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Sample records for fft zipper artifacts

  1. Periodic additive noises reduction in 3D images used in building of voxel phantoms through an efficient implementation of the 3D FFT: zipper artifacts filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Alex C.H. de; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Vieira, Jose W.; Leal Neto, Viriato

    2009-01-01

    The anthropomorphic models used in computational dosimetry are predominantly build from scanning CT (Computed Tomography) or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) image stacks obtained of patients or volunteers. The building of these stacks (usually called of voxel phantoms or tomography phantoms) requires computer processing to be used in an exposure computational model. Noises present in these stacks can be confused with significant structures. In a 3D image with periodic additive noise in the frequency domain, the noise is fully added to its central slice. The discrete Fourier transform is the fundamental mathematical tool that allows the switch of the spatial domain for the frequency domain, and vice versa. The FFT (fast Fourier transform) algorithm is an ideal computational tool for this switch in domain with efficiency. This paper presents a new methodology for implementation in managed C++ language (Microsoft Visual Studio R .NET) of the fast Fourier transform of 3D digital images (FFT3D) using, essentially, the trigonometric recombination. The reduction of periodic additive noise consists in filtering only the central slice of 3D image in the frequency domain and transforms it back into the spatial domain through the inverse FFT3D. An example of application of this method it is the zipper artifacts filtering in images of MRI. These processes were implemented in the software DIP (Digital Image Processing). (author)

  2. z-transform DFT filters and FFT's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, G.

    1978-01-01

    of DFT filter banks which utilize a minimum of complex coefficients. These implementations lead to new forms of FFT's, among which is acos/sinFFT for a real signal which only employs real coefficients. The new FFT algorithms use only half as many real multiplications as does the classical FFT....

  3. Parallel FFT using Eden Skeletons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthold, Jost; Dieterle, Mischa; Lobachev, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    The paper investigates and compares skeleton-based Eden implementations of different FFT-algorithms on workstation clusters with distributed memory. Our experiments show that the basic divide-and-conquer versions suffer from an inherent input distribution and result collection problem. Advanced...... approaches like calculating FFT using a parallel map-and-transpose skeleton provide more flexibility to overcome these problems. Assuming a distributed access to input data and re-organising computation to return results in a distributed way improves the parallel runtime behaviour....

  4. The industrial water footprint of zippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Wu, Xiong Ying; Wang, Lai Li; Ding, Xue Mei

    2014-01-01

    Industrial production of apparel consumes large quantity of freshwater and discharges effluents that intensify the problem of freshwater shortage and water pollution. The industrial water footprint (IWF) of a piece of apparel includes the water footprint (WF) of the fabric, apparel accessories (e.g. zipper, fastener, sewing thread) and industrial production processes. The objective of this paper is to carry out a pilot study on IWF accounting for three kinds of typical zipper (i.e. metal zipper, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) zipper and polyoxymethylene copolymer (Co-POM) zipper) that are commonly used for apparel production. The results reveal that product output exerts a remarkable influence on zipper's average IWF. Metal zipper has the largest IWF and followed by Co-POM zipper and PET zipper. Painting, dyeing and primary processing are the top three water-consuming processes and contribute about 90% of the zipper's IWF. Painting consumes the largest amount of freshwater among all processes and occupies more than 50% of the zipper's IWF. In addition, the grey water footprint (WFgrey) provides the greatest contribution, more than 80%, to the zipper's IWF. Based on these results, this paper also provides several strategies aimed at water economization and pollution reduction during industrial production of zipper.

  5. Zipper, The Kid with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janover, Caroline

    This children's novel tells the story of Zachary (nicknamed Zipper), a fifth-grader who has attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The boy has trouble concentrating and controlling himself until a retired jazz musician recognizes his talent, believes in him, and gives him the motivation to start trying to do better. An appendix provides…

  6. Zipper mast for enhanced communications and surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, George; Muench, Paul; Witus, Gary

    2011-05-01

    In this project, we further developed and tested a "ZipperMast" for small robots and legacy manned vehicles. The ZipperMast knits three coiled bands of spring steel together to form a rigid mast. As the mast is extended, it draws up a cable connecting the host platform to the payload, typically antennas and sensors. Elevating the payload improves line of sight, and thus improves radio communication and surveillance situation awareness. When the mast is retracted, the interior cable slides into a horizontal tray. The ZipperMast is a scaleable design. We have made systems that elevate to 8 and 20 feet. The 8 foot ZipperMast collapses to less that 8 inches high and 8 inches wide. The 20 foot ZipperMast collapses to less that 12 inches high and 18 inches wide. In this paper we report on tests of the mechanical properties of the mast, specifically the strength and stiffness under quasi-static and impulsive loading. These properties are important for specifying constraints on height as a function of speed and payload and on speed as a function of height and payload in order to ensure that the mast will not fail in the event of sudden stop, as in the event of a collision.

  7. FFT-local gravimetric geoid computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Dezso; Fury, Rudolf J.

    1989-01-01

    Model computations show that changes of sampling interval introduce only 0.3 cm changes, whereas zero padding provides an improvement of more than 5 cm in the fast Fourier transformation (FFT) generated geoid. For the Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of Franklin County, Ohio, the parameters selected as a result of model computations, allow large reduction in local data requirements while still retaining the cm accuracy when tapering and padding is applied. The results are shown in tables.

  8. Pipeline FFT Architectures Optimized for FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents optimized implementations of two different pipeline FFT processors on Xilinx Spartan-3 and Virtex-4 FPGAs. Different optimization techniques and rounding schemes were explored. The implementation results achieved better performance with lower resource usage than prior art. The 16-bit 1024-point FFT with the R22SDF architecture had a maximum clock frequency of 95.2 MHz and used 2802 slices on the Spartan-3, a throughput per area ratio of 0.034 Msamples/s/slice. The R4SDC architecture ran at 123.8 MHz and used 4409 slices on the Spartan-3, a throughput per area ratio of 0.028 Msamples/s/slice. On Virtex-4, the 16-bit 1024-point R22SDF architecture ran at 235.6 MHz and used 2256 slice, giving a 0.104 Msamples/s/slice ratio; the 16-bit 1024-point R4SDC architecture ran at 219.2 MHz and used 3064 slices, giving a 0.072 Msamples/s/slice ratio. The R22SDF was more efficient than the R4SDC in terms of throughput per area due to a simpler controller and an easier balanced rounding scheme. This paper also shows that balanced stage rounding is an appropriate rounding scheme for pipeline FFT processors.

  9. FFT-BM, Code Accuracy Evaluations with the 1D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: FFT-BM is an integrated version of the programs package performing code accuracy evaluations with the 1D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) methodology. It contains two programs: - CASEM: Takes care of the complete manipulation of data in order to evaluate the quantities through which the FFT method quantifies the code accuracy. - AAWFTO completes the evaluation of the average accuracy (AA) and related weighted frequency (WF) values in order to obtain the AAtot and WFtot values characterising the global calculation performance. 2 - Methods: The Fast Fourier Transform, or FFT, which is based on the Fourier analysis method is an optimised method for calculating the amplitude Vs frequency, of functions or experimental or computed data. In order to apply this methodology, after selecting the parameters to be analyzed, it is necessary to choose the following parameters: - number of curves (exp + calc) to be analyzed; - number of time windows to be analyzed; - sampling frequency; - cut frequency; - time begin and time end of each time window. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Up to 30 curves (exp + calc) and 5 time windows may be analyzed

  10. Coiled-coil driven membrane fusion: zipper-like vs. non-zipper-like peptide orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Frank; Dominguez, Juan; Voskuhl, Jens; Kros, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion plays a central role in biological processes such as neurotransmission and exocytosis. An important class of proteins that induce membrane fusion are called SNARE (soluble N-ethyl malemeide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) proteins. To induce membrane fusion, two SNARE proteins embedded in opposing membranes form a four-helix coiled-coil motif together with a third, cytoplasmic, SNARE protein. Coiled-coil formation brings the two membranes into close proximity allowing fusion to occur. Importantly, structural investigations have demonstrated that native membrane fusion only occurs when the orientation of the coiled-coil motif resembles that of a zipper. The zipper orientation arises when parallel coiled-coil formation takes place between peptides that are anchored into apposing membranes at identical termini, thereby forcing the membranes into close contact. Recently, we have designed a synthetic model for membrane fusion, which is based on a set of lipidated coiled-coil forming peptide pairs which are denoted E-K. When incorporated into liposomal membranes, coiled-coil formation between these lipidated peptides induces targeted and efficient membrane fusion of liposomes. Our model system mimics SNARE-driven membrane fusion, as it contains a coiled-coil motif which has a zipper-like orientation, similar to that of the SNARE proteins. Here we investigate whether the zipper-like orientation of the coiled-coil motifs is a prerequisite for membrane fusion in our model system. Our strategy is based on conjugation of the transmembrane anchor to either the N- or the C-terminus of peptides E and K. Whereas the use of a set of complementary peptides with the membrane anchor on identical peptide termini yields the zipper-like orientation of the coiled-coil complex, membrane anchors on opposite peptide termini results in a non-zipper-like coiled-coil orientation. Surprisingly, it was observed that efficient and targeted membrane fusion was

  11. FFT-Based Spectrum Analysis Using a Digital Signal Processor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dorcey, Charles

    2001-01-01

    .... Portable C programs demonstrated optimization of the FFT algorithm for maximum speed. Previously published algorithms were adapted to the unique features of this Very-Long Instruction Word (VLIW...

  12. Artifacts in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Whan; Kim, Jung Min; Jeong, Hoi Woun

    2015-01-01

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments

  13. Artifacts in digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shin Gu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Beakseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments.

  14. Dynamics in artifact ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    artifacts influence the use of others. Understanding this interplay becomes more and more essential for interaction design as our artifact ecologies grow. This paper continues a recent discourse on artifact ecologies. Through interviews with iPhone users, we demonstrate that relationships between artifacts...

  15. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  16. CONTRIBUTIONS TO CLASSIFICATION ZIPPERS USED IN INDUSTRY FOOTWEAR AND LEATHER GOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALCOCI Marina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Now customary accessory companies of all leather garments, zipper began to enjoy popularity only after 80 years of its invention. The first is considered the inventor of the zipper Elias Howe. Essentially involves fashion, change, innovation, originality, creativity and is defined as a succession of trends or fads, short. Create fashionable leather confections from home means accepting a contract with the producer and / or consumer, showing a profit motivating all at the right time. Continuous which require the exercise involves creative skills of fashion design, leading to a wide range of products. Current zipper is composed of: slider, teeth, strips shooter stops. Currently there is possibility to customize shooters to customer requirements, and even to form their own zippers. The present work presents the classification criteria zippers. They are after construction fastener after destination zippers, after the role they fulfill zippers, after the presentation at the procurement zippers, after finishing module of the metallic elements, as visibility zipper in the product, by type of teeth, by nature material strip zipper, after the type of materials they are made pullers, after the nature of the materials they are made of sliders and stops after the oxidation of metal components after finishing module teeth after shaped zipper, after slider type, by mode of ornamentation zippers. Knowing appearance zippers, elements of which it is composed, and their classification criteria allow us to correlate the shape of the product and destination.

  17. SNARE zippering is hindered by polyphenols in the neuron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yoosoo; Kim, Se-Hyun; Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jonghyeok; Jung, Young-Hun; Yoon, Keejung; Chung, Woo-Jae; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Membrane fusion driven by SNARE complex is hindered by several polyphenols. • Distinctive inhibitory effect of each polyphenol on SNARE zippering in neuron was examined. • FRET between fluorescence protein-tagged SNAREs probed well SNARE zippering in PC12 cells. • Delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit N-terminal SNARE nucleation in Ca 2+ -independent manner. • Myricetin inhibits Ca 2+ -dependent transmembrane association of SNARE complex. - Abstract: Fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in the neuron is mediated by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. SNARE complex formation is a zippering-like process which initiates at the N-terminus and proceeds to the C-terminal membrane-proximal region. Previously, we showed that this zippering-like process is regulated by several polyphenols, leading to the arrest of membrane fusion and the inhibition of neuroexocytosis. In vitro studies using purified SNARE proteins reconstituted in liposomes revealed that each polyphenol uniquely regulates SNARE zippering. However, the unique regulatory effect of each polyphenol in cells has not yet been examined. In the present study, we observed SNARE zippering in neuronal PC12 cells by measuring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) changes of a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP) and a yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) fused to the N-termini or C-termini of SNARE proteins. We show that delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit the initial N-terminal nucleation of SNARE complex formation in a Ca 2+ -independent manner, while myricetin inhibits Ca 2+ -dependent transmembrane domain association of the SNARE complex in the cell. This result explains how polyphenols exhibit botulinum neurotoxin-like activity in vivo

  18. SNARE zippering is hindered by polyphenols in the neuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yoosoo [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Hyun; Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jonghyeok; Jung, Young-Hun; Yoon, Keejung; Chung, Woo-Jae [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yeon-Kyun [Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kweon, Dae-Hyuk, E-mail: dhkweon@skku.edu [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Membrane fusion driven by SNARE complex is hindered by several polyphenols. • Distinctive inhibitory effect of each polyphenol on SNARE zippering in neuron was examined. • FRET between fluorescence protein-tagged SNAREs probed well SNARE zippering in PC12 cells. • Delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit N-terminal SNARE nucleation in Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner. • Myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane association of SNARE complex. - Abstract: Fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in the neuron is mediated by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. SNARE complex formation is a zippering-like process which initiates at the N-terminus and proceeds to the C-terminal membrane-proximal region. Previously, we showed that this zippering-like process is regulated by several polyphenols, leading to the arrest of membrane fusion and the inhibition of neuroexocytosis. In vitro studies using purified SNARE proteins reconstituted in liposomes revealed that each polyphenol uniquely regulates SNARE zippering. However, the unique regulatory effect of each polyphenol in cells has not yet been examined. In the present study, we observed SNARE zippering in neuronal PC12 cells by measuring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) changes of a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP) and a yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) fused to the N-termini or C-termini of SNARE proteins. We show that delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit the initial N-terminal nucleation of SNARE complex formation in a Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner, while myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane domain association of the SNARE complex in the cell. This result explains how polyphenols exhibit botulinum neurotoxin-like activity in vivo.

  19. A Framework for Low-Communication 1-D FFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Tak Peter Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In high-performance computing on distributed-memory systems, communication often represents a significant part of the overall execution time. The relative cost of communication will certainly continue to rise as compute-density growth follows the current technology and industry trends. Design of lower-communication alternatives to fundamental computational algorithms has become an important field of research. For distributed 1-D FFT, communication cost has hitherto remained high as all industry-standard implementations perform three all-to-all internode data exchanges (also called global transposes. These communication steps indeed dominate execution time. In this paper, we present a mathematical framework from which many single-all-to-all and easy-to-implement 1-D FFT algorithms can be derived. For large-scale problems, our implementation can be twice as fast as leading FFT libraries on state-of-the-art computer clusters. Moreover, our framework allows tradeoff between accuracy and performance, further boosting performance if reduced accuracy is acceptable.

  20. The Single Needle Lockstitch Machine. [Setting Zippers.] Module 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on setting zippers, one in a series on the single needle lockstitch sewing machine for student self-study, contains five sections. Each section includes the following parts: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student information, student self-check, check-out activities, and an instructor's final checklist.…

  1. Small Artifacts - Big Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The computer IC is the heart of the information and telecommunication technology. It is a tiny artifact, but with incredible organizing powers. We use this physical artifact as the location for studying central problems of the knowledge economy. First, the paper describes the history of chip design...

  2. FFT Bifurcation Analysis of Routes to Chaos via Quasiperiodic Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Borkowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of a ring of seven unidirectionally coupled nonlinear Duffing oscillators is studied. We show that the FFT analysis presented in form of a bifurcation graph, that is, frequency distribution versus a control parameter, can provide a valuable and helpful complement to the corresponding typical bifurcation diagram and the course of Lyapunov exponents, especially in context of detailed identification of the observed attractors. As an example, bifurcation analysis of routes to chaos via 2-frequency and 3-frequency quasiperiodicity is demonstrated.

  3. Application of the PRBS/FFT technique to digital simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes a method for obtaining a small-signal frequency response from a digital dynamic simulation. It employs a modified form of the PRBS/FFT technique, whereby a system is perturbed by a pseudo-random binary sequence and its response is analyzed using a fast Fourier transform-based program. Two applications of the technique are described; one involves a set of two coupled, second-order, ordinary differential equations; the other is a set of non-linear partial differential equations describing the thermohydraulic behaviour of water boiling in a fuel channel. (author)

  4. Obscuring the ancient artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tugrul, B.

    1987-01-01

    Radiography is a non-destructive method which is preferable for ancient artifacts. X-rays, gama rays, beta rays and neutrons can be used for radiography. Differences of them and application materials can be different. In this study, the radiographic techniques are determined with application parameters according to materials of the artifacts, and some interesting examples are given. Therefore, investigation of the artifacts can be realized for definition of physical properties, manufacturing techniques and quality controls of them easily by the application of the radiography. (author)

  5. Fatty filum terminale (FFT) as a secondary tethering element in children with closed spinal dysraphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankush; Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of FFT as an additional tethering element in children operated for closed spinal dysraphism, where FFT was not the primary tethering pathology. This is a retrospective study of 195 children (dermal sinus (n = 28, 14.4%), and dermoid cyst (n = 10, 5.1%). Factors such as age and sex, presenting symptoms, intraoperative findings, and radiological presence of a FFT on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were documented, and the relationship between the primary diagnoses and presence of FFT was analyzed. FFT as a secondary finding was seen in 63 patients (32.3%). The mean age of the cohort was 54 months (4.5 years) and the sex distribution was relatively even (51.8% girls). The commonest symptom at presentation was a swelling in the back, followed by lower limb weakness. The mean duration of symptoms was nearly 30 months. FFT was seen on the MRI and confirmed intraoperatively in 55 patients (28.2%). There were 8 patients (4.1%) where a FFT was seen intraoperatively, but was not diagnosed on the preoperative MRI. In 16 patients, FFT was seen > 2 segments away from the primary tethering pathology, 8 of which mandated a second skin incision for sectioning of the FFT. Secondary FFT was most commonly associated with a SCM (types I and II combined) and was seen in 42.6% of those patients. It was least commonly associated with intradural dermoid cysts. The presence of a secondary FFT should be considered and actively sought on preoperative thin-slice T1W axial MR images in the sacral region in all patients with spinal dysraphism. Even if a FFT is not seen on preoperative MR images, the filum should be explored and sectioned if it is in the vicinity of the primary surgical field, especially in patients with SCM.

  6. Hydrogen Epoch of Reinozation Array (HERA) Calibrated FFT Correlator Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Jeffrey David; Parsons, Aaron

    2018-01-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) project is an astronomical radio interferometer array with a redundant baseline configuration. Interferometer arrays are being used widely in radio astronomy because they have a variety of advantages over single antenna systems. For example, they produce images (visibilities) closely matching that of a large antenna (such as the Arecibo observatory), while both the hardware and maintenance costs are significantly lower. However, this method has some complications; one being the computational cost of correlating data from all of the antennas. A correlator is an electronic device that cross-correlates the data between the individual antennas; these are what radio astronomers call visibilities. HERA, being in its early stages, utilizes a traditional correlator system. The correlator cost scales as N2, where N is the number of antennas in the array. The purpose of a redundant baseline configuration array setup is for the use of a more efficient Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) correlator. FFT correlators scale as Nlog2N. The data acquired from this sort of setup, however, inherits geometric delay and uncalibrated antenna gains. This particular project simulates the process of calibrating signals from astronomical sources. Each signal “received” by an antenna in the simulation is given random antenna gain and geometric delay. The “linsolve” Python module was used to solve for the unknown variables in the simulation (complex gains and delays), which then gave a value for the true visibilities. This first version of the simulation only mimics a one dimensional redundant telescope array detecting a small amount of sources located in the volume above the antenna plane. Future versions, using GPUs, will handle a two dimensional redundant array of telescopes detecting a large amount of sources in the volume above the array.

  7. Implementing EW Receivers Based on Large Point Reconfigured FFT on FPGA Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Chen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents design and implementation of digital receiver based on large point fast Fourier transform (FFT suitable for electronic warfare (EW applications. When implementing the FFT algorithm on field-programmable gate array (FPGA platforms, the primary goal is to maximize throughput and minimize area. This algorithm adopts two-dimension, parallel and pipeline stream mode and implements the reconfiguration of FFT's points. Moreover, a double-sequence-separation FFT algorithm has been implemented in order to achieve faster real time processing in broadband digital receivers. The performance of the hardware implementation on the FPGA platforms of broadband digital receivers has been analyzed in depth. It reaches the requirement of high-speed digital signal processing, and reveals the designing this kind of digital signal processing systems on FPGA platforms. Keywords: digital receivers, field programmable gate array (FPGA, fast Fourier transform (FFT, large point reconfigured, signal processing system.

  8. Mystery of an artifact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tugrul, B.

    1987-01-01

    A chunk of metals and beads clustered together had been found in the city of Ashur in East Anatolia. Over the years, the environmental effects to which these burried artifacts are exposed,fused them together. The x-ray radiography of the cluster disclosed a major part of a disc with cuneiform script on it. By reading of cuneiform script from the radiograph, it was disclosed that the disc belongs to the period of Assyrian King Shalmaneser I (1274-1245 B.C.). The age of the chuck and the other artifacts which were found near the chunk could be decided. (author)

  9. The Information Systems Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Surtirtha; Xiao, Xiao; Elbanna, Amany

    2017-01-01

    Passionate debates regarding the defining characteristic of the “IT artifact” continue. Such debates, and also the lack of explicit consideration of the “information” element in the IT artifact, motivate us to propose a revised conception, drawing upon concepts from General Systems Theory (GST...

  10. A High-Throughput, Adaptive FFT Architecture for FPGA-Based Space-Borne Data Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kayla; Zheng, Jason; He, Yutao; Shah, Biren

    2010-01-01

    Historically, computationally-intensive data processing for space-borne instruments has heavily relied on ground-based computing resources. But with recent advances in functional densities of Field-Programmable Gate-Arrays (FPGAs), there has been an increasing desire to shift more processing on-board; therefore relaxing the downlink data bandwidth requirements. Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) are commonly used building blocks for data processing applications, with a growing need to increase the FFT block size. Many existing FFT architectures have mainly emphasized on low power consumption or resource usage; but as the block size of the FFT grows, the throughput is often compromised first. In addition to power and resource constraints, space-borne digital systems are also limited to a small set of space-qualified memory elements, which typically lag behind the commercially available counterparts in capacity and bandwidth. The bandwidth limitation of the external memory creates a bottleneck for a large, high-throughput FFT design with large block size. In this paper, we present the Multi-Pass Wide Kernel FFT (MPWK-FFT) architecture for a moderately large block size (32K) with considerations to power consumption and resource usage, as well as throughput. We will also show that the architecture can be easily adapted for different FFT block sizes with different throughput and power requirements. The result is completely contained within an FPGA without relying on external memories. Implementation results are summarized.

  11. The Human-Artifact Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2011-01-01

    needs to support such development through concepts and methods. This leads to a methodological approach that focuses on new artifacts to supplement and substitute existing artifacts. Through a design case, we develop the methodological approach and illustrate how the human–artifact model can be applied...... to analyze present artifacts and to design future ones. The model is used to structure such analysis and to reason about findings while providing leverage from activity theoretical insights on mediation, dialectics, and levels of activity....

  12. Small Artifacts - Big Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The computer IC is the heart of the information and telecommunication technology. It is a tiny artifact, but with incredible organizing powers. We use this physical artifact as the location for studying central problems of the knowledge economy. First, the paper describes the history of chip design...... and the emergence of the technological community involved in designing and manufacturing computer chips. The community is structured in a way that reflects the underlying physical nature silicon and the numerous other materials and chemicals involved. But it also reflects the human agency of defining new projects......, of visioning the liberation from atoms, of committing to travel many detours in the labyrinths of development, and of perceiving and exploring the affordance that new technologies hide. Some of these characteristics are analyzed empirically in a case study of designing a chip for a digitalized hearing...

  13. Controlling Modelling Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Michael James Andrew; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    the possible configurations of the system (for example, by counting the number of components in a certain state). We motivate our methodology with a case study of the LMAC protocol for wireless sensor networks. In particular, we investigate the accuracy of a recently proposed high-level model of LMAC......When analysing the performance of a complex system, we typically build abstract models that are small enough to analyse, but still capture the relevant details of the system. But it is difficult to know whether the model accurately describes the real system, or if its behaviour is due to modelling...... artifacts that were inadvertently introduced. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology to reason about modelling artifacts, given a detailed model and a highlevel (more abstract) model of the same system. By a series of automated abstraction steps, we lift the detailed model to the same state space...

  14. Protein-ligand docking using FFT based sampling: D3R case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhorny, Dzmitry; Hall, David R; Mirzaei, Hanieh; Mamonov, Artem B; Moghadasi, Mohammad; Alekseenko, Andrey; Beglov, Dmitri; Kozakov, Dima

    2018-01-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) based approaches have been successful in application to modeling of relatively rigid protein-protein complexes. Recently, we have been able to adapt the FFT methodology to treatment of flexible protein-peptide interactions. Here, we report our latest attempt to expand the capabilities of the FFT approach to treatment of flexible protein-ligand interactions in application to the D3R PL-2016-1 challenge. Based on the D3R assessment, our FFT approach in conjunction with Monte Carlo minimization off-grid refinement was among the top performing methods in the challenge. The potential advantage of our method is its ability to globally sample the protein-ligand interaction landscape, which will be explored in further applications.

  15. Protein–ligand docking using FFT based sampling: D3R case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhorny, Dzmitry; Hall, David R.; Mirzaei, Hanieh; Mamonov, Artem B.; Moghadasi, Mohammad; Alekseenko, Andrey; Beglov, Dmitri; Kozakov, Dima

    2018-01-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) based approaches have been successful in application to modeling of relatively rigid protein-protein complexes. Recently, we have been able to adapt the FFT methodology to treatment of flexible protein-peptide interactions. Here, we report our latest attempt to expand the capabilities of the FFT approach to treatment of flexible protein-ligand interactions in application to the D3R PL-2016-1 challenge. Based on the D3R assessment, our FFT approach in conjunction with Monte Carlo minimization off-grid refinement was among the top performing methods in the challenge. The potential advantage of our method is its ability to globally sample the protein-ligand interaction landscape, which will be explored in further applications.

  16. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  17. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) for Young People in Treatment for Non-opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use.......The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use....

  18. From Ecological Sounding Artifacts Towards Sonic Artifact Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of sonic interaction design has been focused on the interaction between a single user and an artifact. This strongly limits one of the fundamental aspects of music as a social and interactive experience. In this paper we propose sonic artifact ecologies as a mean to examine...... interactions between one or many users with one or many artifacts. Case studies from a recently run workshop on product sound design are examined....

  19. High-Throughput, Adaptive FFT Architecture for FPGA-Based Spaceborne Data Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    NguyenKobayashi, Kayla; Zheng, Jason X.; He, Yutao; Shah, Biren N.

    2011-01-01

    Exponential growth in microelectronics technology such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) has enabled high-performance spaceborne instruments with increasing onboard data processing capabilities. As a commonly used digital signal processing (DSP) building block, fast Fourier transform (FFT) has been of great interest in onboard data processing applications, which needs to strike a reasonable balance between high-performance (throughput, block size, etc.) and low resource usage (power, silicon footprint, etc.). It is also desirable to be designed so that a single design can be reused and adapted into instruments with different requirements. The Multi-Pass Wide Kernel FFT (MPWK-FFT) architecture was developed, in which the high-throughput benefits of the parallel FFT structure and the low resource usage of Singleton s single butterfly method is exploited. The result is a wide-kernel, multipass, adaptive FFT architecture. The 32K-point MPWK-FFT architecture includes 32 radix-2 butterflies, 64 FIFOs to store the real inputs, 64 FIFOs to store the imaginary inputs, complex twiddle factor storage, and FIFO logic to route the outputs to the correct FIFO. The inputs are stored in sequential fashion into the FIFOs, and the outputs of each butterfly are sequentially written first into the even FIFO, then the odd FIFO. Because of the order of the outputs written into the FIFOs, the depth of the even FIFOs, which are 768 each, are 1.5 times larger than the odd FIFOs, which are 512 each. The total memory needed for data storage, assuming that each sample is 36 bits, is 2.95 Mbits. The twiddle factors are stored in internal ROM inside the FPGA for fast access time. The total memory size to store the twiddle factors is 589.9Kbits. This FFT structure combines the benefits of high throughput from the parallel FFT kernels and low resource usage from the multi-pass FFT kernels with desired adaptability. Space instrument missions that need onboard FFT capabilities such as the

  20. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  1. Multi-Static Multi-Frequency Image Reconstruction Based on Non-Uniform FFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Krainy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By now a considerable number of articles on the common principles and theory of radio holographic imaging of objects based on a new method of multi-static radio-holography (MRH have been are published.In contrast to the method of image reconstruction using the classical radio holography (CRH to have the MRH approach it is possible to use a non-equispaced antennas array with independent transmitting and receiving elements. Radio-holography samples are received for each pair of “transmitting element-receiving element”. The number of independent samples is equal to the product of the number of transmitter elements and receiver elements and may be approximately equal to the number of samples used in CRH. An additional improvement in the quality of reconstructed image for three-dimensional objects in both approaches is achieved through the use of multi-frequency radiation.The wide common method of reconstructing images from the classical radio-hologram uses algorithms of two-fold Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, while due to focusing the multi-static radio-hologram a back projection method has been used. The back projection method is timeconsuming. However, it can be transformed to the form of two-fold non-uniform FFT (NuFFT. According to data available in the foreign references a computational efficiency of NuFFT is close to the efficiency of the classical FFT on an equidistant grid sampling. In the specific antenna configuration an example of the multi-static multi-frequency focusing and image reconstruction of three dimensional model object with back projection and NuFFT approach are presented.

  2. Validation of a Sensor-Driven Modeling Paradigm for Multiple Source Reconstruction with FFT-07 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    conduite au moyens d’essais pratiques en 2007 (FFT-07) par les réseaux d’observation de capteurs d’information FUSION (FUsing Sensor Information from... capteurs CBR ait ef- fectué la détection d’un tel événement. Il s’agit d’un problème de reconstruction des sources (appelé aussi dans certaines...le terrain a été conduite au moyen d’essais pratiques, en 2007, (FFT-07) par les réseaux d’observation de capteurs d’information FU- SION (FUsing

  3. Development of PC-based FFT system for reactor dynamic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, S.; Baig, A.R.

    1993-03-01

    A personal computer based fast fourier transform (FFT) analyzer has been developed for frequency spectrum analysis of signals from nuclear reactor. The system can perform window smoothing, computation of auto- and cross-power spectral density, coherence and auto and cross-correlation functions. The feature of 16 analogue signals acquisition with high precision and high sampling frequency makes the analyzer suitable for malfunction diagnosis of nuclear reactors using reactor noise analysis. The development work for the fourier analyzer was undertaken as a part of IAEA research contract no. 5925/RB. The applications of the FFT analyzer are described in reactor transfer function measurements and nuclear instrumentation channels frequency response testing. (author)

  4. Turquoise Artifact from Teotihuacan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Michael W.; Harbottle, Garman; Weigand, Phil C.

    1999-07-01

    Turquoise artifacts appeared sporadically in Mesoamerica as early as the Formative period (Merry de Morales 1987:100, Figure 8.4; Weigand 1989:43). Most occurrences, however, postdate the collapse of Teotihuacan. In the Late Classic and Postclassic periods increasing quantities are found, often in the form of elaborate mosaics, in a wide variety of contexts in central, west and northwest Mexico. Neutron activation analysis has determined that much of this turquoise derives from sources in the southwestern United States (Weigand et al. 1977; Harbottle and Weigand 1992; Weigand and Harbottle 1993). Teotihuacan played a major role in Mesoamerica during the Terminal Formative and Early-Middle Classic periods. It was the dominant power in central Mexico from about the time of Christ to its collapse at about A.D. 650 (Millon 1988, 1992; Cowgill 1996). Throughout this period goods flowed into Teotihuacan from many parts of the Mesoamerican world. Despite this widespread economic interaction, only two pieces of turquoise have been recovered in the city. In the following pages, the context and implications of one of these finds will be examined.

  5. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M., E-mail: qchen@email.arizona.edu

    2014-04-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA.

  6. Characterization of the Zebrafish Homolog of Zipper Interacting Protein Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon W. Carr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK is a conserved vertebrate-specific regulator of actomyosin contractility in smooth muscle and non-muscle cells. Murine ZIPK has undergone an unusual divergence in sequence and regulation compared to other ZIPK orthologs. In humans, subcellular localization is controlled by phosphorylation of threonines 299 and 300. In contrast, ZIPK subcellular localization in mouse and rat is controlled by interaction with PAR-4. We carried out a comparative biochemical characterization of the regulation of the zebrafish ortholog of ZIPK. Like the human orthologs zebrafish ZIPK undergoes nucleocytoplasmic-shuttling and is abundant in the cytoplasm, unlike the primarily nuclear rat ZIPK. Rat ZIPK, but not human or zebrafish ZIPK, interacts with zebrafish PAR-4. Mutation of the conserved residues required for activation of the mammalian orthologs abrogated activity of the zebrafish ZIPK. In contrast to the human ortholog, mutation of threonine 299 and 300 in the zebrafish ZIPK has no effect on the activity or subcellular localization. Thus, we found that zebrafish ZIPK functions in a manner most similar to the human ZIPK and quite distinct from murine orthologs, yet the regulation of subcellular localization is not conserved.

  7. Investigating media artifacts with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    The dissertation’s aim is to explore the everyday relevance media artifacts have for young children. It discusses and further develops analytical concepts that are committed to taking the children’s perspectives on possibilities and limitations of such artifacts seriously. These conceptual...... developments are rooted in the author’s participation in a daycare practice in Berlin, Germany. The daycare’s situational approach precisely attempted to draw on the children’s everyday life experiences so as to engage in problem-oriented learning projects, on media artifacts and beyond....

  8. A simple and efficient parallel FFT algorithm using the BSP model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisseling, R.H.; Inda, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a new parallel radix FFT algorithm based on the BSP model Our parallel algorithm uses the groupcyclic distribution family which makes it simple to understand and easy to implement We show how to reduce the com munication cost of the algorithm by a factor of three in the case

  9. Leak Detection in Waterworks: Comparison Between STFT and FFT with an Overcoming of Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay-Ekuakille Aimé

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection of leakages in pipelines is a matter of continuous research because of the basic importance for a waterworks system is finding the point of the pipeline where a leak is located and − in some cases − a nature of the leak. There are specific difficulties in finding leaks by using spectral analysis techniques like FFT (Fast Fourier Transform, STFT (Short Term Fourier Transform, etc. These difficulties arise especially in complicated pipeline configurations, e.g. a zigzag one. This research focuses on the results of a new algorithm based on FFT and comparing them with a developed STFT technique. Even if other techniques are used, they are costly and difficult to be managed. Moreover, a constraint in the leak detection is the pipeline diameter because it influences accuracy of the adopted algorithm. FFT and STFT are not fully adequate for complex configurations dealt with in this paper, since they produce ill-posed problems with an increasing uncertainty. Therefore, an improved Tikhonov technique has been implemented to reinforce FFT and STFT for complex configurations of pipelines. Hence, the proposed algorithm overcomes the aforementioned difficulties due to applying a linear algebraic approach.

  10. GPU-Based FFT Computation for Multi-Gigabit WirelessHD Baseband Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Hinitt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The next generation Graphics Processing Units (GPUs are being considered for non-graphics applications. Millimeter wave (60 Ghz wireless networks that are capable of multi-gigabit per second (Gbps transfer rates require a significant baseband throughput. In this work, we consider the baseband of WirelessHD, a 60 GHz communications system, which can provide a data rate of up to 3.8 Gbps over a short range wireless link. Thus, we explore the feasibility of achieving gigabit baseband throughput using the GPUs. One of the most computationally intensive functions commonly used in baseband communications, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT algorithm, is implemented on an NVIDIA GPU using their general-purpose computing platform called the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA. The paper, first, investigates the implementation of an FFT algorithm using the GPU hardware and exploiting the computational capability available. It then outlines the limitations discovered and the methods used to overcome these challenges. Finally a new algorithm to compute FFT is proposed, which reduces interprocessor communication. It is further optimized by improving memory access, enabling the processing rate to exceed 4 Gbps, achieving a processing time of a 512-point FFT in less than 200 ns using a two-GPU solution.

  11. Kriging accelerated by orders of magnitude: combining low-rank with FFT techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-05-04

    Kriging algorithms based on FFT, the separability of certain covariance functions and low-rank representations of covariance functions have been investigated. The current study combines these ideas, and so combines the individual speedup factors of all ideas. The reduced computational complexity is O(dLlogL), where L := max ini, i = 1

  12. Zippered release from polymer-gated carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mashat, Afnan

    2012-01-01

    A thermosensitive drug delivery system based on polymer-gated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are loaded with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is herein reported. The development of carbon nanotubes for various biomedical applications is the research focus of many research groups and holds great promise. The major drawback of these materials is the toxicity that is associated with conjugated carbon systems. Functionalization of CNTs with polymers has proved very successful in lowering the toxicity and improving the pharmacokinetic profile. In this work, CNTs are coated with polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) via the "zipper effect" that provides both support and control over drug release. PEI/PVA provides excellent support to increase DOX loading on the nanocarrier. The system is controlled by changes in temperature due to the complexation (low temperature) and decomplexation (high temperature) of PEI and PVA via hydrogen bonding. The release of DOX was tested in three cell lines (Lung fibroblast (LF), Breast Adenocarcinoma (BA), and HeLa). It was further tested in primary cell lines (Human Dermal Fibroblast adult (HDFa) and Human Dermal Fibroblast neonatal (HDFn)). When the bonds between PEI and PVA are decomplexed at high temperature (≥40 °C), drug release was observed as verified by fluorescence microscopy. There was no drug release at room temperature (25 °C) and a slow release at normal body temperature (37 °C). This system represents a promising method for incorporating stimuli triggered polymer-gated CNTs in future controlled release applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  14. An FFT-accelerated fdtd scheme with exact absorbing conditions for characterizing axially symmetric resonant structures

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    An accurate and efficient finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for characterizing transient waves interactions on axially symmetric structures is presented. The method achieves its accuracy and efficiency by employing localized and/or fast Fourier transform (FFT) accelerated exact absorbing conditions (EACs). The paper details the derivation of the EACs, discusses their implementation and discretization in an FDTD method, and proposes utilization of a blocked-FFT based algorithm for accelerating the computation of temporal convolutions present in nonlocal EACs. The proposed method allows transient analyses to be carried for long time intervals without any loss of accuracy and provides reliable numerical data pertinent to physical processes under resonant conditions. This renders the method highly useful in characterization of high-Q microwave radiators and energy compressors. Numerical results that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method are presented.

  15. HexServer: an FFT-based protein docking server powered by graphics processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macindoe, Gary; Mavridis, Lazaros; Venkatraman, Vishwesh; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Ritchie, David W

    2010-07-01

    HexServer (http://hexserver.loria.fr/) is the first Fourier transform (FFT)-based protein docking server to be powered by graphics processors. Using two graphics processors simultaneously, a typical 6D docking run takes approximately 15 s, which is up to two orders of magnitude faster than conventional FFT-based docking approaches using comparable resolution and scoring functions. The server requires two protein structures in PDB format to be uploaded, and it produces a ranked list of up to 1000 docking predictions. Knowledge of one or both protein binding sites may be used to focus and shorten the calculation when such information is available. The first 20 predictions may be accessed individually, and a single file of all predicted orientations may be downloaded as a compressed multi-model PDB file. The server is publicly available and does not require any registration or identification by the user.

  16. A Temporal Millimeter Wave Propagation Model for Tunnels Using Ray Frustum Techniques and FFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyen Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A temporal millimeter wave propagation model for tunnels is presented using ray frustum techniques and fast Fourier transform (FFT. To directly estimate or simulate effects of millimeter wave channel properties on the performance of communication services, time domain impulse responses of demodulated signals should be obtained, which needs rather large computation time. To mitigate the computational burden, ray frustum techniques are used to obtain frequency domain transfer function of millimeter wave propagation environment and FFT of equivalent low pass signals are used to retrieve demodulated waveforms. This approach is numerically efficient and helps to directly estimate impact of tunnel structures and surfaces roughness on the performance of millimeter wave communication services.

  17. A FFT-based formulation for discrete dislocation dynamics in heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, N.; Capolungo, L.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, an extension of the DDD-FFT approach presented in [1] is developed for heterogeneous elasticity. For such a purpose, an iterative spectral formulation in which convolutions are calculated in the Fourier space is developed to solve for the mechanical state associated with the discrete eigenstrain-based microstructural representation. With this, the heterogeneous DDD-FFT approach is capable of treating anisotropic and heterogeneous elasticity in a computationally efficient manner. In addition, a GPU implementation is presented to allow for further acceleration. As a first example, the approach is used to investigate the interaction between dislocations and second-phase particles, thereby demonstrating its ability to inherently incorporate image forces arising from elastic inhomogeneities.

  18. Parallel implementation of 3D FFT with volumetric decomposition schemes for efficient molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaewoon; Kobayashi, Chigusa; Imamura, Toshiyuki; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (3D FFT) plays an important role in a wide variety of computer simulations and data analyses, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this study, we develop hybrid (MPI+OpenMP) parallelization schemes of 3D FFT based on two new volumetric decompositions, mainly for the particle mesh Ewald (PME) calculation in MD simulations. In one scheme, (1d_Alltoall), five all-to-all communications in one dimension are carried out, and in the other, (2d_Alltoall), one two-dimensional all-to-all communication is combined with two all-to-all communications in one dimension. 2d_Alltoall is similar to the conventional volumetric decomposition scheme. We performed benchmark tests of 3D FFT for the systems with different grid sizes using a large number of processors on the K computer in RIKEN AICS. The two schemes show comparable performances, and are better than existing 3D FFTs. The performances of 1d_Alltoall and 2d_Alltoall depend on the supercomputer network system and number of processors in each dimension. There is enough leeway for users to optimize performance for their conditions. In the PME method, short-range real-space interactions as well as long-range reciprocal-space interactions are calculated. Our volumetric decomposition schemes are particularly useful when used in conjunction with the recently developed midpoint cell method for short-range interactions, due to the same decompositions of real and reciprocal spaces. The 1d_Alltoall scheme of 3D FFT takes 4.7 ms to simulate one MD cycle for a virus system containing more than 1 million atoms using 32,768 cores on the K computer.

  19. Intergranular Strain Evolution During Biaxial Loading: A Multiscale FE-FFT Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Upadhyay, M. V.; Čapek, Jan; van Petegem, S.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 5 (2017), s. 839-847 ISSN 1047-4838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : In-Situ Neutron Diffraction * Macroscale FE Simulations * Mesoscale EVP-FFT Model Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.860, year: 2016

  20. An FDTD method with FFT-accelerated exact absorbing boundary conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-07-01

    An accurate and efficient finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for analyzing axially symmetric structures is presented. The method achieves its accuracy and efficiency using exact absorbing conditions (EACs) for terminating the computation domain and a blocked-FFT based scheme for accelerating the computation of the temporal convolutions present in non-local EACs. The method is shown to be especially useful in characterization of long-duration resonant wave interactions. © 2011 IEEE.

  1. Complexity evaluation for the implementation of a pre-FFT equalizer in an OFDM receiver

    OpenAIRE

    Armour, SMD; Nix, AR

    2000-01-01

    A pre-FFT equalizer (PFE) has been shown to offer a significant throughput efficiency improvement when applied to an OFDM receiver. Alternatively, the PFE can be used to increase the maximum delay spread conditions under which the OFDM system can operate effectively. Due to the manner of its operation, the PFE requires the use of modified adaptation algorithms if iterative, decision directed, adaptation is required. The computational complexity required to implement a PFE and a suitable adapt...

  2. Ultrasonic Measurement of Velocity Profile on Bubbly Flow Using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsaroj, W.; Hamdani, A.; Thong-un, N.; Takahashi, H.; Kikura, H.

    2017-10-01

    In two-phase bubbly flow, measurement of liquid and bubble velocity is a necessity to understand fluid characteristic. The conventional ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP), which has been known as a nonintrusive measurement technique, can measure velocity profile of liquid and bubble simultaneously by applying a separation technique for both phases (liquid and bubble) and transparent test section is unnecessary. The aim of this study was to develop a new technique for separating liquid and bubble velocity data in UVP method to measure liquid and bubble velocity profiles separately. The technique employs only single resonant frequency transducer and a simple UVP system. An extra equipment is not required. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based frequency estimator paralleled with other signal processing techniques, which is called as proposed technique, was proposed to measure liquid and bubble velocity separately. The experimental facility of two-phase bubbly flow in the vertical pipe was constructed. Firstly, the Doppler frequency estimation by using the FFT technique was evaluated in single-phase liquid flow. Results showed that FFT technique showed a good agreement with autocorrelation and maximum likelihood estimator. Then, separation of liquid and bubble velocity was demonstrated experimentally in the two-phase bubbly flow. The proposed technique confirmed that liquid and bubble velocity could be measured efficiently.

  3. Canonic FFT flow graphs for real-valued even/odd symmetric inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Yingjie; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2017-12-01

    Canonic real-valued fast Fourier transform (RFFT) has been proposed to reduce the arithmetic complexity by eliminating redundancies. In a canonic N-point RFFT, the number of signal values at each stage is canonic with respect to the number of signal values, i.e., N. The major advantage of the canonic RFFTs is that these require the least number of butterfly operations and only real datapaths when mapped to architectures. In this paper, we consider the FFT computation whose inputs are not only real but also even/odd symmetric, which indeed lead to the well-known discrete cosine and sine transforms (DCTs and DSTs). Novel algorithms for generating the flow graphs of canonic RFFTs with even/odd symmetric inputs are proposed. It is shown that the proposed algorithms lead to canonic structures with N/2 +1 signal values at each stage for an N-point real even symmetric FFT (REFFT) or N/2 -1 signal values at each stage for an N-point RFFT real odd symmetric FFT (ROFFT). In order to remove butterfly operations, several twiddle factor transformations are proposed in this paper. We also discuss the design of canonic REFFT for any composite length. Performances of the canonic REFFT/ROFFT are also discussed. It is shown that the flow graph of canonic REFFT/ROFFT has less number of interconnections, less butterfly operations, and less twiddle factor operations, compared to prior works.

  4. FFT Algorithm for Binary Extension Finite Fields and Its Application to Reed–Solomon Codes

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Sian Jheng

    2016-08-15

    Recently, a new polynomial basis over binary extension fields was proposed, such that the fast Fourier transform (FFT) over such fields can be computed in the complexity of order O(n lg(n)), where n is the number of points evaluated in FFT. In this paper, we reformulate this FFT algorithm, such that it can be easier understood and be extended to develop frequency-domain decoding algorithms for (n = 2(m), k) systematic Reed-Solomon (RS) codes over F-2m, m is an element of Z(+), with n-k a power of two. First, the basis of syndrome polynomials is reformulated in the decoding procedure so that the new transforms can be applied to the decoding procedure. A fast extended Euclidean algorithm is developed to determine the error locator polynomial. The computational complexity of the proposed decoding algorithm is O(n lg(n-k)+(n-k)lg(2)(n-k)), improving upon the best currently available decoding complexity O(n lg(2)(n) lg lg(n)), and reaching the best known complexity bound that was established by Justesen in 1976. However, Justesen\\'s approach is only for the codes over some specific fields, which can apply Cooley-Tukey FFTs. As revealed by the computer simulations, the proposed decoding algorithm is 50 times faster than the conventional one for the (2(16), 2(15)) RS code over F-216.

  5. Toddlers View Artifact Function Normatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casler, Krista; Terziyan, Treysi; Greene, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    When children use objects like adults, are they simply tracking regularities in others' object use, or are they demonstrating a normatively defined awareness that there are right and wrong ways to act? This study provides the first evidence for the latter possibility. Young 2- and 3-year-olds (n = 32) learned functions of 6 artifacts, both…

  6. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  7. Temporary abdominal closure with zipper-mesh device for management of intra-abdominal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo Massazo Utiyama

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to present our experience with scheduled reoperations in 15 patients with intra-abdominal sepsis. METHODS: we have applied a more effective technique consisting of temporary abdominal closure with a nylon mesh sheet containing a zipper. We performed reoperations in the operating room under general anesthesia at an average interval of 84 hours. The revision consisted of debridement of necrotic material and vigorous lavage of the involved peritoneal area. The mean age of patients was 38.7 years (range, 15 to 72 years; 11 patients were male, and four were female. RESULTS: forty percent of infections were due to necrotizing pancreatitis. Sixty percent were due to perforation of the intestinal viscus secondary to inflammation, vascular occlusion or trauma. We performed a total of 48 reoperations, an average of 3.2 surgeries per patient. The mesh-zipper device was left in place for an average of 13 days. An intestinal ostomy was present adjacent to the zipper in four patients and did not present a problem for patient management. Mortality was 26.6%. No fistulas resulted from this technique. When intra-abdominal disease was under control, the mesh-zipper device was removed, and the fascia was closed in all patients. In three patients, the wound was closed primarily, and in 12 it was allowed to close by secondary intent. Two patients developed hernia; one was incisional and one was in the drain incision. CONCLUSION: the planned reoperation for manual lavage and debridement of the abdomen through a nylon mesh-zipper combination was rapid, simple, and well-tolerated. It permitted effective management of severe septic peritonitis, easy wound care and primary closure of the abdominal wall.

  8. VLSI Design of a Variable-Length FFT/IFFT Processor for OFDM-Based Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chih Kuo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The technique of {orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM} is famous for its robustness against frequency-selective fading channel. This technique has been widely used in many wired and wireless communication systems. In general, the {fast Fourier transform (FFT} and {inverse FFT (IFFT} operations are used as the modulation/demodulation kernel in the OFDM systems, and the sizes of FFT/IFFT operations are varied in different applications of OFDM systems. In this paper, we design and implement a variable-length prototype FFT/IFFT processor to cover different specifications of OFDM applications. The cached-memory FFT architecture is our suggested VLSI system architecture to design the prototype FFT/IFFT processor for the consideration of low-power consumption. We also implement the twiddle factor butterfly {processing element (PE} based on the {{coordinate} rotation digital computer (CORDIC} algorithm, which avoids the use of conventional multiplication-and-accumulation unit, but evaluates the trigonometric functions using only add-and-shift operations. Finally, we implement a variable-length prototype FFT/IFFT processor with TSMC 0.35 μm 1P4M CMOS technology. The simulations results show that the chip can perform (64-2048-point FFT/IFFT operations up to 80 MHz operating frequency which can meet the speed requirement of most OFDM standards such as WLAN, ADSL, VDSL (256∼2K, DAB, and 2K-mode DVB.

  9. Reduction of motion artifact in pulse oximetry by smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuan-ting

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pulse oximeter, a medical device capable of measuring blood oxygen saturation (SpO2, has been shown to be a valuable device for monitoring patients in critical conditions. In order to incorporate the technique into a wearable device which can be used in ambulatory settings, the influence of motion artifacts on the estimated SpO2 must be reduced. This study investigates the use of the smoothed psuedo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD for the reduction of motion artifacts affecting pulse oximetry. Methods The SPWVD approach is compared with two techniques currently used in this field, i.e. the weighted moving average (WMA and the fast Fourier transform (FFT approaches. SpO2 and pulse rate were estimated from a photoplethysmographic (PPG signal recorded when subject is in a resting position as well as in the act of performing four types of motions: horizontal and vertical movements of the hand, and bending and pressing motions of the finger. For each condition, 24 sets of PPG signals collected from 6 subjects, each of 30 seconds, were studied with reference to the PPG signal recorded simultaneously from the subject's other hand, which was stationary at all times. Results and Discussion The SPWVD approach shows significant improvement (p Conclusion The results suggested that the SPWVD approach could potentially be used to reduce motion artifact on wearable pulse oximeters.

  10. Artifacts as Authoritative Actors in Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Virginie; Kelchtermans, Geert; Vermeir, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Educational reforms are often translated in and implemented through artifacts. Although research has frequently treated artifacts as merely functional, more recent work acknowledges the complex relationship between material artifacts and human/organizational behavior. This article aims at disentangling this relationship in order to deepen our…

  11. Streak artifacts in dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partanen, K.; Kormano, M.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a body phantom during dynamic CT scanning with the Somatom 2 CT scanner indicate that the periodic streak artifacts seen on the anterior part of the liver in patients are caused by peristalsis of the stomach and resulting motion of the air fluid level. Therefore, the attenuation values of the anterior portion of the liver artifactually oscillate around the baseline value during the dynamic series of scans. This artifact is produced by a change in the position of the stomach air fluid level and is dependent on the direction of tube rotation. The mean of the artifactually oscillating attenuation readings is close to the mean density but usually useless in dynamic CT because the attenuation values change so rapidly in the dynamic phase that averaging measurements also will cause errors. (Auth.)

  12. Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    would like to replace ‘art’ with ‘type’, in a search for the idea­typemachines of our time.We would be most honored if you would join us in our pursuit.”In the hopes of launching a non­dogmatic effort to discover the idea­type­machines of our time, a conference was held in Copenhagen in 2010, where...... uses a conceptual form of art, it means that all the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair. The idea becomes a machine that makes art.’ (Sol LeWitt, ‘Paragraph on Conceptual art’, in Artforum, 1967.)We would like to draw on Sol LeWitt’s vision and then we...

  13. Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    CONCEPTUAL TYPE: TYPE LED BY IDEAS 26/10/12“Where are the idealistic fonts, the artsy fonts, the non fonts, the political fonts, the funny fonts, the difficult fonts, the fonts that don’t look like fonts, the fonts that are frontiers of new beliefs? We would like to focus on the ideas and concepts...... behind type. Rather than ushering in our examination about type by asking who it was that created it and what it looks like, we want to ring in this new decade by asking why we create type and what it means.‘In conceptual art the idea or concept is the most important aspect of the work. When an artist...... designers and theorists convened to discuss the current status of typedesign with a point of departurein what was proposed on the invitation quoted above. The conference attracted more than 500 graphic designers, type designers and theorists from all over Europeand the large turnout and the huge interest...

  14. Kriging accelerated by orders of magnitude: combining low-rank with FFT techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-01-08

    Kriging algorithms based on FFT, the separability of certain covariance functions and low-rank representations of covariance functions have been investigated. The current study combines these ideas, and so combines the individual speedup factors of all ideas. For separable covariance functions, the results are exact, and non-separable covariance functions can be approximated through sums of separable components. Speedup factor is 1e+8, problem sizes 1.5e+13 and 2e+15 estimation points for Kriging and spatial design.

