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Sample records for fever accentuates transmural

  1. Accentuation-suppression and scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Alrik; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    a scaling mechanism modulating the decision bias of the observer and also through an accentuation-suppression mechanism that modulates the degree of subjective relevance of objects, contracting attention around fewer, highly relevant objects while suppressing less relevant objects. These mechanisms may...

  2. Dutch transmural nurse clinics for chronic patients: a descriptive study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, D.; Francke, A.L.; Kerkstra, A.; Huyer Abu-Saad, H.

    2000-01-01

    'Transmural care' can be defined as patient-tailored care provided on the basis of close collaboration and joint responsibility between hospitals and home care organizations. One form of transmural care is transmural nurse clinics for chronically ill. This study describes 62 transmural nurse clinics

  3. Accentuated Factors of Handheld Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Bo; Henningsson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The recent years of rapid development of mobile technologies create opportunities for new user groups in the mobile workforce to take advantage of information systems (IS). However, to apprehend and harness these opportunities for mobile IS, it is crucial to fully understand the user group...... and the mobile technology. In this chapter, we deductively, from previous research on aspects on mobility, synthesize a tentative analytical framework capturing factors accentuated in mobile IS design. We evaluate the framework based on criteria of completeness, distinctiveness and simplicity. Eventually...

  4. Accentuated Factors of Handheld Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Bo; Henningsson, Stefan

    The recent years of rapid development of mobile technologies creates opportunities for new user-groups in the mobile workforce to take advantage of in-formation systems (IS). However, to apprehend and harness these opportunities for mobile IS it is crucial to fully understand the user group...... and the mobile tech-nology. In this paper we deductively, from previous research on aspects on mobili-ty, synthesize a tentative analytical framework capturing factors accentuated in mobile IS design. We evaluate the framework based on criteria of completeness, distinctiveness, and simplicity. Eventually...

  5. Accentuated Factors of Handheld Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Bo; Henningsson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The recent years of rapid development of mobile technologies create opportunities for new user groups in the mobile workforce to take advantage of information systems (IS). However, to apprehend and harness these opportunities for mobile IS, it is crucial to fully understand the user group...... and the mobile technology. In this chapter, we deductively, from previous research on aspects on mobility, synthesize a tentative analytical framework capturing factors accentuated in mobile IS design. We evaluate the framework based on criteria of completeness, distinctiveness and simplicity. Eventually......, these two steps develop the framework towards a theoretical contribution as theory for describing handheld computing from a designer’s perspective. Thirteen semi-structured interviews were made and the tentative framework was elaborated and confirmed....

  6. Accentuated Factors of Handheld Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Bo; Henningsson, Stefan

    The recent years of rapid development of mobile technologies creates opportunities for new user-groups in the mobile workforce to take advantage of in-formation systems (IS). However, to apprehend and harness these opportunities for mobile IS it is crucial to fully understand the user group...... and the mobile tech-nology. In this paper we deductively, from previous research on aspects on mobili-ty, synthesize a tentative analytical framework capturing factors accentuated in mobile IS design. We evaluate the framework based on criteria of completeness, distinctiveness, and simplicity. Eventually......, these two steps develop the framework towards a theoretical contribution as theory for describing handheld computing from a designer’s perspective. Thirteen semi-structured interviews were made and the tentative framework was elaborated and confirmed....

  7. Bilingualism accentuates children's conversational understanding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Siegal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although bilingualism is prevalent throughout the world, little is known about the extent to which it influences children's conversational understanding. Our investigation involved children aged 3-6 years exposed to one or more of four major languages: English, German, Italian, and Japanese. In two experiments, we examined the children's ability to identify responses to questions as violations of conversational maxims (to be informative and avoid redundancy, to speak the truth, be relevant, and be polite. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Experiment 1, with increasing age, children showed greater sensitivity to maxim violations. Children in Italy who were bilingual in German and Italian (with German as the dominant language L1 significantly outperformed Italian monolinguals. In Experiment 2, children in England who were bilingual in English and Japanese (with English as L1 significantly outperformed Japanese monolinguals in Japan with vocabulary age partialled out. CONCLUSIONS: As the monolingual and bilingual groups had a similar family SES background (Experiment 1 and similar family cultural identity (Experiment 2, these results point to a specific role for early bilingualism in accentuating children's developing ability to appreciate effective communicative responses.

  8. Bilingualism Accentuates Children's Conversational Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael; Surian, Luca; Matsuo, Ayumi; Geraci, Alessandra; Iozzi, Laura; Okumura, Yuko; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    Background Although bilingualism is prevalent throughout the world, little is known about the extent to which it influences children's conversational understanding. Our investigation involved children aged 3–6 years exposed to one or more of four major languages: English, German, Italian, and Japanese. In two experiments, we examined the children's ability to identify responses to questions as violations of conversational maxims (to be informative and avoid redundancy, to speak the truth, be relevant, and be polite). Principal Findings In Experiment 1, with increasing age, children showed greater sensitivity to maxim violations. Children in Italy who were bilingual in German and Italian (with German as the dominant language L1) significantly outperformed Italian monolinguals. In Experiment 2, children in England who were bilingual in English and Japanese (with English as L1) significantly outperformed Japanese monolinguals in Japan with vocabulary age partialled out. Conclusions As the monolingual and bilingual groups had a similar family SES background (Experiment 1) and similar family cultural identity (Experiment 2), these results point to a specific role for early bilingualism in accentuating children's developing ability to appreciate effective communicative responses. PMID:20140246

  9. The Analysis of Low Accentuation in Estonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asu, Eva Liina; Nolan, Francis

    2007-01-01

    In Estonian, as in a number of other languages, the nuclear pitch accent is often low and level. This paper presents two studies of this phenomenon. The first, a phonetic analysis of carefully structured read sentences shows that low accentuation can also spread to the prenuclear accents in an intonational phrase. The resulting sentence contours…

  10. Microvariation in Accentual Alignment in Basque Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elordieta, Gorka; Calleja, Nagore

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents patterns of accentual alignment in two varieties of Spanish spoken in the Basque Country: Lekeitio Spanish (LS), with speakers whose other native language is Lekeitio Basque (LB); and Vitoria Spanish (VS), with monolingual speakers of Spanish from the city of Vitoria. These patterns are compared to those of Madrid Spanish (MS),…

