.

  16. Thymosin beta 4 may translocate from the cytoplasm in to the nucleus in HepG2 cells following serum starvation. An ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piludu, Marco; Piras, Monica; Pichiri, Giuseppina; Coni, Pierpaolo; Orrù, Germano; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Due to its actin-sequestering properties, thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is considered to play a significant role in the cellular metabolism. Several physiological properties of Tβ4 have been reported;, however, many questions concerning its cellular function remain to be ascertained. To better understand the role of this small peptide we have analyzed by means of transmission immunoelectron microscopy techniques the ultrastructural localization of Tβ4 in HepG2 cells. Samples of HepG2 cells were fixed in a mixture of 3% formaldehyde and 0.1% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer and processed for standard electron microscopic techniques. The samples were dehydrated in a cold graded methanol series and embedded in LR gold resin. Ultrathin sections were labeled with rabbit antibodies to Tβ4, followed by gold-labeled goat anti-rabbit, stained with uranyl acetate and bismuth subnitrate, observed and photographed in a JEOL 100S transmission electron microscope. High-resolution electron microscopy showed that Tβ4 was mainly restricted to the cytoplasm of HepG2 growing in complete medium. A strong Tβ4 reactivity was detected in the perinuclear region of the cytoplasmic compartment where gold particles appeared strictly associated to the nuclear membrane. In the nucleus specific Tβ4 labeling was observed in the nucleolus. The above electron microscopic results confirm and extend previous observations at light microscopic level, highlighting the subcellular distribution of Tβ4 in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of HepG2 cells. The meaning of Tβ4 presence in the nucleolus is not on the best of our knowledge clarified yet. It could account for the interaction of Tβ4 with nucleolar actin and according with this hypothesis, Tβ4 could contribute together with the other nucleolar acting binding proteins to modulate the transcription activity of the RNA polymerases.

  17. Thymosin Beta 4 May Translocate from the Cytoplasm in to the Nucleus in HepG2 Cells following Serum Starvation. An Ultrastructural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piludu, Marco; Piras, Monica; Pichiri, Giuseppina; Coni, Pierpaolo; Orrù, Germano; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Due to its actin-sequestering properties, thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is considered to play a significant role in the cellular metabolism. Several physiological properties of Tβ4 have been reported;, however, many questions concerning its cellular function remain to be ascertained. To better understand the role of this small peptide we have analyzed by means of transmission immunoelectron microscopy techniques the ultrastructural localization of Tβ4 in HepG2 cells. Samples of HepG2 cells were fixed in a mixture of 3% formaldehyde and 0.1% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer and processed for standard electron microscopic techniques. The samples were dehydrated in a cold graded methanol series and embedded in LR gold resin. Ultrathin sections were labeled with rabbit antibodies to Tβ4, followed by gold-labeled goat anti-rabbit, stained with uranyl acetate and bismuth subnitrate, observed and photographed in a JEOL 100S transmission electron microscope. High-resolution electron microscopy showed that Tβ4 was mainly restricted to the cytoplasm of HepG2 growing in complete medium. A strong Tβ4 reactivity was detected in the perinuclear region of the cytoplasmic compartment where gold particles appeared strictly associated to the nuclear membrane. In the nucleus specific Tβ4 labeling was observed in the nucleolus. The above electron microscopic results confirm and extend previous observations at light microscopic level, highlighting the subcellular distribution of Tβ4 in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of HepG2 cells. The meaning of Tβ4 presence in the nucleolus is not on the best of our knowledge clarified yet. It could account for the interaction of Tβ4 with nucleolar actin and according with this hypothesis, Tβ4 could contribute together with the other nucleolar acting binding proteins to modulate the transcription activity of the RNA polymerases. PMID:25835495

  18. Biochemical Pathways That Are Important for Cotton Fiber Cell Elongation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU YU-xian

    2008-01-01

    @@ The regulatory mechanism that controls the sustained cotton fiber cell elongation is gradually being elucidated by coupling genome-wide transcriptome profiling with systematic biochemical and physiological studies.Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA),H2O2,and several types of plant hormones including ethylene,gibberellin,and brassinolide have been reported to be involved in this process.Here we first identified by proteomic analysis a cotton cytosolic APX1 (GhAPX1) that was specifically accumulated during cotton fiber elongation.GhAPX1 expression was up-regulated in response to cellular H2O2 and ethylene,and it was involved in modulating the stead-state level of H2O2.

  19. The control of cell orientation using biodegradable alginate fibers fabricated by near-field electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Wu, Yun-Chung; He, Zhe-Yu; Huang, Zih-Ming; Hu, Wei-Wen

    2016-05-01

    For spatially controlling cell alignment, near field electrospinning (NFES) was developed to direct-write alginate fiber patterns. Compared to randomly electrospun fibers, NFES fibers guided the extension of HEK 293T cells and the levels of cell alignment increased with decreasing fiber distances. However, these guiding fibers were unfavorable for cell adhesion and limited cell growth. To preserve cell alignment ability and improve biocompatibility, the stability of patterned alginate fibers was adjusted by regulating the level of ion crosslinking. These partially crosslinked NFES fibers demonstrated parallel line-patterns in the initial stage while gradually degraded with time. The reduction of fiber density increased the available area for cell growth and enhanced cell viability. On the other hand, aligned cells were still found on these degraded patterns, suggesting that cell morphologies were mainly guided during cell seeding. This dynamically controlled fiber pattern system fulfilled the need of controlling cell orientation and biocompatibility, thus was potential to modify scaffold surfaces for tissue engineering application.

  20. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  1. Cytoplasmic kinases downstream of GPR30 suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Faidiban O; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2016-01-01

    GPR30 is known as a membrane receptor for picomolar concentrations of estradiol. The GPR30-specific agonist G1 causes a rapid, non-genomic suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. A few studies have recently clarified that protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) might be involved in cytoplasmic signaling pathways of GPR30 in other cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PKA and ERK kinase (MEK) are important cytoplasmic mediators for GPR30-associated non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells. Bovine AP cells (n = 8) were cultured for 3 days under steroid-free conditions. The AP cells were previously treated for 30 min with one of the following: 5000 nM of PKA inhibitor (H89), 1000 nM of MEK inhibitor (U0126), or a combination of H89 and U0126. Next, the AP cells were treated with 0.01 nM estradiol for 5 min before GnRH stimulation. Estradiol treatment without inhibitor pretreatment significantly suppressed GnRH-induced LH secretion (P < 0.01). In contrast, estradiol treatment after pretreatment with H89, U0126 or their combination had no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH secretion. The inhibitors also inhibited the G1 suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion. Therefore, these data supported the hypothesis that PKA and MEK (thus, also pERK) are the intracellular mediators downstream of GPR30 that induce the non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells by estradiol or G1.

  2. Secretory TAT-peptide-mediated protein transduction of LIF receptor α-chain distal cytoplasmic motifs into human myeloid HL-60 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Q. [Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, No. 401 Hospital of PLA, Qingdao (China); Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiong, J. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Lu, J. [Office of Medical Education, Training Department, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xu, S. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Li, Y. [State Food and Drug Administration of China,Huangdao Branch, Qingdao (China); Zhong, X.P.; Gao, G.K. [Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, No. 401 Hospital of PLA, Qingdao (China); Liu, H.Q. [2Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-06-22

    The distal cytoplasmic motifs of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor α-chain (LIFRα-CT3) can independently induce intracellular myeloid differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells by gene transfection; however, there are significant limitations in the potential clinical use of these motifs due to liposome-derived genetic modifications. To produce a potentially therapeutic LIFRα-CT3 with cell-permeable activity, we constructed a eukaryotic expression pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc plasmid with a signal peptide (ss) inserted into the N-terminal that codes for an ss-TAT-CT3-cMyc fusion protein. The stable transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells via this vector and subsequent selection by Geneticin resulted in cell lines that express and secrete TAT-CT3-cMyc. The spent medium of pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc-transfected CHO cells could be purified using a cMyc-epitope-tag agarose affinity chromatography column and could be detected via SDS-PAGE, with antibodies against cMyc-tag. The direct administration of TAT-CT3-cMyc to HL-60 cell culture media caused the enrichment of CT3-cMyc in the cytoplasm and nucleus within 30 min and led to a significant reduction of viable cells (P < 0.05) 8 h after exposure. The advantages of using this mammalian expression system include the ease of generating TAT fusion proteins that are adequately transcripted and the potential for a sustained production of such proteins in vitro for future AML therapy.

  3. Hydrodynamic property of the cytoplasm is sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in the Caenorhabiditis elegans embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwayama, Ritsuya; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is a type of intracellular transport widely seen in nature. Cytoplasmic streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans at the one-cell stage is bidirectional; the flow near the cortex (“cortical flow”) is oriented toward the anterior, whereas the flow in the central region (“cytoplasmic flow”) is oriented toward the posterior. Both cortical flow and cytoplasmic flow depend on non-muscle-myosin II (NMY-2), which primarily localizes in the cortex. The manner in which NMY-2 proteins drive cytoplasmic flow in the opposite direction from remote locations has not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate the forces generated by the cortical myosin to drive bidirectional streaming throughout the cytoplasm. We quantified the flow velocities of cytoplasmic streaming using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and conducted a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation using the moving particle semiimplicit method. Our simulation quantitatively reconstructed the quantified flow velocity distribution resolved through PIV analysis. Furthermore, our PIV analyses detected microtubule-dependent flows during the pronuclear migration stage. These flows were reproduced via hydrodynamic interactions between moving pronuclei and the cytoplasm. The agreement of flow dynamics in vivo and in simulation indicates that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in C. elegans embryos. PMID:21730185

  4. Hydrodynamic property of the cytoplasm is sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwayama, Ritsuya; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2011-07-19

    Cytoplasmic streaming is a type of intracellular transport widely seen in nature. Cytoplasmic streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans at the one-cell stage is bidirectional; the flow near the cortex ("cortical flow") is oriented toward the anterior, whereas the flow in the central region ("cytoplasmic flow") is oriented toward the posterior. Both cortical flow and cytoplasmic flow depend on non-muscle-myosin II (NMY-2), which primarily localizes in the cortex. The manner in which NMY-2 proteins drive cytoplasmic flow in the opposite direction from remote locations has not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate the forces generated by the cortical myosin to drive bidirectional streaming throughout the cytoplasm. We quantified the flow velocities of cytoplasmic streaming using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and conducted a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation using the moving particle semiimplicit method. Our simulation quantitatively reconstructed the quantified flow velocity distribution resolved through PIV analysis. Furthermore, our PIV analyses detected microtubule-dependent flows during the pronuclear migration stage. These flows were reproduced via hydrodynamic interactions between moving pronuclei and the cytoplasm. The agreement of flow dynamics in vivo and in simulation indicates that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in C. elegans embryos.

  5. Cell proliferation on PVA/sodium alginate and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) electrospun fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jen Ming, E-mail: jmyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yang, Jhe Hao [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsou, Shu Chun; Ding, Chian Hua [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsu, Chih Chin [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yang, Kai Chiang [School of Biomedical Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yang, Chun Chen [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ming-Chi University of Science and Technology, New Taipei City, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Ko Shao [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Szi Wen [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Jong Shyan [Department of Physical Therapy and the Graduate Institute of Rehabilitation Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-09-01

    To overcome the obstacles of easy dissolution of PVA nanofibers without crosslinking treatment and the poor electrospinnability of the PVA cross-linked nanofibers via electrospinning process, the PVA based electrospun hydrogel nanofibers are prepared with post-crosslinking method. To expect the electrospun hydrogel fibers might be a promising scaffold for cell culture and tissue engineering applications, the evaluation of cell proliferation on the post-crosslinking electrospun fibers is conducted in this study. At beginning, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), PVA/sodium alginate (PVASA) and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PVAPGA) electrospun fibers were prepared by electrospinning method. The electrospun PVA, PVASA and PVAPGA nanofibers were treated with post-cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde (Glu) as crosslinking agent. These electrospun fibers were characterized with thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and their morphologies were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). To support the evaluation and explanation of cell growth on the fiber, the study of 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell growth on the surface of pure PVA, SA, and PGA thin films is conducted. The proliferation of 3T3 on the electrospun fiber surface of PVA, PVASA, and PVAPGA was evaluated by seeding 3T3 fibroblast cells on these crosslinked electrospun fibers. The cell viability on electrospun fibers was conducted with water-soluble tetrazolium salt-1 assay (Cell Proliferation Reagent WST-1). The morphology of the cells on the fibers was also observed with SEM. The results of WST-1 assay revealed that 3T3 cells cultured on different electrospun fibers had similar viability, and the cell viability increased with time for all electrospun fibers. From the morphology of the cells on electrospun fibers, it is found that 3T3 cells attached on all electrospun fiber after 1 day seeded. Cell–cell communication was noticed on day 3 for all electrospun fibers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) productions were found and

  6. A FIBER APPARATUS IN THE NUCLEUS OF THE YEAST CELL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinow, C. F.; Marak, J.

    1966-01-01

    The structure and mode of division of the nucleus of budding yeast cells have been studied by phase-contrast microscopy during life and by ordinary microscopy after Helly fixation. The components of the nucleus were differentially stained by the Feulgen procedure, with Giemsa solution after hydrolysis, and with iron alum haematoxylin. New information was obtained in cells fixed in Helly's by directly staining them with 0.005% acid fuchsin in 1% acetic acid in water. Electron micrographs have been made of sections of cells that were first fixed with 3% glutaraldehyde, then divested of their walls with snail juice, and postfixed with osmium tetroxide. Light and electron microscopy have given concordant information about the organization of the yeast nucleus. A peripheral segment of the nucleus is occupied by relatively dense matter (the "peripheral cluster" of Mundkur) which is Feulgen negative. The greater part of the nucleus is filled with fine-grained Feulgen-positive matter of low density in which chromosomes could not be identified. Chromosomes become visible in this region under the light microscope at meiosis. In the chromatin lies a short fiber with strong affinity for acid fuchsin. The nucleus divides by elongation and constriction, and during this process the fiber becomes long and thin. Electron microscopy has resolved it into a bundle of dark-edged 150 to 180 A filaments which extends between "centriolar plaques" that are attached to the nuclear envelope. PMID:5331666

  7. Observation of fiber ultrastructure of Ligon lintless mutant in upland cotton during fiber elongation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Chaohua; WANG Xuede; NI Xiyuan

    2005-01-01

    Lintless mutant is a super-short fiber mutant in upland cotton only 4-8 mm in fiber length and also named Ligon cotton controlled by one dominant gene Li1. Fiber ultrastructure of the mutant (Li1) and its wild type (li1) in situ and in vitro was observed under an electron microscope to understand its cytological characteristics during the fiber cell elongation. The results showed that the mutant fiber in situ had thinner cytoplasm, more small vacuoles, less mitochondria, Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticula, and there were more starch granules which were free or packed in the amyloplast beside the cell wall than that of wild type. It was indicated that scarcity of functional organelles and disability of transformation from starch to sugar might be associated with the fact that the mutant fiber cell was aborted too early to elongate into normal length. Mutant ovule in some media containing GA3 could produce a kind of huge callus that grew faster than normal ovules. The callus was covered with many white, loose, and semitransparent fiber-like cells that apt to get off from ovule. These fiber-like cells were multicellular fibers generated by cell division and had black dots just like pigment glands in the stem and leaf of cotton. There were lots of micro-tubes beside cytoplasm membrane of the multicellular fiber, which were thought to be primary preparation for second wall deposition of multicellular fiber. It was indicated that GA3 might induce the expression of gene(s) that kept inactive in the field condition and then stimulate the original fiber cell in vitro to undergo division again.

  8. Regulatory components of the alternative complement pathway in endothelial cell cytoplasm, factor H and factor I, are not packaged in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Turner

    Full Text Available It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP, would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF--but not factor H.

  9. Regulatory components of the alternative complement pathway in endothelial cell cytoplasm, factor H and factor I, are not packaged in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nancy A; Sartain, Sarah E; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF--but not factor H.

  10. The nucleocytoplasmic microfilament network in protoplasts from cultured soybean cells is a plastic entity that pervades the cytoplasm except the central vacuole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Marco A; Schindler, Melvin; Wang, John L

    2005-11-01

    The microfilament network of cultured Glycine max cells (SB-1 line), and protoplasts was visualized with rhodamine-phalloidin under conditions that lysed the protoplast and changed the cell shape. The whole cell had the typical microfilament distribution of a "cage" around the nucleus, from which the large subcortical cables and transvacuolar strands radiated towards the cortex until it reached the cortical microfilament network. Upon cell wall removal, the network conserved its compartmentalization. Thus, the redistribution of the shape where the vacuole becomes a central entity, made the cytoplasm displace peripherally, but the network distribution was conserved. When protoplasts were lysed in a low osmotic medium, the vacuoles were gradually released intact. Under these conditions, the F-actin staining remained within the ghost of the cell, but none was detected in either emerging or almost completely released vacuoles. Most of the released F-actin was found in debris from the cell lysate in the form of microfilaments. When the ghosts were constrained in a coverslip with an air bubble, the shape of the ghost changed accordingly, but the microfilament network distribution remained constant. These results provide further evidence that the vacuole of plant cells does not have detectable associated F-actin. In addition, we demonstrate that the actin microfilament network is a moldable entity that can change its shape but keeps its distribution under constant conditions, in these cultured cells.

  11. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F+ HEL Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Weber

    2015-03-01

    cells, Stat5 is predominantly present in the cytoplasm and the survival of the Jak2(V617F+ HEL cells is impeded through the inhibition of the cytoplasmic functions of Stat5.

  12. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo eKuwata

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of nonhuman primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7900-fold, 1000-fold, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody.

  13. Objective assessment of contact lens wear-associated conjunctival squamous metaplasia by linear measures of cell size, shape and nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    To objectively assess the cell and nucleus dimensions of human bulbar conjunctival cells in female soft contact lens wearers to illustrate a method for assessment of the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio based on simple linear measures. Impression cytology samples were taken from the nasal side exposed bulbar conjunctiva surface from 12 young adult, white European females with a history of successful daily soft contact lens wear. A Millcell(®)-CM filter was used after topical anesthesia, which was stained with Giemsa. Color images of portions of the cells, in a monolayer at 200× magnification by light microscopy, were graded by the Nelson scale and then a projection overlay method was used to outline the cell and nucleus borders. The cell longest dimension (LONG), shorter dimension (SHORT), and the longest dimension of the nucleus (NUCLONG) were measured. A nucleus-to-cytoplasm N:C ratio was calculated from (LONG-NUCLONG)/NUCLONG. Cells had appearances consistent with a grade 2 or 3 squamous metaplasia and were moderately enlarged (mean LONG ± SD of 46.0 ± 3.8 microm), only slightly elongated (mean LONG:SHORT ratio of 1.397 ± 0.101) and the nucleus size was consistently greater than normal (man 12.8 ± 1.3 microm). A calculation of N:C showed a relatively wide range of values with average values from 1:2.143 to 1:3.317 (for an overall mean of 2.675 ± 0.371). These studies further indicate that grade 2 to 3 squamous metaplasia of the exposed bulbar conjunctival cells is an expected consequence of soft contact lens wear. The cell enlargement is not associated with a significant change in cell shape (i.e., the LONG:SHORT ratio is little different from grade 0 cells) but is associated in a slight increase in nucleus size. The calculated N:C ratio based on linear measures is no higher than 1:5 and more likely closer to 1:2.5.

  14. Quantitative proteomic view on secreted, cell surface-associated, and cytoplasmic proteins of the methicillin-resistant human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus under iron-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Kristina; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Moche, Martin; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Dörte

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is capable of colonizing and infecting humans by its arsenal of surface-exposed and secreted proteins. Iron-limited conditions in mammalian body fluids serve as a major environmental signal to bacteria to express virulence determinants. Here we present a comprehensive, gel-free, and GeLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteome profiling of S. aureus under this infection-relevant situation. (14)N(15)N metabolic labeling and three complementing approaches were combined for relative quantitative analyses of surface-associated proteins. The surface-exposed and secreted proteome profiling approaches comprise trypsin shaving, biotinylation, and precipitation of the supernatant. By analysis of the outer subproteomic and cytoplasmic protein fraction, 1210 proteins could be identified including 221 surface-associated proteins. Thus, access was enabled to 70% of the predicted cell wall-associated proteins, 80% of the predicted sortase substrates, two/thirds of lipoproteins and more than 50% of secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. For iron-deficiency, 158 surface-associated proteins were quantified. Twenty-nine proteins were found in altered amounts showing particularly surface-exposed proteins strongly induced, such as the iron-regulated surface determinant proteins IsdA, IsdB, IsdC and IsdD as well as lipid-anchored iron compound-binding proteins. The work presents a crucial subject for understanding S. aureus pathophysiology by the use of methods that allow quantitative surface proteome profiling.

  15. Inhibition of Aβ(25-35)-induced cell apoptosis by low-power-laser-irradiation (LPLI) through promoting Akt-dependent YAP cytoplasmic translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Wu, Shengnan; Xing, Da

    2012-01-01

    Deposition of amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain is considered a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our previous studies show that Yes-associated protein (YAP) is involved in the regulation of apoptosis induced by Aβ(25-35) through YAP nuclear translocation and its pro-apoptotic function is mediated by its interaction with p73. In the present study, we first found that Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) promoted YAP cytoplasmic translocation and inhibited Aβ(25-35)-induced YAP nuclear translocation. Moreover, the cytoplasmic translocation was in an Akt-dependent manner. Activated Akt by LPLI phosphorylated YAP on ser127 (S127) and resulted in decreasing the interaction between YAP and p73, and in suppressing the proapoptotic gene bax expression following Aβ(25-35) treatment. Inhibition of Akt expression by siRNA significantly abolished the effect of LPLI. More importantly, LPLI could inhibit Aβ(25-35)-induced cell apoptosis through activation of Akt/YAP/p73 signaling pathway. Therefore, our findings first suggest that YAP may be a therapeutic target and these results directly point to a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD through Akt/YAP/p73 signaling pathway with LPLI.

  16. Cell proliferation on PVA/sodium alginate and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) electrospun fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jen Ming; Yang, Jhe Hao; Tsou, Shu Chun; Ding, Chian Hua; Hsu, Chih Chin; Yang, Kai Chiang; Yang, Chun Chen; Chen, Ko Shao; Chen, Szi Wen; Wang, Jong Shyan

    2016-09-01

    To overcome the obstacles of easy dissolution of PVA nanofibers without crosslinking treatment and the poor electrospinnability of the PVA cross-linked nanofibers via electrospinning process, the PVA based electrospun hydrogel nanofibers are prepared with post-crosslinking method. To expect the electrospun hydrogel fibers might be a promising scaffold for cell culture and tissue engineering applications, the evaluation of cell proliferation on the post-crosslinking electrospun fibers is conducted in this study. At beginning, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), PVA/sodium alginate (PVASA) and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PVAPGA) electrospun fibers were prepared by electrospinning method. The electrospun PVA, PVASA and PVAPGA nanofibers were treated with post-cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde (Glu) as crosslinking agent. These electrospun fibers were characterized with thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and their morphologies were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). To support the evaluation and explanation of cell growth on the fiber, the study of 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell growth on the surface of pure PVA, SA, and PGA thin films is conducted. The proliferation of 3T3 on the electrospun fiber surface of PVA, PVASA, and PVAPGA was evaluated by seeding 3T3 fibroblast cells on these crosslinked electrospun fibers. The cell viability on electrospun fibers was conducted with water-soluble tetrazolium salt-1 assay (Cell Proliferation Reagent WST-1). The morphology of the cells on the fibers was also observed with SEM. The results of WST-1 assay revealed that 3T3 cells cultured on different electrospun fibers had similar viability, and the cell viability increased with time for all electrospun fibers. From the morphology of the cells on electrospun fibers, it is found that 3T3 cells attached on all electrospun fiber after 1day seeded. Cell-cell communication was noticed on day 3 for all electrospun fibers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) productions were found and

  17. Velocity of cytoplasm streaming in basal and subbasal cells of antheridium as well as internodal cells of pleuridium in Chara vulgaris L. and GA3 influence on it: videomicroscopic observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The velocity of cytoplasm streaming in an antheridial basal cell and in a subbasal cell as well as in internodal cells of pleuridia carrying antheridia were measured with the use of videomicroscopy. Velocity of streaming proved different depending on a cell type. The most intensive streaming (ca 40 µm/s was observed in a subbasal cell while in a basal cell it was quite intensive during antheridial filament cells proliferation but falling to half of it during spermatozoid differentiation (ca 20 µm/s and 10 µm/s respectively. In internodal cells of pleuridia the velocity was ca 17 µm/s. GA3 at the 10-5M concentration decreased the velocity of streaming in a basal cell during proliferation of antheridial filament cells and increased it during spermiogenesis. In internodal cells of pleuridia the velocity diminished while in a subbasal cell it rose a little after GA3 administering. The obtained data suggest that cytoplasm streaming and its reaction to exogenous gibberellin depend on the role of a cell in a multicellulate system; it also depends on a developmental stage.

  18. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankus, John J; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R

    2006-02-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (pfibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1,700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues.

  19. Low molecular weight fluorescent probes with good photostability for imaging RNA-rich nucleolus and RNA in cytoplasm in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guofen; Sun, Yuming; Liu, Yong; Wang, Xiankun; Chen, Meiling; Miao, Fang; Zhang, Weijia; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Jin, Jianling

    2014-02-01

    We have synthesized two low molecular weight organic molecules, PY and IN successfully, which selectively stain nucleolus and cytoplasm of living cells in 30 min, with a much lower uptake in the nucleus. Nucleic acids electrophoresis and digest test of ribonuclease indicate their markedly higher affinity for RNA, especially PY. Moreover their RNA localization in cells is further supported by digest test of ribonuclease, namely, the nucleolar fluorescence signal is distinctly lost upon treatment with RNase. And, the fact that live cells stained by PY and IN still possess physiological function can be confirmed: 1) MTT assay demonstrates that the mitochondria of cells stained remains its electron mediating ability, 2) Double assay of PY/IN and propidium iodide as well as trypan blue testing show that the membrane of cells stained still is intact. Importantly, compared with the only commercial RNA probe, SYTO RNA-Select, PY and IN exhibit much better photostability when continuously illuminated with 488 nm laser and mercury lamp. These results prove that PY and IN are very attractive staining reagents for visualizing RNA in living cells.

  20. The Protective Effect of Cell Wall and Cytoplasmic Fraction of Selenium Enriched Yeast on 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine-induced Damage in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Dadrass

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH enhances lipid peroxidation rate by tumor mitochondria than normal tissue counterpart and causes many disorders in antioxidant system in liver. It also increases the level of enzymes that metabolize toxin in liver and colon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alteration of liver and its enzymes after DMH injection and evaluate protective effect of cell wall and cytoplasmic fractions of Saccharomyces cereviseae enriched with selenium (Se on these tissues. Materials and Methods: Forty eight female rats were prepared and acclimatized to the laboratory conditions for two weeks, and all animals received 1, 2- dimethyl hydrazine chloride (40 mg/kg body weight twice a week for 4 weeks except healthy control. At first colon carcinoma (aberrant crypt foci confirmed by light microscope. Then the changes resulting from injection of DMH on liver of animals in initial and advanced stages of colon cancer were examined. In addition, the protective effect of cell wall and cytoplasmic fractions of Selenium-enriched S. cerevisiae were investigated in two phases. First phase in initial stage and second phase in advanced stage of colon cancer were performed respectively. Forty weeks following the first DMH injection, all survived animals were sacrificed. Then, colon and liver removed and exsanguinated by heart puncture. For measuring the levels of enzymes (AST, ALT, and ALP, a commercial kit (Parsazmoon, Iran and an autoanalyzer (BT 3000 Pluse, Italy were used. Results: The results showed that subcutaneous injection of DMH increased the ALT, AST, and ALP levels up to 78.5, 161.38, and 275.88 U/L compared to the control, respectively. Moreover, statistical analysis in both phases of experiment revealed that the enzyme levels were decreased in the treated groups in comparison with the DMH-injected group, while the levels of these enzymes were lower in the control group. Conclusion: It should be concluded that

  1. DNA Damage Activates a Spatially Distinct Late Cytoplasmic Cell-Cycle Checkpoint Network Controlled by MK2-Mediated RNA Stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, H. Christian; Hasskamp, Pia; Schmedding, Ingolf; Morandell, Sandra; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; Wang, XiaoZhe; Linding, Rune; Ong, Shao-En; Weaver, David; Carr, Steven A.; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Following genotoxic stress, cells activate a complex kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and initiate DNA repair. p53-defective tumor cells rewire their checkpoint response and become dependent on the p38/MK2 pathway for survival after DNA damage, despite a functional ATR-Chk1 pa

  2. DNA damage activates a spatially distinct late cytoplasmic cell-cycle checkpoint network controlled by MK2-mediated RNA stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, H Christian; Hasskamp, Pia; Schmedding, Ingolf

    2010-01-01

    Following genotoxic stress, cells activate a complex kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and initiate DNA repair. p53-defective tumor cells rewire their checkpoint response and become dependent on the p38/MK2 pathway for survival after DNA damage, despite a functional ATR-Chk1...

  3. The D Domain of LRRC4 anchors ERK1/2 in the cytoplasm and competitively inhibits MEK/ERK activation in glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyou Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a well-characterized key player in various signal transduction networks, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 has been widely implicated in the development of many malignancies. We previously found that Leucine-rich repeat containing 4 (LRRC4 was a tumor suppressor and a negative regulator of the ERK/MAPK pathway in glioma tumorigenesis. However, the precise molecular role of LRRC4 in ERK signal transmission is unclear. Methods The interaction between LRRC4 and ERK1/2 was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays in vivo and in vitro. We also investigated the interaction of LRRC4 and ERK1/2 and the role of the D domain in ERK activation in glioma cells. Results Here, we showed that LRRC4 and ERK1/2 interact via the D domain and CD domain, respectively. Following EGF stimuli, the D domain of LRRC4 anchors ERK1/2 in the cytoplasm and abrogates ERK1/2 activation and nuclear translocation. In glioblastoma cells, ectopic LRRC4 expression competitively inhibited the interaction of endogenous mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK and ERK1/2. Mutation of the D domain decreased the LRRC4-mediated inhibition of MAPK signaling and its anti-proliferation and anti-invasion roles. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the D domain of LRRC4 anchors ERK1/2 in the cytoplasm and competitively inhibits MEK/ERK activation in glioma cells. These findings identify a new mechanism underlying glioblastoma progression and suggest a novel therapeutic strategy by restoring the activity of LRRC4 to decrease MAPK cascade activation.

  4. Photoelectrochemical cell using dye sensitized zinc oxide nanowires grown on carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Wei, Di; Suzuki, Kenichi; Dalal, Sharvari; Hiralal, Pritesh; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Imaizumi, Shinji; Minagawa, Mie; Tanioka, Akihiko; Flewitt, Andrew J.; Milne, William I.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2008-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) grown on carbon fibers using a vapor transport and condensation approach are used as the cathode of a photoelectrochemical cell. The carbon fibers were obtained by electrospray deposition and take the form of a flexible carbon fabric. The ZnO NW on carbon fiber anode is combined with a "black dye" photoabsorber, an electrolyte, and a platinum (Pt) counterelectrode to complete the cell. The results show that ZnO NW and carbon fibers can be used for photoinduced charge separation/charge transport and current collection, respectively, in a photoelectrochemical cell.

  5. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Y Hsiao

    Full Text Available The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  6. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  7. Molecular mechanism of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, Masayoshi; Uemura, Takeshi; Yasumura, Misato; Yoshida, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum receives two excitatory afferents, the climbing fiber (CF) and the mossy fiber-parallel fiber (PF) pathway, both converging onto Purkinje cells (PCs) that are the sole neurons sending outputs from the cerebellar cortex. Glutamate receptor δ2 (GluRδ2) is expressed selectively in cerebellar PCs and localized exclusively at the PF-PC synapses. We found that a significant number of PC spines lack synaptic contacts with PF terminals and some of residual PF-PC synapses show mismatching between pre- and postsynaptic specializations in conventional and conditional GluRδ2 knockout mice. Studies with mutant mice revealed that in addition to PF-PC synapse formation, GluRδ2 is essential for synaptic plasticity, motor learning, and the restriction of CF territory. GluRδ2 regulates synapse formation through the amino-terminal domain, while the control of synaptic plasticity, motor learning, and CF territory is mediated through the carboxyl-terminal domain. Thus, GluRδ2 is the molecule that bridges synapse formation and motor learning. We found that the trans-synaptic interaction of postsynaptic GluRδ2 and presynaptic neurexins (NRXNs) through cerebellin 1 (Cbln1) mediates PF-PC synapse formation. The synaptogenic triad is composed of one molecule of tetrameric GluRδ2, two molecules of hexameric Cbln1 and four molecules of monomeric NRXN. Thus, GluRδ2 triggers synapse formation by clustering four NRXNs. These findings provide a molecular insight into the mechanism of synapse formation in the brain.

  8. Molecular mechanism of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi eMishina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum receives two excitatory afferents, the climbing fiber (CF and the mossy fiber-parallel fiber (PF pathway, both converging onto Purkinje cells (PCs that are the sole neurons sending outputs from the cerebellar cortex. Glutamate receptor δ2 (GluRδ2 is expressed selectively in cerebellar PCs and localized exclusively at the PF-PC synapses. We found that a significant number of PC spines lack synaptic contacts with PF terminals and some of residual PF-PC synapses show mismatching between pre- and postsynaptic specializations in conventional and conditional GluRδ2 knockout mice. Studies with mutant mice revealed that in addition to PF-PC synapse formation, GluRδ2 is essential for synaptic plasticity, motor learning and the restriction of CF territory. GluRδ2 regulates synapse formation through the amino-terminal domain, while the control of synaptic plasticity, motor learning and CF territory is mediated through the carboxyl-terminal domain. Thus, GluRδ2 is the molecule that bridges synapse formation and motor learning. We found that the trans-synaptic interaction of postsynaptic GluRδ2 and presynaptic neurexins (NRXNs through Cbln1 mediates PF-PC synapse formation. The synaptogenic triad is composed of one molecule of tetrameric GluRδ2, two molecules of hexameric Cbln1 and four molecules of monomeric NRXN. Thus, GluRδ2 triggers synapse formation by clustering four NRXNs. These findings provide a molecular insight into the mechanism of synapse formation in the brain.