  15. A transformada de Fourier em basic The Fourier transform (FFT in basic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Gomes Constantino

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe three computer programs in Basic language about the Fourier transform (FFT which are available in the Internet site http://artemis.ffclrp.usp.br/SoftwareE.htm (in English or http://artemis.ffclrp.usp.br/softwareP.htm (in Portuguese since October 1998. Those are addresses to the Web Page of our Laboratory of Organic Synthesis. The programs can be downloaded and used by anyone who is interested on the subject. The texts, menus and captions in the programs are written in English.

  16. Improving the Performance and Resource Utilization of the CASPER FFT and Polyphase Filterbank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Ryan

    2016-03-01

    The effectiveness of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) solutions for radio-astronomy is limited by the efficiency of the implemented algorithms. Novel implementations of several popular DSP algorithms are presented. Their optimization strategies are discussed and their efficiency is compared to that of the standard Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) library solutions. Compared to CASPER, the PFB-FIR and FFT modules require 73% and 45% of the DSP48E1 resources, with performance dominated by ADC quantization noise for typical radio-astronomy inputs.

  17. A pre-FFT equalizer design for application to Hiperlan/2

    OpenAIRE

    Armour, SMD; Nix, AR; Bull, David

    2000-01-01

    Use of a pre-FFT Equaliser (PFE) has been previously proposed as a method for either improving the efficiency of OFDM radio modems or increasing the excess delay spread that they are capable of operating under. In this paper, application of the PFE to the Hiperlad/2 standard is considered. Key features of the physical layer specification of the Hiperlad/2 standard are summarised and those aspects that are particularly relevant when considering the use of the PFE are highlighted. A Hiperlad/2 ...

  18. Kriging accelerated by orders of magnitude: combining low-rank with FFT techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-01-06

    Kriging algorithms based on FFT, the separability of certain covariance functions and low-rank representations of covariance functions have been investigated. The current study combines these ideas, and so combines the individual speedup factors of all ideas. The reduced computational complexity is O(dLlogL), where L := max ini, i = 1..d. For separable covariance functions, the results are exact, and non-separable covariance functions can be approximated through sums of separable components. Speedup factor is 10 8, problem sizes 15e + 12 and 2e + 15 estimation points for Kriging and spatial design.

  19. Implementations of FFT and STBD for MIMO-OFDM on a Reconfigurable Baseband Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang; Lu, Wenqing; Zhou, Xiaofang; Zhou, Dian; Sobelman, Gerald E.

    MIMO-OFDM systems aim to improve transmission quality and/or throughput but require significant signal processing capability and flexibility at reasonable cost. This paper proposes a reconfigurable architecture and associated algorithm optimizations for these types of systems based on the IEEE 802.11n and IEEE 802.16e standards. In particular, we describe the implementation of two key computations onto this architecture, namely Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Space-Time Block Decoding (STBD). The design is post-layout using a UMC 0.18micron technology at a clock rate of 100MHz. Performance comparisons with other optimization methods and hardware implementations are given.

  20. A virtualized software based on the NVIDIA cuFFT library for image denoising: performance analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galletti, Ardelio; Marcellino, Livia; Montella, Raffaele

    2017-01-01

    ancillary libraries with good results. Here, our aim is to analyze the applicability of this powerful tool to a real problem, which uses the NVIDIA cuFFT library. As case study we consider a simple denoising algorithm, implementing a virtualized GPU-parallel software based on the convolution theorem...... in order to perform the noise removal procedure in the frequency domain. We report some preliminary tests in both physical and virtualized environments to study and analyze the potential scalability of such an algorithm....

  1. Artifacts that mimic ballistic magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhoff, W.F. . E-mail : egelhoff@nist.gov; Gan, L.; Ettedgui, H.; Kadmon, Y.; Powell, C.J.; Chen, P.J.; Shapiro, A.J.; McMichael, R.D.; Mallett, J.J.; Moffat, T.P.; Stiles, M.D.; Svedberg, E.B.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the circumstances underlying recent reports of very large values of ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR) in nanocontacts between magnetic wires. We find that the geometries used are subject to artifacts due to motion of the wires that distort the nanocontact thereby changing its electrical resistance. Since these nanocontacts are often of atomic scale, reliable experiments would require stability on the atomic scale. No method for achieving such stability in macroscopic wires is apparent. We conclude that macroscopic magnetic wires cannot be used to establish the validity of the BMR effect

  2. Automatic Synthesis of Cost Effective FFT/IFFT Cores for VLSI OFDM Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Insalata, Nicola E.; Saponara, Sergio; Fanucci, Luca; Terreni, Pierangelo

    This work presents an FFT/IFFT core compiler particularly suited for the VLSI implementation of OFDM communication systems. The tool employs an architecture template based on the pipelined cascade principle. The generated cores support run-time programmable length and transform type selection, enabling seamless integration into multiple mode and multiple standard terminals. A distinctive feature of the tool is its accuracy-driven configuration engine which automatically profiles the internal arithmetic and generates a core with minimum operands bit-width and thus minimum circuit complexity. The engine performs a closed-loop optimization over three different internal arithmetic models (fixed-point, block floating-point and convergent block floating-point) using the numerical accuracy budget given by the user as a reference point. The flexibility and re-usability of the proposed macrocell are illustrated through several case studies which encompass all current state-of-the-art OFDM communications standards (WLAN, WMAN, xDSL, DVB-T/H, DAB and UWB). Implementations results of the generated macrocells are presented for two deep sub-micron standard-cells libraries (65 and 90nm) and commercially available FPGA devices. When compared with other tools for automatic FFT core generation, the proposed environment produces macrocells with lower circuit complexity expressed as gate count and RAM/ROM bits, while keeping the same system level performance in terms of throughput, transform size and numerical accuracy.

  3. Low Complexity Moving Target Parameter Estimation for MIMO Radar using 2D-FFT

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2017-06-16

    In multiple-input multiple-output radar, to localize a target and estimate its reflection coefficient, a given cost function is usually optimized over a grid of points. The performance of such algorithms is directly affected by the grid resolution. Increasing the number of grid points enhances the resolution of the estimator but also increases its computational complexity exponentially. In this work, two reduced complexity algorithms are derived based on Capon and amplitude and phase estimation (APES) to estimate the reflection coefficient, angular location and, Doppler shift of multiple moving targets. By exploiting the structure of the terms, the cost-function is brought into a form that allows us to apply the two-dimensional fast-Fourier-transform (2D-FFT) and reduce the computational complexity of estimation. Using low resolution 2D-FFT, the proposed algorithm identifies sub-optimal estimates and feeds them as initial points to the derived Newton gradient algorithm. In contrast to the grid-based search algorithms, the proposed algorithm can optimally estimate on- and off-the-grid targets in very low computational complexity. A new APES cost-function with better estimation performance is also discussed. Generalized expressions of the Cramér-Rao lower bound are derived to asses the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Accurate Frequency Estimation Based On Three-Parameter Sine-Fitting With Three FFT Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple DFT-based golden section searching algorithm (DGSSA for the single tone frequency estimation. Because of truncation and discreteness in signal samples, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT and Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT are inevitable to cause the spectrum leakage and fence effect which lead to a low estimation accuracy. This method can improve the estimation accuracy under conditions of a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and a low resolution. This method firstly uses three FFT samples to determine the frequency searching scope, then – besides the frequency – the estimated values of amplitude, phase and dc component are obtained by minimizing the least square (LS fitting error of three-parameter sine fitting. By setting reasonable stop conditions or the number of iterations, the accurate frequency estimation can be realized. The accuracy of this method, when applied to observed single-tone sinusoid samples corrupted by white Gaussian noise, is investigated by different methods with respect to the unbiased Cramer-Rao Low Bound (CRLB. The simulation results show that the root mean square error (RMSE of the frequency estimation curve is consistent with the tendency of CRLB as SNR increases, even in the case of a small number of samples. The average RMSE of the frequency estimation is less than 1.5 times the CRLB with SNR = 20 dB and N = 512.

  5. FFT-based preconditioners for Toeplitz-Block least square problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, R.H. (Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Mathematics); Nagy, J.G.; Plemons, R.J. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Inst. for Mathematics and its Applications)

    1993-12-01

    Discretized two-dimensional deconvolution problems arising, e.g., in image restoration and seismic tomography, can be formulated as least squares computations, min [parallel] b [minus] Tx [parallel][sub 2], where T is often a large-scale rectangular Toeplitz-block matrix. The authors consider solving such block least squares problems by the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm using square nonsingular circulant-block and related preconditioners, constructed from the blocks of the rectangular matrix T. Preconditioning with such matrices allows efficient implementation using the one-dimensional or two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT). Two-block preconditioners, related to those proposed by T. Chan and J. Olkin for square nonsingular Toeplitz-block systems, are derived and analyzed. It is shown that, for important classes of T, the singular values of the preconditioned matrix are clustered around one. This extends the authors' earlier work on preconditioners for Toeplitz least squares iterations for one-dimensional problems. It is well known that the resolution of ill-posed deconvolution problems can be substantially improved by regularization to compensate for their ill-posed nature. It is shown that regularization can easily be incorporated into the preconditioners, and a report is given on numerical experiments on a Cray Y-MP. The experiments illustrate good convergence properties of these FFT-based preconditioned iterations.

  6. Fault diagnosis method based on FFT-RPCA-SVM for Cascaded-Multilevel Inverter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianzhen; Qi, Jie; Xu, Hao; Wang, Yide; Liu, Lei; Gao, Diju

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to reduced switch stress, high quality of load wave, easy packaging and good extensibility, the cascaded H-bridge multilevel inverter is widely used in wind power system. To guarantee stable operation of system, a new fault diagnosis method, based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Relative Principle Component Analysis (RPCA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM), is proposed for H-bridge multilevel inverter. To avoid the influence of load variation on fault diagnosis, the output voltages of the inverter is chosen as the fault characteristic signals. To shorten the time of diagnosis and improve the diagnostic accuracy, the main features of the fault characteristic signals are extracted by FFT. To further reduce the training time of SVM, the feature vector is reduced based on RPCA that can get a lower dimensional feature space. The fault classifier is constructed via SVM. An experimental prototype of the inverter is built to test the proposed method. Compared to other fault diagnosis methods, the experimental results demonstrate the high accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An Efficient Algorithm for EM Scattering from Anatomically Realistic Human Head Model Using Parallel CG-FFT Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient algorithm is proposed to analyze the electromagnetic scattering problem from a high resolution head model with pixel data format. The algorithm is based on parallel technique and the conjugate gradient (CG method combined with the fast Fourier transform (FFT. Using the parallel CG-FFT method, the proposed algorithm is very efficient and can solve very electrically large-scale problems which cannot be solved using the conventional CG-FFT method in a personal computer. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is verified by comparing numerical results with analytical Mie-series solutions for dielectric spheres. Numerical experiments have demonstrated that the proposed method has good performance on parallel efficiency.

  8. Exposure artifacts in raster scanned equalization radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plewes, D.B.; Vogelstein, E.

    1984-01-01

    The image artifacts characteristic of a scanning chest radiographic system are reviewed. The technique employs a pulsed beam of radiation swept in an overlapping raster pattern that can result in severe ripple and scan line artifacts with improper scanning parameters. A one-dimensional treatment of the scanner geometry shows that the artifacts can be eliminated when the beam width is an integral multiple of interpulse spacing. An extension to a two-dimensional analysis indicates that with the collimator geometries employed, artifact-free images are not possible with a fixed x-ray frequency but can be achieved when a variable frequency source is used. A treatment of the sensitivity for artifact formation shows that with proper choice of scanning parameters sizable errors in beam width can be tolerated without significant artifact formation

  9. FFT Analysis of the X-ray Tube Voltage Waveforms of High-Frequency Generators for Radiographic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, K.; Saito, H.; Ito, D.; Shimura, H.; Zuguchi, M.; Takai, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method for analyzing the voltage waveform from high-frequency X-ray generators for radiographic systems. Material and Methods: The output signal of the actual voltage across the tube of a high-frequency generator was measured using the built-in voltage sense taps that are used for voltage regulation feedback in X-ray generators. The output signal was stored in an analyzing recorder, and the waveforms were analyzed using FFT analysis. The FFT analysis of high-frequency generators consisted of obtaining the power spectrum, comparing the major frequency components in the tube voltage waveforms, and examining the intensity of each frequency component. Results: FFT analysis enables an objective comparison of the complex tube voltage waveforms in high-frequency X-ray generators. FFT analysis detected the change in the X-ray tube voltage waveform that occurred when there were problems with the high-frequency generator. Conclusion: High-frequency X-ray generators are becoming the universal choice for radiographic systems. The X-ray tube voltage and its waveform are important features of an X-ray generator, and quality assurance (QA) is important, too. As a tool for engineers involved in the design and development of X-ray generators, we can see that our methods (FFT analysis) might have some value as a means of describing generator performance under varying conditions. Furthermore, since the X-ray tube voltage waveform of a high-frequency generator is complex, FFT analysis may be useful for QA of the waveform

  10. An EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1 Chelsey...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 1 Ball Aerospace – 2875 Presidential Drive , Fairborn, Ohio 45324 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science...electroencephalogram (EEG) is a positive indicator of mental workload. However, EEG signals are easily affected by artifacts . An artifact mediation

  11. Adaptive motion compensation without blocking artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriberry, Timothy B.

    2015-03-01

    The Block Matching Algorithms used in most popular video codec standards introduce blocking artifacts which must be removed via residual coding or deblocking filters. Alternative transform stages that do not cause blocking artifacts, such as lapped transforms or wavelets, require motion compensation methods that do not produce blocking artifacts, since they are expensive to remove. We design a new Overlapped Block Motion Compensation (OBMC) scheme that avoids these artifacts while allowing adaptive blending window sizes. This has the potential to show significant visual quality improvements over traditional OBMC.

  12. MADR: metal artifact detection and reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Prasad; Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Metal in CT-imaged objects drastically reduces the quality of these images due to the severe artifacts it can cause. Most metal artifacts reduction (MAR) algorithms consider the metal-affected sinogram portions as the corrupted data and replace them via sophisticated interpolation methods. While these schemes are successful in removing the metal artifacts, they fail to recover some of the edge information. To address these problems, the frequency shift metal artifact reduction algorithm (FSMAR) was recently proposed. It exploits the information hidden in the uncorrected image and combines the high frequency (edge) components of the uncorrected image with the low frequency components of the corrected image. Although this can effectively transfer the edge information of the uncorrected image, it also introduces some unwanted artifacts. The essential problem of these algorithms is that they lack the capability of detecting the artifacts and as a result cannot discriminate between desired and undesired edges. We propose a scheme that does better in these respects. Our Metal Artifact Detection and Reduction (MADR) scheme constructs a weight map which stores whether a pixel in the uncorrected image belongs to an artifact region or a non-artifact region. This weight matrix is optimal in the Linear Minimum Mean Square Sense (LMMSE). Our results demonstrate that MADR outperforms the existing algorithms and ensures that the anatomical structures close to metal implants are better preserved.

  13. Area efficient radix 4/sup 2/ 64 point pipeline fft architecture using modified csd multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiq, F.; Muhammad, T.; Iqbal, M.

    2014-01-01

    A modified Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based radix 42 algorithm for Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems is presented. When compared with similar schemes like Canonic signed digit (CSD) Constant Multiplier, the modified CSD multiplier can provide a improvement of more than 36% in terms of multiplicative complexity. In Comparison of area being occupied the amount of Full adders is reduced by 32% and amount of half adders is reduced by 42%. The modified CSD multiplier scheme is implemented on Xilinx ISE 10.1 using Spartan-III XC3S1000 FPGA as a target device. The synthesis results of modified CSD Multiplier on Xilinx show efficient Twiddle Factor ROM Design and effective area reduction in comparison to CSD constant multiplier. (author)

  14. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION FOR FAULT DI AGNOSIS BASED ON FFT AND WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAIL PRICOP

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Belts are components of the mechanical systems of rotation commonly used for mechanical power transmission and changes in rotational speeds in the shafts. Various failures of the drive belts (foot shear, tooth wear, hollowed teeth, back cracks are common in rotating machines and can cause economic losses. To increase efficiency, reliability and safety of the machines the use of new fault diagnosis techniques of belts, identification and classification is required. In this paper Fast Fourier Transform (FFT and Wavelet transform complementary methods are used for fault monitoring of drive belts, analyzing in this way the limitations and advantages of using these methods. Experimental investigations for the fault diagnosis of drive belts are made using experimental platform and Bruel & Kjaer equipment for measuring vibration and PULSE and MATLAB software for recorded signal processing. The results were analyzed and presented.

  15. FFT communications requirement optimizations on massively parallel architectures with local and global interprocessor communications capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuszmaul, Christopher L.

    1990-11-01

    Fast Fourier Transforms [1] Batcher sorting [2] Cyclic Reduction [3] and a host of other recursively defined divide and conquer style algorithms can be implemented on massively parallel computers which provide for rapid communications between data elements whose indices differ by a power of two. This paper addresses the general issue of how two different communication mechanisms one Global and one Local can provide for hybrid performance that substantially exceeds what either could provide separately. In particular power of two communications schemes are explored for the MP-1 family ofmassively parallel computers. By using a combination of the eight way nearest neighbor toroidally wrapped grid and the Global Router on an MP-1 1200 series computer with 16 processors (PEs) the communications requirements for a 16 point FFT are shown to require less than 2 milliseconds.

  16. SREBP-1 dimerization specificity maps to both the helix-loop-helix and leucine zipper domains: use of a dominant negative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishi, Vikas; Gal, Jozsef; Krylov, Dmitry

    2004-01-01

    -HLH-ZIP proteins MAX, USF, or MITF, even at 100 molar eq. Chimeric proteins containing the HLH domain of SREBP-1 and the leucine zipper from either MAX, USF, or MITF indicate that both the HLH and leucine zipper regions of SREBP-1 contribute to its dimerization specificity. Transient co-transfection studies...

  17. An FFT-accelerated time-domain multiconductor transmission line simulator

    KAUST Repository

    Bagci, Hakan

    2010-02-01

    A fast time-domain multiconductor transmission line (MTL) simulator for analyzing general MTL networks is presented. The simulator models the networks as homogeneous MTLs that are excited by external fields and driven/terminated/ connected by potentially nonlinear lumped circuitry. It hybridizes an MTL solver derived from time-domain integral equations (TDIEs) in unknown wave coefficients for each MTL with a circuit solver rooted in modified nodal analysis equations in unknown node voltages and voltage-source currents for each circuit. These two solvers are rigorously interfaced at MTL and circuit terminals, and the resulting coupled system of equations is solved simultaneously for all MTL and circuit unknowns at each time step. The proposed simulator is amenable to hybridization, is fast Fourier transform (FFT)-accelerated, and is highly accurate: 1) It can easily be hybridized with TDIE-based field solvers (in a fully rigorous mathematical framework) for performing electromagnetic interference and compatibility analysis on electrically large and complex structures loaded with MTL networks. 2) It is accelerated by an FFT algorithm that calculates temporal convolutions of time-domain MTL Green functions in only O(Ntlog2 N t) rather than O(Ntt2) operations, where N t is the number of time steps of simulation. Moreover, the algorithm, which operates on temporal samples of MTL Green functions, is indifferent to the method used to obtain them. 3) It approximates MTL voltages, currents, and wave coefficients, using high-order temporal basis functions. Various numerical examples, including the crosstalk analysis of a (twisted) unshielded twisted-pair (UTP)-CAT5 cable and the analysis of field coupling into UTP-CAT5 and RG-58 cables located on an airplane, are presented to demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency, and versatility of the proposed simulator. © 2010 IEEE.

  18. Evaluating an artifact in design science research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available as the artifact which was evaluated. This example from practice can contribute towards an enhanced understanding of the evaluation of DSR artifacts and the contribution of program theory during both the ex ante and ex post part of the development....

  19. Computed Tomographic Artifacts in Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Arita, Emiko Saito; Pinheiro, Lucas Rodrigues; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; Watanabe, Plauto Christopher Aranha; Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzalez

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to present 4 cases and to undertake a systematic review on the current knowledge of the impact of cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) artifacts on oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up. The MEDLINE (PubMed) database was searched for the period from February 2004 to February 2017, for studies on the impact of CBCT artifacts on surgical planning of oral and maxillofacial surgeries. The PRISMA statement was followed during data assessment and extraction. As a result, data extraction included information regarding: the use of CBCT to plan or follow-up oral and maxillofacial surgeries, presence and type identification of a CBCT artifact, and details on the impact of artifacts on image quality and/or surgical planning. Four cases were selected to illustrate the topic. The search strategy yielded 408 publications in MEDLINE (PubMed). An initial screening of the publications was performed using abstracts and key words. After application of exclusion criteria, a total of 11 studies were finally identified as eligible to be discussed. Studies revealed 3 main types of artifact: beam hardening, streak, and motion artifacts. Most of the studies suggest that artifacts significantly affect oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up, despite of allowing for identification of metal projectiles in cases of maxillofacial trauma. CBCT artifacts have a significant impact on oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up.

  20. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF.MIREKU

    or having multilingual classrooms. The language of mathematics is another symbolic artifact that may impact mathematics learning. Concrete learning materials, textbooks, and computers are physical artifacts that mediate math teaching and learning (Jurdak,. 2009). Also, it is important to consider the fact that language is a ...

  1. The Ambivalent Ontology of Digital Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallinikos, Jannis; Aaltonen, Aleksi; Marton, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Digital artifacts are embedded in wider and constantly shifting ecosystems such that they become increasingly editable, interactive, reprogrammable, and distributable. This state of flux and constant transfiguration renders the value and utility of these artifacts contingent on shifting webs of f...

  2. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...... of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) signaling domain. The entire extracellular domain of the GHR was replaced by the hemagglutinin-tagged zipper sequence of either the c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factor (termed Fos-GHR and Jun-GHR, respectively). Transient transfection of Fos-GHR or Jun-GHR resulted...

  3. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...

  4. A Reduced-Complexity Fast Algorithm for Software Implementation of the IFFT/FFT in DMT Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tsun-Shan; Kuo, Jen-Chih; Wu, An-Yeu (Andy)

    2002-12-01

    The discrete multitone (DMT) modulation/demodulation scheme is the standard transmission technique in the application of asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSL) and very-high-speed digital subscriber lines (VDSL). Although the DMT can achieve higher data rate compared with other modulation/demodulation schemes, its computational complexity is too high for cost-efficient implementations. For example, it requires 512-point IFFT/FFT as the modulation/demodulation kernel in the ADSL systems and even higher in the VDSL systems. The large block size results in heavy computational load in running programmable digital signal processors (DSPs). In this paper, we derive computationally efficient fast algorithm for the IFFT/FFT. The proposed algorithm can avoid complex-domain operations that are inevitable in conventional IFFT/FFT computation. The resulting software function requires less computational complexity. We show that it acquires only 17% number of multiplications to compute the IFFT and FFT compared with the Cooly-Tukey algorithm. Hence, the proposed fast algorithm is very suitable for firmware development in reducing the MIPS count in programmable DSPs.

  5. A Reduced-Complexity Fast Algorithm for Software Implementation of the IFFT/FFT in DMT Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Jen-Chih

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The discrete multitone (DMT modulation/demodulation scheme is the standard transmission technique in the application of asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSL and very-high-speed digital subscriber lines (VDSL. Although the DMT can achieve higher data rate compared with other modulation/demodulation schemes, its computational complexity is too high for cost-efficient implementations. For example, it requires 512-point IFFT/FFT as the modulation/demodulation kernel in the ADSL systems and even higher in the VDSL systems. The large block size results in heavy computational load in running programmable digital signal processors (DSPs. In this paper, we derive computationally efficient fast algorithm for the IFFT/FFT. The proposed algorithm can avoid complex-domain operations that are inevitable in conventional IFFT/FFT computation. The resulting software function requires less computational complexity. We show that it acquires only 17% number of multiplications to compute the IFFT and FFT compared with the Cooly-Tukey algorithm. Hence, the proposed fast algorithm is very suitable for firmware development in reducing the MIPS count in programmable DSPs.

  6. Silicon bulk micromachined hybrid dimensional artifact.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Bauer, Todd Marks; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Oliver, Andrew David

    2010-03-01

    A mesoscale dimensional artifact based on silicon bulk micromachining fabrication has been developed and manufactured with the intention of evaluating the artifact both on a high precision coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and video-probe based measuring systems. This hybrid artifact has features that can be located by both a touch probe and a video probe system with a k=2 uncertainty of 0.4 {micro}m, more than twice as good as a glass reference artifact. We also present evidence that this uncertainty could be lowered to as little as 50 nm (k=2). While video-probe based systems are commonly used to inspect mesoscale mechanical components, a video-probe system's certified accuracy is generally much worse than its repeatability. To solve this problem, an artifact has been developed which can be calibrated using a commercially available high-accuracy tactile system and then be used to calibrate typical production vision-based measurement systems. This allows for error mapping to a higher degree of accuracy than is possible with a glass reference artifact. Details of the designed features and manufacturing process of the hybrid dimensional artifact are given and a comparison of the designed features to the measured features of the manufactured artifact is presented and discussed. Measurement results from vision and touch probe systems are compared and evaluated to determine the capability of the manufactured artifact to serve as a calibration tool for video-probe systems. An uncertainty analysis for calibration of the artifact using a CMM is presented.

  7. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...

  8. A particle accelerator probes artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Dran, J C; Salomon, J

    2002-01-01

    The AGLAE system is made up of a 2 mega volts electrostatic accelerator and of 3 irradiation lines: one leads to a vacuum enclosure in which targets are irradiated and the 2 others lines are designed to irradiate targets under an air or helium atmosphere. The AGLAE system is located in the premises of the Louvre museum in Paris and is devoted to the study of cultural objects through ion beam analysis (IBA). 4 techniques are used: -) proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) -) proton-induced gamma ray (PIGE) -) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (NRS) and -) nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). A decisive progress has permitted the direct analysis of artifacts without sampling. The object itself is set just a few millimeters away from the exit window of the beam in an air or helium atmosphere. The exit window must be resistant enough to bear the atmospheric pressure and the damages caused by the proton beam but must be thin enough to not deteriorate the quality of the beam. By using a 10 sup - sup 7 m thick exit w...

  9. A zipper network model of the failure mechanics of extracellular matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Michael C; Jesudason, Rajiv; Majumdar, Arnab; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Stone, Phillip J; Nugent, Matthew A; Suki, Béla

    2009-01-27

    Mechanical failure of soft tissues is characteristic of life-threatening diseases, including capillary stress failure, pulmonary emphysema, and vessel wall aneurysms. Failure occurs when mechanical forces are sufficiently high to rupture the enzymatically weakened extracellular matrix (ECM). Elastin, an important structural ECM protein, is known to stretch beyond 200% strain before failing. However, ECM constructs and native vessel walls composed primarily of elastin and proteoglycans (PGs) have been found to fail at much lower strains. In this study, we hypothesized that PGs significantly contribute to tissue failure. To test this, we developed a zipper network model (ZNM), in which springs representing elastin are organized into long wavy fibers in a zipper-like formation and placed within a network of springs mimicking PGs. Elastin and PG springs possessed distinct mechanical and failure properties. Simulations using the ZNM showed that the failure of PGs alone reduces the global failure strain of the ECM well below that of elastin, and hence, digestion of elastin does not influence the failure strain. Network analysis suggested that whereas PGs drive the failure process and define the failure strain, elastin determines the peak and failure stresses. Predictions of the ZNM were experimentally confirmed by measuring the failure properties of engineered elastin-rich ECM constructs before and after digestion with trypsin, which cleaves the core protein of PGs without affecting elastin. This study reveals a role for PGs in the failure properties of engineered and native ECM with implications for the design of engineered tissues.

  10. Lee-Yang zeros and large-deviation statistics of a molecular zipper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deger, Aydin; Brandner, Kay; Flindt, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The complex zeros of partition functions were originally investigated by Lee and Yang to explain the behavior of condensing gases. Since then, Lee-Yang zeros have become a powerful tool to describe phase transitions in interacting systems. Today, Lee-Yang zeros are no longer just a theoretical concept; they have been determined in recent experiments. In one approach, the Lee-Yang zeros are extracted from the high cumulants of thermodynamic observables at finite size. Here we employ this method to investigate a phase transition in a molecular zipper. From the energy fluctuations in small zippers, we can predict the temperature at which a phase transition occurs in the thermodynamic limit. Even when the system does not undergo a sharp transition, the Lee-Yang zeros carry important information about the large-deviation statistics and its symmetry properties. Our work suggests an interesting duality between fluctuations in small systems and their phase behavior in the thermodynamic limit. These predictions may be tested in future experiments.

  11. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Reed, John C. [Program on Apoptosis, Cancer Center, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Pascual, Jaime, E-mail: pascual@burnham.org [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2007-04-01

    A leucine-zipper with properties as apoptotic regulator in the ER has been crystallized. X-ray data to 2.5 Å resolution were collected, molecular replacement solutions were identified and refinement has been started. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160–Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 Å resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 Å. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  12. Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of the Apple Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao eZhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs play essential roles in the regulatory networks controlling many developmental processes in plants. Members of the basic leucine (Leu zipper (bZIP TF family, which is unique to eukaryotes, are involved in regulating diverse processes, including flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling and defense responses to pathogens. The bZIP proteins have a characteristic bZIP domain composed of a DNA-binding basic region and a Leu zipper dimerization region. In this study, we identified 112 apple (Malus domestica Borkh bZIP TF-encoding genes, termed MdbZIP genes. Synteny analysis indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events, as well as whole genome duplication, have contributed to the expansion of the apple bZIP family. The family could be divided into 11 groups based on structural features of the encoded proteins, as well as on the phylogenetic relationship of the apple bZIP proteins to those of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtbZIP genes. Synteny analysis revealed that several paired MdbZIP genes and AtbZIP gene homologs were located in syntenic genomic regions. Furthermore, expression analyses of group A MdbZIP genes showed distinct expression levels in ten different organs. Moreover, changes in these expression profiles in response to abiotic stress conditions and various hormone treatments identified MdbZIP genes that were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as to different phytohormones.

  13. The Ambivalent Ontology of Digital Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallinikos, Jannis; Aaltonen, Aleksi; Marton, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Digital artifacts are embedded in wider and constantly shifting ecosystems such that they become increasingly editable, interactive, reprogrammable, and distributable. This state of flux and constant transfiguration renders the value and utility of these artifacts contingent on shifting webs...... are illustrated with reference to (1) provenance and authenticity of digital documents within the overall context of archiving and social memory and (2) the content dynamics occasioned by the findability of content mediated by Internet search engines. We conclude that the steady change and transfiguration...... of digital artifacts signal a shift of epochal dimensions that calls for rethinking some of the inherited wisdom in IS research and practice....

  14. The Many Faces of Computational Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune; Harper, Richard

    2016-01-01

    the computational artifacts are both coordinative, image-generating, and intended for the control of nuclear-physical and chemical processes. Furthermore, the paper entails a critique of the notion of ‘computer support’, for not capturing the diverse constitutive powers of computer technology; its types if you will....... The paper is a step towards establishing a lexicon of computational artifacts in practice. It is a call for a wider effort to systematically conceptualise the multiple and specifiable ways in which computational artifacts may be part of work activities. This is for the benefit of design and our...

  15. The Unified-FFT Method for Fast Solution of Integral Equations as Applied to Shielded-Domain Electromagnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautio, Brian

    Electromagnetic (EM) solvers are widely used within computer-aided design (CAD) to improve and ensure success of circuit designs. Unfortunately, due to the complexity of Maxwell's equations, they are often computationally expensive. While considerable progress has been made in the realm of speed-enhanced EM solvers, these fast solvers generally achieve their results through methods that introduce additional error components by way of geometric approximations, sparse-matrix approximations, multilevel decomposition of interactions, and more. This work introduces the new method, Unified-FFT (UFFT). A derivative of method of moments, UFFT scales as O(N log N), and achieves fast analysis by the unique combination of FFT-enhanced matrix fill operations (MFO) with FFT-enhanced matrix solve operations (MSO). In this work, two versions of UFFT are developed, UFFT-Precorrected (UFFT-P) and UFFT-Grid Totalizing (UFFT-GT). UFFT-P uses precorrected FFT for MSO and allows the use of basis functions that do not conform to a regular grid. UFFT-GT uses conjugate gradient FFT for MSO and features the capability of reducing the error of the solution down to machine precision. The main contribution of UFFT-P is a fast solver, which utilizes FFT for both MFO and MSO. It is demonstrated in this work to not only provide simulation results for large problems considerably faster than state of the art commercial tools, but also to be capable of simulating geometries which are too complex for conventional simulation. In UFFT-P these benefits come at the expense of a minor penalty to accuracy. UFFT-GT contains further contributions as it demonstrates that such a fast solver can be accurate to numerical precision as compared to a full, direct analysis. It is shown to provide even more algorithmic efficiency and faster performance than UFFT-P. UFFT-GT makes an additional contribution in that it is developed not only for planar geometries, but also for the case of multilayered dielectrics and

  16. Results of a prospective randomised study comparing a non-invasive surgical zipper versus intracutaneous sutures for wound closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roolker, W.; Kraaneveld, E.; Been, H. D.; Marti, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    A prospective randomised study was undertaken to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of a non-invasive surgical zipper (Medizip) vs intracutaneous sutures skin closure in orthopaedic surgery. The study group consisted of 120 consecutive patients, 45 men and 75 women with a mean age of 47

  17. Divergent effects of endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper in animal models of inflammation and arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngo, Devi; Beaulieu, Elaine; Gu, Ran; Leaney, Alexandra; Santos, Leilani; Fan, Huapeng; Yang, Yuanhang; Kao, Wenping; Xu, Jiake; Escriou, Virginie; Loiler, Scott; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Morand, Eric F.

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) has effects on inflammatory pathways that suggest it to be a key inhibitory regulator of the immune system, and its expression is exquisitely sensitive to induction by glucocorticoids. We undertook this study to test our hypothesis that GILZ deficiency

  18. Regulation of MIR165/166 by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merelo, Paz; Ram, Hathi; Caggiano, Monica Pia

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD...

  19. Detection of apnea using a short-window FFT technique and an artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldemark, Karina E.; Agehed, Kenneth I.; Lindblad, Thomas; Waldemark, Joakim T. A.

    1998-03-01

    Sleep apnea is characterized by frequent prolonged interruptions of breathing during sleep. This syndrome causes severe sleep disorders and is often responsible for development of other diseases such as heart problems, high blood pressure and daytime fatigue, etc. After diagnosis, sleep apnea is often successfully treated by applying positive air pressure (CPAP) to the mouth and nose. Although effective, the (CPAP) equipment takes up a lot of space and the connected mask causes a lot of inconvenience for the patients. This raised interest in developing new techniques for treatment of sleep apnea syndrome. Several studies have indicated that electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve and muscle in the tongue may be a useful method for treating patients with severe sleep apnea. In order to be able to successfully prevent the occurrence of apnea it is necessary to have some technique for early and fast on-line detection or prediction of the apnea events. This paper suggests using measurements of respiratory airflow (mouth temperature). The signal processing for this task includes the use of a short window FFT technique and uses an artificial back propagation neural net to model or predict the occurrence of apneas. The results show that early detection of respiratory interruption is possible and that the delay time for this is small.

  20. Microelectrode array-induced neuronal alignment directs neurite outgrowth: analysis using a fast Fourier transform (FFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radotić, Viktorija; Braeken, Dries; Kovačić, Damir

    2017-12-01

    Many studies have shown that the topography of the substrate on which neurons are cultured can promote neuronal adhesion and guide neurite outgrowth in the same direction as the underlying topography. To investigate this effect, isotropic substrate-complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) chips were used as one example of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) for directing neurite growth of spiral ganglion neurons. Neurons were isolated from 5 to 7-day-old rat pups, cultured 1 day in vitro (DIV) and 4 DIV, and then fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. For analysis of neurite alignment and orientation, fast Fourier transformation (FFT) was used. Results revealed that on the micro-patterned surface of a CMOS chip, neurons orient their neurites along three directional axes at 30, 90, and 150° and that neurites aligned in straight lines between adjacent pillars and mostly followed a single direction while occasionally branching perpendicularly. We conclude that the CMOS substrate guides neurites towards electrodes by means of their structured pillar organization and can produce electrical stimulation of aligned neurons as well as monitoring their neural activities once neurites are in the vicinity of electrodes. These findings are of particular interest for neural tissue engineering with the ultimate goal of developing a new generation of MEA essential for improved electrical stimulation of auditory neurons.

  1. VoxHenry: FFT-Accelerated Inductance Extraction for Voxelized Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Yucel, Abdulkadir C.

    2018-01-18

    VoxHenry, a fast Fourier transform (FFT)-accelerated integral-equation-based simulator for extracting frequency-dependent inductances and resistances of structures discretized by voxels, is presented. VoxHenry shares many features with the popular inductance extractor, FastHenry. Just like FastHenry, VoxHenry solves a combination of the electric volume integral equation and the current continuity equation, but with three distinctions that make VoxHenry suitable and extremely efficient for analyzing voxelized geometries: 1) it leverages a carefully selected set of piecewise-constant and piecewise-linear basis functions; 2) it exploits FFTs to accelerate the matrix-vector multiplications during the iterative solution of system of equations; and 3) it employs a sparse preconditioner to ensure the rapid convergence of iterative solution. VoxHenry is capable of accurately computing frequency-dependent inductances and resistances of arbitrarily shaped and large-scale structures on a desktop computer. The accuracy, efficiency, and applicability of VoxHenry are demonstrated through inductance analysis of various structures, including square and circular coils as well as arrays of RF inductors (situated over ground planes).

  2. Removal of high signal artifact (marching metal artifact) by the magnetic substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Iwasaki, Atsushi; Mori, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    During this project, we evaluated methods to prevent high-signal artifact (marching metal artifact) that are caused by magnetic substance. Marching metal artifact is caused by the resonance frequency created by magnetic substance. Phase encoding and frequency encoding are often switched to minimize the influence that marching metal artifact have on the image. However, this method will only change the position at which marching metal artifact occur. It does not have the ability to completely prevent marching metal artifact. Our research illustrated that marching metal artifact can be prevented by changing the strength of the slice selective gradient field at the 90 deg RF pulse and 180 deg RF pulse. In other words, marching metal artifact can be prevented by changing the frequency bandwidth for the 90 deg RF pulse and 180 deg RF pulse. The incorporation of the phase correct option in the device used for our research (SIGNA LX and SIGNA CV/i) results in different slice selective gradient field strengths at the 90 deg RF pulse and the 180 deg RF pulse. This indicates that the use of phase correction enables marching metal artifact to be prevented. (author)

  3. The leucine zipper domains of the transcription factors GCN4 and c-Jun have ribonuclease activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav Nikolaev

    Full Text Available Basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP proteins are one of the largest transcription factor families that regulate a wide range of cellular functions. Owing to the stability of their coiled coil structure leucine zipper (LZ domains of bZIP factors are widely employed as dimerization motifs in protein engineering studies. In the course of one such study, the X-ray structure of the retro-version of the LZ moiety of yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 suggested that this retro-LZ may have ribonuclease activity. Here we show that not only the retro-LZ but also the authentic LZ of GCN4 has weak but distinct ribonuclease activity. The observed cleavage of RNA is unspecific, it is not suppressed by the ribonuclease A inhibitor RNasin and involves the breakage of 3',5'-phosphodiester bonds with formation of 2',3'-cyclic phosphates as the final products as demonstrated by HPLC/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Several mutants of the GCN4 leucine zipper are catalytically inactive, providing important negative controls and unequivocally associating the enzymatic activity with the peptide under study. The leucine zipper moiety of the human factor c-Jun as well as the entire c-Jun protein are also shown to catalyze degradation of RNA. The presented data, which was obtained in the test-tube experiments, adds GCN4 and c-Jun to the pool of proteins with multiple functions (also known as moonlighting proteins. If expressed in vivo, the endoribonuclease activity of these bZIP-containing factors may represent a direct coupling between transcription activation and controlled RNA turnover. As an additional result of this work, the retro-leucine zipper of GCN4 can be added to the list of functional retro-peptides.

  4. The robustness of subcarrier-index modulation in 16-QAM CO-OFDM system with 1024-point FFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Omar H A; Sandel, David; Puntsri, Kidsanapong; Al-Bermani, Ali; El-Darawy, Mohamed; Noé, Reinhold

    2012-12-17

    We present in numerical simulations the robustness of subcarrier index modulation (SIM) OFDM to combat laser phase noise. The ability of using DFB lasers with SIM-OFDM in 16-QAM CO-OFDM system with 1024-point FFT has been verified. Although SIM-OFDM has lower spectral efficiency compared to the conventional CO-OFDM system, it is a good candidate for 16-QAM CO-OFDM system with 1024-point FFT which uses a DFB laser of 1 MHz linewidth. In addition, we show the tolerance of SIM-OFDM for mitigation of fiber nonlinearities in long-haul CO-OFDM system. The simulation results show a significant penalty reduction, essentially that due to SPM.

  5. A novel power harmonic analysis method based on Nuttall-Kaiser combination window double spectrum interpolated FFT algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Chen, Yiyang; Flesch, Rodolfo C. C.

    2017-11-01

    Harmonics pose a great threat to safe and economical operation of power grids. Therefore, it is critical to detect harmonic parameters accurately to design harmonic compensation equipment. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) is widely used for electrical popular power harmonics analysis. However, the barrier effect produced by the algorithm itself and spectrum leakage caused by asynchronous sampling often affects the harmonic analysis accuracy. This paper examines a new approach for harmonic analysis based on deducing the modifier formulas of frequency, phase angle, and amplitude, utilizing the Nuttall-Kaiser window double spectrum line interpolation method, which overcomes the shortcomings in traditional FFT harmonic calculations. The proposed approach is verified numerically and experimentally to be accurate and reliable.

  6. The use of the FFT for the efficient solution of the problem of electromagnetic scattering by a body of revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedney, Stephen D.; Mittra, Raj

    1990-01-01

    The enhancement of the computational efficiency of the body of revolution (BOR) scattering problem is discused with a view to making it practical for solving large-body problems. The problem of EM scattering by a perfectly conducting BOR is considered, although the methods can be extended to multilayered dielectric bodies as well. Typically, the generation of the elements of the moment method matrix consumes a major portion of the computational time. It is shown how this time can be significantly reduced by manipulating the expression for the matrix elements to permit efficient FFT computation. A technique for extracting the singularity of the Green function that appears within the integrands of the matrix diagonal is also presented, further enhancing the usefulness of the FFT. The computation time can thus be improved by at least an order of magnitude for large bodies in comparison to that for previous algorithms.

  7. Extending the S-FFT direct-methods algorithm to density functions with positive and negative peaks. XIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Jordi; Frontera, Carles

    2008-11-01

    Some years ago the direct-methods origin-free modulus sum function (S) was adapted to the processing of intensity data from density functions with positive and negative peaks [Rius, Miravitlles & Allmann (1996). Acta Cryst. A52, 634-639]. That implementation used phase relationships explicitly. Although successfully applied to different situations where the number of reflections was small, its generalization to larger problems required avoiding the time-consuming manipulation of quartet terms. To circumvent this limitation, a modification of the recently introduced S-FFT algorithm (that maximizes S with only Fourier transforms) is presented here. The resulting S2-FFT algorithm is highly effective for crystal structures with at least one moderate scatterer in the unit cell. Test calculations have been performed on conventional single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, on neutron diffraction data of compounds with negative scatterers and on intensities of superstructure reflections to solve difference structures.

  8. Structural basis for the regulation of maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Sha Cao

    Full Text Available MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase, which is a member of the AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase-related kinase family, plays important roles in diverse cellular processes and has become a promising drug target for certain cancers. However, the regulatory mechanism of MELK remains elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of a fragment of human MELK that contains the kinase domain and ubiquitin-associated (UBA domain. The UBA domain tightly binds to the back of the kinase domain, which may contribute to the proper conformation and activity of the kinase domain. Interestingly, the activation segment in the kinase domain displays a unique conformation that contains an intramolecular disulfide bond. The structural and biochemical analyses unravel the molecular mechanisms for the autophosphorylation/activation of MELK and the dependence of its catalytic activity on reducing agents. Thus, our results may provide the basis for designing specific MELK inhibitors for cancer treatment.

  9. Host epithelial cell invasion by Campylobacter jejuni: trigger or zipper mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadhg eÓ Cróinín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative pathogen, is a highly frequent cause of gastrointestinal foodborne illness in humans worldwide. Clinical outcome of C. jejuni infections ranges from mild to severe diarrheal disease, and some other complications including reactive arthritis and Guillain–Barré syndrome. This review article highlights various C. jejuni pathogenicity factors, host cell determinants and proposed signaling mechanisms involved in human host cell invasion and their potential role in the development of C. jejuni-mediated disease. A model is presented which outlines the various important interactions of C. jejuni with the intestinal epithelium, and we discuss the pro’s and con’s for the zipper over the trigger mechanism of invasion. Future work should clarify the contradictory role of some previously identified factors, and should identify and characterize novel virulence determinants, which are crucial to provide fresh insights into the diversity of strategies employed by this pathogen to cause disease.

  10. Wavelet approach to artifact noise removal from Capacitive coupled Electrocardiograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Ko Keun; Park, Kwang Suk

    2008-01-01

    Capacitive coupled Electrocardiography (ECG) is introduced as non-invasive measurement technology for ubiquitous health care and appliance are spread out widely. Although it has many merits, however, capacitive coupled ECG is very weak for motion artifacts for its non-skin-contact property. There are many studies for artifact problems which treats all artifact signals below 0.8Hz. In our capacitive coupled ECG measurement system, artifacts exist not only below 0.8Hz but also over than 10Hz. Therefore, artifact noise removal algorithm using wavelet method is tested to reject artifact-wandered signal from measured signals. It is observed that using power calculation each decimation step, artifact-wandered signal is removed as low frequency artifacts as high frequency artifacts. Although some original ECG signal is removed with artifact signal, we could level the signal quality for long term measure which shows the best quality ECG signals as we can get.

  11. Switchable zipper-like thermoresponsive molecularly imprinted polymers for selective recognition and extraction of estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Huihuang; Wu, Xiaqing; Lu, Wenhui; Fu, Junqing; Peng, Hailong; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xiong, Hua; Chen, Lingxin

    2018-01-01

    Zipper-like thermoresponsive molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared based on interpolymer complexation via the synergy of dual functional monomers of acrylamide (AAm) and 2-acrylamide-2-methyl propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) for selective recognition and extraction of estradiol (E2) by temperature regulation. The resulting E2-MIPs attained controlled adsorption and release of E2 in response to temperature change, with higher adsorption capacity (8.78mg/g) and stronger selectivity (imprinting factor was 3.18) at 30°C compared with that at 20 and 40°C; the zipper-like interpolymer interaction between poly(AAm) and poly(AMPS) enabled switchable molecular recognition. The adsorption processes obeyed Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. High recognition selectivity of the MIPs toward E2 was achieved over its structural analogues, and good reusability was displayed over 86% recovery after six adsorption-desorption cycles. Accordingly, the E2-MIPs were empolyed as new adsorbents for selective dispersive solid-phase extraction of E2, and offered low limits of detection and quantification of 4.81 and 16.03μg/L, respectively. Recoveries from goat milk samples ranged from 76.2% to 89.7% with the precisions (relative standard deviations, n = 3, %) of 2.8-3.7% at 30°C. The intelligent E2-MIPs combining good adsorption, special recognition and temperature sensitivity proved to be a promising alternative to the selective identification and controlled extraction/removal of E2 in complicated samples by simple temperature-responsive regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Artifacts Quantification of Metal Implants in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrachnis, I. N.; Vlachopoulos, G. F.; Maris, T. G.; Costaridou, L. I.

    2017-11-01

    The presence of materials with different magnetic properties, such as metal implants, causes distortion of the magnetic field locally, resulting in signal voids and pile ups, i.e. susceptibility artifacts in MRI. Quantitative and unbiased measurement of the artifact is prerequisite for optimization of acquisition parameters. In this study an image gradient based segmentation method is proposed for susceptibility artifact quantification. The method captures abrupt signal alterations by calculation of the image gradient. Then the artifact is quantified in terms of its extent by an automated cross entropy thresholding method as image area percentage. The proposed method for artifact quantification was tested in phantoms containing two orthopedic implants with significantly different magnetic permeabilities. The method was compared against a method proposed in the literature, considered as a reference, demonstrating moderate to good correlation (Spearman’s rho = 0.62 and 0.802 in case of titanium and stainless steel implants). The automated character of the proposed quantification method seems promising towards MRI acquisition parameter optimization.

  13. Metallic artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Eiji; Okuyama, Koichiro; Ishikawa, Noriyuki; Hongo, Michio; Sato, Kozo; Sashi, Ryuji; Ishikawa, Eijiro.

    1995-01-01

    Seven metallic implants with different content of magnetic materials were compared in terms of the degree of MRI artifact. The degree of artifact well correlated with the total content of iron and cobalt than the total content of ferromagnets (iron, cobalt, nickel). No significant difference was observed regarding artifact among 4 titanium alloys containing very small amount of ferromagnet (0.058%-2.5%). Pedicle screws were made from different alloys in the same shape. Those screws were inserted into the swine vertebrae and artifact was evaluated by MRI. The degree of artifact was SUS316 (stainless steel)>MP-35N (cobalt alloy)>Ti-6AI-4V (titanium alloy), 1.5 Tesla>0.5 Tesla as for magnetic intensity, and T2 (gradient echo)>T2 (long SE)>proton density>T1 as for exposure condition. The condition of the site screw was inserted in the vertebral canal was detectable by T1-weighted images of titanium alloy and cobalt alloy in 0.5 Tesla and T1-weighted images of titanium alloy in 1.5 Tesla. (S.Y)

  14. Arabidopsis pab1, a mutant with reduced anthocyanins in immature seeds from banyuls, harbors a mutation in the MATE transporter FFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Satoshi; Oono, Yutaka; Narumi, Issay

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics approaches have helped elucidate the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in plants. Here, we used the Arabidopsis banyuls (ban) mutant, which accumulates anthocyanins, instead of colorless proanthocyanidin precursors, in immature seeds. In contrast to standard screens for mutants lacking anthocyanins in leaves/stems, we mutagenized ban plants and screened for mutants showing differences in pigmentation of immature seeds. The pale banyuls1 (pab1) mutation caused reduced anthocyanin pigmentation in immature seeds compared with ban. Immature pab1 ban seeds contained less anthocyanins and flavonols than ban, but showed normal expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. In contrast to pab1, introduction of a flavonol-less mutation into ban did not produce paler immature seeds. Map-based cloning showed that two independent pab1 alleles disrupted the MATE-type transporter gene FFT/DTX35. Complementation of pab1 with FFT confirmed that mutation in FFT causes the pab1 phenotype. During development, FFT promoter activity was detected in the seed-coat layers that accumulate flavonoids. Anthocyanins accumulate in the vacuole and FFT fused to GFP mainly localized in the vacuolar membrane. Heterologous expression of grapevine MATE-type anthocyanin transporter gene partially complemented the pab1 phenotype. These results suggest that FFT acts at the vacuolar membrane in anthocyanin accumulation in the Arabidopsis seed coat, and that our screening strategy can reveal anthocyanin-related genes that have not been found by standard screening.

  15. A Language of Objects and Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    This is a conceptual inquiry about materiality. It gives an introductory overview to the vocabulary of materiality in a chosen selection of theories. The paper shows a language of artifacts and objects as it is used within practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. The examined...... intellectual traditions are interpretive-cultural approaches; activity theory; and sociology of translation. Similarities and differences are presented in the way these three distinct intellectual traditions conceptualize the array of material objects and artifacts which are central in the tales of practice....... The paper looks into the mediatedness of knowing and doing in organizations. The intellectual traditions which are scrutinized all agree that ‘doing’ is materially embedded – that objects and artifacts are central to both knowing and learning. But what is their understanding of materiality? With which...

  16. A comb filter based signal processing method to effectively reduce motion artifacts from photoplethysmographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fulai; Liu, Hongyun; Wang, Weidong

    2015-10-01

    A photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal can provide very useful information about a subject's cardiovascular status. Motion artifacts (MAs), which usually deteriorate the waveform of a PPG signal, severely obstruct its applications in the clinical diagnosis and healthcare area. To reduce the MAs from a PPG signal, in the present study we present a comb filter based signal processing method. Firstly, wavelet de-noising was implemented to preliminarily suppress a part of the MAs. Then, the PPG signal in the time domain was transformed into the frequency domain by a fast Fourier transform (FFT). Thirdly, the PPG signal period was estimated from the frequency domain by tracking the fundamental frequency peak of the PPG signal. Lastly, the MAs were removed by the comb filter which was designed based on the obtained PPG signal period. Experiments with synthetic and real-world datasets were implemented to validate the performance of the method. Results show that the proposed method can effectively restore the PPG signals from the MA corrupted signals. Also, the accuracy of blood oxygen saturation (SpO2), calculated from red and infrared PPG signals, was significantly improved after the MA reduction by the proposed method. Our study demonstrates that the comb filter can effectively reduce the MAs from a PPG signal provided that the PPG signal period is obtained.

  17. Application of zipper-fracturing of horizontal cluster wells in the Changning shale gas pilot zone, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Qian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available After several years of exploration practices in the Changning-Weiyuan national shale gas pilot zone, the industrial production has been achieved in a number of vertical and horizontal wells completed by SRV fracturing, and a series of independent shale gas reservoir stimulation technologies have come into being. Next, it is necessary to consider how to enhance the efficiency of fracturing by a factory-mode operation. This paper presents the deployment of Changning Well Pad A, the first cluster horizontal shale gas well group, and proposes the optimal design for the factory operation mode of this Pad according to the requirements of wellpad fracturing stimulation technologies and the mountainous landform in the Sichuan Basin. Accordingly, a zipper-fracturing mode was firstly adopted in the factory fracturing on wellpad. With the application of standardized field process, zipper operation, assembly line work, staggered placement of downhole fractures, and microseismic monitoring in real time, the speed of fracturing reached 3.16 stages a day on average, and the stimulated reservoir volume was maximized, which has fully revealed how the factory operation mode contributes to the large-scale SRV fracturing of horizontal shale gas cluster wells on wellpads in the aspect of speed and efficiency. Moreover, the fracturing process, operation mode, surface facilities and post-fracturing preliminary evaluation of the zipper-fracturing in the well group were examined comprehensively. It is concluded from the practice that the zipper-fracturing in the two wells enhanced the efficiency by 78% and stimulated reservoir volume by 50% compared with the single-well fracturing at the preliminary stage in this area.