  11. ACCENTUATION OF PERSONALITY TRAITS IN THE PATIENTS WITH GRANULOMATOUS LESIONS OF RESPIRATORY ORGANS IN CASE OF SARCOIDOSIS AND TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Chernikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 404 sarcoidosis and 404 tuberculosis patients were examined in order to detect correlations between clinical manifestations, psychological adaptation and accentuation of personality traits and granulomatous lesions of respiratory organs in case of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. All patients had subjective and objective examinations and answered the following questionnaires: Schmieschek questionnaire to identify accentuation of personality traits, clinical questionnaire to detect and evaluate neurotic disorders, Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale to detect the level of anxiety. It has been found out that sarcoidosis patients are characterized both by asymptomatic course of the disease as well as diverse clinical manifestations: pain syndrome, nodal fever, intoxication with expressed general fatigue, respiratory insufficiency. It is combined with stuck, pedant, cycloid, exalted, emotive accentuations of personality traits, with psychological maladaptation as per the scores of autonomic imbalance, neurotic depression, asthenia, with average high level of anxiety. The following is typical of tuberculosis patients: syndrome of bronchial tree lesions and respiratory insufficiency; distymny, demonstrative, excitable, exalted, anxiety-hypochondriac accentuations of personality traits, with psychological maladaptation as per the scores of autonomic imbalance, obsessive-phobic disorders and hysteria; average high level of anxiety. The strong correlation has been found between the degree of symptoms expression, level of anxiety and psychological maladaptation and the type of patient's accentuation of personality traits.

  12. Transmural care in the rehabilitation sector: implementation experiences with a transmural care model for people with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H.A. Bloemen-Vrencken

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Purposes: The purpose of this article is first to describe the development and content of a transmural care model in the rehabilitation sector, which aims to reduce the number and severity of health problems of people with spinal cord injury (SCI and improve the continuity of care. Second, the purpose is to describe the applicability and implementation experiences of a transmural care model in the rehabilitation sector. Methods: The transmural care model was developed in cooperation with the Dutch Association of Spinal Cord Injured Patients, community nurses, general practitioners, rehabilitation nurses, rehabilitation managers, physiatrists and researchers. The core component of the care model consists of a transmural nurse, who ‘liaises’ between people with SCI living in the community, professional primary care professionals and the rehabilitation centre. The transmural care model provides a job description containing activities to support people with SCI and their family/partners and activities to promote continuity of care. The transmural care model was implemented in two Dutch rehabilitation centres. The following three aspects, as experienced by the transmural nurses, were evaluated: the extent to which the care model was implemented; enabling factors and barriers for implementation; strength and weakness of the care model. Results: The transmural care model was not implemented in all its details, with a clear difference between the two rehabilitation centres. Enabling factors and barriers for implementation were found at three levels: 1. the level of the individual professional (e.g. competencies, attitude and motivation, 2. the organisational and financing level (e.g. availability of facilities and finances, and 3. the social context (the opinion of colleagues, managers and other professionals involved with the care. The most important weakness experienced was that there was not enough time to put all the activities into practice

  13. Transmural care in the rehabilitation sector: implementation experiences with a transmural care model for people with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen-Vrencken, J.H.A.; De Witte, L.P.; Engels, J.P.G.M.; Van den Heuvel, W.J.A.; Post, M.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purposes: The purpose of this article is first to describe the development and content of a transmural care model in the rehabilitation sector, which aims to reduce the number and severity of health problems of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and improve the continuity of care. Second, the purp

  14. Transmural myocardial ischemia due to slow coronary flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Slow coronary flow phenomenon(SCFP) is an angiographic observation characterized by delayed distal vessel opacification in the absence of significant epicardial coronary disease. Only limited studies have been focused on the etiologies, clinical manifestations and treatment of this unique angiographic phenomenon. In our case report, we described an 85-year-old man who came with significant ST segment elevation in leads V1-V4 and V3R-V5R without increase in myocardial enzyme. The patient also developed respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Coronary angiography revealed only mild atherosclerosis without spasm or thromboembolic occlusion. Slow flow was seen in all coronary arteries, especially in the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries. This case speculated that transmural myocardial ischemia with ST segment elevation might be resulted from slow coronary flow. Transmural myocardial ischemia can occur owing to abnormalities of the coronary microcirculation.

  15. Hemorrhagic Fevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of viruses. These include the Ebola and Marburg, Lassa fever, and yellow fever viruses. VHFs have common features: ... the animals that carry them live. For example, Lassa fever is limited to rural areas of West Africa ...

  16. An acoustic study of accentuation in Estonian Swedish compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Schötz, Susanne; Asu, Eva Liina

    2013-01-01

    This study, addressing the analysis of pitch patterns in Estonian Swedish compounds, enables us to draw some preliminary conclusions about the characteristics of accentuation in this little studied regional variety of Swedish. The analysis in the first part of the paper was inspired by the classification of Edvin Lagman (1979) who on the basis of auditory analysis distinguished between four accent types for Estonian Swedish compounds. Using the same materials, the present acoustic study broad...

  17. Changes of transmural heterogeneity of Cx43 expression in acute myocardial ischemia reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Hua Zhong; Shi-Juan Lu; Xiao-Pan Chen; Qi Zuo; Zheng-Wang Liu; Ding-Jun Sun; Miao Wu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the change of transmural heterogeneity of Cx43 protein among three myocardial layers and explore physiological mechanisms of malignant ventricular arrhythmia (MVA) in myocardial ischemia reperfusion (MIR).Methods: Twenty rabbits were randomly divided into MIR group (n=10) which rabbits with MIR were made in and sham group (n=10). 90% monophasic action potential repolarization duration (APD90), transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) and Cx43 protein (Cx43-pro) and mRNA (Cx43-Cq) expression among three myocardial layers were measured in both groups.Results:Compared with APD90 and TDR among three myocardial layers in the sham group, those in the MIR group were significant increased (P<0.01), which showed that transmural dispersion of repolarization increased significantly in MIR. Compared to those in the sham group, all three myocardial Cx43-pro significantly decreased (P<0.05) and△Cx43-pro obviously increased (P<0.05) in the MIR group which indicated transmural expression heterogeneity of Cx43 protein enlarged in MIR. 3. Cx43-Cq in all myocardium were significantly reduced (P<0.05) and△Cx43-Cq was significantly increased (P<0.05) in the MIR group compared to those in the sham group, which proved that transmural heterogeneity of Cx43 mRNA raised in MIR.Conclusions:Transmural heterogeneity of Cx43 expression among three myocardial layers in MIR significantly increased, which may enlarge dispersion of repolarization and prone to MVA.