  9. Detailed topology mapping reveals substantial exposure of the "cytoplasmic" C-terminal tail (CTT sequences in HIV-1 Env proteins at the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Steckbeck

    Full Text Available Substantial controversy surrounds the membrane topology of the HIV-1 gp41 C-terminal tail (CTT. While few studies have been designed to directly address the topology of the CTT, results from envelope (Env protein trafficking studies suggest that the CTT sequence is cytoplasmically localized, as interactions with intracellular binding partners are required for proper Env targeting. However, previous studies from our lab demonstrate the exposure of a short CTT sequence, the Kennedy epitope, at the plasma membrane of intact Env-expressing cells, the exposure of which is not observed on viral particles. To address the topology of the entire CTT sequence, we serially replaced CTT sequences with a VSV-G epitope tag sequence and examined reactivity of cell- and virion-surface Env to an anti-VSV-G monoclonal antibody. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the CTT sequence is accessible to antibody binding on the surface of Env expressing cells, and that the CTT-exposed Env constitutes 20-50% of the cell-surface Env. Cell surface CTT exposure was also apparent in virus-infected cells. Passive transfer of Env through cell culture media to Env negative (non-transfected cells was not responsible for the apparent cell surface CTT exposure. In contrast to the cell surface results, CTT-exposed Env was not detected on infectious pseudoviral particles containing VSV-G-substituted Env. Finally, a monoclonal antibody directed to the Kennedy epitope neutralized virus in a temperature-dependent manner in a post-attachment neutralization assay. Collectively, these results suggest that the membrane topology of the HIV gp41 CTT is more complex than the widely accepted intracytoplasmic model.

  10. Cytoplasmic TERT Associates to RNA Granules in Fully Mature Neurons: Role in the Translational Control of the Cell Cycle Inhibitor p15INK4B.

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    Francesca Iannilli

    Full Text Available The main role of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT is to protect telomere length from shortening during cell division. However, recent works have revealed the existence of a pool of TERT associated to mitochondria, where it plays a role in survival. We here show that in fully differentiated neurons the largest pool of cytoplasmic TERT associates to TIA1 positive RNA granules, where it binds the messenger RNA of the cyclin kinase inhibitor p15INK4B. Upon stress, p15INK4B and TERT dissociate and p15INK4B undergoes efficient translation, allowing its pro-survival function. These results unveil another mechanism implicated in the survival of fully differentiated neurons.

  11. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-negative Pauci-immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis and Mantle-cell Lymphoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wang*

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL is an aggressive lymphoid neoplasm of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. Crescentic glomerulonephritis associated with NHL has rarely been reported. In this report, we present a case of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-negative pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN, presenting with the coexistence of proteinuria, haematuria, progressive renal failure and MCL infiltration in the kidney, in the setting of newly-diagnosed MCL. Following the chemotherapy, there was a resolution of renal function. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ANCA-negative pauci-immune crescentic GN and MCL. The pathophysiologic relationship between ANCA-negative pauci-immune crescentic GN and MCL should be investigated further.

  12. Dissecting Regional Variations in Stress Fiber Mechanics in Living Cells with Laser Nanosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Kandice; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J; Kumar, Sanjay

    2010-03-02

    The ability of a cell to distribute contractile stresses across the extracellular matrix in a spatially heterogeneous fashion underlies many cellular behaviors, including motility and tissue assembly. Here we investigate the biophysical basis of this phenomenon by using femtosecond laser nanosurgery to measure the viscoelastic recoil and cell-shape contributions of contractile stress fibers (SFs) located in specific compartments of living cells. Upon photodisruption and recoil, myosin light chain kinase-dependent SFs located along the cell periphery display much lower effective elasticities and higher plateau retraction distances than Rho-associated kinase-dependent SFs located in the cell center, with severing of peripheral fibers uniquely triggering a dramatic contraction of the entire cell within minutes of fiber irradiation. Image correlation spectroscopy reveals that when one population of SFs is pharmacologically dissipated, actin density flows toward the other population. Furthermore, dissipation of peripheral fibers reduces the elasticity and increases the plateau retraction distance of central fibers, and severing central fibers under these conditions triggers cellular contraction. Together, these findings show that SFs regulated by different myosin activators exhibit different mechanical properties and cell shape contributions. They also suggest that some fibers can absorb components and assume mechanical roles of other fibers to stabilize cell shape.

  13. Polylysine modification of adenoviral fiber protein enhances muscle cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouri, K; Feero, W G; Myerburg, M M; Wickham, T J; Kovesdi, I; Hoffman, E P; Clemens, P R

    1999-07-01

    Adenoviral vectors (ADVs) are used widely for gene delivery to different tissues including muscle. One particularly promising use for ADVs is in the transfer of the dystrophin gene to the muscle of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, studies in different animal models of DMD suggest that ADVs inefficiently transduce mature skeletal muscle. In this article we test whether AdZ.F(pK7), a genetically modified ADV that expresses a polylysine moiety on the end of the fiber protein, could enhance transduction of muscle cells and circumvent the maturation-dependent loss of muscle infectivity by ADVs. The efficiency of transduction was tested at different levels of muscle maturation. In vitro, AdZ.F(pK7) showed a higher level of transduction at all stages of differentiation including myoblasts, myotubes, and single muscle fibers. In vivo, mature skeletal muscle was transduced fourfold better by AdZ.F(pK7) than by the unmodifled vector (AdZ.F). Together, these observations demonstrate improved ADV transduction of skeletal muscle by modifying ADV tropism, and provide a proof-of-principle that modification of ADVs to target muscle-specific molecules could result in tissue-specific transfer of skeletal muscle tissue as well.

  14. Origin and function of spiral fibers projecting to the goldfish Mauthner cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J W; Zottoli, S J; Beatty, N P; Korn, H

    1994-01-01

    Two neuron types contact the Mauthner cell (M cell) in the axon cap, a specialized region of high electrical resistance surrounding the initial segment of the M cell axon. One type produces a mixed electrical and chemical inhibition of the M cell. The second sends axons into the central core of the axon cap, where they spiral around the initial segment making both conventional synapses and gap junction contacts. The origin and synaptic effects of these spiral fibers have not been studied previously. When goldfish M cells were filled with Lucifer yellow, presynaptic spiral fibers were seen in the axon cap. These fibers could be traced back through the medial longitudinal fasciculus to their somata, near the contralateral fifth nerve motor nucleus. The same somata were labeled by horseradish peroxidase injected extracellularly into the axon cap. Recordings were made in the axon cap and the M cell after stimulation of hindbrain areas near the spiral fiber somata and axons. Extracellularly, a negative potential was observed close to the termination of the spiral fibers and termed the spiral fiber potential (SFP). Intracellularly, a graded, short latency depolarization of the M cell corresponded to the SFP and could cause the M cell to spike. This depolarization did not shunt the membrane, indicating that it may be produced through gap junctions. Intracellular responses to hindbrain stimulation also had a chloride-dependent, second component that shunted the membrane during paired-pulse testing. This inhibitory second component was probably evoked by cells other than the spiral fiber cells themselves.

  15. Ro small cytoplasmic ribonucleoproteins are a subclass of La ribonucleoproteins: Further characterization of the Ro and La small ribonucleoproteins from uninfected mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrick, J.P.; Wolin, S.L.; Rinke, J.; Lerner, M.R.; Steitz, J.A.

    1981-12-01

    Small ribonucleic acid (RNA)-protein complexes precipitated by anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies from lupus patients have been examined with emphasis on their RNA components. In both ribonucleoprotein (RNP) classes, the numbers of different RNA molecules and their sequences vary between mouse and human cells. The complex mixtures of La RNAs include two previously sequenced 4.5S RNAs from mouse cells and 5S ribosomal RNA-like molecules from both mouse and human cells. All Ro and La RNAs possess 5'-triphosphates. Some La RNAs have internal modifications typical of transfer RNAs. The RoRNPs are quite stable and are localized by immunofluorescence in the cell cytoplasm, whereas the majority of the La RNPs turn over rapidly and reside in the nucleus. Despite these differences, reconstitution experiments show that the Ro particles carry the La as well as the Ro determinant. Studies using a nuclear transcription system demonstrate that most of the La RNAs are synthesized by RNA polymerase III. The possibility that the La protein(s) functions in the transcription or maturation of all RNA polymerase III transcripts is discussed.

  16. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  17. The Cytoplasmic Domain of CD4 Is Sufficient for Its Down-Regulation from the Cell Surface by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef

    OpenAIRE

    S. J. Anderson; Lenburg, M; Landau, N R; Garcia, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef down-regulates surface expression of murine and human CD4 but not human CD8. We recently reported that the cytoplasmic domain of CD4 is required for its down-regulation by Nef. Using a chimeric molecule composed of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of human CD8 fused to the cytoplasmic domain of human CD4, we show here that the cytoplasmic domain of CD4 is sufficient for down-regulation by Nef. Since the cytoplasmic domain of CD4 is also the s...

  18. The Instrumentation of a Microfluidic Analyzer Enabling the Characterization of the Specific Membrane Capacitance, Cytoplasm Conductivity, and Instantaneous Young's Modulus of Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Huang, Chengjun; Fan, Beiyuan; Long, Rong; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wang, Junbo; Wu, Min-Hsien; Chen, Jian

    2017-06-19

    This paper presents the instrumentation of a microfluidic analyzer enabling the characterization of single-cell biophysical properties, which includes seven key components: a microfluidic module, a pressure module, an imaging module, an impedance module, two LabVIEW platforms for instrument operation and raw data processing, respectively, and a Python code for data translation. Under the control of the LabVIEW platform for instrument operation, the pressure module flushes single cells into the microfluidic module with raw biophysical parameters sampled by the imaging and impedance modules and processed by the LabVIEW platform for raw data processing, which were further translated into intrinsic cellular biophysical parameters using the code developed in Python. Based on this system, specific membrane capacitance, cytoplasm conductivity, and instantaneous Young's modulus of three cell types were quantified as 2.76 ± 0.57 μF/cm², 1.00 ± 0.14 S/m, and 3.79 ± 1.11 kPa for A549 cells (ncell = 202); 1.88 ± 0.31 μF/cm², 1.05 ± 0.16 S/m, and 3.74 ± 0.75 kPa for 95D cells (ncell = 257); 2.11 ± 0.38 μF/cm², 0.87 ± 0.11 S/m, and 5.39 ± 0.89 kPa for H460 cells (ncell = 246). As a semi-automatic instrument with a throughput of roughly 1 cell per second, this prototype instrument can be potentially used for the characterization of cellular biophysical properties.

  19. The Instrumentation of a Microfluidic Analyzer Enabling the Characterization of the Specific Membrane Capacitance, Cytoplasm Conductivity, and Instantaneous Young’s Modulus of Single Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Huang, Chengjun; Fan, Beiyuan; Long, Rong; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wang, Junbo; Wu, Min-Hsien; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the instrumentation of a microfluidic analyzer enabling the characterization of single-cell biophysical properties, which includes seven key components: a microfluidic module, a pressure module, an imaging module, an impedance module, two LabVIEW platforms for instrument operation and raw data processing, respectively, and a Python code for data translation. Under the control of the LabVIEW platform for instrument operation, the pressure module flushes single cells into the microfluidic module with raw biophysical parameters sampled by the imaging and impedance modules and processed by the LabVIEW platform for raw data processing, which were further translated into intrinsic cellular biophysical parameters using the code developed in Python. Based on this system, specific membrane capacitance, cytoplasm conductivity, and instantaneous Young’s modulus of three cell types were quantified as 2.76 ± 0.57 μF/cm2, 1.00 ± 0.14 S/m, and 3.79 ± 1.11 kPa for A549 cells (ncell = 202); 1.88 ± 0.31 μF/cm2, 1.05 ± 0.16 S/m, and 3.74 ± 0.75 kPa for 95D cells (ncell = 257); 2.11 ± 0.38 μF/cm2, 0.87 ± 0.11 S/m, and 5.39 ± 0.89 kPa for H460 cells (ncell = 246). As a semi-automatic instrument with a throughput of roughly 1 cell per second, this prototype instrument can be potentially used for the characterization of cellular biophysical properties. PMID:28629175

  20. Expression of dynein, cytoplasmic 2, heavy chain 1 (DHC2) associated with glioblastoma cell resistance to temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai; Feng, Wenfeng; Lu, Yuntao; Li, Hezhen; Xiang, Wei; Chen, Ziyang; He, Minyi; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Xuegang; Lei, Bingxi; Qi, Songtao; Liu, Yawei

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is the main chemotherapeutic drug utilized for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GMB), however, drug resistance often leads to tumor recurrence and poor outcomes. GMB cell lines were treated with TMZ for up to two weeks and then subjected to proteomics analysis to identify the underlying molecular pathology that is associated with TMZ resistance. Proteomics data showed that TMZ altered expression of proteins that related to cytoskeleton structure and function, such as DHC2 and KIF2B. qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence were used to verify expression of DHC2 and KIF2B in these cells. Immunohistochemistry was used to verify expression of these two proteins in xenografts of a nude mouse model, and ex vivo GBM tissue samples. Their expression was knocked down using siRNA to confirm their role in the regulation of GBM cell sensitivity to TMZ. Knockdown of DHC2 expression enhanced sensitivity of U87 cells to TMZ treatment. Ex vivo data showed that DHC2 expression in GBM tissue samples was associated with tumor recurrence after TMZ chemotherapy. These results indicated cytoskeleton related protein DHC2 reduced sensitivity of GBM cells to TMZ treatment. Further studies should assess DHC2 as a novel target in GBM for TMZ combination treatment.

  1. Exposure of pig oocytes to PCBs during in vitro maturation: effects on developmental competence, cytoplasmic remodelling and communications with cumulus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAL Brevini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are one of the most persistent and widespread groups of endocrine disrupting compounds in the ecosystem. These substances are present in sewage sludge that is spread in increasing amounts on arable land and pasture as fertilizer, and are ingested by farm animals with food and drinking water. This study investigated the effect of different PCB concentrations on pig oocyte in vitro maturation and developmental competence as well as examined the possible mechanisms involved. A concentration ranging from 0 to 1 ?g/mL of Aroclor 1254 (A1254, a pool of more than 60 PCB congeners, was added to the maturation medium, as its composition is considered environmentally relevant. A1254 had no effect on maturation of pig oocytes and on the number of oocytes that cleaved following parthenogenetic activation at any of the doses tested. By contrast, a significant decrease in the number of zygotes that developed to blastocyst stage became evident at a concentration of 10 ng/mL. The number of blastocysts obtained decreased significantly, and in a dose response manner with higher concentrations. Exposure to PCBs altered mitochondria relocation during maturation and this was associated with the lack of a cytoplasmic microtubule network. No effect on mitochondria activity was observed. A1254 exposure also perturbed gap-junction mediated communications between oocytes and cumulus cells. In conclusion, PCB exposure of pig oocytes during in vitro maturation significantly decreased oocyte developmental competence, altered both their cytoplasmic remodelling and the communication with the somatic compartment. These data indicated that accumulation of PCBs in the pig organism may have a detrimental effect on the reproductive efficiency in this species.

  2. Calcium-activated K+ Channels of Mouse β-cells are Controlled by Both Store and Cytoplasmic Ca2+

    OpenAIRE

    Goforth, P. B.; Bertram, R.; Khan, F. A.; Zhang, M.; Sherman, A.; Satin, L. S.

    2002-01-01

    A novel calcium-dependent potassium current (Kslow) that slowly activates in response to a simulated islet burst was identified recently in mouse pancreatic β-cells (Göpel, S.O., T. Kanno, S. Barg, L. Eliasson, J. Galvanovskis, E. Renström, and P. Rorsman. 1999. J. Gen. Physiol. 114:759–769). Kslow activation may help terminate the cyclic bursts of Ca2+-dependent action potentials that drive Ca2+ influx and insulin secretion in β-cells. Here, we report that when [Ca2+]i handling was disrupted...

  3. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Koprowski

    Full Text Available Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  4. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Piotr; Grajkowski, Wojciech; Balcerzak, Marcin; Filipiuk, Iwona; Fabczak, Hanna; Kubalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS) channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS) family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  5. Optical Fiber/Nanowire Hybrid Structures for Efficient Three-Dimensional Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Weintraub, Benjamin

    2009-11-09

    Wired up: The energy conversion efficiency of three-dimensional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) in a hybrid structure that integrates optical fibers and nanowire arrays is greater than that of a two-dimensional device. Internal axial illumination enhances the energy conversion efficiency of a rectangular fiber-based hybrid structure (see picture) by a factor of up to six compared to light illumination normal to the fiber axis from outside the device.

  6. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  7. Cytoplasmic Streaming in the Drosophila Oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Margot E

    2016-10-06

    Objects are commonly moved within the cell by either passive diffusion or active directed transport. A third possibility is advection, in which objects within the cytoplasm are moved with the flow of the cytoplasm. Bulk movement of the cytoplasm, or streaming, as required for advection, is more common in large cells than in small cells. For example, streaming is observed in elongated plant cells and the oocytes of several species. In the Drosophila oocyte, two stages of streaming are observed: relatively slow streaming during mid-oogenesis and streaming that is approximately ten times faster during late oogenesis. These flows are implicated in two processes: polarity establishment and mixing. In this review, I discuss the underlying mechanism of streaming, how slow and fast streaming are differentiated, and what we know about the physiological roles of the two types of streaming.

  8. Physics and (patho)physiology in confined flows: from colloidal patterns to cytoplasmic rheology and sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss a few problems that involve the interaction of fluids and solids in confined spaces. (i) Jamming in pressure-driven suspension flows that show a transition from Stokes flows to Darcy flows as the solids start to lock, as in evaporative patterning in colloids (e.g. coffee stain formation) .(ii) Jamming and clogging of red blood cells, as in sickle-cell pathophysiology, with implications for other diseases that involve jamming. (iii) The mechanical response of crowded networks of filaments bathed in a fluid, as in the cytoskeleton, that can be described by poroelasticity theory. In each case, I will show how simple theories of multiphase flow and deformation can be used to explain a range of experimental observations, while failing to account for others, along with some thoughts on how to improve them.

  9. Bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase is present in the cell cytoplasm and nucleus of multiple shark tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is directly stimulated by bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) to produce the signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Because sAC and sAC-related enzymes are found throughout phyla from cyanobacteria to mammals and they regulate cell physiology in response to internal and external changes in pH, CO2, and HCO3(-), sAC is deemed an evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor. Previously, sAC has been reported in dogfish shark and round ray gill cells, where they sense and counteract blood alkalosis by regulating the activity of V-type H(+)- ATPase. Here, we report the presence of sAC protein in gill, rectal gland, cornea, intestine, white muscle, and heart of leopard shark Triakis semifasciata Co-expression of sAC with transmembrane adenylyl cyclases supports the presence of cAMP signaling microdomains. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry on tissue sections, and western blots and cAMP-activity assays on nucleus-enriched fractions demonstrate the presence of sAC protein in and around nuclei. These results suggest that sAC modulates multiple physiological processes in shark cells, including nuclear functions. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  10. Climbing fiber synapse elimination in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu

    2011-11-01

    Innervation of Purkinje cells (PCs) by multiple climbing fibers (CFs) is refined into mono-innervation during the first three postnatal weeks of rodents' lives. In this review article, we will integrate the current knowledge on developmental process and mechanisms of CF synapse elimination. In the 'creeper' stage of CF innervation (postnatal day 0 (P0)∼), CFs creep among PC somata to form transient synapses on immature dendrites. In the 'pericellular nest' stage (P5∼), CFs densely surround and innervate PC somata. CF innervation is then displaced to the apical portion of PC somata in the 'capuchon' stage (P9∼), and translocate to dendrites in the 'dendritic' (P12∼) stage. Along with the developmental changes in CF wiring, functional and morphological distinctions become larger among CF inputs. PCs are initially innervated by more than five CFs with similar strengths (∼P3). During P3-7 only a single CF is selectively strengthened (functional differentiation), and it undergoes dendritic translocation from P9 on (dendritic translocation). Following the functional differentiation, perisomatic CF synapses are eliminated nonselectively; this proceeds in two distinct phases. The early phase (P7-11) is conducted independently of parallel fiber (PF)-PC synapse formation, while the late phase (P12-17) critically depends on it. The P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel in PCs triggers selective strengthening of single CF inputs, promotes dendritic translocation of the strengthened CFs, and drives the early phase of CF synapse elimination. In contrast, the late phase is mediated by the mGluR1-Gαq-PLCβ4-PKCγ signaling cascade in PCs driven at PF-PC synapses, whose structural connectivity is stabilized and maintained by the GluRδ2-Cbln1-neurexin system.

  11. Gold nanoparticles administration induces disarray of heart muscle, hemorrhagic, chronic inflammatory cells infiltrated by small lymphocytes, cytoplasmic vacuolization and congested and dilated blood vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhalim Mohamed Anwar K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite significant research efforts on cancer therapy, diagnostics and imaging, many challenges remain unsolved. There are many unknown details regarding the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs and biological systems. The structure and properties of gold nanoparticles (GNPs make them useful for a wide array of biological applications. However, for the application of GNPs in therapy and drug delivery, knowledge regarding their bioaccumulation and associated local or systemic toxicity is necessary. Information on the biological fate of NPs, including distribution, accumulation, metabolism, and organ specific toxicity is still minimal. Studies specifically dealing with the toxicity of NPs are rare. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal administration of GNPs on histological alterations of the heart tissue of rats in an attempt to identify and understand the toxicity and the potential role of GNPs as a therapeutic and diagnostic tool. Methods A total of 40 healthy male Wistar-Kyoto rats received 50 μl infusions of 10, 20 and 50 nm GNPs for 3 or 7 days. Animals were randomly divided into groups: 6 GNP-treated rats groups and one control group (NG. Groups 1, 2 and 3 received infusions of 50 μl GNPs of size 10 nm (3 or 7 days, 20 nm (3 or 7 days and 50 nm (3 or 7 days, respectively. Results In comparison with the respective control rats, exposure to GNPs doses produced heart muscle disarray with a few scattered chronic inflammatory cells infiltrated by small lymphocytes, foci of hemorrhage with extravasation of red blood cells, some scattered cytoplasmic vacuolization and congested and dilated blood vessels. None of the above alterations were observed in the heart muscle of any member of the control group. Conclusions The alterations induced by intraperitoneal administration of GNPs were size-dependent, with smaller ones inducing greater affects, and were also related to the time exposure to

  12. How crowded is the prokaryotic cytoplasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2013-07-11

    We consider biomacromolecular crowding within the cytoplasm of prokaryotic cells as a two-phase system of 'supercrowded' cytogel and 'dilute' cytosol; we simplify and quantify this model for a coccoid cell over a wide range of biomacromolecular crowding. The key result shows that the supercrowded cytogel extends the vectorial character of the plasma membrane deeper into the cytoplasm by about 20-70 nm. We discuss useful physiological insights that this model gives into the functioning of a prokaryotic cell on the micrometer scale. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 interacts with RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 and suppresses cell death and defense responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Plants use a variety of innate immune regulators to trigger cell death and defense responses against pathogen attack. We identified pepper (Capsicum annuum) GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (CaGRP1) as a RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 (CaPIK1)-interacting partner, based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation analyses as well as gene silencing and transient expression analysis. CaGRP1 contains an N-terminal RNA recognition motif and a glycine-rich region at the C-terminus. The CaGRP1 protein had DNA- and RNA-binding activity in vitro. CaGRP1 interacted with CaPIK1 in planta. CaGRP1 and CaGRP1-CaPIK1 complexes were localized to the nucleus in plant cells. CaPIK1 phosphorylated CaGRP1 in vitro and in planta. Transient coexpression of CaGRP1 with CaPIK1 suppressed the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response, accompanied by a reduced CaPIK1-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst. The RNA recognition motif region of CaGRP1 was responsible for the nuclear localization of CaGRP1 as well as the suppression of the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response. CaGRP1 silencing in pepper conferred enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection; however, CaPIK1-silenced plants were more susceptible to Xcv. CaGRP1 interacts with CaPIK1 and negatively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defense responses by suppressing ROS accumulation.

  14. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE AND CALCIUM-CHANNEL INHIBITORS ON CYTOPLASMIC FREE CALCIUM CONCENTRATION OF MOUSE BRAIN CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming-mei; XIE Ji-min; CHEN Min; ZHANG Yan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) and Verapamil and Nifedipine (calcium channel inhibitors) on free calcium concentrations of cells and intrasynaptosomes in hypothalamus (HT), periaqueductual grey matter (PAG) and hippocampus (HIP) of mice. Methods: The female ICR mice were randomly divided into control, EA, CaCl2 and CaCl2+EA groups (n=8 in each group). Pain threshold was detected by using radiation-heat irradiation-induced tail flick method. EA (8 Hz, a suitable stimulating strength, dense-sparse waves and duration of 30 min) was applied to"Shuigou" (水沟 GV 26) and "Chengjiang" (承浆CV 24). CaCl2 (10 μL, 0.2 μmol/L) was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle of mice after EA. The concentrations of cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in HIP, PAG, HT cell suspension specimen and hippocampal intrasynaptosome suspension of mice were determined by the fluorescent calcium indicator Fura-2-AM and a spectrofluorometer. Results: During EA analgesia, the intracellular free [Ca2+]i in HT and PAG specimens and intrsynaptosomal [Ca2+]i of the 3 cerebral regions decreased considerably (P<0.05~0.01), but that in hippocampal cell suspension increased significantly (P<0.01) in comparison with control group. The concentrations of hippocampal intrasynaptosomal free [Ca2+]i decreased significantly after adding Verapamil and Nifedipine to the extracted hippocampal intrasynaptosomal specimen. Microinjection of CaCl2 into lateral ventricle had no apparent influence on degree of analgesia (DA)% and intracellular and intrasynapsotomal [Ca2+]i, but significantly lower DA% and reduce changes of cytosolic and intrasynaptosomal [Ca2+]i induced by EA stimulation. Conclusion: Calcium ion in the neurons and intrasynaptosome of HT, PAG and HIP is involved in electroacupuncture analgesia.

  15. Juliprosopine and juliprosine from prosopis juliflora leaves induce mitochondrial damage and cytoplasmic vacuolation on cocultured glial cells and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Victor Diogenes A; Pitanga, Bruno P S; Nascimento, Ravena P; Souza, Cleide S; Coelho, Paulo Lucas C; Menezes-Filho, Noélio; Silva, André Mário M; Costa, Maria de Fátima D; El-Bachá, Ramon S; Velozo, Eudes S; Costa, Silvia L

    2013-12-16

    Prosopis juliflora is a shrub largely used for animal and human consumption. However, ingestion has been shown to induce intoxication in animals, which is characterized by neuromuscular alterations induced by mechanisms that are not yet well understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of a total alkaloid extract (TAE) and one alkaloid fraction (F32) obtained from P. juliflora leaves to rat cortical neurons and glial cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of F32 showed that this fraction is composed of a mixture of two piperidine alkaloids, juliprosopine (majority constituent) and juliprosine. TAE and F32 at concentrations between 0.3 and 45 μg/mL were tested for 24 h on neuron/glial cell primary cocultures. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test revealed that TAE and F32 were cytotoxic to cocultures, and their IC50 values were 31.07 and 7.362 μg/mL, respectively. Exposure to a subtoxic concentration of TAE or F32 (0.3-3 μg/mL) induced vacuolation and disruption of the astrocyte monolayer and neurite network, ultrastructural changes, characterized by formation of double-membrane vacuoles, and mitochondrial damage, associated with changes in β-tubulin III and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression. Microglial proliferation was also observed in cultures exposed to TAE or F32, with increasing levels of OX-42-positive cells. Considering that F32 was more cytotoxic than TAE and that F32 reproduced in vitro the main morphologic and ultrastructural changes of "cara torta" disease, we can also suggest that piperidine alkaloids juliprosopine and juliprosine are primarily responsible for the neurotoxic damage observed in animals after they have consumed the plant.

  16. Characterizing exogenous mRNA delivery, trafficking, cytoplasmic release and RNA-protein correlations at the level of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L; Bhosle, Sushma; Vanover, Daryll; Blanchard, Emmeline L; Loomis, Kristin H; Zurla, Chiara; Murray, Kathryn; Lam, Blaine C; Santangelo, Philip J

    2017-07-07

    The use of synthetic messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) to express specific proteins is a highly promising therapeutic and vaccine approach that avoids many safety issues associated with viral or DNA-based systems. However, in order to optimize mRNA designs and delivery, technology advancements are required to study fundamental mechanisms of mRNA uptake and localization at the single-cell and tissue level. Here, we present a single RNA sensitive fluorescent labeling method which allows us to label and visualize synthetic mRNA without significantly affecting function. This approach enabled single cell characterization of mRNA uptake and release kinetics from endocytic compartments, the measurement of mRNA/protein correlations, and motivated the investigation of mRNA induced cellular stress, all important mechanisms influencing protein production. In addition, we demonstrated this approach can facilitate near-infrared imaging of mRNA localization in vivo and in ex-vivo tissue sections, which will facilitate mRNA trafficking studies in pre-clinical models. Overall, we demonstrate the ability to study fundamental mechanisms necessary to optimize delivery and therapeutic strategies, in order to design the next generation of novel mRNA therapeutics and vaccines. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Cytoplasm Affects Embryonic Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recent studies by CAS researchers furnish strong evidence that a fertilized egg's nucleus isn't the sole site of control for an embryo's development. A research team headed by Prof. Zhu Zuoyan from the CAS Institute of Hydrobiology in Wuhan discovered that cytoplasm affects the number of vertebrae in cloned offspring created when nuclei from one fish genus were transplanted to enucleated eggs of another.

  18. Development of secondary cell wall in cotton fibers as examined with Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our presentation will focus on continuing efforts to examine secondary cell wall development in cotton fibers using infrared Spectroscopy. Cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering were examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-...

  19. Extent of mossy fiber sprouting in patients with mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy correlates with neuronal cell loss and granule cell dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeiser, Barbara; Zentner, Josef; Prinz, Marco; Brandt, Armin; Freiman, Thomas M

    2017-01-01

    The most frequent finding in temporal lobe epilepsy is hippocampal sclerosis, characterized by selective cell loss of hippocampal subregions CA1 and CA4 as well as mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) towards the supragranular region and granule cell dispersion. Although selective cell loss is well described, its impact on mossy fiber sprouting and granule cell dispersion remains unclear. In a single center series, we examined 319 human hippocampal specimens, collected in a 15-years period. Hippocampal specimens were stained for neuronal loss, granule cell dispersion (Wyler scale I-IV, Neu-N, HE) and mossy fiber sprouting (synaptoporin-immunohistochemistry). For seizure outcome Engel score I-IV was applied. In Wyler I and II specimens, mossy fibers were found along their natural projection exclusively in CA4 and CA3. In Wyler III and IV, sprouting of mossy fibers into the molecular layer and a decrease of mossy fibers in CA4 and CA3 was detected. Mean granule cell dispersion was extended from 121μm to 185μm and correlated with Wyler III-IV as well as mossy fiber sprouting into the molecular layer. Wyler grade, mossy fiber sprouting and granule cell dispersion correlated with longer epilepsy duration, late surgery and higher preoperative seizure frequency. Parameters analyzed above did not correlate with postoperative seizure outcome. Mossy fiber sprouting might be a compensatory phenomenon of cell death of the target neurons in CA4 and CA3 in Wyler III-IV. Axonal reorganization of granule cells is accompanied by their migration and is correlated with the severity of cell loss and epilepsy duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell Attachment and Viability Study of PCL Nano-fiber Modified by Cold Atmospheric Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atyabi, Seyed Mohammad; Sharifi, Fereshteh; Irani, Shiva; Zandi, Mojgan; Mivehchi, Houri; Nagheh, Zahra

    2016-06-01

    The field of tissue engineering is an emerging discipline which applies the basic principles of life sciences and engineering to repair and restore living tissues and organs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cold and non-thermal plasma surface modification of poly (ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds on fibroblast cell behavior. Nano-fiber PCL was fabricated through electrospinning technique, and some fibers were then treated by cold and non-thermal plasma. The cell-biomaterial interactions were studied by culturing the fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL. Scaffold biocompatibility test was assessed using an inverted microscope. The growth and proliferation of fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL were analyzed by MTT viability assay. Cellular attachment on the nano-fiber and their morphology were evaluated using scanning electron microscope. The result of cell culture showed that nano-fiber could support the cellular growth and proliferation by developing three-dimensional topography. The present study demonstrated that the nano-fiber surface modification with cold plasma sharply enhanced the fibroblast cell attachment. Thus, cold plasma surface modification greatly raised the bioactivity of scaffolds.

  1. How crowded is the prokaryotic cytoplasm?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert; Ferguson, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    We consider biomacromolecular crowding within the cytoplasm of prokaryotic cells as a two-phase system of 'supercrowded' cytogel and 'dilute' cytosol; we simplify and quantify this model for a coccoid cell over a wide range of biomacromolecular crowding. The key result shows that the supercrowded

  2. Stromal fibers in oral squamous cell carcinoma: A possible new prognostic indicator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardam, Priyanka; Mehendiratta, Monica; Rehani, Shweta; Kumra, Madhumani; Sahay, Khushboo; Jain, Kanu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have been carried out to study the role of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors and matrix metalloproteinases on tumor invasion. However, literature related to the analysis of connective tissue fibers in varying grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is very limited. Aim: To analyze the changes in collagen and elastic fibers in varying grades of (OSCC). Settings and Design: This retrospective study was carried out using a light and polarizing microscope. Materials and Methods: Three sections each were cut from fifty samples of varying grades of OSCC and ten samples of control followed by staining with H and E, Picrosirius-Red and Verhoeff–Van Gieson. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of collagen and elastic fibers were accomplished using set criteria. Statistical Analysis: Data were entered into the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13.5 for analysis. Results: A change in colors of collagen fibers was seen on progressing from well to poorly differentiated OSCC. Thin collagen fibers predominantly exhibited greenish yellow, but the thick fibers exhibited a variety of colors. As the grade of OSCC progressed, collagen fibers were loosely packed haphazardly arranged. Statistically insignificant results were obtained for quantitative analysis of collagen and qualitative analysis of elastic fibers. Conclusion: The collagen fibers undergo a change in color, orientation and packing in the stroma of varying grades of OSCC. The uniqueness of this study lies in the exploration of elastic fibers in OSCC which has not been done so far. PMID:27721605

  3. Gibberellin overproduction promotes sucrose synthase expression and secondary cell wall deposition in cotton fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Qin Bai

    Full Text Available Bioactive gibberellins (GAs comprise an important class of natural plant growth regulators and play essential roles in cotton fiber development. To date, the molecular base of GAs' functions in fiber development is largely unclear. To address this question, the endogenous bioactive GA levels in cotton developing fibers were elevated by specifically up-regulating GA 20-oxidase and suppressing GA 2-oxidase via transgenic methods. Higher GA levels in transgenic cotton fibers significantly increased micronaire values, 1000-fiber weight, cell wall thickness and cellulose contents of mature fibers. Quantitative RT-PCR and biochemical analysis revealed that the transcription of sucrose synthase gene GhSusA1 and sucrose synthase activities were significantly enhanced in GA overproducing transgenic fibers, compared to the wild-type cotton. In addition, exogenous application of bioactive GA could promote GhSusA1 expression in cultured fibers, as well as in cotton hypocotyls. Our results suggested that bioactive GAs promoted secondary cell wall deposition in cotton fibers by enhancing sucrose synthase expression.