  18. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study deals with the influence of cooperative learning on the ability of students to solve the problems. The study also concerns the introduction of mathematical mediating artifacts as factors which effect the learning of mathematics by students. Experimental research method of pre-test and post-test types was ...

  19. [E-MTAB-587] PCR_artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muino Acuna, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    WARNING: This library was yield low amount of material and it was over-amplified by PCR. This libraries are used study the robustness of several statitical methods against PCR artifacts. ChIP experiments were performed on Arabidopsis wildtype inflorescences using an antibody raised against a

  20. Information Design for Visualizing History Museum Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Lai, Tingsheng; Yasuda, Takami; Yokoi, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, museum visualization systems have become a hot topic that attracts many researchers' interests. Several systems provide Web services for browsing museum collections through the Web. In this paper, we proposed an intelligent museum system for history museum artifacts, and described a study in which we enable access to China…

  1. A constructivist approach to artifact development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Hans

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory on artifact development. The theory is built on the constructivist paradigm, and the research strategy applied is the constructivist approach to grounded theory. A conceptual framework was employed for the analysis of a number of food producers and retailers. The ...

  2. Studying the Creation of Design Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher J.; Hevner, Ala n R.; Weber, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    and information systems represents a highly interconnected locus in which both the generative processes of building design artifacts and articulating constructs used to evaluate their quality take place. We address this interconnectedness with an extended process-oriented research design enabling multi...

  3. A Social Language of Objects and Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an inquiry about design. It gives an introductory overview of the vocabulary of 'materiality', which is used by a chosen selection of social theories. The paper shows a language of artifacts and objjects as it is used within practice-based approaches to knowing in organization  ...

  4. Sparse-View Ultrasound Diffraction Tomography Using Compressed Sensing with Nonuniform FFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoyan Hua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate reconstruction of the object from sparse-view sampling data is an appealing issue for ultrasound diffraction tomography (UDT. In this paper, we present a reconstruction method based on compressed sensing framework for sparse-view UDT. Due to the piecewise uniform characteristics of anatomy structures, the total variation is introduced into the cost function to find a more faithful sparse representation of the object. The inverse problem of UDT is iteratively resolved by conjugate gradient with nonuniform fast Fourier transform. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method that the main characteristics of the object can be properly presented with only 16 views. Compared to interpolation and multiband method, the proposed method can provide higher resolution and lower artifacts with the same view number. The robustness to noise and the computation complexity are also discussed.

  5. Implementación de la FFT en hardware aplicada a recepción en OFDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Pedraza Bonilla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigación ilustra la forma de implementar la transformada rápida de Fourier usando el algoritmo de Cooley Tukey, aplicado a los sistemas que requieren de recepción en OFDM. La investigación está basada en una arquitectura FPGA para obtener más rendimiento que un PC con un lenguaje de alto nivel; además, se desarrollan las diferentes partes de hardware necesarias para el cálculo de la FFT de 64 y 128 puntos, con la posibilidad de ampliarla a 256 y 512 puntos.

  6. How Do Artifact Models Help Direct SPI Projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Richardson, Ita

    2015-01-01

    To overcome shortcomings associated with software process improvement (SPI), we previously recommended that process engineers focus on the artifacts to be developed in SPI projects. These artifacts should define desired outcomes, rather than specific methods. During this prior research, we...

  7. Patient-related pitfalls and artifacts in nuclear medicine imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, D M; Forstrom, L A; O'Connor, M K; Thomas, P A; Cardew, A P

    1996-10-01

    Quality control in nuclear medicine is all important. This applies not only to preparation of the patient and acquisition of the image, but also to interpretation of the study. Although it may seem self-evident, it is important to remain aware of artifacts that are directly related to the patient and need special consideration. Furthermore, at times the distinction between normal variants and artifacts can be difficult. Commonly encountered patient-related artifacts include artifacts caused by attenuation, contamination artifacts, and artifacts caused by intravenous lines, tubes, and catheters. Less commonly, artifacts arise because of the use of multiple isotopes, the presence of fistulas or surgically altered anatomy, and pharmaceuticals and other substances interfering with expected radiopharmaceutical uptake and distribution. The diagnostic accuracy of nuclear medicine reporting can be improved by awareness of these patient-related artifacts. Both awareness and experience are also important when it comes to detecting and identifying normal (and abnormal) variants.

  8. Teaching and learning the nature of technical artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Frederik, I.; Sonneveld, W.; De Vries, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical artifacts that can be used for educational purposes. Furthermore we report a small exploratory empirical study to see to what extent teachers’ intuitive ideas about artifacts match with the way philosophe...

  9. Small leucine zipper protein functions as a negative regulator of estrogen receptor α in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juyeon Jeong

    Full Text Available The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα plays a critical role in breast cancer progression. ERα acts as an important growth stimulatory protein in breast cancer and the expression level of ERα is tightly related to the prognosis and treatment of patients. Small leucine zipper protein (sLZIP functions as a transcriptional cofactor by binding to various nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. However, the role of sLZIP in the regulation of ERα and its involvement in breast cancer progression is unknown. We found that sLZIP binds to ERα and represses the transcriptional activity of ERα in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. sLZIP also suppressed the expression of ERα target genes. sLZIP disrupted the binding of ERα to the estrogen response element of the target gene promoter, resulting in suppression of cell proliferation. sLZIP is a novel co-repressor of ERα, and plays a negative role in ERα-mediated cell proliferation in breast cancer.

  10. A Kinetic Zipper Model and the Assembly of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela J.; Kegel, Willem K.; van der Schoot, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We put forward a modified Zipper model inspired by the statics and dynamics of the spontaneous reconstitution of rodlike tobacco mosaic virus particles in solutions containing the coat protein and the single-stranded RNA of the virus. An important ingredient of our model is an allosteric switch associated with the binding of the first protein unit to the origin-of-assembly domain of the viral RNA. The subsequent addition and conformational switching of coat proteins to the growing capsid we believe is catalyzed by the presence of the helical arrangement of bound proteins to the RNA. The model explains why the formation of complete viruses is favored over incomplete ones, even though the process is quasi-one-dimensional in character. We numerically solve the relevant kinetic equations and show that time evolution is different for the assembly and disassembly of the virus, the former exhibiting a time lag even if all forward rate constants are equal. We find the late-stage assembly kinetics in the presence of excess protein to be governed by a single-exponential relaxation, which agrees with available experimental data on TMV reconstruction. PMID:22735535

  11. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper Protein Controls Macropinocytosis in Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmette, Joseph; Bertrand, Matthieu; Vétillard, Mathias; Ellouze, Mehdi; Flint, Shaun; Nicolas, Valérie; Biola-Vidamment, Armelle; Pallardy, Marc; Morand, Eric; Bachelerie, Françoise; Godot, Véronique; Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine

    2016-12-01

    Ag sampling is a key process in dendritic cell (DC) biology. DCs use constitutive macropinocytosis, receptor-mediated endocytosis, and phagocytosis to capture exogenous Ags for presentation to T cells. We investigated the mechanisms that regulate Ag uptake by DCs in the steady-state and after a short-term LPS exposure in vitro and in vivo. We show that the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ), already known to regulate effector versus regulatory T cell activation by DCs, selectively limits macropinocytosis, but not receptor-mediated phagocytosis, in immature and recently activated DCs. In vivo, the GILZ-mediated inhibition of Ag uptake is restricted to the CD8α + DC subset, which expresses the highest GILZ level among splenic DC subsets. In recently activated DCs, we further establish that GILZ limits p38 MAPK phosphorylation, providing a possible mechanism for GILZ-mediated macropinocytosis control. Finally, our results demonstrate that the modulation of Ag uptake by GILZ does not result in altered Ag presentation to CD4 T cells but impacts the efficiency of cross-presentation to CD8 T cells. Altogether, our results identify GILZ as an endogenous inhibitor of macropinocytosis in DCs, the action of which contributes to the fine-tuning of Ag cross-presentation. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Role of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ in inflammatory bone loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianlan Yang

    Full Text Available TNF-α plays a key role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and inflammatory bone loss. Unfortunately, treatment of RA with anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids (GCs also causes bone loss resulting in osteoporosis. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ, a mediator of GC's anti-inflammatory effect, can enhance osteogenic differentiation in vitro and bone acquisition in vivo. To investigate whether GILZ could antagonize TNF-α-induced arthritic inflammation and protect bone in mice, we generated a TNF-α-GILZ double transgenic mouse line (TNF-GILZ Tg by crossbreeding a TNF-α Tg mouse, which ubiquitously expresses human TNF-α, with a GILZ Tg mouse, which expresses mouse GILZ under the control of a 3.6kb rat type I collagen promoter fragment. Results showed that overexpression of GILZ in bone marrow mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells protected mice from TNF-α-induced inflammatory bone loss and improved bone integrity (TNF-GILZ double Tg vs. TNF-αTg, n = 12-15. However, mesenchymal cell lineage restricted GILZ expression had limited effects on TNF-α-induced arthritic inflammation as indicated by clinical scores and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

  13. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor inhibits the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids via glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huapeng; Kao, Wenping; Yang, Yuan H; Gu, Ran; Harris, James; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter; Bucala, Richard; Ngo, Devi; Beaulieu, Elaine; Morand, Eric F

    2014-08-01

    Glucocorticoids remain a mainstay in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Dose-dependent adverse effects highlight the need for therapies that regulate glucocorticoid sensitivity to enable dosage reduction. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory protein that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of RA; it impairs glucocorticoid sensitivity via MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) inhibition. The intracellular protein glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) mimics the effects of glucocorticoids in models of RA, but whether it represents a target for the modulation of glucocorticoid sensitivity remains unknown. We undertook this study to investigate whether GILZ is involved in the regulation of glucocorticoid sensitivity by MIF. GILZ expression was studied in the presence and absence of MIF, and the role of GILZ in the MIF-dependent regulation of the glucocorticoid sensitivity mediator MKP-1 was studied at the level of expression and function. GILZ expression was significantly inhibited by endogenous MIF, both basally and during responses to glucocorticoid treatment. The effects of MIF on GILZ were dependent on the expression and Akt-induced nuclear translocation of the transcription factor FoxO3A. GILZ was shown to regulate the expression of MKP-1 and consequent MAPK phosphorylation and cytokine release. MIF exerts its effects on MKP-1 expression and MAPK activity through inhibitory effects on GILZ. These findings suggest a previously unsuspected interaction between MIF and GILZ and identify GILZ as a potential target for the therapeutic regulation of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Teaching and Learning the Nature of Technical Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederik, Ineke; Sonneveld, Wim; de Vries, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical artifacts that can be used for educational purposes.…

  15. Investigation of hidden periodic structures on SEM images of opal-like materials using FFT and IFFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephant, Nicolas; Rondeau, Benjamin; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Cody, Jason A; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method to use fast Fourier transformation (FFT) and inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT) to investigate hidden periodic structures on SEM images. We focused on samples of natural, play-of-color opals that diffract visible light and hence are periodically structured. Conventional sample preparation by hydrofluoric acid etch was not used; untreated, freshly broken surfaces were examined at low magnification relative to the expected period of the structural features, and, the SEM was adjusted to get a very high number of pixels in the images. These SEM images were treated by software to calculate autocorrelation, FFT, and IFFT. We present how we adjusted SEM acquisition parameters for best results. We first applied our procedure on an SEM image on which the structure was obvious. Then, we applied the same procedure on a sample that must contain a periodic structure because it diffracts visible light, but on which no structure was visible on the SEM image. In both cases, we obtained clearly periodic patterns that allowed measurements of structural parameters. We also investigated how the irregularly broken surface interfered with the periodic structure to produce additional periodicity. We tested the limits of our methodology with the help of simulated images. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Supporting Knowledge Transfer through Decomposable Reasoning Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, William A.; May, Richard A.; Turner, Alan E.

    2007-01-03

    Technology to support knowledge transfer and cooperative inquiry must offer its users the ability to effectively interpret knowledge structures produced by collaborators. Communicating the reasoning processes that underlie a finding is one method for enhancing interpretation, and can result in more effective evaluation and application of shared knowledge. In knowledge management tools, interpretation is aided by creating knowledge artifacts that can expose their provenance to scrutiny and that can be transformed into diverse representations that suit their consumers’ perspectives and preferences. We outline the information management needs of inquiring communities characterized by hypothesis generation tasks, and propose a model for communication, based in theories of hermeneutics, semiotics, and abduction, in which knowledge structures can be decomposed into the lower-level reasoning artifacts that produced them. We then present a proof-of-concept implementation for an environment to support the capture and communication of analytic products, with emphasis on the domain of intelligence analysis.

  17. Artifacts Of Spectral Analysis Of Instrument Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents experimental and theoretical study of some of artifacts introduced by processing outputs of two nominally identical low-frequency-reading instruments; high-sensitivity servo-accelerometers mounted together and operating, in conjunction with signal-conditioning circuits, as seismometers. Processing involved analog-to-digital conversion with anti-aliasing filtering, followed by digital processing including frequency weighting and computation of different measures of power spectral density (PSD).

  18. Panning artifacts in digital pathology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Lanciault, Christian; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2017-03-01

    In making a pathologic diagnosis, a pathologist uses cognitive processes: perception, attention, memory, and search (Pena and Andrade-Filho, 2009). Typically, this involves focus while panning from one region of a slide to another, using either a microscope in a traditional workflow or software program and display in a digital pathology workflow (DICOM Standard Committee, 2010). We theorize that during panning operation, the pathologist receives information important to diagnosis efficiency and/or correctness. As compared to an optical microscope, panning in a digital pathology image involves some visual artifacts due to the following: (i) the frame rate is finite; (ii) time varying visual signals are reconstructed using imperfect zero-order hold. Specifically, after pixel's digital drive is changed, it takes time for a pixel to emit the expected amount of light. Previous work suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., 2015), but the influence of display factors has not been measured. We conducted a reader study to establish a relationship between display frame rate, panel response time, and threshold panning speed (above which the artifacts become noticeable). Our results suggest visual tasks that involve tissue structure are more impacted by the simulated panning artifacts than those that only involve color (e.g., staining intensity estimation), and that the panning artifacts versus normalized panning speed has a peak behavior which is surprising and may change for a diagnostic task. This is work in progress and our final findings should be considered in designing future digital pathology systems.

  19. Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Liscinsky, David; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Destaillats, Hugo; Holder, Amara L.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-05-15

    We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.

  20. Ultrasound artifacts mimicking pleural sliding after pneumonectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Franco; Zamparelli, Roberto; Soave, Maurizio P; Gargaruti, Riccardo; Scapigliati, Andrea; De Paulis, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    To determine the presence of pleural sliding on chest ultrasonography (US) in a series of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Prospective, observational study. 16-bed SICU of a University hospital. 8 patients (7 men, 1 woman), aged 64 - 73 years (mean 67.5 yrs). Seven patients underwent pneumonectomy for pulmonary neoplasms; one patient underwent an atypical lung resection after having undergone a pneumonectomy one year before. None. Chest ultrasounds were performed during mechanical ventilation and spontaneous ventilation after endotracheal tube removal. In both examinations, pleural sliding was searched bilaterally in brightness mode (B-mode) and motion mode (M-mode) on the anterior thoracic wall in the least gravitationally dependent areas. During mechanical ventilation, pleural sliding was always absent on the side of the pneumonectomy and present on the other side. During spontaneous ventilation, some artifacts mimicking pleural sliding were noted on the side of the pneumonectomy both in B-mode and M-mode (presence of the seashore sign) in all patients, except for the one patient who had undergone a pneumonectomy one year earlier. Those artifacts became more pronounced during deep breaths. Ultrasound artifacts mimicking pleural sliding may be observed in the absence of the lung and may originate from the activity of intercostal muscles since they become more evident during deep breathing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Awe and Artifacts: Religious and Scientific Endeavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionut Untea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article takes as its point of departure the reflections of Henry Adams and Jacques Ellul on the possible gradual replacement of objects used in religious worship with objects used in technological worship, and advances the hypothesis that such a substitution is unlikely. Using information from psychology, history of religions, and history of science, the perspective proposed is that of a parallel historical analogous development of both religious and scientific attitudes of awe by the use of artifacts carrying two functions: firstly, to coagulate social participation around questions dealing with humanity’s destiny and interpersonal relationships across communities, and secondly to offer cultural coherence through a communal sense of social stability, comfort, and security. I argue that, though animated by attitudes of awe (“awefull”, both leading scientists and religious founders have encountered the difficulty in representing and introducing this awe to the large public via “awesome” artifacts. The failure to represent coherently the initial awe via artifacts may give rise to “anomalous awefullness”: intolerance, persecutions, global conflicts.

  2. The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 is essential and sufficient for its caveolae-association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhuang; Zou, Xinle; Wang, Hongzhong; Lei, Jigang; Wu, Yuan; Liao, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Highlight: • The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 determines caveolar association. • Different cellular localization of PTRF/cavin-1 influences its serine 389 and 391 phosphorylation state. • PTRF/cavin-1 regulates cell motility via its caveolar association. - Abstract: PTRF/cavin-1 is a protein of two lives. Its reported functions in ribosomal RNA synthesis and in caveolae formation happen in two different cellular locations: nucleus vs. plasma membrane. Here, we identified that the N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 was essential for the protein to be associated with caveolae in plasma membrane. It could counteract the effect of nuclear localization sequence in the molecule (AA 235–251). Deletion of this leucine-zipper motif from PTRF/cavin-1 caused the mutant to be exclusively localized in nuclei. The fusion of this leucine-zipper motif with histone 2A, which is a nuclear protein, could induce the fusion protein to be exported from nucleus. Cell migration was greatly inhibited in PTRF/cavin-1 −/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The inhibited cell motility could only be rescued by exogenous cavin-1 but not the leucine-zipper motif deleted cavin-1 mutant. Plasma membrane dynamics is an important factor in cell motility control. Our results suggested that the membrane dynamics in cell migration is affected by caveolae associated PTRF/cavin-1

  3. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a 'voting strategy'. The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications

  4. pH-jump induced leucine zipper folding beyond the diffusion limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donten, Mateusz L; Hassan, Shabir; Popp, Alexander; Halter, Jonathan; Hauser, Karin; Hamm, Peter

    2015-01-29

    The folding of a pH-sensitive leucine zipper, that is, a GCN4 mutant containing eight glutamic acid residues, has been investigated. A pH-jump induced by a caged proton (o-nitrobenzaldehyde, oNBA) is employed to initiate the process, and time-resolved IR spectroscopy of the amide I band is used to probe it. The experiment has been carefully designed to minimize the buffer capacity of the sample solution so that a large pH jump can be achieved, leading to a transition from a completely unfolded to a completely folded state with a single laser shot. In order to eliminate the otherwise rate-limiting diffusion-controlled step of the association of two peptides, they have been covalently linked. The results for the folding kinetics of the cross-linked peptide are compared with those of an unlinked peptide, which reveals a detailed picture of the folding mechanism. That is, folding occurs in two steps, one on an ∼1-2 μs time scale leading to a partially folded α-helix even in the monomeric case and a second one leading to the final coiled-coil structure on distinctively different time scales of ∼30 μs for the cross-linked peptide and ∼200 μs for the unlinked peptide. By varying the initial pH, it is found that the folding mechanism is consistent with a thermodynamic two-state model, despite the fact that a transient intermediate is observed in the kinetic experiment.

  5. Abscisic-acid-dependent basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors in plant abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditya; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep

    2017-01-01

    One of the major causes of significant crop loss throughout the world is the myriad of environmental stresses including drought, salinity, cold, heavy metal toxicity, and ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays. Plants as sessile organisms have evolved various effective mechanism which enable them to withstand this plethora of stresses. Most of such regulatory mechanisms usually follow the abscisic-acid (ABA)-dependent pathway. In this review, we have primarily focussed on the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) activated by the ABA-mediated signalosome. Upon perception of ABA by specialized receptors, the signal is transduced via various groups of Ser/Thr kinases, which phosphorylate the bZIP TFs. Following such post-translational modification of TFs, they are activated so that they bind to specific cis-acting sequences called abscisic-acid-responsive elements (ABREs) or GC-rich coupling elements (CE), thereby influencing the expression of their target downstream genes. Several in silico techniques have been adopted so far to predict the structural features, recognize the regulatory modification sites, undergo phylogenetic analyses, and facilitate genome-wide survey of TF under multiple stresses. Current investigations on the epigenetic regulation that controls greater accessibility of the inducible regions of DNA of the target gene to the bZIP TFs exclusively under stress situations, along with the evolved stress memory responses via genomic imprinting mechanism, have been highlighted. The potentiality of overexpression of bZIP TFs, either in a homologous or in a heterologous background, in generating transgenic plants tolerant to various abiotic stressors have also been addressed by various groups. The present review will provide a coherent documentation on the functional characterization and regulation of bZIP TFs under multiple environmental stresses, with the major goal of generating multiple-stress-tolerant plant cultivars in near future.

  6. Bistable forespore engulfment in Bacillus subtilis by a zipper mechanism in absence of the cell wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Ojkic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To survive starvation, the bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms durable spores. The initial step of sporulation is asymmetric cell division, leading to a large mother-cell and a small forespore compartment. After division is completed and the dividing septum is thinned, the mother cell engulfs the forespore in a slow process based on cell-wall degradation and synthesis. However, recently a new cell-wall independent mechanism was shown to significantly contribute, which can even lead to fast engulfment in [Formula: see text] 60 [Formula: see text] of the cases when the cell wall is completely removed. In this backup mechanism, strong ligand-receptor binding between mother-cell protein SpoIIIAH and forespore-protein SpoIIQ leads to zipper-like engulfment, but quantitative understanding is missing. In our work, we combined fluorescence image analysis and stochastic Langevin simulations of the fluctuating membrane to investigate the origin of fast bistable engulfment in absence of the cell wall. Our cell morphologies compare favorably with experimental time-lapse microscopy, with engulfment sensitive to the number of SpoIIQ-SpoIIIAH bonds in a threshold-like manner. By systematic exploration of model parameters, we predict regions of osmotic pressure and membrane-surface tension that produce successful engulfment. Indeed, decreasing the medium osmolarity in experiments prevents engulfment in line with our predictions. Forespore engulfment may thus not only be an ideal model system to study decision-making in single cells, but its biophysical principles are likely applicable to engulfment in other cell types, e.g. during phagocytosis in eukaryotes.

  7. Structural insight into maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) conformation and inhibition toward structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevari, Giulia; Re Depaolini, Stefania; Cucchi, Ulisse; Bertrand, Jay A; Casale, Elena; Perrera, Claudia; Forte, Barbara; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Felder, Eduard R

    2013-09-17

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is upregulated in several types of tumor, including breast, prostate, and brain tumors. Its expression is generally associated with cell survival, cell proliferation, and resistance to apoptosis. Therefore, the potential of MELK inhibitors as therapeutic agents is recently attracting considerable interest. Here we report the first structures of MELK in complex with AMP-PNP and with nanomolar inhibitors. Our studies shed light on the role of the MELK UBA domain, provide a characterization of the kinase active site, and identify key residues for achieving high potency, laying the groundwork for structure-based drug design efforts.

  8. An FMM-FFT Accelerated SIE Simulator for Analyzing EM Wave Propagation in Mine Environments Loaded with Conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Yucel, Abdulkadir C.

    2018-02-05

    A fast and memory efficient 3D full wave simulator for analyzing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in electrically large and realistic mine tunnels/galleries loaded with conductors is proposed. The simulator relies on Muller and combined field surface integral equations (SIEs) to account for scattering from mine walls and conductors, respectively. During the iterative solution of the system of SIEs, the simulator uses a fast multipole method - fast Fourier transform (FMM-FFT) scheme to reduce CPU and memory requirements. The memory requirement is further reduced by compressing large data structures via singular value and Tucker decompositions. The efficiency, accuracy, and real-world applicability of the simulator are demonstrated through characterization of EM wave propagation in electrically large mine tunnels/galleries loaded with conducting cables and mine carts.

  9. Metal artifact suppression in megavoltage computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, L. John; Rogers, Myron; Salomons, Greg; Kerr, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    There has been considerable interest in megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging associated with the development of image guided radiation therapy. It is clear that MVCT can provide good image quality for patient setup verification with soft tissue contrast much better than noted in conventional megavoltage portal imaging. In addition, it has been observed that MVCT images exhibit considerably reduced artifacts surrounding metal implants (e.g., surgical clips, hip implants, dental fillings) compared to conventional diagnostic CT images (kVCT). When encountered, these artifacts greatly limit the usefulness of kVCT images, and a variety of solutions have been proposed to remove the artifacts, but these have met with only partial success. In this paper, we investigate the potential for CT imaging in regions surrounding metal implants using high-energy photons from a Cobalt-60 source and from a 4 MV linear accelerator. MVCT and kVCT images of contrast phantoms and a phantom containing a hip prosthesis are compared and analysed. We show that MVCT scans provide good fidelity for CT number quantification in the high-density regions of the images, and in the regions immediately adjacent to the metal implants. They also provide structural details within the high-density inserts and implants. Calculations will show that practical clinical MVCT imaging, able to detect 3% contrast objects, should be achievable with doses of about 2.5cGy. This suggests that MVCT not only has a role in radiotherapy treatment planning and guidance, but may also be indicated for surgical guidance and follow-up in regions where metal implants cannot be avoided.

  10. Accessing Cultural Artifacts Through Digital Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Jensen, Martin Lynge

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study that explores how the introduction of a digital companion agent for a museum exploration game changes children’s engagement with the presented artworks. To this end, a mobile application was developed featuring a monster agent that has eaten the artworks, which the chi...... the children had now to find in the museum. Results show that in comparison to the paper-based version of the exploration game, children engaged in more interactions with the actual cultural artifacts and showed a significantly higher retention rate for details of the involved artworks....

  11. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. Subjects and methods: From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0–3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I–III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Results: Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Conclusion: Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants.

  12. Contrast artifacts in tapping tip atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Zandbergen, Julie Bjerring

    1998-01-01

    When recording images with an atomic force microscope using the resonant vibrating cantilever mode, surprising strange results are often achieved. Typical artifacts are strange contours, unexpected height shifts, and sudden changes of the apparent resolution in the acquired images. Such artifacts...... interaction. The oscillating cantilever will be in a specific swing mode according to which type of interaction is dominating, and it is the switching between these modes that is responsible for a range of artifacts observed during image acquisition. This includes the artifact often referred to as "contrast...

  13. Artifact removal from EEG data with empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Efremova, Tatyana Yu.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2017-03-01

    In the paper we propose the novel method for dealing with the physiological artifacts caused by intensive activity of facial and neck muscles and other movements in experimental human EEG recordings. The method is based on analysis of EEG signals with empirical mode decomposition (Hilbert-Huang transform). We introduce the mathematical algorithm of the method with following steps: empirical mode decomposition of EEG signal, choosing of empirical modes with artifacts, removing empirical modes with artifacts, reconstruction of the initial EEG signal. We test the method on filtration of experimental human EEG signals from movement artifacts and show high efficiency of the method.

  14. Alanine Zipper-Like Coiled-Coil Domains Are Necessary for Homotypic Dimerization of Plant GAGA-Factors in the Nucleus and Nucleolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Ulrich; Hecker, Andreas; Elgass, Kirstin; Hummel, Sabine; Hahn, Achim; Caesar, Katharina; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Harter, Klaus; Berendzen, Kenneth W.

    2011-01-01

    GAGA-motif binding proteins control transcriptional activation or repression of homeotic genes. Interestingly, there are no sequence similarities between animal and plant proteins. Plant BBR/BPC-proteins can be classified into two distinct groups: Previous studies have elaborated on group I members only and so little is known about group II proteins. Here, we focused on the initial characterization of AtBPC6, a group II protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparison of orthologous BBR/BPC sequences disclosed two conserved signatures besides the DNA binding domain. A first peptide signature is essential and sufficient to target AtBPC6-GFP to the nucleus and nucleolus. A second domain is predicted to form a zipper-like coiled-coil structure. This novel type of domain is similar to Leucine zippers, but contains invariant alanine residues with a heptad spacing of 7 amino acids. By yeast-2-hybrid and BiFC-assays we could show that this Alanine zipper domain is essential for homotypic dimerization of group II proteins in vivo. Interhelical salt bridges and charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds between acidic and basic residues of the two monomers are predicted to form an interaction domain, which does not follow the classical knobs-into-holes zipper model. FRET-FLIM analysis of GFP/RFP-hybrid fusion proteins validates the formation of parallel dimers in planta. Sequence comparison uncovered that this type of domain is not restricted to BBR/BPC proteins, but is found in all kingdoms. PMID:21347358

  15. Molecular recognition of carboxylates in the protein leucine zipper by a multivalent supramolecular ligand: residue-specific, sensitive and label-free probing by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, B; Niebling, S; Martinéz, A G; Sokkar, P; Sanchez-Garcia, E; Schmuck, C; Schlücker, S

    2018-01-17

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy is a selective, sensitive and label-free vibrational spectroscopic technique. Here, we demonstrate as proof of concept that UVRR can be used for probing the recognition between a multivalent supramolecular ligand and acidic residues in leucine zipper, an α-helical structural motif of many proteins.

  16. Alanine zipper-like coiled-coil domains are necessary for homotypic dimerization of plant GAGA-factors in the nucleus and nucleolus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dierk Wanke

    Full Text Available GAGA-motif binding proteins control transcriptional activation or repression of homeotic genes. Interestingly, there are no sequence similarities between animal and plant proteins. Plant BBR/BPC-proteins can be classified into two distinct groups: Previous studies have elaborated on group I members only and so little is known about group II proteins. Here, we focused on the initial characterization of AtBPC6, a group II protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparison of orthologous BBR/BPC sequences disclosed two conserved signatures besides the DNA binding domain. A first peptide signature is essential and sufficient to target AtBPC6-GFP to the nucleus and nucleolus. A second domain is predicted to form a zipper-like coiled-coil structure. This novel type of domain is similar to Leucine zippers, but contains invariant alanine residues with a heptad spacing of 7 amino acids. By yeast-2-hybrid and BiFC-assays we could show that this Alanine zipper domain is essential for homotypic dimerization of group II proteins in vivo. Interhelical salt bridges and charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds between acidic and basic residues of the two monomers are predicted to form an interaction domain, which does not follow the classical knobs-into-holes zipper model. FRET-FLIM analysis of GFP/RFP-hybrid fusion proteins validates the formation of parallel dimers in planta. Sequence comparison uncovered that this type of domain is not restricted to BBR/BPC proteins, but is found in all kingdoms.

  17. Pacemaker-induced Metallic Artifacts in Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Clinical Feasibility of Single Energy Metal Artifact Reduction Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Tomoya; Arai, Takehiro; Amanuma, Makoto; Sano, Tomonari; Ichiba, Masato; Ishizaka, Kazumasa; Sekine, Takako; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Morita, Hitomi; Takase, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in patients with pacemaker suffers from metallic lead-induced artifacts, which often interfere with accurate assessment of coronary luminal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to assess a frequency of the lead-induced artifacts and artifact-suppression effect by the single energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) technique. Forty-one patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker were evaluated using a 320 multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Among them, 22 patients with motion-free full data reconstruction images were the final candidates. Images with and without the SMEAR technique were subjectively compared, and the degree of metallic artifacts was compared. On images without SEMAR, severe metallic artifacts were often observed in the right coronary artery (#1, #2, #3) and distal anterior descending branch (#8). These artifacts were effectively suppressed by SEMAR, and the luminal accessibility was significantly improved in #3 and #8. While pacemaker leads often cause metallic-induced artifacts, SEMAR technique reduced the artifacts and significantly improved the accessibility of coronary lumen in #3 and #8.

  18. Medical image of the week: polysomnogram artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartell J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 54 year-old man with a past medical history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, low back pain, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia presented to the sleep laboratory for evaluation of sleep disordered breathing. Pertinent medications include fluoxetine, ambien, and clonazepam. His Epworth sleepiness score was 18. He had a total sleep time of 12 min. On the night of his sleep study, the patient was restless and repeatedly changed positions in bed. Figures 1 and 2 show the artifact determined to be lead displacement of O1M2 after the patient shifted in bed, inadvertently removing one of his scalp electrodes. The sine waves are 60 Hz in frequency. Once the problem was identified, the lead was quickly replaced to its proper position.

  19. Beyond the interface: Encountering artifacts in use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Bannon, Liam

    1991-01-01

    in their interactions with technology. He became uncomfortable with the gap between current cognitive theories and their utility in designing better interfaces to computer systems. The other person has a background in software engineering and computer systems design. In her search for a deeper understanding of  issues...... - they are not static and unchanging. For this reason the history of technology as well as of the organization of work become very important to us when we consider the (re)design of computer artifacts for people. What we do here is similar to Christiane Floyd's enterprise in her paper on software engineering...... in HCi, she came across the cognitive science framework, but she felt that its methods did not provide much help for concrete design in real life situations. In many ways our personal histories reflect some of the developments within the HCI area - the search for more theoretical frameworks...

  20. Persuasion through artifacts: Sociological and psychological dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroe Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that applicants use various impression management tactics during employment interviews to influence interviewers' evaluations of their performance. Yet, little research has examined inteviewers/perceptions of applicant's impression management and their degree of nonverbal influence. This PhD study examines these questions, using both quantitative and qualitative data: Do interviewers accurately perceive applicant's impression management tactics? How are these perceptions integrated into their evaluations of applicant's nonverbal behaviour? Is perception accuracy influenced by artifacts (professional clothing that interviewees wear? It has cross-cultural design, because describes the differences in European Commission interviewers' social perceptions and Romanian human resources managers on one hand, and between social perceptions of European Commission public servants and Romanian employees on the other hand, concerning 12 key concepts: persuasion, first impressions, professional image, credibility, authenticity, competence, self- confidence, self-management, self-presentation, self-promotion, impression management tactics, professional appearance.

  1. An extension to artifact-free projection overlaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In multipinhole single photon emission computed tomography, the overlapping of projections has been used to increase sensitivity. Avoiding artifacts in the reconstructed image associated with projection overlaps (multiplexing) is a critical issue. In our previous report, two types of artifact-free projection overlaps, i.e., projection overlaps that do not lead to artifacts in the reconstructed image, were formally defined and proved, and were validated via simulations. In this work, a new proposition is introduced to extend the previously defined type-II artifact-free projection overlaps so that a broader range of artifact-free overlaps is accommodated. One practical purpose of the new extension is to design a baffle window multipinhole system with artifact-free projection overlaps. Methods: First, the extended type-II artifact-free overlap was theoretically defined and proved. The new proposition accommodates the situation where the extended type-II artifact-free projection overlaps can be produced with incorrectly reconstructed portions in the reconstructed image. Next, to validate the theory, the extended-type-II artifact-free overlaps were employed in designing the multiplexing multipinhole spiral orbit imaging systems with a baffle window. Numerical validations were performed via simulations, where the corresponding 1-pinhole nonmultiplexing reconstruction results were used as the benchmark for artifact-free reconstructions. The mean square error (MSE) was the metric used for comparisons of noise-free reconstructed images. Noisy reconstructions were also performed as part of the validations. Results: Simulation results show that for noise-free reconstructions, the MSEs of the reconstructed images of the artifact-free multiplexing systems are very similar to those of the corresponding 1-pinhole systems. No artifacts were observed in the reconstructed images. Therefore, the testing results for artifact-free multiplexing systems designed using the

  2. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heußer, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.heusser@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Brehm, Marcus [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ritschl, Ludwig [Ziehm Imaging GmbH, Donaustraße 31, 90451 Nürnberg (Germany); Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander–University (FAU) of Erlangen–Nürnberg, Henkestraße 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data.

  3. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heußer, Thorsten; Brehm, Marcus; Ritschl, Ludwig; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data

  4. Consequences of alteration in leucine zipper sequence of melittin in its neutralization of lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory response in macrophage cells and interaction with lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Raghvendra M; Srivastava, Saurabh; Singh, Manish; Bajpai, Virendra Kumar; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2012-01-13

    The bee venom antimicrobial peptide, melittin, besides showing versatile activity against microorganisms also neutralizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory responses in macrophage cells. However, how the amino acid sequence of melittin contributes in its anti-inflammatory properties is mostly unknown. To determine the importance of the leucine zipper sequence of melittin in its neutralization of LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages and interaction with LPS, anti-inflammatory properties of melittin and its three analogues and their interactions with LPS were studied in detail. Two of these analogues, namely melittin Mut-1 (MM-1) and melittin Mut-2 (MM-2), possess leucine to alanine substitutions in the single and double heptadic leucine residue(s) of melittin, respectively, whereas the third analogue is a scrambled peptide (Mel-SCR) that contains the amino acid composition of melittin with minor rearrangement in its leucine zipper sequence. Although MM-1 partly inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines in RAW 264.7 and rat primary macrophage cells in the presence of LPS, MM-2 and Mel-SCR were negligibly active. A progressive decrease in interaction of melittin with LPS, aggregation in LPS, and dissociation of LPS aggregates with alteration in the leucine zipper sequence of melittin was observed. Furthermore, with alteration in the leucine zipper sequence of melittin, these analogues failed to exhibit cellular responses associated with neutralization of LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophage cells by melittin. The data indicated a probable important role of the leucine zipper sequence of melittin in neutralizing LPS-induced proinflammatory responses in macrophage cells as well as in its interaction with LPS.

  5. Teaching and learning the nature of technical artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederik, I.; Sonneveld, W.; De Vries, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical

  6. Kindergarten Children's Perceptions of "Anthropomorphic Artifacts" with Adaptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Asi; Mioduser, David

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, children from a kindergarten in central Israel have been exposed to learning experiences in technology as part of the implementation of a curriculum based on technological thinking, including topics related to behaving-adaptive-artifacts (e.g., robots). This study aims to unveil children's stance towards behaving artifacts:…

  7. Making Digital Artifacts on the Web Verifiable and Reliable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, T.; Dumontier, M.

    2015-01-01

    The current Web has no general mechanisms to make digital artifacts - such as datasets, code, texts, and images - verifiable and permanent. For digital artifacts that are supposed to be immutable, there is moreover no commonly accepted method to enforce this immutability. These shortcomings have a

  8. On Lifecycle Constraints of Artifact-Centric Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukoguz, Esra; Su, Jianwen

    Data plays a fundamental role in modeling and management of business processes and workflows. Among the recent "data-aware" workflow models, artifact-centric models are particularly interesting. (Business) artifacts are the key data entities that are used in workflows and can reflect both the business logic and the execution states of a running workflow. The notion of artifacts succinctly captures the fluidity aspect of data during workflow executions. However, much of the technical dimension concerning artifacts in workflows is not well understood. In this paper, we study a key concept of an artifact "lifecycle". In particular, we allow declarative specifications/constraints of artifact lifecycle in the spirit of DecSerFlow, and formulate the notion of lifecycle as the set of all possible paths an artifact can navigate through. We investigate two technical problems: (Compliance) does a given workflow (schema) contain only lifecycle allowed by a constraint? And (automated construction) from a given lifecycle specification (constraint), is it possible to construct a "compliant" workflow? The study is based on a new formal variant of artifact-centric workflow model called "ArtiNets" and two classes of lifecycle constraints named "regular" and "counting" constraints. We present a range of technical results concerning compliance and automated construction, including: (1) compliance is decidable when workflow is atomic or constraints are regular, (2) for each constraint, we can always construct a workflow that satisfies the constraint, and (3) sufficient conditions where atomic workflows can be constructed.

  9. 76 FR 25378 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory; Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities Arts and Artifacts...) notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel of the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities will be held at 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20506, in...

  10. Incidental ferumoxytol artifacts in clinical brain MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowser, Bruce A.; Campeau, Norbert G.; Carr, Carrie M.; Diehn, Felix E.; McDonald, Jennifer S.; Miller, Gary M.; Kaufmann, Timothy J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Ferumoxytol (Feraheme) is a parenteral therapy approved for treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The product insert for ferumoxytol states that it may affect the diagnostic ability of MRI for up to 3 months. However, the expected effects may not be commonly recognized among clinical neuroradiologists. Our purpose is to describe the artifacts we have seen at our institution during routine clinical practice. We reviewed the patients at our institution that had brain MRI performed within 90 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. The imaging was reviewed for specific findings, including diffusion-weighted imaging vascular susceptibility artifact, gradient-echo echo-planar T2*-weighted vascular susceptibility artifact, SWI/SWAN vascular susceptibility artifact, hypointense vascular signal on T2-weighted images, pre-gadolinium contrast vascular enhancement on magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) imaging, and effects on post-gadolinium contrast T1 imaging. Multiple artifacts were observed in patients having a brain MRI within 3 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. These included susceptibility artifact on DWI, GRE, and SWAN/SWI imaging, pre-gadolinium contrast increased vascular signal on MPRAGE imaging, and decreased expected enhancement on post-gadolinium contrast T1-weighted imaging. Ferumoxytol can create imaging artifacts which complicate clinical interpretation when brain MRI is performed within 3 days of administration. Recognition of the constellation of artifacts produced by ferumoxytol is important in order to obviate additional unnecessary examinations and mitigate errors in interpretation. (orig.)

  11. Quantification of Rain Induced Artifacts on Digital Satellite Television ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of artifacts on the high definition television (TV) content and the eventual loss of the digital TV signals to rain is still a major concern to satellite operators, digital satellite television (DSTV) and terrestrial television content providers. In this paper, the artifacts present in a typical DSTV signal is examined on a ...

  12. Distributed Cognition and Distributed Morality: Agency, Artifacts and Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heersmink, Richard

    2017-04-01

    There are various philosophical approaches and theories describing the intimate relation people have to artifacts. In this paper, I explore the relation between two such theories, namely distributed cognition and distributed morality theory. I point out a number of similarities and differences in these views regarding the ontological status they attribute to artifacts and the larger systems they are part of. Having evaluated and compared these views, I continue by focussing on the way cognitive artifacts are used in moral practice. I specifically conceptualise how such artifacts (a) scaffold and extend moral reasoning and decision-making processes, (b) have a certain moral status which is contingent on their cognitive status, and (c) whether responsibility can be attributed to distributed systems. This paper is primarily written for those interested in the intersection of cognitive and moral theory as it relates to artifacts, but also for those independently interested in philosophical debates in extended and distributed cognition and ethics of (cognitive) technology.

  13. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase is stabilized in mitosis by phosphorylation and is partially degraded upon mitotic exit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badouel, Caroline; Chartrain, Isabelle; Blot, Joelle; Tassan, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase) is a cell cycle dependent protein kinase involved in diverse cell processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle and mRNA processing. Noticeably, MELK expression is increased in cancerous tissues, upon cell transformation and in mitotically-blocked cells. The question of how MELK protein level is controlled is therefore important. Here, we show that MELK protein is restricted to proliferating cells derived from either cancer or normal tissues and that MELK protein level is severely decreased concomitantly with other cell cycle proteins in cells which exit the cell cycle. Moreover, we demonstrate in human HeLa cells and Xenopus embryos that approximately half of MELK protein is degraded upon mitotic exit whereas another half remains stable during interphase. We show that the stability of MELK protein in M-phase is dependent on its phosphorylation state.

  14. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase is stabilized in mitosis by phosphorylation and is partially degraded upon mitotic exit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badouel, Caroline; Chartrain, Isabelle; Blot, Joelle [CNRS UMR 6061 Genetique et Developpement, Universite de Rennes 1, IFR140 GFAS, Faculte de medecine, 2 avenue du Professeur Leon Bernard, CS 34317, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France); Tassan, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jean-pierre.tassan@univ-rennes1.fr [CNRS UMR 6061 Genetique et Developpement, Universite de Rennes 1, IFR140 GFAS, Faculte de medecine, 2 avenue du Professeur Leon Bernard, CS 34317, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2010-08-01

    MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase) is a cell cycle dependent protein kinase involved in diverse cell processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle and mRNA processing. Noticeably, MELK expression is increased in cancerous tissues, upon cell transformation and in mitotically-blocked cells. The question of how MELK protein level is controlled is therefore important. Here, we show that MELK protein is restricted to proliferating cells derived from either cancer or normal tissues and that MELK protein level is severely decreased concomitantly with other cell cycle proteins in cells which exit the cell cycle. Moreover, we demonstrate in human HeLa cells and Xenopus embryos that approximately half of MELK protein is degraded upon mitotic exit whereas another half remains stable during interphase. We show that the stability of MELK protein in M-phase is dependent on its phosphorylation state.

  15. A Petunia Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper Protein, PhHD-Zip, Plays an Important Role in Flower Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaoxiao; Donnelly, Linda; Sun, Daoyang; Rao, Jingping; Reid, Michael S.; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Flower senescence is initiated by developmental and environmental signals, and regulated by gene transcription. A homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor, PhHD-Zip, is up-regulated during petunia flower senescence. Virus-induced gene silencing of PhHD-Zip extended flower life by 20% both in unpollinated and pollinated flowers. Silencing PhHD-Zip also dramatically reduced ethylene production and the abundance of transcripts of genes involved in ethylene (ACS, ACO), and ABA (NCED) biosynthesis. Abundance of transcripts of senescence-related genes (SAG12, SAG29) was also dramatically reduced in the silenced flowers. Over-expression of PhHD-Zip accelerated petunia flower senescence. Furthermore, PhHD-Zip transcript abundance in petunia flowers was increased by application of hormones (ethylene, ABA) and abiotic stresses (dehydration, NaCl and cold). Our results suggest that PhHD-Zip plays an important role in regulating petunia flower senescence. PMID:24551088

  16. Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase (MELK: A Novel Regulator in Cell Cycle Control, Embryonic Development, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK functions as a modulator of intracellular signaling and affects various cellular and biological processes, including cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, spliceosome assembly, gene expression, embryonic development, hematopoiesis, and oncogenesis. In these cellular processes, MELK functions by binding to numerous proteins. In general, the effects of multiple protein interactions with MELK are oncogenic in nature, and the overexpression of MELK in kinds of cancer provides some evidence that it may be involved in tumorigenic process. In this review, our current knowledge of MELK function and recent discoveries in MELK signaling pathway were discussed. The regulation of MELK in cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target were also described.

  17. A Petunia homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, PhHD-Zip, plays an important role in flower senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaoxiao; Donnelly, Linda; Sun, Daoyang; Rao, Jingping; Reid, Michael S; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Flower senescence is initiated by developmental and environmental signals, and regulated by gene transcription. A homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor, PhHD-Zip, is up-regulated during petunia flower senescence. Virus-induced gene silencing of PhHD-Zip extended flower life by 20% both in unpollinated and pollinated flowers. Silencing PhHD-Zip also dramatically reduced ethylene production and the abundance of transcripts of genes involved in ethylene (ACS, ACO), and ABA (NCED) biosynthesis. Abundance of transcripts of senescence-related genes (SAG12, SAG29) was also dramatically reduced in the silenced flowers. Over-expression of PhHD-Zip accelerated petunia flower senescence. Furthermore, PhHD-Zip transcript abundance in petunia flowers was increased by application of hormones (ethylene, ABA) and abiotic stresses (dehydration, NaCl and cold). Our results suggest that PhHD-Zip plays an important role in regulating petunia flower senescence.

  18. A Petunia homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, PhHD-Zip, plays an important role in flower senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Chang

    Full Text Available Flower senescence is initiated by developmental and environmental signals, and regulated by gene transcription. A homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor, PhHD-Zip, is up-regulated during petunia flower senescence. Virus-induced gene silencing of PhHD-Zip extended flower life by 20% both in unpollinated and pollinated flowers. Silencing PhHD-Zip also dramatically reduced ethylene production and the abundance of transcripts of genes involved in ethylene (ACS, ACO, and ABA (NCED biosynthesis. Abundance of transcripts of senescence-related genes (SAG12, SAG29 was also dramatically reduced in the silenced flowers. Over-expression of PhHD-Zip accelerated petunia flower senescence. Furthermore, PhHD-Zip transcript abundance in petunia flowers was increased by application of hormones (ethylene, ABA and abiotic stresses (dehydration, NaCl and cold. Our results suggest that PhHD-Zip plays an important role in regulating petunia flower senescence.

  19. [Joint correction for motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts in multi-shot diffusion magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenchuan; Fang, Sheng; Guo, Hua

    2014-06-01

    Aiming at motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts in multi-shot diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we proposed a joint correction method in this paper to correct the two kinds of artifacts simultaneously without additional acquisition of navigation data and field map. We utilized the proposed method using multi-shot variable density spiral sequence to acquire MRI data and used auto-focusing technique for image deblurring. We also used direct method or iterative method to correct motion induced phase errors in the process of deblurring. In vivo MRI experiments demonstrated that the proposed method could effectively suppress motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts and achieve images with fine structures. In addition, the scan time was not increased in applying the proposed method.

  20. Adiabatic Low-Pass J Filters for Artifact Suppression in Heteronuclear NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian; Benie, Andrew J; Duus, Jens Øllgaard

    2009-01-01

    NMR artifact purging: Modern NMR experiments depend on efficient coherence transfer pathways for their sensitivity and on suppression of undesired pathways leading to artifacts for their spectral clarity. A novel robust adiabatic element suppresses hard-to-get-at artifacts....

  1. Searching for alien artifacts on the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P. C. W.; Wagner, R. V.

    2013-08-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has a low probability of success, but it would have a high impact if successful. Therefore it makes sense to widen the search as much as possible within the confines of the modest budget and limited resources currently available. To date, SETI has been dominated by the paradigm of seeking deliberately beamed radio messages. However, indirect evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence could come from any incontrovertible signatures of non-human technology. Existing searchable databases from astronomy, biology, earth and planetary sciences all offer low-cost opportunities to seek a footprint of extraterrestrial technology. In this paper we take as a case study one particular new and rapidly-expanding database: the photographic mapping of the Moon's surface by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to 0.5 m resolution. Although there is only a tiny probability that alien technology would have left traces on the moon in the form of an artifact or surface modification of lunar features, this location has the virtue of being close, and of preserving traces for an immense duration. Systematic scrutiny of the LRO photographic images is being routinely conducted anyway for planetary science purposes, and this program could readily be expanded and outsourced at little extra cost to accommodate SETI goals, after the fashion of the SETI@home and Galaxy Zoo projects.

  2. Colorectal Cancer "Methylator Phenotype": Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Anacleto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that human colorectal tumors can be classified into two groups: one in which methylation is rare, and another with methylation of several loci associated with a "CpG island methylated phenotype (CIMP," characterized by preferential proximal location in the colon, but otherwise poorly defined. There is considerable overlap between this putative methylator phenotype and the well-known mutator phenotype associated with microsatellite instability (MSI. We have examined hypermethylation of the promoter region of five genes (DAPK, MGMT, hMLH1, p16INK4a, and p14ARF in 106 primary colorectal cancers. A graph depicting the frequency of methylated loci in the series of tumors showed a continuous, monotonically decreasing distribution quite different from the previously claimed discontinuity. We observed a significant association between the presence of three or more methylated loci and the proximal location of the tumors. However, if we remove from analysis the tumors with hMLH1 methylation or those with MSI, the significance vanishes, suggesting that the association between multiple methylations and proximal location was indirect due to the correlation with MSI. Thus, our data do not support the independent existence of the so-called methylator phenotype and suggest that it rather may represent a statistical artifact caused by confounding of associations.

  3. An observer model for quantifying panning artifacts in digital pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Lanciault, Christian; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2017-03-01

    Typically, pathologists pan from one region of a slide to another, choosing areas of interest for closer inspection. Due to finite frame rate and imperfect zero-order hold reconstruction (i.e., the non-zero time to reach the target brightness after a change in pixel drive), panning in whole slide images (WSI) cause visual artifacts. It is important to study the impact of such artifacts since research suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., Histopathology 2015). In this paper, we explain what types of medical information may be harmed by panning artifacts, propose a method to simulate panning artifacts, and design an observer model to predict the impact of panning artifacts on typical human observers' performance in basic diagnostically relevant visual tasks. The proposed observer model is based on derivation of perceived object border maps from luminance and chrominance information and may be tuned to account for visual acuity of the human observer to be modeled. Our results suggest that increasing the contrast (e.g., using a wide gamut display) with a slow response panel may not mitigate the panning artifacts which mostly affect visual tasks involving spatial discrimination of objects (e.g., normal vs abnormal structure, cell type and spatial relationships between them, and low-power nuclear morphology), and that the panning artifacts worsen with increasing panning speed. The proposed methods may be used as building blocks in an automatic WSI quality assessment framework.

  4. Thermoluminescent determination of prehistoric heat treatment of chert artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melcher, C.L.; Zimmerman, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years archeologists have become interested in the extent to which prehistoric peoples heat-treated chert prior to shaping it into tools. Thermoluminescent determination of the radiation dose accumulated by an artifact since it was formed or last heated provides a simple, reliable test for such heat treatment. This test can be applied to single artifacts without the need for raw source material for comparison. Results on 25 artifacts from four sites indicate that, for many chert sources, color and luster are not useful indicators of heat treatment by prehistoric peoples

  5. Towards a concept of community artifact ecology in HCI?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Korsgaard, Henrik

    or workplaces do. This has implications on understanding how to research and design HCI for communities but also on refining the ecological perspective in HCI. We look in particular at examples from preliminary research on a local self-organised urban community and discuss what existing concepts in the ecology......In this paper we introduce the concept of community artifact ecology. We argue that taking a community perspective on the concept of artifact ecologies is relevant in HCI because communities are also dealing with multitudes of artifacts, in ways di↵erent that individuals, organizations...