  18. Interactive visualization for scar transmurality in cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiml, Sabrina; Toth, Daniel; Panayiotou, Maria; Fahn, Bernhard; Karim, Rashed; Behar, Jonathan M.; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Brost, Alexander; Mountney, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Heart failure is a serious disease affecting about 23 million people worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is used to treat patients suffering from symptomatic heart failure. However, 30% to 50% of patients have limited clinical benefit. One of the main causes is suboptimal placement of the left ventricular lead. Pacing in areas of myocardial scar correlates with poor clinical outcomes. Therefore precise knowledge of the individual patient's scar characteristics is critical for delivering tailored treatments capable of improving response rates. Current research methods for scar assessment either map information to an alternative non-anatomical coordinate system or they use the image coordinate system but lose critical information about scar extent and scar distribution. This paper proposes two interactive methods for visualizing relevant scar information. A 2-D slice based approach with a scar mask overlaid on a 16 segment heart model and a 3-D layered mesh visualization which allows physicians to scroll through layers of scar from endocardium to epicardium. These complementary methods enable physicians to evaluate scar location and transmurality during planning and guidance. Six physicians evaluated the proposed system by identifying target regions for lead placement. With the proposed method more target regions could be identified.

  19. Aquaporin-1 shifts the critical transmural pressure to compress the aortic intima and change transmural flow: theory and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shripad; Jan, Kung-Ming; Rumschitzki, David S

    2015-12-01

    Transmural-pressure (ΔP)-driven plasma advection carries macromolecules into the vessel wall, the earliest prelesion atherosclerotic event. The wall's hydraulic conductivity, LP, the water flux-to-ΔP ratio, is high at low pressures, rapidly decreases, and remains flat to high pressures (Baldwin AL, Wilson LM. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 264: H26-H32, 1993; Nguyen T, Toussaint, Xue JD, Raval Y, Cancel CB, Russell LM, Shou S, Sedes Y, Sun O, Yakobov Y, Tarbell JM, Jan KM, Rumschitzki DS. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 308: H1051-H1064, 2015; Tedgui A, Lever MJ. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 247: H784-H791, 1984. Shou Y, Jan KM, Rumschitzki DS. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 291: H2758-H2771, 2006) due to pressure-induced subendothelial intima (SI) compression that causes endothelial cells to partially block internal elastic laminar fenestrae. Nguyen et al. showed that rat and bovine aortic endothelial cells express the membrane protein aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and transmural water transport is both transcellular and paracellular. They found that LP lowering by AQP1 blocking was perplexingly ΔP dependent. We hypothesize that AQP1 blocking lowers average SI pressure; therefore, a lower ΔP achieves the critical force/area on the endothelium to partially block fenestrae. To test this hypothesis, we improve the approximate model of Huang et al. (Huang Y, Rumschitzki D, Chien S, Weinbaum SS. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 272: H2023-H2039, 1997) and extend it by including transcellular AQP1 water flow. Results confirm the observation by Nguyen et al.: wall LP and water transport decrease with AQP1 disabling. The model predicts 1) low-pressure LP experiments correctly; 2) AQP1s contribute 30-40% to both the phenomenological endothelial + SI and intrinsic endothelial LP; 3) the force on the endothelium for partial SI decompression with functioning AQP1s at 60 mmHg equals that on the endothelium at ∼43 mmHg with inactive AQP1s; and 4) increasing endothelial AQP1

  20. Valley Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley Fever is a disease caused by a fungus (or mold) called Coccidioides. The fungi live in the soil ... from person to person. Anyone can get Valley Fever. But it's most common among older adults, especially ...

  1. Lassa Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Lassa Fever Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... French) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Lassa fever is an acute viral illness that occurs in ...

  2. Scarlet fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the throat infection. This is crucial to prevent rheumatic fever, a serious complication of strep throat and scarlet ... with the right treatment, but may include: Acute rheumatic fever , which can affect the heart, joints, skin, and ...

  3. The Future of Qualitative Research in Psychology: Accentuating the Positive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Brendan; Lyons, Antonia

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we reflect on current trends and anticipate future prospects regarding qualitative research in Psychology. We highlight various institutional and disciplinary obstacles to qualitative research diversity, complexity and quality. At the same time, we note some causes for optimism, including publication breakthroughs and vitality within the field. The paper is structured into three main sections which consider: 1) the positioning of qualitative research within Psychology; 2) celebrating the different kinds of knowledge produced by qualitative research; and 3) implementing high quality qualitative research. In general we accentuate the positive, recognising and illustrating innovative qualitative research practices which generate new insights and propel the field forward. We conclude by emphasising the importance of research training: for qualitative research to flourish within Psychology (and beyond), students and early career researchers require more sophisticated, in-depth instruction than is currently offered.

  4. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is usually applied to disease caused by Arenaviridae (Lassa fever, Junin and Machupo), Bunyaviridae (Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, ... fever Dengue and severe dengue Ebola virus disease Lassa fever Marburg haemorrhagic fever Rift Valley fever Multimedia, features ...