  4. 粗山羊草细胞质对普通小麦细胞核的遗传效应%Genetic Effects of the Cytoplasm from Aegilops squarrosa L. on the Wheat Cell Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玲丽; 卢碧霞; 马守才; 张永杰

    2001-01-01

    将粗山羊草细胞质导入普通小麦,研究其对普通小麦细胞核的遗传效应。结果表明,粗山羊草细胞质对普通小麦开花习性具有优良的作用;能增加小麦的株高,提高小穗数、穗粒数、结实率和发芽势,但延迟小麦的生育期;对其他性状影响不显著;粗山羊草细胞质对普通小麦细胞核之间有一定的核质杂种优势。%The genetic effects of Aegilops squarrosa L. cytoplasm were studied by transferring Aegilops squarrosa L. cytoplasm into wheat. The results showed that Aegilops squarrosa L. cytoplasm had fine effects on wheat flowering habits and characteristics.Meanwhile, plant height, number of spikelets, grains per spike,setting rate and germinating potential of wheat were improved significantly, but wheat growth phase was lengthened. There were no significant effects on other agronomic characters. There was sure nucleo-cytoplasmic heterosis between Ae. squarrosa L. cytoplasm and wheat cell nucleus.

  5. Fiber biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton fiber cells arising from seed epidermis is the most important agricultural textile commodity in the world. To produce fully mature fibers, approximately two months of fiber developmental process are required. The timing of four distinctive fiber development stages consisting of initiation, ...

  6. A fast platform for simulating semi-flexible fiber suspensions applied to cell mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Rahimian, Abtin; Zorin, Denis; Shelley, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel platform for the large-scale simulation of three-dimensional fibrous structures immersed in a Stokesian fluid and evolving under confinement or in free-space in three dimensions. One of the main motivations for this work is to study the dynamics of fiber assemblies within biological cells. For this, we also incorporate the key biophysical elements that determine the dynamics of these assemblies, which include the polymerization and depolymerization kinetics of fibers, their interactions with molecular motors and other objects, their flexibility, and hydrodynamic coupling. This work, to our knowledge, is the first technique to include many-body hydrodynamic interactions (HIs), and the resulting fluid flows, in cellular assemblies of flexible fibers. We use non-local slender body theory to compute the fluid-structure interactions of the fibers and a second-kind boundary integral formulation for other rigid bodies and the confining boundary. A kernel-independent implementation of the fast multipole method is utilized for efficient evaluation of HIs. The deformation of the fibers is described by nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and their polymerization is modeled by the reparametrization of the dynamic equations in the appropriate non-Lagrangian frame. We use a pseudo-spectral representation of fiber positions and implicit time-stepping to resolve large fiber deformations, and to allow time-steps not excessively constrained by temporal stiffness or fiber-fiber interactions. The entire computational scheme is parallelized, which enables simulating assemblies of thousands of fibers. We use our method to investigate two important questions in the mechanics of cell division: (i) the effect of confinement on the hydrodynamic mobility of microtubule asters; and (ii) the dynamics of the positioning of mitotic spindle in complex cell geometries. Finally to demonstrate the general applicability of the method, we simulate the sedimentation of a cloud of

  7. Effect of Continuous B Cell Depletion With Rituximab on Pathogenic Autoantibodies and Total IgG Levels in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazar, Frank B; Pendergraft, William F; Wenger, Julia; Owens, Charles T; Laliberte, Karen; Niles, John L

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of rituximab on pathogenic autoantibodies and total Ig levels, and to identify serious adverse events in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) treated with continuous B cell depletion. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 239 patients with AAV treated with rituximab-induced continuous B cell depletion. Two treatment cohorts were analyzed: an induction group (n = 52) and a maintenance group (n = 237). Changes in ANCA titers and total Ig levels over time were evaluated using mixed-effects models. Risk factors for serious infections during maintenance treatment were evaluated using Poisson regression. During induction, IgG levels fell at a mean rate of 6% per month (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4, 8%), while ANCA levels declined at a mean rate of 47% per month (95% CI 42, 52%) and 48% per month (95% CI 42, 54%) for patients with antimyeloperoxidase (anti-MPO) antibodies and those with anti-proteinase 3 (anti-PR3) antibodies, respectively. During maintenance treatment, with a median duration of 2.4 years (interquartile range 1.5, 4.0 years), IgG levels declined a mean of 0.6% per year (95% CI -0.2, 1.4%). New significant hypogammaglobulinemia (IgG level of <400 mg/dl) during maintenance treatment occurred in 4.6% of the patients, all of whom were in the lowest baseline IgG quartile. Serious infections during maintenance therapy occurred at a rate of 0.85 per 10 patient-years (95% CI 0.66, 1.1) and were independently associated with an IgG level of <400 mg/dl. B cell-targeted therapy causes a preferential decline in ANCA titers relative to total IgG levels. Despite prolonged maintenance therapy with rituximab, IgG levels remain essentially constant. Serious infections were rare. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Galectin-3 is a non-classic RNA binding protein that stabilizes the mucin MUC4 mRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppin, Lucie; Vincent, Audrey; Frénois, Frédéric; Duchêne, Belinda; Lahdaoui, Fatima; Stechly, Laurence; Renaud, Florence; Villenet, Céline; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dion, Johann; Grandjean, Cyrille; Poirier, Françoise; Figeac, Martin; Delacour, Delphine; Porchet, Nicole; Pigny, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs that encode membrane-bound mucins. These mRNAs share unusual features such as a long half-life. However, it remains unknown how mucin mRNA stability is regulated. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is an endogenous lectin playing important biological functions in epithelial cells. Gal-3 is encoded by LGALS3 which is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. Despite the absence of a RNA-recognition motif, Gal-3 interacts indirectly with pre-mRNAs in the nucleus and promotes constitutive splicing. However a broader role of Gal-3 in mRNA fate is unexplored. We report herein that Gal-3 increases MUC4 mRNA stability through an intermediate, hnRNP-L which binds to a conserved CA repeat element in the 3′UTR in a Gal-3 dependent manner and also controls Muc4 mRNA levels in epithelial tissues of Gal3−/− mice. Gal-3 interacts with hnRNP-L in the cytoplasm, especially during cell mitosis, but only partly associates with protein markers of P-Bodies or Stress Granules. By RNA-IP plus RNA-seq analysis and imaging, we demonstrate that Gal-3 binds to mature spliced MUC4 mRNA in the perinuclear region, probably in hnRNP-L-containing RNA granules. Our findings highlight a new role for Gal-3 as a non-classic RNA-binding protein that regulates MUC4 mRNA post-transcriptionally. PMID:28262838

  9. Nuclear annexin II negatively regulates growth of LNCaP cells and substitution of ser 11 and 25 to glu prevents nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of annexin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala-Sanmartin Jesus

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annexin II heavy chain (also called p36, calpactin I is lost in prostate cancers and in a majority of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN. Loss of annexin II heavy chain appears to be specific for prostate cancer since overexpression of annexin II is observed in a majority of human cancers, including pancreatic cancer, breast cancer and brain tumors. Annexin II exists as a heterotetramer in complex with a protein ligand p11 (S100A10, and as a monomer. Diverse cellular functions are proposed for the two forms of annexin II. The monomer is involved in DNA synthesis. A leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES in the N-terminus of annexin II regulates its nuclear export by the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutation of the NES sequence results in nuclear retention of annexin II. Results Annexin II localized in the nucleus is phosphorylated, and the appearance of nuclear phosphorylated annexin II is cell cycle dependent, indicating that phosphorylation may play a role in nuclear entry, retention or export of annexin II. By exogenous expression of annexin II in the annexin II-null LNCaP cells, we show that wild-type annexin II is excluded from the nucleus, whereas the NES mutant annexin II localizes in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear retention of annexin II results in reduced cell proliferation and increased doubling time of cells. Expression of annexin II, both wild type and NES mutant, causes morphological changes of the cells. By site-specific substitution of glutamic acid in the place of serines 11 and 25 in the N-terminus, we show that simultaneous phosphorylation of both serines 11 and 25, but not either one alone, prevents nuclear localization of annexin II. Conclusion Our data show that nuclear annexin II is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner and that substitution of serines 11 and 25 inhibit nuclear entry of annexin II. Aberrant accumulation of nuclear annexin II retards proliferation of LNCa

  10. Surfing the wave, cycle, life history, and genes/proteins expressed by testicular germ cells. Part 3: developmental changes in spermatid flagellum and cytoplasmic droplet and interaction of sperm with the zona pellucida and egg plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermo, Louis; Pelletier, R-Marc; Cyr, Daniel G; Smith, Charles E

    2010-04-01

    Spermiogenesis constitutes the steps involved in the metamorphosis of spermatids into spermatozoa. It involves modification of several organelles in addition to the formation of several structures including the flagellum and cytoplasmic droplet. The flagellum is composed of a neck region and middle, principal, and end pieces. The axoneme composed of nine outer microtubular doublets circularly arranged to form a cylinder around a central pair of microtubules is present throughout the flagellum. The middle and principal pieces each contain specific components such as the mitochondrial sheath and fibrous sheath, respectively, while outer dense fibers are common to both. A plethora of proteins are constituents of each of these structures, with each playing key roles in functions related to the fertility of spermatozoa. At the end of spermiogenesis, a portion of spermatid cytoplasm remains associated with the released spermatozoa, referred to as the cytoplasmic droplet. The latter has as its main feature Golgi saccules, which appear to modify the plasma membrane of spermatozoa as they move down the epididymal duct and hence may be partly involved in male gamete maturation. The end product of spermatogenesis is highly streamlined and motile spermatozoa having a condensed nucleus equipped with an acrosome. Spermatozoa move through the female reproductive tract and eventually penetrate the zona pellucida and bind to the egg plasma membrane. Many proteins have been implicated in the process of fertilization as well as a plethora of proteins involved in the development of spermatids and sperm, and these are high lighted in this review.

  11. Understanding the relationship between cotton fiber properties and non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajasundaram, Dhivyaa; Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan;

    2014-01-01

    A detailed knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity and complexity is crucial for understanding plant growth and development. One key challenge is to establish links between polysaccharide-rich cell walls and their phenotypic characteristics. It is of particular interest for some plant material, like...... different cotton species were studied. The glycan array was generated by sequential extraction of cell wall polysaccharides from mature cotton fibers and screening samples against eleven extensively characterized cell wall probes. Also, phenotypic characteristics of cotton fibers such as length, strength...... and phenotypic traits. In addition, the analysis also identified specific polysaccharides which may play a major role during fiber development for the final fiber characteristics. Three different regression methods identified a negative correlation between micronaire and the xyloglucan and homogalacturonan...

  12. Understanding the relationship between cotton fiber properties and non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajasundaram, Dhivyaa; Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    different cotton species were studied. The glycan array was generated by sequential extraction of cell wall polysaccharides from mature cotton fibers and screening samples against eleven extensively characterized cell wall probes. Also, phenotypic characteristics of cotton fibers such as length, strength......A detailed knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity and complexity is crucial for understanding plant growth and development. One key challenge is to establish links between polysaccharide-rich cell walls and their phenotypic characteristics. It is of particular interest for some plant material, like...... and phenotypic traits. In addition, the analysis also identified specific polysaccharides which may play a major role during fiber development for the final fiber characteristics. Three different regression methods identified a negative correlation between micronaire and the xyloglucan and homogalacturonan...

  13. Evaluation of diffusion in gel entrapment cell culture within hollow fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan-Qing Wu; Guo-Liang Zhang; Chong Shen; Qian Zhao; Hui Li; Qin Meng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate diffusion in mammalian cell culture by gel entrapment within hollow fibers.METHODS: Freshly isolated rat hepatocytes or human oral epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cells were entrapped in type Ⅰ collagen solutions and statically cultured inside microporous and ultrafiltration hollow fibers. During the culture time collagen gel contraction, cell viability and specific function were assessed. Effective diffusion coefficients of glucose in cell-matrix gels were determined by lag time analysis in a diffusion cell.R ESULTS: Significant gel contractions occurred in the collagen gels by entrapment of either viable hepatocytes or KB cells. And the gel contraction caused a significant reduction on effective diffusion coefficient of glucose. The cell viability assay of both hepatocytes and KB cells statically cultured in hollow fibers by collagen entrapment further confirmed the existence of the inhibited mass transfer by diffusion. Urea was secreted about 50% more by hepatocytes entrapped in hollow fibers with pore size of 0.1 pm than that in hollow fibers with MWCO of 100 ku.CONCLUSION: Cell-matrix gel and membrane pore size are the two factors relevant to the limited mass transfer by diffusion in such gel entrapment of mammalian cell culture.

  14. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  15. N-cadherin regulates signaling mechanisms required for lens fiber cell elongation and lens morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Caitlin M; Rajakaruna, Suren; Bowen, Caitlin; Radice, Glenn L; Robinson, Michael L; Menko, A Sue

    2017-08-01

    Tissue development and regeneration involve high-ordered morphogenetic processes that are governed by elements of the cytoskeleton in conjunction with cell adhesion molecules. Such processes are particularly important in the lens whose structure dictates its function. Studies of our lens-specific N-cadherin conditional knockout mouse (N-cadcKO) revealed an essential role for N-cadherin in the migration of the apical tips of differentiating lens fiber cells along the apical surfaces of the epithelium, a region termed the Epithelial Fiber Interface (EFI), that is necessary for normal fiber cell elongation and the morphogenesis. Studies of the N-cadcKO lens suggest that N-cadherin function in fiber cell morphogenesis is linked to the activation of Rac1 and myosin II, both signaling pathways central to the regulation of cell motility including determining the directionality of cellular movement. The absence of N-cadherin did not disrupt lateral contacts between fiber cells during development, and the maintenance of Aquaporin-0 and increased expression of EphA2 at cell-cell interfaces suggests that these molecules may function in this role. E-cadherin was maintained in newly differentiating fiber cells without interfering with expression of lens-specific differentiation proteins but was not able to replace N-cadherin function in these cells. The dependence of migration of the fiber cell apical domains along the EFI for lens morphogenesis on N-cadherin provides new insight into the process of tissue development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A role for Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling during lens fiber cell differentiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Stump, R J W; Lovicu, F J; McAvoy, J W

    2006-12-01

    Wnt signaling through frizzled (Fz) receptors plays key roles in just about every developmental system that has been studied. Several Wnt-Fz signaling pathways have been identified including the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. PCP signaling is crucial for many developmental processes that require major cytoskeletal rearrangements. Downstream of Fz, PCP signaling is thought to involve the GTPases, Rho, Rac and Cdc42 and regulation of the JNK cascade. Here we report on the localization of these GTPases and JNK in the lens and assess their involvement in the cytoskeletal reorganisation that is a key element of FGF-induced lens fiber cell differentiation.

  17. Molecular markers associated with the immature fiber (im) gene affecting the degree of fiber cell wall thickening in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Moon, Hong S; Delhom, Christopher D; Zeng, Linghe; Fang, David D

    2013-01-01

    Cotton fiber fineness and maturity measured indirectly as micronaire (MIC) are important properties of determining fiber grades in the textile market. To understand the genetic control and molecular mechanisms of fiber fineness and maturity, we studied two near isogenic lines, Gossypium hirsutum, Texas Marker-1 wild type (TM-1) and immature fiber (im) mutant showing a significant difference in MIC values. The fibers from im mutant plants were finer and less mature with lower MIC values than those from the recurrent parent, TM-1. A comprehensive fiber property analysis of TM-1 and im mutant showed that the lower MIC of fibers in im mutant was due to the lower degree of fiber cell wall thickening as compared to the TM-1 fibers. Using an F(2) population comprising 366 progenies derived from a cross between TM-1 and im mutant, we confirmed that the immature fiber phenotype present in a mutant plant was controlled by one single recessive gene im. Furthermore, we identified 13 simple sequence repeat markers that were closely linked to the im gene located on chromosome 3. Molecular markers associated with the im gene will lay the foundation to further investigate genetic information required for improving cotton fiber fineness and maturity.

  18. Porous, single crystalline titanium nitride nanoplates grown on carbon fibers: excellent counter electrodes for low-cost, high performance, fiber-shaped dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Dai, Hui; Zhou, Yong; Hu, Yingjie; Yu, Tao; Liu, Jianguo; Zou, Zhigang

    2014-11-28

    An excellent, platinum free fiber counter electrode (CE) was successfully fabricated, consisting of porous, single crystalline titanium nitride (TiN) nanoplates grown on carbon fibers (CF). The fiber-shaped dye-sensitized solar cells (FDSSCs) based on the TiN-CF CE show a high conversion efficiency of 7.20%, comparable or even superior to that of the Pt wire (6.23%).

  19. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, A.; Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-05-01

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  20. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemel, A [Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dental Medicine, and the Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, 91120 (Israel); Rehfeldt, F [III. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Brown, A E X [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Discher, D E [Graduate Group of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Safran, S A [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-05-19

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  1. A fast platform for simulating semi-flexible fiber suspensions applied to cell mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan, E-mail: ehssan@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Computational Biology, Simons Foundation, New York, NY 10010 (United States); Rahimian, Abtin, E-mail: arahimian@acm.org [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Zorin, Denis, E-mail: dzorin@cs.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Shelley, Michael, E-mail: shelley@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Computational Biology, Simons Foundation, New York, NY 10010 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    We present a novel platform for the large-scale simulation of three-dimensional fibrous structures immersed in a Stokesian fluid and evolving under confinement or in free-space in three dimensions. One of the main motivations for this work is to study the dynamics of fiber assemblies within biological cells. For this, we also incorporate the key biophysical elements that determine the dynamics of these assemblies, which include the polymerization and depolymerization kinetics of fibers, their interactions with molecular motors and other objects, their flexibility, and hydrodynamic coupling. This work, to our knowledge, is the first technique to include many-body hydrodynamic interactions (HIs), and the resulting fluid flows, in cellular assemblies of flexible fibers. We use non-local slender body theory to compute the fluid–structure interactions of the fibers and a second-kind boundary integral formulation for other rigid bodies and the confining boundary. A kernel-independent implementation of the fast multipole method is utilized for efficient evaluation of HIs. The deformation of the fibers is described by nonlinear Euler–Bernoulli beam theory and their polymerization is modeled by the reparametrization of the dynamic equations in the appropriate non-Lagrangian frame. We use a pseudo-spectral representation of fiber positions and implicit time-stepping to resolve large fiber deformations, and to allow time-steps not excessively constrained by temporal stiffness or fiber–fiber interactions. The entire computational scheme is parallelized, which enables simulating assemblies of thousands of fibers. We use our method to investigate two important questions in the mechanics of cell division: (i) the effect of confinement on the hydrodynamic mobility of microtubule asters; and (ii) the dynamics of the positioning of mitotic spindle in complex cell geometries. Finally to demonstrate the general applicability of the method, we simulate the sedimentation of a

  2. Challenges in using cultured primary rodent hepatocytes or cell lines to study hepatic HDL receptor SR-BI regulation by its cytoplasmic adaptor PDZK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Tsukamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PDZK1 is a four PDZ-domain containing cytoplasmic protein that binds to a variety of membrane proteins via their C-termini and can influence the abundance, localization and/or function of its target proteins. One of these targets in hepatocytes in vivo is the HDL receptor SR-BI. Normal hepatic expression of SR-BI protein requires PDZK1 - <5% of normal hepatic SR-BI is seen in the livers of PDZK1 knockout mice. Progress has been made in identifying features of PDZK1 required to control hepatic SR-BI in vivo using hepatic expression of wild-type and mutant forms of PDZK1 in wild-type and PDZK1 KO transgenic mice. Such in vivo studies are time consuming and expensive, and cannot readily be used to explore many features of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have explored the potential to use either primary rodent hepatocytes in culture using 2D collagen gels with newly developed optimized conditions or PDZK1/SR-BI co-transfected cultured cell lines (COS, HEK293 for such studies. SR-BI and PDZK1 protein and mRNA expression levels fell rapidly in primary hepatocyte cultures, indicating this system does not adequately mimic hepatocytes in vivo for analysis of the PDZK1 dependence of SR-BI. Although PDZK1 did alter SR-BI protein expression in the cell lines, its influence was independent of SR-BI's C-terminus, and thus is not likely to occur via the same mechanism as that which occurs in hepatocytes in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Caution must be exercised in using primary hepatocytes or cultured cell lines when studying the mechanism underlying the regulation of hepatic SR-BI by PDZK1. It may be possible to use SR-BI and PDZK1 expression as sensitive markers for the in vivo-like state of hepatocytes to further improve primary hepatocyte cell culture conditions.

  3. Scalable air cathode microbial fuel cells using glass fiber separators, plastic mesh supporters, and graphite fiber brush anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    The combined use of brush anodes and glass fiber (GF1) separators, and plastic mesh supporters were used here for the first time to create a scalable microbial fuel cell architecture. Separators prevented short circuiting of closely-spaced electrodes, and cathode supporters were used to avoid water gaps between the separator and cathode that can reduce power production. The maximum power density with a separator and supporter and a single cathode was 75±1W/m3. Removing the separator decreased power by 8%. Adding a second cathode increased power to 154±1W/m3. Current was increased by connecting two MFCs connected in parallel. These results show that brush anodes, combined with a glass fiber separator and a plastic mesh supporter, produce a useful MFC architecture that is inherently scalable due to good insulation between the electrodes and a compact architecture. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Rotavirus disrupts cytoplasmic P bodies during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Mukherjee, Arpita; Patra, Upayan; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2015-12-02

    Cytoplasmic Processing bodies (P bodies), the RNA-protein aggregation foci of translationally stalled and potentially decaying mRNA, have been reported to be differentially modulated by viruses. Rotavirus, the causative agent of acute infantile gastroenteritis is a double stranded RNA virus which completes its entire life-cycle exclusively in host cell cytoplasm. In this study, the fate of P bodies was investigated upon rotavirus infection. It was found that P bodies get disrupted during rotavirus infection. The disruption occurred by more than one different mechanism where deadenylating P body component Pan3 was degraded by rotavirus NSP1 and exonuclease XRN1 along with the decapping enzyme hDCP1a were relocalized from cytoplasm to nucleus. Overall the study highlights decay and subcellular relocalization of P body components as novel mechanisms by which rotavirus subverts cellular antiviral responses.

  5. TATA-binding protein-related factor 2 is localized in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells and much of it migrates to the nucleus in response to genotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-ae; Tanaka, Yuji; Suenaga, Yusuke; Tamura, Taka-aki

    2006-10-31

    TBP (TATA-binding protein)-related factor 2 (TRF2) regulates transcription during a nuber of cellular processes. We previously demonstrated that it is localized in the cytoplasm and is translocated to the nucleus by DNA-damaging agents. However, the cytoplasmic localization of TRF2 is controversial. In this study, we reconfirmed its cytoplasmic localization in various ways and examined its nuclear migration. Stresses such as heat shock, redox agents, heavy metals, and osmotic shock did not affect localization whereas genotoxins such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), cisplatin, etoposide, and hydroxyurea caused it to migrate to the nucleus. Adriamycin, mitomycin C and gamma-rays had no obvious effect. We determined optimal conditions for the nuclear migration. The proportions of cells with nuclei enriched for TRF2 were 25-60% and 5-10% for stressed cells and control cells, respectively. Nuclear translocation was observed after 1 h, 4 h and 12 h for cisplatin, etoposide and MMS and hydroxyurea, respectively. The association of TRF2 with the chromatin and promoter region of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene, a putative target of TRF2, was increased by MMS treatment. Thus TRF2 may be involved in genotoxin-induced transcriptional regulation.

  6. Physical and Mechanical Characterization of Fiber Cell Wall in Castor (Ricinus communis L. Stalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Castor (Ricinus communis L. stalk is a byproduct of the production of castor oil. As a natural material, castor stalk has great potential in the production of bio-composites as reinforcement materials. To provide more information about the castor stalk for using it better, the structure, microfibril angle (MFA, relative degree of crystallinity (%, and mechanical properties of castor fiber cell walls were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD and nanoindentation. The influence of chemical composition and MFA on the mechanical properties of fiber cell wall was studied as well. The cortex of castor stalks primarily contains long fibers, while the xylem of castor stalk, an excellent wood-type material, comprises most of the castor stalk (83.95% by weight; the pith of the stalk is composed of parenchyma cells. The average elastic modulus of fiber cell wall in lower, upper, and branch parts are 16.0 GPa, 18.6 GPa, and 13.2 GPa, respectively. The average hardness of fiber cell wall in lower, upper, and branch parts are 0.50 GPa, 0.54 GPa, and 0.43 GPa, respectively. As lignin content increases from 15.57% to 17.41% and MFA decreases from 21.3˚ to 15.4˚, the elastic modulus increases from 13.2 GPa to 18.6 GPa and the hardness increases from 0.43 GPa to 0.54 GPa. The mechanical properties, including the elastic modulus and the hardness of the fiber cell wall in the upper region of the castor stalk, are higher than those in the lower region, while the mechanical properties of the fiber cell wall in the branches are lower than those in either the upper or lower regions.

  7. Modeling of hydrodynamics in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor for mammalian cells cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Menshutina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling in CFD-packages are powerfull instrument for design and calculation of any engineering tasks. CFD-package contains the set of programs that allow to model the different objects behavior based on the mathematical lows. ANSYS Fluent are widely used for modelling of biotechnological and chemical-technological processes. This package is convenient to describe their hydrodynamics. As cell cultivation is one of the actual scientific direction in modern biotechnology ANSYS Fluent was used to create the model of hollow fiber membrane bioreactor. The fibers are hollow cylindrical membrane to be used for cell cultivation. The criterion of process effectiveness for cell growth is full filling of the membrane surface by cells in the bioreactor. While the cell growth the fiber permeability is decreased which effects to feed flow through membrane pores. The specific feature of this process is to ensure such feed flow to deliver the optimal nutrition for the cells on the external membrane surface. The velocity distribution inside the fiber and in all bioreactor as a whole has been calculated based on mass an impulse conservation equations taking into account the mathematical model assumptions. The hydrodynamics analysis in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor is described by the three-dimensional model created in ANSYS Fluent. The specific features of one membrane model are considered and for whole bioreactor too.

  8. Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Ting-zhao; LI Wan-chen; CAO Mo-ju; HU Chang-yuan

    2002-01-01

    14 isoplasmic and allonuclear cytoplasmic male sterile lines were used as female parents, 8 tester lines as male parents, 101 F1 progenies were obtained. Fertility restoration response of 101 F1 progenies were investigated through field observation and pollen stainability examination under microscope. 14 isoplasmic and allonuclear cytoplasmic male sterile lines were developed by repeated backcross with recurrent male parent lines for more than 8 generations. The result shows: tester line Zifeng1 not only restored the isoplasmic and allonuclear sterile lines of group C backcrossed with Mo17, Yu30 and Heer, but also completely restored the isoplasmic and allonuclear cytoplasm male sterile lines of group T backcrossed with Mo17, HZS , 1792 ,292 and Yu30. Therefore, nuclear background limits the use of Zifeng1 as a tester for identification of cytoplasmic male sterility. Furthermore RFLPs of mitochondrial DNA of 6 isonuclear and alloplasmic cytoplasmic male sterile lines were analyzed with Bam H Ⅰ and Hind Ⅲ restriction endonuclease and mitochondrial DNA probes pBcmH3 and Cox Ⅱ. The same RFLPs were found within sterile cytoplasm of group C, including C,Chuan G, Lei 2 and Lei 3, but a different RFLP pattern was observed among sterile cytoplasm of group S, C,T and the normal cytoplasm. This result suggested that the RFLP markers tightly linked to sterile mitochondrial genes of different groups could be applied in the identifcation of cytoplasmic male sterility.

  9. The molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Motoki; Ito, Kohji

    2015-10-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs widely in plants ranging from algae to angiosperms. However, the molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming have long remained unelucidated. Recent molecular genetic approaches have identified specific myosin members (XI-2 and XI-K as major and XI-1, XI-B, and XI-I as minor motive forces) for the generation of cytoplasmic streaming among 13 myosin XIs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Simultaneous knockout of these myosin XI members led to a reduced velocity of cytoplasmic streaming and marked defects of plant development. Furthermore, the artificial modifications of myosin XI-2 velocity changed plant and cell sizes along with the velocity of cytoplasmic streaming. Therefore, we assume that cytoplasmic streaming is one of the key regulators in determining plant size.

  10. Effect of polyvinylidene fluoride electrospun fiber orientation on neural stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Luanda C; Wianny, Florence; Livi, Sebastien; Dehay, Colette; Duchet-Rumeau, Jannick; Gérard, Jean-François

    2016-08-29

    Electrospun polymer piezoelectric fibers can be used in neural tissue engineering (NTE) to mimic the physical, biological, and material properties of the native extracellular matrix. In this work, we have developed scaffolds based on polymer fiber architectures for application in NTE. To study the role of such three-dimensional scaffolds, a rotating drum collector was used for electrospinning poly(vinylidene) fluoride (PVDF) polymer at various rotation speeds. The morphology, orientation, polymorphism, as well as the mechanical behavior of the nonaligned and aligned fiber-based architectures were characterized. We have demonstrated that the jet flow and the electrostatic forces generated by electrospinning of PVDF induced local conformation changes which promote the generation of the β-phase. Fiber anisotropy could be a critical feature for the design of suitable scaffolds for NTEs. We thus assessed the impact of PVDF fiber alignment on the behavior of monkey neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs were seeded on nonaligned and aligned scaffolds and their morphology, adhesion, and differentiation capacities into the neuronal and glial pathways were studied using microscopic techniques. Significant changes in the growth and differentiation capacities of NSCs into neuronal and glial cells as a function of the fiber alignment were evidenced. These results demonstrate that PVDF scaffolds may serve as instructive scaffolds for NSC survival and differentiation, and may be valuable tools for the development of cell- and scaffold-based strategies for neural repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  11. FILLER LOADING IN THE LUMEN OR/AND CELL WALL OF FIBERS – A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Pal Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature reveals potential advantages that papermakers can achieve by placing minerals in the lumens or cell walls of fibers before the pulp is formed into paper. Loading of filler into the fiber lumen by mechanical deposition or within the cell wall by in-situ precipitation has been reported to generally result in a moderate reduction in light scattering coefficient and increased strength properties of laboratory handsheets, as well as in paper manufactured with pilot plant equipment, when compared to conventional addition of filler. However, there are some exceptions to this general observation, where the fiber loading is reported to decrease the tensile strength of paper. Some related effects can be achieved by either precipitating mineral onto fiber surfaces or co-flocculating mineral particles with cellulosic fines. Challenges remain with respect to the implementation of fiber-loading concepts at a commercial scale. Also, there is a need for further research aimed at establishing high-end applications in which it may be an advantage to load cellulosic fiber cell walls or lumens with minerals or other substances.

  12. Three-dimensional hierarchical cultivation of human skin cells on bio-adaptive hybrid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planz, Viktoria; Seif, Salem; Atchison, Jennifer S; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Sparenberg, Lisa; Kroner, Elmar; Windbergs, Maike

    2016-07-11

    The human skin comprises a complex multi-scale layered structure with hierarchical organization of different cells within the extracellular matrix (ECM). This supportive fiber-reinforced structure provides a dynamically changing microenvironment with specific topographical, mechanical and biochemical cell recognition sites to facilitate cell attachment and proliferation. Current advances in developing artificial matrices for cultivation of human cells concentrate on surface functionalizing of biocompatible materials with different biomolecules like growth factors to enhance cell attachment. However, an often neglected aspect for efficient modulation of cell-matrix interactions is posed by the mechanical characteristics of such artificial matrices. To address this issue, we fabricated biocompatible hybrid fibers simulating the complex biomechanical characteristics of native ECM in human skin. Subsequently, we analyzed interactions of such fibers with human skin cells focusing on the identification of key fiber characteristics for optimized cell-matrix interactions. We successfully identified the mediating effect of bio-adaptive elasto-plastic stiffness paired with hydrophilic surface properties as key factors for cell attachment and proliferation, thus elucidating the synergistic role of these parameters to induce cellular responses. Co-cultivation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes on such fiber mats representing the specific cells in dermis and epidermis resulted in a hierarchical organization of dermal and epidermal tissue layers. In addition, terminal differentiation of keratinocytes at the air interface was observed. These findings provide valuable new insights into cell behaviour in three-dimensional structures and cell-material interactions which can be used for rational development of bio-inspired functional materials for advanced biomedical applications.

  13. Visualisation of the oscillation dynamics of cytoplasm in a living cell of Physarum mixomycete plasmodium by the method of optical coherence Doppler tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, A. V.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Lauri, J.; Myllylä, Risto

    2009-04-01

    The method of optical coherence Doppler tomography is used for the first time to visualise the oscillatory amoeboid mobility in strands of Physarum polycephalum mixomycete plasmodium and to record periodic radial contractions of the strands and spatiotemporal variations in the velocity of the cytoplasmic flow inside them.

  14. Effect of CNT on collagen fiber structure, stiffness assembly kinetics and stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyoung; Sridharan, Indumathi; Zhu, Bofan; Orgel, Joseph; Wang, Rong

    2015-04-01

    Collagen is a native one-dimensional nanomaterial. Carbon nanotube (CNT) was found to interface with biological materials and show promising applications in creating reinforced scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we examined the unique role of CNT in collagen fiber structure, mechanical strength and assembly kinetics. The results imply that CNT interacts with collagen at the molecular level. It relaxes the helical coil of collagen fibrils and has the effect of flattening the fibers leading to the elongation of D-period, the characteristic banding feature of collagen fibers. The surface charge of oxidized CNT leads to enhanced local ionic strength during collagen fibrillogenesis, accounting for the slower kinetics of collagen-CNT (COL-CNT) fiber assembly and the formation of thicker fibers. Due to the rigidity of CNT, the addition of CNT increases the fiber stiffness significantly. When applied as a matrix for human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) differentiation, COL-CNT was found to support fast and efficient neural differentiation ascribed to the elongated D-period. These results highlight the superiority of CNT to modulate collagen fiber assembly at the molecular level. The study also exemplifies the use of CNT to enhance the functionality of collagen for biological and biomedical applications.

  15. ANK, a host cytoplasmic receptor for the Tobacco mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement protein, facilitates intercellular transport through plasmodesmata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Ueki

    Full Text Available Plasmodesma (PD is a channel structure that spans the cell wall and provides symplastic connection between adjacent cells. Various macromolecules are known to be transported through PD in a highly regulated manner, and plant viruses utilize their movement proteins (MPs to gate the PD to spread cell-to-cell. The mechanism by which MP modifies PD to enable intercelluar traffic remains obscure, due to the lack of knowledge about the host factors that mediate the process. Here, we describe the functional interaction between Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV MP and a plant factor, an ankyrin repeat containing protein (ANK, during the viral cell-to-cell movement. We utilized a reverse genetics approach to gain insight into the possible involvement of ANK in viral movement. To this end, ANK overexpressor and suppressor lines were generated, and the movement of MP was tested. MP movement was facilitated in the ANK-overexpressing plants, and reduced in the ANK-suppressing plants, demonstrating that ANK is a host factor that facilitates MP cell-to-cell movement. Also, the TMV local infection was largely delayed in the ANK-suppressing lines, while enhanced in the ANK-overexpressing lines, showing that ANK is crucially involved in the infection process. Importantly, MP interacted with ANK at PD. Finally, simultaneous expression of MP and ANK markedly decreased the PD levels of callose, β-1,3-glucan, which is known to act as a molecular sphincter for PD. Thus, the MP-ANK interaction results in the downregulation of callose and increased cell-to-cell movement of the viral protein. These findings suggest that ANK represents a host cellular receptor exploited by MP to aid viral movement by gating PD through relaxation of their callose sphincters.