  6. Artifact in Pediatric Oculomotor Findings during Videonystagmography: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doettl, Steven M; Plyler, Patrick N; McCaslin, Devin L

    2017-04-01

    Accurate measurement of oculomotor function using videonystagmography (VNG) is imperative for diagnosis and management of patients with reported dizziness. The oculomotor evaluation during VNG utilizes video-oculography providing valuable information regarding the central structures and pathways that control eye movements. Artifact may have an effect on the overall validity and reliability of VNG oculomotor tracings and can result from patient and/or recording errors. It is postulated that artifact could occur more frequently in the pediatric population due to both patient and equipment factors. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the occurrence and impact of artifact on saccades, smooth pursuit, and optokinetic (OPK) testing in normal pediatric and adult subjects using commercially available clinical VNG equipment and standard clinical protocols for oculomotor testing. The present study utilized a retrospective analysis of a repeated measures design. Oculomotor results from a total of 62 participants were analyzed. Portions of these data have been presented in a previous research study. Group 1 consisted of twenty-nine 4- to 6-yr-olds with an average age of 4.86 (SD = 0.88) yr. Group 2 consisted of thirty-three 22- to 44-yr-olds with an average age of 25.2 (SD = 5.34) yr. Raw oculomotor recordings were analyzed "offline" by a single masked, trained investigator. Each tracing was evaluated for instances of artifact including eye blinks, eye closure, eyes moving in opposite direction of the target, eye tracking software problems, and overall poor morphology. The number of instances of artifact were noted and recorded for each participant in both groups. Individual eye movements not affected by artifact were included for final analysis. Artifact rejection techniques were also compared. The results indicated increased artifact for the pediatric group for saccade and smooth pursuit testing. Additionally, a significant decrease in instances of

  7. Timing and related artifacts in multidimensional NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The information content of multidimensional NMR spectra is limited by the presence of several kinds of artifacts that originate from incorrect timing of evolution periods. The objective of this review is to provide tools for successful implementation of published pulse sequences, in which timing and pulse compensations are often implicit. We will analyze the constraints set by the use of Fourier transformation, the spin precession during rectangular or shaped pulses, the Bloch-Siegert effects due to pulse on other spins and the delay introduced by the filters for the acquisition dimension. A frequency dependent phase correction or an incorrect scaling of the first data point leads to baseline offsets or curvature due to the properties of the Fourier transform. Because any r.f. pulse has a finite length, chemical shift is always active during excitation, flip-back, inversion, and refocusing pulses. Rectangular or selective shaped pulses can be split into three periods: an ideal rotation surrounded by two chemical shift evolution periods, which should be subtracted from the adjacent delays to avoid linear phase correction. Bloch-Siegert effects originate from irradiation at frequencies near those observed in the spectrum and can lead to phase or frequency shifts. They can be minimized by simultaneous irradiation on both sides of the observed spins. In terms of timing, the very end of the pulse sequence the acquisition behaves differently since the data are filtered by either analog or digital means. This additional delay is filter and spectrometer specific and should be tuned to minimize the required phase correction. Combined together, all these adjustments lead to perfectly phased spectra with flat baseline and no peak shifts or distortion. (author)

  8. Chemical Principles Revisited: Artifacts and the Electromotive Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews chemical information relevant to the study of archeology and specifically to the history of man's use of metals. Gives reasons why most significant artifacts found by archeologists are made of gold instead of iron. (CS)

  9. Cultural Artifact Detection in Long Wave Infrared Imagery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dylan Zachary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Craven, Julia M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ramon, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Detection of cultural artifacts from airborne remotely sensed data is an important task in the context of on-site inspections. Airborne artifact detection can reduce the size of the search area the ground based inspection team must visit, thereby improving the efficiency of the inspection process. This report details two algorithms for detection of cultural artifacts in aerial long wave infrared imagery. The first algorithm creates an explicit model for cultural artifacts, and finds data that fits the model. The second algorithm creates a model of the background and finds data that does not fit the model. Both algorithms are applied to orthomosaic imagery generated as part of the MSFE13 data collection campaign under the spectral technology evaluation project.

  10. Information Content Across Types of Nurse Cognitive Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaz, Jacquelyn W; Doig, Alexa K; Cloyes, Kristin G; Staggers, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Acute care nurses commonly use personalized cognitive artifacts to organize information during a shift. The purpose of this content analysis is to compare information content across three formats of cognitive artifacts used by acute care nurses in a medical oncology unit: hand-made free-form, preprinted skeleton, and EHR-generated. Information contained in free-form and skeleton artifacts is more tailored to specific patient context than the NSR. Free-form and skeleton artifacts provide a space for synthesizing information to construct a "story of the patient" that is missing in the NSR. Future design of standardized handoff tools will need to take these differences into account for successful adoption by acute care nurses, including tailoring of information by patient, not just unit type, and allowing a space for nurses to construct a narrative describing the patients "story."

  11. Situating Creative Artifacts in Art and Design Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithikul Nimkulrat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuss the position of art and design artifacts, and their creation, in a practice-led research process.  Two creative productions and exhibitions featuring my textile artifacts were intentionally carried out in order to tackle a specific research problem, and these will be examined here as case studies.  These cases cover the production and exhibition of two sets of artworks, named Seeing Paper and Paper World, that were created as part of my completed doctoral research entitled Paperness: Expressive Material inTextile Art from an Artist’s Viewpoint. The study examined the relationship between a physical material and artistic expression in textile art and design.  Both cases exemplify the roles of creative productions and artifacts situated in the process of inquiry.  Throughout a practice-led research process, art and design artifacts can serve as inputs into knowledge production and as outputs for knowledge communication.  As inputs, both art productions and artifacts can be the starting point of a research project from which the research question is formulated.  They can also provide data for analysis from which knowledge is constructed.  Asoutputs, artifacts can indicate whether the research problem requires reformulation, demonstrate the experiential knowledge of the creative process, and strengthen the findings articulated in the written output.  Creative practice in a research context can contribute to generating or enhancing the knowledge which is embedded in the practice and embodied by the practitioner.  This knowledge or insight can be obtained from the artist creating the artifact, the artifact created, the process of making it, and the culture in which it is produced and viewed or used, all taking place at different stages of a research process.

  12. Perspectives on digital computational systems as aesthetic artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Luísa Ribas

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the study of digital computational systems as aesthetic artifacts seeking to provide instruments for their analysis and critical understanding. What this aim implies is the need to articulate complementary perspectives for considering not only their specificity as digital computational (software-driven) systems, but also the different aesthetic intents that drive the creation of these artifacts, as well as the kinds of experience they propose. This approach entails articu...

  13. A new interpretation of distortion artifacts in sweep measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torras Rosell, Antoni; Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of acoustical spaces by means of impulse response measurements is often biased by the nonlinear behavior of the loudspeaker used to excite the system under test. In this context the distortion immunity provided by the sweep technique has been investigated. The results show...... that the sweep method can reject a significant amount of distortion artifacts but, in contrast to what is claimed in the literature, it cannot exclude all distortion artifacts from the causal part of the estimated impulse response....

  14. Determiner-Established Deixis to Communicative Artifacts in Pedagogical Text

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Shomir; Oberlander, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Pedagogical materials frequently containdeixis to communicative artifacts such astextual structures (e.g., sections and lists),discourse entities, and illustrations. Byrelating such artifacts to the prose, deixis playsan essential role in structuring the flow ofinformation in informative writing. However,existing language technologies have largelyoverlooked this mechanism. We examineproperties of deixis to communicative artifactsusing a corpus rich in determiner-establishedinstances of the ph...

  15. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  16. Mitigation of artifacts in rtm with migration kernel decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2012-01-01

    The migration kernel for reverse-time migration (RTM) can be decomposed into four component kernels using Born scattering and migration theory. Each component kernel has a unique physical interpretation and can be interpreted differently. In this paper, we present a generalized diffraction-stack migration approach for reducing RTM artifacts via decomposition of migration kernel. The decomposition leads to an improved understanding of migration artifacts and, therefore, presents us with opportunities for improving the quality of RTM images.

  17. Artifact removal in physiological signals--practices and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Kevin T; Ward, Tomás E; McLoone, Seán F

    2012-05-01

    The combination of reducing birth rate and increasing life expectancy continues to drive the demographic shift toward an aging population. This, in turn, places an ever-increasing burden on healthcare due to the increasing prevalence of patients with chronic illnesses and the reducing income-generating population base needed to sustain them. The need to urgently address this healthcare "time bomb" has accelerated the growth in ubiquitous, pervasive, distributed healthcare technologies. The current move from hospital-centric healthcare toward in-home health assessment is aimed at alleviating the burden on healthcare professionals, the health care system and caregivers. This shift will also further increase the comfort for the patient. Advances in signal acquisition, data storage and communication provide for the collection of reliable and useful in-home physiological data. Artifacts, arising from environmental, experimental and physiological factors, degrade signal quality and render the affected part of the signal useless. The magnitude and frequency of these artifacts significantly increases when data collection is moved from the clinic into the home. Signal processing advances have brought about significant improvement in artifact removal over the past few years. This paper reviews the physiological signals most likely to be recorded in the home, documenting the artifacts which occur most frequently and which have the largest degrading effect. A detailed analysis of current artifact removal techniques will then be presented. An evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages of each of the proposed artifact detection and removal techniques, with particular application to the personal healthcare domain, is provided.

  18. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces Correa, A; Laciar, E; Patino, H D; Valentinuzzi, M E

    2007-01-01

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records

  19. Analysis of image reconstruction artifacts in structured illumination microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospíšil, Jakub; Fliegel, Karel; Klíma, Miloš

    2017-09-01

    Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) is a super-resolution technique which enables to enhance the resolution of optical microscopes beyond the diffraction limit. The final super-resolution image quality strongly depends on the performance of SIM image reconstruction. Standard SIM methods require precise knowledge of the illumination pattern and assume the sample to be stationary during the acquisition of illumination patterned images. In the case of imaging live cells, the movements of the cell result in the occurrence of image reconstruction artifacts. To reduce this kind of artifacts the short acquisition time is needed. However, short exposure time causes low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Moreover, a drift of the specimen may distort the illumination pattern properties in each image. This issue together with the low SNR makes the estimation of reconstruction parameters a challenging task. Inaccurate assessment of spatial frequency, phase shift or orientation of the illumination pattern leads to incorrect separation and shift of spectral components in Fourier space. This results in unwanted image reconstruction artifacts and hampers the resolution enhancement in practice. In this paper, we analyze possible artifacts in super-resolution images reconstructed using super-resolution SIM technique (SR-SIM). An overview of typical image reconstruction artifact types is presented. Distinguishing image artifacts from newly resolved sample features is essential for future SIM applications in cell biology.

  20. Utilization of an amphipathic leucine zipper sequence to design antibacterial peptides with simultaneous modulation of toxic activity against human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aqeel; Yadav, Sharada Prasad; Asthana, Neeta; Mitra, Kalyan; Srivastava, Swati Prakash; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2006-08-04

    The toxicity of naturally occurring or designed antimicrobial peptides is a major barrier for converting them into drugs. To synthesize antimicrobial peptides with reduced toxicity, several amphipathic peptides were designed based on the leucine zipper sequence. The first one was a leucine zipper peptide (LZP); in others, leucine residues at the a- and/or d-position were substituted with single or double alanine residues. The results showed that LZP and its analogs exhibited appreciable and similar antibacterial activity against the tested gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. However, the substitution of alanine progressively lowered the toxicity of LZP against human red blood cells (hRBCs). The substitution of leucine with alanine impaired the binding and localization of LZP to hRBCs, but had little effect on the peptide-induced damage of Escherichia coli cells. Although LZP and its analogs exhibited similar permeability, secondary structures, and localization in negatively charged membranes, significant differences were observed among these peptides in zwitterionic membranes. The results suggest a novel approach for designing antibacterial peptides with modulation of toxicity against hRBCs by employing the leucine zipper sequence. Also, to the best of our knowledge, the results demonstrate that this sequence could be utilized to design novel cell-selective molecules for the first time.

  1. FFT-SOLUTION®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical product bulletin: this dispersant for oil spill cleanups should be applied as droplets. Manufacturer recommends that spray tips on booms be changed into solid tubing for injection of product 3 to 5 feet below water surface.

  2. Historical Artifact Collection at the East Tennessee Technology Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodpasture, S.T.; Wood, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) was originally built during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. Known as the K-25 Site, its primary mission was to enrich uranium for use in atomic weapons. During the Cold War, the site's mission was changed to include the enrichment of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel elements and to recycle spent fuel. In the 1980's, a reduction in the demand for nuclear fuel resulted in the shutdown of the enrichment process and production ceased. The emphasis of the mission for the ETTP was then changed to environmental management and restoration operation. Beginning in the 1990's, re-industrialization (conversion of under-utilized government facilities for use by the private sector) became a major mission at the ETTP. These activities involve cleaning and demolishing facilities. Decommission and demolition (D and D) of facilities at the ETTP or Manhattan Project K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) presented significant challenges complying with the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that was negotiated with the stakeholders. Development of a process to identify, record and preserve the artifacts and the cooperation of several agencies and contractors were critical to completing the collection of the artifacts without impacting the D and D project schedule. Additional challenges included contaminated and classified artifacts, entry to facilities with hazardous conditions, schedule pressures and funding for collection and permanent storage. A process was developed to achieve compliance with the requirements of the NHPA. The NHPA requirements and implementing instruments at the ETTP as well as the process developed to preserve significant Manhattan Project era artifacts at the ETTP will be discussed. Implementation of the artifact collection process is also summarized. The challenge of complying with the

  3. Activation of the bacterial thermosensor DesK involves a serine zipper dimerization motif that is modulated by bilayer thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Larisa Estefanía; Ballering, Joost; Moussatova, Anastassiia; Inda, Maria Eugenia; Vazquez, Daniela B; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; de Mendoza, Diego; Tieleman, D Peter; Killian, J Antoinette

    2015-05-19

    DesK is a bacterial thermosensor protein involved in maintaining membrane fluidity in response to changes in environmental temperature. Most likely, the protein is activated by changes in membrane thickness, but the molecular mechanism of sensing and signaling is still poorly understood. Here we aimed to elucidate the mode of action of DesK by studying the so-called "minimal sensor DesK" (MS-DesK), in which sensing and signaling are captured in a single transmembrane segment. This simplified version of the sensor allows investigation of membrane thickness-dependent protein-lipid interactions simply by using synthetic peptides, corresponding to the membrane-spanning parts of functional and nonfunctional mutants of MS-DesK incorporated in lipid bilayers with varying thicknesses. The lipid-dependent behavior of the peptides was investigated by circular dichroism, tryptophan fluorescence, and molecular modeling. These experiments were complemented with in vivo functional studies on MS-DesK mutants. Based on the results, we constructed a model that suggests a new mechanism for sensing in which the protein is present as a dimer and responds to an increase in bilayer thickness by membrane incorporation of a C-terminal hydrophilic motif. This results in exposure of three serines on the same side of the transmembrane helices of MS-DesK, triggering a switching of the dimerization interface to allow the formation of a serine zipper. The final result is activation of the kinase state of MS-DesK.

  4. Identification of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper as a key regulator of tumor cell proliferation in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Hervé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the molecules that contribute to tumor progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC, currently a leading cause of mortality from gynecological malignancies. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ, an intracellular protein widely expressed in immune tissues, has been reported in epithelial tissues and controls some of key signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis. However, there has been no report on GILZ in EOC up to now. The objectives of the current study were to examine the expression of GILZ in EOC and its effect on tumor cell proliferation. Results GILZ expression was measured by immunohistochemical staining in tissue sections from 3 normal ovaries, 7 benign EOC and 50 invasive EOC. GILZ was not detected on the surface epithelium of normal ovaries and benign tumors. In contrast, it was expressed in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in 80% EOC specimens. GILZ immunostaining scores correlated positively to the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Spearman test in univariate analysis, P P Conclusion The present study is the first to identify GILZ as a molecule produced by ovarian cancer cells that promotes cell cycle progression and proliferation. Our findings clearly indicate that GILZ activates AKT, a crucial signaling molecule in tumorigenesis. GILZ thus appears as a potential key molecule in EOC.

  5. Motion Artifact in the MR imaging of temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamamura, Kiyoharu; Miyajima, Hisashi; Nihei, Yoshinobu; Nemoto, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tomoya

    1997-01-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Motion Artifacts of MRI occur more frequently than in other conventional methods, because it takes a long time to obtain the images. This paper reported on Motion Artifacts on MRI. MRI studies of 232 temporomandibular joints were performed in 116 patients with TMD by using a 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, with spin echo sequence: protondensity-weighted. And we took MRI slices at opening phase and closing phase. So 232 slices were gathered and we evaluated clinically the incidence of Motion Artifacts, that is to say, double and multiple images and other factors. The 103 slices in 56 patients showed Motion Artifacts. There is no significant difference between sexes. By age group, those in their teens were most frequent, followed by those in their fifties, forties, thirties and twenties. Also the same results were obtained for double image and multiple image. Incidence of Motion Artifact was most frequent at the opening phase. There is no significant difference between double and multiple image. (author)

  6. Metal artifact reduction method using metal streaks image subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, Rizza D.; Cho, Seung Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have been dedicated for metal artifact reduction (MAR); however, the methods are successful to varying degrees depending on situations. Sinogram in-painting, filtering, iterative method are some of the major categories of MAR. Each has its own merits and weaknesses. A combination of these methods or hybrid methods have also been developed to make use of the different benefits of two techniques and minimize the unfavorable results. Our method focuses on the in-paitning approach and a hybrid MAR described by Xia et al. Although in-painting scheme is an effective technique in reducing the primary metal artifacts, a major drawback is the reintroduction of new artifacts that can be caused by an inaccurate interpolation process. Furthermore, combining the segmented metal image to the corrected nonmetal image in the final step of a conventional inpainting approach causes an issue of incorrect metal pixel values. Our proposed method begins with a sinogram in-painting approach and ends with an image-based metal artifact reduction scheme. This work provides a simple, yet effective solution for reducing metal artifacts and acquiring the original metal pixel information. The proposed method demonstrated its effectiveness in a simulation setting. The proposed method showed image quality that is comparable to the standard MAR; however, quantitatively more accurate than the standard MAR

  7. Artifact detection in electrodermal activity using sparse recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Malia; Palumbo, Richard Vincent; Urbaneja, Alberto; Akcakaya, Murat; Huang, Jeannie; Kleckner, Ian R.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Quigley, Karen S.; Sejdic, Ervin; Goodwin, Matthew S.

    2017-05-01

    Electrodermal Activity (EDA) - a peripheral index of sympathetic nervous system activity - is a primary measure used in psychophysiology. EDA is widely accepted as an indicator of physiological arousal, and it has been shown to reveal when psychologically novel events occur. Traditionally, EDA data is collected in controlled laboratory experiments. However, recent developments in wireless biosensing have led to an increase in out-of-lab studies. This transition to ambulatory data collection has introduced challenges. In particular, artifacts such as wearer motion, changes in temperature, and electrical interference can be misidentified as true EDA responses. The inability to distinguish artifact from signal hinders analyses of ambulatory EDA data. Though manual procedures for identifying and removing EDA artifacts exist, they are time consuming - which is problematic for the types of longitudinal data sets represented in modern ambulatory studies. This manuscript presents a novel technique to automatically identify and remove artifacts in EDA data using curve fitting and sparse recovery methods. Our method was evaluated using labeled data to determine the accuracy of artifact identification. Procedures, results, conclusions, and future directions are presented.

  8. The Visibility of Temporal Artifacts in Stereo 3D Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joohwan Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The temporal protocols used in stereoscopic 3D (S3D displays have many parameters that affect the visibility of temporal artifacts. Flicker is visible at low presentation rates. Motion artifacts—judder, edge banding, and edge blur—are salient at low capture rates. Different stereoscopic techniques can introduce distortions in apparent depth. For example, temporal interlacing (i.e., alternating presentation to the two eyes can cause depth distortions for objects moving horizontally across the screen. Spatial interlacing (i.e., presenting information to the two eyes simultaneously, but with alternate pixel rows going to different eyes avoids depth distortions, but causes a reduction in effect spatial resolution. We performed a psychophysical experiment to measure perceptual thresholds for three temporal artifacts in S3D displays: flicker, motion artifacts, and depth distortions. We used a stereoscope consisting of two CRTs running at 200 Hz. A high-precision synchronizer drove the two CRTs thereby allowing us to simulate a wide variety of S3D display protocols accurately. We measured the visibility of the three artifacts while varying presentation rate, capture rate, object contrast, and object velocity. We tested both temporal- and spatial-interlacing protocols. From the results, we developed a perceptual model of artifact visibility in S3D displays.

  9. Ensemble Artifact Design For Context Sensitive Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah J Miah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although an improvement of design knowledge is an essential goal of design research, current design research predominantly focuses on knowledge concerning the IT artifact (tool design process, rather than a more holistic understanding encompassing the dynamic usage contexts of a technological artifact. Conceptualising a design in context as an “ensemble artifact” (Sein et al., 2011 provides the basis for a more rigorous treatment. This paper describes an IS artifact design framework that has been generated from the development of several practitioner-oriented decision support systems (DSS in which contextual aspects relevant to practitioners’ decision making are considered as integral design themes. We describe five key dimensions of an ensemble artifact design and show their value in designing practitioner-oriented DSS. The features are user centredness, knowledge sharing, situation-specific customisation, reduced model orientation, and practice based secondary design abilities. It is argued that this understanding can contribute to design research knowledge more effectively both to develop dynamic DSS, and by its extensibility to other artifact designs.

  10. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...

  11. Medical image of the week: DBS polysomnogram artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty S,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old man with known Parkinson’s disease and status post deep brain stimulator (DBS implantation underwent an overnight polysomnogram for clinical suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea. Artifact was seen on the polysomnogram recording (Figures 1 & 2. Patient-related electrical artifacts may be seen from devices such as pacemakers, deep brain stimulators and vagal nerve simulators. Abrupt discontinuation of DBS is associated with a high likelihood of worsening of symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease (1. Patients with DBS are most commonly programmed in monopolar mode. Bipolar configuration, forms a short electrical dipole that affects a relatively smaller volume of tissue and generates far less artifact, suggesting that this may be an effective option in a Parkinsonian patient with indications for polysomnography (2.

  12. Testing safety commitment in organizations through interpretations of safety artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Gil; Rafaeli, Anat

    2008-01-01

    Safety culture relates to injuries and safety incidents in organizations, but is difficult to asses and measure. We describe a preliminary test of assessing an organization's safety culture by examining employee interpretations of organizational safety artifacts (safety signs). We collected data in three organizations using a new safety culture assessment tool that we label the Safety Artifact Interpretation (SAI) scale; we then crossed these data with safety climate and leadership evaluations. SAI were interpreted by employees in accordance with two conceptually distinct themes that are salient in the literature on organizational safety culture: safety compliance and commitment to safety. A significant correlation exists between SAI scores and the organizational safety climate. A similar (though insignificant) relationship was observed between SAI scores and leadership ratings. Employee perceptions and interpretations of safety artifacts can facilitate assessments of safety culture and can ultimately lead to understanding of and improvements in the level of organizational safety.

  13. Motion characterization scheme to minimize motion artifacts in intravital microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungon; Courties, Gabriel; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Vinegoni, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory- and cardiac-induced motion artifacts pose a major challenge for in vivo optical imaging, limiting the temporal and spatial imaging resolution in fluorescence laser scanning microscopy. Here, we present an imaging platform developed for in vivo characterization of physiologically induced axial motion. The motion characterization system can be straightforwardly implemented on any conventional laser scanning microscope and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of different motion stabilization schemes. This method is particularly useful to improve the design of novel tissue stabilizers and to facilitate stabilizer positioning in real time, therefore facilitating optimal tissue immobilization and minimizing motion induced artifacts.

  14. Importance of correct interpretation of postmortem artifacts in medicolegal autopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, F H; Makhdoom, P A

    1998-02-01

    To study whether various injuries labelled as antemortem are in fact postmortem artifacts. 780 postmortems conducted in mortuary of S.M.C. Karachi from 1-1-95 to 20-9-95. Out of 780 autopsies, 229 showed postmortem artifacts which included decomposition in 78, animal and insects producing changes in 45, injuries due to rough handling in 40, breaking of rigor mortis and shifting of postmortem lividity during transportation in 37, iatrogenic fracture of skull during opening in 15, fractured ribs during resuscitation after death in 8 and exhumation producing fractures of bones in 6 bodies.

  15. EEG Artifact Removal Using a Wavelet Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Anh T.; Musson, John; Li, Jiang; McKenzie, Frederick; Zhang, Guangfan; Xu, Roger; Richey, Carl; Schnell, Tom

    2011-01-01

    !n this paper we developed a wavelet neural network. (WNN) algorithm for Electroencephalogram (EEG) artifact removal without electrooculographic (EOG) recordings. The algorithm combines the universal approximation characteristics of neural network and the time/frequency property of wavelet. We. compared the WNN algorithm with .the ICA technique ,and a wavelet thresholding method, which was realized by using the Stein's unbiased risk estimate (SURE) with an adaptive gradient-based optimal threshold. Experimental results on a driving test data set show that WNN can remove EEG artifacts effectively without diminishing useful EEG information even for very noisy data.

  16. Metal artifacts in computed tomography for radiation therapy planning: dosimetric effects and impact of metal artifact reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; De Man, Bruno; Verburg, Joost; Trofimov, Alexei; Jin, Yannan; Wang, Ge; Gjesteby, Lars; Paganetti, Harald

    2017-04-01

    A significant and increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy present with metal objects close to, or even within, the treatment area, resulting in artifacts in computed tomography (CT) imaging, which is the most commonly used imaging method for treatment planning in radiation therapy. In the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings in treatment of head-and-neck tumors, spinal stabilization implants in spinal or paraspinal treatment or hip replacements in prostate cancer treatments, the extreme photon absorption by the metal object leads to prominent image artifacts. Although current CT scanners include a series of correction steps for beam hardening, scattered radiation and noisy measurements, when metal implants exist within or close to the treatment area, these corrections do not suffice. CT metal artifacts affect negatively the treatment planning of radiation therapy either by causing difficulties to delineate the target volume or by reducing the dose calculation accuracy. Various metal artifact reduction (MAR) methods have been explored in terms of improvement of organ delineation and dose calculation in radiation therapy treatment planning, depending on the type of radiation treatment and location of the metal implant and treatment site. Including a brief description of the available CT MAR methods that have been applied in radiation therapy, this article attempts to provide a comprehensive review on the dosimetric effect of the presence of CT metal artifacts in treatment planning, as reported in the literature, and the potential improvement suggested by different MAR approaches. The impact of artifacts on the treatment planning and delivery accuracy is discussed in the context of different modalities, such as photon external beam, brachytherapy and particle therapy, as well as by type and location of metal implants.

  17. Constitutive expression of the Poplar FD-like basic leucine zipper transcription factor alters growth and bud development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier-Line, Cécile M; Coleman, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    In poplar, the CO/FT regulatory module mediates seasonal growth cessation. Although FT interacts with the basic leucine zipper transcription factor FD, surprisingly little is known about the possible role of FD in bud development and growth cessation in trees. In this study, we examined the expression and localization of the poplar FD homolog, PtFD1, during short-day (SD)-induced bud development, and the consequences of overexpressing PtFD1 on bud development and shoot growth. PtFD1 was primarily expressed in apical and axillary buds and exhibited a transient increase in expression during the initial stages of SD-induced bud development. This transient increase declined with continued SD treatment. When PtFD1 was overexpressed in poplar, SD-induced growth cessation and bud formation were abolished. PTFD1 overexpression also resulted in precocious flowering of juvenile plants in long-day (LD) photoperiods. Because the phenotypes associated with overexpression of PtFD1 are similar to those observe when poplar FT1 is overexpressed (Science, 312, 2006, 1040), the expression and diurnal patterns of expression of both poplar FT1 and FT2 were characterized in PtFD1 overexpression poplars and found to be altered. DNA microarray analysis revealed few differences in gene expression between PtFD1 overexpressing poplars in LD conditions while extensive levels of differential gene expression occur in SD-treated plants. These results enforce the connection between the regulation of flowering and the regulation of growth cessation and bud development in poplar. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  19. Divergent effects of endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper in animal models of inflammation and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Devi; Beaulieu, Elaine; Gu, Ran; Leaney, Alexandra; Santos, Leilani; Fan, Huapeng; Yang, Yuanhang; Kao, Wenping; Xu, Jiake; Escriou, Virginie; Loiler, Scott; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J; Morand, Eric F

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) has effects on inflammatory pathways that suggest it to be a key inhibitory regulator of the immune system, and its expression is exquisitely sensitive to induction by glucocorticoids. We undertook this study to test our hypothesis that GILZ deficiency would exacerbate experimental immune-mediated inflammation and impair the effects of glucocorticoids on inflammation and, correspondingly, that exogenous GILZ would inhibit these events. GILZ(-/-) mice were generated using the Cre/loxP system, and responses were studied in delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), antigen-induced arthritis (AIA), K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokinemia. Therapeutic expression of GILZ via administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus expressing the GILZ gene (GILZ-rAAV) was compared to the effects of glucocorticoid in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Increased T cell proliferation and DTH were observed in GILZ(-/-) mice, but neither AIA nor K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis was affected, and GILZ deficiency did not affect LPS-induced cytokinemia. Deletion of GILZ did not impair the effects of exogenous glucocorticoids on CIA or cytokinemia. In contrast, overexpression of GILZ in joints significantly inhibited CIA, with an effect similar to that of dexamethasone. Despite effects on T cell activation, GILZ deficiency had no effect on effector pathways of arthritis and was unexpectedly redundant with effects of glucocorticoids. These findings do not support the hypothesis that GILZ is central to the actions of glucocorticoids, but the efficacy of exogenous GILZ in CIA suggests that further evaluation of GILZ in inflammatory disease is required. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Design of educational artifacts as support to learning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Adson Eduardo; Vasconcelos, Flávio Henrique

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify utilization schemes developed by students and teachers in their interaction with educational workstations in the electronic measurement and instrumentation laboratory at the Department of Electrical Engineering in the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Brazil. After that, these schemes were used to design a new workstation. For this, it was important to bear in mind that the mentioned artifacts contain two key characteristics: (1) one from the designers themselves, resulting from their experience and their technical knowledge of what they are designing and (2) the experience from users and the means through which they take advantage of and develop these artifacts, in turn rendering them appropriate to perform the proposed task - the utilization schemes developed in the process of mediation between the user and the artifact. The satisfactory fusion of these two points makes these artifacts a functional unit - the instruments. This research aims to demonstrate that identifying the utilization schemes by taking advantage of user experience and incorporating this within the design, facilitates its appropriation and, consequently, its efficiency as an instrument of learning.

  1. Coevolution of variability models and related software artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passos, Leonardo; Teixeira, Leopoldo; Dinztner, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    models coevolve with other artifact types, we study a large and complex real-world variant-rich software system: the Linux kernel. Specifically, we extract variability-coevolution patterns capturing changes in the variability model of the Linux kernel with subsequent changes in Makefiles and C source...

  2. Assessment of intraoral image artifacts related to photostimulable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of intraoral image artifacts related to photostimulable phosphor plates in a dentomaxillofacial radiology department. ... Of these, 2008 were of adult patients and 336 were of pediatric patients. While movement of the phosphor plate in the disposable pocket was the most common cause of the observed image ...

  3. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  4. Soft tissue artifact in canine kinematic gait analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwencke, M.; Smolders, L.A.; Bergknut, N.; Gustas, P.; Meij, B.P.; Hazewinkel, H.A.W.

    2012-01-01

    Vet Surg. 2012 Oct;41(7):829-37. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2012.01021.x. Soft tissue artifact in canine kinematic gait analysis. Schwencke M, Smolders LA, Bergknut N, Gustås P, Meij BP, Hazewinkel HA. Source Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals,, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine,

  5. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune

    2015-01-01

    A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected t...

  6. 77 FR 40914 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 10(a)(2) of the...

  7. 77 FR 64146 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting... hereby given that the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities will hold a meeting of the Arts and...

  8. 78 FR 4878 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities; National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting... hereby given that the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities will hold a meeting of the Arts and...

  9. quantification of rain quantification of rain induced artifacts on digital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    3DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, OSUN STATE UNIVERSITY,OSOGBO, OSUN STATE. NIGERIA. 5 KING FAHD ... The presence of artifacts on the high definition television (TV) content and the eventual loss of the digital TV signals to rain is still a ... 4, October 2015 803 a short period of time over a little coverage area, and.

  10. Science Teachers Sharing Artifacts from Practice like Students’ Tablet Productions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    to support the success of integrating technology. Experiences from a large-scale, long-term TPD project for primary and secondary science teachers supporting the teachers in trying out innovative practices and new ICT tools in own classes, and in sharing artifacts from these trials in teacher networks...

  11. SREBP-2, a second basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that stimulates transcription by binding to a sterol regulatory element.

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, X; Yokoyama, C; Wu, J; Briggs, M R; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Wang, X

    1993-01-01

    We report the cDNA cloning of SREBP-2, the second member of a family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors that recognize sterol regulatory element 1 (SRE-1). SRE-1, a conditional enhancer in the promoters for the low density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase genes, increases transcription in the absence of sterols and is inactivated when sterols accumulate. Human SREBP-2 contains 1141 amino acids and is 47% identical t...

  12. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2-or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2 '-alkylated RNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Guenther, Dale C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances with triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, polyamides and more recently engineered proteins, there remains an urgent need for synthetic ligands that enable specific recognition of double-stranded (ds) DNA to accelerate studies aiming at detecting, regulating......'-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA...

  13. Total Variation-Based Reduction of Streak Artifacts, Ring Artifacts and Noise in 3D Reconstruction from Optical Projection Tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2015), s. 1602-1615 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-12412S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : optical projection tomography * microscopy * artifacts * total variation * data mismatch Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  14. Effects of artifact removal on cone-beam computed tomography images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooriyeh Bashizade Fakhar

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Applying artifact removal does not affect the visibility of large anatomical structures and linear bone measurements, but delicate structures such as lamina dura may become less clear after artifact removal.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of artifact removal in real magnetoencephalogram signals with blind source separation

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero, Javier; Hornero, Roberto; Fernandez Perez, Alvaro; Abasolo, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The magnetoencephalogram (MEG) is contaminated with undesired signals, which are called artifacts. Some of the most important ones are the cardiac and the ocular artifacts (CA and OA, respectively), and the power line noise (PLN). Blind source separation (BSS) has been used to reduce the influence of the artifacts in the data. There is a plethora of BSS-based artifact removal approaches, but few comparative analyses. In this study, MEG background activity from 26 subjects was processed with f...

  16. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2- or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2'-alkylated RNA monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas S; Guenther, Dale C; Gibbons, Bradley C; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2014-10-21

    Despite advances with triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, polyamides and--more recently--engineered proteins, there remains an urgent need for synthetic ligands that enable specific recognition of double-stranded (ds) DNA to accelerate studies aiming at detecting, regulating and modifying genes. Invaders, i.e., energetically activated DNA duplexes with interstrand zipper arrangements of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides, are emerging as an attractive approach toward this goal. Here, we characterize and compare Invaders based on 1-, 2- and 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2'-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA hairpins with single nucleotide fidelity. Intercalator-mediated unwinding and activation of the double-stranded probe, coupled with extraordinary stabilization of probe-target duplexes (ΔT(m)/modification up to +14.0 °C), provides the driving force for dsDNA recognition. In contrast, Z-modified Invaders show much lower dsDNA recognition efficiency. Thus, even very conservative changes in the chemical makeup of the intercalator-functionalized nucleotides used to activate Invader duplexes, affects dsDNA-recognition efficiency of the probes, which highlights the importance of systematic structure-property studies. The insight from this study will guide future design of Invaders for applications in molecular biology and nucleic acid diagnostics.

  17. Quantitative Comparison of Commercial and Non-Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Techniques in Computed Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, Dirk; van der Graaf, Emiel R.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Greuter, Marcel J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Typical streak artifacts known as metal artifacts occur in the presence of strongly attenuating materials in computed tomography (CT). Recently, vendors have started offering metal artifact reduction (MAR) techniques. In addition, a MAR technique called the metal deletion technique (MDT)

  18. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts

  19. Perspectives on digital computational systems as aesthetic artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Ribas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the study of digital computational systems as aesthetic artifacts seeking to provide instruments for their analysis and critical understanding. What this aim implies is the need to articulate complementary perspectives for considering not only their specificity as digital computational (software-driven systems, but also the different aesthetic intents that drive the creation of these artifacts, as well as the kinds of experience they propose. This approach entails articulating the viewpoint of their creation or poetics with the viewpoint of their experience or aesthetics, while tackling into their enacted processes. Accordingly, this paper discusses concepts, models and frameworks that not only argue on the distinctive processual nature of these systems, but also stress the interdependency of views on their principles, mechanics and experience.

  20. Interpolation strategies for reducing IFOV artifacts in microgrid polarimeter imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Bradley M; LaCasse, Charles F; Tyo, J Scott

    2009-05-25

    Microgrid polarimeters are composed of an array of micro-polarizing elements overlaid upon an FPA sensor. In the past decade systems have been designed and built in all regions of the optical spectrum. These systems have rugged, compact designs and the ability to obtain a complete set of polarimetric measurements during a single image capture. However, these systems acquire the polarization measurements through spatial modulation and each measurement has a varying instantaneous field-of-view (IFOV). When these measurements are combined to estimate the polarization images, strong edge artifacts are present that severely degrade the estimated polarization imagery. These artifacts can be reduced when interpolation strategies are first applied to the intensity data prior to Stokes vector estimation. Here we formally study IFOV error and the performance of several bilinear interpolation strategies used for reducing it.

  1. Woodworm Disinfestation of Wooden Artifacts by Vacuum Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Chidichimo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wooden artifacts are subject to being heavily damaged by the attack of worms which develop in the wood through the eggs deposited by adult pests before their final transformation into flying insects. Among the most dangerous species are xylophagous (wood-boring insects, whose larvae are responsible for one of the most efficient wood-destroying mechanisms in wooden cultural heritage. Their elimination has always been a huge problem for the conservation of wood. In this work, we present the experimentation of a simple vacuum technique to disinfest wood from the larval Hylotrupes bajolus. We will also introduce the possibility of treating large-sized wooden artifacts by means of a special vacuum chamber.

  2. Inter-deriving Semantic Artifacts for Object-Oriented Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Johannsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    .e., big-step operational semantics) specified in Abadi and Cardelli's monograph. This abstract machine therefore embodies the soundness of Abadi and Cardelli's reduction semantics and natural semantics relative to each other. To move closer to actual implementations, which use environments rather than......We present a new abstract machine for Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects. What is special about this semantic artifact (i.e., man-made construct) is that is mechanically corresponds to both the reduction semantics (i.e., small-step operational semantics) and the natural semantics (i...... actual substitutions, we then represent object methods as closures and in the same inter-derivational spirit, we present three new semantic artifacts: a reduction semantics for a version of Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects with explicit substitutions, an environment-based abstract machine...

  3. DBS artifact suppression using a time-frequency domain filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán-Guzmán, Alina; Heute, Ulrich; Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Stephani, Ulrich; Galka, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a useful tool for brain research. However, during Deep-Brain Stimulation (DBS), there are large artifacts that obscure the physiological EEG signals. In this paper, we aim at suppressing the DBS artifacts by means of a time-frequency-domain filter. As a pre-processing step, Empirical-Mode Decomposition (EMD) is applied to detrend the raw data. The detrended signals are then filtered iteratively until, by visual inspection, the quality is good enough for interpretation. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by an application to a clinical DBS-EEG data set in resting state and in finger-tapping condition. Moreover, a comparison with a Low-Pass filter (LPF) is provided, by visual inspection and by a quantitative measure.

  4. Two-dimensional analysis of motion artifacts, including flow effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litt, A.M.; Brody, A.S.; Spangler, R.A.; Scott, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of motion on magnetic resonance images have been theoretically analyzed for the case of a point-like object in simple harmonic motion and for other one-dimensional trajectories. The authors of this paper extend this analysis to a generalized two-dimensional magnetization with an arbitrary motion trajectory. The authors provide specific solutions for the clinically relevant cases of the cross-sections of cylindrical objects in the body, such as the aorta, which has a roughly one-dimensional, simple harmonic motion during respiration. By extending the solution to include inhomogeneous magnetizations, the authors present a model which allows the effects of motion artifacts and flow artifacts to be analyzed simultaneously

  5. Humans perceive flicker artifacts at 500 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Lee, Hung-Chi

    2015-02-03

    Humans perceive a stable average intensity image without flicker artifacts when a television or monitor updates at a sufficiently fast rate. This rate, known as the critical flicker fusion rate, has been studied for both spatially uniform lights, and spatio-temporal displays. These studies have included both stabilized and unstablized retinal images, and report the maximum observable rate as 50-90 Hz. A separate line of research has reported that fast eye movements known as saccades allow simple modulated LEDs to be observed at very high rates. Here we show that humans perceive visual flicker artifacts at rates over 500 Hz when a display includes high frequency spatial edges. This rate is many times higher than previously reported. As a result, modern display designs which use complex spatio-temporal coding need to update much faster than conventional TVs, which traditionally presented a simple sequence of natural images.

  6. Santeria and Palo Mayombe: skulls, mercury, and artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James R; Rainwater, Christopher W; Adams, Bradley J

    2009-11-01

    Santeria and Palo Mayombe are syncretic religions created in the New World based upon African religious beliefs combined with Christianity. The main worship of Palo Mayombe involves religious receptacles that may contain earth, sticks, varied artifacts, and animal and human remains. Due to the use of human and nonhuman remains, discovery of these items often leads to involvement by the police due to a concern of homicide. We review in detail the medical examiner records of two of these ritualistic cases including the autopsy, anthropology, police, and investigators' reports. For the human remains, careful consideration of the context in which the remains were recovered, their state of preservation, and the associated artifacts (e.g., beads and mercury) are important in determining the appropriate level of forensic significance. Anthropological examination with particular attention to taphonomic characteristics also may help determine the origin and forensic significance.

  7. Classification of independent components of EEG into multiple artifact classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Laura; Andersen, Tobias; Mørup, Morten

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to automatically identify multiple artifact types in EEG. We used multinomial regression to classify independent components of EEG data, selecting from 65 spatial, spectral, and temporal features of independent components using forward selection. The classifier identified...... neural and five nonneural types of components. Between subjects within studies, high classification performances were obtained. Between studies, however, classification was more difficult. For neural versus nonneural classifications, performance was on par with previous results obtained by others. We...

  8. Why and How to Control Cloning in Software Artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Juergens, Elmar

    2011-01-01

    Software cloning is a well-known software quality defect. Nevertheless, it abounds in practice -- across artifacts, organizations and domains. This has two principal reasons: first, the significance of cloning is not well understood. Second, no comprehensive method exists that guides practitioners to establish successful clone control. This thesis contributes to both areas. First, we present empirical results on the significance of cloning. Our case studies on source code, requirements specif...

  9. Artifacts and pitfalls in shoulder magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Marcon, Gustavo Felix; Macedo, Tulio Augusto Alves

    2015-01-01

    AbstractMagnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of shoulder lesions, in many cases becoming the method of choice. However, anatomical variations, artifacts and the particularity of the method may be a source of pitfalls, especially for less experienced radiologists. In order to avoid false-positive and false-negative results, the authors carried out a compilation of imaging findings that may simulate injury. It is the authors’ intention to provide a useful, consistent and ...

  10. Carbon fiber intramedullary nails reduce artifact in postoperative advanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimel, Melissa N.; Hwang, Sinchun; Riedel, Elyn R.; Healey, John H.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether radiolucent carbon fiber reinforced-polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) intramedullary nails decreased hardware artifact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in vitro and in an oncologic patient population. In vitro and clinical evaluations were done. A qualitative assessment of metal artifact was performed using CFR-PEEK and titanium nail MRI phantoms. Eight patients with a femoral or tibial prophylactic CFR-PEEK nail were retrospectively identified. All patients had postoperative surveillance imaging by MRI, CT, and were followed for a median 20 months (range, 12-28 months). CFR-PEEK images were compared to images from a comparative group of patients with titanium femoral intramedullary nails who had a postoperative MRI or CT. A musculoskeletal-trained radiologist graded visualization of the cortex, corticomedullary junction, and bone-muscle interface, on T1-weighted (T1W), STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fat-saturated (T1W FS) sequences of both groups with a five-point scale, performing independent reviews 4 months apart. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a weighted kappa. Substantially less MRI signal loss occurred in the CFR-PEEK phantom than in the titanium phantom simulation, particularly as the angle increased with respect to direction of the static magnetic field. CFR-PEEK nails had less MRI artifact than titanium nails on scored T1W, STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1W FS MRI sequences (p ≤ 0.03). The mean weighted kappa was 0.64, showing excellent intraobserver reliability between readings. CFR-PEEK intramedullary nail fixation is a superior alternative to minimize implant artifact on MRI or CT imaging for patients requiring long bone fixation. (orig.)

  11. Essential Layers, Artifacts, and Dependencies of Enterprise Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Robert; Fischer, Ronny

    2007-01-01

    After a period where implementation speed was more important than integration, consistency and reduction of complexity, architectural considerations have become a key issue of information management in recent years again. Enterprise architecture is widely accepted as an essential mechanism for ensuring agility and consistency, compliance and efficiency. Although standards like TOGAF and FEAF have developed, however, there is no common agreement on which architecture layers, which artifact typ...

  12. Interslice leakage artifact reduction technique for simultaneous multislice acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Stephen F; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Bhat, Himanshu; Wald, Lawrence L; Setsompop, Kawin

    2014-07-01

    Controlled aliasing techniques for simultaneously acquired echo-planar imaging slices have been shown to significantly increase the temporal efficiency for both diffusion-weighted imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. The "slice-GRAPPA" (SG) method has been widely used to reconstruct such data. We investigate robust optimization techniques for SG to ensure image reconstruction accuracy through a reduction of leakage artifacts. Split SG is proposed as an alternative kernel optimization method. The performance of Split SG is compared to standard SG using data collected on a spherical phantom and in vivo on two subjects at 3 T. Slice-accelerated and nonaccelerated data were collected for a spin-echo diffusion-weighted acquisition. Signal leakage metrics and time-series SNR were used to quantify the performance of the kernel fitting approaches. The Split SG optimization strategy significantly reduces leakage artifacts for both phantom and in vivo acquisitions. In addition, a significant boost in time-series SNR for in vivo diffusion-weighted acquisitions with in-plane 2× and slice 3× accelerations was observed with the Split SG approach. By minimizing the influence of leakage artifacts during the training of SG kernels, we have significantly improved reconstruction accuracy. Our robust kernel fitting strategy should enable better reconstruction accuracy and higher slice-acceleration across many applications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Detection of movement artifact in recorded pulse oximeter saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poets, C F; Stebbens, V A

    1997-10-01

    Movement artifact (MA) must be detected when analysing recordings of pulse oximeter saturation (SpO2). Visual analysis of individual pulse waveforms is the safest, but also the most tedious, method for this purpose. We wanted to test the reliability of a computer algorithm (Edentec Motion Annotation System), based on a comparison between pulse and heart rate, for MA detection. Ten 12-h recordings of SpO2, pulse waveforms and heart rate from ten preterm infants were analysed for the presence of MA on the pulse waveform signal. These data were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the computer algorithm, and of the oximeter itself, in detecting MA. Recordings were divided into segments of 2.5 s duration to compare the movement identification methods. Of the segments 31% +/- 6% (mean +/- SD) contained MA. The computer algorithm identified 95% +/- 3% of these segments, the pulse oximeter only 18% +/- 11%. Specificity was 85% +/- 4% and 99% +/- 0%, respectively. SpO2 was signal showed MA during this time, leaving a significant potential for erroneous identification of hypoxaemia. Recordings of SpO2 do not allow a reliable identification of MA. Without additional information about movement artifact, a significant proportion of recording time of pulse oximeter signal may be regarded as demonstrating hypoxaemia which, in fact, simply reflects poor measurement conditions. The computer algorithm used in this study identified periods of movement artifact reliably.

  14. Removal of ring artifacts in microtomography by characterization of scintillator variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Jakob C; Hertz, Hans M

    2017-09-18

    Ring artifacts reduce image quality in tomography, and arise from faulty detector calibration. In microtomography, we have identified that ring artifacts can arise due to high-spatial frequency variations in the scintillator thickness. Such variations are normally removed by a flat-field correction. However, as the spectrum changes, e.g. due to beam hardening, the detector response varies non-uniformly introducing ring artifacts that persist after flat-field correction. In this paper, we present a method to correct for ring artifacts from variations in scintillator thickness by using a simple method to characterize the local scintillator response. The method addresses the actual physical cause of the ring artifacts, in contrary to many other ring artifact removal methods which rely only on image post-processing. By applying the technique to an experimental phantom tomography, we show that ring artifacts are strongly reduced compared to only making a flat-field correction.

  15. Metal Artifact Suppression in Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images Using Image Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Masoumeh; Abdollahzadeh, Milad; Esmaeili, Farzad; Sakhamanesh, Vahideh

    2018-01-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images suffer from severe metal artifacts. These artifacts degrade the quality of acquired image and in some cases make it unsuitable to use. Streaking artifacts and cavities around teeth are the main reason of degradation. In this article, we have proposed a new artifact reduction algorithm which has three parallel components. The first component extracts teeth based on the modeling of image histogram with a Gaussian mixture model. Striking artifact reduction component reduces artifacts using converting image into the polar domain and applying morphological filtering. The third component fills cavities through a simple but effective morphological filtering operation. Finally, results of these three components are combined into a fusion step to create a visually good image which is more compatible to human visual system. Results show that the proposed algorithm reduces artifacts of dental CBCT images and produces clean images.

  16. Isolating gait-related movement artifacts in electroencephalography during human walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Julia E.; Huang, Helen J.; Snyder, Kristine L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. High-density electroencephelography (EEG) can provide an insight into human brain function during real-world activities with walking. Some recent studies have used EEG to characterize brain activity during walking, but the relative contributions of movement artifact and electrocortical activity have been difficult to quantify. We aimed to characterize movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes at a range of walking speeds and to test the efficacy of artifact removal methods. We also quantified the similarity between movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes and a head-mounted accelerometer. Approach. We used a novel experimental method to isolate and record movement artifact with EEG electrodes during walking. We blocked electrophysiological signals using a nonconductive layer (silicone swim cap) and simulated an electrically conductive scalp on top of the swim cap using a wig coated with conductive gel. We recorded motion artifact EEG data from nine young human subjects walking on a treadmill at speeds from 0.4 to 1.6 m s-1. We then tested artifact removal methods including moving average and wavelet-based techniques. Main results. Movement artifact recorded with EEG electrodes varied considerably, across speed, subject, and electrode location. The movement artifact measured with EEG electrodes did not correlate well with head acceleration. All of the tested artifact removal methods attenuated low-frequency noise but did not completely remove movement artifact. The spectral power fluctuations in the movement artifact data resembled data from some previously published studies of EEG during walking. Significance. Our results suggest that EEG data recorded during walking likely contains substantial movement artifact that: cannot be explained by head accelerations; varies across speed, subject, and channel; and cannot be removed using traditional signal processing methods. Future studies should focus on more sophisticated methods for removal of EEG

  17. Flexible Capacitive Electrodes for Minimizing Motion Artifacts in Ambulatory Electrocardiograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Su Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring.

  18. Probabilistic expert systems for handling artifacts in complex DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, R G; Lauritzen, S L; Mortera, J

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a coherent probabilistic framework for taking account of allelic dropout, stutter bands and silent alleles when interpreting STR DNA profiles from a mixture sample using peak size information arising from a PCR analysis. This information can be exploited for evaluating the evidential strength for a hypothesis that DNA from a particular person is present in the mixture. It extends an earlier Bayesian network approach that ignored such artifacts. We illustrate the use of the extended network on a published casework example. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of an artifact-free aneurysm clip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brack Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with aneurysm clips, usually a follow-up inspection in MRI is required. To avoid any artifacts, which can make a proper diagnosis difficult, a new approach for the manufacturing of an aneurysm clip entirely made from fiber-reinforced plastics has been developed. In this paper the concept for the design of the clip, the development of a new manufacturing technology for the fiber-reinforced components as well as first results from the examination of the components in phantom MRI testing is shown.

  20. Gold-wire artifacts on diagnostic radiographs: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keestra, Johan Anton Jochum; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Quirynen, Marc [Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven and Dentistry, University Hospitals, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-03-15

    This report described a case in which diagnostic radiographs showed irregular dense radiopaque strings and curved lines in the head and neck area. These artifacts could lead to misinterpretation since they may obscure anatomical structures and/or mask critical structures/pathologies. A more detailed history of the patient indicated that these strings originated from a facelift procedure in which a gold-wire technique was used. Considering that such intervention may cause a radiodiagnostic burden, it should be included in the anamnesis prior to radiography.

  1. Gold-wire artifacts on diagnostic radiographs: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keestra, Johan Anton Jochum; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Quirynen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This report described a case in which diagnostic radiographs showed irregular dense radiopaque strings and curved lines in the head and neck area. These artifacts could lead to misinterpretation since they may obscure anatomical structures and/or mask critical structures/pathologies. A more detailed history of the patient indicated that these strings originated from a facelift procedure in which a gold-wire technique was used. Considering that such intervention may cause a radiodiagnostic burden, it should be included in the anamnesis prior to radiography.

  2. The real deal: what judgments of really reveal about how people think about artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malt, Barbara C; Paquet, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    It is widely assumed that artifacts fall into distinct kinds. These kinds are generally identified by appeal to words-chair versus stool versus bowl versus vase, and so on. But contextual and cross-linguistic variation in what artifacts are grouped together by name raise questions about whether artifacts indeed do fall into fixed kinds. Can judgments of what artifacts really are reveal a true kind membership, distinct from what the objects are called in communicative contexts? In two experiments, we examined what drives judgments of what an artifact really is and what these judgments can tell us about how people think about artifacts. In both experiments, we found that people failed to treat artifacts as having a definitive kind membership in their judgments of what the artifacts really were. Instead, really judgments reflected the typicality of objects with respect to the things normally called by the queried name. If these judgments are taken as direct evidence about the existence of artifact kinds, the outcome argues against such kinds. Alternatively, really judgments themselves may be fundamentally linguistic in nature, and so unable to tap into underlying kind memberships. In either case, if such kinds exist, they remain to be found. A more likely reality may be that intuitions about the existence of artifact kinds reflect the partial clustering of objects in similarity space, plus the fact that each language provides names for some constellations of objects in that space.