  5. Chronic non-transmural infarction has a delayed recovery of function following revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer John

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The time course of regional functional recovery following revascularization with regards to the presence or absence of infarction is poorly known. We studied the effect of the presence of chronic non-transmural infarction on the time course of recovery of myocardial perfusion and function after elective revascularization. Methods Eighteen patients (mean age 69, range 52-84, 17 men prospectively underwent cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, delayed contrast enhanced MRI and rest/stress 99m-Tc-tetrofosmin single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT before, one and six months after elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Results Dysfunctional myocardial segments (n = 337/864, 39% were classified according to the presence (n = 164 or absence (n = 173 of infarction. Infarct transmurality in dysfunctional segments was largely non-transmural (transmurality = 31 ± 22%. Quantitative stress perfusion and wall thickening increased at one month in dysfunctional segments without infarction (p Conclusions Dysfunctional segments without infarction represent repetitively stunned or hibernating myocardium, and these segments improved both perfusion and function within one month after revascularization with no improvement thereafter. Although dysfunctional segments with non-transmural infarction improved in perfusion at one month, functional recovery was mostly seen between one and six months, possibly reflecting a more severe ischemic burden. These findings may be of value in the clinical assessment of regional functional recovery in the time period after revascularization.

  6. Yellow fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, Thomas P; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever, a mosquito-borne flavivirus disease occurs in tropical areas of South America and Africa. It is a disease of major historical importance, but remains a threat to travelers to and residents of endemic areas despite the availability of an effective vaccine for nearly 70 years. An important aspect is the receptivity of many non-endemic areas to introduction and spread of yellow fever. This paper reviews the clinical aspects, pathogenesis, and epidemiology of yellow fever, with an emphasis on recent changes in the distribution and incidence of the disease. Recent knowledge about yellow fever 17D vaccine mechanism of action and safety are discussed.

  7. Transmural palliative care by means of teleconsultation: a window of opportunities and new restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurp, J.L. van; Selm, M. van; Leeuwen, E. van; Hasselaar, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Audio-visual teleconsultation is expected to help home-based palliative patients, hospital-based palliative care professionals, and family physicians to jointly design better, pro-active care. Consensual knowledge of the possibilities and limitations of teleconsultation in transmural pal

  8. Transmural palliative care by means of teleconsultation: a window of opportunities and new restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gurp, J.; van Selm, M.; van Leeuwen, E.; Hasselaar, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Audio-visual teleconsultation is expected to help home-based palliative patients, hospital-based palliative care professionals, and family physicians to jointly design better, pro-active care. Consensual knowledge of the possibilities and limitations of teleconsultation in transmural pal

  9. Survival of stroke patients after introduction of the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol TIA/CVA'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd, Leonie; Groenhof, Feikje; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; van der Meer, Klaas

    2013-01-01

    Background: Earlier research showed that healthcare in stroke could be better organized, aiming for improved survival and less comorbidity. Therefore, in 2004 the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG) and the Dutch Association of Neurology (NVN) introduced the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol

  10. [A group fever: safari's fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiniaux, S; Serratrice, J; De Roux-Serratrice, C; Disdier, P; Perez, L; Bricaire, F; Caumes, E; Mary, C; Weiller, P J

    2004-12-01

    Acute schistosomiasis, called safari's fever in Africa and Katayama fever in Japan, is an immunoallergic reaction due to transcutaneous penetration of infective cercaria. We report the collective case of seven young adults spending holidays in Mali. An eighteen years-old girl presents fever, headache, diarrhoea and abdominal pains at return from Dogon country (south of Mali). After turned down malaria and with the notion of bathing in fresh water followed by pruritus, we think to safari's fever. So we alarm all other members of the group. All can be treated to avoid chronic schistosomiasis. These observations recall that acute schistosomiasis is a real danger for tourists when bathing in fresh water in endemic areas of Africa. Education of travellers is necessary. Occurrence of safari's fever should alert physicians to prevent chronic schistosomiasis.

  11. Typhoid fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most commonly caused due to a bacteria called Salmonella typhi ( S typhi ). Causes S typhi is spread through contaminated food, ... as food handlers. Alternative Names Enteric fever Images Salmonella typhi organism Fly Digestive system organs References Harris JB, ...

  12. Dengue fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the mosquito Aedes aegypti , which is found in tropic and subtropic regions. This area includes parts of: ... encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, Kyasanur forest disease, Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever, Zika). In: Bennett JE, ...

  13. Recurrent fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, David; Kesson, Alison; Lester-Smith, David; Chaitow, Jeffrey

    2013-03-01

    An 11-year-old girl had four episodes of fever in a year, lasting 7-10 days and associated with headache and neck stiffness. She had a long history of recurrent urticaria, usually preceding the fevers. There was also a history of vague pains in her knees and in the small joints of her hands. Her serum C-reactive protein was moderately raised at 41 g/L (normal <8). Her rheumatologist felt the association of recurrent fevers that lasted 7 or more days with headaches, arthralgia and recurrent urticaria suggested one of the periodic fever syndromes. Genetic testing confirmed she had a gene mutation consistent with one of tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

  14. Alcohol consumption and accentuated personality traits among young adults in Romania: a cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cornelia Rada; Alexandru Teodor Ispas

    2016-01-01

    .... As dependence is particularly difficult to cure, prevention is important. This study aimed to identify the frequency, quantity, occasions, reasons, type of AC, and correlation with accentuated personality traits among young adults in Romania...

  15. Childhood fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, C Y; Allen, D M

    1996-02-01

    Childhood fever is a common symptom, reflective of multiple causes. As the child is often unable to express himself, the physician must rely on parents' observations and the physical examination. The majority of febrile children have non-bacterial upper respiratory tract infection and indiscriminate use of antibiotics is inappropriate, ineffective and leads to drug-resistance such as the emergence of Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this article, we attempt to identify the possible causes of fever by a simple approach using the presence or absence of associated or localising symptoms. Infants less than 3 months constitute a unique group as the fever may be related to perinatal events and as serious bacterial infections can still occur despite unremarkable physical findings. Management of fever needs to take into account the toxicity, immune status and age of the patients as well as the source of the infection. Zealous overprescription of antipyretics needs to be avoided with attention directed to the cause of the fever, the child's capacity to cope with the illness and parental education.