  16. Damage to lens fiber cells causes TRPV4-dependent Src family kinase activation in the epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidullah, M; Mandal, A; Delamere, N A

    2015-11-01

    The bulk of the lens consists of tightly packed fiber cells. Because mature lens fibers lack mitochondria and other organelles, lens homeostasis relies on a monolayer of epithelial cells at the anterior surface. The detection of various signaling pathways in lens epithelial cells suggests they respond to stimuli that influence lens function. Focusing on Src Family Kinases (SFKs) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), we tested whether the epithelium can sense and respond to an event that occurs in fiber mass. The pig lens was subjected to localized freeze-thaw (FT) damage to fibers at posterior pole then the lens was incubated for 1-10 min in Krebs solution at 37 °C. Transient SFK activation in the epithelium was detectable at 1 min. Using a western blot approach, the ion channel TRPV4 was detected in the epithelium but was sparse or absent in fiber cells. Even though TRPV4 expression appears low at the actual site of FT damage to the fibers, SFK activation in the epithelium was suppressed in lenses subjected to FT damage then incubated with the TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 (10 μM). Na,K-ATPase activity was examined because previous studies report changes of Na,K-ATPase activity associated with SFK activation. Na,K-ATPase activity doubled in the epithelium removed from FT-damaged lenses and the response was prevented by HC067047 or the SFK inhibitor PP2 (10 μM). Similar changes were observed in response to fiber damage caused by injection of 5 μl hyperosmotic NaCl or mannitol solution beneath the surface of the posterior pole. The findings point to a TRPV4-dependent mechanism that enables the epithelial cells to detect remote damage in the fiber mass and respond within minutes by activating SFK and increasing Na,K-ATPase activity. Because TRPV4 channels are mechanosensitive, we speculate they may be stimulated by swelling of the lens structure caused by damage to the fibers. Increased Na,K-ATPase activity gives the lens greater capacity to

  17. Modulation of Dendritic-Epithelial Cell Responses against Sphingomonas Paucimobilis by Dietary Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-07-25

    Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli, such as Sphingomonas paucimobilis (S.paucimobilis), are among the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections. Up to now, no definitive guidelines exist for antimicrobial therapy for S. paucimobilis infections. As we have shown that some dietary fibers exhibit pronounced immune-regulatory properties, we hypothesized that specific immune active dietary fibers might modulate the responses against S. paucimobilis. We studied the immunomodulatory effects of dietary fibers against S. paucimobilis on cytokine release and maturation of human dendritic cells (DCs) in co-cultures of DCs and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). S. paucimobilis infection resulted in increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by DCs/IECs; these effects were strongly attenuated by specific dietary fibers. Chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, and both starches had the strongest regulatory effects. IL-12 and TNF-α were drastically diminished upon exposure to chicory inulin and sugar beet pectin, or both starches. High-maize 260, was more effective in the reduction of chemokine release than the others fibers tested. In summary, chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, High-maize 260, and Novelose 330 attenuate S. paucimobilis-induced cytokines. These results demonstrate that dietary fibers with a specific chemical composition can be used to manage immune responses against pathogens such as S. paucimobilis.

  18. Modulation of Dendritic-Epithelial Cell Responses against Sphingomonas Paucimobilis by Dietary Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli, such as Sphingomonas paucimobilis (S.paucimobilis), are among the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections. Up to now, no definitive guidelines exist for antimicrobial therapy for S. paucimobilis infections. As we have shown that some dietary fibers exhibit pronounced immune-regulatory properties, we hypothesized that specific immune active dietary fibers might modulate the responses against S. paucimobilis. We studied the immunomodulatory effects of dietary fibers against S. paucimobilis on cytokine release and maturation of human dendritic cells (DCs) in co-cultures of DCs and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). S. paucimobilis infection resulted in increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by DCs/IECs; these effects were strongly attenuated by specific dietary fibers. Chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, and both starches had the strongest regulatory effects. IL-12 and TNF-α were drastically diminished upon exposure to chicory inulin and sugar beet pectin, or both starches. High-maize 260, was more effective in the reduction of chemokine release than the others fibers tested. In summary, chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, High-maize 260, and Novelose 330 attenuate S. paucimobilis-induced cytokines. These results demonstrate that dietary fibers with a specific chemical composition can be used to manage immune responses against pathogens such as S. paucimobilis. PMID:27452116

  19. Ectopic bone formation in rat marrow stromal cell/titanium fiber mesh scaffold constructs: effect of initial cell phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtorf, H.L.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Titanium fiber mesh scaffolds have been shown to be a suitable material for culture of primary marrow stromal cells in an effort to create tissue engineered constructs for bone tissue replacement. In native bone tissue, these cells are known to attach to extracellular matrix molecules via integrin r

  20. Unique and analogous functions of aquaporin O for fiber cell architecture and ocular lens transparency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, S.S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Mathias, R. T.; Varadaraj, K.

    2011-09-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) 1 and AQP0 water channels are expressed in lens epithelial and fiber cells, respectively, facilitating fluid circulation for nourishing the avascular lens to maintain transparency. Even though AQP0 water permeability is 40-fold less than AQP1, AQP0 is selectively expressed in the fibers. Delimited AQP0 fiber expression is attributed to a unique structural role as an adhesion protein. To validate this notion, we determined if wild type (WT) lens ultrastructure and fibercell adhesion are different in AQP0{sup -/-}, and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} mice that transgenically express AQP1 (TgAQP1) in fibercells without AQP0 (AQP0{sup -/-}). In WT, lenses were transparent with 'Y' sutures. Fibers contained opposite end curvature, lateral interdigitations, hexagonal shape, and were arranged as concentric growth shells. AQP0{sup -/-}lenses were cataractous, lacked 'Y' sutures, ordered packing and well-defined lateral interdigitations. TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} lenses showed improvement in transparency and lateral interdigitations in the outer cortex while inner cortex and nuclear fibers were severely disintegrated. Transmission electron micrographs exhibited tightly packed fibercells in WT whereas AQP0{sup -/-} and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-}lenses had wide extracellular spaces. Fibers were easily separable by teasing in AQP0{sup -/-} and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-}lenses compared to WT. Our data suggest that the increased water permeability through AQP1 does not compensate for loss of AQP0 expression in TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} mice. Fibercell AQP0 expression is required to maintain their organization, which is a requisite for lenstransparency. AQP0 appears necessary for cell-to-cell adhesion and thereby to minimize light scattering since in the AQP0{sup -/-} and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} lenses, fiber cell disorganization was evident.

  1. Modulation, plasticity and pathophysiology of the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriola Hoxha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse represents the point of maximal signal divergence in the cerebellar cortex with an estimated number of about 60 billion synaptic contacts in the rat and 100,000 billions in humans. At the same time, the Purkinje cell dendritic tree is a site of remarkable convergence of more than 100,000 parallel fiber synapses. Parallel fibers activity generates fast postsynaptic currents via AMPA receptors, and slower signals, mediated by mGlu1 receptors, resulting in Purkinje cell depolarization accompanied by sharp calcium elevation within dendritic regions. Long-term depression and long-term potentiation have been widely described for the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse and have been proposed as mechanisms for motor learning. The mechanisms of induction for LTP and LTD involve different signaling mechanisms within the presynaptic terminal and/or at the postsynaptic site, promoting enduring modification in the neurotransmitter release and change in responsiveness to the neurotransmitter. The parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse is finely modulated by several neurotransmitters, including serotonin, noradrenaline, and acetylcholine. The ability of these neuromodulators to gate LTP and LTD at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse could, at least in part, explain their effect on cerebellar-dependent learning and memory paradigms. Overall, these findings have important implications for understanding the cerebellar involvement in a series of pathological conditions, ranging from ataxia to autism. For example, parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse dysfunctions have been identified in several murine models of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA types 1, 3, 5 and 27. In some cases, the defect is specific for the AMPA receptor signaling (SCA27, while in others the mGlu1 pathway is affected (SCA1, 3, 5. Interestingly, the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse has been shown to be hyper-functional in a mutant mouse model of autism

  2. Cell flow analysis with a two-photon fluorescence fiber probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ye, Jing Yong; Thomas, Thommey P.; Baker, James R., Jr.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2010-11-01

    We report the use of a sensitive double-clad fiber (DCF) probe for in situ cell flow velocity measurements and cell analysis by means of two-photon excited fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). We have demonstrated the feasibility to use this fiber probe for in vivo two-photon flow cytometry previously. However, because of the viscosity of blood and the non-uniform flow nature in vivo, it is problematic to use the detected cell numbers to estimate the sampled blood volume. To precisely calibrate the sampled blood volume, it is necessary to conduct real time flow velocity measurement. We propose to use FCS technique to measure the flow velocity. The ability to measure the flow velocities of labeled cells in whole blood has been demonstrated. Our two-photon fluorescence fiber probe has the ability to monitor multiple fluorescent biomarkers simultaneously. We demonstrate that we can distinguish differently labeled cells by their distinct features on the correlation curves. The ability to conduct in situ cell flow analysis using the fiber probe may be useful in disease diagnosis or further comprehension of the circulation system.

  3. Sugar-fiber Imprinting to Generate Microgrooves on Polymeric Film Surfaces for Contact Guidance of Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈泽华; 丁建东

    2012-01-01

    Anisotropic surface topography is known to induce the contact guidance of cells, and facile and biocompatible approaches of the physical modification of the pertinent matrix surfaces are thus meaningful for biomaterials. Herein, we put forward a sugar-fiber imprinting technique to generate microgrooves on hydrophobic polymers demonstrated by the poly(lactic-eo-glycolic acid) (PLGA) films. Microgrooves were conveniently generated after removing sugar fibers simply by water. The resulting locally anisotropic microgrooves were confirmed to elongate the cells cultured on the surface.

  4. The Capsicum annuum class IV chitinase ChitIV interacts with receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase PIK1 to accelerate PIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase, CaPIK1, which mediates signalling of plant cell death and defence responses was previously identified. Here, the identification of a class IV chitinase, CaChitIV, from pepper plants (Capsicum annuum), which interacts with CaPIK1 and promotes CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses, is reported. CaChitIV contains a signal peptide, chitin-binding domain, and glycol hydrolase domain. CaChitIV expression was up-regulated by Xanthomona...

  5. Microfluidic cell counter with embedded optical fibers fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation and anodic bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Dawn; Gibson, Emily A; Salim, Evan A; Palmer, Amy E; Jimenez, Ralph; Squier, Jeff

    2009-04-13

    A simple fabrication technique to create all silicon/glass microfluidic devices is demonstrated using femtosecond laser ablation and anodic bonding. In a first application, we constructed a cell counting device based on small angle light scattering. The counter featured embedded optical fibers for multiangle excitation and detection of scattered light and/or fluorescence. The performance of the microfluidic cell counter was benchmarked against a commercial fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

  6. Subunit organization in cytoplasmic dynein subcomplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen J.; Bonilla, Myriam; Rodgers, Michael E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    2002-01-01

    Because cytoplasmic dynein plays numerous critical roles in eukaryotic cells, determining the subunit composition and the organization and functions of the subunits within dynein are important goals. This has been difficult partly because of accessory polypeptide heterogeneity of dynein populations. The motor domain containing heavy chains of cytoplasmic dynein are associated with multiple intermediate, light intermediate, and light chain accessory polypeptides. We examined the organization of these subunits within cytoplasmic dynein by separating the molecule into two distinct subcomplexes. These subcomplexes were competent to reassemble into a molecule with dynein-like properties. One subcomplex was composed of the dynein heavy and light intermediate chains whereas the other subcomplex was composed of the intermediate and light chains. The intermediate and light chain subcomplex could be further separated into two pools, only one of which contained dynein light chains. The two pools had distinct intermediate chain compositions, suggesting that intermediate chain isoforms have different light chain–binding properties. When the two intermediate chain pools were characterized by analytical velocity sedimentation, at least four molecular components were seen: intermediate chain monomers, intermediate chain dimers, intermediate chain monomers with bound light chains, and a mixture of intermediate chain dimers with assorted bound light chains. These data provide new insights into the compositional heterogeneity and assembly of the cytoplasmic dynein complex and suggest that individual dynein molecules have distinct molecular compositions in vivo. PMID:11967380

  7. Dual membrane hollow fiber fuel cell and method of operating same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, J. D.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A gaseous fuel cell is described which includes a pair of electrodes formed by open-ended, ion-exchange hollow fibers, each having a layer of metal catalyst deposited on the inner surface and large surface area current collectors such as braided metal mesh in contact with the metal catalyst layer. A fuel cell results when the electrodes are immersed in electrolytes and electrically connected. As hydrogen and oxygen flow through the bore of the fibers, oxidation and reduction reactions develop an electrical potential. Since the hollow fiber configuration provides large electrode area per unit volume and intimate contact between fuel and oxidizer at the interface, and due to the low internal resistance of the electrolyte, high power densities can be obtained.

  8. Somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and fibers in the medulla oblongata et spinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forssmann, W G; Burnweit, C; Shehab, T; Triepel, J

    1979-10-01

    Complete serial sectioning of the medulla oblongata in monkey, cat, guinea pig, and japanese dancing mouse and incubation for somatostatin-immunoreaction was carried out. Numerous regions of the medulla oblongata such as the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, nucleus cuneatus et gracillis, nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus tractus solitarius, nucleus vestibularis, and parts of the oliva contain dense networks of somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve fibers. Cell bodies were seen in the nucleus reticularis medullae oblongatae. In the spinal cord the sections from each segment were analyzed, showing the highest concentrations of somatostatinergic fibers in the substantia gelantinosa of the columna dorsalis. Cell bodies were seen in the zona intermedia centralis, especially in the upper cervical segments. Many positive fibers were also seen in the entire zona intermedia and the columna ventralis. Especially prominent was the immunoreactivity in the zona intermediolateralis of the thoracic segments and the columna ventralis of the lower lumbar and sacral segments.

  9. Dietary fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma: evidence from a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tian-bao; Ding, Pei-pei; Chen, Jian-feng; Yan, Yang; Zhang, Long; Liu, Huan; Liu, Peng-cheng; Che, Jian-ping; Zheng, Jun-hua; Yao, Xu-dong

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible relationships between dietary fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched to find eligible studies. Random-effects relative risk (RR) and its corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) were used. Besides, random-effects dose-response analyses were also performed to clarify the dose-response relations. Finally, publication bias was assessed by Egger's test and Begg's test. All p values were two tailed. Seven studies, including two cohort studies and five case-control studies, were eligible and included in this meta-analysis. Overall analysis in highest versus lowest level revealed that total dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced RCC risk (RR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.74-0.96). In addition, pooled estimated data showed that risk of RCC was significantly associated with vegetable and legume fiber intake (RR 0.70, RR 0.80, respectively), but not with fruit and cereal fiber intake (RR 0.92, RR 1.04, respectively). However, in dose-response analysis, no significant association was reported. Finally, no publication bias was detected by Egger's or Begg's test. The dietary fiber intake, especially vegetable and legume fiber, may be associated with reduced RCC risk. Considering the limitations of the included studies, more well-designed prospective studies will be needed to confirm our findings.

  10. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  11. Air-bubbling, hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, K; Sode, K; Karube, I

    1990-05-01

    Continuous asymmetric reduction of dyhydrooxoisophorone (DOIP) to 4-hydroxy-2,2,6-trimethylcyclo-hexanone (4-HTMCH) was achieved by a thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NK86-0151. Three reactors were used: an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration, an air-lift reactor, and a CSTR with PAA immobilized cells. The maximum cell concentration of 11.1 g dry wt L(-1) was obtained in an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor, while in the other reactors the cell densities were between 3.5 and 4.1 g dry wt L(-1) The optimum bleed ratio was 0.1 at the dilution rate 0.3 h(-1) in the hollow-fiber reactor. The highest viable cell concentration was maintained in the dilution range of 0.4-0.7 h(-1) by a combination of proper cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration. The maximum volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH reached 826 mg L(-1) h(-1) at the dilution rate 0.54 h(-1). This value was 4 and 2 times higher than those in the air-lift reactor and CSTR, respectively. The increasing viable cell concentration increased the volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH. A cell free product solution was continuously obtained by cross-flow filtration.

  12. Cellulose acetate fibers covered by CdS nanoparticles for hybrid solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina, Hugo; Martinez-Alonso, Claudia [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Priv. Xochicalco S/N, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Castillo-Ortega, Monica [Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Hu, Hailin, E-mail: hzh@cie.unam.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Priv. Xochicalco S/N, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico)

    2012-09-20

    In this work cellulose acetate (CA) fibers with a diameter of approximately 1 {mu}m were immersed in a cadmium sulfide (CdS) precursor solution. After 3 h the original white color CA fibers became yellow and maintained the same form, suggesting the deposition of CdS on fiber surface. SEM images showed that CA fibers were covered by uniformly sized CdS nanoparticles of approximately 100 nm. XRD and optical absorption spectra indicated that they contained mostly cubic crystalline phase with the optical band gap of 2.43 eV. CdS coated CA fibers, called CdS(CA) fibers, were dispersed in a polar dispersant (dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO) and then mixed with a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) solution in a non-polar solvent (dichlorobenzene, DCB). The mixture was cast onto a transparent conductive glass substrate (Indium-Tin-Oxide, ITO), and after solvent evaporation a thin layer of CdS(CA)-P3HT composite was formed. It is observed that the volume relation between the polar dispersant and non-polar solvent influences the solubility of the P3HT product in the composite coating and the photovoltaic performance of the corresponding cell as well. The mass ratio between CdS(CA) fibers and P3HT in the composite layer affects the optical absorption of the composite. The best photovoltaic performance was obtained in CdS(CA)-P3HT based cells with a volume relation between DCB and DMSO of 3.5-1, a mass ratio between CdS(CA) and P3HT of 1:1, and a rapid drying process for composite coatings.

  13. Long Life Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Cells: Fiber Substrates Nickel Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Howard H.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of nickel fiber mat electrodes were investigated over a wide range of fiber diameters, electrode thickness, porosity and active material loading levels. Thickness' were 0.040, 0.060 and 0.080 inches for the plaque: fiber diameters were primarily 2, 4, and 8 micron and porosity was 85, 90, and 95%. Capacities of 3.5 in. diameter electrodes were determined in the flooded condition with both 26 and 31% potassium hydroxide solution. These capacity tests indicated that the highest capacities per unit weight were obtained at the 90% porosity level with a 4 micron diameter fiber plaque. It appeared that the thinner electrodes had somewhat better performance, consistent with sintered electrode history. Limited testing with two-positive-electrode boiler plate cells was also carried out. Considerable difficulty with constructing the cells was encountered with short circuits the major problem. Nevertheless, four cells were tested. The cell with 95% porosity electrodes failed during conditioning cycling due to high voltage during charge. Discharge showed that this cell had lost nearly all of its capacity. The other three cells after 20 conditioning cycles showed capacities consistent with the flooded capacities of the electrodes. Positive electrodes made from fiber substrates may well show a weight advantage of standard sintered electrodes, but need considerably more work to prove this statement. A major problem to be investigated is the lower strength of the substrate compared to standard sintered electrodes. Problems with welding of leads were significant and implications that the electrodes would expand more than sintered electrodes need to be investigated. Loading levels were lower than had been expected based on sintered electrode experiences and the lower loading led to lower capacity values. However, lower loading causes less expansion and contraction during cycling so that stress on the substrate is reduced.

  14. Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cytoplasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farooq Rashid; Abdullah Shah; Ge Shan

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) transcribed from eukaryotic genome are important regulators in different aspects of cellular events. Cytoplasm is the residence and the site of action for many lncRNAs. The cytoplasmic lncRNAs play indispensable roles with multiple molecular mechanisms in animal and human cells. In this review, we mainly talk about functions and the underlying mechanisms of lncRNAs in the cytoplasm. We highlight relatively well-studied examples of cytoplasmic lncRNAs for their roles in modulating mRNA stability, regulating mRNA translation, serving as competing endogenous RNAs, functioning as precursors of microRNAs, and mediating protein modifications. We also elaborate the perspectives of cytoplasmic lncRNA studies.

  15. Cytoplasmic streaming velocity as a plant size determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Motoki; Kimura, Atsushi; Yokota, Etsuo; Haraguchi, Takeshi; Shimmen, Teruo; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Nakano, Akihiko; Ito, Kohji

    2013-11-11

    Cytoplasmic streaming is active transport widely occurring in plant cells ranging from algae to angiosperms. Although it has been revealed that cytoplasmic streaming is generated by organelle-associated myosin XI moving along actin bundles, the fundamental function in plants remains unclear. We generated high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI by replacing the motor domains of Arabidopsis thaliana myosin XI-2 with those of Chara corallina myosin XI and Homo sapiens myosin Vb, respectively. Surprisingly, the plant sizes of the transgenic Arabidopsis expressing high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI-2 were larger and smaller, respectively, than that of the wild-type plant. This size change correlated with acceleration and deceleration, respectively, of cytoplasmic streaming. Our results strongly suggest that cytoplasmic streaming is a key determinant of plant size. Furthermore, because cytoplasmic streaming is a common system for intracellular transport in plants, our system could have applications in artificial size control in plants.

  16. Evaluation of various seeding techniques for culturing osteogenic cells on titanium fiber mesh.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolder, J. van den; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to learn more about the effect of seeding and loading techniques on the osteogenic differentiation in vitro of rat bone marrow cells into titanium fiber mesh. This material was used as received or subjected to glow discharge treatment (RFGD). The seeding

  17. Evaluation of various seeding techniques for culturing osteogenic cells on titanium fiber mesh.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolder, J. van den; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to learn more about the effect of seeding and loading techniques on the osteogenic differentiation in vitro of rat bone marrow cells into titanium fiber mesh. This material was used as received or subjected to glow discharge treatment (RFGD). The seeding method

  18. Influence of rhBMP-2 on rat bone marrow stromal cells cultured on titanium fiber mesh.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, J.W.M.; Ruijter, J.E. de; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) fiber mesh is a candidate scaffold material for the creation of bone graft substitutes (BGS). Two densities (3.54 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) [LD or low density] and 3.54 x 10(5) cells/cm(2) [HD or high density]) of rat bone marrow stromal cells were seeded on Ti-fiber mesh discs. Cells were c

  19. Distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the monkey temporal lobe: the hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, A; Amaral, D G

    1993-05-01

    The distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the various fields of the hippocampal formation was studied in the macaque monkey. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons had aspiny or sparsely spiny dendrites that often had a beaded appearance; most resembled classically identified interneurons. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive fibers and terminals were confined to certain laminae in each field and generally had a pericellular distribution. In the dentate gyrus, there was a dense pericellular plexus of immunoreactive terminals in the granule cell layer. Except for a narrow supragranular zone, there was a marked paucity of terminals in the molecular and polymorphic cell layers. Immunoreactive neurons were mainly located immediately subjacent to the granule cell layer and comprised a variety of morphological cell types. The three fields of the hippocampus proper (CA3, CA2, and CA1) demonstrated differences in their parvalbumin staining characteristics. In CA3, there was a prominent pericellular terminal plexus in the pyramidal cell layer that was densest distally (closer to CA2). Immunoreactive cells were located either in the pyramidal cell layer, where many had a pyramidal shape and prominent apical and basal dendrites, or in stratum oriens. CA2 had a staining pattern similar to that in CA3, though both the number of labeled cells and the density of the pericellular terminal plexus were greater in CA2. In CA1, there was a markedly lower number of parvalbumin-labeled cells than in CA3 and CA2 and the cells tended to be located in the deep part of the pyramidal cell layer or in stratum oriens. The pyramidal cell layer of CA1 contained a pericellular terminal plexus that was substantially less dense than in CA3 and CA2. At the border between CA1 and the subiculum there was a marked increase in the number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The positive cells were scattered throughout the pyramidal cell layer of the subiculum and comprised a variety of

  20. Cells that emerge from embryonic explants produce fibers of type IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J M; Little, C D

    1985-10-01

    Double immunofluorescence staining experiments designed to examine the synthesis and deposition of collagen types I and IV in cultured explants of embryonic mouse lung revealed the presence of connective tissue-like fibers that were immunoreactive with anti-type IV collagen antibodies. This observation is contrary to the widely accepted belief that type IV collagen is found only in sheet-like arrangements beneath epithelia or as a sheath-like layer enveloping bundles of nerve or muscle cells. The extracellular matrix produced by cells that migrate from embryonic mouse lung rudiments in vitro was examined by double indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Affinity-purified monospecific polyclonal antibodies were used to examine cells after growth on glass or native collagen substrata. The data show that embryonic mesenchymal cells can produce organized fibers of type IV collagen that are not contained within a basement membrane, and that embryonic epithelial cells deposit fibers and strands of type IV collagen beneath their basal surface when grown on glass; however, when grown on a rat tail collagen substratum the epithelial cells produce a fine meshwork. To our knowledge this work represents the first report that type IV collagen can be organized by cells into a fibrous extracellular matrix that is not a basement membrane.

  1. Expression of a cotton profilin gene GhPFN1 is associated with fiber cell elongation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Profilin is an important actin-binding protein involved in regulating the organization of actin filaments. A cotton profilin gene (GhPFN1) that shares 71% identity to profilin1 of Arabidopsis in its amino acid sequence was isolated. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that GhPFN1 was expressed preferentially in the developing cotton fibers and reached the highest level at the fast elongation stage. The function of GhPFN1 in vivo was analyzed using the S. pombe system, and results suggested that GhPFN1 plays a role in fiber cell elongation.

  2. Cytoplasmic tail of coronavirus spike protein has intracellular targeting signals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JIBIN SADASIVAN; MANMEET SINGH; JAYASRI DAS SARMA

    2017-06-01

    Intracellular trafficking and localization studies of spike protein from SARS and OC43 showed that SARS spikeprotein is localized in the ER or ERGIC compartment and OC43 spike protein is predominantly localized in thelysosome. Differential localization can be explained by signal sequence. The sequence alignment using Clustal Wshows that the signal sequence present at the cytoplasmic tail plays an important role in spike protein localization. Aunique GYQEL motif is identified at the cytoplasmic terminal of OC43 spike protein which helps in localization in thelysosome, and a novel KLHYT motif is identified in the cytoplasmic tail of SARS spike protein which helps in ER orERGIC localization. This study sheds some light on the role of cytoplasmic tail of spike protein in cell-to-cell fusion,coronavirus host cell fusion and subsequent pathogenicity.

  3. Simulated colon fiber metabolome regulates genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, and energy metabolism in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, Heli; Mäkivuokko, Harri; Tiihonen, Kirsti; Rautonen, Nina

    2011-11-01

    High level of dietary fiber has been epidemiologically linked to protection against the risk for developing colon cancer. The mechanisms of this protection are not clear. Fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon results in production of for example butyrate that has drawn attention as a chemopreventive agent. Polydextrose, a soluble fiber that is only partially fermented in colon, was fermented in an in vitro colon simulator, in which the conditions mimic the human proximal, ascending, transverse, and distal colon in sequence. The subsequent fermentation metabolomes were applied on colon cancer cells, and the gene expression changes studied. Polydextrose fermentation down-regulated gene ontology classes linked with cell cycle, and affected number of metabolically active cells. Furthermore, up-regulated effects on classes linked with apoptosis, with increased caspase 2 and 3 activity, implicate that polydextrose fermentation plays a role in induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells. The up-regulated genes involved also key regulators of lipid metabolism, such as PPARα and PGC-1α. These results offer hypotheses for the mechanisms of two health benefits linked with consumption of dietary fiber, reducing risk of development of colon cancer, and dyslipidemia.

  4. Hirschsprung's disease: Is there a relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Kumar Yadav; Kiran Mishra; Anup Mohta; Sarla Agarwal

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To define the topography of mast cells and their numbers in cases of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) and non-HD, assess neural hypertrophy using imaging software and to study the relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers. METHODS:HE stained sections of 32 cases of chronic constipation in the age group of 0-14 years were reviewed for ganglion cells. AChE staining was performed on frozen sections of colonic and rectal biopsies. Based on their findings cases were divided into HD and non-HD and mast cells stained by toluidine blue were evaluated. Image analysis by computerized software was applied to S-100 stained sections for assessment of neural hypertrophy. RESULTS:Difference between number of mast cells in HD group (mean = 36.44) and in non-HD group (mean = 14.79) was statistically significant. Image analysis morphometry on S-100 stained sections served as a useful adjunct. The difference between number, size, and perimeter of the nerve fibers between HD and non-HD group was statistically significant. CONCLUSION:Mast cells are significantly increased in HD and their base line values are much higher in Indian children than that reported in Western literature. Their role in HD needs further research. Morphometry of S-100 stained nerve fibers is a useful adjunct to conventional methods for diagnosis of HD.

  5. Evaluating Kinetic Composing of Cell Wall for Low-Fiber Mutation Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Heng-sheng; CHEN Jun-chen; ZENG Da-li; TU Jie-feng; TANG Bao-sha; TENG Sheng

    2004-01-01

    The work compared the differences of low fiber mutation rice (LF, Nendao) that selectedthrough gamma-ray (γ) with parental variety Shuangkezao (CK) on their biologicaldevelopment and cell wall composing after rice heading stage. Comparing with parentalrice, LF rice revealed an advantage on its vegetative growing by increasing the yieldsof leave blade, leave sheath and stem for 27.77, 30.19 and 37.96% respectively. And thecellulose content of LF rice straw was decreased remarkably for 23.9%, the hemicellulose,lignin and biogenic silicon contents were increased contrarily for 11.94, 8.79 and 5.60%respectively. Moreover, the crude protein content was increased by 20.71% for LF rice andwith an improvement on its solubility for 63.49% concomitantly. The results indicatedthat the Iow-fiber mutation rice exhibited its potential as a fodder-rice variety or asdual-purpose rice to improve fiber degradability of straw.

  6. Optical fiber-based core-shell coaxially structured hybrid cells for self-powered nanosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Caofeng; Zhu, Guang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Guo, Wenxi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Dong, Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); School of Materials Science and Enginnering, Zhenzhou University, Zhenghou 450001 (China); Wang, Zhong Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-03

    An optical fiber-based 3D hybrid cell consisting of a coaxially structured dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and a nanogenerator (NG) for simultaneously or independently harvesting solar and mechanical energy is demonstrated. The current output of the hybrid cell is dominated by the DSSC, and the voltage output is dominated by the NG; these can be utilized complementarily for different applications. The output of the hybrid cell is about 7.65 {mu}A current and 3.3 V voltage, which is strong enough to power nanodevices and even commercial electronic components. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. The development of a potassium-sulfide glass fiber cell and studies on impurities in alkali metal-sulfur cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, F. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Potassium sulfur rechargeable cells, having as the electrolyte the thin walls of hollow glass fibers made from permeable glass, were developed. The cells had short lives, probably due to the construction materials and impurities in the potassium. The effect of the impurities in the analogous NA-S system was studied. Calcium, potassium, and NaOH/oxide impurities caused increased resistance or corrosion of the glass fibers. For long lived cell operation, the Na must contain less than 1 ppm Ca and less than a few ppm of hydroxide/oxide. Up to 150 ppm K can be tolerated. After purification of the Na anolyte, cell lifetimes in excess of 1000 deep charge-discharge cycles or over 8 months on continuous cycling at 10-30 percent depth of discharge were obtained.

  8. Cytoplasmic localized infected cell protein 0 (bICP0) encoded by bovine herpesvirus 1 inhibits beta interferon promoter activity and reduces IRF3 (interferon response factor 3) protein levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Leticia Frizzo; Gaudreault, Natasha; Jones, Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), an alpha-herpesvirinae subfamily member, establishes a life-long latent infection in sensory neurons. Periodically, BHV-1 reactivates from latency, infectious virus is spread, and consequently virus transmission occurs. BHV-1 acute infection causes upper respiratory track infections and conjunctivitis in infected cattle. As a result of transient immunesuppression, BHV-1 infections can also lead to life-threatening secondary bacterial pneumonia that is referred to as bovine respiratory disease. The infected cell protein 0 (bICP0) encoded by BHV-1 reduces human beta-interferon (IFN-β) promoter activity, in part, by inducing degradation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) and interacting with IRF7. In contrast to humans, cattle contain three IFN-β genes. All three bovine IFN-β proteins have anti-viral activity: but each IFN-β gene has a distinct transcriptional promoter. We have recently cloned and characterized the three bovine IFN-β promoters. Relative to the human IFN-β promoter, each of the three IFN-β promoters contain differences in the four positive regulatory domains that are required for virus-induced activity. In this study, we demonstrate that bICP0 effectively inhibits bovine IFN-β promoter activity following transfection of low passage bovine cells with interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) or IRF7. A bICP0 mutant that localizes to the cytoplasm inhibits bovine IFN-β promoter activity as efficiently as wt bICP0. The cytoplasmic localized bICP0 protein also induced IRF3 degradation with similar efficiency as wt bICP0. In summary, these studies suggested that cytoplasmic localized bICP0 plays a role in inhibiting the IFN-β response during productive infection. PMID:21689696

  9. GABAergic cells are the major postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acsády, L; Kamondi, A; Sík, A; Freund, T; Buzsáki, G

    1998-05-01

    Dentate granule cells communicate with their postsynaptic targets by three distinct terminal types. These include the large mossy terminals, filopodial extensions of the mossy terminals, and smaller en passant synaptic varicosities. We examined the postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers by combining in vivo intracellular labeling of granule cells, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy. Single granule cells formed large, complex "mossy" synapses on 11-15 CA3 pyramidal cells and 7-12 hilar mossy cells. In contrast, GABAergic interneurons, identified with immunostaining for substance P-receptor, parvalbumin, and mGluR1a-receptor, were selectively innervated by very thin (filopodial) extensions of the mossy terminals and by small en passant boutons in both the hilar and CA3 regions. These terminals formed single, often perforated, asymmetric synapses on the cell bodies, dendrites, and spines of GABAergic interneurons. The number of filopodial extensions and small terminals was 10 times larger than the number of mossy terminals. These findings show that in contrast to cortical pyramidal neurons, (1) granule cells developed distinct types of terminals to affect interneurons and pyramidal cells and (2) they innervated more inhibitory than excitatory cells. These findings may explain the physiological observations that increased activity of granule cells suppresses the overall excitability of the CA3 recurrent system and may form the structural basis of the target-dependent regulation of glutamate release in the mossy fiber system.