  3. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography caused by dental materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Klinke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artifacts caused by dental restorations, such as dental crowns, dental fillings and orthodontic appliances, are a common problem in MRI and CT scans of the head and neck. The aim of this in-vitro study was to identify and evaluate the artifacts produced by different dental restoration materials in CT and MRI images. METHODS: Test samples of 44 materials (Metal and Non-Metal commonly used in dental restorations were fabricated and embedded with reference specimens in gelatin moulds. MRI imaging of 1.5T and CT scan were performed on the samples and evaluated in two dimensions. Artifact size and distortions were measured using a digital image analysis software. RESULTS: In MRI, 13 out of 44 materials produced artifacts, while in CT 41 out of 44 materials showed artifacts. Artifacts produced in both MRI and CT images were categorized according to the size of the artifact. SIGNIFICANCE: Metal based restoration materials had strong influence on CT and less artifacts in MRI images. Rare earth elements such as Ytterbium trifluoride found in composites caused artifacts in both MRI and CT. Recognizing these findings would help dental materials manufacturers and developers to produce materials which can cause less artifacts in MRI and CT images.

  4. Improved artifact rejection and isolation of compound action potentials by means of digital subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, I; Shizgal, P

    1989-12-01

    When recording compound action potentials (CAPs) elicited by stimulating near the recording site, it may prove difficult to distinguish the CAP from the shock artifact because of their overlap in time. This problem is compounded when a pair of stimulation pulses is delivered because the CAP elicited by the test pulse (T pulse) may be partially superimposed on the artifact and response elicited by the conditioning pulse (C pulse) as well as on the T pulse artifact. Methods based on digital subtraction were used to address these problems. A record was obtained with the C-T interval adjusted to be slightly less than the absolute refractory period so that the T pulse would fail to elicit a CAP. A record consisting of a C pulse artifact and response was subtracted from this record to yield a 'pure' shock artifact. In principle, subtracting this 'artifact-only' record from records obtained with single pulses removes the shock artifact and yields a 'pure' response. An extension of this method was used to isolate T pulse responses from the C pulse artifact, C pulse response, and T pulse artifact. These methods proved effective in improving the isolation of the CAPs of interest from other features of the raw records. Limitations of the techniques and their complementarity with other methods of artifact reduction are discussed.

  5. Metal Artifact Reduction in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Head and Neck Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpics, Mark; Johnson, Paul; Patel, Rakesh; Surucu, Murat; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate a method for reducing metal artifacts, arising from dental fillings, on cone-beam computed tomography images. A projection interpolation algorithm is applied to cone-beam computed tomography images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings. This technique involves identifying metal regions in individual cone-beam computed tomography projections and interpolating the surrounding values to remove the metal from the projection data. Axial cone-beam computed tomography images are then reconstructed, resulting in a reduction in the streak artifacts produced by the metal. Both phantom and patient imaging data are used to evaluate this technique. The interpolation substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in all cases. Corrected images had fewer or no streak artifacts compared to their noncorrected counterparts. Quantitatively, regions of interest containing the artifacts showed reduced variance in the corrected images versus the uncorrected images. Average pixel values in regions of interest around the metal object were also closer in value to nonmetal regions after artifact reduction. Artifact correction tended to perform better on patient images with less complex metal objects versus those with multiple large dental fillings. The interpolation substitution is potentially an efficient and effective technique for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings on cone-beam computed tomography image. This technique may be effective in reducing such artifacts in patients with head and neck cancer receiving daily image-guided radiotherapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. The role of basic leucine zipper transcription factor E4BP4 in the immune system and immune-mediated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinghua; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Qianjin

    2017-07-01

    Basic leucine zipper transcription factor E4BP4 (also known as NFIL3) has been implicated in the molecular and cellular mechanisms of functions and activities in mammals. The interactions between E4BP4 and major regulators of cellular processes have triggered significant interest in the roles of E4BP4 in the pathogenesis of certain chronic diseases. Indeed, novel discoveries have been emerging to illustrate the involvement of E4BP4 in multiple disorders. It is recognized that E4BP4 is extensively involved in some immune-mediated diseases, but the mechanisms of E4BP4 involvement in these complex diseases remain poorly defined. Here we review the regulatory mechanisms of E4BP4 engaging in not only the biological function but also the development of immune-mediated diseases, paving the way for future therapies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Iterative image-domain ring artifact removal in cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaokun; Zhang, Zhicheng; Niu, Tianye; Yu, Shaode; Wu, Shibin; Li, Zhicheng; Zhang, Huailing; Xie, Yaoqin

    2017-07-01

    Ring artifacts in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images are caused by pixel gain variations using flat-panel detectors, and may lead to structured non-uniformities and deterioration of image quality. The purpose of this study is to propose a method of general ring artifact removal in CBCT images. This method is based on the polar coordinate system, where the ring artifacts manifest as stripe artifacts. Using relative total variation, the CBCT images are first smoothed to generate template images with fewer image details and ring artifacts. By subtracting the template images from the CBCT images, residual images with image details and ring artifacts are generated. As the ring artifact manifests as a stripe artifact in a polar coordinate system, the artifact image can be extracted by mean value from the residual image; the image details are generated by subtracting the artifact image from the residual image. Finally, the image details are compensated to the template image to generate the corrected images. The proposed framework is iterated until the differences in the extracted ring artifacts are minimized. We use a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom, Catphan©504 phantom, uniform acrylic cylinder, and images from a head patient to evaluate the proposed method. In the experiments using simulated data, the spatial uniformity is increased by 1.68 times and the structural similarity index is increased from 87.12% to 95.50% using the proposed method. In the experiment using clinical data, our method shows high efficiency in ring artifact removal while preserving the image structure and detail. The iterative approach we propose for ring artifact removal in cone-beam CT is practical and attractive for CBCT guided radiation therapy.

  8. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2- or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2′-alkylated RNA monomers†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas S.; Guenther, Dale C.; Gibbons, Bradley C.; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances with triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, polyamides and - more recently - engineered proteins, there remains an urgent need for synthetic ligands that enable specific recognition of double-stranded (ds) DNA to accelerate studies aiming at detecting, regulating and modifying genes. Invaders, i.e., energetically activated DNA duplexes with interstrand zipper arrangements of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides, are emerging as an attractive approach toward this goal. Here, we characterize and compare Invaders based on 1-, 2- and 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2′-alkylated uridine monomers X–Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA hairpins with single nucleotide fidelity. Intercalator-mediated unwinding and activation of the double-stranded probe, coupled with extraordinary stabilization of probe-target duplexes (ΔTm/modification up to +14.0 °C), provides the driving force for dsDNA recognition. In contrast, Z-modified Invaders show much lower dsDNA recognition efficiency. Thus, even very conservative changes in the chemical makeup of the intercalator-functionalized nucleotides used to activate Invader duplexes, affects dsDNA-recognition efficiency of the probes, which highlights the importance of systematic structure-property studies. The insight from this study will guide future design of Invaders for applications in molecular biology and nucleic acid diagnostics. PMID:25144705

  9. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein switches the pathway of transactivation response element RNA/DNA annealing from loop-loop "kissing" to "zipper".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-02-27

    The chaperone activity of HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates multiple nucleic acid rearrangements that are critical for reverse transcription of the single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded DNA. Annealing of the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA hairpin to a complementary TAR DNA hairpin is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. Previously, we used truncated 27-nt mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs to investigate this annealing reaction pathway in the presence and in the absence of HIV-1 NC. In this work, full-length 59-nt TAR RNA and TAR DNA constructs were used to systematically study TAR hairpin annealing kinetics. In the absence of NC, full-length TAR hairpin annealing is approximately 10-fold slower than mini-TAR annealing. Similar to mini-TAR annealing, the reaction pathway for TAR in the absence of NC involves the fast formation of an unstable "kissing" loop intermediate, followed by a slower conversion to an extended duplex. NC facilitates the annealing of TAR by approximately 10(5)-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate ( approximately 10(4)-fold) and promoting the subsequent exchange reaction ( approximately 10-fold). In contrast to the mini-TAR annealing pathway, wherein NC-mediated annealing can initiate through both loop-loop kissing and a distinct "zipper" pathway involving nucleation at the 3'-/5'-terminal ends, full-length TAR hairpin annealing switches predominantly to the zipper pathway in the presence of saturated NC.

  10. P-FFT Accelerated EFIE with a Novel Diagonal Perturbed ILUT Preconditioner for Electromagnetic Scattering by Conducting Objects in Half Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Wei Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient and robust scheme is proposed for analyzing electromagnetic scattering from electrically large arbitrary shaped conductors in a half space. This scheme is based on the electric field integral equation (EFIE with a half-space Green’s function. The precorrected fast Fourier transform (p-FFT is first extended to a half space for general three-dimensional scattering problems. A novel enhanced dual threshold incomplete LU factorization (ILUT is then constructed as an effective preconditioner to improve the convergence of the half-space EFIE. Inspired by the idea of the improved electric field integral operator (IEFIO, the geometrical-optics current/principle value term of the magnetic field integral equation is used as a physical perturbation to stabilize the traditional ILUT perconditioning matrix. The high accuracy of EFIE is maintained, yet good calculating efficiency comparable to the combined field integral equation (CFIE can be achieved. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to arbitrary geometrical structures including open surfaces and requires no extra types of Sommerfeld integrals needed in the half-space CFIE. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the high performance of the proposed solver among several other approaches in typical half-space problems.

  11. Textural analyses of carbon fiber materials by 2D-FFT of complex images obtained by high frequency eddy current imaging (HF-ECI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Martin H.; Heuer, Henning

    2012-04-01

    Carbon fiber based materials are used in many lightweight applications in aeronautical, automotive, machine and civil engineering application. By the increasing automation in the production process of CFRP laminates a manual optical inspection of each resin transfer molding (RTM) layer is not practicable. Due to the limitation to surface inspection, the quality parameters of multilayer 3 dimensional materials cannot be observed by optical systems. The Imaging Eddy- Current (EC) NDT is the only suitable inspection method for non-resin materials in the textile state that allows an inspection of surface and hidden layers in parallel. The HF-ECI method has the capability to measure layer displacements (misaligned angle orientations) and gap sizes in a multilayer carbon fiber structure. EC technique uses the variation of the electrical conductivity of carbon based materials to obtain material properties. Beside the determination of textural parameters like layer orientation and gap sizes between rovings, the detection of foreign polymer particles, fuzzy balls or visualization of undulations can be done by the method. For all of these typical parameters an imaging classification process chain based on a high resolving directional ECimaging device named EddyCus® MPECS and a 2D-FFT with adapted preprocessing algorithms are developed.

  12. Mascara--an unsuspected cause of magnetic resonance imaging artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, F W; Crosher, G A

    1985-01-01

    It is well recognised that metals, especially iron, will cause artifacts in magnetic resonance (MR) images. Hitherto it has not been recognised that some facial cosmetics contain magnetic materials, in sufficient quantities to cause artifacts. We report a case of a 25-year-old female who had MR images of her orbits made while wearing mascara eye makeup. The resultant images showed distortion of the signal over the anterior aspect of both eyes. Examination following the removal of the eye makeup resulted in the acquisition of normal images. The typical ingredients of mascara are natural and synthetic waxes, glycerine, water, kaolin, preservatives, polymer film formers and pigments. A wide range of pigments may be used, especially iron oxide, which is a constituent of both brown and blue mascara. In addition it is likely that a number of mascaras will be contaminated with heavy metals. As a result of this observation we now ensure that all patients who are undergoing MR imaging of the head, remove all facial cosmetics as well as any jewelry prior to imaging.

  13. Racial IQ Differences among Transracial Adoptees: Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Some academic publications infer from studies of transracial adoptees’ IQs that East Asian adoptees raised in the West by Whites have higher IQs than Western Whites, and that White adoptees raised by Whites have higher IQs than Black adoptees raised by Whites. Those publications suggest that this is because genetic differences give East Asians a higher mean IQ than Whites, and Whites a higher mean IQ than Blacks. This paper proposes a parsimonious alternative explanation: the apparent IQ advantage of East Asian adoptees is an artifact caused by ignoring the Flynn effect and adoption’s beneficial effect on IQ, and most of the IQ disadvantage of Black adoptees disappears when one allows for attrition in the Minnesota Transracial Adoption Study, and acknowledges the results of other studies. Diagnosing these artifacts suggests a nil hypothesis: East Asian, White, and Black adoptees raised in the same environment would have similar IQs, hinting at a minimal role for genes in racial IQ differences.

  14. A generic approach to haptic modeling of textile artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidanshidi, H.; Naghdy, F.; Naghdy, G.; Wood Conroy, D.

    2009-08-01

    Haptic Modeling of textile has attracted significant interest over the last decade. In spite of extensive research, no generic system has been proposed. The previous work mainly assumes that textile has a 2D planar structure. They also require time-consuming measurement of textile properties in construction of the mechanical model. A novel approach for haptic modeling of textile is proposed to overcome the existing shortcomings. The method is generic, assumes a 3D structure for the textile, and deploys computational intelligence to estimate the mechanical properties of textile. The approach is designed primarily for display of textile artifacts in museums. The haptic model is constructed by superimposing the mechanical model of textile over its geometrical model. Digital image processing is applied to the still image of textile to identify its pattern and structure through a fuzzy rule-base algorithm. The 3D geometric model of the artifact is automatically generated in VRML based on the identified pattern and structure obtained from the textile image. Selected mechanical properties of the textile are estimated by an artificial neural network; deploying the textile geometric characteristics and yarn properties as inputs. The estimated mechanical properties are then deployed in the construction of the textile mechanical model. The proposed system is introduced and the developed algorithms are described. The validation of method indicates the feasibility of the approach and its superiority to other haptic modeling algorithms.

  15. Avoiding electromagnetic artifacts when recording auditory steady-state responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Terence W; John, M Sasha

    2004-09-01

    Electromagnetic artifacts can occur when recording multiple auditory steady-state responses evoked by sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) stimuli. High-intensity air-conducted stimuli evoked responses even when hearing was prevented by masking. Additionally, high-intensity bone-conducted stimuli evoked responses that were completely different from those evoked by air-conducted stimuli of similar sensory level. These artifacts were caused by aliasing since they did not occur when recordings used high analog-digital (AD) conversion rates or when high frequencies in the electroencephalographic (EEG) signal were attenuated by steep-slope low-pass filtering. Two possible techniques can displace aliased energy away from the response frequencies: (1) using an AD rate that is not an integer submultiple of the carrier frequencies and (2) using stimuli with frequency spectra that do not alias back to the response frequencies, such as beats or "alternating SAM" tones. Alternating SAM tones evoke responses similar to conventional SAM tones, whereas beats produce significantly smaller responses.

  16. Social web artifacts for boosting recommenders theory and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Cai-Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Recommender systems, software programs that learn from human behavior and make predictions of what products we are expected to appreciate and purchase, have become an integral part of our everyday life. They proliferate across electronic commerce around the globe and exist for virtually all sorts of consumable goods, such as books, movies, music, or clothes. At the same time, a new evolution on the Web has started to take shape, commonly known as the “Web 2.0” or the “Social Web”: Consumer-generated media has become rife, social networks have emerged and are pulling significant shares of Web traffic. In line with these developments, novel information and knowledge artifacts have become readily available on the Web, created by the collective effort of millions of people. This textbook presents approaches to exploit the new Social Web fountain of knowledge, zeroing in first and foremost on two of those information artifacts, namely classification taxonomies and trust networks. These two are used to impr...

  17. Artifact-free resizing using an optical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowron, John W.; Tsintzouras, George

    2000-04-01

    Pixelated spatial light modulators (SLMs) are commonly used in projection displays. The total number of columns and rows in the device define its `native' resolution. This native resolution may not match the resolution of the signal that is to be displayed. It is common to use electronic methods to re-scale the signal to match the resolution of the panel. This resizing introduces artifacts that may be unacceptable in some applications. A new technique is described using optical methods to obtain an artifact free representation of the signal. This method works particularly well with high- resolution 1.8' diagonal devices where the signals to be displayed have equal or lesser resolution than the SLM. The system requires a zoom illumination system and a zoom projection lens. Information is sent to a sub-area of the panel that matches the native resolution of the signal. The zoom illumination system concentrates the total light flux onto this sub-area. A zoom projection lens adjusts the size of the final image to be constant.

  18. Packaging Design. A Systemic Approach to a Complex Artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Ciravegna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Packaging is a complex artifact, which has considerably expanded its functions over time. It is an object of use (instrumental prosthesis, which allows to contain the product, protect it, store it, transport it, and at the same time, facilitate its physical interaction with the user. Also, it is communication device (communication prosthesis, characterized by functions, among others, of appellative, persuasive, informative and prescriptive kind. For its multifaceted nature, the project of a package requires different skills and the intervention of multiple disciplines: for that reason, should be understood as the result of an integrated set of choices made by a plurality of actors, where each performs a specific role – direct or indirect – in its definition. These actors, together with the relationships that are established throughout the product life cycle, define the so-called “packaging-system”. Within this system, Design –and specifically Communication Design– may play an important role in direction and mediation, potentially giving shape through the project synthesis to solutions which are an expression of the confluence of the needs of the different parties involved and the multiple functions of the artifact, connecting the communicative dimension to a strictly instrumental dimension.

  19. A convolutional neural network to filter artifacts in spectroscopic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbani, Saumya S; Schreibmann, Eduard; Maudsley, Andrew A; Cordova, James Scott; Soher, Brian J; Poptani, Harish; Verma, Gaurav; Barker, Peter B; Shim, Hyunsuk; Cooper, Lee A D

    2018-03-09

    Proton MRSI is a noninvasive modality capable of generating volumetric maps of in vivo tissue metabolism without the need for ionizing radiation or injected contrast agent. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging has been shown to be a viable imaging modality for studying several neuropathologies. However, a key hurdle in the routine clinical adoption of MRSI is the presence of spectral artifacts that can arise from a number of sources, possibly leading to false information. A deep learning model was developed that was capable of identifying and filtering out poor quality spectra. The core of the model used a tiled convolutional neural network that analyzed frequency-domain spectra to detect artifacts. When compared with a panel of MRS experts, our convolutional neural network achieved high sensitivity and specificity with an area under the curve of 0.95. A visualization scheme was implemented to better understand how the convolutional neural network made its judgement on single-voxel or multivoxel MRSI, and the convolutional neural network was embedded into a pipeline capable of producing whole-brain spectroscopic MRI volumes in real time. The fully automated method for assessment of spectral quality provides a valuable tool to support clinical MRSI or spectroscopic MRI studies for use in fields such as adaptive radiation therapy planning. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Metal Artifact Reduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging Around Arthroplasty Implants: The Negative Effect of Long Echo Trains on the Implant-Related Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neil M; de Cesar Netto, Cesar; Schon, Lew C; Fritz, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Long echo train length (ETL) is an often recommended but unproven technique to decrease metal artifacts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Therefore, we quantitatively and qualitatively assessed the effects of ETL on metal artifact on MRI scans using a cobalt-chromium-containing arthroplasty implant system. Using a total ankle arthroplasty system implanted into a human cadaver ankle and a clinical 1.5 T MRI system, turbo spin echo (TSE) pulse sequences were acquired with ETL ranging from 3 to 23 and receiver bandwidth (BW) from 100 to 750 Hz/pixel, whereas effective echo time and spatial resolution were controlled. A compressed sensing slice encoding for metal artifact correction TSE prototype pulse sequence was used as reference standard. End points included the total implant-related artifact area and implant-related signal void areas. Two raters evaluated the overall image quality and preference across varying BW and ETL. Two-factor analysis of variance, Friedman test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson correlation were used. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. The total implant-related artifact area ranged from 0.119 for compressed sensing slice encoding for metal artifact correction (BW, 600 Hz/pixel; ETL, 3) to 0.265 for TSE (BW, 100 Hz/pixel; ETL, 23). Longer ETL significantly increases the total implant-related artifact area (P = 0.0004), whereas it decreased with increasing BW (P train length, but reduced with higher BW (P trains fail to reduce implant-related metal artifacts, but in fact cause degradation of image quality around the implant with resultant larger appearing total metal artifacts.

  1. Evaluation of metal artifacts in clinical MR images of patients with total hip arthroplasty using different metal artifact-reducing sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gunilla M; Lundin, Björn; von Schewelov, Thord; Müller, Markus F; Ekberg, Olle; Månsson, Sven

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the distortion and artifact area of metal in MR images and to compare artifact reduction using different metal artifact-reducing sequences in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) and non-MoM total hip prostheses. Thirty-six MoM and 15 non-MoM prostheses were examined in a 1.5-T MR scanner using T1-weighted (T1-w) sequences: turbo spin echo (TSE) high-readout bandwidth (hiBW), T1-w; TSE view angle tilting (VAT), T1-w; TSE VAT + slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC); short tau inversion recovery (STIR) hiBW or matched RF pulses (mRFp). Distortion was quantified using a new method measuring the acetabular roof angle (ARA). The artifact area was defined in the mid-coronal plane of the artifact. The T1 VAT + SEMAC sequence showed the least distortion compared to T1 VAT and T1-hiBW (150°, 127° and 102°, p < 0.001, in MoM; 152°, 143° and 128°, p ≤ 0.014, in non-MoM). The artifact area was smaller in MoM prostheses using the T1 VAT sequence compared to T1 hiBW and T1 VAT + SEMAC (2506 mm(2), 3160 mm(2) and 3214 mm(2), p < 0.001) and smaller in non-MoM prostheses using T1 VAT compared to T1-hiBW (4296 mm(2) and 4831 mm(2), p = 0.041). STIR-mRFp substantially reduced the artifact size compared with STIR-hiBW (MoM 4559 mm(2) and 6323 mm(2); non-MoM 5625 mm(2) and 8764 mm(2), p < 0.001). Metal artifacts in MR imaging examinations of hip prostheses can be evaluated for distortion using a distortion angle (ARA) and the degree of signal artifact as determined by measuring the largest cross-sectional artifact area. T1 VAT + SEMAC showed the least distortion; T1 VAT and STIR-mRFp were most efficient for reduction of the artifact area.

  2. Artifact Elimination Technique in Tomogram of X-ray Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasif Mohd Zain

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts of tomogram are main commonly problems occurred in x-ray computed tomography. The artifacts will be appearing in tomogram due to noise, beam hardening, and scattered radiation. The study has been carried out using CdTe time pix detector. The new technique has been developed to eliminate the artifact occurred in hardware and software. The hardware setup involved the careful alignment all of the components of the system and the introduction of a collimator beam. Meanwhile, in software development deal with the flat field correction, noise filter and data projection algorithm. The results show the technique developed produce good quality images and eliminate the artifacts. (author)

  3. Ring artifact reduction in synchrotron x-ray tomography through helical acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelt, Daniël M.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2018-03-01

    In synchrotron x-ray tomography, systematic defects in certain detector elements can result in arc-shaped artifacts in the final reconstructed image of the scanned sample. These ring artifacts are commonly found in many applications of synchrotron tomography, and can make it difficult or impossible to use the reconstructed image in further analyses. The severity of ring artifacts is often reduced in practice by applying pre-processing on the acquired data, or post-processing on the reconstructed image. However, such additional processing steps can introduce additional artifacts as well, and rely on specific choices of hyperparameter values. In this paper, a different approach to reducing the severity of ring artifacts is introduced: a helical acquisition mode. By moving the sample parallel to the rotation axis during the experiment, the sample is detected at different detector positions in each projection, reducing the effect of systematic errors in detector elements. Alternatively, helical acquisition can be viewed as a way to transform ring artifacts to helix-like artifacts in the reconstructed volume, reducing their severity. We show that data acquired with the proposed mode can be transformed to data acquired with a virtual circular trajectory, enabling further processing of the data with existing software packages for circular data. Results for both simulated data and experimental data show that the proposed method is able to significantly reduce ring artifacts in practice, even compared with popular existing methods, without introducing additional artifacts.

  4. Scanning RBS-PIXE study of ancient artifacts from South America using a microbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvalcaba-Sil, J. L.; Demortier, G.

    1997-07-01

    Pre-Hispanic goldsmiths developed original techniques to manufacture and to gild ornaments and artifacts. Gold metallurgy in ancient America was mainly a surface technology. Surface studies of artifacts from various regions of pre-Hispanic South America were carried out using a 2 MeV proton microbeam (10 μm diameter). Several regions of the artifacts were scanned: RBS and PIXE were used simultaneously to determine the elemental composition and to characterize the homogeneity in depth and at the surface. Complementary information is provided from previous analyses using a macrobeam. Outstanding aspects about the metallurgical processes involved in the gilding of the artifacts have been established.

  5. What causes the "wet diaper" artifact? computed tomography and magnetic resonance observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Richard I; Altes, Talissa A; Jaramillo, Diego

    2009-01-01

    Disposable diapers contain super absorbent polymers that absorb liquid. A radio-dense artifact, seen when the diaper is wet, obscures radiographic information but is frequently misinterpreted. Our purpose was to examine this artifact on CT and MR to further clarify and explain its origin. Dry and wet diapers were imaged. Fluid within the wet diaper appeared as small nodules with characteristics of bound water. No free water was detected. Dry diapers produced no artifact. The artifact is most undesirable on radiographs, but does not obscure diagnostic information on cross-sectional imaging. It should not be misinterpreted as contrast.

  6. Dealing with noise and physiological artifacts in human EEG recordings: empirical mode methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Khramova, Marina V.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2017-04-01

    In the paper we propose the new method for removing noise and physiological artifacts in human EEG recordings based on empirical mode decomposition (Hilbert-Huang transform). As physiological artifacts we consider specific oscillatory patterns that cause problems during EEG analysis and can be detected with additional signals recorded simultaneously with EEG (ECG, EMG, EOG, etc.) We introduce the algorithm of the proposed method with steps including empirical mode decomposition of EEG signal, choosing of empirical modes with artifacts, removing these empirical modes and reconstructing of initial EEG signal. We show the efficiency of the method on the example of filtration of human EEG signal from eye-moving artifacts.

  7. A fully automatic device for compensating for artifacts in conventional catheter-manometer pressure recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, R W; Spaans, W; Rewiersma, P A; Meester, G T

    1975-08-01

    A device is described which detects the resonant artifacts in clinical cathetermanometer systems and automatically sets a notch filter so as to provide some measure of compensation. The equalised response characteristic does visibly improve transient response by removing resonant artifacts due to the uneven transfer function characteristic in these systems. Artifacts due to knocking of the catheter by the heart, external vibrations induced in the manometer, its mechanical support, or the catheter are reduced, but not eliminated. Nevertheless, the system described here has provided a solution to an important class of artifacts in conventional fluid filled catheter-manometer pressure recordings.

  8. Roadmap grounded as 'visual portray' : Reflecting on an artifact and metaphor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonse, W.L.; Buijs, J.A.; Hultink, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Artifacts Design representations and presentations of work, strategic thinking, and business processes. Main theme Design!? - related by research program on Design Roadmapping, at the Industrial Design Engineering Faculty.

  9. Artifacts in global atmospheric modeling: Two recent examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Mark G.; Landgraf, Jochen; Jöckel, Patrick; Eaton, Brian

    To what extent can we trust the results of global atmospheric models? It is well known that a substantial degree of uncertainty exists in the parameters used in these models, for instance in parameterizations of complex physical processes such as convection and in reaction rates for photochemical models. Anyone familiar with computer work is also well aware of occasional “bugs,” such as an “l” typed where a “j” was intended.However, many newcomers to the field of atmospheric modeling (or other similar Earth systems modeling endeavors) are not yet very familiar with the technical side of modeling, have little or no formal education in computer programming, and are instead expected to learn the art of programming on the job. These researchers are often unaware of some of the types of artifacts that can be generated by the software and hardware they use.

  10. Trail Trees: Living Artifacts (Vivifacts of Eastern North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas C. Kawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Living trees historically modified by human populations, oftentimes referred to as “culturally modified trees” (CMTs, are found throughout the North American landscape. In eastern North America specifically, indigenous populations bent thousands of trees to mark trails, and some of these still exist in the region today. In this article, we present a synthesis of current knowledge on trail trees, including their speculated functions, formation, and selection. We also examine the theoretical implications of these living artifacts (or vivifacts and how they may open new avenues for investigation by archaeologists, environmental historians, and ethnobiologists. To conclude, we make a call for expanded public recognition and documentation of trail trees, discussing the need for their incorporation into forest and park management plans.

  11. Motion artifact suppression: a review of post-processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, M; Yan, H

    1992-01-01

    Patient motion during data acquisition in magnetic resonance imaging causes artifacts in the reconstructed image, which for two-dimensional Fourier transform imaging techniques appear as blurring and ghost repetitions of the moving structures. While the problem with intra-view effects has been effectively addressed using gradient moment nulling techniques, there is no corresponding technique for inter-view effects with equal effectiveness and general applicability. A number of techniques have been proposed for correcting the inter-view effects, and these may be divided into those that minimise the corruption of the data, and those that post-process the data to restore the image. The techniques in the former category are briefly reviewed, then those in the latter category are examined in detail. These are analysed in terms of motion model, model parameter estimation, and data correction.

  12. MORAL TECHNIQUES. FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY AND ITS ARTIFACTS FOR DOING GOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIEL GATTI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In many of its applications forensic anthropology is a singular discipline, midway between a bare techno-scientific exercise and a militant involvement in overcoming situations marked by human rights violations. Today, riding on an intense and transnational wave of humanitarian sensitivity, forensic anthropology has acquired a significant scientific, moral and media status, and has become a front line scientific-technical practice in the human rights field at the planetary level. This text, which analyzes some of the artifacts with which forensic anthropology represents and works on its object, aims to understand this discipline through the concept of moral technique, which, in my understanding, captures the particular tensions of this form of working for good.

  13. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Hansen, Adam E.; Keller, Sune

    2015-01-01

    region of patients with dental implants. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency and magnitude of subsequent PET image distortions following MR-AC. METHODS: A total of 148 PET/MR patients with clear visual signal voids on the attenuation map in the dental region were included in this study......BACKGROUND: In the absence of CT or traditional transmission sources in combined clinical positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems, MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The susceptibility effects due to metal implants challenge MR-AC in the neck...... substituted with soft tissue information. Our inpainting algorithm delineates the outer contour of signal voids breaching the anatomical volume using the non-attenuation-corrected PET image and classifies the inner air regions based on an aligned template of likely dental artifact areas. The reconstructed PET...

  14. Postmortem Aortic Dissection: An Artifact of the Embalming Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Guenevere; Husain, Mujtaba; McGoey, Robin; Swartz, William

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a serious condition that affects 3/100,000 individuals a year. Recently, a case report was published describing an embalmed patient with an aortic dissection. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of AD among 80 embalmed cadavers and confirm the AD with histopathologic evaluation. In seven cases of grossly identified AD, six were determined to be due to the embalming procedure and only one case of true antemortem AD was confirmed. These results suggest that aortic morphology can be altered by administration of the embalming fluid and that alterations can mimic AD, not only on gross inspection but also on postmortem imaging. Awareness of this embalming artifact may prevent misdiagnosis of an aortic dissection in an embalmed patient, a point particularly useful for autopsy pathology that may include postmortem examination of an embalmed patient. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Sex differences in jealousy: evolutionary mechanism or artifact of measurement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSteno, David; Bartlett, Monica Y; Braverman, Julia; Salovey, Peter

    2002-11-01

    Two studies are presented that challenge the evidentiary basis for the existence of evolved sex differences in jealousy. In opposition to the evolutionary view, Study I demonstrated that a sex difference in jealousy resulting from sexual versus emotional infidelity is observed only when judgments are recorded using a forced-choice response format. On all other measures, no sex differences were found; both men and women reported greater jealousy in response to sexual infidelity. A second study revealed that the sex difference on the forced-choice measure disappeared under conditions of cognitive constraint. These findings suggest that the sex difference used to support the evolutionary view of jealousy (e.g., D. M. Buss, R. Larsen, D. Westen, & J. Semmelroth, 1992; D. M. Buss et al., 1999) likely represents a measurement artifact resulting from a format-induced effortful decision strategy and not an automatic, sex-specific response shaped by evolution.

  16. Clinical evaluation of TOF versus non-TOF on PET artifacts in simultaneous PET/MR: a dual centre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Ahn, Sangtae [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wiesinger, Florian [GE Global Research, Muenchen (Germany); Khalighi, M.M.; Delso, Gaspar [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States); Levin, Craig S. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Stanford, CA (United States); Zaharchuk, Greg [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Huellner, Martin [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    Our objective was to determine clinically the value of time-of-flight (TOF) information in reducing PET artifacts and improving PET image quality and accuracy in simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanning. A total 65 patients who underwent a comparative scan in a simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanner were included. TOF and non-TOF PET images were reconstructed, clinically examined, compared and scored. PET imaging artifacts were categorized as large or small implant-related artifacts, as dental implant-related artifacts, and as implant-unrelated artifacts. Differences in image quality, especially those related to (implant) artifacts, were assessed using a scale ranging from 0 (no artifact) to 4 (severe artifact). A total of 87 image artifacts were found and evaluated. Four patients had large and eight patients small implant-related artifacts, 27 patients had dental implants/fillings, and 48 patients had implant-unrelated artifacts. The average score was 1.14 ± 0.82 for non-TOF PET images and 0.53 ± 0.66 for TOF images (p < 0.01) indicating that artifacts were less noticeable when TOF information was included. Our study indicates that PET image artifacts are significantly mitigated with integration of TOF information in simultaneous PET/MR. The impact is predominantly seen in patients with significant artifacts due to metal implants. (orig.)

  17. Photoplethysmograph signal reconstruction based on a novel motion artifact detection-reduction approach. Part II: Motion and noise artifact removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehizadeh, S M A; Dao, Duy K; Chong, Jo Woon; McManus, David; Darling, Chad; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a new method to reconstruct motion and noise artifact (MNA) contaminated photoplethysmogram (PPG) data. A method to detect MNA corrupted data is provided in a companion paper. Our reconstruction algorithm is based on an iterative motion artifact removal (IMAR) approach, which utilizes the singular spectral analysis algorithm to remove MNA artifacts so that the most accurate estimates of uncorrupted heart rates (HRs) and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) values recorded by a pulse oximeter can be derived. Using both computer simulations and three different experimental data sets, we show that the proposed IMAR approach can reliably reconstruct MNA corrupted data segments, as the estimated HR and SpO2 values do not significantly deviate from the uncorrupted reference measurements. Comparison of the accuracy of reconstruction of the MNA corrupted data segments between our IMAR approach and the time-domain independent component analysis (TD-ICA) is made for all data sets as the latter method has been shown to provide good performance. For simulated data, there were no significant differences in the reconstructed HR and SpO2 values starting from 10 dB down to -15 dB for both white and colored noise contaminated PPG data using IMAR; for TD-ICA, significant differences were observed starting at 10 dB. Two experimental PPG data sets were created with contrived MNA by having subjects perform random forehead and rapid side-to-side finger movements show that; the performance of the IMAR approach on these data sets was quite accurate as non-significant differences in the reconstructed HR and SpO2 were found compared to non-contaminated reference values, in most subjects. In comparison, the accuracy of the TD-ICA was poor as there were significant differences in reconstructed HR and SpO2 values in most subjects. For non-contrived MNA corrupted PPG data, which were collected with subjects performing walking and stair climbing tasks, the IMAR significantly

  18. Archaeology through Computational Linguistics: Inscription Statistics Predict Excavation Sites of Indus Valley Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Gabriel L.; Louwerse, Max M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational techniques comparing co-occurrences of city names in texts allow the relative longitudes and latitudes of cities to be estimated algorithmically. However, these techniques have not been applied to estimate the provenance of artifacts with unknown origins. Here, we estimate the geographic origin of artifacts from the Indus Valley…

  19. Automatic detection and classification of artifacts in single-channel EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olund, Thomas; Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels W.

    2014-01-01

    artifact classes using the selected features. Single-channel (Fp1-F7) EEG recordings are obtained from experiments with 12 healthy subjects performing artifact inducing movements. The dataset was used to construct and validate the model. Both subject-specific and generic implementation, are investigated...

  20. X-ray CT Metal Artifact Reduction Using Wavelet Domain L-0 Sparse Regularization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of patients with metallic implants usually suffers from streaking metal artifacts. In this paper, we propose a new projection completion metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm by formulating the completion of missing projections as a regularized inverse

  1. 75 FR 57825 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Artifacts From Auschwitz...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Artifacts From Auschwitz-Birkenau... of August 28, 2000, I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Artifacts...), Washington, DC 20522-0505. Dated: September 16, 2010. Ann Stock, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Educational...

  2. Online Help-Seeking in Communities of Practice: Modeling the Acceptance of Conceptual Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, Nicolae; Schworm, Silke; Werner, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Interactive online help systems are considered to be a fruitful supplement to traditional IT helpdesks, which are often overloaded. They often comprise user-generated FAQ collections playing the role of technology-based conceptual artifacts. Two main questions arise: how the conceptual artifacts should be used, and which factors influence their…

  3. Examining Student Digital Artifacts during a Year-Long Technology Integration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Prisca M.; Frey, Chris; Dawson, Kara; Liu, Feng; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2012-01-01

    This study was situated within a year-long, statewide technology integration initiative designed to support technology integration within science, technology, engineering, and math classrooms. It examined the elements used in student artifacts in an attempt to investigate trends in digital artifact creation. Among several conclusions, this…

  4. Evaluation of MRI artifacts at 3 Tesla for 38 commonly used cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Kirin; Shellock, Frank G

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate MRI artifacts at 3-Tesla for 38 commonly used cosmetics. Thirty-eight cosmetics (16, nail polishes; 5, eyeliners; 3, mascaras; 10, eye shadows; 1, lip gloss; 1, body lotion; 1, body glitter, and 1, hair loss concealer) underwent evaluation for MRI artifacts at 3-Tesla. The cosmetics were applied a copper-sulfate-filled, phantom and initially assessed using a "screening" gradient echo (GRE) pulse sequence. Of the 38 different cosmetics, 14 (37%) exhibited artifacts. For these 14 cosmetics, additional characterization of artifacts was performed using a GRE pulse sequence. A qualitative scale was applied to characterize the artifact size. Artifacts were observed, as follows: 2, nail polishes; 5, eyeliners; 3, mascaras; 3, eye shadows; 1, hair loss concealer. Artifact size ranged from small (eye shadow) to very large (hair loss concealer) and tended to be associated with the presence of iron oxide or other metal-based ingredient. Commonly used cosmetics caused artifacts that may create issues if the area of interest is the same as where the cosmetic was applied or if its presence was unknown, thus, potentially causing it to be construed as pathology. Therefore, these findings have important implications for patients referred for MRI examinations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Balter, Peter A; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Stingo, Francesco C

    2015-01-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. (paper)

  6. A robust post-processing workflow for datasets with motion artifacts in diffusion kurtosis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianjun; Yang, Jian; Gao, Jie; Luo, Xue; Zhou, Zhenyu; Hu, Yajie; Wu, Ed X; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a robust post-processing workflow for motion-corrupted datasets in diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI). The proposed workflow consisted of brain extraction, rigid registration, distortion correction, artifacts rejection, spatial smoothing and tensor estimation. Rigid registration was utilized to correct misalignments. Motion artifacts were rejected by using local Pearson correlation coefficient (LPCC). The performance of LPCC in characterizing relative differences between artifacts and artifact-free images was compared with that of the conventional correlation coefficient in 10 randomly selected DKI datasets. The influence of rejected artifacts with information of gradient directions and b values for the parameter estimation was investigated by using mean square error (MSE). The variance of noise was used as the criterion for MSEs. The clinical practicality of the proposed workflow was evaluated by the image quality and measurements in regions of interest on 36 DKI datasets, including 18 artifact-free (18 pediatric subjects) and 18 motion-corrupted datasets (15 pediatric subjects and 3 essential tremor patients). The relative difference between artifacts and artifact-free images calculated by LPCC was larger than that of the conventional correlation coefficient (pworkflow improved the image quality and reduced the measurement biases significantly on motion-corrupted datasets (pworkflow was reliable to improve the image quality and the measurement precision of the derived parameters on motion-corrupted DKI datasets. The workflow provided an effective post-processing method for clinical applications of DKI in subjects with involuntary movements.

  7. Review of artifacts associated with transrectal ultrasound: understanding, recognition, and prevention of misinterpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsmans, F. J.; Castelijns, J. A.; Reeders, J. W.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    Artifacts are inadequate representations of the structures being imaged. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) used for evaluating rectal tumors has its own, unique spectrum of artifacts such as (1) pseudomasses (beam thickness: imaging of rectal folds; mirror image: reflection at an intraluminal fluid

  8. Individual and joint expert judgments as reference standards in artifact detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduijn, Marion; Peek, Niels; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; van Lieshout, Erik-Jan; de Pont, Anne-Cornelie J. M.; Schultz, Marcus J.; de Jonge, Evert; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the agreement among clinical experts in their judgments of monitoring data with respect to artifacts, and to examine the effect of reference standards that consist of individual and joint expert judgments on the performance of artifact filters. DESIGN: Individual judgments

  9. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Kerns, James R.; Nute, Jessica L.; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Followill, David S.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios.

  10. A standardized evaluation of artifacts from metallic compounds during fast MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kataoka, Miyoshi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Metallic compounds present in the oral and maxillofacial regions (OMR) cause large artifacts during MR scanning. We quantitatively assessed these artifacts embedded within a phantom according to standards set by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). MATERIALS AND METHO...

  11. Spectral CT metal artifact reduction with an optimization-based reconstruction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat Schmidt, Taly; Barber, Rina F.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2017-03-01

    Metal objects cause artifacts in computed tomography (CT) images. This work investigated the feasibility of a spectral CT method to reduce metal artifacts. Spectral CT acquisition combined with optimization-based reconstruction is proposed to reduce artifacts by modeling the physical effects that cause metal artifacts and by providing the flexibility to selectively remove corrupted spectral measurements in the spectral-sinogram space. The proposed Constrained `One-Step' Spectral CT Image Reconstruction (cOSSCIR) algorithm directly estimates the basis material maps while enforcing convex constraints. The incorporation of constraints on the reconstructed basis material maps is expected to mitigate undersampling effects that occur when corrupted data is excluded from reconstruction. The feasibility of the cOSSCIR algorithm to reduce metal artifacts was investigated through simulations of a pelvis phantom. The cOSSCIR algorithm was investigated with and without the use of a third basis material representing metal. The effects of excluding data corrupted by metal were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the proposed cOSSCIR algorithm reduced metal artifacts and improved CT number accuracy. For example, CT number error in a bright shading artifact region was reduced from 403 HU in the reference filtered backprojection reconstruction to 33 HU using the proposed algorithm in simulation. In the dark shading regions, the error was reduced from 1141 HU to 25 HU. Of the investigated approaches, decomposing the data into three basis material maps and excluding the corrupted data demonstrated the greatest reduction in metal artifacts.

  12. How to bring a technical artifact into use: A micro-developmental perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overdijk, Maarten; Van Diggelen, Wouter; Andriessen, Jerry; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    In order to understand how technical artifacts are attuned to, interacted with, and shaped in various and varied classrooms, it is necessary to construct detailed accounts of the use of particular artifacts in particular classrooms. This paper presents a descriptive account of how a shared

  13. 3D Prior Image Constrained Projection Completion for X-ray CT Metal Artifact Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    The presence of metallic implants in the body of patients undergoing X-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations often results insevere streaking artifacts that degrade image quality. In this work, we propose a new metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm for 2D fan-beam and 3D cone-beam CT based on

  14. Effect of pressure and padding on motion artifact of textile electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert, Alper; Honkala, Markku; Hyttinen, Jari

    2013-04-08

    With the aging population and rising healthcare costs, wearable monitoring is gaining importance. The motion artifact affecting dry electrodes is one of the main challenges preventing the widespread use of wearable monitoring systems. In this paper we investigate the motion artifact and ways of making a textile electrode more resilient against motion artifact. Our aim is to study the effects of the pressure exerted onto the electrode, and the effects of inserting padding between the applied pressure and the electrode. We measure real time electrode-skin interface impedance, ECG from two channels, the motion artifact related surface potential, and exerted pressure during controlled motion by a measurement setup designed to estimate the relation of motion artifact to the signals. We use different foam padding materials with various mechanical properties and apply electrode pressures between 5 and 25 mmHg to understand their effect. A QRS and noise detection algorithm based on a modified Pan-Tompkins QRS detection algorithm estimates the electrode behaviour in respect to the motion artifact from two channels; one dominated by the motion artifact and one containing both the motion artifact and the ECG. This procedure enables us to quantify a given setup's susceptibility to the motion artifact. Pressure is found to strongly affect signal quality as is the use of padding. In general, the paddings reduce the motion artifact. However the shape and frequency components of the motion artifact vary for different paddings, and their material and physical properties. Electrode impedance at 100 kHz correlates in some cases with the motion artifact but it is not a good predictor of the motion artifact. From the results of this study, guidelines for improving electrode design regarding padding and pressure can be formulated as paddings are a necessary part of the system for reducing the motion artifact, and further, their effect maximises between 15 mmHg and 20 mmHg of

  15. Analysis of artifact and infrequent physiological uptake in 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianran; Zhao Chunlei; Qian Gennian; Chen Ziqian; Wang Kaitang; You Xueyu; Zheng Chunyu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the artifact and infrequent physiological uptake in PET/CT with its imaging and formation features. Methods: The data of PET/CT imaging were retrospectively analyzed and classified based on their cause. Besides, the infrequent physiological uptakes were also analyzed. Results: Artifacts could be classified into natural and technological causes. In natural causes, respiratory movement and high-density matters artifacts were frequently found, whereas in technological cause, the truncation, radioactive leakage and pollution commonly appeared. Infrequent physiological uptakes included uterine endometrium, breast and fat uptakes. Conclusions: The imaging features of artifact in PET can be divided into 'hot' or 'cold' area while infrequent physiological uptakes mainly are 'hot' area. Among the cause of artifact formation, CT-based attenuation corrected physical factor is the commonest. The infrequent physiological uptake somewhat relates to technological error. (authors)

  16. A Framework for the Assessment of Temporal Artifacts in Medium Frame-Rate Binary Video Halftones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Hamood-Ur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Display of a video having a higher number of bits per pixel than that available on the display device requires quantization prior to display. Video halftoning performs this quantization so as to reduce visibility of certain artifacts. In many cases, visibility of one set of artifacts is decreased at the expense of increasing the visibility of another set. In this paper, we focus on two key temporal artifacts, flicker and dirty-window-effect, in binary video halftones. We quantify the visibility of these two artifacts when the video halftone is displayed at medium frame rates (15 to 30 frames per second. We propose new video halftoning methods to reduce visibility of these artifacts. The proposed contributions are (1 an enhanced measure of perceived flicker, (2 a new measure of perceived dirty-window-effect, (3 a new video halftoning method to reduce flicker, and (4 a new video halftoning method to reduce dirty-window-effect.

  17. Artifacts, intentions, and contraceptives: the problem with having a plan B for plan B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Philip A

    2013-12-01

    It is commonly proposed that artifacts cannot be understood without reference to human intentions. This fact, I contend, has relevance to the use of artifacts in intentional action. I argue that because artifacts have intentions embedded into them antecedently, when we use artifacts we are sometimes compelled to intend descriptions of our actions that we might, for various reasons, be inclined to believe that we do not intend. I focus this argument to a specific set of artifacts, namely, medical devices, before considering an extended application to emergency contraceptive devices. Although there is some debate about whether emergency contraception has an abortifacient effect, I argue that if there is an abortifacient effect, then the effect cannot normally be a side effect of one's action.

  18. Filtration of human EEG recordings from physiological artifacts with empirical mode method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Khramova, Marina V.

    2017-03-01

    In the paper we propose the new method for dealing with noise and physiological artifacts in experimental human EEG recordings. The method is based on analysis of EEG signals with empirical mode decomposition (Hilbert-Huang transform). We consider noises and physiological artifacts on EEG as specific oscillatory patterns that cause problems during EEG analysis and can be detected with additional signals recorded simultaneously with EEG (ECG, EMG, EOG, etc.) We introduce the algorithm of the method with following steps: empirical mode decomposition of EEG signal, choosing of empirical modes with artifacts, removing empirical modes with artifacts, reconstruction of the initial EEG signal. We test the method on filtration of experimental human EEG signals from eye-moving artifacts and show high efficiency of the method.

  19. Renal streaky artifact during contrast-enhanced abdominal and pelvic CT: Comparison of high versus low osmolality contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Hong; Kim, Jong Chul; Lee, Chung Keun; Shin, Kyoung Suk

    1994-01-01

    Introduction of low osmolality contrast agent(LOCA) has allowed safer, more comfortable contrast-enhanced CT examination, but there has been significant increase in image degradation when evaluating the kidneys due to streaky artifact. The authors reviewed findings of contrast- enhanced abdominal and pelvic computed tomography(CT) to know the difference of renal streaky artifact between a high osmolality contrast agent (HOCA) and LOCA. This study included two hundred contrast-enhanced CT in 200 patients, 100 performed with HOCA(meglumine ioglicate, 150 ml) and 100 performed with LOCA (iopromide,150 ml). The severity of renal streaky artifact was compared between HOCA and LOCA groups. Of the scans performed with HOCA, 40 had no artifact, 52 had grade I artifact, 6 had grade II artifact, and 2 had grade III artifact. Of the scans preformed with LOCA, 23 had no artifact, 44 had grade I artifact, 29 had grade II artifact, and 4 had grade III artifact. There was significant difference in the degree of the streaky artifact depending upon the osmolality of the contrast media used(by χ 2 -test, P=.0001). The results of this study revealed a statistically significant increased incidence of artifacts and distortions of renal image with LOCA when compared with HOCA

  20. Image statistics and nonlinear artifacts in composed transmission x-ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerinckx, A.J.G.

    1979-01-01

    Knowledge of the image quality and image statistics in Computed Tomography (CT) images obtained with transmission x-ray CT scanners can increase the amount of clinically useful information that can be retrieved. Artifacts caused by nonlinear shadows are strongly object-dependent and are visible over larger areas of the image. No simple technique exists for their complete elimination. One source of artifacts in the first order statistics is the nonlinearities in the measured shadow or projection data used to reconstruct the image. One of the leading causes is the polychromaticity of the x-ray beam used in transmission CT scanners. Ways to improve the resulting image quality and techniques to extract additional information using dual energy scanning are discussed. A unique formalism consisting of a vector representation of the material dependence of the photon-tissue interactions is generalized to allow an in depth analysis. Poly-correction algorithms are compared using this analytic approach. Both quantum and detector electronic noise decrease the quality or information content of first order statistics. Preliminary results are presented using an heuristic adaptive nonlinear noise filter system for projection data. This filter system can be improved and/or modified to remove artifacts in both first and second order image statistics. Artifacts in the second order image statistics arise from the contribution of quantum noise. This can be described with a nonlinear detection equivalent model, similar to the model used to study artifacts in first order statistics. When analyzing these artifacts in second order statistics, one can divide them into linear artifacts, which do not present any problem of interpretation, and nonlinear artifacts, referred to as noise artifacts. A study of noise artifacts is presented together with a discussion of their relative importance in diagnostic radiology

  1. Metal artifact reduction in MRI-based cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuan James; Zoberi, Jacqueline E.; Kadbi, Mo; Grigsby, Perry W.; Cammin, Jochen; Mackey, Stacie L.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, S. Murty; Schwarz, Julie K.; Gach, H. Michael

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasingly important role in brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Yet, metal tandem, ovoid intracavitary applicators, and fiducial markers used in brachytherapy cause magnetic susceptibility artifacts in standard MRI. These artifacts may impact the accuracy of brachytherapy treatment and the evaluation of tumor response by misrepresenting the size and location of the metal implant, and distorting the surrounding anatomy and tissue. Metal artifact reduction sequences (MARS) with high bandwidth RF selective excitations and turbo spin-echo readouts were developed for MRI of orthopedic implants. In this study, metal artifact reduction was applied to brachytherapy of cervical cancer using the orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) sequence. O-MAR combined MARS features with view angle tilting and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) to minimize in-plane and through-plane susceptibility artifacts. O-MAR improved visualization of the tandem tip on T2 and proton density weighted (PDW) imaging in phantoms and accurately represented the diameter of the tandem. In a pilot group of cervical cancer patients (N  =  7), O-MAR significantly minimized the blooming artifact at the tip of the tandem in PDW MRI. There was no significant difference observed in artifact reduction between the weak (5 kHz, 7 z-phase encodes) and medium (10 kHz, 13 z-phase encodes) SEMAC settings. However, the weak setting allowed a significantly shorter acquisition time than the medium setting. O-MAR also reduced susceptibility artifacts associated with metal fiducial markers so that they appeared on MRI at their true dimensions.

  2. Signal processing methods for reducing artifacts in microelectrode brain recordings caused by functional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D; Willett, F; Memberg, W D; Murphy, B; Walter, B; Sweet, J; Miller, J; Hochberg, L R; Kirsch, R F; Ajiboye, A B

    2018-04-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a promising technology for restoring movement to paralyzed limbs. Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) have enabled intuitive control over virtual and robotic movements, and more recently over upper extremity FES neuroprostheses. However, electrical stimulation of muscles creates artifacts in intracortical microelectrode recordings that could degrade iBCI performance. Here, we investigate methods for reducing the cortically recorded artifacts that result from peripheral electrical stimulation. One participant in the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial had two intracortical microelectrode arrays placed in the motor cortex, and thirty-six stimulating intramuscular electrodes placed in the muscles of the contralateral limb. We characterized intracortically recorded electrical artifacts during both intramuscular and surface stimulation. We compared the performance of three artifact reduction methods: blanking, common average reference (CAR) and linear regression reference (LRR), which creates channel-specific reference signals, composed of weighted sums of other channels. Electrical artifacts resulting from surface stimulation were 175  ×  larger than baseline neural recordings (which were 110 µV peak-to-peak), while intramuscular stimulation artifacts were only 4  ×  larger. The artifact waveforms were highly consistent across electrodes within each array. Application of LRR reduced artifact magnitudes to less than 10 µV and largely preserved the original neural feature values used for decoding. Unmitigated stimulation artifacts decreased iBCI decoding performance, but performance was almost completely recovered using LRR, which outperformed CAR and blanking and extracted useful neural information during stimulation artifact periods. The LRR method was effective at reducing electrical artifacts resulting from both intramuscular and surface FES, and almost completely restored iBCI decoding

  3. Signal processing methods for reducing artifacts in microelectrode brain recordings caused by functional electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D.; Willett, F.; Memberg, W. D.; Murphy, B.; Walter, B.; Sweet, J.; Miller, J.; Hochberg, L. R.; Kirsch, R. F.; Ajiboye, A. B.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a promising technology for restoring movement to paralyzed limbs. Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) have enabled intuitive control over virtual and robotic movements, and more recently over upper extremity FES neuroprostheses. However, electrical stimulation of muscles creates artifacts in intracortical microelectrode recordings that could degrade iBCI performance. Here, we investigate methods for reducing the cortically recorded artifacts that result from peripheral electrical stimulation. Approach. One participant in the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial had two intracortical microelectrode arrays placed in the motor cortex, and thirty-six stimulating intramuscular electrodes placed in the muscles of the contralateral limb. We characterized intracortically recorded electrical artifacts during both intramuscular and surface stimulation. We compared the performance of three artifact reduction methods: blanking, common average reference (CAR) and linear regression reference (LRR), which creates channel-specific reference signals, composed of weighted sums of other channels. Main results. Electrical artifacts resulting from surface stimulation were 175  ×  larger than baseline neural recordings (which were 110 µV peak-to-peak), while intramuscular stimulation artifacts were only 4  ×  larger. The artifact waveforms were highly consistent across electrodes within each array. Application of LRR reduced artifact magnitudes to less than 10 µV and largely preserved the original neural feature values used for decoding. Unmitigated stimulation artifacts decreased iBCI decoding performance, but performance was almost completely recovered using LRR, which outperformed CAR and blanking and extracted useful neural information during stimulation artifact periods. Significance. The LRR method was effective at reducing electrical artifacts resulting from both intramuscular and surface FES, and

  4. Two Cassava Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP Transcription Factors (MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 Confer Disease Resistance against Cassava Bacterial Blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Basic domain-leucine zipper (bZIP transcription factor, one type of conserved gene family, plays an important role in plant development and stress responses. Although 77 MebZIPs have been genome-wide identified in cassava, their in vivo roles remain unknown. In this study, we analyzed the expression pattern and the function of two MebZIPs (MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 in response to pathogen infection. Gene expression analysis indicated that MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 were commonly regulated by flg22, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam, salicylic acid (SA, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Subcellular localization analysis showed that MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 are specifically located in cell nucleus. Through overexpression in tobacco, we found that MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 conferred improved disease resistance against cassava bacterial blight, with more callose depositions. On the contrary, MebZIP3- and MebZIP5-silenced plants by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS showed disease sensitive phenotype, lower transcript levels of defense-related genes and less callose depositions. Taken together, this study highlights the positive role of MebZIP3 and MebZIP5 in disease resistance against cassava bacterial blight for further utilization in genetic improvement of cassava disease resistance.