  16. Low-dose carvedilol reduces transmural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization in congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-hua ZHONG; Xiao-pan CHEN; Mei-ling YUN; Wei-jing LI; Yan-fang CHEN; Zhen YAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of carvedilol on the transmural heterogeneity of ven-tricular repolarization in rabbits with congestive heart failure (CHF). Methods:Rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups: control, CHF and carvedilol treated CHF group. Monophasic action potential duration (MAPD) in the 3 myocardial layers was simultaneously recorded. Results: All the rabbits in the CHF group had signs of severe CHF. Compared with the control group, the mean blood pressure and cardiac output were significantly decreased, while peripheral resis-tance was significantly increased in the CHF group. This proved that the CHF model was successful created with adriamycin in this study. Compared to the control group, the ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) was remarkably decreased and all MAPD of the 3 myocardial layers were extended in rabbits with CHF. However, the extension of MAPD in the midmyocardium was more obvious. The transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) was significantly increased in CHF.Low-dose carvedilol (0.25 mg/kg, twice daily) had no effects on ventricular remodeling. Treatment with low-dose carvedilol significantly increased VFT. Al-though the MAPD of the 3 myocardial layers were further prolonged in the carvedilol treated CHF group, the prolongation of MAPD in the midmyocardium was shorter than those in the epicardium and endocardium. Treatment with low-dose carvedilol significantly decreased TDR in CHF. Conclusion: In the present study, the trans-mural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization increased in the rabbits with CHF. Low-dose carvedilol decreased the transmural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization in CHF, which may be related to its direct electrophysiological pro-perty rather than its effect on ventricular remodeling.

  17. Atrial lesion transmurality assessment using multi-fiber diffuse reflectance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-02-01

    In non-pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrhythmias such as catheter ablation therapy, long-term treatment effectiveness is related in part to the quality of lesion generation. Superficial lesions may lead to arrhythmia recurrence by allowing recovery along conduction channels for arrhythmic impulses to propagate; conversely transmural lesions inhibit conduction. Conventional techniques rely on measurement of surrogate parameters such as change in bioelectrical impedance, or electrogram amplitude dampening as a qualitative assessment for lesion size. In previous work, we've demonstrated a relationship between lesion dimensions and spectroscopic parameters extracted using an optically-integrated ablation catheter. Though these metrics present some trend, a method to directly assess lesion transmurality maybe better suited. In this work, we report a method for direct recovery of lesion depth in cardiac tissue using diffusely reflected optical measurements and present initial in silico validation. Photon transport throughout a heterogeneous volume was simulated for a series of source-detector pairs and optical properties using a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) code. Results were used to generate a multi-dimensional look-up table for each collection geometry for partial to transmural lesions. A genetic algorithm-based two-step inversion method was employed to extract lesion transmurality. MC simulated optical measurements for various lesion sizes were generated using optical properties for ablated and normal cardiac tissue found in literature and were fitted using our algorithm. Recovered lesion depths ranged between 2-10% for lesions less than 3mm and were within 20% for lesions greater than 4mm. These results support the application of this technique for lesion validation for atrial tissue.

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided endoscopic transmural drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts Drenagem transmural de pseudocistos de pâncreas guiada por ecoendoscopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Vivian Lopes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgery is the traditional treatment for symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts, but the morbidity is still too high. Minimally invasive endoscopic approaches have been encouraged. AIMS: To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided endoscopic transmural drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts. METHODS: From January, 2003 to August, 2006, 31 consecutive symptomatic patients submitted to 37 procedures at the same endoscopic unit were retrospectively analysed. Chronic and acute pancreatitis were found in, respectively, 17 (54.8% and 10 (32.3% cases. Bulging was present in 14 (37.8% cases. Cystogastrostomy or cystoduodenostomy were created with an interventional linear echoendoscope under endosonographic and fluoroscopic control. By protocol, only a single plastic stent, without nasocystic drain, was used. Straight or double pigtail stents were used in, respectively, 22 (59.5% and 15 (40.5% procedures. RESULTS: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage was successful in 29 (93.5% patients. Two cases needed surgery, both due to procedure-related complications. There was no mortality related to the procedure. Twenty-four patients were followed-up longer than 4 weeks. During a mean follow-up of 12.6 months, there were six (25% symptomatic recurrences due to stent clogging or migration, with two secondary infections. Median time for developing complications and recurrence of the collections was 3 weeks. These cases were successfully managed with new stents. Complications were more frequent in patients treated with straight stents and in those with a recent episode of acute pancreatitis. CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic transmural drainage provides an effective approach to the management of pancreatic pseudocysts.RACIONAL: A abordagem cirúrgica é o tratamento tradicional para os pseudocistos sintomáticos de pâncreas, contudo a morbidade permanece elevada. Terapêuticas endoscópicas minimamente invasivas têm sido encorajadas. OBJETIVO

  19. Typhoid fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Mikoleit, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Control of typhoid fever relies on clinical information, diagnosis, and an understanding for the epidemiology of the disease. Despite the breadth of work done so far, much is not known about the biology of this human-adapted bacterial pathogen and the complexity of the disease in endemic areas...... with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main...... cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow...

  20. Rat-bite fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are found in ...

  1. Kid's Guide to Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the Operating Room? A Kid's Guide to Fever KidsHealth > For Kids > A Kid's Guide to Fever ... some lighter-weight pajamas. previous continue Fighting a Fever For almost all kids, fevers aren't a ...

  2. Dengue fever (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  3. Transmural transverse stiffness estimation in vascular shear wave imaging: A simulation and phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuexin; Lo, Ho Yuen; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2017-05-01

    Shear wave imaging has emerged as a potential non-invasive technique for the quantitative assessment of the arterial shear modulus. Nonetheless, the arterial elasticity estimation in the transverse direction has been overlooked compared with the longitudinal direction, and the estimated transmural stiffness has rarely been evaluated. Accurate depiction of the transverse stiffness across the thin arterial wall warrants comprehensive characterization in both normal and pathological conditions. This study estimated the transmural arterial shear modulus in both the longitudinal ( μ Long) and transverse directions ( μ Trans) using group ( c T) and phase velocities ( c p h) in finite element models and hollow cylindrical tissue-mimicking phantoms with various shape factors. The results were validated against mechanical testing. Zero-order antisymmetric Lamb wave and circumferential Lamb type wave models were considered in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the thin-walled hollow cylinder, respectively. The results derived from the model with the thin plate assumption confirmed that c T underestimated μ Long and μ Trans. Unlike the c p h-based μ Long estimates that were in excellent agreement with measured values, the c p h-based μ Trans estimates were found to be comparable to c p h-based μ Long at the inner wall but increased radially outward. Transmural μ Trans estimation using c p h was demonstrated to be feasible for thin-walled hollow cylinders but necessitated careful account of the wall geometry, in particular the shape factor.