  10. Note: Compact optical fiber coupler for diamond anvil high pressure cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, E.

    2013-10-01

    A compact optical fiber coupler has been developed to allow transmission of light through an optical fiber to and from the high pressure region of a diamond anvil high pressure cell. Despite its small size the coupler has focusing adjustments and optics, which allows the light to be focused precisely on the sample within the pressure cell. The coupler is suitable for a wide range of optical measurements and particularly for high pressure measurements at low temperatures in cryostats with no optical windows. The use of the coupler to determine the pressure in a diamond anvil cell at 1.2 K using the ruby fluorescence spectra of ruby is demonstrated. The small size of the coupler and its construction out of nonmagnetic beryllium copper makes it suitable for use in high magnetic fields and for magnetization experiments.

  11. Three-dimensional fiber deposition of cell-laden, viable, patterned constructs for bone tissue printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; De Wijn, Joost R; Verbout, Abraham J; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2008-01-01

    Organ or tissue printing, a novel approach in tissue engineering, creates layered, cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with a defined three-dimensional (3D) structure and organized cell placement. In applying the concept of tissue printing for the development of vascularized bone grafts, the primary focus lies on combining endothelial progenitors and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Here we characterize the applicability of 3D fiber deposition with a plotting device, Bioplotter, for the fabrication of spatially organized, cell-laden hydrogel constructs. The viability of printed BMSCs was studied in time, in several hydrogels, and extruded from different needle diameters. Our findings indicate that cells survive the extrusion and that their subsequent viability was not different from that of unprinted cells. The applied extrusion conditions did not affect cell survival, and BMSCs could subsequently differentiate along the osteoblast lineage. Furthermore, we were able to combine two distinct cell populations within a single scaffold by exchanging the printing syringe during deposition, indicating that this 3D fiber deposition system is suited for the development of bone grafts containing multiple cell types.

  12. Secondary cell wall development in cotton fibers as examined with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering were examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. The selected harvesting points coincide with secondary cell wall (SCW) development in the fibers. Progressive but moderat...

  13. Persistent posttetanic depression at cerebellar parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Bergerot

    Full Text Available Plasticity at the cerebellar parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapse may underlie information processing and motor learning. In vivo, parallel fibers appear to fire in short high frequency bursts likely to activate sparsely distributed synapses over the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. Here, we report that short parallel fiber tetanic stimulation evokes a ∼7-15% depression which develops over 2 min and lasts for at least 20 min. In contrast to the concomitantly evoked short-term endocannabinoid-mediated depression, this persistent posttetanic depression (PTD does not exhibit a dependency on the spatial pattern of synapse activation and is not caused by any detectable change in presynaptic calcium signaling. This persistent PTD is however associated with increased paired-pulse facilitation and coefficient of variation of synaptic responses, suggesting that its expression is presynaptic. The chelation of postsynaptic calcium prevents its induction, suggesting that post- to presynaptic (retrograde signaling is required. We rule out endocannabinoid signaling since the inhibition of type 1 cannabinoid receptors, monoacylglycerol lipase or vanilloid receptor 1, or incubation with anandamide had no detectable effect. The persistent PTD is maximal in pre-adolescent mice, abolished by adrenergic and dopaminergic receptors block, but unaffected by adrenergic and dopaminergic agonists. Our data unveils a novel form of plasticity at parallel fiber synapses: a persistent PTD induced by physiologically relevant input patterns, age-dependent, and strongly modulated by the monoaminergic system. We further provide evidence supporting that the plasticity mechanism involves retrograde signaling and presynaptic diacylglycerol.

  14. Identification and characterization of plasma membrane aquaporins isolated from fiber cells of Calotropis procera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Usman ASLAM; Asia KHATOON; Hafiza Masooma Naseer CHEEMA; Aftab BASHIR

    2013-01-01

    Calotropis procera,commonly known as "milkweed",possesses long seed trichomes for seed dispersal and has the ability to survive under harsh conditions such as drought and salinity.Aquaporins are water channel proteins expressed in all land plants,divided into five subfamilies plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs),tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs),NOD26-1ike proteins (NIPs),small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs),and the unfamiliar X intrinsic proteins (XlPs).PIPs constitute the largest group of water channel proteins that are involved in different developmental and regulatory mechanisms including water permeability,cell elongation,and stomata opening.Aquaporins are also involved in abiotic stress tolerance and cell expansion mechanisms,but their role in seed trichomes (fiber cells) has never been investigated.A large number of clones isolated from C.procera fiber cDNA library showed sequence homology to PIPs.Both expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies revealed that the transcript abundance of this gene family in fiber cells of C.procera is greater than that of cotton.Full-length cDNAs of CpPIP1 and CpPIP2 were isolated from C.procera fiber cDNA library and used for constructing plant expression vectors under constitutive (2x35S) and trichome-specific (GhLTP3) promoters.Transgenic tobacco plants were developed via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.The phenotypic characteristics of the plants were observed after confirming the integration of transgene in plants.It was observed that CpPIP2 expression cassette under 2x35S and GhLTP3 promoter enhanced the numbers of stem and leave trichomes.However,2x35S::CpPIP2 has a more amplified effect on trichome density and length than GhLTP3::CpPIP2 and other PIP constructs.These findings imply the role of C.procera PIP aquaporins in fiber cell elongation.The PIPs-derived cell expansion mechanism may be exploited through transgenic approaches for improvement of fiber staple

  15. Identification and characterization of plasma membrane aquaporins isolated from fiber cells of Calotropis procera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Usman; Khatoon, Asia; Cheema, Hafiza Masooma Naseer; Bashir, Aftab

    2013-07-01

    Calotropis procera, commonly known as "milkweed", possesses long seed trichomes for seed dispersal and has the ability to survive under harsh conditions such as drought and salinity. Aquaporins are water channel proteins expressed in all land plants, divided into five subfamilies plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), NOD26-like proteins (NIPs), small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs), and the unfamiliar X intrinsic proteins (XIPs). PIPs constitute the largest group of water channel proteins that are involved in different developmental and regulatory mechanisms including water permeability, cell elongation, and stomata opening. Aquaporins are also involved in abiotic stress tolerance and cell expansion mechanisms, but their role in seed trichomes (fiber cells) has never been investigated. A large number of clones isolated from C. procera fiber cDNA library showed sequence homology to PIPs. Both expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies revealed that the transcript abundance of this gene family in fiber cells of C. procera is greater than that of cotton. Full-length cDNAs of CpPIP1 and CpPIP2 were isolated from C. procera fiber cDNA library and used for constructing plant expression vectors under constitutive (2×35S) and trichome-specific (GhLTP3) promoters. Transgenic tobacco plants were developed via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The phenotypic characteristics of the plants were observed after confirming the integration of transgene in plants. It was observed that CpPIP2 expression cassette under 2×35S and GhLTP3 promoter enhanced the numbers of stem and leave trichomes. However, 2×35S::CpPIP2 has a more amplified effect on trichome density and length than GhLTP3::CpPIP2 and other PIP constructs. These findings imply the role of C. procera PIP aquaporins in fiber cell elongation. The PIPs-derived cell expansion mechanism may be exploited through transgenic approaches for

  16. Human amniotic epithelial cells express specific markers of nerve cells and migrate along the nerve fibers in the corpus callosum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyuan Wu; Guozhen Hui; Yi Lu; Tianjin Liu; Qin Huang; Lihe Guo

    2012-01-01

    Human amniotic epithelial cells were isolated from a piece of fresh amnion. Using immunocytochemical methods, we investigated the expression of neuronal phenotypes (microtubule-associated protein-2, glial fibrillary acidic protein and nestin) in human amniotic epithelial cells. The conditioned medium of human amniotic epithelial cells promoted the growth and proliferation of rat glial cells cultured in vitro, and this effect was dose-dependent. Human amniotic epithelial cells were further transplanted into the corpus striatum of healthy adult rats and the grafted cells could integrate with the host and migrate 1-2 mm along the nerve fibers in corpus callosum. Our experimental findings indicate that human amniotic epithelial cells may be a new kind of seed cells for use in neurograft.

  17. Gravity-dependent polarity of cytoplasmic streaming in Nitellopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.; Leopold, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    The internodal cells of the characean alga Nitellopsis obtusa were chosen to investigate the effect of gravity on cytoplasmic streaming. Horizontal cells exhibit streaming with equal velocities in both directions, whereas in vertically oriented cells, the downward-streaming cytoplasm flows ca. 10% faster than the upward-streaming cytoplasm. These results are independent of the orientation of the morphological top and bottom of the cell. We define the ratio of the velocity of the downward- to the upward-streaming cytoplasm as the polar ratio (PR). The normal polarity of a cell can be reversed (PR polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. Less than 1 micromole Ca2+ resulted in a PR < 1 while greater than 1 micromole Ca2+ resulted in the normal gravity response. The voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channel blocker, nifedipine, inhibited the gravity response in a reversible manner, while treatment with LaCl3 resulted in a PR < 1, indicating the presence of two types of Ca2+ channels. A new model for graviperception is presented in which the whole cell acts as the gravity sensor, and the plasma membrane acts as the gravireceptor. This is supported by ligation and UV irradiation experiments which indicate that the membranes at both ends of the cell are required for graviperception. The density of the external medium also affects the PR of Nitellopsis. Calculations are presented that indicate that the weight of the protoplasm may provide enough potential energy to open ion channels.

  18. Id2从核迁移到细胞质后通过调节凋亡诱导因子表达促进骨骼肌细胞分化%Id2 translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm accelerating differentiation of skeletal muscle cells by regulating the expression of apoptosis inducing factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓芳; 赖桂华; 王乐禹; 欧阳钧; 余磊; 邱小忠

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨Id2在骨骼肌再生中的作用机制.方法 用绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)-Id2-C2表达载体转染C2C12成肌细胞,对转染组和非转染组进行H2O2处理和2%马血清处理,用RT-PCR法观察两组细胞Id2基因表达的差异;Western blotting观察两组细胞的成肌分化相关蛋白的表达情况;免疫荧光显微镜观察正常组、纤维损伤组以及去神经支配组大鼠的骨骼肌中Id2和凋亡诱导因子(AIF)蛋白的表达情况.结果 与非转染组相比,Id2转染组细胞成肌分化明显增强.免疫荧光染色法显示,50μmol/L H2O2能增加核Id2蛋白的表达.在氧化应激条件下,Id2能抑制成肌调节因子(MyoD)而活化肌浆蛋白(myogenin).2%马血清能引起大多数Id2从细胞核迁移到细胞质,从而抑制活性氧(ROS)诱导的线粒体AIF表达.免疫荧光分析显示,去神经支配组大鼠的骨骼肌中细胞内的Id2和AIF蛋白表达增多.结论 Id2从细胞核迁移到细胞质后能促进骨骼肌细胞分化,其作用与AIF表达水平相关.%Objective To explore the functional role of Id2 in skeletal muscle regeneration. Methods Id2 expression vectors were transferred into C2C12 cells. The transferred and un-transferred C2C12 skeletal muscle cells were exposed to 50μmol/L H2O2 and 2% horse serum for 12 hours without fetal bovine serum( FBS ). Expression of Id2 gene in transferred and untransferred C2C12 cells was observed by RT-PCR. Expression of various myogenesis related proteins in the transferred and untransferred C2C12 cells were observed by Western blotting. Expression of Id2 and AIF proteins in the normal, fiber-damaged and denervated skeletal muscles were observed by immunofluorescence. Results Compared with un-transferred cells, the Id2 transferred cells exhibited higher differentiation. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that 50μmol/L H2O2 treatment increased the expression of nucleic Id2. Under the oxidative stress, Id2 repressed both MyoD repressors and myogenin

  19. Colonization of Fiber Cells by Colletotrichum graminicola in Wounded Maize Stalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venard, C; Vaillancourt, L

    2007-04-01

    ABSTRACT Colonization of wounded maize stalks by a wild-type strain of Colletotrichum graminicola was compared with colonization by a C. graminicola mutant that is avirulent on maize leaves, and by a wild-type strain of C. sublineolum that is normally a pathogen of sorghum but not maize. Local infection by all strains at the wound site resulted in formation of primary lesions consisting of disintegrated parenchyma cells beneath an intact rind and epidermis. However, subsequent rapid longitudinal expansion of the primary lesion occurred only in infections with the wild-type C. graminicola strain, and proceeded specifically through the fiber cells associated with the vascular bundles and the rind. Hyphae emerged from the fiber cells to produce discontinuous secondary lesions. There was no evidence that C. graminicola is a vascular wilt pathogen. Resistance of wounded cv. Jubilee maize stalks to the mutant strain of C. graminicola and to C. sublineolum was associated with restriction of colonization and spread of the pathogen through the fibers, as well as with the limitation of localized destruction of parenchyma cells at the wound site.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for lens fiber cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haotian; Yang, Tianyu; Madakashira, Bhavani P; Thiels, Cornelius A; Bechtle, Chad A; Garcia, Claudia M; Zhang, Huiming; Yu, Kai; Ornitz, David M; Beebe, David C; Robinson, Michael L

    2008-06-15

    The vertebrate lens provides an excellent model to study the mechanisms that regulate terminal differentiation. Although fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are thought to be important for lens cell differentiation, it is unclear which FGF receptors mediate these processes during different stages of lens development. Deletion of three FGF receptors (Fgfr1-3) early in lens development demonstrated that expression of only a single allele of Fgfr2 or Fgfr3 was sufficient for grossly normal lens development, while mice possessing only a single Fgfr1 allele developed cataracts and microphthalmia. Profound defects were observed in lenses lacking all three Fgfrs. These included lack of fiber cell elongation, abnormal proliferation in prospective lens fiber cells, reduced expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p27(kip1) and p57(kip2), increased apoptosis and aberrant or reduced expression of Prox1, Pax6, c-Maf, E-cadherin and alpha-, beta- and gamma-crystallins. Therefore, while signaling by FGF receptors is essential for lens fiber differentiation, different FGF receptors function redundantly.

  1. The Capsicum annuum class IV chitinase ChitIV interacts with receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase PIK1 to accelerate PIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-04-01

    The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase, CaPIK1, which mediates signalling of plant cell death and defence responses was previously identified. Here, the identification of a class IV chitinase, CaChitIV, from pepper plants (Capsicum annuum), which interacts with CaPIK1 and promotes CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses, is reported. CaChitIV contains a signal peptide, chitin-binding domain, and glycol hydrolase domain. CaChitIV expression was up-regulated by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. Notably, avirulent Xcv infection rapidly induced CaChitIV expression in pepper leaves. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation revealed that CaPIK1 interacts with CaChitIV in planta, and that the CaPIK1-CaChitIV complex is localized mainly in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. CaChitIV is also localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Transient co-expression of CaChitIV with CaPIK1 enhanced CaPIK1-triggered cell death response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) bursts. Co-silencing of both CaChitIV and CaPIK1 in pepper plants conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection, which was accompanied by a reduced induction of cell death response, ROS and NO bursts, and defence response genes. Ectopic expression of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced basal resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Together, the results suggest that CaChitIV positively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses through its interaction with CaPIK1.

  2. Polymer Solar Cells : Solubility Controls Fiber Network Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Franeker, Jacobus J.; Heintges, Gael H. L.; Schaefer, Charley; Portale, Giuseppe; Li, Weiwei; Wienk, Martijn M.; van der Schoot, Paul; Janssen, Rene A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The photoactive layer of polymer solar cells is commonly processed from a four-component solution, containing a semiconducting polymer and a fullerene derivative dissolved in a solvent cosolvent mixture. The nanoscale dimensions of the polymer fullerene morphology that is formed upon drying determin

  3. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl{sup +} K562 and Jak2(V617F){sup +} HEL Leukemia Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Axel [Georg-Speyer-Haus, Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Frankfurt am Main 60596 (Germany); Borghouts, Corina [Ganymed Pharmaceuticals AG, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Brendel, Christian [Boston Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Moriggl, Richard [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Cancer Research (LBI-CR), Vienna 1090 (Austria); Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd, E-mail: Groner@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Georg-Speyer-Haus, Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Frankfurt am Main 60596 (Germany)

    2015-03-19

    , Stat5 is predominantly present in the cytoplasm and the survival of the Jak2(V617F){sup +} HEL cells is impeded through the inhibition of the cytoplasmic functions of Stat5.

  4. Serine phosphorylation of syndecan-2 proteoglycan cytoplasmic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, E S; Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1997-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, and the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-2 contains two serines (residues 197 and 198) which lie in a consensus sequence for phosphorylation by PKC. Other serine and threonine residues are present but not in a consensus seque...

  5. Uniparental Inheritance Promotes Adaptive Evolution in Cytoplasmic Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Joshua R; Beekman, Madeleine

    2017-03-01

    Eukaryotes carry numerous asexual cytoplasmic genomes (mitochondria and plastids). Lacking recombination, asexual genomes should theoretically suffer from impaired adaptive evolution. Yet, empirical evidence indicates that cytoplasmic genomes experience higher levels of adaptive evolution than predicted by theory. In this study, we use a computational model to show that the unique biology of cytoplasmic genomes-specifically their organization into host cells and their uniparental (maternal) inheritance-enable them to undergo effective adaptive evolution. Uniparental inheritance of cytoplasmic genomes decreases competition between different beneficial substitutions (clonal interference), promoting the accumulation of beneficial substitutions. Uniparental inheritance also facilitates selection against deleterious cytoplasmic substitutions, slowing Muller's ratchet. In addition, uniparental inheritance generally reduces genetic hitchhiking of deleterious substitutions during selective sweeps. Overall, uniparental inheritance promotes adaptive evolution by increasing the level of beneficial substitutions relative to deleterious substitutions. When we assume that cytoplasmic genome inheritance is biparental, decreasing the number of genomes transmitted during gametogenesis (bottleneck) aids adaptive evolution. Nevertheless, adaptive evolution is always more efficient when inheritance is uniparental. Our findings explain empirical observations that cytoplasmic genomes-despite their asexual mode of reproduction-can readily undergo adaptive evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. In situ pressure calibration for piston cylinder cells via ruby fluorescence with fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama-Nakazawa, Kazuko; Koeda, Masahito; Hedo, Masato; Uwatoko, Yoshiya

    2007-06-01

    A fiber-optic measurement technique is developed for estimating the pressure inside a piston cylinder cell up to approximately 4 GPa, based on the pressure-induced R1 fluorescence line shift of ruby (ruby scale). Ruby scale and a conventional technique (calibration on phase transitions of bismuth) were simultaneously applied to the cell filled with a pressure transmitting medium of isopropyl alcohol. The pressure readings of the two methods were consistent with each other, and no pressure gradient was observed. The ruby scale has the advantages of real time estimation and easy installation in a small space. Because of these advantages, three fibers were simultaneously introduced in the sample space at the same time, and pressure distribution was measured for Fluorinert (FC70:FC77=1:1), Daphne oil 7373, and Fomblin oil (YHVAC 13014).

  7. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Paoli, Frank de; Vissing, Kristian

    2014-10-15

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type-specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose) supplementation. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were analyzed for fiber type-specific SCs, myonuclei, and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). Following training, SCs increased with Conc in both type I and type II fibers (P hypertrophy correlated with whole muscle hypertrophy exclusively following Conc training (P eccentric resistance training while type II fiber hypertrophy was accentuated when combining concentric resistance training with whey protein supplementation.

  8. Fiber and fabric solar cells by directly weaving carbon nanotube yarns with CdSe nanowire-based electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luhui; Shi, Enzheng; Ji, Chunyan; Li, Zhen; Li, Peixu; Shang, Yuanyuan; Li, Yibin; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai; Cao, Anyuan

    2012-08-21

    Electrode materials are key components for fiber solar cells, and when combined with active layers (for light absorption and charge generation) in appropriate ways, they enable design and fabrication of efficient and innovative device structures. Here, we apply carbon nanotube yarns as counter electrodes in combination with CdSe nanowire-grafted primary electrodes (Ti wire) for making fiber and fabric-shaped photoelectrochemical cells with power conversion efficiencies in the range 1% to 2.9%. The spun-twist long nanotube yarns possess both good electrical conductivity and mechanical flexibility compared to conventional metal wires or carbon fibers, which facilitate fabrication of solar cells with versatile configurations. A unique feature of our process is that instead of making individual fiber cells, we directly weave single or multiple nanotube yarns with primary electrodes into a functional fabric. Our results demonstrate promising applications of semiconducting nanowires and carbon nanotubes in woven photovoltaics.

  9. Dark Variants of Luminous Bacteria Whole Cell Bioluminescent Optical Fiber Sensor to Genotoxicants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙雅量; 周铁波; 过健俐; 李义勇

    2004-01-01

    A stable dark variant separated from photobacterium phosphoreum (A2) was fixed in agar-gel membrane and immobilized onto an exposed end of a fiber-optic linked with bioluminometer. The variant could emit a luminescent signal in the presence of genotoxic agents, such as Mitomycin C (MC). The performance of this whole-cell optical fiber sensor system was examined as a function of several parameters, including gel probe thickness, bacterial cell density, and diameter of the fiber-optic core and working temperature. An optimal response to a model genotoxicant, Mitomycin C, was achieved with agar-bacterial gel membrane: the thickness of gel membrane was about 5 mm; the cell density of bacteria in gel membranewas about 2.0 × 107/ml; the diameter of fiberoptic core was 5.0 mm; the working temperature was 25℃. Under these optimized conditions, the response time was less than 10 h to Mitomycin C, with a lower detection threshold of 0.1 mg/L.

  10. Fiber and fabric solar cells by directly weaving carbon nanotube yarns with CdSe nanowire-based electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luhui; Shi, Enzheng; Ji, Chunyan; Li, Zhen; Li, Peixu; Shang, Yuanyuan; Li, Yibin; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai; Cao, Anyuan

    2012-07-01

    Electrode materials are key components for fiber solar cells, and when combined with active layers (for light absorption and charge generation) in appropriate ways, they enable design and fabrication of efficient and innovative device structures. Here, we apply carbon nanotube yarns as counter electrodes in combination with CdSe nanowire-grafted primary electrodes (Ti wire) for making fiber and fabric-shaped photoelectrochemical cells with power conversion efficiencies in the range 1% to 2.9%. The spun-twist long nanotube yarns possess both good electrical conductivity and mechanical flexibility compared to conventional metal wires or carbon fibers, which facilitate fabrication of solar cells with versatile configurations. A unique feature of our process is that instead of making individual fiber cells, we directly weave single or multiple nanotube yarns with primary electrodes into a functional fabric. Our results demonstrate promising applications of semiconducting nanowires and carbon nanotubes in woven photovoltaics.Electrode materials are key components for fiber solar cells, and when combined with active layers (for light absorption and charge generation) in appropriate ways, they enable design and fabrication of efficient and innovative device structures. Here, we apply carbon nanotube yarns as counter electrodes in combination with CdSe nanowire-grafted primary electrodes (Ti wire) for making fiber and fabric-shaped photoelectrochemical cells with power conversion efficiencies in the range 1% to 2.9%. The spun-twist long nanotube yarns possess both good electrical conductivity and mechanical flexibility compared to conventional metal wires or carbon fibers, which facilitate fabrication of solar cells with versatile configurations. A unique feature of our process is that instead of making individual fiber cells, we directly weave single or multiple nanotube yarns with primary electrodes into a functional fabric. Our results demonstrate promising applications

  11. Comparative Study of Two Carbon Fiber Cathodes and Theoretical Analysis in Microbial Fuel Cells on Ocean Floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yubin; LIU Yuanyuan; XU Qian; LU Zhikai; ZHANG Yelong

    2014-01-01

    Cathode activity plays an important role in the improvement of the microbial fuel cells on ocean floor (BMFCs). A comparison study between Rayon-based (CF-R) and PAN-based carbon fiber (CF-P) cathodes is conducted in the paper. The two carbon fibers were heat treated to improve cell performance (CF-R-H&CF-P-H), and were used to build a new BMFCs structure with a foamy carbon anode. The maximum power density was 112.4 mW m-2 for CF-R-H, followed by 66.6 mW m-2 for CF-R, 49.7 mW m-2 for CF-P-H and 21.6 mW m-2 for CF-P respectively. The higher specific area and deep groove make CF-R have a better power output than with CF-P. Meanwhile, heat treatment of carbon fiber can improve cell power, nearly two-fold higher than heat treatment of plain fiber. This improvement may be due to the quinones group formation to accelerate the reduction of oxygen and electron transfer on the fiber surface in the three phase boundary after heat treatment. Compared to PAN-based carbon fiber, Rayon-based carbon fiber would be preferentially selected as cathode in novel BMFCs design due to its high surface area, low cost and higher power. The comparison research is significant for cathode material selection and cell design.

  12. Influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on pathfinding of dentate granule cell axons, the hippocampal mossy fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mossy fibers, the dentate granule cell axons, are generated throughout an animal's lifetime. Mossy fiber paths and synapses are primarily restricted to the stratum lucidum within the CA3 region. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a neurotrophin family protein that activates Trk neurotrophin receptors, is highly expressed in the stratum lucidum in an activity-dependent manner. The addition of a Trk neurotrophin receptor inhibitor, K252a, to cultured hippocampal slices induced aberrant extension of mossy fibers into ectopic regions. BDNF overexpression in granule cells ameliorated the mossy fiber pathway abnormalities caused by a submaximal dose of K252a. A similar rescue was observed when BDNF was expressed in CA3 pyramidal cells, most notably in mossy fibers distal to the expression site. These findings are the first to clarify the role of BDNF in mossy fiber pathfinding, not as an attractant cue but as a regulator, possibly acting in a paracrine manner. This effect of BDNF may be as a signal for new fibers to fasciculate and extend further to form synapses with neurons that are far from active BDNF-expressing synapses. This mechanism would ensure the emergence of new independent dentate gyrus-CA3 circuits by the axons of new-born granule cells.

  13. Influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on pathfinding of dentate granule cell axons, the hippocampal mossy fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Makoto; Tamura, Naohiro; Ikeda, Takamitsu; Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji; Matsuki, Norio; Yamada, Maki K

    2009-01-31

    Mossy fibers, the dentate granule cell axons, are generated throughout an animal's lifetime. Mossy fiber paths and synapses are primarily restricted to the stratum lucidum within the CA3 region. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin family protein that activates Trk neurotrophin receptors, is highly expressed in the stratum lucidum in an activity-dependent manner. The addition of a Trk neurotrophin receptor inhibitor, K252a, to cultured hippocampal slices induced aberrant extension of mossy fibers into ectopic regions. BDNF overexpression in granule cells ameliorated the mossy fiber pathway abnormalities caused by a submaximal dose of K252a. A similar rescue was observed when BDNF was expressed in CA3 pyramidal cells, most notably in mossy fibers distal to the expression site. These findings are the first to clarify the role of BDNF in mossy fiber pathfinding, not as an attractant cue but as a regulator, possibly acting in a paracrine manner. This effect of BDNF may be as a signal for new fibers to fasciculate and extend further to form synapses with neurons that are far from active BDNF-expressing synapses. This mechanism would ensure the emergence of new independent dentate gyrus-CA3 circuits by the axons of new-born granule cells.

  14. Continual Cell Deformation Induced via Attachment to Oriented Fibers Enhances Fibroblast Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Sisi Qin; Vincent Ricotta; Marcia Simon; Clark, Richard A.F.; Rafailovich, Miriam H.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast migration is critical to the wound healing process. In vivo, migration occurs on fibrillar substrates, and previous observations have shown that a significant time lag exists before the onset of granulation tissue. We therefore conducted a series of experiments to understand the impact of both fibrillar morphology and migration time. Substrate topography was first shown to have a profound influence. Fibroblasts preferentially attach to fibrillar surfaces, and orient their cytoplasm...

  15. Expansion of activated lymphocytes obtained from renal cell carcinoma in an automated hollow fiber bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, G G; Wolf, M L; Montecillo, E; Younes, E; Ali, E; Pontes, J E; Haas, G P

    1994-01-01

    Immunotherapy using IL-2 alone or combined with activated lymphocytes has been promising for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Cytotoxic lymphocytes can be isolated from tumors, expanded in vitro with IL-2, and adoptively transferred back into the tumor-bearing host. These cells can also be transduced with the genes coding for cytokines for local delivery to tumor sites. A major drawback in adoptive immunotherapy is the cumbersome and expensive culture technology associated with the growth of large numbers of cells required for their therapeutic effect. To reduce the cost, resources, and manpower, we have developed the methodology for lymphocyte activation and expansion in the automated hollow fiber bioreactor IMMUNO*STAR Cell Expander (ACT BIOMEDICAL, INC). Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TIL) isolated from human renal cell carcinoma tumor specimens were inoculated at a number of 10(8) cells in a small bioreactor of 30 ml extracapillary space volume. We have determined the medium flow rates and culture conditions to obtain a significant and repeated expansion of TIL at weekly intervals. The lymphocytes cultured in the bioreactor demonstrated the same phenotype and cytotoxic activity as those expanded in parallel in tissue culture plates. Lymphocyte expansion in the hollow fiber bioreactor required lower volumes of medium, human serum, IL-2 and minimal labor. This technology may facilitate the use of adoptive immunotherapy for the treatment of refractory malignancies.

  16. Differences in modifications of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration and 86Rb+ influx in human neoplastic B cells by antibodies to mu- relative to delta-Ig heavy chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, R; Ruud, E; Funderud, S; Godal, T

    1985-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration and influx of 86Rb+ (K+ analogue) were determined during the first minutes after stimulation of neoplastic human B cells and B cell lines by antibodies to surface Ig. The Ca2+ concentration increased in the great majority of samples (41 of 48). All of four B cell lines also responded, providing formal evidence that accessory cells are not required for this early, surface Ig-mediated event. Antibodies to delta as well as mu, heavy chains (anti-delta and anti-mu) could induce both Ca2+ and 86Rb+ responses. 86Rb+ responders were found within the group of Ca2+ responders, but no quantitative relation was observed between the two responses. In cells expressing both sIgM and sIgD, antibodies to delta heavy chains were more potent than those to mu heavy chains in inducing Ca2+ responses, whereas the opposite pattern was seen with regard to 86Rb+ responses. These results demonstrate that sIgM and sIgD can deliver different biochemical signals to the cell. PMID:3921300

  17. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes and endothelial cells in multi-component hydrogel fibers for liver tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chan; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Leong, Meng Fatt; Wan, Andrew C A

    2014-07-01

    Liver tissue engineering requires a suitable cell source, methodologies to assemble the cells within their niche microenvironments in a spatially defined manner, and vascularization of the construct in vivo for maintenance of hepatocyte viability and function. Recently, we have developed methods of encapsulating cells within separate domains in multi-component hydrogel fibers and methods of assembling fibers to form 3D-patterned tissue constructs. In the present work, we have combined these approaches to encapsulate hepatocytes and endothelial cells within their specific niches, and to assemble them into endothelialized liver tissue constructs. The hepatocytes and endothelial cells were obtained in parallel by differentiating human recombinant protein-induced human pluripotent stem cells, resulting in a construct which contained genetically identical endothelial and parenchymal elements. We were able to demonstrate that the presence of endothelial cells in the scaffold significantly improved hepatocyte function in vitro and facilitated vascularization of the scaffold when implanted in a mouse partial hepatectomy model. The in vivo studies further asserted that integration of the scaffold with host vasculature had occurred, as demonstrated by the presence of human albumin in the mouse serum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Columnar deformation of human red blood cell by highly localized fiber optic Bessel beam stretcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungrae; Joo, Boram; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Im, Seongil; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-01-01

    A single human red blood cell was optically stretched along two counter-propagating fiber-optic Bessel-like beams in an integrated lab-on-a-chip structure. The beam enabled highly localized stretching of RBC, and it induced a nonlinear mechanical deformation to finally reach an irreversible columnar shape that has not been reported. We characterized and systematically quantified this optically induced mechanical deformation by the geometrical aspect ratio of stretched RBC and the irreversible stretching time. The proposed RBC mechanism can realize a versatile and compact opto-mechanical platform for optical diagnosis of biological substances in the single cell level. PMID:26601005

  19. Columnar deformation of human red blood cell by highly localized fiber optic Bessel beam stretcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungrae; Joo, Boram; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Im, Seongil; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-11-01

    A single human red blood cell was optically stretched along two counter-propagating fiber-optic Bessel-like beams in an integrated lab-on-a-chip structure. The beam enabled highly localized stretching of RBC, and it induced a nonlinear mechanical deformation to finally reach an irreversible columnar shape that has not been reported. We characterized and systematically quantified this optically induced mechanical deformation by the geometrical aspect ratio of stretched RBC and the irreversible stretching time. The proposed RBC mechanism can realize a versatile and compact opto-mechanical platform for optical diagnosis of biological substances in the single cell level.

  20. Method for Confirming Cytoplasmic Delivery of RNA Aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, David D; Dassie, Justin P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-01-01

    RNA aptamers are single-stranded RNA oligos that represent a powerful emerging technology with potential for treating numerous diseases. More recently, cell-targeted RNA aptamers have been developed for delivering RNA interference (RNAi) modulators (siRNAs and miRNAs) to specific diseased cells (e.g., cancer cells or HIV infected cells) in vitro and in vivo. However, despite initial promising reports, the broad application of this aptamer delivery technology awaits the development of methods that can verify and confirm delivery of aptamers to the cytoplasm of target cells where the RNAi machinery resides. We recently developed a functional assay (RIP assay) to confirm cellular uptake and subsequent cytoplasmic release of an RNA aptamer which binds to a cell surface receptor expressed on prostate cancer cells (PSMA). To assess cytoplasmic delivery, the aptamer was chemically conjugated to saporin, a ribosome inactivating protein toxin that is toxic to cells only when delivered to the cytoplasm (where it inhibits the ribosome) by a cell-targeting ligand (e.g., aptamer). Here, we describe the chemistry used to conjugate the aptamer to saporin and discuss a gel-based method to verify conjugation efficiency. We also detail an in vitro functional assay to confirm that the aptamer retains function following conjugation to saporin and describe a cellular assay to measure aptamer-mediated saporin-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26472453

  1. Demonstration of actin filament stress fibers in microvascular endothelial cells in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, V; Drenckhahn, D

    1991-07-01

    We have developed a method for immunostaining the microvascular tree of rat mesenteric windows in situ. The procedure consists of three steps, i.e., mild fixation with formaldehyde, controlled proteolytic digestion of the mesothelial layer, and permeabilization with acetone. Discrimination between different microvascular segments was possible by double-fluorescent staining with antibodies to the smooth muscle isoform of alpha-actin and to nonmuscle myosin from platelets. Antibodies to nonmuscle myosin labeled numerous longitudinally oriented cables in endothelial cells of all microvascular segments (arterioles, metarterioles, pre-, mid-, and postcapillaries, small venules). Occasionally, the myosin-containing cables displayed the interrupted sarcomere-like staining pattern that is diagnostic for stress fibers. In contrast, staining of actin filaments with phalloidin-rhodamin resulted in a noninterrupted, continuous fluorescence of the stress fibers. A possible functional role of microvascular endothelial stress fibers is to serve as a tensile cytoskeletal scaffold that stabilizes the tubular, three-dimensional geometry of microvessels and, in addition, to help the endothelium resist the shear forces created by blood flow and by collision with red and white blood cells.