  5. Engineering of a novel zipFv using leucine zipper motif against rabies virus glycoprotein G with improved protection potency in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hualong; Zhang, Kaixin; Yin, Yanchun; Gu, Tiejun; Sun, Qing; Li, Zhuang; Cheng, Yue; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2017-06-01

    Rabies is an acute zoonotic infectious disease with a high fatality rate but is preventable with vaccination and rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). The single-chain Fv fragment (scFv), a small engineered antigen-binding protein derived from antibody variable heavy (V H ) and light (V L ) chains connected by a peptide linker, can potentially be used to replace RIG. Here, we produced two peptides V H -JUN-HIS and V L -FOS-HA separately in Escherichia coli and assembled them to form zipFv successfully in vitro. The new zipFv utilizes FOS and JUN leucine zippers to form an antibody structure similar to the IgG counterpart with two free N-terminal ends of V H and V L . The zipFv protein showed notable improvement in binding ability and affinity over its corresponding scFv. The zipFv also demonstrated greater stability in serum and the same protective rate as RIG against challenge with a standard rabies virus (CVS-24) in mice. Our results indicated zipFv as a novel and efficient antibody form with enhanced neutralizing potency. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Glutamine rich and basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) domains stabilize cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Bernhard M; Guzman, Ernesto; Montminy, Marc

    2005-04-15

    We have examined the dynamics of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding to chromatin in live cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). CREB was found to bind to target sites with a residence time of 100 s, and exposure to a cAMP agonist had no effect on these kinetics. In addition to the basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) domain, a glutamine-rich trans-activation domain in CREB called Q2 also appeared to be critical for promoter occupancy. Indeed, mutations in Q2 that reduced residence time by FRAP assay disrupted target gene activation via CREB in cells exposed to a cAMP agonist. Notably, insertion of the glutamine-rich B trans-activation domain of SP1 into a mutant CREB polypeptide lacking Q2 stabilized CREB occupancy and rescued target gene activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which the family of glutamine-rich activators promotes cellular gene expression.

  7. Buildings as Artifacts: Heritage, Patriotism, and the Constructed Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Marie Barry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Architectural collections or reconstructed villages are popular tourist attractions in Europe and the United States, often promoting architecture as a demonstration of national and regional heritages. At times, these sites betray the biases of their creators, perpetuated through methods of display and their public interpretation. The architecture can be used as artifact or backdrop to promote ethics, history, or industry at the hand of curators, particularly when removed from its original context and constructed in a new one. When viewed through the lens of tourism, the collections become a constructed landscape of architectural heritage, experienced by visitors through a narrow understanding of time and place, propagated by fabricated historical connections or purposeful nationalist arrangements. Often accessorizing ‘authentic’ architectural heritage with reconstructions and reproductions, these collections suggest a skewed heritage landscape to the non-specialized visitor, emphasizing tourism over truth and entertainment over education. Following 19th century examples in Scandinavia and the broader introduction of international architecture through the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, early 20th century American collections at Greenfield Village and the Manitou Cliff Dwellings underscore the intent to capitalize on architectural heritage tourism, and how a diluted history is interpreted through the eyes of the modern tourist.

  8. Improved field-mapping and artifact correction in multispectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Brady; Shi, Xinwei; Weber, Hans; Hargreaves, Brian A

    2017-11-01

    To develop a method for improved B 0 field-map estimation, deblurring, and image combination for multispectral imaging near metal. A goodness-of-fit field-map estimation technique is proposed that uses only the multispectral imaging (MSI) data to estimate the field map. Using the improved field map, a novel deblurring technique is proposed that also employs a new image combination scheme to reduce the effects of noise and other residual MSI artifacts. The proposed field-map estimation and deblurring techniques are compared to the current methods in phantoms and/or in vivo from subjects with knee, hip, and spinal metallic implants. Phantom experiments validate that the goodness-of-fit field-map estimation is less sensitive to noise and bias than the conventional center-of-mass technique, which reduces distortion in the deblurring methods. The new deblurring approach also is substantially less sensitive to noise and distortion than the current deblurring method, as demonstrated in phantoms and in vivo, and is able to find a good tradeoff between deblurring and distortion. The proposed methods not only enable field-mapping with reduced noise sensitivity but are able to create deblurred images with less distortion and better signal-to-noise ratio with no additional scan time, thereby enabling improved visualization of underlying anatomy near metallic implants. Magn Reson Med 78:2022-2034, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Automatic detection of artifacts in converted S3D video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokov, Alexander; Vatolin, Dmitriy; Zachesov, Anton; Belous, Alexander; Erofeev, Mikhail

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present algorithms for automatically detecting issues specific to converted S3D content. When a depth-image-based rendering approach produces a stereoscopic image, the quality of the result depends on both the depth maps and the warping algorithms. The most common problem with converted S3D video is edge-sharpness mismatch. This artifact may appear owing to depth-map blurriness at semitransparent edges: after warping, the object boundary becomes sharper in one view and blurrier in the other, yielding binocular rivalry. To detect this problem we estimate the disparity map, extract boundaries with noticeable differences, and analyze edge-sharpness correspondence between views. We pay additional attention to cases involving a complex background and large occlusions. Another problem is detection of scenes that lack depth volume: we present algorithms for detecting at scenes and scenes with at foreground objects. To identify these problems we analyze the features of the RGB image as well as uniform areas in the depth map. Testing of our algorithms involved examining 10 Blu-ray 3D releases with converted S3D content, including Clash of the Titans, The Avengers, and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. The algorithms we present enable improved automatic quality assessment during the production stage.

  10. High temperature viscoplastic ratchetting: Material response or modeling artifact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    Ratchetting, the net accumulation of strain over a loading cycle, is a deformation mechanism that leads to distortions in shape, often resulting in a loss of function that culminates in structural failure. Viscoplastic ratchetting is prevalent at high homologous temperatures where viscous characteristics are prominent in material response. This deformation mechanism is accentuated by the presence of a mean stress; a consequence of interaction between thermal gradients and structural constraints. Favorable conditions for viscoplastic ratchetting exist in the Stirling engines being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) for space and terrestrial power applications. To assess the potential for ratchetting and its effect on durability of high temperature structures requires a viscoplastic analysis of the design. But ratchetting is a very difficult phenomenon to accurately model. One must therefore ask whether the results from such an analysis are indicative of actual material behavior, or if they are artifacts of the theory being used in the analysis. There are several subtle aspects in a viscoplastic model that must be dealt with in order to accurately model ratchetting behavior, and therefore obtain meaningful predictions from it. In this paper, some of these subtlties and the necessary ratchet experiments needed to obtain an accurate viscoplastic representation of a material are discussed

  11. Solvent selection for fatty acid residue analysis of archeologicial artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosentreter Jeffrey J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Residue analysis has rapidly become one of the most useful techniques for determining an artifact function and revealing insight into paleodiets. The success of analytical residue analysis often lies with the first preparatory step, where the residue is extracted from the object. Detection of a residue requires effective solvation of the material, and there is a large range of potential solvents. One purpose of this study is to determine the efficiency of various solvents for the extraction of fatty acids from charcoal, a material that is ubiquitous, easily identified, remarkably stable in the archaeological record but, most importantly for this research, retains fats extremely well. This investigation examines the removal efficiency of model fatty acids from carbonized wood samples. The strong affinity of lipids to charcoal makes carbonized wood ideal for retaining them, but also makes their extraction extremely challenging and thus an ideal benchmark for solvent extraction characterization. Several solvents (benzene, chloroform, hexane, methanol and water are used to determine the quantitative extraction efficiency of tripalmitin. While benzene and chloroform perform best for some wood types, neither solvent is better for all carbonized wood. Correlations between the chemical properties of the solvents and the effectiveness of the extraction provide guidance for solvents. Findings indicate solvent characteristics including dipole moment, dielectric constant, hydrogen bonding, and molecular weight all play an important role in extraction of fat from a charcoal matrix. Results presented should provide guidelines to allow for more effective residue extration and more accurate lipid analysis.

  12. Choice in experiential learning: True preferences or experimental artifacts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Nathaniel J S; Konstantinidis, Emmanouil; Yechiam, Eldad

    2017-03-01

    The rate of selecting different options in the decisions-from-feedback paradigm is commonly used to measure preferences resulting from experiential learning. While convergence to a single option increases with experience, some variance in choice remains even when options are static and offer fixed rewards. Employing a decisions-from-feedback paradigm followed by a policy-setting task, we examined whether the observed variance in choice is driven by factors related to the paradigm itself: Continued exploration (e.g., believing options are non-stationary) or exploitation of perceived outcome patterns (i.e., a belief that sequential choices are not independent). Across two studies, participants showed variance in their choices, which was related (i.e., proportional) to the policies they set. In addition, in Study 2, participants' reported under-confidence was associated with the amount of choice variance in later choices and policies. These results suggest that variance in choice is better explained by participants lacking confidence in knowing which option is better, rather than methodological artifacts (i.e., exploration or failures to recognize outcome independence). As such, the current studies provide evidence for the decisions-from-feedback paradigm's validity as a behavioral research method for assessing learned preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A level set method for cupping artifact correction in cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Shipeng; Li, Haibo; Ge, Qi [College of Telecommunications and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210003 (China); Li, Chunming, E-mail: li-chunming@hotmail.com [School of Electronic Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu, Sichuan 611731 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To reduce cupping artifacts and improve the contrast-to-noise ratio in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: A level set method is proposed to reduce cupping artifacts in the reconstructed image of CBCT. The authors derive a local intensity clustering property of the CBCT image and define a local clustering criterion function of the image intensities in a neighborhood of each point. This criterion function defines an energy in terms of the level set functions, which represent a segmentation result and the cupping artifacts. The cupping artifacts are estimated as a result of minimizing this energy. Results: The cupping artifacts in CBCT are reduced by an average of 90%. The results indicate that the level set-based algorithm is practical and effective for reducing the cupping artifacts and preserving the quality of the reconstructed image. Conclusions: The proposed method focuses on the reconstructed image without requiring any additional physical equipment, is easily implemented, and provides cupping correction through a single-scan acquisition. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully reduces the cupping artifacts.

  14. A semi-simulated EEG/EOG dataset for the comparison of EOG artifact rejection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klados, Manousos A; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-09-01

    Artifact rejection techniques are used to recover the brain signals underlying artifactual electroencephalographic (EEG) segments. Although over the last few years many different artifact rejection techniques have been proposed (http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/JSEN.2011.2115236[1], http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2006.09.003[2], http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/e16126553[3]), none has been established as a gold standard so far, because assessing their performance is difficult and subjective (http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ITAB.2009.5394295[4], http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bspc.2011.02.001[5], http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-89208-3_300. [6]). This limitation is mainly based on the fact that the underlying artifact-free brain signal is unknown, so there is no objective way to measure how close the retrieved signal is to the real one. This article solves the aforementioned problem by presenting a semi-simulated EEG dataset, where artifact-free EEG signals are manually contaminated with ocular artifacts, using a realistic head model. The significant part of this dataset is that it contains the pre-contamination EEG signals, so the brain signals underlying the EOG artifacts are known and thus the performance of every artifact rejection technique can be objectively assessed.

  15. [Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging artifacts of five common dental materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yisheng; Yu, Risheng

    2015-06-01

    To compare five materials commonly used in dentistry, including three types of metals and two types of ceramics, by using different sequences of three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strengths (0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T). Three types of metals and two types of ceramics that were fabricated into the same size and thickness as an incisor crown were placed in a plastic tank filled with saline. The crowns were scanned using an magnetic resonance (MR) machine at 0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T field strengths. The TlWI and T2WI images were obtained. The differences of various materials in different artifacts of field MR scans were determined. The zirconia crown presented no significant artifacts when scanned under the three types of MRI field strengths. The artifacts of casting ceramic were minimal. All dental precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain, and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy showed varying degrees of artifacts under the three MRI field strengths. Zirconia and casting ceramics present almost no or faint artifacts. By contrast, precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy display MRI artifacts. The artifact area increase with increasing magnetic field.

  16. Methods for artifact detection and removal from scalp EEG: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Kafiul; Rastegarnia, Amir; Yang, Zhi

    2016-11-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is the most popular brain activity recording technique used in wide range of applications. One of the commonly faced problems in EEG recordings is the presence of artifacts that come from sources other than brain and contaminate the acquired signals significantly. Therefore, much research over the past 15 years has focused on identifying ways for handling such artifacts in the preprocessing stage. However, this is still an active area of research as no single existing artifact detection/removal method is complete or universal. This article presents an extensive review of the existing state-of-the-art artifact detection and removal methods from scalp EEG for all potential EEG-based applications and analyses the pros and cons of each method. First, a general overview of the different artifact types that are found in scalp EEG and their effect on particular applications are presented. In addition, the methods are compared based on their ability to remove certain types of artifacts and their suitability in relevant applications (only functional comparison is provided not performance evaluation of methods). Finally, the future direction and expected challenges of current research is discussed. Therefore, this review is expected to be helpful for interested researchers who will develop and/or apply artifact handling algorithm/technique in future for their applications as well as for those willing to improve the existing algorithms or propose a new solution in this particular area of research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative assessment of an MR technique for reducing metal artifact: application to spin-echo imaging in a phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.J.; Janzen, D.L.; Munk, P.L.; McGowen, A.; MacKay, A.; Xiang, Q.S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To quantify image artifact reduction using a new technique (MARS - metal artifact reduction sequence) in vitro.Design. Coronal T1-weighted MR images were obtained through two metal phantoms (titanium/chromium-cobalt and stainless steel femoral prostheses) immersed in water. Comparison of artifact volume was made with images obtained using conventional and modified (MARS) T1-weighted sequences. Signal intensity values outside a range of ±40% the average signal intensity for water were considered artifact and segmented into low or high signal artifact categories. Considering the arbitrary selection of this threshold value, volumetric calculations of artifact were also evaluated at ±50%, 60%, 70%, and 80% the mean signal for water.Results. Conventional T1-weighted images produced 87% more low signal artifact and 212% more high signal artifact compared with the MARS modified T1-weighted images of the stainless steel prosthesis. Conventional T1-weighted images of the titanium prosthesis produced 84% more low signal artifact and 211% more high signal artifact than the MARS modified sequence. The level of artifact reduction was essentially uniform for the various threshold levels tested and was greatest at ±20% the global signal intensity average for water.Conclusion. The MARS technique reduces the volume of image signal artifact produced by stainless steel and titanium/chromium-cobalt femoral prostheses on T1-weighted spin-echo images in a tissue phantom model. (orig.)

  18. Quantification of MRI visibility and artifacts at 3T of liquid fiducial marker in a pancreas tissue-mimicking phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Sergej; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Troost, Esther Gera Cornelia

    2018-01-01

    marker with volumes of 25-100 mu L showing no correlation with the magnitude of artifact. The solid markers showed a strong nonlinear correlation between magnitude of visibility and artifact, whereas the solid marker consisting of a gold-iron alloy induced the strongest artifacts.Conclusion: The liquid...

  19. Projection-based metal-artifact reduction for industrial 3D X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhanov, Artem; Heinzl, Christoph; Reiter, Michael; Kastner, Johann; Gröller, M Eduard

    2011-12-01

    Multi-material components, which contain metal parts surrounded by plastic materials, are highly interesting for inspection using industrial 3D X-ray computed tomography (3DXCT). Examples of this application scenario are connectors or housings with metal inlays in the electronic or automotive industry. A major problem of this type of components is the presence of metal, which causes streaking artifacts and distorts the surrounding media in the reconstructed volume. Streaking artifacts and dark-band artifacts around metal components significantly influence the material characterization (especially for the plastic components). In specific cases these artifacts even prevent a further analysis. Due to the nature and the different characteristics of artifacts, the development of an efficient artifact-reduction technique in reconstruction-space is rather complicated. In this paper we present a projection-space pipeline for metal-artifacts reduction. The proposed technique first segments the metal in the spatial domain of the reconstructed volume in order to separate it from the other materials. Then metal parts are forward-projected on the set of projections in a way that metal-projection regions are treated as voids. Subsequently the voids, which are left by the removed metal, are interpolated in the 2D projections. Finally, the metal is inserted back into the reconstructed 3D volume during the fusion stage. We present a visual analysis tool, allowing for interactive parameter estimation of the metal segmentation. The results of the proposed artifact-reduction technique are demonstrated on a test part as well as on real world components. For these specimens we achieve a significant reduction of metal artifacts, allowing an enhanced material characterization. © 2010 IEEE

  20. Enhanced detection of artifacts in EEG data using higher-order statistics and independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Arnaud; Sejnowski, Terrence; Makeig, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Detecting artifacts produced in EEG data by muscle activity, eye blinks and electrical noise is a common and important problem in EEG research. It is now widely accepted that independent component analysis (ICA) may be a useful tool for isolating artifacts and/or cortical processes from electroencephalographic (EEG) data. We present results of simulations demonstrating that ICA decomposition, here tested using three popular ICA algorithms Infomax, SOBI, and FastICA, can allow more sensitive automated detection of small non-brain artifacts than applying the same detection methods directly to the scalp channel data. We tested the upper bound performance of five methods for detecting various types of artifacts by separately optimizing and then applying them to artifact-free EEG data into which we had added simulated artifacts of several types, ranging in size from thirty times smaller (−50 dB) to the size of the EEG data themselves (0 dB). Of the methods tested, those involving spectral thresholding were most sensitive. Except for muscle artifact detection where we found no gain of using ICA, all methods proved more sensitive when applied to the ICA-decomposed data than applied to the raw scalp data: the mean performance for ICA was higher and situated at about two standard deviations away from the performance distribution obtained on raw data. We note that ICA decomposition also allows simple subtraction of artifacts accounted for by single independent components, and/or separate and direct examination of the decomposed non-artifact processes themselves. PMID:17188898

  1. Spurious structures created by interpolation-based CT metal artifact reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J.; Buzug, T. M.

    2009-02-01

    Under normal circumstances the quality of images reconstructed with the classic FBP CT reconstruction algorithm is adequate for medical diagnosis. However, in some special cases the assumptions made by this method are not applicable because of non-linearities in the underlying physical imaging processes. Especially in the presence of metal implants in the field of view, effects like beam hardening, scatter and photon starvation result in serious streaking and banding artifacts around and between these objects. In order to reduce the artifacts, several different types of correction methods were introduced during the last two decades. In one of the most often used approaches, an interpolation scheme is used to replace all corrupted beam data in the shadow of the metal with artificially generated values. Although this leads to a reduction of the most severe artifacts, typically the results are far from being perfect. Instead of removing all artifacts, in most cases new streak artifacts are introduced. In the present work it is shown that the origin of these new artifacts is related to the loss of edge information of the objects by using surrogate data. The application of a more sophisticated artifact reduction method based on a segmentation of a preliminary reconstructed image decreases the number of newly introduced artifacts to a large degree. This is possible, because edge information between air and tissue recovered from the preliminary reconstruction can be included into the correction scheme. It is concluded that a restoration scheme without additionally information is not sufficient for a successful metal artifact reduction method.

  2. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  3. Image-based metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography utilizing local anatomical similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xue; Yang, Xiaofeng; Rosenfield, Jonathan; Elder, Eric; Dhabaan, Anees

    2017-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used in radiation therapy treatment planning in recent years. However, metal implants such as dental fillings and hip prostheses can cause severe bright and dark streaking artifacts in reconstructed CT images. These artifacts decrease image contrast and degrade HU accuracy, leading to inaccuracies in target delineation and dose calculation. In this work, a metal artifact reduction method is proposed based on the intrinsic anatomical similarity between neighboring CT slices. Neighboring CT slices from the same patient exhibit similar anatomical features. Exploiting this anatomical similarity, a gamma map is calculated as a weighted summation of relative HU error and distance error for each pixel in an artifact-corrupted CT image relative to a neighboring, artifactfree image. The minimum value in the gamma map for each pixel is used to identify an appropriate pixel from the artifact-free CT slice to replace the corresponding artifact-corrupted pixel. With the proposed method, the mean CT HU error was reduced from 360 HU and 460 HU to 24 HU and 34 HU on head and pelvis CT images, respectively. Dose calculation accuracy also improved, as the dose difference was reduced from greater than 20% to less than 4%. Using 3%/3mm criteria, the gamma analysis failure rate was reduced from 23.25% to 0.02%. An image-based metal artifact reduction method is proposed that replaces corrupted image pixels with pixels from neighboring CT slices free of metal artifacts. This method is shown to be capable of suppressing streaking artifacts, thereby improving HU and dose calculation accuracy.

  4. Characterization of Aortic Valve Closure Artifact During Outflow Tract Mapping: Correlation With Hemodynamics and Mechanical Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Ajijola, Olujimi; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Tung, Roderick

    2017-06-01

    Premature ventricular contractions originating in the left ventricle outflow tract represent a significant subgroup of patients referred for catheter ablation. Mechanical artifacts from aortic valve leaflet motion may be observed during mapping, although the incidence and characteristics have not been reported. Twenty-eight consecutive patients with left ventricle outflow tract premature ventricular contraction were included. Electric signals recorded on the ablation catheter not coincident with atrial or ventricular depolarization were analyzed on the recording system. Correlation with invasive hemodynamic aortic pressure tracings was performed. Additionally, 4 patients with mechanical aortic valves, who underwent scar-related ventricular tachycardia ablation, were analyzed to correlate the timing of the observed artifacts with native aortic valves. Aortic valve artifact was observed while mapping within the coronary cusps in 11 patients (39%; 73% men; age, 41±25 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 49±16%) with high incidence from the left coronary cusp. This artifact was consistently observed with timing coincident with the terminal portion of the T wave. The average interval between the end of the T wave and the aortic valve artifact was 19±37 ms. The duration of the aortic valve artifact was 39±8 ms with amplitude of 0.12±0.07 mV (range, 0.06-0.36 mV). In patients referred for left ventricle outflow tract premature ventricular contraction ablation, an aortic valve closure artifact is observed in up to one third of cases during mapping within the aortic cusps. The timing of this artifact correlates with invasive hemodynamics and mechanical aortic valve artifacts. Recognition of this physiological phenomenon is useful when assigning near-field activation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. A dialectical take on artifact ecologies and the physical - digital divide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    In this position paper, we will present and discuss our understanding of artifact ecologies as we have developed it, rooted in activity theoretical HCI and dialectical thinking . Our basis is in the Human-Artifact Model, as well as well as cases where we have worked with artifact ecologies in ana...... in analysis and design of computer mediated activity. The paper concludes with a positioning of our perspective vis-a-vis the notions of natural and blended interaction and the physical-digital divide...

  6. I Am My Identity Kit : using Artifact Data in Research on Identity

    OpenAIRE

    LeCompte, Margaret D.

    2007-01-01

    Este texto se presentó como comunicación al II Congreso Internacional de Etnografía y Educación: Migraciones y Ciudadanías. Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, 5-8 Septiembre 2008. This presentation addresses how to collect and analyze artifacts in ethnographic and qualitative research, and the value of using artifacts in research which seeks to describe and interpret the identities that research participants construct. We believe that artifacts can be very useful in such researc...

  7. Ancient Artifacts vs. Digital Artifacts: New Tools for Unmasking the Sale of Illicit Antiquities on the Dark Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie A. Paul

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS, also known as Daesh and ISIL in 2014, antiquities have been a widely publicized source of funding for what has become one of the most technologically savvy terrorist organizations of the modern era. The globalization of technology and rise of popularity in cryptocurrencies has changed the face of black-market trade and the actors that carry out these crimes. While art and antiquities have long served as a market with susceptibilities to laundering, the emergence of Dark Web markets, identification-masking software, and untraceable cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin have opened new doors to potential vulnerabilities. The anonymity that is offered by these technologies acts as a roadblock for authorities, while attracting the likes of terrorists and transnational criminals. Investigative research using cyber security platforms to identify digital artifacts connected to potential traffickers provides the opportunity to unmask the seemingly untraceable actors behind these activities. The evidence of illicit antiquities trafficking on the Dark Web displayed in this article can generate a new discussion on how and where to study black-market antiquities to gain needed insight into combating the illicit trade online and the transnational criminal groups it may finance.

  8. SU-F-J-74: High Z Geometric Integrity and Beam Hardening Artifact Assessment Using a Retrospective Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) Reconstruction Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K; DiCostanzo, D; Gupta, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the efficacy of a retrospective metal artifact reduction (MAR) reconstruction algorithm for a commercial computed tomography (CT) scanner for radiation therapy purposes. Methods: High Z geometric integrity and artifact reduction analysis was performed with three phantoms using General Electric’s (GE) Discovery CT. The three phantoms included: a Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS) electron density phantom (Model 062) with a 6.5 mm diameter titanium rod insert, a custom spine phantom using Synthes Spine hardware submerged in water, and a dental phantom with various high Z fillings submerged in water. Each phantom was reconstructed using MAR and compared against the original scan. Furthermore, each scenario was tested using standard and extended Hounsfield Unit (HU) ranges. High Z geometric integrity was performed using the CIRS phantom, while the artifact reduction was performed using all three phantoms. Results: Geometric integrity of the 6.5 mm diameter rod was slightly overestimated for non-MAR scans for both standard and extended HU. With MAR reconstruction, the rod was underestimated for both standard and extended HU. For artifact reduction, the mean and standard deviation was compared in a volume of interest (VOI) in the surrounding material (water and water equivalent material, ∼0HU). Overall, the mean value of the VOI was closer to 0 HU for the MAR reconstruction compared to the non-MAR scan for most phantoms. Additionally, the standard deviations for all phantoms were greatly reduced using MAR reconstruction. Conclusion: GE’s MAR reconstruction algorithm improves image quality with the presence of high Z material with minimal degradation of its geometric integrity. High Z delineation can be carried out with proper contouring techniques. The effects of beam hardening artifacts are greatly reduced with MAR reconstruction. Tissue corrections due to these artifacts can be eliminated for simple high Z geometries and greatly

  9. Color dissociation artifacts in double Maddox rod cyclodeviation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, K; Arnoldi, K; Brown, M H

    1994-12-01

    The double Maddox rod test, based on a red Maddox rod in front of one eye and a clear Maddox rod in front of the other, is used to measure cyclodeviation, typically in patients with superior oblique muscle pareses. Discrepant results between the double Maddox rod test and other torsion measures, and reports of "paradoxic" cyclodeviation in the normal eye of some patients with superior oblique paresis, suggest the two-color format of the double Maddox rod test may produce artifactual torsion measures. Forty patients with superior oblique paresis were tested twice using the double Maddox rod test, reversing the red and white Maddox rods between eyes for the second test, and 18 were tested further with same-color red or clear Maddox rods in front of both eyes. With the standard double Maddox rod test, 33 (83%) of 40 patients localized their cyclodeviation to the eye viewing through the red Maddox rod, irrespective of laterality of the paresis or fixation preference. In all 33 patients, laterality of the perceived torsion changed between eyes when testing was repeated with red and white Maddox rods interchanged between eyes. With same-color Maddox rods before both eyes, 17 (94%) of 18 patients localized extorsion to the paretic eye. There was 7.6:1 ratio of luminance transmission and a 1.6:1 ratio of grating spatial frequency bandpass in the plano meridian between the clear and red Maddox rods, which appear to be responsible for the double Maddox rod test artifact. The traditional double Maddox rod test may produce artifactual cyclodeviation measurements. An alternative version of the test, based on same-color Maddox rods in front of both eyes, is proposed. The relatively high spatial frequency bandpass characteristics of the plano meridian of the Maddox rod (as high as 20/25 Snellen equivalent resolution through the clear Maddox rod) also suggests double Maddox rod testing should be conducted in a dark room to avoid biases from visual environment cues.

  10. Anticoagulant Effect of Sugammadex: Just an In Vitro Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmann, Daniel; Britten, Martin W; Pauling, Henning; Weidle, Juliane; Volbracht, Lothar; Görlinger, Klaus; Peters, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Sugammadex prolongs activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) suggestive of anticoagulant effects. To pinpoint its presumed anticoagulant site of action, the authors assessed Sugammadex's impact on a panel of coagulation assays. Sugammadex, Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, or saline were added to blood samples from healthy volunteers and analyzed using plasmatic (i.e., aPTT, thrombin time, and fibrinogen concentration) (n = 8 each), PT (quick), activities of plasmatic coagulation factors, and whole blood (extrinsically and intrinsically activated thromboelastometry) assays (n = 18 each). Furthermore, dose-dependent effects of Sugammadex were also assessed (n = 18 each) in diluted Russel viper venom time (DRVVT) assays with low (DRVVT1) and high (DRVVT2) phospholipid concentrations and in a highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assay. Sugammadex increased PT (+9.1%; P IX, XI, and XII decreased (-7%, P = 0.009; -7.8%, P < 0.0001; -6.9%, P < 0.0001; and -4.3%, P = 0.011, respectively). Sugammadex dose-dependently prolonged both DRVVT1 and the highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assays, but additional phospholipids in the DRVVT2 assay almost abolished these prolongations. Thrombin time, a thromboelastometric thrombin generation assay, clot firmness, clot lysis, fibrinogen concentration, and activities of other coagulation factors were unaltered. Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, and saline exerted no effects. Sugammadex significantly affects various coagulation assays, but this is explainable by an apparent phospholipid-binding effect, suggesting that Sugammadex`s anticoagulant effects are likely an in vitro artifact.

  11. Automated Artifact Rejection for Transient Identification in WFC3 IR Image Subtractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Kyle; Boone, Kyle; Hayden, Brian; Aldering, Greg Scott; Perlmutter, Saul; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2016-01-01

    We describe a set of features for identifying z>1 supernovae in reference-subtracted HST WFC3 IR images produced by the Supernova Cosmology Project's pipeline for the "See Change" project. These features, in combination with a random forest classifier, yield an effective system for automatically discriminating between supernovae and image artifacts produced by the instrumentation and the image processing procedure. When k-fold cross-validation is performed using a set of 30,000 artifacts and 10,000 synthetic supernovae, the classifier gives an efficiency comparable to that of a human scanner, correctly identifying 97 percent of the synthetic supernovae while rejecting 95 percent of the artifacts. This software will allow for less labor-intensive transient search procedures by automatically rejecting artifacts that would otherwise require human review.

  12. Standardization and Correction of Artifacts in Atom-Probe Tomographic Analysis of Allende Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. B.; Isheim, D.; Moutanabbir, O.; Floss, C.; Seidman, D. N.

    2015-07-01

    We use complementary atom-probe tomography and secondary ion mass spectrometry to measure the 12C/13C isotopic ratios of meteoritic nanodiamonds and thus determine their origins. We are investigating and quantifying instrumental artifacts.

  13. The use of chitosan in protecting wooden artifacts from damage by mold fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab El-Gamal

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The growth of fungi on the treated wood samples decreased with increasing the concentration of chitosan. Hence, it was demonstrated that chitosan prevented fungal growth, and its use could be recommended for the protection of archeological wooden artifacts.

  14. Do Martian Blueberries Have Pits? -- Artifacts of an Early Wet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, L.

    2005-03-01

    Early Martian weather cycles would have supported organic chemical self-organization, the assumed predecessor to an independent "origin" of Martian life. Artifacts of these processes are discussed, including the possibility that Martian blueberries nucleated around organic cores.

  15. Muscle artifact suppression using independent-component analysis and state-space modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán-Guzmán, Alina; Heute, Ulrich; Stephani, Ulrich; Galka, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we aim at suppressing the muscle artifacts present in electroencephalographic (EEG) signals with a technique based on a combination of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and State-Space Modeling (SSM). The novel algorithm uses ICA to provide an initial model for SSM which is further optimized by the maximum-likelihood approach. This model is fitted to artifact-free data. Then it is applied to data with muscle artifacts. The state space is augmented by extracting additional components from the data prediction errors. The muscle artifacts are well separated in the additional components and, hence, a suppression of them can be performed. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by application to a clinical epilepsy EEG data set.

  16. Archaeology Through Computational Linguistics: Inscription Statistics Predict Excavation Sites of Indus Valley Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Gabriel L; Louwerse, Max M

    2016-11-01

    Computational techniques comparing co-occurrences of city names in texts allow the relative longitudes and latitudes of cities to be estimated algorithmically. However, these techniques have not been applied to estimate the provenance of artifacts with unknown origins. Here, we estimate the geographic origin of artifacts from the Indus Valley Civilization, applying methods commonly used in cognitive science to the Indus script. We show that these methods can accurately predict the relative locations of archeological sites on the basis of artifacts of known provenance, and we further apply these techniques to determine the most probable excavation sites of four sealings of unknown provenance. These findings suggest that inscription statistics reflect historical interactions among locations in the Indus Valley region, and they illustrate how computational methods can help localize inscribed archeological artifacts of unknown origin. The success of this method offers opportunities for the cognitive sciences in general and for computational anthropology specifically. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  17. Mineral raw materials used in the archaeological artifacts in Guayacas - Dayman - Paysandu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdepont, I.; Del Puerto, L.; Castineira, C.; Pineiro, G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is about the election, exploitation and modes of supply mineral raw resources used in the manufacturing of lithic and ceramic archaeological artifacts in Guayacas - Dayman - Paysandu

  18. Mitigation of Selected Hanford Site Manhattan Project and Cold War Era Artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Harvey, David W.

    2006-01-01

    This document is the first time that Manhattan Project and Cold War era artifacts from the Hanford Site have been assembled within a publication. The publication presents photographic and written documentation of a number of Manhattan Project and Cold War era artifacts that were identified and tagged during assessment walk throughs of historic buildings on the Hanford Site but which could not be curated within the Hanford collection because they were too large for long-term storage and/or exhibit purposes or were radiologically contaminated. The significance of the artifacts in this publication and a proposed future appendix is based not on the individual significance of any single artifact but on their collective contribution to the science and engineering of creating plutonium and advancing nuclear technology in nuclear fuel and power.

  19. Are Movement Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging a Real Problem?—A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Havsteen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Movement artifacts compromise image quality and may interfere with interpretation, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI applications with low signal-to-noise ratio such as functional MRI or diffusion tensor imaging, and when imaging small lesions. High image resolution has high sensitivity to motion artifacts and often prolongs scan time that again aggravates movement artifacts. During the scan fast imaging techniques and sequences, optimal receiver coils, careful patient positioning, and instruction may minimize movement artifacts. Physiological noise sources are motion from respiration, flow and pulse coupled to cardiac cycles, from the swallowing reflex and small spontaneous head movements. Par example, in resting-state functional MRI spontaneous neuronal activity adds 1–2% of signal change, even under optimal conditions signal contributions from physiological noise remain a considerable fraction hereof. Movement tracking during imaging may allow for prospective correction or postprocessing steps separating signal and noise.

  20. Experimental study on metal artifacts caused by dental materials in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitani, Tomio; Yotsui, Yoritaka; Koseki, Yonoshin

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed metallic artifacts in magnetic resonance images (MRI) caused by 14 dental crowns made of NiCr alloy. Three MRI sequences (fast spin echo (FSE)-3D, FSE-2D and spin echo (SE)-2D) were taken of anterior and posterior cast crowns combined in various arrangements. We observed the shape and volume of the resulting metallic artifacts using multi-planer and three-dimensional reconstructions from the slice data. The metallic artifacts were divided into three signal intensities: high, intermediate and low. The shape of the crown, which was in the center of the artifact, could be detected in the area of low signal intensity. An area of high signal intensity existed only in the frequency direction of the metallic crowns in the slice data. An area of intermediate signal intensity extended widely vertically and horizontally. The high signal intensity area increased in volume as the number of crowns increased. (author)

  1. An evaluation on magnetic resonance imaging of the metallic artifacts, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikumoto, Yoshiaki; Tomura, Kiminori

    1990-01-01

    This report evaluates a variety of dental materials with respect to MR imaging artifacts in vitro. The increasing use of MR imaging as a clinical method necessitates a study of artifacts that may appear on these images. A wide variety of metallic materials are used in the dentistry and some can potentially cause distortion of MR images. MR imaging was performed using a superconductive magnetom of 1.5 Tesra (Magnetom; Simens). Imaging was obtained with the use of a single 4-mm thick slice two-dimensional Fourier transform rapid technique. Pulse sequence was obtained by Flash method at flip angle=90, echo delay (TE)=10 ms, repetition time (TR)=400 ms. The following results were obtained; Titanium, gold and high nickel content dental materials produced no discernible artifacts. Stainless steel alloys caused major imaging artifacts. (author)

  2. A program to compute geographical positions of underwater artifact based on linear measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ganesan, P.

    While carrying out underwater positioning in shallow waters, the Diver Archaeologists measure lengths and bearings from a base line of the well-established control network to each and every corner of the artifact. A program in Basic language...

  3. Mitigation of Selected Hanford Site Manhattan Project and Cold War Era Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Ellen P.; Harvey, David W.

    2006-09-08

    This document is the first time that Manhattan Project and Cold War era artifacts from the Hanford Site have been assembled within a publication. The publication presents photographic and written documentation of a number of Manhattan Project and Cold War era artifacts that were identified and tagged during assessment walk throughs of historic buildings on the Hanford Site but which could not be curated within the Hanford collection because they were too large for long-term storage and/or exhibit purposes or were radiologically contaminated. The significance of the artifacts in this publication and a proposed future appendix is based not on the individual significance of any single artifact but on their collective contribution to the science and engineering of creating plutonium and advancing nuclear technology in nuclear fuel and power.

  4. Modeling artifacts in the simulation of the sedimentation of raindrops with a Quadrature Method of Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Jasor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Quadrature Method of Moments (QMoM is applied to a one-dimensional test case for sedimentation of raindrops. Comparison of the results with a reference spectral method exhibits discrepancies (“step patterns” that must be considered as modeling artifacts. As the QMoM has been demonstrated to be effective and accurate in various contexts, the origin of these artifacts is investigated and found to be related to the transport of the quadrature abscissas. Further test cases are considered to examine the influence of different initial conditions on the development of the modeling artifacts. The study shows that these artifacts are inherent to the application of QMoM in pure sedimentation context.

  5. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-04: Evaluation of Metal Artifact Reduction Technique for the Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, K; Kuo, H; Ritter, J; Shen, J; Basavatia, A; Yaparpalvi, R; Kalnicki, S; Tome, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using a metal artifact reduction technique in depleting metal artifact and its application in improving dose calculation in External Radiation Therapy Planning. Methods: CIRS electron density phantom was scanned with and without steel drill bits placed in some plug holes. Meta artifact reduction software with Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) was used to remove metal artifacts for scanned image with metal. Hounsfield units of electron density plugs from artifact free reference image and MDT processed images were compared. To test the dose calculation improvement after the MDT processed images, clinically approved head and neck plan with manual dental artifact correction was tested. Patient images were exported and processed with MDT and plan was recalculated with new MDT image without manual correction. Dose profiles near the metal artifacts were compared. Results: The MDT used in this study effectively reduced the metal artifact caused by beam hardening and scatter. The windmill around the metal drill was greatly improved with smooth rounded view. Difference of the mean HU in each density plug between reference and MDT images were less than 10 HU in most of the plugs. Dose difference between original plan and MDT images were minimal. Conclusion: Most metal artifact reduction methods were developed for diagnostic improvement purpose. Hence Hounsfield unit accuracy was not rigorously tested before. In our test, MDT effectively eliminated metal artifacts with good HU reproduciblity. However, it can introduce new mild artifacts so the MDT images should be checked with original images

  6. Location of Artifacts Deposited by the Blow Fly Lucilia cuprina After Feeding on Human Blood at Simulated Indoor Crime Scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdle, Annalisa; Verdon, Timothy J; Mitchell, Robert John; van Oorschot, Roland A H

    2017-11-16

    Human DNA profiles can be obtained from fly artifacts (feces and regurgitant) when a fly has been feeding on biological material, sometimes 2 years after deposition. Morphological similarity between artifacts and spots of unaltered biological material make it difficult to distinguish between them, and presumptive and confirmatory forensic tests are unreliable in making the distinction. Knowing possible artifact locations will assist investigators in recognizing where DNA contamination might occur. Flies were released into a house with human blood available under a variety of different climatic and lighting conditions. The location of flies and artifacts was recorded after 72 h. It was found flies may move toward warm or well-lit areas and deposit artifacts there, but artifacts were predominantly located around food sources and were often found in low positions. Factors such as ambient temperature, and the proximity of light and food sources, had an impact on where artifacts were deposited. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. 3D measurement for archeological artifact using CCD camera and line laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Hatano, Katsuhiro; Chikatsu, Hirofumi

    1997-07-01

    In the compilation of archival records for archeological artifacts, true ortho-graphic drawings of these artifacts have to be drawn by the archaeologists themselves or part- timers, taking a great deal of time, labor and skill. For saving the labor, the authors have developed ortho projection system using CCD camera. 3D measurement system using ortho projection system are described in this paper. Finally, it demonstrates wireframe model for jomon-pottery by using this system.

  8. Reduction of Flow Artifacts by Using Partial Saturation in RF-Spoiled Gradient-Echo Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Misung; Hargreaves, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF)-spoiled gradient-echo imaging provides a signal intensity close to pure T1 contrast by using spoiler gradients and RF phase cycling to eliminate net transverse magnetization. Generally, spins require many RF excitations to reach a steady-state magnetization level; therefore, when unsaturated flowing spins enter the imaging slab, they can cause undesirable signal enhancement and generate image artifacts. These artifacts can be reduced by partially saturating an outer slab u...

  9. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Fox, Tim [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Dhabaan, Anees, E-mail: anees.dhabaan@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  10. Ultrasound-guided probe-generated artifacts stimulating ventricular tachycardia: A rare phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat Shamim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrocardiographic (ECG artifacts may arise due to interference, faulty earthing, and current leakages in biomedical equipment which might create clinical dilemmas in the perioperative settings. Piezoelectric signals generated by ultrasonography probe are another uncommon source which might be sensed by the ECG electrodes and produce tracings similar to pathological arrhythmias triggering false alarms and avoidable therapies. Anesthesiologists should be familiar with these uncommon sources which might produce these artifacts and they should be identified swiftly.

  11. Diffusion artifacts in dating by stepwise thermal release of rare gases. [Ar isotope lunar chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneke, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the age of an isochron of apparent age plateau can be easily altered during a thermal release experiment, and that constant rare gas compositions can be observed which are artifacts of the experimental technique and are not chronologically meaningful. Examples are selected from 40Ar-39Ar dating of lunar samples in which anomalous variations in apparent ages can be ascribed to such experimental artifacts.

  12. Evaluation of Metallic Artifacts Caused by Nonpenetrating Titanium Clips in Postoperative Neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Seguchi, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Takuya; Chiba, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Takatoshi; Nagm, Alhusain; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-12-01

    Nonpenetrating titanium clips create no suture holes and thereby reduce cerebrospinal fluid leakage after dural closure. However, no data exist regarding metallic artifacts caused by these clips during postoperative neuroimaging. We aimed to evaluate clip-related artifacts on postoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images of 17 patients who underwent spinal surgery. A phantom study evaluated the size of metallic artifacts, and a clinical study evaluated the quality of postoperative spinal MR images. Both 1.5-T studies used T1-weighted and T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences. The phantom study compared clip and artifact size for 10 clips. Artifacts were defined as signal voids surrounded by high signal amplitude that followed the clip shape. In the clinical study, 2 neurosurgeons assessed 22 images from 17 patients of the spinal cord, cauda equina, and paravertebral muscles adjacent to the nonpenetrating titanium clips, using 5-point scales. Mean metallic artifact sizes were 4.82 ± 0.16 mm (T1) and 4.66 ± 0.25 mm (T2; P < 0.001 vs. control). The former and latter were respectively 207% and 200% larger than the clip size. Both readers graded spinal cord and paravertebral muscles images as 3 or 4, indicating very good image quality regardless of clip-related artifacts, with excellent interobserver agreement (κ = 0.99 and 0.98, respectively). Metallic artifacts caused by nonpenetrating titanium clips were 200% larger than the actual clip but did not affect spinal cord and extradural tissue visualization. The use of these clips for closing the spinal dura mater does not alter postoperative radiologic evaluation quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduction of variable-truncation artifacts from beam occlusion during in situ x-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Leise; Jørgensen, Jakob S.; Frikel, Jürgen; Sporring, Jon

    2017-12-01

    Many in situ x-ray tomography studies require experimental rigs which may partially occlude the beam and cause parts of the projection data to be missing. In a study of fluid flow in porous chalk using a percolation cell with four metal bars drastic streak artifacts arise in the filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction at certain orientations. Projections with non-trivial variable truncation caused by the metal bars are the source of these variable-truncation artifacts. To understand the artifacts a mathematical model of variable-truncation data as a function of metal bar radius and distance to sample is derived and verified numerically and with experimental data. The model accurately describes the arising variable-truncation artifacts across simulated variations of the experimental setup. Three variable-truncation artifact-reduction methods are proposed, all aimed at addressing sinogram discontinuities that are shown to be the source of the streaks. The ‘reduction to limited angle’ (RLA) method simply keeps only non-truncated projections; the ‘detector-directed smoothing’ (DDS) method smooths the discontinuities; while the ‘reflexive boundary condition’ (RBC) method enforces a zero derivative at the discontinuities. Experimental results using both simulated and real data show that the proposed methods effectively reduce variable-truncation artifacts. The RBC method is found to provide the best artifact reduction and preservation of image features using both visual and quantitative assessment. The analysis and artifact-reduction methods are designed in context of FBP reconstruction motivated by computational efficiency practical for large, real synchrotron data. While a specific variable-truncation case is considered, the proposed methods can be applied to general data cut-offs arising in different in situ x-ray tomography experiments.

  14. Artifacts in orthodontic bracket systems in cone-beam computed tomography and multislice computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschinger, V; Hanke, S; Hirschfelder, U; Hofmann, E

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify artifacts caused by different bracket systems in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) scans. Orthodontic brackets of four different systems were consecutively bonded to the surface of a residual molar on a human cadaveric mandible. One MSCT system and three CBCT units were used to scan each of the four bonded brackets, in addition to obtaining a blank reference scan of the tooth surface. All datasets were registered to the reference dataset using visualization software (Analyze 11.0® by AnalyzeDirect). Artifact-related reductions in image quality were expressed in percent of theoretical maximum standard deviations (SD) obtained for the gray values of the adjacent voxels, with higher percentages correlating more pronounced artifacts. Both the SD percentages for three defined line profiles and their mean values were almost invariably higher with the MSCT system than with the CBCT units. Looking into the individual SD percentages, two of the CBCT units (Pax Zenith 3D® and Picasso Trio®; both Vatech) produced higher values than the MSCT system (SOMATOM Definition AS+®; Siemens) in some line profiles. The titanium bracket, in particular, was associated with marked differences between the two scanner technologies, as the mean artifact intensities from this bracket were particularly high with the MSCT unit and relatively low with the CBCT units. The artifact intensities observed with the other three bracket systems varied widely depending on which scanner was used. Different artifact intensities were noted depending on the composition of the bracket system and on the scanner technology (MSCT/CBCT). While the artifacts manifested themselves differently with different scanners, their adverse effects were comparable. However, given the variable severity of the artifacts observed depending on the materials scanned and the scanners used, a blanket recommendation for or against MSCT or CBCT

  15. Iterative Covariance-Based Removal of Time-Synchronous Artifacts: Application to Gastrointestinal Electrical Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jonathan C; Putney, Joy; Hilbert, Douglas; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Greg; Angeli, Timothy R

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, validate, and apply a fully automated method for reducing large temporally synchronous artifacts present in electrical recordings made from the gastrointestinal (GI) serosa, which are problematic for properly assessing slow wave dynamics. Such artifacts routinely arise in experimental and clinical settings from motion, switching behavior of medical instruments, or electrode array manipulation. A novel iterative Covariance-Based Reduction of Artifacts (COBRA) algorithm sequentially reduced artifact waveforms using an updating across-channel median as a noise template, scaled and subtracted from each channel based on their covariance. Application of COBRA substantially increased the signal-to-artifact ratio (12.8 ± 2.5 dB), while minimally attenuating the energy of the underlying source signal by 7.9% on average ( -11.1 ± 3.9 dB). COBRA was shown to be highly effective for aiding recovery and accurate marking of slow wave events (sensitivity = 0.90 ± 0.04; positive-predictive value = 0.74 ± 0.08) from large segments of in vivo porcine GI electrical mapping data that would otherwise be lost due to a broad range of contaminating artifact waveforms. Strongly reducing artifacts with COBRA ultimately allowed for rapid production of accurate isochronal activation maps detailing the dynamics of slow wave propagation in the porcine intestine. Such mapping studies can help characterize differences between normal and dysrhythmic events, which have been associated with GI abnormalities, such as intestinal ischemia and gastroparesis. The COBRA method may be generally applicable for removing temporally synchronous artifacts in other biosignal processing domains.

  16. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Peter C.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Fox, Tim; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dong, Lei; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts

  17. Survey on the artifacts of magnetic resonance imaging in the maxillo-facial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arita, Masahiro; Okayosi, Tetsuo; Sakamoto, Fumihiko; Furuhasi, Kaiji; Wakuta, Kazunari; Ohba, Takeshi; Morikawa, Masao; Han, Dongwei

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is accepted as a valuable method for evaluating and diagnosing various diseases in medical and dental area. On the other hand, dental magnetic attachments have been applied as one of the most suitable retainers of removable prostheses. The dental magnetic attachment is an advanced procedure for the restoration, whereas the dental magnetic attachment is one of the causes of MRI artifacts and/or distortions. In this study the results obtained by a survey in general hospitals on MRI artifacts caused by dental metals, especially dental magnetic attachments, are reported. The results obtained were as follows; MRI artifacts are experienced in most hospitals. Most radiologists did not regard the effect of the magnetic alloy as the cause, although they thought dental metals in oral cavity were the main cause of MRI artifact. Although about a half of radiologist were aware of the presence of the magnetic attachments, few of them had little experience in taking pictures of the patients with magnetic attachment or magnetic keepers by using MRI. Even when dental metals and magnetic keepers in oral cavity were considered to produce the MRI artifacts, none of radiologists asked dentists to remove them. They tried to solve the trouble of MRI artifacts by themselves. Prothodontists should give much more information about the dental magnetic attachment to radiologists and medical doctors in addition to improving the magnetic attachment and investigating materials to minimize the effect on MRI. (author)

  18. ERAASR: an algorithm for removing electrical stimulation artifacts from multielectrode array recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Daniel J.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation is a widely used and effective tool in systems neuroscience, neural prosthetics, and clinical neurostimulation. However, electrical artifacts evoked by stimulation prevent the detection of spiking activity on nearby recording electrodes, which obscures the neural population response evoked by stimulation. We sought to develop a method to clean artifact-corrupted electrode signals recorded on multielectrode arrays in order to recover the underlying neural spiking activity. Approach. We created an algorithm, which performs estimation and removal of array artifacts via sequential principal components regression (ERAASR). This approach leverages the similar structure of artifact transients, but not spiking activity, across simultaneously recorded channels on the array, across pulses within a train, and across trials. The ERAASR algorithm requires no special hardware, imposes no requirements on the shape of the artifact or the multielectrode array geometry, and comprises sequential application of straightforward linear methods with intuitive parameters. The approach should be readily applicable to most datasets where stimulation does not saturate the recording amplifier. Main results. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated in macaque dorsal premotor cortex using acute linear multielectrode array recordings and single electrode stimulation. Large electrical artifacts appeared on all channels during stimulation. After application of ERAASR, the cleaned signals were quiescent on channels with no spontaneous spiking activity, whereas spontaneously active channels exhibited evoked spikes which closely resembled spontaneously occurring spiking waveforms. Significance. We hope that enabling simultaneous electrical stimulation and multielectrode array recording will help elucidate the causal links between neural activity and cognition and facilitate naturalistic sensory protheses.

  19. Metal artifact reduction using a patch-based reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly emerging as the main clinical tool for breast cancer screening. Although several reconstruction methods for DBT are described by the literature, one common issue is the interplane artifacts caused by out-of-focus features. For breasts containing highly attenuating features, such as surgical clips and large calcifications, the artifacts are even more apparent and can limit the detection and characterization of lesions by the radiologist. In this work, we propose a novel method of combining backprojected data into tomographic slices using a patch-based approach, commonly used in denoising. Preliminary tests were performed on a geometry phantom and on an anthropomorphic phantom containing metal inserts. The reconstructed images were compared to a commercial reconstruction solution. Qualitative assessment of the reconstructed images provides evidence that the proposed method reduces artifacts while maintaining low noise levels. Objective assessment supports the visual findings. The artifact spread function shows that the proposed method is capable of suppressing artifacts generated by highly attenuating features. The signal difference to noise ratio shows that the noise levels of the proposed and commercial methods are comparable, even though the commercial method applies post-processing filtering steps, which were not implemented on the proposed method. Thus, the proposed method can produce tomosynthesis reconstructions with reduced artifacts and low noise levels.