  4. Scarlet Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Katherine Fleming-Dutra, pediatrician, discusses scarlet fever, its cause, how to treat it, and how to prevent its spread.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  5. Yellow fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prata Aluízio

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available With the infestation by Aedes aegypti, urban yellow fever might already exist. This did not occur because of either the lacking of a sufficient contact between the diseased individual and the A. aegypti or perhaps because this, after sixty years without transmitting the virus, needs an adaptation phase to infecting again.

  6. Q fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coxiella burnetii . These bacteria can infect: Sheep Goats Cattle Dogs Cats Birds Rodents Ticks Infected animals shed ... The main treatment for Q fever is antibiotics. For early-stage Q ... If you have the infection for more than 6 months, it is called ...

  7. Drenagem endoscópica transmural de pseudocisto pancreático: resultados a longo prazo Transmural endoscopy drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst: long-term outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rone Antônio Alves de Abreu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Os pseudocistos pancreáticos são complicações relativamente comuns em pacientes adultos com pancreatite. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados a longo prazo da drenagem endoscópica transmural, estabelecendo seu papel no manejo do pseudocisto pancreático. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 14 pacientes com pseudocisto de pâncreas, cuja principal queixa à apresentação foi dor no andar superior do abdome e massa abdominal palpável, submetidos a cistogastrostomia (n = 12 e cistoduodenostomia (n = 2, acompanhados clinicamente e com tomografia computadorizada de abdome por até 51 meses. A colangiopancreatografia endoscópica retrógrada era tentada em todos os casos para estudo do ducto pancreático e classificação dos cistos. RESULTADOS: A pancreatite crônica alcoólica agudizada foi responsável por 10 casos (71,5% e a biliar por 4 (28,5%. As duas formas de drenagens (cistogastrostomia e cistoduodenostomia endoscópicas foram efetivas. Não houve mudança na conduta terapêutica proposta; em dois pacientes a migração da órtese para o interior do pseudocisto, no momento da inserção, foi a principal complicação, sendo possível sua retirada no mesmo ato, com o uso da cesta de Dormia, sob o auxílio de fluoroscopia. Não houve mortalidade, nem recidiva até o momento. O tempo médio de permanência hospitalar foi de 3 dias. CONCLUSÃO: A drenagem endoscópica transmural se apresentou como terapêutica eficaz, com baixo índice de complicações, mortalidade nula e pequeno tempo de internação hospitalar.BACKGROUND: Pancreatic pseudocysts are relatively common complications of pancreatitis in adults. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long-term results from transmural endoscopic drainage and thus to establish its role in managing pancreatic pseudocyst. METHODS: Fourteen patients with pancreatic pseudocyst were studied. Their main complaint was pain in the upper levels of the abdomen. They presented palpable abdominal mass and underwent

  8. Speckle-Tracking Layer-Specific Analysis of Myocardial Deformation and Evaluation of Scar Transmurality in Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarascio, Michela; Leo, Laura Anna; Klersy, Catherine; Murzilli, Romina; Moccetti, Tiziano; Faletra, Francesco Fulvio

    2017-07-01

    Identification of the extent of scar transmurality in chronic ischemic heart disease is important because it correlates with viability. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether layer-specific two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography allows distinction of scar presence and transmurality. A total of 70 subjects, 49 with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy and 21 healthy subjects, underwent two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography and late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance. Scar extent was determined as the relative amount of hyperenhancement using late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance in an 18-segment model (0% hyperenhancement = normal; 1%-50% = subendocardial scar; 51%-100% = transmural scar). In the same 18-segment model, peak systolic circumferential strain and longitudinal strain were calculated separately for the endocardial and epicardial layers as well as the full-wall myocardial thickness. All strain parameters showed cutoff values (area under the curve > 0.69) that allowed the discrimination of normal versus scar segments but not of transmural versus subendocardial scars. This was true for all strain parameters analyzed, without differences in efficacy between longitudinal and circumferential strain and subendocardial, subepicardial, and full-wall-thickness strain values. Circumferential and longitudinal strain in normal segments showed transmural and basoapical gradients (greatest values at the subendocardial layer and apex). In segments with scar, transmural gradient was maintained, whereas basoapical gradient was lost because the reduction of strain values in the presence of the scar was greater at the apex. The two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiographic values distinguish scar presence but not transmurality; thus, they are not useful predictors of scar segment viability. It remains unclear why there is a greater strain value reduction in the presence of a scar at the apical

  9. [Milk fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M

    1989-05-01

    Infectious complications following delivery were, in the past, attributed to "milk fever": these were milk congestion, milk deposits, rancid milk, etc., that were held responsible. The milk was reabsorbed into the blood of the patient and settled in the peritoneum ("milk peritonitis"), in the broad ligaments (pelvic abscess), in the thighs (phlebitis) and also in the breasts (breast abscess). This belief, originated by Aristotle, was accepted by excellent authors like Andre Levret (1703-1780), one of the most famous French obstetricians and Nicolas Puzos, at the same time. More recently, authors alluded to it and blamed "milk fever" for being at the origin of dramatic pictures which they described in their novels, like Victor Hugo and Guy de Maupassant, for instance.