  2. N-myc regulates growth and fiber cell differentiation in lens development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Gabriel R.; Matos-Rodrigues, Gabriel E.; Zhao, Yilin; Gomes, Anielle L.; Anand, Deepti; Predes, Danilo; de Lima, Silmara; Abreu, Jose G.; Zheng, Deyou; Lachke, Salil A.; Cvekl, Ales; Martins, Rodrigo A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Myc proto-oncogenes regulate diverse cellular processes during development, but their roles during morphogenesis of specific tissues are not fully understood. We found that c-myc regulates cell proliferation in mouse lens development and previous genome-wide studies suggested functional roles for N-myc in developing lens. Here, we examined the role of N-myc in mouse lens development. Genetic inactivation of N-myc in the surface ectoderm or lens vesicle impaired eye and lens growth, while "late" inactivation in lens fibers had no effect. Unexpectedly, defective growth of N-myc--deficient lenses was not associated with alterations in lens progenitor cell proliferation or survival. Notably, N-myc-deficient lens exhibited a delay in degradation of DNA in terminally differentiating lens fiber cells. RNA-sequencing analysis of N-myc--deficient lenses identified a cohort of down-regulated genes associated with fiber cell differentiation that included DNaseIIβ. Further, an integrated analysis of differentially expressed genes in N-myc-deficient lens using normal lens expression patterns of iSyTE, N-myc-binding motif analysis and molecular interaction data from the String database led to the derivation of an N-myc-based gene regulatory network in the lens. Finally, analysis of N-myc and c-myc double-deficient lens demonstrated that these Myc genes cooperate to drive lens growth prior to lens vesicle stage. Together, these findings provide evidence for exclusive and cooperative functions of Myc transcription factors in mouse lens development and identify novel mechanisms by which N-myc regulates cell differentiation during eye morphogenesis. PMID:28716713

  3. Miniaturized ascorbic acid fuel cells with flexible electrodes made of graphene-coated carbon fiber cloth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Kazuki; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisato; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2016-04-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is a biologically friendly compound and exists in many products such as sports drinks, fruit, and even in human blood. Thus, a miniaturized and flexible ascorbic acid fuel cell (AAFC) is expected be a power source for portable or implantable electric devices. In this study, we fabricated an AAFC with anode and cathode dimensions of 3 × 10 mm2 made of a graphene-coated carbon fiber cloth (GCFC) and found that GCFC electrodes significantly improve the power generated by the AAFC. This is because the GCFC has more than two times the effective surface area of a conventional carbon fiber cloth and it can contain more enzymes. The power density of the AAFC in a phosphate buffer solution containing 100 mM AA at room temperature was 34.1 µW/cm2 at 0.46 V. Technical issues in applying the AAFC to portable devices are also discussed.

  4. The RNA-binding protein TIAR is translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during Fas-mediated apoptotic cell death.

    OpenAIRE

    Taupin, J L; Tian, Q.; Kedersha, N; Robertson, M.; Anderson, P

    1995-01-01

    We have determined the structure, intracellular localization, and tissue distribution of TIAR, a TIA-1-related RNA-binding protein. Two related isoforms of TIAR, migrating at 42 and 50 kDa, are expressed in primate cells. Unlike TIA-1, which is found in the granules of cytotoxic lymphocytes, TIAR is concentrated in the nucleus of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Because TIAR can trigger DNA fragmentation in permeabilized thymocytes, it is a candidate effector of apoptotic cell death....

  5. Cut-off analysis of 19-cell Yb-doped double-cladding rod-type photonic crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, F; Coscelli, E; Alkeskjold, T T; Passaro, D; Cucinotta, A; Leick, L; Broeng, J; Selleri, S

    2011-05-09

    Yb-doped double-cladding large mode area rod-type photonic crystal fibers are a key component for power scaling in fiber laser systems. Recently, designs with 19-cell core defect, that is with 19 missing air-holes in the center of the photonic crystal cladding, have been proposed, with reported core diameter up to 100 μm. In this paper an analysis of the cut-off wavelength of the first high-order mode in such low-NA fibers is reported, accounting for different approaches for the definition of the cladding effective index. Results have shown that taking into account the finite fiber cross-section and considering the first cladding mode of the actual fiber is mandatory to obtain a correct estimate of the cut-off wavelength.

  6. In vitro cytotoxicity and transforming potential of industrial carbon dust (fibers and particles) in syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darne, C; Terzetti, F; Coulais, C; Fournier, J; Guichard, Y; Gaté, L; Binet, S

    2010-07-01

    Carbon fibers have many applications, mainly in high-tech industries such as the aviation industry. Eleven carbon samples (fibers and particles) coming from an aeronautic group were tested for their cytotoxicity and carcinogenic potential using in vitro short-term assays in Syrian hamster embryo cells. These samples were taken during each important step of the process, i.e. from the initial heating of polyacrylonitrile fibers to pure carbon fibers. They were compared to an asbestos fiber, an amorphous silica, and two commercial graphite powders. Their physical-chemical characteristics and their capacity to release reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined. This study showed that none of the carbon samples was able to generate ROS as measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance analysis, and in our biological assays, they demonstrated no morphological transformation potential and low cytotoxicity compared to positive control (chrysotile asbestos).

  7. GMP-Compliant Expansion of Clinical-Grade Human Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells Using a Closed Hollow Fiber Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barckhausen, Christina; Rice, Brent; Baila, Stefano; Sensebé, Luc; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Nold, Philipp; Hackstein, Holger; Rojewski, Markus Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for GMP-compliant expansion of human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSC) from bone marrow aspirates, using the Quantum(®) Cell Expansion System from Terumo BCT. The Quantum system is a functionally closed, automated hollow fiber bioreactor system designed to reproducibly grow cells in either GMP or research laboratory environments. The chapter includes protocols for preparation of media, setup of the Quantum system, coating of the hollow fiber bioreactor, as well as loading, feeding, and harvesting of cells. We suggest a panel of quality controls for the starting material, the interim product, as well as the final product.

  8. High intensity training may reverse the fiber type specific decline in myogenic stem cells in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean eFarup

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is associated with loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. The myogenic stem cells (satellite cells – SCs are instrumental to accretion of myonuclei, but remain to be investigated in MS. The present study aimed to compare the SC and myonuclei content between MS patients (n=23 and age matched healthy controls (HC, n=18. Furthermore, the effects of 12 weeks of high intensity training on SC and myonuclei content were explored in MS. Muscle biopsies were obtained from m. Vastus Lateralis at baseline (MS+HC and following 12 weeks of training (MS only. Frozen biopsies were sectioned followed by immunohistochemical analysis for fiber type specific SCs (Pax7+, myonuclei (MN and central nuclei content and fiber cross-sectional area (fCSA using ATPase histochemistry. At baseline the SCs per fiber was lower in type II compared to type I fiber in both MS (119%, p<0.01 and HC (69%, p<0.05, whereas the SCs per fCSA was lower in type II fibers compared to type I only in MS (72%, p<0.05. No differences were observed in MN or central nuclei between MS and HC. Following training the type II fiber SCs per fiber and fCSA in MS patients increased by 165% (p<0.05 and 135% (p<0.05, respectively. Furthermore, the type II fiber MN content increased by 35% (p<0.05 following training. In conclusion, the SC content is lower in type II compared to type I fibers in both MS and HC. Furthermore, high intensity training was observed to selectively increase the SC and myonuclei content in type II fibers in MS patients.

  9. Diffuse fluorescence fiber probe for in vivo detection of circulating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Vivian; Tan, Xuefei; Runnels, Judith; Sardesai, Neha; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2017-03-01

    There has been significant recent interest in the development of technologies for enumeration of rare circulating cells directly in the bloodstream in many areas of research, for example, in small animal models of circulating tumor cell dissemination during cancer metastasis. We describe a fiber-based optical probe that allows fluorescence detection of labeled circulating cells in vivo in a diffuse reflectance configuration. We validated this probe in a tissue-mimicking flow phantom model in vitro and in nude mice injected with fluorescently labeled multiple myeloma cells in vivo. Compared to our previous work, this design yields an improvement in detection signal-to-noise ratio of 10 dB, virtually eliminates problematic motion artifacts due to mouse breathing, and potentially allows operation in larger animals and limbs.

  10. Hyperlayer hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Roda, Barbara; Cinque, Leonardo; Melucci, Dora; Min, Byung Ryul; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2003-01-24

    Interest in low-cost, analytical-scale, highly efficient and sensitive separation methods for cells, among which bacteria, is increasing. Particle separation in hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF FlFFF) has been recently improved by the optimization of the HF FIFFF channel design. The intrinsic simplicity and low cost of this HF FlFFF channel allows for its disposable usage. which is particularly appealing for analytical bio-applications. Here, for the first time, we present a feasibility study on high-performance, hyperlayer HF FIFFF of micrometer-sized bacteria (Escherichia coli) and of different types of cells (human red blood cells, wine-making yeast from Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Fractionation performance is shown to be at least comparable to that obtained with conventional, flat-channel hyperlayer FIFFF of cells, at superior size-based selectivity and reduced analysis time.

  11. Neutrophil and asbestos fiber-induced cytotoxicity in cultured human mesothelial and bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnula, V L; Raivio, K O; Linnainmaa, K; Ekman, A; Klockars, M

    1995-03-01

    This study investigates reactive oxygen species generation and oxidant-related cytotoxicity induced by amosite asbestos fibers and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) in human mesothelial cells and human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. Transformed human pleural mesothelial cells (MET 5A) and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS 2B) were treated with amosite (2 micrograms/cm2) for 48 h. After 24 h of incubation, the cells were exposed for 1 h to nonactivated or amosite (50 micrograms) activated PMNs, washed, and incubated for another 23 h. Reactive oxygen species generation by the PMNs and the target cells was measured by chemiluminescence. Cell injury was assessed by cellular adenine nucleotide depletion, extracellular release of nucleotides, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Amosite-activated (but also to a lesser degree nonactivated) PMNs released substantial amounts of reactive oxygen metabolites, whereas the chemiluminescence of amosite-exposed mesothelial cells and epithelial cells did not differ from the background. Amosite treatment (48 h) of the target cells did not change intracellular adenine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP) or nucleotide catabolite products (xanthine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid). When the target cells were exposed to nonactivated PMNs, significant adenine nucleotide depletion and nucleotide catabolite accumulation was observed in mesothelial cells only. In separate experiments, when the target cells were exposed to amosite-activated PMNs, the target cell injury was further potentiated compared with the amosite treatment alone or exposure to nonactivated PMNs. In conclusion, this study suggests the importance of inflammatory cell-derived free radicals in the development of amosite-induced mesothelial cell injury.

  12. The effect of nutritional status and muscle fiber type on myogenic satellite cell fate and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D J; McFarland, D C; Cowieson, A J; Muir, W I; Velleman, S G

    2014-01-01

    Satellite cells (SC) are multipotential stem cells that can be induced by nutrition to alter their cellular developmental fate, which may vary depending on their fiber type origin. The objective of the current study was to determine the effect of restricting protein synthesis on inducing adipogenic transdifferentiation and apoptosis of SC originating from fibers of the fast glycolytic pectoralis major (p. major) and fast oxidative and glycolytic biceps femoris (b. femoris) muscles of the chicken. The availability of the essential sulfur amino acids Met and Cys was restricted to regulate protein synthesis during SC proliferation and differentiation. The SC were cultured and treated with 1 of 6 Met/Cys concentrations: 60/192, 30/96 (control), 7.5/24, 3/9.6, 1/3.2, or 0/0 mg/L. Reductions in Met/Cys concentrations from the control level resulted in increased lipid staining and expression of the adipogenic marker genes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and stearoyl-CoA desaturase during differentiation in the p. major SC. Although b. femoris SC had increased lipid staining at lower Met/Cys concentrations, there was no increase in expression of either adipogenic gene. For both muscle types, SC Met/Cys, concentration above the control increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and stearoyl-CoA desaturase during differentiation. As Met/Cys concentration was decreased during proliferation, a dose-dependent decline in all apoptotic cells occurred except for early apoptotic cells in the p. major, which had no treatment effect (P nutrition on SC transdifferentiation to an adipogenic lineage and apoptosis, and the effect of fiber type on this response in an in vitro context.

  13. Amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells on glass fiber textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plentz, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.plentz@leibniz-ipht.de; Andrä, Gudrun; Pliewischkies, Torsten; Brückner, Uwe; Eisenhawer, Björn; Falk, Fritz

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amorphous silicon solar cells on textile glass fiber fabrics are demonstrated. • Open circuit voltages of 883 mV show shunt-free contacting on non-planar fabrics. • Short-circuit current densities of 3.7 mA/cm{sup 2} are limited by transmission losses. • Fill factors of 43.1% and pseudo fill factors of 70.2% show high series resistance. • Efficiencies of 1.4% and pseudo efficiencies of 2.1% realized on textile fabrics. - Abstract: In this contribution, amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells on textile glass fiber fabrics for smart textiles are prepared and the photovoltaic performance is characterized. These solar cells on fabrics delivered open circuit voltages up to 883 mV. This shows that shunt-free contacting of the solar cells was successful, even in case of non-planar fabrics. The short-circuit current densities up to 3.7 mA/cm{sup 2} are limited by transmission losses in a 10 nm thin titanium layer, which was used as a semi-transparent contact. The low conductivity of this layer limits the fill factor to 43.1%. Pseudo fill factors, neglecting the series resistance, up to 70.2% were measured. Efficiencies up to 1.4% and pseudo efficiencies up to 2.1% were realized on textile fabrics. A transparent conductive oxide could further improve the efficiency to above 5%.

  14. Enhanced adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells on conductive PANI-PCL fiber scaffold by electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumei; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Chuying; Qiu, Fangping; Sun, Bolun; Ji, He; Qiu, Ju; Wang, Ce

    2017-03-01

    Recently, electrically conductive biomaterial scaffolds have shown great potential in tissue regeneration. Herein, we reported an electrically conductive polyaniline (PANI) coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) electrospun micron-fiber scaffold for the enhanced attachment and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under electrical stimulation conditions. After the O2 plasma treatment toward PCL electrospun fiber, PANI could be polymerized onto their surfaces successfully. The obtained PANI-PCL fibers were characterized by SEM observations, FT-IR spectra, XPS analysis, and water contact angle measurement. The mechanical tests indicated that the fibers could satisfy the practical vascular scaffold requirements. The conductivity of the PANI-PCL fibers was 6.71×10(-3)S/cm which could provide a conductive in-vitro platform to study the effect of electrical stimulation on HUVECs proliferation. When PANI-coated PCL fibers were compared with PCL fibers, HUVECs exhibited highly enhanced adhesion and viability, especially under electrical stimulation (ES) of 200, 300, and 400mV/cm. Proliferation of HUVECs on PANI-PCL fibers was strongly dependent on electrical stimulation intensity. The results showed new insights into conductive scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter 5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549.

  16. Generation of H9 T-cells stably expressing a membrane-bound form of the cytoplasmic tail of the Env-glycoprotein: lack of transcomplementation of defective HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Valerie

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract H9-T-cells do not support the replication of mutant HIV-1 encoding Env protein lacking its long cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (Env-CT. Here we describe the generation of a H9-T-cell population constitutively expressing the HIV-1 Env-CT protein domain anchored in the cellular membrane by it homologous membrane-spanning domain (TMD. We confirmed that the Env-TMD-CT protein was associated with cellular membranes, that its expression did not have any obvious cytotoxic effects on the cells and that it did not affect wild-type HIV-1 replication. However, as measured in both a single-round assay as well as in spreading infections, replication competence of mutant pNL-Tr712, lacking the Env-CT, was not restored in this H9 T-cell population. This means that the Env-CT per se cannot transcomplement the replication block of HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env proteins and suggests that the Env-CT likely exerts its function only in the context of the complete Env protein.

  17. Colicin S8 export: extracellular and cytoplasmic colicin are different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Diaz, Maria-Elena; Concepción Curbelo, Juan Luis

    2003-12-01

    The properties of colicin S8 are different for the cytoplasmic, periplasmic and extracellular protein. Interactions with its specific receptors reflect this. Active cell extracts separate into a non-anionic along with an anionic fraction by DEAE-Sephacell chromatography. Previously, we have purified cell-associated colicin S8 as an aggregation of highly related polypeptides; cytoplasmic colicin S8 seems to be post-translationally processed into an aggregation of polypeptides of molecular mass ranging from 45,000 Da to 60,000 Da. We suggest that a conformational change to colicin S8 may occur related to the export process.

  18. On the entry of an emerging arbovirus into host cells: Mayaro virus takes the highway to the cytoplasm through fusion with early endosomes and caveolae-derived vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A.M. Carvalho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mayaro virus (MAYV is an emergent sylvatic alphavirus in South America, related to sporadic outbreaks of a chikungunya-like human febrile illness accompanied by severe arthralgia. Despite its high potential for urban emergence, MAYV is still an obscure virus with scarce information about its infection cycle, including the corresponding early events. Even for prototypical alphaviruses, the cell entry mechanism still has some rough edges to trim: although clathrin-mediated endocytosis is quoted as the putative route, alternative paths as distinct as direct virus genome injection through the cell plasma membrane seems to be possible. Our aim was to clarify crucial details on the entry route exploited by MAYV to gain access into the host cell. Tracking the virus since its first contact with the surface of Vero cells by fluorescence microscopy, we show that its entry occurs by a fast endocytic process and relies on fusion with acidic endosomal compartments. Moreover, blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis or depleting cholesterol from the cell membrane leads to a strong inhibition of viral infection, as assessed by plaque assays. Following this clue, we found that early endosomes and caveolae-derived vesicles are both implicated as target membranes for MAYV fusion. Our findings unravel the very first events that culminate in a productive infection by MAYV and shed light on potential targets for a rational antiviral therapy, besides providing a better comprehension of the entry routes exploited by alphaviruses to get into the cell.

  19. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon

    2014-01-01

    -specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose......Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type......) supplementation. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were analyzed for fiber type-specific SCs, myonuclei, and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). Following training, SCs increased with Conc in both type I and type II fibers (P

  20. Enhanced performance of electrospun carbon fibers modified with carbon nanotubes: promising electrodes for enzymatic biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A Both; Cherifi, A; Tingry, S; Cornu, D; Peigney, A; Laurent, Ch

    2013-06-21

    New nanostructured electrodes, promising for the production of clean and renewable energy in biofuel cells, were developed with success. For this purpose, carbon nanofibers were produced by the electrospinning of polyacrylonitrile solution followed by convenient thermal treatments (stabilization followed by carbonization at 1000, 1200 and 1400° C), and carbon nanotubes were adsorbed on the surfaces of the fibers by a dipping method. The morphology of the developed electrodes was characterized by several techniques (SEM, Raman spectroscopy, electrical conductivity measurement). The electrochemical properties were evaluated through cyclic voltammetry, where the influence of the carbonization temperature of the fibers and the beneficial contribution of the carbon nanotubes were observed through the reversibility and size of the redox peaks of K3Fe(CN)6 versus Ag/AgCl. Subsequently, redox enzymes were immobilized on the electrodes and the electroreduction of oxygen to water was realized as a test of their efficiency as biocathodes. Due to the fibrous and porous structure of these new electrodes, and to the fact that carbon nanotubes may have the ability to promote electron transfer reactions of redox biomolecules, the new electrodes developed were capable of producing higher current densities than an electrode composed only of electrospun carbon fibers.

  1. Chromatin remodeling enzyme Brg1 is required for mouse lens fiber cell terminal differentiation and its denucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Shuying

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1, also known as Smarca4 and Snf2β encodes an adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP-dependent catalytical subunit of the (switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF complexes are recruited to chromatin through multiple mechanisms, including specific DNA-binding factors (for example, heat shock transcription factor 4 (Hsf4 and paired box gene 6 (Pax6, chromatin structural proteins (for example, high-mobility group A1 (HMGA1 and/or acetylated core histones. Previous studies have shown that a single amino acid substitution (K798R in the Brg1 ATPase domain acts via a dominant-negative (dn mechanism. Genetic studies have demonstrated that Brg1 is an essential gene for early (that is, prior implantation mouse embryonic development. Brg1 also controls neural stem cell maintenance, terminal differentiation of multiple cell lineages and organs including the T-cells, glial cells and limbs. Results To examine the roles of Brg1 in mouse lens development, a dnBrg1 transgenic construct was expressed using the lens-specific αA-crystallin promoter in postmitotic lens fiber cells. Morphological studies revealed abnormal lens fiber cell differentiation in transgenic lenses resulting in cataract. Electron microscopic studies showed abnormal lens suture formation and incomplete karyolysis (that is, denucleation of lens fiber cells. To identify genes regulated by Brg1, RNA expression profiling was performed in embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5 wild-type and dnBrg1 transgenic lenses. In addition, comparisons between differentially expressed genes in dnBrg1 transgenic, Pax6 heterozygous and Hsf4 homozygous lenses identified multiple genes coregulated by Brg1, Hsf4 and Pax6. DNase IIβ, a key enzyme required for lens fiber cell denucleation, was found to be downregulated in each of the Pax6, Brg1 and Hsf4 model systems. Lens-specific deletion of Brg1 using conditional gene targeting demonstrated that

  2. Guidance of in vitro migration of human mesenchymal stem cells and in vivo guided bone regeneration using aligned electrospun fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-hye; Lee, Young Jun; Cho, Hyeong-jin; Shin, Heungsoo

    2014-08-01

    Tissue regeneration is a complex process in which numerous chemical and physical signals are coordinated in a specific spatiotemporal pattern. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that cell migration and bone tissue formation can be guided and facilitated by microscale morphological cues presented from a scaffold. We prepared poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun fibers with random and aligned structures and investigated their effect on in vitro migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and in vivo bone growth using a critical-sized defect model. Using a polydopamine coating on the fibers, we compared the synergistic effects of chemical signals. The adhesion morphology of hMSCs was consistent with the direction of fiber alignment, whereas the proliferation of hMSCs was not affected. The orientation of fibers profoundly affected cell migration, in which hMSCs cultured on aligned fibers migrated 10.46-fold faster along the parallel direction than along the perpendicular direction on polydopamine-coated PLLA nanofibers. We implanted each fiber type into a mouse calvarial defect model for 2 months. The micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated that regenerated bone area was the highest when mice were implanted with aligned fibers with polydopamine coating, indicating a positive synergistic effect on bone regeneration. More importantly, scanning electron microscopy microphotographs revealed that the direction of regenerated bone tissue appeared to be consistent with the direction of the implanted fibers, and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the orientation of collagen fibrils appeared to be overlapped along the direction of nanofibers. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the aligned nanofibers can provide spatial guidance for in vitro cell migration as well as in vivo bone regeneration, which may be incorporated as major instructive cues for the stimulation of tissue regeneration.

  3. Influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on pathfinding of dentate granule cell axons, the hippocampal mossy fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura Makoto; Tamura Naohiro; Ikeda Takamitsu; Koyama Ryuta; Ikegaya Yuji; Matsuki Norio; Yamada Maki K

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Mossy fibers, the dentate granule cell axons, are generated throughout an animal's lifetime. Mossy fiber paths and synapses are primarily restricted to the stratum lucidum within the CA3 region. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin family protein that activates Trk neurotrophin receptors, is highly expressed in the stratum lucidum in an activity-dependent manner. The addition of a Trk neurotrophin receptor inhibitor, K252a, to cultured hippocampal slices induced a...

  4. Narciclasine, a plant growth modulator, activates Rho and stress fibers in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, Florence; Sauvage, Sébastien; Van Goietsenoven, Gwendoline; Mégalizzi, Véronique; Lamoral-Theys, Delphine; Debeir, Olivier; Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Berger, Walter; Mathieu, Véronique; Decaestecker, Christine; Kiss, Robert

    2009-07-01

    Cell motility and resistance to apoptosis characterize glioblastoma multiforme growth and malignancy. Narciclasine, a plant growth modulator, could represent a powerful new weapon targeting the Achilles' heel of glioblastoma multiforme and may offer the potential to better combat these devastating malignancies. The in vitro effects of narciclasine on cell proliferation, morphology, actin cytoskeleton organization, and the Rho/Rho kinase/LIM kinase/cofilin pathway and its antitumor activity in vivo have been determined in models of human glioblastoma multiforme. Narciclasine impairs glioblastoma multiforme growth by markedly decreasing mitotic rates without inducing apoptosis. The compound also modulates the Rho/Rho kinase/LIM kinase/cofilin signaling pathway, greatly increasing GTPase RhoA activity as well as inducing actin stress fiber formation in a RhoA-dependent manner. Lastly, the treatment of human glioblastoma multiforme orthotopic xenograft- bearing mice with nontoxic doses of narciclasine significantly increased their survival. Narciclasine antitumor effects were of the same magnitude as those of temozolomide, the drug associated with the highest therapeutic benefits in treating glioblastoma multiforme patients. Our results show for the first time that narciclasine, a plant growth modulator, activates Rho and stress fibers in glioblastoma multiforme cells and significantly increases the survival of human glioblastoma multiforme preclinical models. This statement is made despite the recognition that to date, irrespective of treatment, no single glioblastoma multiforme patient has been cured.

  5. Sensitive detection of beryllium using a fiber optic liquid waveguide cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gang; Wei, Lily; Collins, Greg E

    2003-05-28

    The metallochromic chelating agent, Chromazurol S, has been utilized in conjunction with a fiber optic liquid waveguide capillary cell to enable the sensitive detection of beryllium in solution (30 ng l(-1) detection limit) and following extraction from a contaminated plexiglas surface (0.5 ng cm(-2) detection limit). The addition of a cationic surfactant, cetylpyridinium chloride, to Chromazurol S at pH 10 in Tris-HCl buffer results in the formation of two bathochromic peaks in the visible spectrum following metal chelation by beryllium. The first absorbance band, at 515 nm, is intermediate in nature, permitting maximal sensitivity for low beryllium concentrations, but diminishing in intensity at concentrations above 100 mug l(-1). The second absorbance band, centered at 610 nm, dominates for beryllium concentrations of 100 mug l(-1) and above. Experimental conditions including pH, buffer type, additive surfactants, masking agents, and dye concentration were investigated in order to optimize detection sensitivity and selectivity. A fiber optic spectrometer is used with both a liquid waveguide capillary cell and 1 cm cuvette cell, to give a sensitive and broad dynamic range for beryllium detection that capitalizes on both beryllium metal chelate absorbance bands formed under these conditions.

  6. A Chlamydia trachomatis OmcB C-Terminal Fragment Is Released into the Host Cell Cytoplasm and Is Immunogenic in Humans ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane complex protein B (OmcB) is an antigen with diagnostic and vaccine relevance. To further characterize OmcB, we generated antibodies against OmcB C-terminal (OmcBc) and N-terminal (OmcBn) fragments. Surprisingly, the anti-OmcBc antibody detected dominant signals in the host cell cytosol, while the anti-OmcBn antibody exclusively labeled intrainclusion signals in C. trachomatis-infected cells permeabilized with saponin. Western blot analyses revealed tha...

  7. Development of a Micro-Fiber Nickel Electrode for Nickel-Hydrogen Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a high specific energy battery is one of the objectives of the lightweight nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) program at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The approach has been to improve the nickel electrode by continuing combined in-house and contract efforts to develop a more efficient and lighter weight electrode for the nickel-hydrogen fuel cell. Small fiber diameter nickel plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques are commercial products and have an advantage of increased surface area available for the deposition of active materials. Initial tests include activation and capacity measurements at different discharge levels followed by half-cell cycle testing at 80 percent depth-of-discharge in a low Earth orbit regime. The electrodes that pass the initial tests are life cycle tested in a boiler plate nickel-hydrogen cell before flightweight designs are built and tested.

  8. Evidence for a intimate relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers in the tongue of the frog, Rana esculenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella; Minucci, Sergio [Naples, II Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisiologia Umana e Funzioni Biologiche Integrate `Filippo Bottazzi`

    1997-12-31

    Morphological and ultrastructural association of mast cells and nerve fibers were studied in the tongue of the frog Rana esculenta. The number of mast cells in the tongue (253 {+-} 45 / mm{sup 2}) is far the highest of the frog tissue as far as people know. They are distributed throughout the connective tissue among the muscular fibers, near arterioles and venules but predominantly in close association and within the nerves. They are often embedded in the endoneurium within a nerve bundle near to myelinic or unmyelinic fibers and in membrane-to-membrane contact with axonlike processes. Just for the richness of mast cells, the tongue of the frog could represent an useful model to study the relationship between these cells and the peripheral nervous system.

  9. Real-time monitoring of intracellular signal transduction in PC12 cells by non-adiabatic tapered optical fiber biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Asadollahi, A.; Noraeipoor, Z.; Dargahi, L.

    2014-05-01

    Real-time observation of intracellular process of signal transduction is very useful for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications as well as for basic research work of cell biology. For feasible and reagentless observation of intracellular alterations in real time, we examined the use of a nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber (NATOF) biosensor for monitoring of intracellular signal transduction that was mainly translocation of protein kinase C via refractive index change in PC12 cells adhered on tapered fiber sensor without any indicator reagent. PC12 cells were stimulated with KCl . Our results suggest that complex intracellular reactions could be real-time monitored and characterized by NATOF biosensor.

  10. GhDET2,a Steroid 5alpha-reductase,Plays an Important Role in Cotton Fiber Cell Initiation and Elongation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Cotton(Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers,one of the most important natural raw materials for the textile industry,are highly elongated trichomes from epidermal cells of cotton ovules.Among the longest plant cells ever characterized,cotton fiber is an ideal system for studying plant cell elongation.

  11. THE KINETICS OF CYTOPLASMIC GRANULE SECRETION IN NATURAL KILLER CYTOTOXICITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚伊红; R.R.Hcrberman; C.W.Reynolds

    1994-01-01

    Antisexum against purified cytoplasmic granules from rat LGL tumor cells, and protein A-gold inmmnoelec-tron microscopy were used to study the secretory events in lysis of YAC-1 tumor cells by rat LGL tumor cells or by isolated LGL from normal rats. After 30 min incubation of effector and target cells together, gold-labeled cyto-plasmic granules were often seen concentrated in the area of the LGL adjacent to the ~ YAC-1 Within 60min,the grantees were observed to move to the cell border near the conjugazed site. At this point, fine granules were fused with file cell membrane, and subsequently released file gold-labeled contents into the junction between the LGL and the target cell. Gold particles could be seen at the B-T interface, on the surface,or sometimes on the target cell surface.These data provide direct evidence for the hypothesis that under conditions of active cytotoxicity,natural killer cells secrete their cytoplasmic granule contents leading to the deposition of granule material on the target cell surface and the eventual lysis of the cell.

  12. Regulation of the muscle fiber microenvironment by activated satellite cells during hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S; Lee, Jonah D; Jackson, Janna R; Kirby, Tyler J; Stasko, Shawn A; Liu, Honglu; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2014-04-01

    Our aim in the current study was to determine the necessity of satellite cells for long-term muscle growth and maintenance. We utilized a transgenic Pax7-DTA mouse model, allowing for the conditional depletion of > 90% of satellite cells with tamoxifen treatment. Synergist ablation surgery, where removal of synergist muscles places functional overload on the plantaris, was used to stimulate robust hypertrophy. Following 8 wk of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle demonstrated an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and fibroblast expansion that resulted in reduced specific force of the plantaris. Although the early growth response was normal, an attenuation of hypertrophy measured by both muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area occurred in satellite cell-depleted muscle. Isolated primary myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) negatively regulated fibroblast ECM mRNA expression in vitro, suggesting a novel role for activated satellite cells/MPCs in muscle adaptation. These results provide evidence that satellite cells regulate the muscle environment during growth.

  13. Boric acid induces cytoplasmic stress granule formation, eIF2α phosphorylation, and ATF4 in prostate DU-145 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kimberly A; Kobylewski, Sarah E; Yamada, Kristin E; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2015-02-01

    Dietary boron intake is associated with reduced prostate and lung cancer risk and increased bone mass. Boron is absorbed and circulated as boric acid (BA) and at physiological concentrations is a reversible competitive inhibitor of cyclic ADP ribose, the endogenous agonist of the ryanodine receptor calcium (Ca(+2)) channel, and lowers endoplasmic reticulum (ER) [Ca(2+)]. Low ER [Ca(2+)] has been reported to induce ER stress and activate the eIF2α/ATF4 pathway. Here we report that treatment of DU-145 prostate cells with physiological levels of BA induces ER stress with the formation of stress granules and mild activation of eIF2α, GRP78/BiP, and ATF4. Mild activation of eIF2α and its downstream transcription factor, ATF4, enables cells to reconfigure gene expression to manage stress conditions and mild activation of ATF4 is also required for the differentiation of osteoblast cells. Our results using physiological levels of boric acid identify the eIF2α/ATF pathway as a plausible mode of action that underpins the reported health effects of dietary boron.

  14. Novel origin of lamin-derived cytoplasmic intermediate filaments in tardigrades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Lars; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Reichelt, Julian; Magin, Thomas M; Mayer, Georg

    2016-02-03

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins, including nuclear lamins and cytoplasmic IF proteins, are essential cytoskeletal components of bilaterian cells. Despite their important role in protecting tissues against mechanical force, no cytoplasmic IF proteins have been convincingly identified in arthropods. Here we show that the ancestral cytoplasmic IF protein gene was lost in the entire panarthropod (onychophoran + tardigrade + arthropod) rather than arthropod lineage and that nuclear, lamin-derived proteins instead acquired new cytoplasmic roles at least three times independently in collembolans, copepods, and tardigrades. Transcriptomic and genomic data revealed three IF protein genes in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, one of which (cytotardin) occurs exclusively in the cytoplasm of epidermal and foregut epithelia, where it forms belt-like filaments around each epithelial cell. These results suggest that a lamin derivative has been co-opted to enhance tissue stability in tardigrades, a function otherwise served by cytoplasmic IF proteins in all other bilaterians.