  20. Deep learning methods for CT image-domain metal artifact reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjesteby, Lars; Yang, Qingsong; Xi, Yan; Shan, Hongming; Claus, Bernhard; Jin, Yannan; De Man, Bruno; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Artifacts resulting from metal objects have been a persistent problem in CT images over the last four decades. A common approach to overcome their effects is to replace corrupt projection data with values synthesized from an interpolation scheme or by reprojection of a prior image. State-of-the-art correction methods, such as the interpolation- and normalization-based algorithm NMAR, often do not produce clinically satisfactory results. Residual image artifacts remain in challenging cases and even new artifacts can be introduced by the interpolation scheme. Metal artifacts continue to be a major impediment, particularly in radiation and proton therapy planning as well as orthopedic imaging. A new solution to the long-standing metal artifact reduction (MAR) problem is deep learning, which has been successfully applied to medical image processing and analysis tasks. In this study, we combine a convolutional neural network (CNN) with the state-of-the-art NMAR algorithm to reduce metal streaks in critical image regions. Training data was synthesized from CT simulation scans of a phantom derived from real patient images. The CNN is able to map metal-corrupted images to artifact-free monoenergetic images to achieve additional correction on top of NMAR for improved image quality. Our results indicate that deep learning is a novel tool to address CT reconstruction challenges, and may enable more accurate tumor volume estimation for radiation therapy planning.

  1. Clinical observation of metal artifacts on magnetic resonance images of oral and maxillofacial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Shimahara, Masashi; Takeishi, Hiroshi; Uesugi, Yasuo; Narabayashi, Isamu

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the effect of metal materials used in prosthodontics on the clarity of clinical magnetic resonance (MR) images of the oral and maxillofacial regions in 37 patients. Excluded were patients who had undergone surgery in either region, patients with deciduous teeth, patients with a space-occupying lesion, i.e., an inflammatory change or a malignant process, and patients for whom images were affected by motion artifacts. The patients had all undergone orthopantomography, though none received dental treatment in the period between the MR imaging and orthopantomography study. T1- and T2- weighted axial images were used. There were no apparent differences between T1- and T2- weighted images in artifacts caused by metal prosthodontics, whereas artifacts caused by metal crowns were severe in comparison to those caused by metal inlays. In the lateral and apex portions of the tongue, when more than four crowns were present, artifacts had a marked influence on the image, and diagnosis could not be made. Moreover, in the upper and lower alveolus, the presence of two crowns had a similar effect, precluding diagnosis. However, in the antrum, mandibular body, and mental regions, metal artifacts had less of an effect on the images compared to that of metal artifacts in the alveolus region. (author)

  2. MARSAME Radiological Release Report for Archaeological Artifacts Excavated from Area L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gillis, Jessica Mcdonnel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-03

    In 1991 Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL’s) cultural resources team excavated archaeological site LA 4618 located at Technical Area 54, within Material Disposal Area L (MDA L). MDA L received non-radioactive chemical waste from the early 1960s until 1985. Further development of the MDA required excavation of several cultural sites under National Historic Preservation Act requirements; artifacts from these sites have been subsequently stored at LANL. The LANL cultural resources group would now like to release these artifacts to the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe for curation. The history of disposal at Area L suggests that the artifact pool is unlikely to be chemically contaminated and LANL staff washed each artifact at least once following excavation. Thus, it is unlikely that the artifacts present a chemical hazard. LANL’s Environmental Stewardship group (EPC-ES) has evaluated the radiological survey results for the Area L artifact pool and found that the items described in this report meet the criteria for unrestricted radiological release under Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment and are candidates for release without restriction from LANL control. This conclusion is based on the known history of MDA L and on radiation survey data.

  3. Preventing probe induced topography correlated artifacts in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Leo; Wijngaarden, Rinke J

    2016-12-01

    Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) on samples with rough surface topography can be hindered by topography correlated artifacts. We show that, with the proper experimental configuration and using homogeneously metal coated probes, we are able to obtain amplitude modulation (AM) KPFM results on a gold coated sample with rough topography that are free from such artifacts. By inducing tip inhomogeneity through contact with the sample, clear potential variations appear in the KPFM image, which correlate with the surface topography and, thus, are probe induced artifacts. We find that switching to frequency modulation (FM) KPFM with such altered probes does not remove these artifacts. We also find that the induced tip inhomogeneity causes a lift height dependence of the KPFM measurement, which can therefore be used as a check for the presence of probe induced topography correlated artifacts. We attribute the observed effects to a work function difference between the tip and the rest of the probe and describe a model for such inhomogeneous probes that predicts lift height dependence and topography correlated artifacts for both AM and FM-KPFM methods. This work demonstrates that using a probe with a homogeneous work function and preventing tip changes is essential for KPFM on non-flat samples. From the three investigated probe coatings, PtIr, Au and TiN, the latter appears to be the most suitable, because of its better resistance against coating damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Computed tomography of kidney with diuretics. A method for avoiding artifact due to nonionic contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiromura, Tadao; Terae, Satoshi; Takamura, Akio; Mizoe, Junetsu (Obihiro Kosei Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)); Morita, Yutaka; Irie, Goro

    1989-07-01

    We devised a method for avoiding beam-hardening artifacts, which interfere with enhanced CT images of kidney due to nonionic contrast medium. The radiographic effect and the frequency of beam-hardening artifacts on enhanced CT of kidney were studied by prospective comparison among three groups: a group of 20 patients examined with furosemide (f-d.CT), a group of 20 patients examined without diuretics (non-d.CT) and a group of 20 patients examined after water intake (w-d.CT). In all patients of f-d.CT group, the renal parenchyma from the cortex to the papilla was almost evently enhanced, free from artifacts. The density of the renal papilla and pelvis in non-d.CT and w-d.CT groups was significantly higher than that in f-d.CT group, and artifacts were also observed in 14 (70%) of non-d.CT group and 12 (60%) of w.d.CT group, respectively. Satisfactory CT of kidney free from artifacts was obtained by f-d.CT, providing easy evaluation of renal pelvic or peripelvic lesions. In conclusion, this technique can be used in those pathologic cases of renal pelvis or peripelvic region, that are not clear on routine CT because of artifacts. (author).

  5. Individuality evaluation for paper based artifact-metrics using transmitted light image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Manabu; Tanaka, Junichi; Furuie, Makoto; Hirabayashi, Masashi; Matsumoto, Tsutomu

    2008-02-01

    Artifact-metrics is an automated method of authenticating artifacts based on a measurable intrinsic characteristic. Intrinsic characters, such as microscopic random-patterns made during the manufacturing process, are very difficult to copy. A transmitted light image of the distribution can be used for artifact-metrics, since the fiber distribution of paper is random. Little is known about the individuality of the transmitted light image although it is an important requirement for intrinsic characteristic artifact-metrics. Measuring individuality requires that the intrinsic characteristic of each artifact significantly differs, so having sufficient individuality can make an artifact-metric system highly resistant to brute force attack. Here we investigate the influence of paper category, matching size of sample, and image-resolution on the individuality of a transmitted light image of paper through a matching test using those images. More concretely, we evaluate FMR/FNMR curves by calculating similarity scores with matches using correlation coefficients between pairs of scanner input images, and the individuality of paper by way of estimated EER with probabilistic measure through a matching method based on line segments, which can localize the influence of rotation gaps of a sample in the case of large matching size. As a result, we found that the transmitted light image of paper has a sufficient individuality.

  6. Metal artifact reduction in CT using tissue-class modeling and adaptive prefiltering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, Matthieu; Spies, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    High-density objects such as metal prostheses, surgical clips, or dental fillings generate streak-like artifacts in computed tomography images. We present a novel method for metal artifact reduction by in-painting missing information into the corrupted sinogram. The information is provided by a tissue-class model extracted from the distorted image. To this end the image is first adaptively filtered to reduce the noise content and to smooth out streak artifacts. Consecutively, the image is segmented into different material classes using a clustering algorithm. The corrupted and missing information in the original sinogram is completed using the forward projected information from the tissue-class model. The performance of the correction method is assessed on phantom images. Clinical images featuring a broad spectrum of metal artifacts are studied. Phantom and clinical studies show that metal artifacts, such as streaks, are significantly reduced and shadows in the image are eliminated. Furthermore, the novel approach improves detectability of organ contours. This can be of great relevance, for instance, in radiation therapy planning, where images affected by metal artifacts may lead to suboptimal treatment plans

  7. Gaussian Elimination-Based Novel Canonical Correlation Analysis Method for EEG Motion Artifact Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Vandana; Shukla, Shailja; Shukla, Piyush Kumar; Rawat, Paresh

    2017-01-01

    The motion generated at the capturing time of electro-encephalography (EEG) signal leads to the artifacts, which may reduce the quality of obtained information. Existing artifact removal methods use canonical correlation analysis (CCA) for removing artifacts along with ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and wavelet transform (WT). A new approach is proposed to further analyse and improve the filtering performance and reduce the filter computation time under highly noisy environment. This new approach of CCA is based on Gaussian elimination method which is used for calculating the correlation coefficients using backslash operation and is designed for EEG signal motion artifact removal. Gaussian elimination is used for solving linear equation to calculate Eigen values which reduces the computation cost of the CCA method. This novel proposed method is tested against currently available artifact removal techniques using EEMD-CCA and wavelet transform. The performance is tested on synthetic and real EEG signal data. The proposed artifact removal technique is evaluated using efficiency matrices such as del signal to noise ratio (DSNR), lambda ( λ ), root mean square error (RMSE), elapsed time, and ROC parameters. The results indicate suitablity of the proposed algorithm for use as a supplement to algorithms currently in use.

  8. Gaussian Elimination-Based Novel Canonical Correlation Analysis Method for EEG Motion Artifact Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Roy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion generated at the capturing time of electro-encephalography (EEG signal leads to the artifacts, which may reduce the quality of obtained information. Existing artifact removal methods use canonical correlation analysis (CCA for removing artifacts along with ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD and wavelet transform (WT. A new approach is proposed to further analyse and improve the filtering performance and reduce the filter computation time under highly noisy environment. This new approach of CCA is based on Gaussian elimination method which is used for calculating the correlation coefficients using backslash operation and is designed for EEG signal motion artifact removal. Gaussian elimination is used for solving linear equation to calculate Eigen values which reduces the computation cost of the CCA method. This novel proposed method is tested against currently available artifact removal techniques using EEMD-CCA and wavelet transform. The performance is tested on synthetic and real EEG signal data. The proposed artifact removal technique is evaluated using efficiency matrices such as del signal to noise ratio (DSNR, lambda (λ, root mean square error (RMSE, elapsed time, and ROC parameters. The results indicate suitablity of the proposed algorithm for use as a supplement to algorithms currently in use.

  9. The Hairless Stem Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium barbadense) Is Linked to a Copia-Like Retrotransposon Insertion in a Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper Gene (HD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mingquan; Ye, Wuwei; Lin, Lifeng; He, Shae; Du, Xiongming; Chen, Aiqun; Cao, Yuefen; Qin, Yuan; Yang, Fen; Jiang, Yurong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xiyin; Paterson, Andrew H; Rong, Junkang

    2015-09-01

    Cotton (Gossypium) stem trichomes are mostly single cells that arise from stem epidermal cells. In this study, a homeodomain-leucine zipper gene (HD1) was found to cosegregate with the dominant trichome locus previously designated as T1 and mapped to chromosome 6. Characterization of HD1 orthologs revealed that the absence of stem trichomes in modern Gossypium barbadense varieties is linked to a large retrotransposon insertion in the ninth exon, 2565 bp downstream from the initial codon in the At subgenome HD1 gene (At-GbHD1). In both the At and Dt subgenomes, reduced transcription of GbHD1 genes is caused by this insertion. The disruption of At-HD1 further affects the expression of downstream GbMYB25 and GbHOX3 genes. Analyses of primitive cultivated accessions identified another retrotransposon insertion event in the sixth exon of At-GbHD1 that might predate the previously identified retrotransposon in modern varieties. Although both retrotransposon insertions results in similar phenotypic changes, the timing of these two retrotransposon insertion events fits well with our current understanding of the history of cotton speciation and dispersal. Taken together, the results of genetics mapping, gene expression and association analyses suggest that GbHD1 is an important component that controls stem trichome development and is a promising candidate gene for the T1 locus. The interspecific phenotypic difference in stem trichome traits also may be attributable to HD1 inactivation associated with retrotransposon insertion. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. A conserved leucine zipper-like motif accounts for strong tetramerization capabilities of SEPALLATA-like MADS-domain transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümpler, Florian; Theißen, Günter; Melzer, Rainer

    2018-02-21

    The development of angiosperm flowers is regulated by homeotic MIKC-type MADS-domain transcription factors that activate or repress target genes via the formation of DNA-bound, organ specific tetrameric complexes. The protein-protein interaction (PPI) capabilities differ considerably between different MIKC-type proteins. The floral homeotic protein SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) acts as a hub that incorporates numerous other MADS-domain proteins into tetrameric complexes that would otherwise not form. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these promiscuous interactions remain largely unknown. In this study we created a collection of amino acid substitution mutants of SEP3 to quantify the contribution of individual residues on protein tetramerization during DNA-binding, employing methods of molecular biophysics. We show that leucine residues at certain key positions form a leucine zipper structure that is essential for tetramerization of SEP3, whereas the introduction of physicochemically very similar residues at respective sites impedes the formation of DNA-bound tetramers. Comprehensive molecular evolutionary analyses of MADS-domain proteins from a diverse set of flowering plants revealed exceedingly high conservation of the identified leucine residues within SEP3-subfamily proteins throughout angiosperm evolution. In contrast, MADS-domain proteins that are unable to tetramerize among themselves exhibit preferences for other amino acids at homologous sites. Our findings indicate that the subfamily-specific conservation of amino acid residues at just a few key positions account for subfamily-specific interaction capabilities of MADS-domain transcription factors and shaped the present-day structure of the PPI network controlling flower development.

  11. Mechanistic Multi-Tissue Modeling of Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper Regulation: Integrating Circadian Gene Expression with Receptor-Mediated Corticosteroid Pharmacodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyar, Vivaswath S; DuBois, Debra C; Almon, Richard R; Jusko, William J

    2017-10-01

    The glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) is an important mediator of anti-inflammatory corticosteroid action. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic/pharmacogenomic effects of acute and chronic methylprednisolone (MPL) dosing on the tissue-specific dynamics of GILZ expression were examined in rats. A mechanism-based model was developed to investigate and integrate the role of MPL and circadian rhythms on the transcriptional enhancement of GILZ in multiple tissues. Animals received a single 50-mg/kg intramuscular bolus or a 7-day 0.3-mg/kg/h subcutaneous infusion of MPL and were euthanized at several time points. An additional group of rats were euthanized at several times and served as 24-hour light/dark (circadian) controls. Plasma MPL and corticosterone concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression of GILZ and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA was quantified in tissues using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The pharmacokinetics of MPL were described using a two-compartment model. Mild-to-robust circadian oscillations in GR and GILZ mRNA expression were characterized in muscle, lung, and adipose tissues and modeled using Fourier harmonic functions. Acute MPL dosing caused significant down-regulation (40%-80%) in GR mRNA and enhancement of GILZ mRNA expression (500%-1080%) in the tissues examined. While GILZ returned to its rhythmic baseline following acute dosing, a new steady-state was observed upon enhancement by chronic dosing. The model captured the complex dynamics in all tissues for both dosing regimens. The model quantitatively integrates physiologic mechanisms, such as circadian processes and GR tolerance phenomena, which control the tissue-specific regulation of GILZ by corticosteroids. These studies characterize GILZ as a pharmacodynamic marker of corticosteroid actions in several tissues. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental

  12. NMR insight into myosin-binding subunit coiled-coil structure reveals binding interface with protein kinase G-Iα leucine zipper in vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok K; Birrane, Gabriel; Anklin, Clemens; Rigby, Alan C; Alper, Seth L

    2017-04-28

    Nitrovasodilators relax vascular smooth-muscle cells in part by modulating the interaction of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain (CC) and/or the leucine zipper (LZ) domain of the myosin light-chain phosphatase component, myosin-binding subunit (MBS), with the N-terminal LZ domain of protein kinase G (PKG)-Iα. Despite the importance of vasodilation in cardiovascular homeostasis and therapy, our structural understanding of the MBS CC interaction with LZ PKG-1α has remained limited. Here, we report the 3D NMR solution structure of homodimeric CC MBS in which amino acids 932-967 form a coiled-coil of two monomeric α-helices in parallel orientation. We found that the structure is stabilized by non-covalent interactions, with dominant contributions from hydrophobic residues at a and d heptad positions. Using NMR chemical-shift perturbation (CSP) analysis, we identified a subset of hydrophobic and charged residues of CC MBS (localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal region) contributing to the dimer-dimer interaction interface between homodimeric CC MBS and homodimeric LZ PKG-Iα. 15 N backbone relaxation NMR revealed the dynamic features of the CC MBS interface residues identified by NMR CSP. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement- and CSP-NMR-guided HADDOCK modeling of the dimer-dimer interface of the heterotetrameric complex exhibits the involvement of non-covalent intermolecular interactions that are localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal regions of each homodimer. These results deepen our understanding of the binding restraints of this CC MBS·LZ PKG-Iα low-affinity heterotetrameric complex and allow reevaluation of the role(s) of myosin light-chain phosphatase partner polypeptides in regulation of vascular smooth-muscle cell contractility. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. A novel variable antibody fragment dimerized by leucine zippers with enhanced neutralizing potency against rabies virus G protein compared to its corresponding single-chain variable antibody fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuang; Cheng, Yue; Xi, Hualong; Gu, Tiejun; Yuan, Ruosen; Chen, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2015-12-01

    Fatal rabies can be prevented effectively by post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Single-chain variable fragments (scFv), which are composed of a variable heavy chain (VH) and a variable light chain (VL) connected by a peptide linker, can potentially be used to replace RIG. However, in our previous study, a scFv (scFV57S) specific for the rabies virus (RV) G protein showed a lower neutralizing potency than that of its parent IgG due to lower stability and altered peptide assembly pattern. In monoclonal antibodies, the VH and VL interact non-covalently, while in scFvs the VH is connected covalently with the VL by the artificial linker. In this study, we constructed and expressed two peptides 57VL-JUN-HIS and 57VH-FOS-HA in Escherichia coli. The well-known Fos and Jun leucine zippers were utilized to dimerize VH and VL similarly to the IgG counterpart. The two peptides assembled to form zipFv57S in vitro. Due to the greater similarity in structure with IgG, the zipFv57S protein showed a higher binding ability and affinity resulting in notable improvement of in vitro neutralizing activity over its corresponding scFv. The zipFv57S protein was also found to be more stable and showed similar protective rate as RIG in mice challenged with a lethal dose of RV. Our results not only indicated zipFv57S as an ideal alternative for RIG in PEP but also offered a novel and efficient hetero-dimerization pattern of VH and VL leading to enhanced neutralizing potency. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Histologic processing artifacts and inter-pathologist variation in measurement of inked margins of canine mast cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Patti K; Löhr, Christiane V; Meritet, Danielle; Spagnoli, Sean T; Milovancev, Milan; Russell, Duncan S

    2018-02-01

    Although quantitative assessment of margins is recommended for describing excision of cutaneous malignancies, there is poor understanding of limitations associated with this technique. We described and quantified histologic artifacts in inked margins and determined the association between artifacts and variance in histologic tumor-free margin (HTFM) measurements based on a novel grading scheme applied to 50 sections of normal canine skin and 56 radial margins taken from 15 different canine mast cell tumors (MCTs). Three broad categories of artifact were 1) tissue deformation at inked edges, 2) ink-associated artifacts, and 3) sectioning-associated artifacts. The most common artifacts in MCT margins were ink-associated artifacts, specifically ink absent from an edge (mean prevalence: 50%) and inappropriate ink coloring (mean: 45%). The prevalence of other artifacts in MCT skin was 4-50%. In MCT margins, frequency-adjusted kappa statistics found fair or better inter-rater reliability for 9 of 10 artifacts; intra-rater reliability was moderate or better in 9 of 10 artifacts. Digital HTFM measurements by 5 blinded pathologists had a median standard deviation (SD) of 1.9 mm (interquartile range: 0.8-3.6 mm; range: 0-6.2 mm). Intraclass correlation coefficients demonstrated good inter-pathologist reliability in HTFM measurement (κ = 0.81). Spearman rank correlation coefficients found negligible correlation between artifacts and HTFM SDs ( r ≤ 0.3). These data confirm that although histologic artifacts commonly occur in inked margin specimens, artifacts are not meaningfully associated with variation in HTFM measurements. Investigators can use the grading scheme presented herein to identify artifacts associated with tissue processing.

  15. Artifacts in MR angiography of the intracranial vessels using the 3D TOF and 3D PC techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Yong Soo; Park, Choong Ki [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To classify artifacts and to assess their frequency in magnetic resonance angiography of intracranial vessels using three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast techniques. One hundred and eleven patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease were imaged on a 1.5T superconducting magnetic resonance machine employing three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiographic techniques. We retrospectively reviewed the artifacts in three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography of the intracranial circulatory system, comparing them with routine spin-echo magnetic resonance images and magnetic resonance angiography source images, and partially with conventional angiography. Artifacts in magnetic resonance angiography were classified as flow-related, and flow-unrealted, by patient, hardware, magnetic resonance angiography acquisition and postprocessing techniques. Type and frequency of flow-related artifacts included saturation artifact (100%), dephasing artifact (100%), phase-encoding ghost artifact (97%), turbulence artifact (14%) and flow displacement artifact (5%) on three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography, and phase aliasing artifact (2%) on three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. Type and frequency of flow-unrelated artifacts included stair-step artifact (100%) by three- dimensional reconstruction process, magnetic susceptibility artifact by carotid canal (69%) and metal (4%), maximum intensity projection artifact (30%) by maximum intensity projection algorithm, and motion artifact by respiration (20%) and voluntary movement (8%); these were seen on both time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. Paramagnetic substance artifact by fat and paranasal sinus mucosa (100%), hematoma (14%) and gadolinium (5%) were seen on time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. In three- dimensional time-of-flight and

  16. Using Internet Artifacts to Profile a Child Pornography Suspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus K. Rogers

    2014-03-01

    behavioral analysis process described, but the ability to infer the predilection for being a consumer of child pornography based on Internet artifacts may prove to be a powerful tool for investigators.

  17. Artifact-based reflective interviews for identifying pragmatic epistemological resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, Christopher Walden

    Physics Education Research studies the science of teaching and learning physics. The process of student learning is complex, and the factors that affect it are numerous. Describing students' understanding of physics knowledge and reasoning is the basis for much productive research; however, such research fails to account for certain types of student learning difficulties. In this dissertation, I explore one source of student difficulty: personal epistemology, students' ideas about knowledge and knowing. Epistemology traditionally answers three questions: What is knowledge? How is knowledge created? And, how do we know what we know? An individual's responses to these questions can affect learning in terms of how they approach tasks involving the construction and application of knowledge. The key issue addressed in this dissertation is the effect of methodological choices on the validity and reliability of claims concerning personal epistemology. My central concern is contextual validity, how what is said about one's epistemology is not identical to how one behaves epistemologically. In response to these issues, I present here a new methodology for research on student epistemology: video artifact-based reflective interview protocols. These protocols begin with video taping students in their natural classroom activities, and then asking the participants epistemological questions immediately after watching selected scenes from their activity, contextually anchoring them in their actual learning experience. The data from these interviews is viewed in the framework of Epistemological Resource Theory, a framework of small bits of knowledge whose coordination in a given context is used to describe personal epistemology. I claim that the privileged data from these interviews allows detailed epistemological resources to be identified, and that these resources can provide greater insight into how student epistemologies are applied in learning activities. This research

  18. View-Angle Tilting and Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction for Artifact Reduction in MRI: Experimental Sequence Optimization for Orthopaedic Tumor Endoprostheses and Clinical Application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M Jungmann

    Full Text Available MRI plays a major role in follow-up of patients with malignant bone tumors. However, after limb salvage surgery, orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses might cause significant metal-induced susceptibility artifacts.To evaluate the benefit of view-angle tilting (VAT and slice-encoding metal artifact correction (SEMAC for MRI of large-sized orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses in an experimental model and to demonstrate clinical benefits for assessment of periprosthetic soft tissue abnormalities.In an experimental setting, tumor endoprostheses (n=4 were scanned at 1.5T with three versions of optimized high-bandwidth turbo-spin-echo pulse sequences: (i standard, (ii VAT and (iii combined VAT and SEMAC (VAT&SEMAC. Pulse sequences included coronal short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR, coronal T1-weighted (w, transverse T1-w and T2-w TSE sequences. For clinical evaluation, VAT&SEMAC was compared to conventional metal artifact-reducing MR sequences (conventional MR in n=25 patients with metal implants and clinical suspicion of tumor recurrence or infection. Diameters of artifacts were measured quantitatively. Qualitative parameters were assessed on a five-point scale (1=best, 5=worst: "image distortion", "artificial signal changes at the edges" and "diagnostic confidence". Imaging findings were correlated with pathology. T-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used for statistical analyses.The true size of the prostheses was overestimated on MRI (P<0.05. A significant reduction of artifacts was achieved by VAT (P<0.001 and VAT&SEMAC (P=0.003 compared to the standard group. Quantitative scores improved in the VAT and VAT&SEMAC group (P<0.05. On clinical MR images, artifact diameters were significantly reduced in the VAT&SEMAC-group as compared with the conventional-group (P<0.001. Distortion and artificial signal changes were reduced and diagnostic confidence improved (P<0.05. In two cases, tumor-recurrence, in ten cases infection and in thirteen cases other

  19. Metal Artifact Reduction in Computed Tomography After Deep Brain Stimulation Electrode Placement Using Iterative Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissa, Joel; Boos, Johannes; Schleich, Christoph; Sedlmair, Martin; Krzymyk, Karl; Kröpil, Patric; Antoch, Gerald; Thomas, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic accuracy of intraoperative computed tomography (CT) after deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode placement is limited due to artifacts induced by the metallic hardware, which can potentially mask intracranial postoperative complications. Different metal artifact reduction (MAR) techniques have been introduced to reduce artifacts from metal hardware in CT. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a novel iterative MAR technique on image quality and diagnostic performance in the follow-up of patients with DBS electrode implementation surgery. Seventeen patients who had received routine intraoperative CT of the head after implantation of DBS electrodes between March 2015 and June 2015 were retrospectively included. Raw data of all patients were reconstructed with standard weighted filtered back projection (WFBP) and additionally with a novel iterative MAR algorithm. We quantified frequencies of density changes to assess quantitative artifact reduction. For evaluation of qualitative image quality, the visibility of numerous cerebral anatomic landmarks and the detectability of intracranial electrodes were scored according to a 4-point scale. Furthermore, artifact strength overall and adjacent to the electrodes was rated. Our results of quantitative artifact reduction showed that images reconstructed with iterative MAR (iMAR) contained significantly lower metal artifacts (overall low frequency values, 1608.6 ± 545.5; range, 375.5-3417.2) compared with the WFBP (overall low frequency values, 4487.3 ± 875.4; range, 2218.3-5783.5) reconstructed images (P < 0.004). Qualitative image analysis showed a significantly improved image quality for iMAR (overall anatomical landmarks, 2.49 ± 0.15; median, 3; range, 0-3; overall electrode characteristics, 2.35 ± 0.16; median, 2; range, 0-3; artifact characteristics, 2.16 ± 0.08; median, 2.5; range, 0-3) compared with WFBP (overall anatomical landmarks, 1.21 ± 0.64; median, 1; range, 0-3; overall electrode

  20. Separating drought effects from roof artifacts on ecosystem processes in a grassland drought experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Anja; Fester, Thomas; Eisenhauer, Nico; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Schmid, Bernhard; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Weigelt, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    1: Given the predictions of increased drought probabilities under various climate change scenarios, there have been numerous experimental field studies simulating drought using transparent roofs in different ecosystems and regions. Such roofs may, however, have unknown side effects, called artifacts, on the measured variables potentially confounding the experimental results. A roofed control allows the quantification of potential artifacts, which is lacking in most experiments. 2: We conducted a drought experiment in experimental grasslands to study artifacts of transparent roofs and the resulting effects of artifacts on ecosystems relative to drought on three response variables (aboveground biomass, litter decomposition and plant metabolite profiles). We established three drought treatments, using (1) transparent roofs to exclude rainfall, (2) an unroofed control treatment receiving natural rainfall and (3) a roofed control, nested in the drought treatment but with rain water reapplied according to ambient conditions. 3: Roofs had a slight impact on air (+0.14°C during night) and soil temperatures (-0.45°C on warm days, +0.25°C on cold nights), while photosynthetically active radiation was decreased significantly (-16%). Aboveground plant community biomass was reduced in the drought treatment (-41%), but there was no significant difference between the roofed and unroofed control, i.e., there were no measurable roof artifact effects. 4: Compared to the unroofed control, litter decomposition was decreased significantly both in the drought treatment (-26%) and in the roofed control treatment (-18%), suggesting artifact effects of the transparent roofs. Moreover, aboveground metabolite profiles in the model plant species Medicago x varia were different from the unroofed control in both the drought and roofed control treatments, and roof artifact effects were of comparable magnitude as drought effects. 5: Our results stress the need for roofed control treatments

  1. Combining EEG and eye tracking: Identification, characterization and correction of eye movement artifacts in electroencephalographic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael ePlöchl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Eye movements introduce large artifacts to electroencephalographic recordings (EEG and thus render data analysis difficult or even impossible. Trials contaminated by eye movement and blink artifacts have to be discarded, hence in standard EEG-paradigms subjects are required to fixate on the screen. To overcome this restriction, several correction methods including regression and blind source separation have been proposed. Yet, there is no automated standard procedure established. By simultaneously recording eye movements and 64-channel-EEG during a guided eye movement paradigm, we show that eye movement artifacts consist of several components, which arise from different sources. These include corneo-retinal dipole changes, saccadic spike potentials and eyelid movements. Moreover, we demonstrate that depending on electrode site, gaze direction and choice of reference these components contribute differently to the measured signal. Therefore they cannot be removed by regression-based correction methods, as these inevitably over- or under-correct individual artifact components. Finally we propose a correction procedure based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA. This procedure uses eye tracker information to reliably and objectively identify eye-artifact related ICA-components in an automated manner. We demonstrate that this approach allows removing or substantially reducing ocular artifacts including microsaccades without affecting the signal originating from brain sources. In conclusion the proposed method does not only provide a tool for detecting and correcting eye artifacts in standard EEG-paradigms but it also permits to study EEG-activity during eye tracking experiments and thus to investigate neural mechanisms of eye movement control and visual attention under natural conditions.

  2. Stimulation artifact correction method for estimation of early cortico-cortical evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebaul, Lena; Rudrauf, David; Job, Anne-Sophie; Mălîia, Mihai Dragos; Popa, Irina; Barborica, Andrei; Minotti, Lorella; Mîndruţă, Ioana; Kahane, Philippe; David, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Effective connectivity can be explored using direct electrical stimulations in patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsies and investigated with intracranial electrodes. Responses to brief electrical pulses mimic the physiological propagation of signals and manifest as cortico-cortical evoked potentials (CCEP). The first CCEP component is believed to reflect direct connectivity with the stimulated region but the stimulation artifact, a sharp deflection occurring during a few milliseconds, frequently contaminates it. In order to recover the characteristics of early CCEP responses, we developed an artifact correction method based on electrical modeling of the electrode-tissue interface. The biophysically motivated artifact templates are then regressed out of the recorded data as in any classical template-matching removal artifact methods. Our approach is able to make the distinction between the physiological responses time-locked to the stimulation pulses and the non-physiological component. We tested the correction on simulated CCEP data in order to quantify its efficiency for different stimulation and recording parameters. We demonstrated the efficiency of the new correction method on simulations of single trial recordings for early responses contaminated with the stimulation artifact. The results highlight the importance of sampling frequency for an accurate analysis of CCEP. We then applied the approach to experimental data. The model-based template removal was compared to a correction based on the subtraction of the averaged artifact. This new correction method of stimulation artifact will enable investigators to better analyze early CCEP components and infer direct effective connectivity in future CCEP studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Post-processing sets of tilted CT volumes as a method for metal artifact reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballhausen, Hendrik; Reiner, Michael; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Söhn, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Metal implants, surgical clips and other foreign bodies may cause ‘streaking’ or ‘star’ artifacts in computed tomography (CT) reconstructions, for example in the vicinity of dental restorations or hip implants. The deteriorated image quality complicates contouring and has an adverse effect on quantitative planning in external beam therapy. The potential to reduce artifacts by acquisition of tilted CT reconstructions from different angles of the same object was investigated. While each of those reconstructions still contained artifacts, they were not necessarily in the same place in each CT. By combining such CTs with complementary information, a reconstructed volume with less or even without artifacts was obtained. The most straightforward way to combine the co-registered volumes was to calculate the mean or median per voxel. The method was tested with a calibration phantom featuring a titanium insert, and with a human skull featuring multiple dental restorations made from gold and steel. The performance of the method was compared to established metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms. Dose reduction was tested. In a visual comparison, streaking artifacts were strongly reduced and details in the vicinity of metal foreign bodies became much more visible. In case of the calibration phantom, average bias in Hounsfield units was reduced by 94% and per-voxel-errors and noise were reduced by 83%. In case of the human skull, bias was reduced by 95% and noise was reduced by 94%. The performance of the method was visually superior and quantitatively compareable to established MAR algorithms. Dose reduction was viable. A simple post-processing method for MAR was described which required one or more complementary scans but did not rely on any a priori information. The method was computationally inexpensive. Performance of the method was quantitatively comparable to established algorithms and visually superior in a direct comparison. Dose reduction was demonstrated

  4. Artifact-reduced imaging of biopsy needles with 2D multispectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Hans; Hargreaves, Brian A; Daniel, Bruce L

    2017-12-29

    Magnetic resonance (MR) guidance for biopsy procedures requires high intrinsic soft-tissue contrast. However, artifacts induced by the metallic needle can reduce its localization and require low-susceptibility needle materials with poorer cutting performance. In a proof of concept, we demonstrate the feasibility of 2D multispectral imaging (2DMSI) for both needle tracking and for needle artifact reduction for more precise needle localization and to enable the usage of needle materials with higher susceptibility. We applied 2DMSI for imaging of MR-compatible biopsy needles, conventional stainless-steel needles, and mixed-material needles and compared it to conventional techniques. In addition, we exploited intrinsic off-resonance information for passive needle tracking. 2DMSI achieved a stronger reduction of the needle artifact compared to conventional techniques. For the mixed-material needles, the artifact was reduced to a level below that for MR-compatible needles with conventional imaging. The passive tracking also improved the ability to pinpoint the needle. 2DMSI is promising for both needle tracking and artifact-reduced imaging of biopsy needles for a more precise needle localization. 2DMSI may be particularly promising for needles inducing large distortions or for targeting of small lesions. In addition, it may enable the use of needle materials with higher susceptibility and potentially better sampling performance. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. An automated method for identifying artifact in ICA of resting-state fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik eBhaganagarapu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An enduring issue with data-driven analysis and filtering methods is the interpretation of results. To assist, we present an automatic method for identifaction of artifact in independent components (ICs derived from functional MRI (fMRI. The method was designed with the following features: Does not require temporal information about an fMRI paradigm; Does not require the user to train the algorithm; Requires only the fMRI images (additional acquisition of anatomical imaging not required; Is able to identify a high proportion of artifact-related ICs without removing components that are likely to be of neuronal origin; Can be applied to resting-state fMRI; Is automated, requiring minimal or no human intervention.We applied the method to a MELODIC probabilistic ICA of resting-state functional connectivity data acquired in 50 healthy control subjects, and compared the results to a blinded expert manual classification. The method identified between 26% and 72% of the components as artifact (mean 55%. 0.3% of components identified as artifact were discordant with the manual classification; retrospective examination of these ICs suggested the automated method had correctly identified these as artifact.We have developed an effective automated method which removes a substantial number of unwanted noisy components in ICA analyses of resting-state fMRI data. Source code of our implementation of the method is available.

  6. Removing ECG Artifact from the Surface EMG Signal Using Adaptive Subtraction Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, S; Fallah, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: The electrocardiogram artifact is a major contamination in the electromyogram signals when electromyogram signal is recorded from upper trunk muscles and because of that the contaminated electromyogram is not useful. Objective: Removing electrocardiogram contamination from electromyogram signals. Methods: In this paper, the clean electromyogram signal, electrocardiogram artifact and electrocardiogram signal were recorded from leg muscles, the pectoralis major muscle of the left side and V4, respectively. After the pre-processing, contaminated electromyogram signal is simulated with a combination of clean electromyogram and electrocardiogram artifact. Then, contaminated electromyogram is cleaned using adaptive subtraction method. This method contains some steps; (1) QRS detection, (2) formation of electrocardiogram template by averaging the electrocardiogram complexes, (3) using low pass filter to remove undesirable artifacts, (4) subtraction. Results: Performance of our method is evaluated using qualitative criteria, power spectrum density and coherence and quantitative criteria signal to noise ratio, relative error and cross correlation. The result of signal to noise ratio, relative error and cross correlation is equal to 10.493, 0.04 and %97 respectively. Finally, there is a comparison between proposed method and some existing methods. Conclusion: The result indicates that adaptive subtraction method is somewhat effective to remove electrocardiogram artifact from contaminated electromyogram signal and has an acceptable result. PMID:25505766

  7. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E.; Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I.; Tsagkalis, A.; Dailiana, Z.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  8. Reduction of variable-truncation artifacts from beam occlusion during in situ x-ray tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Leise; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Frikel, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Many in situ x-ray tomography studies require experimental rigs which may partially occlude the beam and cause parts of the projection data to be missing. In a study of fluid flow in porous chalk using a percolation cell with four metal bars drastic streak artifacts arise in the filtered backproj......Many in situ x-ray tomography studies require experimental rigs which may partially occlude the beam and cause parts of the projection data to be missing. In a study of fluid flow in porous chalk using a percolation cell with four metal bars drastic streak artifacts arise in the filtered...... backprojection (FBP) reconstruction at certain orientations. Projections with non-trivial variable truncation caused by the metal bars are the source of these variable-truncation artifacts. To understand the artifacts a mathematical model of variable-truncation data as a function of metal bar radius and distance...... and artifact-reduction methods are designed in context of FBP reconstruction motivated by computational efficiency practical for large, real synchrotron data. While a specific variable-truncation case is considered, the proposed methods can be applied to general data cut-offs arising in different in situ x...

  9. Home-Explorer: Ontology-Based Physical Artifact Search and Hidden Object Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Guo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new system named Home-Explorer that searches and finds physical artifacts in a smart indoor environment is proposed. The view on which it is based is artifact-centered and uses sensors attached to the everyday artifacts (called smart objects in the real world. This paper makes two main contributions: First, it addresses, the robustness of the embedded sensors, which is seldom discussed in previous smart artifact research. Because sensors may sometimes be broken or fail to work under certain conditions, smart objects become hidden ones. However, current systems provide no mechanism to detect and manage objects when this problem occurs. Second, there is no common context infrastructure for building smart artifact systems, which makes it difficult for separately developed applications to interact with each other and uneasy for them to share and reuse knowledge. Unlike previous systems, Home-Explorer builds on an ontology-based knowledge infrastructure named Sixth-Sense, which makes it easy for the system to interact with other applications or agents also based on this ontology. The hidden object problem is also reflected in our ontology, which enables Home-Explorer to deal with both smart objects and hidden objects. A set of rules for deducing an object's status or location information and for locating hidden objects are described and evaluated.

  10. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E. [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Greece, Department of Medical Radiological Technologists, Athens (Greece); Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I. [University of Thessaly, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Larissa (Greece); Tsagkalis, A. [IASO Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Larissa (Greece); Dailiana, Z. [University of Thessaly, Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Larissa (Greece)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  11. Metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by constrained optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wang, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2011-02-01

    The streak artifacts caused by metal implants have long been recognized as a problem that limits various applications of CT imaging. In this work, the authors propose an iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm based on constrained optimization. After the shape and location of metal objects in the image domain is determined automatically by the binary metal identification algorithm and the segmentation of "metal shadows" in projection domain is done, constrained optimization is used for image reconstruction. It minimizes a predefined function that reflects a priori knowledge of the image, subject to the constraint that the estimated projection data are within a specified tolerance of the available metal-shadow-excluded projection data, with image non-negativity enforced. The minimization problem is solved through the alternation of projection-onto-convex-sets and the steepest gradient descent of the objective function. The constrained optimization algorithm is evaluated with a penalized smoothness objective. The study shows that the proposed method is capable of significantly reducing metal artifacts, suppressing noise, and improving soft-tissue visibility. It outperforms the FBP-type methods and ART and EM methods and yields artifacts-free images. Constrained optimization is an effective way to deal with CT reconstruction with embedded metal objects. Although the method is presented in the context of metal artifacts, it is applicable to general "missing data" image reconstruction problems.

  12. Beam Hardening Artifacts: Comparison between Two Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. At present, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has become a substitute for computed tomography (CT in dental procedures. The metallic materials used in dentistry can produce artifacts due to the beam hardening phenomenon. These artifacts decrease the quality of images. In the present study, the number of artifacts as a result of beam hardening in the images of dental implants was compared between two NewTom VG and Planmeca Promax 3D Max CBCT machines. Materials and methods. An implant drilling model was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Scanning procedures were carried out by two CBCT machines. The corresponding sections (coronal and axial of the implants were evaluated by two radiologists. The number of artifacts in each image was determined using the scale provided. Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons at a significance level of P<0.05. Results. There were statistically significant differences in beam hardening artifacts in axial and coronal sections between the two x-ray machines (P<0.001, with a higher quality in the images produced by the NewTom VG. Conclusion. Given the higher quality of the images produced by the NewTom VG x-ray machine, it is recommended for imaging of patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses or previous implant treatments.

  13. A novel Glycine soja homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) I gene, Gshdz4, positively regulates bicarbonate tolerance and responds to osmotic stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Yu, Yang; DuanMu, Huizi; Chen, Chao; Duan, Xiangbo; Zhu, Pinghui; Chen, Ranran; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Yanming; Ding, Xiaodong

    2016-08-24

    Wild soybean (Glycine soja) is a highly adaptive plant species which can grow well in saline-alkaline soils. In soybean genome, there exist about 140 HD-Zip (Homeodomain-leucine Zipper) genes. HD-Zip transcription factor family is one of the largest plant specific superfamilies and plays important roles in response to abiotic stresses. Although HD-Zip transcription factors have been broadly reported to be involved in plant resistance to abiotic stresses like salt and drought, their roles in response to bicarbonate stress is largely unknown. From our previous transcriptome profile analysis of wild soybean treated by 50 mM NaHCO3, we identified an HD-Zip gene (Gshdz4) which showed high response to the alkaline stress. Our result of qRT-PCR showed that the expression of Gshdz4 was induced by alkaline stress (NaHCO3) in both leaves and roots of wild soybean. Overexpression of Gshdz4 in Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced tolerance to NaHCO3 and KHCO3 during the process of plant growth and development. However, the growths of transgenic and WT plants were not significantly different on the medium with high pH adjusted by KOH, implicating Gshdz4 is only responsible for resisting HCO3 (-) but not high pH. The transgenic plants had less MDA contents but higher POD activities and chlorophyll contents than the WT plants. Moreover, the transcript levels of stress-related genes, such as NADP-ME, H (+) -Ppase, RD29B and KIN1 were increased with greater extent in the transgenic plants than the wild plants. On the contrary, Gshdz4 overexpression lines were much sensitive to osmotic stress at seed germination and stocking stages compared to the wild plants. We revealed that the important and special roles of Gshdz4 in enhancing bicarbonate tolerance and responding to osmotic stress. It is the first time to elucidate these novel functions of HD-ZIP transcription factors. All the evidences broaden our understanding of functions of HD-Zip family and provide clues for uncovering the

  14. Salt effects on hydrophobic interaction and charge screening in the folding of a negatively charged peptide to a coiled coil (leucine zipper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelesarov, I; Dürr, E; Thomas, R M; Bosshard, H R

    1998-05-19

    The stability of a coiled coil or leucine zipper is controlled by hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic forces between the constituent helices. We have designed a 30-residue peptide with the repeating seven-residue pattern of a coiled coil, (abcdefg)n, and with Glu in positions e and g of each heptad. The glutamate side chains prevented folding at pH values above 6 because of electrostatic repulsion across the helix dimer interface as well as within the individual helices. Protonation of the carboxylates changed the conformation from a random coil monomer to a coiled coil dimer. Folding at alkaline pH where the peptide had a net charge of -7e was promoted by the addition of salts. The nature of the charge screening cation was less important than that of the anion. The high salt concentrations (>1 M) necessary to induce folding indicated that the salt-induced folding resulted from alterations in the protein-water interaction. Folding was promoted by the kosmotropic anions sulfate and fluoride and to a lesser extent by the weak kosmotrope formate, whereas chloride and the strong chaotrope perchlorate were ineffective. Kosmotropes are excluded from the protein surface, which is preferentially hydrated, and this promotes folding by strengthening hydrophobic interactions at the coiled coil interface. Although charge neutralization also contributed to folding, it was effective only when the screening cation was partnered by a good kosmotropic anion. Folding conformed to a two-state transition from random coil monomer to coiled coil dimer and was enthalpy driven and characterized by a change in the heat capacity of unfolding of 3.9 +/- 1.2 kJ mol-1 K-1. The rate of folding was analyzed by fluorescence stopped-flow measurements. Folding occurred in a biphasic reaction in which the rapid formation of an initial dimer (kf = 2 x 10(7) M-1 s-1) was followed by an equally rapid concentration-independent rearrangement to the folded dimer (k > 100 s-1).

  15. Assessments of total hip replacements before and after revision surgery with use of computed tomography with metal artifact reduction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.D.; Fishman, E.K.; Kalender, W.A.; Magid, D.; Weiss, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Radiographic assessment of revision total hip replacements suffers from the inability to provide adequate information regarding bone stock loss. Even CT, with its transaxial orientation, is limited because of metal artifacts. Three metal artifact reduction techniques are available for CT: material-dependent imaging, planar reformation of image data, and missing projection data replacement. These techniques were used to evaluate preoperatively seven patients with revision total hip replacements, and postoperatively eight patients with primary total hip replacements. Despite significant artifacts on the routine transaxial images, the metal artifact-reduced images were of sufficient quality to provide pertinent clinical information in all cases

  16. Image quality analysis to reduce dental artifacts in head and neck imaging with dual-source computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, D.; Werner, M.K.; Thomas, C.; Tsiflikas, I.; Reimann, A.; Claussen, C.D.; Heuschmid, M.; Koitschev, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Important oropharyngeal structures can be superimposed by metallic artifacts due to dental implants. The aim of this study was to compare the image quality of multiplanar reconstructions and an angulated spiral in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) of the neck. Materials and Methods: Sixty-two patients were included for neck imaging with DSCT. MPRs from an axial dataset and an additional short spiral parallel to the mouth floor were acquired. Leading anatomical structures were then evaluated with respect to the extent to which they were affected by dental artifacts using a visual scale, ranging from 1 (least artifacts) to 4 (most artifacts). Results: In MPR, 87.1 % of anatomical structures had significant artifacts (3.12 ± 0.86), while in angulated slices leading anatomical structures of the oropharynx showed negligible artifacts (1.28 ± 0.46). The diagnostic growth due to primarily angulated slices concerning artifact severity was significant (p < 0.01). Conclusion: MPRs are not capable of reducing dental artifacts sufficiently. In patients with dental artifacts overlying the anatomical structures of the oropharynx, an additional short angulated spiral parallel to the floor of the mouth is recommended and should be applied for daily routine. As a result of the static gantry design of DSCT, the use of a flexible head holder is essential. (orig.)

  17. Clean HMBC: Suppression of strong-coupling induced artifacts in HMBC spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Peter; Permi, Perttu; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2008-01-01

    in HMBC spectra, but they have apparently been overlooked, presumably because they have been assigned to inefficiency of low-pass J filters or not noticed because of a coarse digital resolution in the spectra. Clean HMBC is the HMBC technique of choice for molecules notorious for strong coupling among......A new experiment, clean HMBC, is introduced for suppression of strong-coupling induced artifacts in HMBC spectra. The culprits of these artifacts are an inherent shortcoming of low-pass J filters in the presence of strong coupling and the 1H p pulse in the middle of the evolution period aimed...... at suppressing evolution under heteronuclear J couplings and 1H chemical shifts. A p pulse causes coherence transfer in strongly coupled spin systems and, as is well known in e.g., homonuclear J spectra, this leads to peaks that would not be there in the absence of strong coupling. Similar artifacts occur...

  18. Artifacts in the measurement of skin temperature under infant radiant warmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, M H; Edwards, N K

    1985-01-01

    All skin temperature probes measure, to some extent, operative temperature as well as skin temperature, and thus artifactually measure a temperature different from true skin temperature. To assess the magnitude and direction of these artifacts in the measurement of surface temperature in radiant warmers designed for human infants, the artifactual deviation of measured surface temperatures from mean surface temperature was determined under a short-wavelength warmer and a long-wavelength radiant warmer, using a copper ball as an experimental model. The measurements were made using both a disk-shaped thermistor and a tubular thermistor. All measurements were made near the top of the hemisphere of the ball facing the heating element of the warmer. In all cases, the average artifact was negative. That is, even on the surface of the ball near the radiant heat source, the surface temperature probes recorded an artifactually low temperature. In the analogous clinical setting, a somewhat larger negative artifact would be expected.

  19. Automated motion artifact removal for intravital microscopy, without a priori information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matthew; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy, through extended penetration depth and imaging resolution, provides the ability to image at cellular and subcellular resolution in live animals, presenting an opportunity for new insights into in vivo biology. Unfortunately, physiological induced motion components due to respiration and cardiac activity are major sources of image artifacts and impose severe limitations on the effective imaging resolution that can be ultimately achieved in vivo. Here we present a novel imaging methodology capable of automatically removing motion artifacts during intravital microscopy imaging of organs and orthotopic tumors. The method is universally applicable to different laser scanning modalities including confocal and multiphoton microscopy, and offers artifact free reconstructions independent of the physiological motion source and imaged organ. The methodology, which is based on raw data acquisition followed by image processing, is here demonstrated for both cardiac and respiratory motion compensation in mice heart, kidney, liver, pancreas and dorsal window chamber.

  20. Metal artifact reduction in CT by identifying missing data hidden in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Choi, Jae Kyu; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Kyung Sang; Lee, Sang-Hwy; Ye, Jong Chul; Seo, Jin Keun

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing demand in the field of dental and medical radiography for effective metal artifact reduction (MAR) in computed tomography (CT) because artifact caused by metallic objects causes serious image degradation that obscures information regarding the teeth and/or other biological structures. This paper presents a new MAR method that uses the Laplacian operator to reveal background projection data hidden in regions containing data from metal. In the proposed method, we attempted to decompose the projection data into two parts: data from metal only (metal data), and background data in the absence of metal. Removing metal data from the projections enables us to perform sparsity-driven reconstruction of the metal component and subsequent removal of the metal artifact. The results of clinical experiments demonstrated that the proposed MAR algorithm improves image quality and increases the standard of 3D reconstruction images of the teeth and mandible.

  1. A PRACTICAL ONTOLOGY FOR THE LARGE-SCALE MODELING OF SCHOLARLY ARTIFACTS AND THEIR USAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RODRIGUEZ, MARKO A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BOLLEN, JOHAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; VAN DE SOMPEL, HERBERT [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-30

    The large-scale analysis of scholarly artifact usage is constrained primarily by current practices in usage data archiving, privacy issues concerned with the dissemination of usage data, and the lack of a practical ontology for modeling the usage domain. As a remedy to the third constraint, this article presents a scholarly ontology that was engineered to represent those classes for which large-scale bibliographic and usage data exists, supports usage research, and whose instantiation is scalable to the order of 50 million articles along with their associated artifacts (e.g. authors and journals) and an accompanying 1 billion usage events. The real world instantiation of the presented abstract ontology is a semantic network model of the scholarly community which lends the scholarly process to statistical analysis and computational support. They present the ontology, discuss its instantiation, and provide some example inference rules for calculating various scholarly artifact metrics.

  2. Industrial Experiences with a Formal DSL Semantics to Check the Correctness of DSL Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmen Keshishzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A domain specific language (DSL abstracts from implementation details and is aligned with the way domain experts reason about a software component. The development of DSLs is usually centered around a grammar and transformations that generate implementation code or analysis models. The semantics of the language is often defined implicitly and in terms of a transformation to implementation code. In the presence of multiple transformations from the DSL, the correctness of the generated artifacts with respect to the semantics of the DSL is a relevant issue. We show that a formal semantics is essential for checking the correctness of the generated artifacts. We exploit the formal semantics in an industrial project and use formal techniques based on equivalence checking and model-based testing for validating the correctness of the generated artifacts. We report about our experience with this approach in an industrial development project.

  3. Neutron measurements of stresses in a test artifact produced by laser-based additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas; Slotwinski, John; Moylan, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    A stainless steel test artifact produced by Direct Metal Laser Sintering and similar to a proposed standardized test artifact was examined using neutron diffraction. The artifact contained a number of structures with different aspect ratios pertaining to wall thickness, height above base plate, and side length. Through spatial resolutions of the order of one millimeter the volumetric distribution of stresses in several was measured. It was found that the stresses peak in the tensile region around 500 MPa near the top surface, with balancing compressive stresses in the interior. The presence of a support structure (a one millimeter high, thin walled, hence weaker, lattice structure deposited on the base plate, followed by a fully dense AM structure) has only minor effects on the stresses

  4. Neutron measurements of stresses in a test artifact produced by laser-based additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas; Slotwinski, John; Moylan, Shawn

    2014-02-01

    A stainless steel test artifact produced by Direct Metal Laser Sintering and similar to a proposed standardized test artifact was examined using neutron diffraction. The artifact contained a number of structures with different aspect ratios pertaining to wall thickness, height above base plate, and side length. Through spatial resolutions of the order of one millimeter the volumetric distribution of stresses in several was measured. It was found that the stresses peak in the tensile region around 500 MPa near the top surface, with balancing compressive stresses in the interior. The presence of a support structure (a one millimeter high, thin walled, hence weaker, lattice structure deposited on the base plate, followed by a fully dense AM structure) has only minor effects on the stresses.