  10. Typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S; Mikoleit, Matthew L; Keddy, Karen H; Ochiai, R Leon

    2015-03-21

    Control of typhoid fever relies on clinical information, diagnosis, and an understanding for the epidemiology of the disease. Despite the breadth of work done so far, much is not known about the biology of this human-adapted bacterial pathogen and the complexity of the disease in endemic areas, especially those in Africa. The main barriers to control are vaccines that are not immunogenic in very young children and the development of multidrug resistance, which threatens efficacy of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Clinicians, microbiologists, and epidemiologists worldwide need to be familiar with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow surveillance and to implement control measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of hypokalemia on transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization in left ventricular myocardium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Hua Zhong; Shi-Juan Lu; Mo-Shui Chen; Zi-Bin Chen; Liu Wang; Ping-Sheng Wu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To observe effects of hypokalemia on transmural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization in left ventricular myocardium of rabbit, and explore the role of hypokalemia in malignant ventricular arrhythmia (MVA). Methods: A total of 20 rabbits were randomly divided into control group and hypokalemic group. Isolated hearts in the control group were simply perfused with modified Tyrode's solution, and were perfused with hypokalemic Tyrode's solution in hypokalemic group. Ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT), 90% monophasic action potential repolarization duration (APD90) of subepicardial, midmyocardial and subendocardial myocardium, transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) and Cx43 protein expression in three layers of myocardium were measured in both groups. Results: VFT in the control group and the hypokalemic group were (13.40±2.95) V, and (7.00±1.49) V, respectively. There was a significant difference between two groups (P<0.01). APD90 of three myocardial layers in the hypokalemic group were significantly prolonged than those in the control group (P<0.01). APD90 in the hypokalemic group and the control group were (38.10±10.29) ms and (23.70±5.68) ms, and TDR were (52.90±14.55) ms and (36.10±12.44) ms, respectively. APD90 and TDR in the hypokalemic group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05), and the increase in APD90 of midmyocardium was more significant in the hypokalemic group. Cx43 protein expression of all three myocardial layers were decreased significantly in the hypokalemic group (P<0.01), and Cx43 was significantly increased (P<0.05). Reduction of Cx43 protein expression was more significant in the midmyocardium. Conclusions: Hypokalemic can increase transmural heterogeneity of Cx43 expression and repolarization in left ventricular myocardium of rabbit, and decrease VFT and can induce MVA more easily.

  12. Event-related potential evidence on the influence of accentuation in spoken discourse comprehension in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqing; Hagoort, Peter; Yang, Yufang

    2008-05-01

    In an event-related potential experiment with Chinese discourses as material, we investigated how and when accentuation influences spoken discourse comprehension in relation to the different information states of the critical words. These words could either provide new or old information. It was shown that variation of accentuation influenced the amplitude of the N400, with a larger amplitude for accented than for deaccented words. In addition, there was an interaction between accentuation and information state. The N400 amplitude difference between accented and deaccented new information was smaller than that between accented and deaccented old information. The results demonstrate that, during spoken discourse comprehension, listeners rapidly extract the semantic consequences of accentuation in relation to the previous discourse context. Moreover, our results show that the N400 amplitude can be larger for correct (new, accented words) than incorrect (new, deaccented words) information. This, we argue, proves that the N400 does not react to semantic anomaly per se, but rather to semantic integration load, which is higher for new information.

  13. "Accentuation Effects" of Dissimilar Academic Departments: An Application and Exploration of Holland's Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John C.; Feldman, Kenneth A.

    1998-01-01

    A longitudinal study, based on Holland's theory of occupational choice, found accentuation of initial group differences for artistic abilities in both male and female college students and for enterprising abilities of male students within academic subenvironments. Data support Holland's theory that students' initial selection of academic…

  14. "Accentuation Effects" of Dissimilar Academic Departments: An Application and Exploration of Holland's Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John C.; Feldman, Kenneth A.

    1998-01-01

    A longitudinal study, based on Holland's theory of occupational choice, found accentuation of initial group differences for artistic abilities in both male and female college students and for enterprising abilities of male students within academic subenvironments. Data support Holland's theory that students' initial selection of academic…

  15. Demgue Fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    登革热的病名源于西班牙语,是形容患者由于发烧、关节疼痛导致走路时步履蹒跚、步态造作。研究者根据其症状,称其为"关节热"或"碎骨热"。1869年,英国伦敦皇家内科学会正式将其命名为"登革热"(dengue fever,DF)。

  16. [Typhoid fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchou, B

    1996-01-15

    Endemic in regions with poor hygienic conditions, Enteric fevers are imported in France by returning travellers. They are caused by Salmonella strains, mainly S. Typhi, transmitted via fecal-oral route. Salmonella reach the blood stream after proliferating in mesenteric lymph nodes. At an initial stage blood and bone marrow cultures, later on Widal-Felix serology permit diagnosis. Antibiotics have rendered death exceptional. Quinolones and ceftriaxone allow treatments shorter than 10 days. Immunization (Typhim Vi) and improvement of hygienic standards are the cornerstone of prevention.

  17. Allergies and Hay Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Allergies and Hay Fever Allergies and Hay Fever Patient Health Information News media interested in covering ... suffer from nasal allergies, commonly known as hay fever. An ear, nose, and throat specialist can help ...

  18. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a ... New Mexico. Why Is the Study of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever a Priority for NIAID? Tickborne diseases ...

  19. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4 viruses that cause two other hemorrhagic fevers, dengue hemorrhagic fever and yellow fever. Virus Families Information ... 2014 Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases ( ...

  20. Dengue Fever Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Dengue Fever Testing Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Dengue Fever Antibodies; Dengue Fever Virus Formal name: Dengue ...

  1. Intractable duodenal ulcer caused by transmural migration of gossypiboma into the duodenum - a case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Gossypiboma is a term used to describe a mass that forms around a cotton sponge or abdominal compress accidentally left in a patient during surgery. Transmural migration of an intra-abdominal gossypiboma has been reported to occur in the digestive tract, bladder, vagina and diaphragm. Open surgery is the most common approach in the treatment of gossypiboma. However, gossypibomas can be extracted by endoscopy while migrating into the digestive tract. We report a case of intractable duodenal ulcer caused by transmural migration of gossypiboma successfully treated by duodenorrhaphy. A systemic literature review is provided and a scheme of the therapeutic approach is proposed. Case presentation A 61-year-old Han Chinese man presented with intermittent epigastric pain for the last 10 months. He had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy conversion to open cholecystectomy for acute gangrenous cholecystitis 10 months ago at another hospital. Transmural migration of gossypiboma into the duodenum was found. Endoscopic intervention failed to remove the entire gauze, and duodenal ulcer caused by the gauze persisted. Surgical intervention was performed and the gauze was removed successfully. The penetrated ulcer was repaired with duodenorrhaphy. The postoperative period was uneventful. We systematically reviewed the literature on transmural migration of gossypiboma into duodenum and present an overview of published cases. Our PubMed search yielded seven reports of transmural migration of retained surgical sponge into the duodenum. Surgical interventions were necessary in two patients. Conclusion Transmural migration of gossypiboma into the duodenum is a rare surgical complication. The treatment strategies include endoscopic extraction and surgical intervention. Prompt surgical intervention should be considered for emergent conditions such as active bleeding, gastrointestinal obstruction, or intra-abdominal sepsis. For non-emergent conditions, surgical intervention

  2. Transmural Variation and Anisotropy of Microvascular Flow Conductivity in the Rat Myocardium

    KAUST Repository

    Smith, Amy F.