  15. Muscle Fiber Characteristics, Satellite Cells and Soccer Performance in Young Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas I. Metaxas, Athanasios Mandroukas, Efstratios Vamvakoudis, Kostas Kotoglou, Björn Ekblom, Konstantinos Mandroukas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to examine the muscle fiber type, composition and satellite cells in young male soccer players and to correlate them to cardiorespiratory indices and muscle strength. The participants formed three Groups: Group A (n = 13, 11.2 ± 0.4yrs, Group B (n=10, 13.1 ± 0.5yrs and Group C (n = 9, 15.2 ± 0.6yrs. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. Peak torque values of the quadriceps and hamstrings were recorded and VO2max was measured on the treadmill. Group C had lower type I percentage distribution compared to A by 21.3% (p < 0.01, while the type IIA relative percentage was higher by 18.1% and 18.4% than in Groups A and B (p < 0.05. Groups B and C had higher cross-sectional area (CSA values in all fiber types than in Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001. The number of satellite cells did not differ between the groups. Groups B and C had higher peak torque at all angular velocities and absolute VO2max in terms of ml·min-1 than Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001. It is concluded that the increased percentage of type IIA muscle fibers noticed in Group C in comparison to the Groups A and B should be mainly attributed to the different workload exercise and training programs. The alteration of myosin heavy chain (MHC isoforms composition even in children is an important mechanism for skeletal muscle characteristics. Finally, CSA, isokinetic muscle strength and VO2max values seems to be expressed according to age.

  16. [Senescence and apoptosis of protoplasts from flax fibers: an ultrastructural analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageeva, M V; Chernova, T E; Gorshkova, T A

    2012-01-01

    Plant fibers represent specialized cells that perform a mechanical function. Their development includes the following phases, typical for the most plant cells: anlage, extension growth, specialization, senescence, and apoptosis. Ultrastructural analysis of these cells has been carried out at the late phases of their development (senescence and apoptosis) using flax phloem fibers, a classical object for the analysis of sclerenchyma fiber formation. The results of the performed analysis show that flax fiber protoplasts remain viable until the end ofa vegetation season. The ultrastructural analysis of flax phloem fibers has not revealed any typical apoptosis manifestations. Gradual degradation of the cytoplasm starts during the active thickening of a secondary cell wall and manifests via the intensification of autolytic processes, causing a partial loss of cell content. The final stage represents the breaking of tonoplast integrity. The obtained data allow us to suppose that the apoptosis of flax fibers occurs during their senescence, and its program is similar to the cell death program realized in the xylem fibers of woody plants.

  17. Calcium-activated K+ channels of mouse beta-cells are controlled by both store and cytoplasmic Ca2+: experimental and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, P B; Bertram, R; Khan, F A; Zhang, M; Sherman, A; Satin, L S

    2002-09-01

    A novel calcium-dependent potassium current (K(slow)) that slowly activates in response to a simulated islet burst was identified recently in mouse pancreatic beta-cells (Göpel, S.O., T. Kanno, S. Barg, L. Eliasson, J. Galvanovskis, E. Renström, and P. Rorsman. 1999. J. Gen. Physiol. 114:759-769). K(slow) activation may help terminate the cyclic bursts of Ca(2+)-dependent action potentials that drive Ca(2+) influx and insulin secretion in beta-cells. Here, we report that when [Ca(2+)](i) handling was disrupted by blocking Ca(2+) uptake into the ER with two separate agents reported to block the sarco/endoplasmic calcium ATPase (SERCA), thapsigargin (1-5 microM) or insulin (200 nM), K(slow) was transiently potentiated and then inhibited. K(slow) amplitude could also be inhibited by increasing extracellular glucose concentration from 5 to 10 mM. The biphasic modulation of K(slow) by SERCA blockers could not be explained by a minimal mathematical model in which [Ca(2+)](i) is divided between two compartments, the cytosol and the ER, and K(slow) activation mirrors changes in cytosolic calcium induced by the burst protocol. However, the experimental findings were reproduced by a model in which K(slow) activation is mediated by a localized pool of [Ca(2+)] in a subspace located between the ER and the plasma membrane. In this model, the subspace [Ca(2+)] follows changes in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] but with a gradient that reflects Ca(2+) efflux from the ER. Slow modulation of this gradient as the ER empties and fills may enhance the role of K(slow) and [Ca(2+)] handling in influencing beta-cell electrical activity and insulin secretion.

  18. Profilin is required for viral morphogenesis, syncytium formation, and cell-specific stress fiber induction by respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is required for the gene expression and morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, a clinically important Pneumovirus of the Paramyxoviridae family. In HEp-2 cells, RSV infection also induces actin stress fibers, which may be important in the immunopathology of the RSV disease. Profilin, a major regulator of actin polymerization, stimulates viral transcription in vitro. Thus, we tested the role of profilin in RSV growth and RSV-actin interactions in cultured cells (ex vivo. Results We tested three cell lines: HEp-2 (human, A549 (human, and L2 (rat. In all three, RSV grew well and produced fused cells (syncytium, and two RSV proteins, namely, the phosphoprotein P and the nucleocapsid protein N, associated with profilin. In contrast, induction of actin stress fibers by RSV occurred in HEp-2 and L2 cells, but not in A549. Knockdown of profilin by RNA interference had a small effect on viral macromolecule synthesis but strongly inhibited maturation of progeny virions, cell fusion, and induction of stress fibers. Conclusions Profilin plays a cardinal role in RSV-mediated cell fusion and viral maturation. In contrast, interaction of profilin with the viral transcriptional proteins P and N may only nominally activate viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Stress fiber formation is a cell-specific response to infection, requiring profilin and perhaps other signaling molecules that are absent in certain cell lines. Stress fibers per se play no role in RSV replication in cell culture. Clearly, the cellular architecture controls multiple steps of host-RSV interaction, some of which are regulated by profilin.

  19. Asbestos-induced endothelial cell activation and injury. Demonstration of fiber phagocytosis and oxidant-dependent toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J G; Gray, L D; Dodson, R F; Callahan, K S

    1988-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cell injury is important in the development of a variety of chronic interstitial lung disorders. However, the involvement of such injury in the inflammatory response associated with the inhalation of asbestos fibers is unclear and the mechanism of asbestos fiber cytotoxicity remains unknown. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were challenged with amosite asbestos and several parameters of cellular function were examined. Electron microscopic examination revealed that endothelial cell exposure to asbestos resulted in active phagocytosis of these particulates. Biochemical evidence of dose-dependent asbestos-mediated endothelial cell activation was indicated by increased metabolism of arachidonic acid. For example, amosite asbestos (500 micrograms/ml) produced a ninefold increase in prostacyclin (PGI2) levels over those levels in non-exposed cells. Incubation of human endothelial cells with asbestos fibers induced specific 51Cr release in both a dose- and time-dependent fashion indicative of cellular injury. Injury induced by amosite asbestos was not significantly attenuated by treatment of the endothelial cell monolayer with either the iron chelator deferoxamine, which prevents hydroxyl radical (.OH) formation, or by the superoxide anion (O2-) scavenger, superoxide dismutase. However, significant dose-dependent protection was observed with the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenger, catalase. Chelation of elemental iron present within amosite asbestos fibers by deferoxamine produced a 33% reduction in asbestos cytotoxicity, suggesting a potential role for hydroxyl radical-mediated injury via the iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Growth of ZnO nanowires on fibers for one-dimensional flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haining; Zhu, Liqun; Liu, Huicong; Li, Weiping

    2012-02-24

    One-dimensional flexible solar cells were fabricated through vertical growth of ZnO nanowires on freestanding carbon fibers and subsequent deposition of CdS quantum dots (QDs). Under light illumination, excitons were generated in the CdS QDs and dissociated in the ZnO/CdS interface. Photoelectrochemical characterization indicates that fiber quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) could effectively absorb visible light and convert it to electric energy. The photoelectrochemical performance was enhanced after the deposition of a ZnS passivating layer on the CF/ZnO/CdS surface. The highest conversion efficiency of about 0.006% was achieved by the fiber QDSCs. A higher conversion efficiency was expected to be achieved after some important parameters and cell structure were optimized and improved.

  1. Self-powered textile for wearable electronics by hybridizing fiber-shaped nanogenerators, solar cells, and supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Zi, Yunlong; Xu, Weidong; Deng, Jianan; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Xin; Hu, Chenguo; Zhu, Liping; Sun, Xuhui; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-10-01

    Wearable electronics fabricated on lightweight and flexible substrate are believed to have great potential for portable devices, but their applications are limited by the life span of their batteries. We propose a hybridized self-charging power textile system with the aim of simultaneously collecting outdoor sunshine and random body motion energies and then storing them in an energy storage unit. Both of the harvested energies can be easily converted into electricity by using fiber-shaped dye-sensitized solar cells (for solar energy) and fiber-shaped triboelectric nanogenerators (for random body motion energy) and then further stored as chemical energy in fiber-shaped supercapacitors. Because of the all-fiber-shaped structure of the entire system, our proposed hybridized self-charging textile system can be easily woven into electronic textiles to fabricate smart clothes to sustainably operate mobile or wearable electronics.

  2. Electrospun fibers for high performance anodes in microbial fuel cells. Optimizing materials and architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shuiliang

    2010-04-15

    A novel porous conducting nanofiber mat (PCNM) with nanostructured polyaniline (nanoPANi) on the fiber surface was successfully prepared by simple oxidative polymerization. The composite PCNM displayed a core/shell structure with highly rough surface. The thickness and the morphology of PANi layer on the electrospun polyamide (PA) fiber surface could be controlled by varying aniline concentration and temperature. The combination of the advantages of electrospinning technique and nanostructured PANi, let the PA/PANi composite PCNM possess more than five good properties, i.e. high conductivity of 6.759 S.m{sup -1}, high specific surface area of 160 m2.g{sup -1}, good strength of 82.88 MPa for mat and 161.75 MPa for highly aligned belts, good thermal properties with 5% weight loss temperature up to 415 C and excellent biocompatibility. In the PA/PANi composite PCNM, PANi is the only conducting component, its conductivity of 6.759 S.m{sup -1} which is measured in dry-state, is not enough for electrode. Moreover, the conductivity decreases in neutral pH environment due to the de-doping of proton. However, the method of spontaneous growth of nanostructured PANi on electrospun fiber mats provides an effective method to produce porous electrically conducting electrospun fiber mats. The combination advantages of nanostructured PANi with the electrospun fiber mats, extends the applications of PANi and electrospun nanofibers, such as chemical- and bio-sensors, actuators, catalysis, electromagnetic shielding, corrosion protection, separation membranes, electro-optic devices, electrochromic devices, tissue engineering and many others. The electrical conductivity of electrospun PCNM with PANi as the only conducting component is too low for application of as anode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). So, we turn to electrospun carbon fiber due to its high electrical conductivity and environmental stability. The current density is greatly dependent on the microorganism density of anode

  3. Electrospun fibers for high performance anodes in microbial fuel cells. Optimizing materials and architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shuiliang

    2010-04-15

    A novel porous conducting nanofiber mat (PCNM) with nanostructured polyaniline (nanoPANi) on the fiber surface was successfully prepared by simple oxidative polymerization. The composite PCNM displayed a core/shell structure with highly rough surface. The thickness and the morphology of PANi layer on the electrospun polyamide (PA) fiber surface could be controlled by varying aniline concentration and temperature. The combination of the advantages of electrospinning technique and nanostructured PANi, let the PA/PANi composite PCNM possess more than five good properties, i.e. high conductivity of 6.759 S.m{sup -1}, high specific surface area of 160 m2.g{sup -1}, good strength of 82.88 MPa for mat and 161.75 MPa for highly aligned belts, good thermal properties with 5% weight loss temperature up to 415 C and excellent biocompatibility. In the PA/PANi composite PCNM, PANi is the only conducting component, its conductivity of 6.759 S.m{sup -1} which is measured in dry-state, is not enough for electrode. Moreover, the conductivity decreases in neutral pH environment due to the de-doping of proton. However, the method of spontaneous growth of nanostructured PANi on electrospun fiber mats provides an effective method to produce porous electrically conducting electrospun fiber mats. The combination advantages of nanostructured PANi with the electrospun fiber mats, extends the applications of PANi and electrospun nanofibers, such as chemical- and bio-sensors, actuators, catalysis, electromagnetic shielding, corrosion protection, separation membranes, electro-optic devices, electrochromic devices, tissue engineering and many others. The electrical conductivity of electrospun PCNM with PANi as the only conducting component is too low for application of as anode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). So, we turn to electrospun carbon fiber due to its high electrical conductivity and environmental stability. The current density is greatly dependent on the microorganism density of anode

  4. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-06-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that deletion, depletion or inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53(-/-) cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53.

  5. A physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming (invited)

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-01-01

    Organisms show a remarkable range of sizes, yet the dimensions of a single cell rarely exceed $100$ $\\mu$m. While the physical and biological origins of this constraint remain poorly understood, exceptions to this rule give valuable insights. A well-known counterexample is the aquatic plant $Chara$, whose cells can exceed $10$ cm in length and $1$ mm in diameter. Two spiraling bands of molecular motors at the cell periphery drive the cellular fluid up and down at speeds up to $100$ $\\mu$m/s, motion that has been hypothesized to mitigate the slowness of metabolite transport on these scales and to aid in homeostasis. This is the most organized instance of a broad class of continuous motions known as "cytoplasmic streaming", found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms - algae, plants, amoebae, nematodes, and flies - often in unusually large cells. In this overview of the physics of this phenomenon, we examine the interplay between streaming, transport and cell size, and discuss the possible role of self-organi...

  6. A physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Raymond E; van de Meent, Jan-Willem

    2015-08-06

    Organisms show a remarkable range of sizes, yet the dimensions of a single cell rarely exceed 100 µm. While the physical and biological origins of this constraint remain poorly understood, exceptions to this rule give valuable insights. A well-known counterexample is the aquatic plant Chara, whose cells can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. Two spiralling bands of molecular motors at the cell periphery drive the cellular fluid up and down at speeds up to 100 µm s(-1), motion that has been hypothesized to mitigate the slowness of metabolite transport on these scales and to aid in homeostasis. This is the most organized instance of a broad class of continuous motions known as 'cytoplasmic streaming', found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms-algae, plants, amoebae, nematodes and flies-often in unusually large cells. In this overview of the physics of this phenomenon, we examine the interplay between streaming, transport and cell size and discuss the possible role of self-organization phenomena in establishing the observed patterns of streaming.

  7. Rotation and deformation of human red blood cells with light from tapered fiber probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Jianbin; Li, Yuchao; Zhang, Yao; Li, Baojun

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic rotation and deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) are extremely important to investigate the survival and mechanical features of cells, which will be of great physiological and pathological significance. Here, we report an optical approach that is capable of both rotating and deforming RBCs with light from two tapered fiber probes (TFPs). With laser beams at the wavelength of 980 nm injected into the TFPs, a single RBC was rotated around different axes while single or multiple RBCs were stretched by adjusting the points of action and magnitude of the optical forces from the TFPs. The biological safety of the approach was also discussed by taking the laser power required into account.

  8. Impact of elastin incorporation into electrochemically aligned collagen fibers on mechanical properties and smooth muscle cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy-Uyen; Bashur, Chris A; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-03-17

    Application of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) for the replacement of small-diameter arteries is limited due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Previous studies have attempted to address the limitations of TEVGs by developing scaffolds that mimic the composition (collagen and elastin) of native arteries to better match the mechanical properties of the graft with the native tissue. However, most existing scaffolds do not recapitulate the aligned topography of the collagen fibers found in native vessels. In the current study, based on the principles of isoelectric focusing, two different types of elastin (soluble and insoluble) were incorporated into highly oriented electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) fibers and the effect of elastin incorporation on the mechanical properties of the ELAC fibers and smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype was investigated. The results indicate that elastin incorporation significantly decreased the modulus of ELAC fibers to converge upon that of native vessels. Further, a significant increase in yield strain and decrease in Young's modulus was observed on all fibers post SMC culture compared with before the culture. Real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed a significant increase in the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and calponin on ELAC fibers with insoluble elastin, suggesting that incorporation of insoluble elastin induces a contractile phenotype in SMCs after two weeks of culture on ELAC fibers. Immunofluorescence results showed that calponin expression increased with time on all fibers. In conclusion, insoluble elastin incorporated ELAC fibers have the potential to be used for the development of functional TEVGs for the repair and replacement of small-diameter arteries.

  9. Optomechatronic System For Automated Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulev Assen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a complex optomechatronic system for In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF, offering almost complete automation of the Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI procedure. The compound parts and sub-systems, as well as some of the computer vision algorithms, are described below. System capabilities for ICSI have been demonstrated on infertile oocyte cells.

  10. "allometry" Deterministic Approaches in Cell Size, Cell Number and Crude Fiber Content Related to the Physical Quality of Kangkong (Ipomoea reptans) Grown Under Different Plant Density Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamat, A.; Atiman, S. A.; Puteh, A.; Abdullah, N. A. P.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Zulkeefli, A. A.; Othman, S.

    Kangkong, especially the upland type (Ipomoea reptans) is popularly consumed as a vegetable dish in the South East Asian countries for its quality related to Vitamins (A and C) and crude fiber contents. Higher fiber contents would prevent from the occurrence of colon cancer and diverticular disease. With young stem edible portion, its cell number and size contribute to the stem crude fiber content. The mathematical approach of allometry of cell size, number, and fiber content of stem could be used in determining the 'best' plant density pressure in producing the quality young stem to be consumed. Basically, allometry is the ratio of relative increment (growth or change) rates of two parameters, or the change rate associated to the log of measured variables relationship. Kangkog grown equal or lower than 55 plants m-2 produced bigger individual plant and good quality (physical) kangkong leafy vegetable, but with lower total yield per unit area as compared to those grown at higher densities.

  11. Cell division in Apicomplexan parasites is organized by a homolog of the striated rootlet fiber of algal flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Maria E; Jordan, Carly N; Patel, Jay D; Sheiner, Lilach; Demerly, Jessica L; Fellows, Justin D; de Leon, Jessica Cruz; Morrissette, Naomi S; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Striepen, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Apicomplexa are intracellular parasites that cause important human diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. During host cell infection new parasites are formed through a budding process that parcels out nuclei and organelles into multiple daughters. Budding is remarkably flexible in output and can produce two to thousands of progeny cells. How genomes and daughters are counted and coordinated is unknown. Apicomplexa evolved from single celled flagellated algae, but with the exception of the gametes, lack flagella. Here we demonstrate that a structure that in the algal ancestor served as the rootlet of the flagellar basal bodies is required for parasite cell division. Parasite striated fiber assemblins (SFA) polymerize into a dynamic fiber that emerges from the centrosomes immediately after their duplication. The fiber grows in a polarized fashion and daughter cells form at its distal tip. As the daughter cell is further elaborated it remains physically tethered at its apical end, the conoid and polar ring. Genetic experiments in Toxoplasma gondii demonstrate two essential components of the fiber, TgSFA2 and 3. In the absence of either of these proteins cytokinesis is blocked at its earliest point, the initiation of the daughter microtubule organizing center (MTOC). Mitosis remains unimpeded and mutant cells accumulate numerous nuclei but fail to form daughter cells. The SFA fiber provides a robust spatial and temporal organizer of parasite cell division, a process that appears hard-wired to the centrosome by multiple tethers. Our findings have broader evolutionary implications. We propose that Apicomplexa abandoned flagella for most stages yet retained the organizing principle of the flagellar MTOC. Instead of ensuring appropriate numbers of flagella, the system now positions the apical invasion complexes. This suggests that elements of the invasion apparatus may be derived from flagella or flagellum associated structures.

  12. Prognostic significance of the S-phase fraction of light-chain-restricted cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) positive plasma cells in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma enrolled on Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group treatment trial E9486.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trendle, M C; Leong, T; Kyle, R A; Katzmann, J A; Oken, M M; Kay, N E; Van Ness, B G; Greipp, P R

    1999-08-01

    The bone marrow plasma cell labeling index (PCLI) as measured by bromodeoxyuridine uptake is a well-established independent prognostic factor for patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, but the test is not easily done in most laboratories. The purpose of this study was to determine if the proliferative activity (% S-phase) as determined by two-color flow cytometry for cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) light chain and DNA content also had prognostic significance. As part of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group clinical trial E9486, 500 patients had successful performance of the bone marrow PCLI. Of 349 patients who had flow cIg and DNA content cytometry, 210 had adequate data to reliably calculate S-phase %. Patients with low % S-phase fraction (/=2%), median survivals 4.1 vs. 2.9 years (P = 0.032). Measurement of the S-phase % by flow cytometry gives significant prognostic information in patients with newly diagnosed myeloma. However, in multivariate analysis, S-phase % did not add prognostic information when PCLI was in the model. S-phase % added prognostic information only when all cases with flow measurement of S-phase % were included, and when PCLI was excluded from the model. Discriminating a population of only cIg positive cells proved difficult in patients with a low percentage of bone marrow plasma cells. Methodology to measure S-phase % in patients with a low percent plasma cells is needed before this technique can be used for diagnosis and prognosis in myeloma. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. IL-4 and IL-13 induce protection from complement and melittin in endothelial cells despite initial loss of cytoplasmic proteins: membrane resealing impairs quantifying cytotoxicity with the lactate dehydrogenase permeability assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Barbara A; Vercellotti, Gregory M; Dalmasso, Agustin P

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell activation and injury by the terminal pathway of complement is important in various pathobiological processes, including xenograft rejection. Protection against injury by human complement can be induced in porcine endothelial cells (ECs) with IL-4 and IL-13 through metabolic activation. However, despite this resistance, the complement-treated ECs were found to lose membrane permeability control assessed with the small molecule calcein. Therefore, to define the apparent discrepancy of permeability changes vis-à-vis the protection from killing, we now investigated whether IL-4 and IL-13 influence the release of the large cytoplasmic protein lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in ECs incubated with complement or the pore-forming protein melittin. Primary cultures of ECs were pre-treated with IL-4 or IL-13 and then incubated with human serum as source of antibody and complement or melittin. Cell death was assessed using neutral red. Membrane permeability was quantitated measuring LDH release. We found that IL-4-/IL-13-induced protection of ECs from killing by complement or melittin despite loss of LDH in amounts similar to control ECs. However, the cytokine-treated ECs that were protected from killing rapidly regained effective control of membrane permeability. Moreover, the viability of the protected ECs was maintained for at least 2 days. We conclude that the protection induced by IL-4/IL-13 in ECs against lethal attack by complement or melittin is effective and durable despite severe initial impairment of membrane permeability. The metabolic changes responsible for protection allow the cells to repair the membrane injury caused by complement or melittin.

  14. The Cytoplasmic Tail Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Regulates Membrane Fusion Activity through Altering gH Binding to gp42 and Epithelial Cell Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2016-11-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a variety of cancers as well as lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised patients. EBV mediates viral entry into epithelial and B cells using fusion machinery composed of four glycoproteins: gB, the gH/gL complex, and gp42. gB and gH/gL are required for both epithelial and B cell fusion. The specific role of gH/gL in fusion has been the most elusive among the required herpesvirus entry glycoproteins. Previous mutational studies have focused on the ectodomain of EBV gH and not on the gH cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). In this study, we chose to examine the function of the gH CTD by making serial gH truncation mutants as well as amino acid substitution mutants to determine the importance of the gH CTD in epithelial and B cell fusion. Truncation of 8 amino acids (aa 698 to 706) of the gH CTD resulted in diminished fusion activity using a virus-free syncytium formation assay and fusion assay. The importance of the amino acid composition of the gH CTD was also investigated by amino acid substitutions that altered the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the CTD. These mutations also resulted in diminished fusion activity. Interestingly, some of the gH CTD truncation mutants and hydrophilic tail substitution mutants lost the ability to bind to gp42 and epithelial cells. In summary, our studies indicate that the gH CTD is an important functional domain.

  15. The Cytoplasmic Tail Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Regulates Membrane Fusion Activity through Altering gH Binding to gp42 and Epithelial Cell Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a variety of cancers as well as lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised patients. EBV mediates viral entry into epithelial and B cells using fusion machinery composed of four glycoproteins: gB, the gH/gL complex, and gp42. gB and gH/gL are required for both epithelial and B cell fusion. The specific role of gH/gL in fusion has been the most elusive among the required herpesvirus entry glycoproteins. Previous mutational studies have focused on the ectodomain of EBV gH and not on the gH cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD. In this study, we chose to examine the function of the gH CTD by making serial gH truncation mutants as well as amino acid substitution mutants to determine the importance of the gH CTD in epithelial and B cell fusion. Truncation of 8 amino acids (aa 698 to 706 of the gH CTD resulted in diminished fusion activity using a virus-free syncytium formation assay and fusion assay. The importance of the amino acid composition of the gH CTD was also investigated by amino acid substitutions that altered the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the CTD. These mutations also resulted in diminished fusion activity. Interestingly, some of the gH CTD truncation mutants and hydrophilic tail substitution mutants lost the ability to bind to gp42 and epithelial cells. In summary, our studies indicate that the gH CTD is an important functional domain.

  16. Two-Mode Multiplexing at 2×10.7 Gbps over 7-Cell Hollow- Core Photonic Band Gap Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jing; Peucheret, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate two-mode multiplexing at 2×10.7 Gbps over 7-cell hollow-core photonic band gap fiber. BER performances below FEC threshold limit (3.3×10-3) are shown for both data channels.......We demonstrate two-mode multiplexing at 2×10.7 Gbps over 7-cell hollow-core photonic band gap fiber. BER performances below FEC threshold limit (3.3×10-3) are shown for both data channels....

  17. Bidirectional transmembrane signaling by cytoplasmic domain separation in integrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsoo; Carman, Christopher V; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-09-19

    Although critical for development, immunity, wound healing, and metastasis, integrins represent one of the few classes of plasma membrane receptors for which the basic signaling mechanism remains a mystery. We investigated cytoplasmic conformational changes in the integrin LFA-1 (alphaLbeta2) in living cells by measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer between cyan fluorescent protein-fused and yellow fluorescent protein-fused alphaL and beta2 cytoplasmic domains. In the resting state these domains were close to each other, but underwent significant spatial separation upon either intracellular activation of integrin adhesiveness (inside-out signaling) or ligand binding (outside-in signaling). Thus, bidirectional integrin signaling is accomplished by coupling extracellular conformational changes to an unclasping and separation of the alpha and beta cytoplasmic domains, a distinctive mechanism for transmitting information across the plasma membrane.

  18. Measuring mitochondrial and cytoplasmic Ca2+ in EGFP expressing cells with a low-affinity calcium Ruby and its dextran conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luccardini, Camilla; Yakovlev, Aleksey V; Pasche, Mathias; Gaillard, Stéphane; Li, Dongdong; Rousseau, France; Ly, Romain; Becherer, Ute; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne; Oheim, Martin

    2009-03-01

    The limited choice and poor performance of red-emitting calcium (Ca(2+)) indicators have hampered microfluorometric measurements of the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration in cells expressing yellow- or green-fluorescent protein constructs. A long-wavelength Ca(2+) indicator would also permit a better discrimination against cellular autofluorescence than the commonly used fluorescein-based probes. Here, we report an improved synthesis and characterization of Calcium Ruby, a red-emitting probe consisting of an extended rhodamine chromophore (578/602 nm peak excitation/emission) conjugated to BAPTA and having an additional NH(2) linker arm. The low-affinity variant (K(D,Ca) approximately 30 microM) with a chloride in meta position that was specifically designed for the detection of large and rapid Ca(2+) transients. While Calcium Ruby is a mitochondrial Ca(2+)probe, its conjugation, via the NH(2) tail, to a 10,000 MW dextran abolishes the sub-cellular compartmentalization and generates a cytosolic Ca(2+) probe with an affinity matched to microdomain Ca(2+) signals. As an example, we show depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) signals triggering the exocytosis of individual chromaffin granules. Calcium Ruby should be of use in a wide range of applications involving dual- or triple labeling schemes or targeted sub-cellular Ca(2+) measurements.

  19. [Changes in cell respiration of postural muscle fibers under long-term gravitational unloading after dietary succinate supplementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, I V; Veselova, O M; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    The intensity of cell respiration of the rat m. soleus, m. gastrocnemius c.m. and tibialis anterior fibers during 35-day gravitational unloading, with the addition of succinate in the diet at a dosage rate of 50 mg per 1 kg animal weight has been investigated. The gravitational unloading was modeled by antiorthostatic hindlimb suspension. The intensity of cell respiration was estimated by polarography. It was shown that the rate of oxygen consumption by soleus and gastrocnemius fibers on endogenous and exogenous substrates and with the addition of ADP decreases after the discharge. This may be associated with the transition to the glycolytic energy path due to a decrease in the EMG-activity. At the same time, the respiration rate after the addition of exogenous substrates in soleus fibers did not increase, indicating a disturbance in the function of the NCCR-section of the respiratory chain and more pronounced changes in the structure of muscle fibers. In tibialis anterior fibers, no changes in oxygen consumption velocity were observed. The introduction of succinate to the diet of rats makes it possible to prevent the negative effects of hypokinesia, although it reduces the basal level of intensity of cell respiration.

  20. Anisotropic poly (glycerol sebacate)-poly (ϵ-caprolactone) electrospun fibers promote endothelial cell guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Sant, Shilpa; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-12-17

    Topographical cell guidance is utilized to engineer highly organized and aligned cellular constructs for numerous tissue engineering applications. Recently, electrospun scaffolds fabricated using poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) have shown a great promise to support valvular interstitial cell functions for the development of tissue engineered heart valves. However, one of the major drawbacks of PGS-PCL scaffolds is the lack of control over cellular alignment. In this work, we investigate the role of scaffold architecture on the endothelial cell alignment, proliferation and formation of organized cellular structures. In particular, PGS-PCL scaffolds with randomly oriented and highly aligned fibers with tunable mechanical properties were fabricated using electrospinning technique. After one week of culture, endothelial cells on the aligned scaffolds exhibited higher proliferation compared to those cultures on randomly oriented fibrous scaffolds. Furthermore, the endothelial cells reorganized in response to the topographical features of aligned scaffolds forming highly organized cellular constructs. Thus, topographical contact guidance, provided by aligned PGS-PCL scaffolds, is envisioned to be useful in developing cellular structures for vascular tissue engineering.

  1. Long-distance laser propulsion and deformation- monitoring of cells in optofluidic photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterkofler, Sarah; Garbos, Martin K; Euser, Tijmen G; St J Russell, Philip

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a unique method for laser-propelling individual cells over distances of 10s of cm through stationary liquid in a microfluidic channel. This is achieved by using liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). HC-PCF provides low-loss light guidance in a well-defined single mode, resulting in highly uniform optical trapping and propulsive forces in the core which at the same time acts as a microfluidic channel. Cells are trapped laterally at the center of the core, typically several microns away from the glass interface, which eliminates adherence effects and external perturbations. During propagation, the velocity of the cells is conveniently monitored using a non-imaging Doppler velocimetry technique. Dynamic changes in velocity at constant optical powers up to 350 mW indicate stress-induced changes in the shape of the cells, which is confirmed by bright-field microscopy. Our results suggest that HC-PCF will be useful as a new tool for the study of single-cell biomechanics.

  2. Electrospun Collagen/Silk Tissue Engineering Scaffolds: Fiber Fabrication, Post-Treatment Optimization, and Application in Neural Differentiation of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bofan

    Biocompatible scaffolds mimicking the locally aligned fibrous structure of native extracellular matrix (ECM) are in high demand in tissue engineering. In this thesis research, unidirectionally aligned fibers were generated via a home-built electrospinning system. Collagen type I, as a major ECM component, was chosen in this study due to its support of cell proliferation and promotion of neuroectodermal commitment in stem cell differentiation. Synthetic dragline silk proteins, as biopolymers with remarkable tensile strength and superior elasticity, were also used as a model material. Good alignment, controllable fiber size and morphology, as well as a desirable deposition density of fibers were achieved via the optimization of solution and electrospinning parameters. The incorporation of silk proteins into collagen was found to significantly enhance mechanical properties and stability of electrospun fibers. Glutaraldehyde (GA) vapor post-treatment was demonstrated as a simple and effective way to tune the properties of collagen/silk fibers without changing their chemical composition. With 6-12 hours GA treatment, electrospun collagen/silk fibers were not only biocompatible, but could also effectively induce the polarization and neural commitment of stem cells, which were optimized on collagen rich fibers due to the unique combination of biochemical and biophysical cues imposed to cells. Taken together, electrospun collagen rich composite fibers are mechanically strong, stable and provide excellent cell adhesion. The unidirectionally aligned fibers can accelerate neural differentiation of stem cells, representing a promising therapy for neural tissue degenerative diseases and nerve injuries.

  3. Progressive Failure of a Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composite Using the Method of Cells: Discretization Objective Computational Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The smeared crack band theory is implemented within the generalized method of cells and high-fidelity generalized method of cells micromechanics models to capture progressive failure within the constituents of a composite material while retaining objectivity with respect to the size of the discretization elements used in the model. An repeating unit cell containing 13 randomly arranged fibers is modeled and subjected to a combination of transverse tension/compression and transverse shear loading. The implementation is verified against experimental data (where available), and an equivalent finite element model utilizing the same implementation of the crack band theory. To evaluate the performance of the crack band theory within a repeating unit cell that is more amenable to a multiscale implementation, a single fiber is modeled with generalized method of cells and high-fidelity generalized method of cells using a relatively coarse subcell mesh which is subjected to the same loading scenarios as the multiple fiber repeating unit cell. The generalized method of cells and high-fidelity generalized method of cells models are validated against a very refined finite element model.

  4. Mechanism of ad5 vaccine immunity and toxicity: fiber shaft targeting of dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Cheng

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant adenoviral (rAd vectors elicit potent cellular and humoral immune responses and show promise as vaccines for HIV-1, Ebola virus, tuberculosis, malaria, and other infections. These vectors are now widely used and have been generally well tolerated in vaccine and gene therapy clinical trials, with many thousands of people exposed. At the same time, dose-limiting adverse responses have been observed, including transient low-grade fevers and a prior human gene therapy fatality, after systemic high-dose recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5 vector administration in a human gene therapy trial. The mechanism responsible for these effects is poorly understood. Here, we define the mechanism by which Ad5 targets immune cells that stimulate adaptive immunity. rAd5 tropism for dendritic cells (DCs was independent of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR, its primary receptor or the secondary integrin RGD receptor, and was mediated instead by a heparin-sensitive receptor recognized by a distinct segment of the Ad5 fiber, the shaft. rAd vectors with CAR and RGD mutations did not infect a variety of epithelial and fibroblast cell types but retained their ability to transfect several DC types and stimulated adaptive immune responses in mice. Notably, the pyrogenic response to the administration of rAd5 also localized to the shaft region, suggesting that this interaction elicits both protective immunity and vector-induced fevers. The ability of replication-defective rAd5 viruses to elicit potent immune responses is mediated by a heparin-sensitive receptor that interacts with the Ad5 fiber shaft. Mutant CAR and RGD rAd vectors target several DC and mononuclear subsets and induce both adaptive immunity and toxicity. Understanding of these interactions facilitates the development of vectors that target DCs through alternative receptors that can improve safety while retaining the immunogenicity of rAd vaccines.