  5. Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion for identifying reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithun Kuniyil Ajith Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of acoustic inhomogeneities and resulting reflection artifacts is an important problem in reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging. Absorption of light by skin and superficial optical absorbers will generate photoacoustic transients, which traverse into the tissue and get reflected from structures having different acoustic impedance. These reflected photoacoustic signals, when reconstructed, may appear in the region of interest, which causes difficulties in image interpretation. We propose a novel method to identify and potentially eliminate reflection artifacts in photoacoustic images using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound [PAFUSion]. Our method uses focused ultrasound pulses to mimic the wave field produced by photoacoustic sources and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts in clinical combined photoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound. Simulation and phantom results are presented to demonstrate the validity and impact of this method. Results show that PAFUSion can identify reflections in photoacoustic images and thus envisages potential for improving photoacoustic imaging of acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  6. Storing and managing information artifacts collected by information analysts using a computing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, William A; Riensche, Roderick M; Best, Daniel M; Roberts, Ian E; Whyatt, Marie V; Hart, Michelle L; Carr, Norman J; Thomas, James J

    2012-09-18

    Systems and computer-implemented processes for storage and management of information artifacts collected by information analysts using a computing device. The processes and systems can capture a sequence of interactive operation elements that are performed by the information analyst, who is collecting an information artifact from at least one of the plurality of software applications. The information artifact can then be stored together with the interactive operation elements as a snippet on a memory device, which is operably connected to the processor. The snippet comprises a view from an analysis application, data contained in the view, and the sequence of interactive operation elements stored as a provenance representation comprising operation element class, timestamp, and data object attributes for each interactive operation element in the sequence.

  7. Analyzing pictorial artifacts from psychotherapy and art therapy when overcoming stress and trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerge, Anna; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This process based article tries to zoom into the need for assessment tools from a wider perspective to come to a preliminary understanding of what to analyze in relation to overcome traumatization and dissociation. The article wants to discuss and build understanding on what we ought...... to look for in pictorial artifacts related overcome traumatization and dissociation. After an introduction to psychotraumatology and it’s adaptions to creative arts therapy and art therapy, a literature review on assessment tools in art therapy, which can be applicable for measuring overcome...... traumatization, will be addressed. The need of a multi-dimensional tool for analysis of pictorial artifacts done in therapy is asked for and the needed components are briefly sketched. Finally the value of pictorial artifacts, made by clients in psycho-social interventions, as valid “windows” of implicit change...

  8. Effect of motion artifact on digital camera based heart rate measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M A; Malik, A S; Saad, N; Fofi, D; Meriaudeau, F

    2017-07-01

    Remote health monitoring is an emerging field in biomedical technology. Digital camera based heart rate measurement method is a recent development which would make remote health monitoring reliable and sustainable in future. This paper presents an investigation on the effect of motion artifact on digital camera-based heart rate measurement. The paper will discuss details on the principles and effects of motion artifacts on photoplethysmography signals. An experiment is conducted using publicly available MAHNOB-HCI database. We have investigated the effects of static scenarios, scenarios involving rigid motion and scenarios involving non-rigid motion. The experiment was tested on state of the art digital camera based heart rate measuring methods. The results showed the effectiveness of the methods and provide a direction to overcome/minimize the effect of motion artifacts for future research.

  9. Evaluation of artifact-corrected electroencephalographic (EEG) training: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Jeffry P; Cruz, Daniel; Fandino, Jennifer; Cacciaguerra, Fabiana R; Fresco, Joseph J; Guerra, Austin T

    2018-03-26

    This double-blind study examined the effect of electromyographical (EMG) artifacts, which contaminate electroencephalographical (EEG) signals, by comparing artifact-corrected (AC) and non-artifact-corrected (NAC) neurofeedback (NF) training procedures. 14 unmedicated college students were randomly assigned to two groups: AC (n = 7) or NAC (n = 7). Both groups received 12 sessions of NF and were trained using identical NF treatment protocols to reduce their theta/beta power ratios (TBPR). Outcomes on a continuous performance test revealed that the AC group had statistically significant increases across measures of auditory and visual attention. The NAC group showed smaller gains that only reached statistical significance on measures of visual attention. Only the AC group reduced their TBPR, the NAC group did not. AC NF appears to play an important role during training that leads to improvements in both auditory and visual attention. Additional research is required to confirm the results of this study.

  10. Expression of the 1-SST and 1-FFT genes and consequent fructan accumulation in Agave tequilana and A. inaequidens is differentially induced by diverse (a)biotic-stress related elicitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Edgar Martín; López, Mercedes G; Délano-Frier, John P; Gómez-Leyva, Juan Florencio

    2014-02-15

    The expression of genes coding for sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST; EC 2.4.1.99) and fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase (1-FFT; EC 2.4.1.100), both fructan biosynthesizing enzymes, characterization by TLC and HPAEC-PAD, as well as the quantification of the fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) accumulating in response to the exogenous application of sucrose, kinetin (cytokinin) or other plant hormones associated with (a)biotic stress responses were determined in two Agave species grown in vitro, domesticated Agave tequilana var. azul and wild A. inaequidens. It was found that elicitors such as salicylic acid (SA), and jasmonic acid methyl ester (MeJA) had the strongest effect on fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) accumulation. The exogenous application of 1mM SA induced a 36-fold accumulation of FOS of various degrees of polymerization (DP) in stems of A. tequilana. Other treatments, such as 50mM abscisic acid (ABA), 8% Sucrose (Suc), and 1.0 mg L(-1) kinetin (KIN) also led to a significant accumulation of low and high DP FOS in this species. Conversely, treatment with 200 μM MeJA, which was toxic to A. tequilana, induced an 85-fold accumulation of FOS in the stems of A. inaequidens. Significant FOS accumulation in this species also occurred in response to treatments with 1mM SA, 8% Suc, and 10% polyethylene glycol (PEG). Maximum yields of 13.6 and 8.9 mg FOS per g FW were obtained in stems of A. tequilana and A. inaequidens, respectively. FOS accumulation in the above treatments was tightly associated with increased expression levels of either the 1-FFT or the 1-SST gene in tissues of both Agave species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Methanol Generates Numerous Artifacts during Sample Extraction and Storage of Extracts in Metabolomics Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Sauerschnig

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Many metabolomics studies use mixtures of (acidified methanol and water for sample extraction. In the present study, we investigated if the extraction with methanol can result in artifacts. To this end, wheat leaves were extracted with mixtures of native and deuterium-labeled methanol and water, with or without 0.1% formic acid. Subsequently, the extracts were analyzed immediately or after storage at 10 °C, −20 °C or −80 °C with an HPLC-HESI-QExactive HF-Orbitrap instrument. Our results showed that 88 (8% of the >1100 detected compounds were derived from the reaction with methanol and either formed during sample extraction or short-term storage. Artifacts were found for various substance classes such as flavonoids, carotenoids, tetrapyrrols, fatty acids and other carboxylic acids that are typically investigated in metabolomics studies. 58 of 88 artifacts were common between the two tested extraction variants. Remarkably, 34 of 73 (acidified extraction solvent and 33 of 73 (non-acidified extraction solvent artifacts were formed de novo as none of these meth(oxylated metabolites were found after extraction of native leaf samples with CD3OH/H2O. Moreover, sample extracts stored at 10 °C for several days, as can typically be the case during longer measurement sequences, led to an increase in both the number and abundance of methylated artifacts. In contrast, frozen sample extracts were relatively stable during a storage period of one week. Our study shows that caution has to be exercised if methanol is used as the extraction solvent as the detected metabolites might be artifacts rather than natural constituents of the biological system. In addition, we recommend storing sample extracts in deep freezers immediately after extraction until measurement.

  12. Language and other artifacts: socio-cultural dynamics of niche construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Niche construction theory is a relatively new approach in evolutionary biology that seeks to integrate an ecological dimension into the Darwinian theory of evolution by natural selection. It is regarded by many evolutionary biologists as providing a significant revision of the Neo-Darwinian modern synthesis that unified Darwin's theory of natural and sexual selection with 20th century population genetics. Niche construction theory has been invoked as a processual mediator of social cognitive evolution and of the emergence and evolution of language. I argue that language itself can be considered as a biocultural niche and evolutionary artifact. I provide both a general analysis of the cognitive and semiotic status of artifacts, and a formal analysis of language as a social and semiotic institution, based upon a distinction between the fundamental semiotic relations of "counting as" and "standing for." I explore the consequences for theories of language and language learning of viewing language as a biocultural niche. I suggest that not only do niches mediate organism-organism interactions, but also that organisms mediate niche-niche interactions in ways that affect evolutionary processes, with the evolution of human infancy and childhood as a key example. I argue that language as a social and semiotic system is not only grounded in embodied engagements with the material and social-interactional world, but also grounds a sub-class of artifacts of particular significance in the cultural history of human cognition. Symbolic cognitive artifacts materially and semiotically mediate human cognition, and are not merely informational repositories, but co-agentively constitutive of culturally and historically emergent cognitive domains. I provide examples of the constitutive cognitive role of symbolic cognitive artifacts drawn from my research with my colleagues on cultural and linguistic conceptualizations of time, and their cultural variability. I conclude by reflecting on

  13. Medication-related cognitive artifacts used by older adults with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Robin S.; Willis, Matt; Holden, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To use a human factors perspective to examine how older adult patients with heart failure use cognitive artifacts for medication management. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of data collected from 30 patients and 14 informal caregivers enrolled in a larger study of heart failure self-care. Data included photographs, observation notes, interviews, video recordings, medical record data, and surveys. These data were analyzed using an iterative content analysis. Results Findings revealed that medication management was complex, inseparable from other patient activities, distributed across people, time, and place, and complicated by knowledge gaps. We identified fifteen types of cognitive artifacts including medical devices, pillboxes, medication lists, and electronic personal health records used for: 1) measurement/evaluation; 2) tracking/communication; 3) organization/administration; and 4) information/sensemaking. These artifacts were characterized by fit and misfit with the patient’s sociotechnical system and demonstrated both advantages and disadvantages. We found that patients often modified or “finished the design” of existing artifacts and relied on “assemblages” of artifacts, routines, and actors to accomplish their self-care goals. Conclusions Cognitive artifacts are useful but sometimes are poorly designed or are not used optimally. If appropriately designed for usability and acceptance, paper-based and computer-based information technologies can improve medication management for individuals living with chronic illness. These technologies can be designed for use by patients, caregivers, and clinicians; should support collaboration and communication between these individuals; can be coupled with home-based and wearable sensor technology; and must fit their users’ needs, limitations, abilities, tasks, routines, and contexts of use. PMID:26855882

  14. Language and other artifacts: socio-cultural dynamics of niche construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Niche construction theory is a relatively new approach in evolutionary biology that seeks to integrate an ecological dimension into the Darwinian theory of evolution by natural selection. It is regarded by many evolutionary biologists as providing a significant revision of the Neo-Darwinian modern synthesis that unified Darwin’s theory of natural and sexual selection with 20th century population genetics. Niche construction theory has been invoked as a processual mediator of social cognitive evolution and of the emergence and evolution of language. I argue that language itself can be considered as a biocultural niche and evolutionary artifact. I provide both a general analysis of the cognitive and semiotic status of artifacts, and a formal analysis of language as a social and semiotic institution, based upon a distinction between the fundamental semiotic relations of “counting as” and “standing for.” I explore the consequences for theories of language and language learning of viewing language as a biocultural niche. I suggest that not only do niches mediate organism-organism interactions, but also that organisms mediate niche-niche interactions in ways that affect evolutionary processes, with the evolution of human infancy and childhood as a key example. I argue that language as a social and semiotic system is not only grounded in embodied engagements with the material and social-interactional world, but also grounds a sub-class of artifacts of particular significance in the cultural history of human cognition. Symbolic cognitive artifacts materially and semiotically mediate human cognition, and are not merely informational repositories, but co-agentively constitutive of culturally and historically emergent cognitive domains. I provide examples of the constitutive cognitive role of symbolic cognitive artifacts drawn from my research with my colleagues on cultural and linguistic conceptualizations of time, and their cultural variability. I conclude by

  15. ECG artifact cancellation in surface EMG signals by fractional order calculus application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljković, Nadica; Popović, Nenad; Djordjević, Olivera; Konstantinović, Ljubica; Šekara, Tomislav B

    2017-03-01

    New aspects for automatic electrocardiography artifact removal from surface electromyography signals by application of fractional order calculus in combination with linear and nonlinear moving window filters are explored. Surface electromyography recordings of skeletal trunk muscles are commonly contaminated with spike shaped artifacts. This artifact originates from electrical heart activity, recorded by electrocardiography, commonly present in the surface electromyography signals recorded in heart proximity. For appropriate assessment of neuromuscular changes by means of surface electromyography, application of a proper filtering technique of electrocardiography artifact is crucial. A novel method for automatic artifact cancellation in surface electromyography signals by applying fractional order calculus and nonlinear median filter is introduced. The proposed method is compared with the linear moving average filter, with and without prior application of fractional order calculus. 3D graphs for assessment of window lengths of the filters, crest factors, root mean square differences, and fractional calculus orders (called WFC and WRC graphs) have been introduced. For an appropriate quantitative filtering evaluation, the synthetic electrocardiography signal and analogous semi-synthetic dataset have been generated. The examples of noise removal in 10 able-bodied subjects and in one patient with muscle dystrophy are presented for qualitative analysis. The crest factors, correlation coefficients, and root mean square differences of the recorded and semi-synthetic electromyography datasets showed that the most successful method was the median filter in combination with fractional order calculus of the order 0.9. Statistically more significant (p ECG peak reduction was obtained by the median filter application compared to the moving average filter in the cases of low level amplitude of muscle contraction compared to ECG spikes. The presented results suggest that the

  16. Language and other artifacts: socio-cultural dynamics of niche construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eSinha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Niche construction theory is a relatively new approach in evolutionary biology that seeks to integrate an ecological dimension into the Darwinian theory of evolution by natural selection. It is regarded by many evolutionary biologists as providing a significant revision of the Neo-Darwinian modern synthesis that unified Darwin’s theory of natural and sexual selection with 20th century population genetics. Niche construction theory has been invoked as a processual mediator of social cognitive evolution and of the emergence and evolution of language. I argue that language itself can be considered as a biocultural niche and evolutionary artifact. I provide both a general analysis of the cognitive and semiotic status of artifacts, and a formal analysis of language as a social and semiotic institution, based upon a distinction between the fundamental semiotic relations of counting as and standing for. I explore the consequences for theories of language and language learning of viewing language as a biocultural niche. I suggest that not only do niches mediate organism-organism interactions, but also that organisms mediate niche-niche interactions in ways that affect evolutionary processes, with the evolution of human infancy and childhood as a key example. I argue that language as a social and semiotic system is not only grounded in embodied engagements with the material and social-interactional world, but also grounds a sub-class of artifacts of particular significance in the cultural history of human cognition. Symbolic cognitive artifacts materially and semiotically mediate human cognition, and are not merely informational repositories, but co-agentively constitutive of culturally and historically emergent cognitive domains. I provide examples of the constitutive cognitive role of symbolic cognitive artifacts drawn from my research with my colleagues on cultural and linguistic conceptualizations of time, and their cultural variability. I conclude

  17. The emergence of semantic categorization in early visual processing: ERP indices of animal vs. artifact recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Zotto Marzia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroimaging and neuropsychological literature show functional dissociations in brain activity during processing of stimuli belonging to different semantic categories (e.g., animals, tools, faces, places, but little information is available about the time course of object perceptual categorization. The aim of the study was to provide information about the timing of processing stimuli from different semantic domains, without using verbal or naming paradigms, in order to observe the emergence of non-linguistic conceptual knowledge in the ventral stream visual pathway. Event related potentials (ERPs were recorded in 18 healthy right-handed individuals as they performed a perceptual categorization task on 672 pairs of images of animals and man-made objects (i.e., artifacts. Results Behavioral responses to animal stimuli were ~50 ms faster and more accurate than those to artifacts. At early processing stages (120–180 ms the right occipital-temporal cortex was more activated in response to animals than to artifacts as indexed by posterior N1 response, while frontal/central N1 (130–160 showed the opposite pattern. In the next processing stage (200–260 the response was stronger to artifacts and usable items at anterior temporal sites. The P300 component was smaller, and the central/parietal N400 component was larger to artifacts than to animals. Conclusion The effect of animal and artifact categorization emerged at ~150 ms over the right occipital-temporal area as a stronger response of the ventral stream to animate, homomorphic, entities with faces and legs. The larger frontal/central N1 and the subsequent temporal activation for inanimate objects might reflect the prevalence of a functional rather than perceptual representation of manipulable tools compared to animals. Late ERP effects might reflect semantic integration and cognitive updating processes. Overall, the data are compatible with a modality-specific semantic memory

  18. Iterative metal artifact reduction improves dose calculation accuracy. Phantom study with dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerz, Manuel; Mittermair, Pia; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara; Krauss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artifacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which affect the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of the metal artifact reduction algorithm iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) in terms of correct representation of Hounsfield units (HU) and dose calculation accuracy. Heterogeneous phantoms consisting of different types of tissue equivalent material surrounding metallic dental implants were designed. Artifact-containing CT data of the phantoms were corrected using iMAR. Corrected and uncorrected CT data were compared to synthetic CT data to evaluate accuracy of HU reproduction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated in Oncentra v4.3 on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to Gafchromic trademark EBT3 films to assess accuracy of dose calculation. The use of iMAR increased the accuracy of HU reproduction. The average deviation of HU decreased from 1006 HU to 408 HU in areas including metal and from 283 HU to 33 HU in tissue areas excluding metal. Dose calculation accuracy could be significantly improved for all phantoms and plans: The mean passing rate for gamma evaluation with 3 % dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement increased from 90.6 % to 96.2 % if artifacts were corrected by iMAR. The application of iMAR allows metal artifacts to be removed to a great extent which leads to a significant increase in dose calculation accuracy. (orig.) [de

  19. Sampling artifacts in active air sampling of semivolatile organic contaminants: Comparing theoretical and measured artifacts and evaluating implications for monitoring networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melymuk, Lisa; Bohlin-Nizzetto, Pernilla; Prokeš, Roman; Kukučka, Petr; Klánová, Jana

    2016-10-01

    The effects of sampling artifacts are often not fully considered in the design of air monitoring with active air samplers. Semivolatile organic contaminants (SVOCs) are particularly vulnerable to a range of sampling artifacts because of their wide range of gas-particle partitioning and degradation rates, and these can lead to erroneous measurements of air concentrations and a lack of comparability between sites with different environmental and sampling conditions. This study used specially adapted filter-sorbent sampling trains in three types of active air samplers to investigate breakthrough of SVOCs, and the possibility of other sampling artifacts. Breakthrough volumes were experimentally determined for a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sampling volumes from 300 to 10,000 m(3), and sampling durations of 1-7 days. In parallel, breakthrough was estimated based on theoretical sorbent-vapor pressure relationships. The comparison of measured and theoretical determinations of breakthrough demonstrated good agreement between experimental and estimated breakthrough volumes, and showed that theoretical breakthrough estimates should be used when developing air monitoring protocols. Significant breakthrough in active air samplers occurred for compounds with vapor pressure >0.5 Pa at volumes air monitoring networks, and may lead to under-reporting of more volatile SVOCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Discovery of the Earliest Synthetic Carborundum (SiC in Neolithic Jade Artifacts in Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jung Chou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Raman microscopy and scanning electron microscopy we have successfully identified, for the first time, synthetic silicon carbide (carborundum particles in 15 unearthed relics and assorted remains from five out of six Neolithic sites (~4000 - 7000 years b.p. in Eastern China. Because of its extreme hardness, silicon carbide was apparently employed in the manufacture of ancient jade artifacts presumably as an abrasive for polishing. We show that Neolithic people may have already used this synthetic material to carve and polish both jade and quartz artifacts, contributing to the blooming development of the jade culture throughout ancient China.

  1. Simple method for adaptive filtering of motion artifacts in E-textile wearable ECG sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhidir, Tamador; Sluzek, Andrzej; Yapici, Murat Kaya

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we have developed a simple method for adaptive out-filtering of the motion artifact from the electrocardiogram (ECG) obtained by using conductive textile electrodes. The textile electrodes were placed on the left and the right wrist to measure ECG through lead-1 configuration. The motion artifact was induced by simple hand movements. The reference signal for adaptive filtering was obtained by placing additional electrodes at one hand to capture the motion of the hand. The adaptive filtering was compared to independent component analysis (ICA) algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the adaptive filtering approach was higher than independent component analysis in most cases.

  2. Pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of oncologic PET/CT of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Capobianco, Julia; Oliveira, Marco Antonio Conde de, E-mail: gustavo.meirelles@grupofleury.com.br [Grupo Fleury, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    PET/CT is widely used for the evaluation of patients with thoracic malignancies. Although the levels of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake are usually high in neoplastic diseases, they can also be physiological, due to artifacts. In addition, FDG uptake can occur in benign conditions such as infectious, inflammatory, and iatrogenic lesions. Furthermore, some malignant tumors, such as adenocarcinoma in situ (formerly known as bronchoalveolar carcinoma) and carcinoid tumors, may not show FDG uptake. Here, we illustrate the main pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of the results of oncologic PET/CT of the chest, outlining strategies for avoiding misinterpretation. (author)

  3. Electrocardiogram artifact caused by rigors mimicking narrow complex tachycardia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Anne Thushara; Indrakumar, Jegarajah

    2014-02-04

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is useful in the diagnosis of cardiac and non-cardiac conditions. Rigors due to shivering can cause electrocardiogram artifacts mimicking various cardiac rhythm abnormalities. We describe an 80-year-old Sri Lankan man with an abnormal electrocardiogram mimicking narrow complex tachycardia during the immediate post-operative period. Electrocardiogram changes caused by muscle tremor during rigors could mimic a narrow complex tachycardia. Identification of muscle tremor as a cause of electrocardiogram artifact can avoid unnecessary pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention to prevent arrhythmias.

  4. Technical Note: On GAFChromic EBT-XD film and the lateral response artifact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, David F.; Chan, Maria F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The new radiochromic film, GAFChromic EBT-XD, contains the same active material, lithium-10,12-pentacosadiynoate, as GAFChromic EBT3, but the crystalline form is different. This work investigates the effect of this change on the well-known lateral response artifact when EBT-XD film is digitized on a flatbed scanner. Methods: The dose response of a single production lot of EBT-XD was characterized by scanning an unexposed film plus a set of films exposed to doses between 2.5 and 50 Gy using 6 MV photons. To characterize the lateral response artifact, the authors used the unexposed film plus a subset of samples exposed to doses between 20 and 50 Gy. Digital images of these films were acquired at seven discrete lateral locations perpendicular to the scan direction on three Epson 10000XL scanners. Using measurements at the discrete lateral positions, the scanner responses were determined as a function of the lateral position of the film. From the data for each scanner, a set of coefficients were derived whereby measured response values could be corrected to remove the effects of the lateral response artifact. The EBT-XD data were analyzed as in their previous work and compared to results reported for EBT3 in that paper. Results: For films scanned in the same orientation and having equal responses, the authors found that the lateral response artifact for EBT-XD and EBT3 films was remarkably similar. For both films, the artifact increases with increased net response. However, as EBT-XD is less sensitive than EBT3, a greater exposure dose is required to reach the same net response. On this basis, the lower sensitivity of EBT-XD relative to EBT3 results in less net response change for equal exposure and a reduction in the impact of the lateral response artifact. Conclusions: The shape of the crystalline active component in EBT-XD and EBT3 does not affect the fundamental existence of the lateral response artifact when the films are digitized on flatbed scanners

  5. CT and MR imaging artifacts produced by stainless steel, titanium, and polymer surgical clips and staples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleine, L.J.; Jolesz, F.A.; Colucci, V.; Adams, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the effect of metal and polymer surgical clips and staples on CT and MR image quality, the authors obtained images of the implants in water and gelatin phantoms and muscle and brain tissue. Deflection angles were measured; the deflection force associated with steel devices of 1.89 T was six times that associated with titanium. Stainless steel staples produced artifacts on CT, while titanium and polymer did not. At 0.14 T, MR imaging artifacts were seen with steel but not titanium or polymer implants. At 1.89 T, distortion was caused by all stainless steel staples and the largest titanium staples, but not by polymer clips

  6. Improved signal model for confocal sensors accounting for object depending artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauch, Florian; Lyda, Wolfram; Gronle, Marc; Osten, Wolfgang

    2012-08-27

    The conventional signal model of confocal sensors is well established and has proven to be exceptionally robust especially when measuring rough surfaces. Its physical derivation however is explicitly based on plane surfaces or point like objects, respectively. Here we show experimental results of a confocal point sensor measurement of a surface standard. The results illustrate the rise of severe artifacts when measuring curved surfaces. On this basis, we present a systematic extension of the conventional signal model that is proven to be capable of qualitatively explaining these artifacts.

  7. Artifact reduction of compressed images and video combining adaptive fuzzy filtering and directional anisotropic diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadernejad, Ehsan; Forchhammer, Søren; Korhonen, Jari

    2011-01-01

    and ringing artifacts, we have applied directional anisotropic diffusion. Besides that, the selection of the adaptive threshold parameter for the diffusion coefficient has also improved the performance of the algorithm. Experimental results on JPEG compressed images as well as MJPEG and H.264 compressed......Fuzzy filtering is one of the recently developed methods for reducing distortion in compressed images and video. In this paper, we combine the powerful anisotropic diffusion equations with fuzzy filtering in order to reduce the impact of artifacts. Based on the directional nature of the blocking...

  8. Reduction of image artifacts in three-dimensional optical coherence tomography of skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Yih Miin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents results of in vivo studies on the effect of refractive index-matching media on image artifacts in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human skin. These artifacts present as streaks of artificially low backscatter and displacement or distortion of features. They are primarily caused by refraction and scattering of the OCT light beam at the skin surface. The impact of the application of glycerol and ultrasound gel is assessed on both novel skin-mimicking phantoms and in vivo human skin, including assessment of the epidermal thickening caused by the media. Based on our findings, recommendations are given for optimal OCT imaging of skin in vivo.

  9. Mastering the discrete Fourier transform in one, two or several dimensions pitfalls and artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Amidror, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    The discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is an extremely useful tool that finds application in many different disciplines. However, its use requires caution. The aim of this book is to explain the DFT and its various artifacts and pitfalls and to show how to avoid these (whenever possible), or at least how to recognize them in order to avoid misinterpretations. This concentrated treatment of the DFT artifacts and pitfalls in a single volume is, indeed, new, and it makes this book a valuable source of information for the widest possible range of DFT users. Special attention is given to the one and

  10. The experimental quantitative study of spectral CT imaging in reducing the metal artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoli; Feng Weihua; Dong Cheng; Chen Haisong; Cao Huizhi; Xu Wenjian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of spectral CT in reducing artifacts caused by metallic implants. Methods: Porcine lumbar spines were chosen as anthropomorphic phantom. The model was examined before and after implanting the titanic nail into the second and fourth lumbar vertebral body using gemstone spectral CT protocol and standard 120 kVp spectra. Specific post-processing technique was applied to generate 11 kinds of images of monochromatic energy and Metal Artifacts Reducing system (MARs) with the interval of 10 keV ranging from 40-140 keV. The image quality was compared subjectively between 120 kVp group and GSI group after implantation. Three regions of interest based on distances along the most pronounced artifact were chosen and marked as ROI near , ROI mid , ROI far successively. Artifacts parameters including CT value and SD value were measured. The CT value of different ROIs were compared with LSD and Bonferroni test. Contrast-to-noise ratio and artifacts index were calculated. An optimal range of keV was determined according to artifacts index. Results: Image quality of' Gemstone spectra images was rated superior to the standard images. An optimized spectrum of keV based on artifacts index was from 80 keV to 100 keV. For ROI near , CT value was (80.25±16.00) HU and (30.10±10.45) HU respectively in group Mono before implantation and group Mono + MARs after implantation. The differences were significant (Z= 2.978, P mid and ROI far , CT value was (63.21±6.61) HU and (54.84±10.60) HU, (76.54±9.07) HU and (73.20±5.39) HU respectively. There was no significant differences (t=0.530, P>0.05; t=0.822, P>0.05). Conclusion: Metal artifacts could be reduced effectively at the site 3 cm away from implants using gemstone spectral CT. An accurate CT value of surrounding tissue can be obtained. (authors)

  11. Technical Note: On GAFChromic EBT-XD film and the lateral response artifact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, David F., E-mail: rcfilmconsulting@gmail.com [RC Film Consulting LLC, 54 Benedict Road, Monroe, Connecticut 06468 (United States); Chan, Maria F. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 136 Mountain View Boulevard, Basking Ridge, New Jersey 07920 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: The new radiochromic film, GAFChromic EBT-XD, contains the same active material, lithium-10,12-pentacosadiynoate, as GAFChromic EBT3, but the crystalline form is different. This work investigates the effect of this change on the well-known lateral response artifact when EBT-XD film is digitized on a flatbed scanner. Methods: The dose response of a single production lot of EBT-XD was characterized by scanning an unexposed film plus a set of films exposed to doses between 2.5 and 50 Gy using 6 MV photons. To characterize the lateral response artifact, the authors used the unexposed film plus a subset of samples exposed to doses between 20 and 50 Gy. Digital images of these films were acquired at seven discrete lateral locations perpendicular to the scan direction on three Epson 10000XL scanners. Using measurements at the discrete lateral positions, the scanner responses were determined as a function of the lateral position of the film. From the data for each scanner, a set of coefficients were derived whereby measured response values could be corrected to remove the effects of the lateral response artifact. The EBT-XD data were analyzed as in their previous work and compared to results reported for EBT3 in that paper. Results: For films scanned in the same orientation and having equal responses, the authors found that the lateral response artifact for EBT-XD and EBT3 films was remarkably similar. For both films, the artifact increases with increased net response. However, as EBT-XD is less sensitive than EBT3, a greater exposure dose is required to reach the same net response. On this basis, the lower sensitivity of EBT-XD relative to EBT3 results in less net response change for equal exposure and a reduction in the impact of the lateral response artifact. Conclusions: The shape of the crystalline active component in EBT-XD and EBT3 does not affect the fundamental existence of the lateral response artifact when the films are digitized on flatbed scanners

  12. Online Artifact Removal for Brain-Computer Interfaces Using Support Vector Machines and Blind Source Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Halder

    2007-01-01

    that are designed for online usage. In order to select a suitable BSS/ICA method, three ICA algorithms (JADE, Infomax, and FastICA and one BSS algorithm (AMUSE are evaluated to determine their ability to isolate electromyographic (EMG and electrooculographic (EOG artifacts into individual components. An implementation of the selected BSS/ICA method with SVMs trained to classify EMG and EOG artifacts, which enables the usage of the method as a filter in measurements with online feedback, is described. This filter is evaluated on three BCI datasets as a proof-of-concept of the method.

  13. Modeling artifacts in the simulation of the sedimentation of raindrops with a Quadrature Method of Moments

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Jasor; Ulrike Wacker; Klaus Dieter Beheng; Wolfgang Polifke

    2014-01-01

    The Quadrature Method of Moments (QMoM) is applied to a one-dimensional test case for sedimentation of raindrops. Comparison of the results with a reference spectral method exhibits discrepancies (“step patterns”) that must be considered as modeling artifacts. As the QMoM has been demonstrated to be effective and accurate in various contexts, the origin of these artifacts is investigated and found to be related to the transport of the quadrature abscissas. Further test cases are considered to...

  14. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approaches is based on the sinogram processing also known as the pre-processing techniques and the other category of techniques perform processing on the 2-D reconstructed images, recognized as the post-processing techniques in the literature. The strength and weakness of these categories of approaches are yet to be explored from a common platform. Method In this paper, a comparative study of the two categories of ring artifact reduction techniques basically designed for the multi-slice CT instruments is presented from a common platform. For comparison, two representative algorithms from each of the two categories are selected from the published literature. A very recently reported state-of-the-art sinogram domain ring artifact correction method that classifies the ring artifacts according to their strength and then corrects the artifacts using class adaptive correction schemes is also included in this comparative study. The first sinogram domain correction method uses a wavelet based technique to detect the corrupted pixels and then using a simple linear interpolation technique estimates the responses of the bad pixels. The second sinogram based correction method performs all the filtering operations in the transform domain, i.e., in the wavelet and Fourier domain. On the other hand, the two post-processing based correction techniques actually operate on the polar transform domain of the reconstructed CT images. The first method extracts the ring artifact template vector using a homogeneity

  15. Independent component analysis for cochlear implant artifacts attenuation from electrically evoked auditory steady-state response measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Hanne; Gransier, Robin; Hofmann, Michael; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan; Moonen, Marc

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs) are potentially useful for objective cochlear implant (CI) fitting and follow-up of the auditory maturation in infants and children with a CI. EASSRs are recorded in the electro-encephalogram (EEG) in response to electrical stimulation with continuous pulse trains, and are distorted by significant CI artifacts related to this electrical stimulation. The aim of this study is to evaluate a CI artifacts attenuation method based on independent component analysis (ICA) for three EASSR datasets. Approach. ICA has often been used to remove CI artifacts from the EEG to record transient auditory responses, such as cortical evoked auditory potentials. Independent components (ICs) corresponding to CI artifacts are then often manually identified. In this study, an ICA based CI artifacts attenuation method was developed and evaluated for EASSR measurements with varying CI artifacts and EASSR characteristics. Artifactual ICs were automatically identified based on their spectrum. Main results. For 40 Hz amplitude modulation (AM) stimulation at comfort level, in high SNR recordings, ICA succeeded in removing CI artifacts from all recording channels, without distorting the EASSR. For lower SNR recordings, with 40 Hz AM stimulation at lower levels, or 90 Hz AM stimulation, ICA either distorted the EASSR or could not remove all CI artifacts in most subjects, except for two of the seven subjects tested with low level 40 Hz AM stimulation. Noise levels were reduced after ICA was applied, and up to 29 ICs were rejected, suggesting poor ICA separation quality. Significance. We hypothesize that ICA is capable of separating CI artifacts and EASSR in case the contralateral hemisphere is EASSR dominated. For small EASSRs or large CI artifact amplitudes, ICA separation quality is insufficient to ensure complete CI artifacts attenuation without EASSR distortion.

  16. Experimental study of beam hardening artifacts in photon counting breast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Del Guerra, A. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Lanconelli, N. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Lauria, A.; Mettivier, G. [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Naples (Italy); Montesi, M.C. [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: montesi@na.infn.it; Panetta, D. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Pani, R. [Dip. di Medicina Sperimentale, Univ. La Sapienza and INFN, Rome (Italy); Quattrocchi, M.G. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Randaccio, P. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Cagliari and INFN, Cagliari (Italy); Rosso, V. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Russo, P. [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Naples (Italy)

    2007-10-21

    We are implementing an X-ray breast Computed Tomography (CT) system on the gantry of a dedicated single photon emission tomography system for breast Tc-99 imaging. For the breast CT system we investigated the relevance of the beam hardening artifact. We studied the use of a single photon counting silicon pixel detector (0.3 mm thick, 256x256 pixel, 55{mu}m pitch, bump-bonded to the Medipix2 photon counting readout chip) as detector unit in our X-ray CT system. We evaluated the beam hardening 'cupping' artifact using homogeneous PMMA slabs and phantoms up to 14 cm in diameter, used as uncompressed breast tissue phantoms, imaged with a tungsten anode tube at 80 kVp with 4.2 mm Al filtration. For beam hardening evaluation we used a bimodal energy model. The CT data show a 'cupping' artifact going from 4% (4-cm thick material) to 18% (14-cm thick material). This huge artifacts is influenced by the low detection efficiency and the charge sharing effect of the silicon pixel detector.

  17. A Compact Closed-Loop Optogenetics System Based on Artifact-Free Transparent Graphene Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiology is a decades-old technique widely used for monitoring activity of individual neurons and local field potentials. Optogenetics has revolutionized neuroscience studies by offering selective and fast control of targeted neurons and neuron populations. The combination of these two techniques is crucial for causal investigation of neural circuits and understanding their functional connectivity. However, electrical artifacts generated by light stimulation interfere with neural recordings and hinder the development of compact closed-loop systems for precise control of neural activity. Here, we demonstrate that transparent graphene micro-electrodes fabricated on a clear polyethylene terephthalate film eliminate the light-induced artifact problem and allow development of a compact battery-powered closed-loop optogenetics system. We extensively investigate light-induced artifacts for graphene electrodes in comparison to metal control electrodes. We then design optical stimulation module using micro-LED chips coupled to optical fibers to deliver light to intended depth for optogenetic stimulation. For artifact-free integration of graphene micro-electrode recordings with optogenetic stimulation, we design and develop a compact closed-loop system and validate it for different frequencies of interest for neural recordings. This compact closed-loop optogenetics system can be used for various applications involving optogenetic stimulation and electrophysiological recordings.

  18. Archaeology Through Computational Linguistics : Inscription Statistics Predict Excavation Sites of Indus Valley Artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recchia, Gabriel L; Louwerse, Max M

    2015-01-01

    Computational techniques comparing co-occurrences of city names in texts allow the relative longitudes and latitudes of cities to be estimated algorithmically. However, these techniques have not been applied to estimate the provenance of artifacts with unknown origins. Here, we estimate the

  19. Complementary contrast media for metal artifact reduction in dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jack W; Edic, Peter M; FitzGerald, Paul F; Torres, Andrew S; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-07-01

    Metal artifacts have been a problem associated with computed tomography (CT) since its introduction. Recent techniques to mitigate this problem have included utilization of high-energy (keV) virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images, produced via dual-energy CT (DECT). A problem with these high-keV images is that contrast enhancement provided by all commercially available contrast media is severely reduced. Contrast agents based on higher atomic number elements can maintain contrast at the higher energy levels where artifacts are reduced. This study evaluated three such candidate elements: bismuth, tantalum, and tungsten, as well as two conventional contrast elements: iodine and barium. A water-based phantom with vials containing these five elements in solution, as well as different artifact-producing metal structures, was scanned with a DECT scanner capable of rapid operating voltage switching. In the VMS datasets, substantial reductions in the contrast were observed for iodine and barium, which suffered from contrast reductions of 97% and 91%, respectively, at 140 versus 40 keV. In comparison under the same conditions, the candidate agents demonstrated contrast enhancement reductions of only 20%, 29%, and 32% for tungsten, tantalum, and bismuth, respectively. At 140 versus 40 keV, metal artifact severity was reduced by 57% to 85% depending on the phantom configuration.

  20. EEG windowed statistical wavelet scoring for evaluation and discrimination of muscular artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vialatte, François-Benoit; Cichocki, Andrzej; Solé-Casals, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    EEG recordings are usually corrupted by spurious extra-cerebral artifacts, which should be rejected or cleaned up by the practitioner. Since manual screening of human EEGs is inherently error prone and might induce experimental bias, automatic artifact detection is an issue of importance. Automatic artifact detection is the best guarantee for objective and clean results. We present a new approach, based on the time–frequency shape of muscular artifacts, to achieve reliable and automatic scoring. The impact of muscular activity on the signal can be evaluated using this methodology by placing emphasis on the analysis of EEG activity. The method is used to discriminate evoked potentials from several types of recorded muscular artifacts—with a sensitivity of 98.8% and a specificity of 92.2%. Automatic cleaning of EEG data is then successfully realized using this method, combined with independent component analysis. The outcome of the automatic cleaning is then compared with the Slepian multitaper spectrum based technique introduced by Delorme et al (2007 Neuroimage 34 1443–9)

  1. Reasserting the Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design through the Rudiments of Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafar, Musa; Babb, Jeffry

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an artifacts-based approach to teaching a senior level Object-Oriented Analysis and Design course. Regardless of the systems development methodology and process model, and in order to facilitate communication across the business modeling, analysis, design, construction and deployment disciplines, we focus on (1) the…

  2. Inspection about the corrosion of metallic archaeological artifacts in ground. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Shingo

    2002-02-01

    The corrosion of iron-base archaeological artifacts, which were dug out in Iyomai-7 (Chitose-shi, Hokkaido) and Izumo-Ooyashiro-Keidai (Taisha-machi, Shimane-ken) sites, was investigated by using X-ray CT, XRD, atomic absorption spectroscopy and EDX techniques. While the artifacts such as swords in Iyomai-7 site had been buried in the ground for 400-500 years, metallic iron remained in the swords and the corrosion amounts were estimated to be 2-5 mm. Several artifacts were investigated among a lot of iron rings and nails buried beside huge pillars of the ancient shrine. Those artifacts had been in ground for 730-750 years. The corrosion amounts were estimated to be 3-5 mm. As the both soil environments are supposed to be oxidizing, the outer oxide layers of all species are composed of goethite and soil. Further, it was clarified that perfectly corroded ones had hollow structures. In this study, the sampling method of species, the corrosion environmental factors, and the corrosion kinetic models were also evaluated. (author)

  3. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Proteins Reveals +98 u Chemical Artifacts Following Precipitation in Acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güray, Melda Z; Zheng, Shi; Doucette, Alan A

    2017-02-03

    Protein precipitation in acetone is frequently employed ahead of mass spectrometry for sample preconcentration and purification. Unfortunately, acetone is not chemically inert; mass artifacts have previously been observed on glycine-containing peptides when exposed to acetone under acidic conditions. We herein report a distinct chemical modification occurring at the level of intact proteins when incubated in acetone. This artifact manifests as one or more satellite peaks in the MS spectrum of intact protein, spaced 98 u above the mass of the unmodified protein. Other artifacts (+84, +112 u) also appear upon incubation of proteins or peptides in acetone. The reaction is pH-sensitive, being suppressed when proteins are exposed to acetone under acidic conditions. The +98 u artifact is speculated to originate through an intermediate product of aldol condensation of acetone to form diacetone alcohol and mesityl oxide. A +98 u product could originate from nucleophilic attack on mesityl oxide or through condensation with diacetone alcohol. Given the extent of modification possible upon exposure of proteins to acetone, particularly following overnight solvent exposure or incubation at room temperature, an awareness of the variables influencing this novel modification is valued by proteomics researchers who employ acetone precipitation for protein purification.

  4. On Gender and Things: Reflections on an Exhibition on Gendered Artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, Nelly E.J.; Saetnan, Ann Rudinow; Lie, Merete

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an exhibition on gendered artifacts we have organized in the Netherlands and Norway. The major aim of the exhibition was to show the public the ways in which technical objects are inscribed with gender; this in order to make people aware that we live in a technological and

  5. Correction of computed tomography motion artifacts using pixel-specific back-projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, C.J.; Crawford, C.R.; Godwin, J.D.; Kim, Y. King, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion can cause artifacts in computed tomography scans of the chest. The authors describe a new method for reducing these artifacts called pixel-specific back-projection (PSBP). PSBP reduces artifacts caused by in-plane motion by reconstructing each pixel in a frame of reference that moves with the in-plane motion in the volume being scanned. The motion of the frame of reference is specified by constructing maps that describe the motion of each pixel in the image at the time each projection was measured; these maps are based on measurements of the in-plane motion. PSBP has been tested in computer simulations and with volunteer data. In computer simulations, PSBP removed the structured artifacts caused by motion. In scans of two volunteers, PSBP reduced doubling and streaking in chest scans to a level that made the images clinically useful. PSBP corrections of liver scans were less satisfactory because the motion of the liver is predominantly superior-inferior (S-I). PSBP uses a unique set of motion parameters to describe the motion at each point in the chest as opposed to requiring that the motion be described by a single set of parameters. Therefore, PSBP may be more useful in correcting clinical scans than are other correction techniques previously described

  6. Connecting Agents and Artifacts in CSCL: Towards a Rationale of Mutual Shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdijk, Maarten; van Diggelen, Wouter; Kirschner, Paul A.; Baker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Studying how collaborative activity takes shape interactionally in the context of technological settings is one of the main challenges in the field of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL). It requires us, amongst other things, to look into the "black box" of how technical artifacts are brought into use, or rather, how they are attuned…

  7. Incorporating a Soil Science Artifact into a University ePortfolio Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, Elena; Werts, Joshua; Post, Christopher; Ring, Gail

    2014-01-01

    The ePortfolio is a useful educational tool that is utilized in many educational institutions to showcase student accomplishments and provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their educational progress. The objective of this study was to develop and test an artifact from an introductory soil science course to be included in the…

  8. Artifacts and Visible Singularities in Limited Data X-Ray Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinto, Todd

    2017-01-01

    and the author explaining artifacts that can be added to limited angle reconstructions, and we provide an easy-to-implement method to decrease them. These ideas are justified using microlocal analysis, deep mathematics that involves Fourier theory. Reconstructions from simulated and real limited data are given...

  9. Human-Robot Collaboration Dynamic Impact Testing and Calibration Instrument for Disposable Robot Safety Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagalakis, Nicholas G; Yoo, Jae Myung; Oeste, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Dynamic Impact Testing and Calibration Instrument (DITCI) is a simple instrument with a significant data collection and analysis capability that is used for the testing and calibration of biosimulant human tissue artifacts. These artifacts may be used to measure the severity of injuries caused in the case of a robot impact with a human. In this paper we describe the DITCI adjustable impact and flexible foundation mechanism, which allows the selection of a variety of impact force levels and foundation stiffness. The instrument can accommodate arrays of a variety of sensors and impact tools, simulating both real manufacturing tools and the testing requirements of standards setting organizations. A computer data acquisition system may collect a variety of impact motion, force, and torque data, which are used to develop a variety of mathematical model representations of the artifacts. Finally, we describe the fabrication and testing of human abdomen soft tissue artifacts, used to display the magnitude of impact tissue deformation. Impact tests were performed at various maximum impact force and average pressure levels.

  10. Muscle and eye movement artifact removal prior to EEG source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, Hans; Vergult, Anneleen; Phlypo, Ronald; Van Hese, Peter; De Clercq, Wim; D'Asseler, Yves; Van de Walle, Rik; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Paesschen, Wim; Van Huffel, Sabine; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2006-01-01

    Muscle and eye movement artifacts are very prominent in the ictal EEG of patients suffering from epilepsy, thus making the dipole localization of ictal activity very unreliable. Recently, two techniques (BSS-CCA and pSVD) were developed to remove those artifacts. The purpose of this study is to assess whether the removal of muscle and eye movement artifacts improves the EEG dipole source localization. We used a total of 8 EEG fragments, each from another patient, first unfiltered, then filtered by the BSS-CCA and pSVD. In both the filtered and unfiltered EEG fragments we estimated multiple dipoles using RAP-MUSIC. The resulting dipoles were subjected to a K-means clustering algorithm, to extract the most prominent cluster. We found that the removal of muscle and eye artifact results to tighter and more clear dipole clusters. Furthermore, we found that localization of the filtered EEG corresponded with the localization derived from the ictal SPECT in 7 of the 8 patients. Therefore, we can conclude that the BSS-CCA and pSVD improve localization of ictal activity, thus making the localization more reliable for the presurgical evaluation of the patient.

  11. Material Life in Revolutionary America: Artifacts and Issues in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Douglas W.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that artifacts found during archaeological research can open up alternative ways to explore, reexamine, and even rewrite history. Maintains that material culture explores three aspects of Revolutionary American life: (1) the nature of day-to-day life; (2) the fluctuating circumstances of enslaved African-Americans; and (3) how…

  12. Metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography by using analytical DBP-type algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates a common metal artifacts problem in X-ray computed tomography (CT). The artifacts in reconstructed image may render image non-diagnostic because of inaccuracy beam hardening correction from high attenuation objects, satisfactory image could not be reconstructed from projections with missing or distorted data. In traditionally analytical metal artifact reduction (MAR) method, firstly subtract the metallic object part of projection data from the original obtained projection, secondly complete the subtracted part in original projection by using various interpolating method, thirdly reconstruction from the interpolated projection by filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm. The interpolation error occurred during the second step can make unrealistic assumptions about the missing data, leading to DC shift artifact in the reconstructed images. We proposed a differentiated back-projection (DBP) type MAR method by instead of FBP algorithm with DBP algorithm in third step. In FBP algorithm the interpolated projection will be filtered on each projection view angle before back-projection, as a result the interpolation error is propagated to whole projection. However, the property of DBP algorithm provide a chance to do filter after the back-projection in a Hilbert filter direction, as a result the interpolation error affection would be reduce and there is expectation on improving quality of reconstructed images. In other word, if we choose the DBP algorithm instead of the FBP algorithm, less contaminated projection data with interpolation error would be used in reconstruction. A simulation study was performed to evaluate the proposed method using a given phantom.

  13. Cortico-muscular coherence on artifact corrected EEG-EMG data recorded with a MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraman, M; Galka, A; Hong, V N; Heute, U; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides great potential for studying human brain activity with high temporal and spatial resolution. But, due to the MRI, the recorded signals are contaminated with artifacts. The correction of these artifacts is important to use these signals for further spectral analysis. The coherence can reveal the cortical representation of peripheral muscle signal in particular motor tasks, e.g. finger movements. The artifact correction of these signals was done by two different algorithms the Brain vision analyzer (BVA) and the Matlab FMRIB plug-in for EEGLAB. The Welch periodogram method was used for estimating the cortico-muscular coherence. Our analysis revealed coherence with a frequency of 5Hz in the contralateral side of the brain. The entropy is estimated for the calculated coherence to get the distribution of coherence in the scalp. The significance of the paper is to identify the optimal algorithm to rectify the MR artifacts and as a first step to use both these signals EEG and EMG in conjunction with MRI for further studies.

  14. A Historical Analysis of the Curriculum of Organic Chemistry Using ACS Exams as Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Standardized examinations, such as those developed and disseminated by the ACS Examinations Institute, are artifacts of the teaching of a course and over time may provide a historical perspective on how curricula have changed and evolved. This study investigated changes in organic chemistry curricula across a 60-year period by evaluating 18 ACS…

  15. Analysis of copper-based metallic artifacts by prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glascock, M.D.; Spalding, T.G.; Biers, J.C.; Cornman, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Non-destructive analysis of the major elements in copper-alloyed artifacts by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis is reported. Copper, zinc, tin and lead were measured in several ancient Roman, Greek and Iranian objects. Good agreement was found in comparison with analysis of similar objects by destructive methods. (author)

  16. Artifact Reduction of Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Using a Short-Echo Phase Mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Y.; Monma, M.; Kohno, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is utilized in magnetic resonance (MR) venography and other applications, but can include artifacts caused by the phase-masking process. Purpose: To demonstrate risks of filter processes used in making phase masks for SWI, and to propose a simple method for reducing artifacts. Material and Methods: Phase linearity related to echo time (TE) was evaluated for the original phase and high-pass-filtered phase using a CuSO 4 -doped water phantom. Effect of filter size of the Hanning window and background homogeneity were also evaluated in a phantom study. Use of a phase mask generated by data with differing magnitudes of TE was attempted in a human study. Shorter TE was used for making the phase mask, and the number of multiplications was increased. As short and long TEs were necessary simultaneously for phase mask and T2* contrast, a dual-echo technique was used. Results: Linearity of TE and phase value collapsed, and an unexpected negative phase appeared in the high-pass-filtered phase. Using a short-TE phase mask, phase-aliasing artifacts were reduced and visibility of deep veins was equivalent to that under conventional methods with an increased number of multiplications. Conclusion: Use of a short-echo phase mask in SWI is useful for reducing artifacts

  17. Split-remerge method for eliminating processing window artifacts in recursive hierarchical segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James C. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method, computer readable storage, and apparatus for implementing recursive segmentation of data with spatial characteristics into regions including splitting-remerging of pixels with contagious region designations and a user controlled parameter for providing a preference for merging adjacent regions to eliminate window artifacts.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of metallic dental materials and their impact on MR imaging artifacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuková, Jana; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Hubálková, H.; Linetskiy, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2008), s. 715-723 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : metallic dental materials * dental alloys * amalgams * MR imaging * magnetic susceptibility * electric conductivity * image artifact Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 2.941, year: 2008

  19. Robust and Accurate Anomaly Detection in ECG Artifacts Using Time Series Motif Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraks, Haemwaan

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) anomaly detection is an important technique for detecting dissimilar heartbeats which helps identify abnormal ECGs before the diagnosis process. Currently available ECG anomaly detection methods, ranging from academic research to commercial ECG machines, still suffer from a high false alarm rate because these methods are not able to differentiate ECG artifacts from real ECG signal, especially, in ECG artifacts that are similar to ECG signals in terms of shape and/or frequency. The problem leads to high vigilance for physicians and misinterpretation risk for nonspecialists. Therefore, this work proposes a novel anomaly detection technique that is highly robust and accurate in the presence of ECG artifacts which can effectively reduce the false alarm rate. Expert knowledge from cardiologists and motif discovery technique is utilized in our design. In addition, every step of the algorithm conforms to the interpretation of cardiologists. Our method can be utilized to both single-lead ECGs and multilead ECGs. Our experiment results on real ECG datasets are interpreted and evaluated by cardiologists. Our proposed algorithm can mostly achieve 100% of accuracy on detection (AoD), sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value with 0% false alarm rate. The results demonstrate that our proposed method is highly accurate and robust to artifacts, compared with competitive anomaly detection methods. PMID:25688284

  20. Investigation of the potential causes of partial scan artifacts in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yinghua; Speidel, Michael; Szczykutowicz, Timothy; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there have been several findings regarding CT number variations (partial scan artifact or PSA) across time in dynamic myocardial perfusion studies with short scan gated reconstruction. These variations are correlated with the view angle range corresponding to the short scan acquisition for a given cardiac phase, which can vary from one cardiac cycle to another due to the asynchrony between heart rate and gantry rotation speed. In this study, we investigate several potential causes of PSA, including noise, beam hardening and scatter, using numerical simulations. In addition, we investigate partial scan artifact in a single source 64-slice diagnostic CT scanner in vivo data sets, and report its effect on perfusion analysis. Results indicated that among all three factors investigated, scatter can cause obvious partial scan artifact in dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging. Further, scatter is a low frequency phenomenon and is not heavily dependent on the changing contrasts, as both the frequency method and the virtual scan method are effective in reducing partial scan artifact. However, PSA does not necessarily lead to different blood volume maps compared to the full scan, because these maps are usually generated with a curve fitting procedure.