  5. Electrospun Matrices for Pelvic Floor Repair: Effect of Fiber Diameter on Mechanical Properties and Cell Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashaghian, Mahshid; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Roovers, Jan-Paul; Smit, Theodoor Henri

    2016-12-01

    Electrospun matrices are proposed as an alternative for polypropylene meshes in reconstructive pelvic surgery. Here, we investigated the effect of fiber diameter on (1) the mechanical properties of electrospun poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)-blended-poly(caprolactone) (PLGA/PCL) matrices; (2) cellular infiltration; and (3) the newly formed extracellular matrix (ECM) in vitro. We compared electrospun matrices with 1- and 8 μm fiber diameter and used nonporous PLGA/PCL films as controls. The 8-μm matrices were almost twice as stiff as the 1-μm matrices with 1.38 and 0.66 MPa, respectively. Matrices had the same ultimate tensile strength, but with 80% the 1-μm matrices were much more ductile than the 8-μm ones (18%). Cells infiltrated deeper into the matrices with larger pores, but cellular activity was comparable on both substrates. New ECM was deposited faster on the electrospun samples, but after 2 and 4 weeks the amount of collagen was comparable with that on nonporous films. The ECM deposited on the 1-μm matrices, and the nonporous film was about three times stiffer than the ECM found on the 8-μm matrices. Cell behavior in terms of myofibroblastic differentiation and remodeling was similar on the 1-μm matrices and nonporous films, in comparison to that on the 8-μm matrices. We conclude that electrospinning enhances the integration of host cells as compared with a nonporous film of the same material. The 1-μm matrices result in better mechanical behavior and qualitatively better matrix production than the 8-μm matrices, but with limited cellular infiltration. These data are useful for designing electrospun matrices for the pelvic floor.

  6. Assessment of Augmented Immune Surveillance and Tumor Cell Death by Cytoplasmic Stabilization of p53 as a Chemopreventive Strategy of 3 Promising Medicinal Herbs in Murine 2-Stage Skin Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farrah; Khan, Rehan; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Lateef, Md Abdul; Maqbool, Tahir; Sultana, Sarwat

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is the final outcome of a plethora of events. Targeting the proliferation or inducing programmed cell death in a proliferating population is a major standpoint in the cancer therapy. However, proliferation is regulated by several cellular and immunologic processes. This study reports the inhibition of proliferation by augmenting immune surveillance, silencing acute inflammation, and inducing p53-mediated apoptosis of skin cancer by 3 promising medicinal extracts. We used the well-characterized model for experimental skin carcinogenesis in mice for 32 weeks to study the chemopreventive effect of the methanolic extracts of Trigonella foenumgraecum, Eclipta alba, and Calendula officinalis. All 3 extracts reduced the number, incidence, and multiplicity of tumors, which was confirmed by the pathologic studies that showed regressed tumors. There was a significant reduction in the PCNA+ nuclei in all treatment groups 32 weeks after the initiation. Mechanistic studies revealed that proliferative population in tumors is diminished by the restoration of the endogenous antioxidant defense, inhibition of the stress-related signal-transducing element NFκB, reduction of inflammation, enhancement of immunosurveillance of the genetically mutated cells, along with silencing of the cell cycle progression signals. Finally, all 3 medicinal extracts induced stable expression of p53 within the tumors, confirmed by the CFDA-Cy3 apoptosis assay. Results of our study confirm that these extracts not only limit the rate of proliferation by inhibition of the processes integral to cancer development but also induce stable cytoplasmic expression of p53-mediated apoptosis, leading to fewer and regressed tumors in mice.

  7. Doxorubicin-Hyaluronan Conjugated Super-Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (DOX-HA-SPION) Enhanced Cytoplasmic Uptake of Doxorubicin and Modulated Apoptosis, IL-6 Release and NF-kappaB Activity in Human MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Dinesh; Lopez-Hisijos, Nicolas; Gandhi, Sulakshana; El-Dakdouki, M; Basson, Marc D; Walsh, Mary F; Huang, X; Vyas, Arpita K; Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S

    2015-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer exhibit increased IL-6 expression compared with matched healthy breast tissue and a strong link between inflammation and cancer progression and metastasis has been reported. We investigated whether doxorubicin-hyaluronan-super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (DOX-HA-SPION) would show greater therapeutic efficacy in human triple negative breast cancer cells (TNBC) MDA-MB-231, as was recently shown in drug-sensitive and multi-drug-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Therefore, we measured cellular DOX uptake via confocal microscopy; observed morphologic changes: mitochondrial and nuclear changes with electron microscopy, and quantitated apoptosis using FACS analysis after Annexin V and PI staining in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with either DOX alone or DOX-HA-SPION. We also measured both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines; IL-6, IL-10 respectively and also measured nitrate levels in the conditioned medium by ELISA. Inaddition, NF-κB activity was measured by luciferase assay. Confocal microscopy demonstrated greater cytoplasmic uptake of DOX-HA-SPION than free DOX. We also demonstrated reduction of Vimentin with DOX-HA-SPION which is significantly less than both control and DOX. DOX-HA-SPION enhanced apoptosis and significantly down regulated both pro-inflammatory mediators IL-6 and NF-κB in comparison to DOX alone. The secretion levels of anti-inflammatory mediators IL-10 and nitrate was not decreased in the DOX or DOX-HA-SPION treatment groups. Our data suggest that DOX-HA-SPION nanomedicine-based drug delivery could have promising potential in treating metastasized and chemoresistant breast cancer by enhancing the drug efficacy and minimizing off-target effects.

  8. An AFM Observation on Fossil Cytoplasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin; YU Junping; FANG Xiaohong

    2008-01-01

    Fossil cytoplasm is a new research topic of interest in paleobotany. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a new technology applied widely in physics and biology; however, it is rarely used in paleontology. Here we applied AFM for the first time to study fossil cytoplasm. The results indicate that the fossil cytoplasm is heterogeneous and full of ultrastructures, just like extant cytoplasm, and that the application of AFM, especially in combination with other techniques, can reveal the subcellular details of fossil plants with more confidence.

  9. Hollow fiber cell fishing with high performance liquid chromatography for screening bioactive compounds from traditional Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xue; Li, Lihua; Chen, Xuan; Hu, Shuang; Bai, Xiaohong

    2013-03-08

    A novel hollow fiber cell fishing method with high performance liquid chromatography was proposed and used to screen, isolate, and analyze bioactive compounds from Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs). The active compounds that interact with the living cells acceptor inside the hollow fiber lumen were screened and isolated from the TCM extracts in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). Subsequently, the active compounds bound to the cells were desorbed with methanol, and were analyzed using HPLC. HFCF with HPLC was introduced for the screening and analysis of lignans in Schisandra chinensis (Turcz) Baill and coumarins in Fructus Cnidii and Fructus Psoraleae. The surface properties of the hollow fibers filled with living cells were characterized. The nonspecific binding between the active centers of the hollow fibers and the bioactive compounds were investigated. The cell survival rates were determined before and after the screening. The repeatability of the method was tested. Some structures of the lignans and coumarins screened from TCMs were identified by the comparison to the retention times of the reference substances. HFCF-HPLC is a simple, fast, effective, and reliable method for the screening and analysis of bioactive compounds, and it can be extended to screen other bioactive compounds from TCMs.

  10. Graphene-coated carbon fiber cloth for flexible electrodes of glucose fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Kazuki; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisato; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we fabricated flexible electrodes for a miniaturized, simple structured, and flexible glucose biofuel cell (BFC) using a graphene-coated carbon fiber cloth (GCFC). The areas of the anode and cathode electrodes were 3 × 10 mm2. The anode area was coated with the enzyme glucose oxidase, and the cathode area was coated with the enzyme bilirubin oxidase. No ion-exchange film was needed because glucose oxidase selectively oxidizes glucose and bilirubin oxidase selectively reduces oxygen. The power density of the BFC with GCFC electrodes in a phosphate buffer solution of 200 mM glucose solution at room temperature was 34.3 µW/cm2 at 0.43 V. The power density of a BFC using carbon fiber cloth (CFC) without graphene modification was 18.5 µW/cm2 at 0.13 V. The BFC with the GCFC electrode continued to function longer than 24 h with a power density higher than 5 µW/cm2. These effects were attributed to the much larger effective surface areas of the GCFC electrodes that maintain more enzymes than those of the CFC electrodes.

  11. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-02

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  12. Generation of human muscle fibers and satellite-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chal, Jérome; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Hestin, Marie; Gobert, Bénédicte; Aivio, Suvi; Hick, Aurore; Cherrier, Thomas; Nesmith, Alexander P; Parker, Kevin K; Pourquié, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Progress toward finding a cure for muscle diseases has been slow because of the absence of relevant cellular models and the lack of a reliable source of muscle progenitors for biomedical investigation. Here we report an optimized serum-free differentiation protocol to efficiently produce striated, millimeter-long muscle fibers together with satellite-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in vitro. By mimicking key signaling events leading to muscle formation in the embryo, in particular the dual modulation of Wnt and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway signaling, this directed differentiation protocol avoids the requirement for genetic modifications or cell sorting. Robust myogenesis can be achieved in vitro within 1 month by personnel experienced in hPSC culture. The differentiating culture can be subcultured to produce large amounts of myogenic progenitors amenable to numerous downstream applications. Beyond the study of myogenesis, this differentiation method offers an attractive platform for the development of relevant in vitro models of muscle dystrophies and drug screening strategies, as well as providing a source of cells for tissue engineering and cell therapy approaches.

  13. Osteogenic and osteoclastogenic differentiation of co-cultured cells in polylactic acid-nanohydroxyapatite fiber scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Sabrina; Salerno, Simona; Holopainen, Jani; Ritala, Mikko; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2015-06-20

    The design of bone substitutes involves the creation of a microenvironment supporting molecular cross-talk between cells and scaffolds during tissue formation and remodelling. Bone remodelling process includes the cooperation of bone-building cells and bone-resorbing cells. In this paper we developed polylactic acid (PLA) and composite PLA-nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) scaffolds with 20 and 50wt.% of nHA by electrospinning technique to be used in bone tissue engineering. The developed scaffolds have different fiber diameter, porosity with interconnected pores and mechanical properties. Taking cues from the bone environment features we investigated the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) from bone marrow in osteoblasts and the osteoclastogenesis in the developed scaffolds in homotypic and in co-culture up to 46 days. PLA and composite PLA-nHA scaffolds induced osteogenic and osteoclastogenic differentiation. Both osteoblasts and osteoclasts displayed high expression of specific markers (osteopontin, osteocalcin, RANK, RANKL) and functions such as secretion of ALP, cathepsin K and TRAP activity on composite scaffolds especially on PLA-nHA containing 20wt.% of nHA. The heterotypic interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts co-cultured in the developed scaffolds triggered their functional differentiation and activation.

  14. Continuous rhamnolipid production using denitrifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in hollow-fiber bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Neissa M; Cook, Aaron G; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2013-01-01

    Rhamnolipids are high-value effective biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Large-scale production of rhamnolipids is still challenging especially under free-cell aerobic conditions in which the highly foaming nature of the culture broth reduces the productivity of the process. Immobilized systems relying on oxygen as electron acceptor have been previously investigated but oxygen transfer limitation presents difficulties for continuous rhamnolipid production. A coupled system using immobilized cells and nitrate instead of oxygen as electron acceptor taking advantage of the ability of P. aeruginosa to perform nitrate respiration was evaluated. This denitrification-based immobilized approach based on a hollow-fiber setup eliminated the transfer limitation problems and was found suitable for continuous rhamnolipid production in a period longer than 1,500 h. It completely eliminated the foaming difficulties related to aerobic systems with a comparable specific productivity of 0.017 g/(g dry cells)-h and allowed easy recovery of rhamnolipids from the cell-free medium.

  15. A graphite-coated carbon fiber epoxy composite bipolar plate for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ha Na; Lim, Jun Woo; Suh, Jung Do; Lee, Dai Gil

    A PEMFC (polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell or proton exchange membrane fuel cell) stack is composed of GDLs (gas diffusion layers), MEAs (membrane electrode assemblies), and bipolar plates. One of the important functions of bipolar plates is to collect and conduct the current from cell to cell, which requires low electrical bulk and interfacial resistances. For a carbon fiber epoxy composite bipolar plate, the interfacial resistance is usually much larger than the bulk resistance due to the resin-rich layer on the composite surface. In this study, a thin graphite layer is coated on the carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate to decrease the interfacial contact resistance between the bipolar plate and the GDL. The total electrical resistance in the through-thickness direction of the bipolar plate is measured with respect to the thickness of the graphite coating layer, and the ratio of the bulk resistance to the interfacial contact resistance is estimated using the measured data. From the experiment, it is found that the graphite coating on the carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate has 10% and 4% of the total electrical and interfacial contact resistances of the conventional carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate, respectively, when the graphite coating thickness is 50 μm.

  16. Redox-filled Carbon-Fiber Microelectrodes for Single-Cell Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Gunderson, Christopher G.; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFEs) are the primary electroanalytical tool in single-cell exocytosis and in-vivo studies. Here we report a new study on the kinetic properties of electrolyte-filled CFEs in single-cell measurements and demonstrate that the addition of outer sphere redox species, such as Fe(CN)63− and Ru(NH3)63+, in the backfill electrolyte solution can greatly enhance the kinetic response of CFEs. We show that at 750 mV, a voltage normally applied for detection of dopamine, the presence of fast outer sphere redox species in the backfilling solution significantly enhances the kinetic response of CFEs toward fast dopamine detection at single PC12 cells. Moreover, we also demonstrate that the use of Fe(CN)63− in the backfilling solution has enabled direct measurement of dopamine at applied voltages as low as 200 mV. This kinetic enhancement is believed to be due to faster electron-transfer kinetics on the coupling pole as compared to the sluggish reduction of oxygen. We anticipate that such redox-filled CFE ultramicroelectrodes will find many useful applications in single cell exocytosis and in-vivo sensing. PMID:24833889

  17. Nematode development after removal of egg cytoplasm: absence of localized unbound determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, J S; von Ehrenstein, G

    1981-01-23

    Embryos of Caenorhabditis elegans develop into fertile adults after cell fragments, containing presumptive cytoplasm of somatic and germ line precursors, are extruded from uncleaved eggs or early blastomeres through laser-induced holes in the eggshells. This suggests that the determinate development of this worm is not dependent on the prelocalization of determinants in specific regions of the egg cytoplasm.

  18. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Pawlica

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral capsid (CA cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus, and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating.

  19. Effects of long-term microgravitation exposure on cell respiration of the rat musculus soleus fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselova, O M; Ogneva, I V; Larina, I M

    2011-07-01

    Cell respiration of the m. soleus fibers was studied in Wistar rats treated with succinic acid and exposed to microgravitation for 35 days. The results indicated that respiration rates during utilization of endogenous and exogenous substrates and the maximum respiration rate decreased in animals subjected to microgravitation without succinate treatment. The respiration rate during utilization of exogenous substrate did not increase in comparison with that on endogenous substrates. Succinic acid prevented the decrease in respiration rate on endogenous substrates and the maximum respiration rate. On the other hand, the respiration rate on exogenous substrates was reduced in vivarium control rats receiving succinate in comparison with intact control group. That could indicate changed efficiency of complex I of the respiratory chain due to reciprocal regulation of the tricarbonic acid cycle.

  20. Production of endothelial cell-enclosing alginate-based hydrogel fibers with a cell adhesive surface through simultaneous cross-linking by horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed reaction in a hydrodynamic spinning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Sakai, Shinji; Taya, Masahito

    2012-09-01

    We developed an alginate-based hydrogel fiber enabling to enclose endothelial cells, degradable on-demand by alginate lyase, and having a cell adhesive surface. The hydrogel fiber was obtained by extruding an aqueous solution of 4% (w/v) alginate derivative possessing phenolic hydroxyl moieties (Alg-Ph) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into a flow of aqueous solution containing 0.3 mM H(2)O(2) and gelatin derivative possessing Ph moieties (Gelatin-Ph). In the process, cross-linking of Alg-Ph resulting in a hydrogel fiber and immobilization of Gelatin-Ph on the surface of the hydrogel fiber were simultaneously accomplished by an HRP-catalyzed cross-linking reaction between Ph moieties. The diameter of the hydrogel fiber and the quantity of immobilized Gelatin-Ph on the fiber were controllable by changing the flow rates of the solutions and the concentration of HRP in the Alg-Ph-containing solution, respectively. The viability of the human endothelial cells enclosed in the hydrogel fibers obtained by 10 s of flowing in the H(2)O(2)-containing solution was 87.1%. In addition, the cells harvested from the hydrogel fibers through degradation using alginate lyase grew on tissue culture dishes in the same fashion as the cells seeded by a conventional subculture protocol. Human smooth muscle cells adhered, grew and achieved confluence on the surface of the hydrogel fibers. By degrading the hydrogel fibers using alginate lyase, a tubular cell construct was successfully obtained.

  1. Tmod1 and CP49 synergize to control the fiber cell geometry, transparency, and mechanical stiffness of the mouse lens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Gokhin

    Full Text Available The basis for mammalian lens fiber cell organization, transparency, and biomechanical properties has contributions from two specialized cytoskeletal systems: the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton and beaded filament cytoskeleton. The spectrin-actin membrane skeleton predominantly consists of α₂β₂-spectrin strands interconnecting short, tropomyosin-coated actin filaments, which are stabilized by pointed-end capping by tropomodulin 1 (Tmod1 and structurally disrupted in the absence of Tmod1. The beaded filament cytoskeleton consists of the intermediate filament proteins CP49 and filensin, which require CP49 for assembly and contribute to lens transparency and biomechanics. To assess the simultaneous physiological contributions of these cytoskeletal networks and uncover potential functional synergy between them, we subjected lenses from mice lacking Tmod1, CP49, or both to a battery of structural and physiological assays to analyze fiber cell disorder, light scattering, and compressive biomechanical properties. Findings show that deletion of Tmod1 and/or CP49 increases lens fiber cell disorder and light scattering while impairing compressive load-bearing, with the double mutant exhibiting a distinct phenotype compared to either single mutant. Moreover, Tmod1 is in a protein complex with CP49 and filensin, indicating that the spectrin-actin network and beaded filament cytoskeleton are biochemically linked. These experiments reveal that the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton and beaded filament cytoskeleton establish a novel functional synergy critical for regulating lens fiber cell geometry, transparency, and mechanical stiffness.

  2. Wet-laid soy fiber reinforced hydrogel scaffold: Fabrication, mechano-morphological and cell studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Andrew T; Everett, Dominique; Budhwani, Karim I; Dickinson, Brenna; Thomas, Vinoy

    2016-06-01

    Among materials used in biomedical applications, hydrogels have received consistent linear growth in interest over the past decade due to their large water volume and saliency to the natural extracellular matrix. These materials are often limited due to their sub-optimal mechanical properties which are typically improved via chemical or physical crosslinking. Chemical crosslinking forms strong inter-polymer bonds but typically uses reagents that are cytotoxic while physical crosslinking is more temperamental to environmental changes but can be formed without these toxic reagents. In this study, we added a fiber-reinforcement phase to a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel formed through successive freezing-thawing cycles by incorporating a non-woven microfiber mat formed by the wet-lay process. By reinforcing the hydrogel with a wet-laid fibrous mat, the ultimate tensile strength and modulus increased from 0.11 ± 0.01 MPa and 0.17 ± 0.02 kPa to 0.24 ± 0.02 MPa and 5.76 ± 1.12 kPa, respectively. An increase in toughness and elongation was also found increasing from 2.52 ± 0.37 MPa to 25.6 ± 3.84 and 51.89 ± 5.16% to 111.16 ± 9.68%, respectively. The soy fibers were also found to induce minimal cytotoxicity with endothelial cell viability showing 96.51% ± 1.91 living cells after a 48 h incubation. This approach to hydrogel-reinforcement presents a rapid, tunable method by which hydrogels can attain increased mechanical properties without sacrificing their inherent biologically favorable properties.

  3. Lipid-protein interactions in plasma membranes of fiber cells isolated from the human eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2014-03-01

    The protein content in human lens membranes is extremely high, increases with age, and is higher in the nucleus as compared with the cortex, which should strongly affect the organization and properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact membranes. To assess these effects, the intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from human lenses from 41- to 60-year-old donors were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling methods. Results were compared with those obtained for lens lipid membranes prepared from total lipid extracts from human eyes of the same age group [Mainali, L., Raguz, M., O'Brien, W. J., and Subczynski, W. K. (2013) Biochim. Biophys. Acta]. Differences were considered to be mainly due to the effect of membrane proteins. The lipid-bilayer portions of intact membranes were significantly less fluid than lipid bilayers of lens lipid membranes, prepared without proteins. The intact membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain. However, the cholesterol bilayer domain, which was detected in cortical and nuclear lens lipid membranes, was not detected in intact membranes. The relative amounts of bulk and trapped lipids were evaluated. The amount of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. Thus, it is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes is greater than that of cortical membranes. Also the permeability coefficients for oxygen measured in domains of nuclear membranes were significantly lower than appropriate coefficients measured in cortical membranes. Relationships between the organization of lipids into lipid domains in fiber cells plasma membranes and the organization of membrane proteins are discussed.

  4. GhDET2,a Steroid 5alpha-reductase,Plays an Important Role in Cotton Fiber Cell Initiation and Elongation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ming; XIAO Yue-hua; LI Xian-bi; LI De-mou; HOU Lei; HU Ming-yu; PEI Yan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers,one of the most important natural raw materials for the textile industry,are highly elongated trichomes from epidermal cells of cotton ovules.Among the longest plant cells ever characterized,cotton fiber is an ideal system for studying plant cell elongation.Brassinosteroids (BRs),a class of steroidal phytohormone,play an important role in plant cell division and elongation.

  5. Endoplasmic-reticulum-mediated microtubule alignment governs cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kenji; Mamane, Alexandre; Sasaki, Tohru; Sato, Kohta; Takagi, Jun; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Hufnagel, Lars; Shimamoto, Yuta; Joanny, Jean-François; Uchida, Seiichi; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2017-04-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming refers to a collective movement of cytoplasm observed in many cell types. The mechanism of meiotic cytoplasmic streaming (MeiCS) in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes is puzzling as the direction of the flow is not predefined by cell polarity and occasionally reverses. Here, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network structure is required for the collective flow. Using a combination of RNAi, microscopy and image processing of C. elegans zygotes, we devise a theoretical model, which reproduces and predicts the emergence and reversal of the flow. We propose a positive-feedback mechanism, where a local flow generated along a microtubule is transmitted to neighbouring regions through the ER. This, in turn, aligns microtubules over a broader area to self-organize the collective flow. The proposed model could be applicable to various cytoplasmic streaming phenomena in the absence of predefined polarity. The increased mobility of cortical granules by MeiCS correlates with the efficient exocytosis of the granules to protect the zygotes from osmotic and mechanical stresses.

  6. Ubiquitin-proteasome-rich cytoplasmic structures in neutrophils of patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necchi, Vittorio; Minelli, Antonella; Sommi, Patrizia; Vitali, Agostina; Caruso, Roberta; Longoni, Daniela; Frau, Maria Rita; Nasi, Cristina; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Zecca, Marco; Ricci, Vittorio; Danesino, Cesare; Solcia, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Background Shwachman–Diamond syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder in which severe bone marrow dysfunction causes neutropenia and an increased risk of leukemia. Recently, novel particulate cytoplasmic structures, rich in ubiquitinated and proteasomal proteins, have been detected in epithelial cells and neutrophils from patients with Helicobacter pylori gastritis and several epithelial neoplasms. Design and Methods Blood neutrophils from 13 cases of Shwachman–Diamond syndrome – ten with and three without SBDS gene mutation – and ten controls were investigated by confocal microscopy and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using antibodies against ubiquitinated proteins, proteasomes, p62 protein, and Helicobacter pylori VacA, urease and outer membrane proteins. Results Many extensively disseminated particulate cytoplasmic structures, accounting for 22.78±5.57% (mean ± standard deviation) of the total cytoplasm, were found in blood neutrophils from mutated Shwachman–Diamond syndrome patients. The particulate cytoplasmic structures showed immunoreactivity for polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasomes, but no reactivity for Helicobacter pylori products, which are present in particulate cytoplasmic structures of Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis. Neutrophils from patients with Shwachman–Diamond syndrome frequently showed p62-positive autophagic vacuoles and apoptotic changes in 5% of cells. No particulate cytoplasmic structures were observed in most control neutrophils; however, in a few cells from two cases we noted focal development of minute particulate cytoplasmic structures, accounting for 0.74±0.56% of the total cytoplasm (P<0.001 versus particulate cytoplasmic structures from mutated Shwachman–Diamond syndrome patients). Neutrophils from non-mutated Shwachman–Diamond-syndrome-like patients resembled controls in two cases, and a third case showed particulate cytoplasmic structure patterns intermediate between those in controls and

  7. Osteogenesis of human adipose-derived stem cells on poly(dopamine)-coated electrospun poly(lactic acid) fiber mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@thu.edu.tw; Fu, Shu-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique to generate large quantities of micro- or nano-fibers from a wide variety of shapes and sizes of polymer. The aim of this study is to develop functionalized electrospun nano-fibers and use a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibers coated with polydopamine (PDA). The morphology, chemical composition, and surface properties of PDA/PLA were characterized by SEM and XPS. PDA/PLA modulated hADSCs' responses in several ways. Firstly, adhesion and proliferation of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly enhanced relative to those on PLA. Increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and collagen I levels and enhanced cell attachment and cell cycle progression were observed upon an increase in PDA content. In addition, the ALP activity and osteocalcin of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly higher than seen in those cultured on a pure PLA mat. Moreover, hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA showed up-regulation of the ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenesis differentiation. Our results demonstrate that the bio-inspired coating synthetic degradable PLA polymer can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic biodegradable fibers, thus enabling them to direct the specific responses of hADSCs. - Highlights: • A simple method of preparing electrospun poly(lactic acid) nanofibers coated with polydopamine • Enhanced adhesion and proliferation of hADSCs on a PDA/PLA mat • Increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK), collagen I levels, cell attachment and cell cycle progression with a high PDA content • Up-regulation of the Ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenesis differentiation of hADSCs is observed. • A promising method for bio-inspired surface modification on organic fiber substrates using PDA.

  8. Fatigue and human umbilical cord stem cell seeding characteristics of calcium phosphate-chitosan-biodegradable fiber scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Burguera, Elena F; Xu, Hockin H K; Amin, Nikhil; Ryou, Heon; Arola, Dwayne D

    2010-02-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has in situ-setting ability and bioactivity, but the brittleness and low strength limit CPC to only non-load-bearing bone repairs. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) can be harvested without an invasive procedure required for the commonly studied bone marrow MSCs. However, little has been reported on hUCMSC delivery via bioactive scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. The objectives of this study were to develop CPC scaffolds with improved resistance to fatigue and fracture, and to investigate hUCMSC delivery for bone tissue engineering. In fast fracture, CPC with 15% chitosan and 20% polyglactin fibers (CPC-chitosan-fiber scaffold) had flexural strength of 26mPa, higher than 10mPa for CPC control (pfiber specimens that survived 2x10(6) cycles had the maximum stress of 10MPa, compared to 5MPa of CPC control. CPC-chitosan-fiber specimens that failed after multiple cycles had a mean stress-to-failure of 9MPa, compared to 5.8MPa for CPC control (pfiber scaffolds. The percentage of live cells reached 96-99%. Cell density was about 300cells/mm(2) at day 1; it proliferated to 700cells/mm(2) at day 4. Wst-1 assay showed that the stronger CPC-chitosan-fiber scaffold had hUCMSC viability that matched the CPC control (p>0.1). In summary, this study showed that chitosan and polyglactin fibers substantially increased the fatigue resistance of CPC, and that hUCMSCs had excellent proliferation and viability on the scaffolds.

  9. A Gas Cell Based on Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF and Its Application for the Detection of Greenhouse Gas (GHG: Nitrous Oxide (N2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas K. Valiunas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the detection of nitrous oxide gas using intracavity fiber laser absorption spectroscopy. A gas cell based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber was constructed and used inside a fiber ring laser cavity as an intracavity gas cell. The fiber laser in the 1.55 μm band was developed using a polarization-maintaining erbium-doped fiber as the gain medium. The wavelength of the laser was selected by a fiber Bragg grating (FBG, and it matches one of the absorption lines of the gas under investigation. The laser wavelength contained multilongitudinal modes, which increases the sensitivity of the detection system. N2O gas has overtones of the fundamental absorption bands and rovibrational transitions in the 1.55 μm band. The system was operated at room temperature and was capable of detecting nitrous oxide gas at sub-ppmv concentration level.

  10. The use of fiber-reinforced scaffolds cocultured with Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells to repair rabbit sciatic nerve defect with vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongyang; You, Yang; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Feng; Sha, Ziyi; Shen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function.

  11. The Use of Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds Cocultured with Schwann Cells and Vascular Endothelial Cells to Repair Rabbit Sciatic Nerve Defect with Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyang Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function.

  12. Design of fibers spun from carbon nanotube-sphere binary colloidal systems as substrates for cell behaviour control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizu, Stefania

    spinnability of the mixture for the fabrication of macroscopic threads. Moreover, by spinning from a binary colloidal system, we generate new conditions for the coagulation mechanism. By initiating the suspension of PLGA nanoparticles, we tailor the characteristics of new fibers, particularly their biodegradability and their biocompatibility. Thanks to PLGA, the fibers become partially biodegradable, which is an important achievement, considering that biodegradabilty in physiological conditions is a limitation for CNTs and PVA. The degradation process gives rise to a fibrillar structure in which CNTs form a framework-like arrangement that overwhelms the releasing effects of nanotubes, a critical point for long term biocompatibility. The permanence of nanotubes in a structured network increases the contact with cells and maintains their biofunctionality during and after the biodegradation of macroscopic fiber. We propose a hybrid approach to produce CNT-fibers as neural biomaterial. The characteristics of these fibers, as determined through this work, demonstrate the validity of this method for the design of new fibrillar substrates for cell sustaining the growth of cells. Moreover, the presence of an aqueous coagulant medium results in the material's cleanness and allows the introduction of numerous active agents or biological molecules without their denaturation. This is an opportunity for the application of pre- or post-treatments in order to manufacture complex hybrid biomaterials containing CNTs. The future of these fibers looks promising. They are the first fibers produced by a hybrid approach using the wet spinning process. They are in vitro biocompatible and biodegradable. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  13. Optimal cytoplasmic transport in viral infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria R D'Orsogna

    Full Text Available For many viruses, the ability to infect eukaryotic cells depends on their transport through the cytoplasm and across the nuclear membrane of the host cell. During this journey, viral contents are biochemically processed into complexes capable of both nuclear penetration and genomic integration. We develop a stochastic model of viral entry that incorporates all relevant aspects of transport, including convection along microtubules, biochemical conversion, degradation, and nuclear entry. Analysis of the nuclear infection probabilities in terms of the transport velocity, degradation, and biochemical conversion rates shows how certain values of key parameters can maximize the nuclear entry probability of the viral material. The existence of such "optimal" infection scenarios depends on the details of the biochemical conversion process and implies potentially counterintuitive effects in viral infection, suggesting new avenues for antiviral treatment. Such optimal parameter values provide a plausible transport-based explanation of the action of restriction factors and of experimentally observed optimal capsid stability. Finally, we propose a new interpretation of how genetic mutations unrelated to the mechanism of drug action may nonetheless confer novel types of overall drug resistance.

  14. Osteogenesis of human adipose-derived stem cells on poly(dopamine)-coated electrospun poly(lactic acid) fiber mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Chang; Fu, Shu-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique to generate large quantities of micro- or nano-fibers from a wide variety of shapes and sizes of polymer. The aim of this study is to develop functionalized electrospun nano-fibers and use a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibers coated with polydopamine (PDA). The morphology, chemical composition, and surface properties of PDA/PLA were characterized by SEM and XPS. PDA/PLA modulated hADSCs' responses in several ways. Firstly, adhesion and proliferation of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly enhanced relative to those on PLA. Increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and collagen I levels and enhanced cell attachment and cell cycle progression were observed upon an increase in PDA content. In addition, the ALP activity and osteocalcin of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly higher than seen in those cultured on a pure PLA mat. Moreover, hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA showed up-regulation of the ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenesis differentiation. Our results demonstrate that the bio-inspired coating synthetic degradable PLA polymer can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic biodegradable fibers, thus enabling them to direct the specific responses of hADSCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dual-Doped Molybdenum Trioxide Nanowires: A Bifunctional Anode for Fiber-Shaped Asymmetric Supercapacitors and Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minghao; Cheng, Xinyu; Zeng, Yinxiang; Wang, Zilong; Tong, Yexiang; Lu, Xihong; Yang, Shihe

    2016-06-01

    A novel in situ N and low-valence-state Mo dual doping strategy was employed to significantly improve the conductivity, active-site accessibility, and electrochemical stability of MoO3 , drastically boosting its electrochemical properties. Consequently, our optimized N-MoO3-x nanowires exhibited exceptional performances as a bifunctional anode material for both fiber-shaped asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) and microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The flexible fiber-shaped ASC and MFC device based on the N-MoO3-x anode could deliver an unprecedentedly high energy density of 2.29 mWh cm(-3) and a remarkable power density of 0.76 μW cm(-1) , respectively. Such a bifunctional fiber-shaped N-MoO3-x electrode opens the way to integrate the electricity generation and storage for self-powered sources.

  16. GeO2-SiO2-chitosan-medium-coated hollow optical fiber for cell immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Nian-Bing; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Wang, Yong-Zhong; Chen, Rong

    2013-08-15

    A GeO(2)-SiO(2)-chitosan-medium (GSCM)-coated hollow optical fiber (HOF) is proposed. The HOF consists of three parts: the fiber core (air), cladding (SiO(2)), and coating (GSCM), which shows the highest refractive index of the three. The HOF's luminescence properties and surface morphology are investigated. Their adsorption capacity for Rhodopseudomonas palustris CQK 01 is also assayed. We discovered that when the amount of 2GeO(2)-SiO(2) sol dopant is 0.9 mass percent, the HOF exhibits the highest luminous intensity and uniform light distribution, and the adsorption capacity for the cell is 3.2 times higher than that of a normal solid optical fiber.

  17. Improving the performance of microbial fuel cells by reducing the inherent resistivity of carbon fiber brush anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yang'en; Ma, Zhaokun; Song, Huaihe; Wang, Huiyao; Xu, Pei

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of carbon fibers as brush anode materials on the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Two types of carbon fibers with different electrical resistivity and functionality - polyacrylonitrile (PAN) (ρ: 28.0 μΩ m) and pitch (ρ: 2.05 μΩ m) were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers presented almost the same surface elements and functional groups, and there was no significant difference in microbial growth on the brush anodes. Current interrupt and steady discharging methods demonstrated the pitch-based carbon brush anodes had lower ohmic resistance and generated higher power density. After nitric acid treatment, the power density generated by the PAN- and pitch-based anodes increased by 29.3% and 26.7%, achieving 816 and 895 mW m-2, respectively. Using pitch-based carbon fiber brush as anode attained