    2014-05-28

    Transmural variations in the relationship between structural and fluid transport properties of myocardial capillary networks are determined via continuum modeling approaches using recent three-dimensional (3D) data on the microvascular structure. Specifically, the permeability tensor, which quantifies the inverse of the blood flow resistivity of the capillary network, is computed by volume-averaging flow solutions in synthetic networks with geometrical and topological properties derived from an anatomically-detailed microvascular data set extracted from the rat myocardium. Results show that the permeability is approximately ten times higher in the principal direction of capillary alignment (the "longitudinal" direction) than perpendicular to this direction, reflecting the strong anisotropy of the microvascular network. Additionally, a 30% increase in capillary diameter from subepicardium to subendocardium is shown to translate to a 130% transmural rise in permeability in the longitudinal capillary direction. This result supports the hypothesis that perfusion is preferentially facilitated during diastole in the subendocardial microvasculature to compensate for the severely-reduced systolic perfusion in the subendocardium.

  3. Accentual mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olander, Thomas Kristoffer

    immobilitet i de fleste stammeklasser, mener andre at der i baltoslavisk har fundet en innovation sted hvor konsonantstammernes accentmobilitet blev kopieret af de øvrige stammeklasser. I nærværende afhandling foreslås det at den baltoslaviske innovation bestod i en førbaltoslavisk accentlov. Hvis en ordform...

  4. Role of accentuation in the selection/rejection task framing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Proctor, Robert W

    2017-04-01

    Procedure invariance is a basic assumption of rational theories of choice, however, it has been shown to be violated: Different response modes, or task frames, sometimes reveal opposite preferences. The current study focused on selection and rejection task frames, involving a unique type of problem with enriched and impoverished options, which has previously led to conflicting findings and theoretical explanations: the compatibility hypothesis (Shafir, 1993) and the accentuation hypothesis (Wedell, 1997). We examined the role of task frame by distinguishing these 2 hypotheses and evaluating the information-processing basis of the choices. Experiments conducted online (Experiments 1 and 3) and in-lab (Experiment 4 with eye-tracking technique) revealed a difference between the 2 task frames in the choice data (i.e., the task-framing effect) as a function of the relative attractiveness of the options. Also, this task-framing effect was not influenced by imposed time constraints (Experiments 5 and 6) and was similarly evident with a more direct measure for the option attractiveness (obtained in Experiment 7). Experiment 2, conducted in a lab setting with verbal-protocol requirements, yielded no task-framing effect, suggesting that a requirement to verbalize reasons for choice minimizes accentuation. With this exception, the choice data are in agreement with the accentuation hypothesis, and the combined findings in choice, decision time, task confusion, and eye-tracking data provide evidence of a basis in cognitive effort rather than motivation, as Wedell proposed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. The accentuation principle of figure-ground segregation and the downbeat illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Baingio; Sirigu, Luca

    2016-10-01

    Pinna and Sirigu (2011) demonstrated a new principle of grouping, called the accentuation principle, stating that, all else being equal, elements tend to group in the same oriented direction of the discontinuous element placed within a whole set of continuous/homogeneous components. The discontinuous element behaves like an accent, i.e. a visual emphasis within the wholeness of components as shown in the next section. In this work, the accentuation principle has been extended to new visual domains. In particular, it is shown how this principle affects shape perception. Moreover several visual object attributes are also highlighted, among which orientation, spatial position, inner dynamics and apparent motion that determine the so-called organic segmentation and furthermore tend to induce figure-ground segregation. On the basis of the results of experimental phenomenology, the accentuation can be considered as a complex principle ruling grouping, figure-ground segregation, shape and meaning formation. Through a new musical illusion of downbeat, it is also demonstrated that this principle influences perceptual organization not only in space but also in time and, thus, in both visual and musical domains. This illusion can be heard in eight measures of Pagodes, a solo piano music by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), where a strong physical-perceptual discrepancy in terms of upbeats and downbeats inversion is strongly perceived in both staves.

  6. The accentuation principle of visual organization and the illusion of musical suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Baingio; Sirigu, Luca

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate a new principle of grouping and shape formation that we called the accentuation principle, stating that, all else being equal, the elements tend to group in the same oriented direction of the element discontinuity placed within a whole set of continuous/homogeneous components. The discontinuous element is like an accent, i.e., a visual emphasis within a whole. We showed that this principle is independent from other gestalt principles. In fact, it shows vectorial properties not present in the other principles. It can be pitted against them. Furthermore, it is not only a grouping principle but it also influences shape formation, by inducing effects like the square/diamond and the rectangle illusions. Finally, the accentuation operates under stroboscopic conditions and manifests filling-in properties and long range effects. Through experimental phenomenology, it was shown that the accentuation principle can influence grouping and shape formation not only in space but also in time and, therefore, not only in vision but also in music perception. This was suggested by phenomenally linking visual and musical accents and by demonstrating a new illusion of musical suspension, related with its opposite effect, the downbeat illusion. This kind of illusions can be appreciated in two solo piano compositions respectively by Debussy and Chopin-Rêverie and Nocturne, op. 27 no. 1. Variations in the note where the accent is placed and in the kind of accent demonstrated their basic role in inducing the illusion of musical suspension.

  7. Fever: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Fever: First aid Fever: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A fever is a rise in body temperature. It's usually a sign of infection. The ... 2 C) or higher Should I treat a fever? When you or your child is sick, the ...

  8. The effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux on concentration polarization of low density lipoprotein in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Peter E; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2009-04-22

    Uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by the arterial wall is likely to play a key role in atherogenesis. A particular process that may cause vascular scale heterogeneity in the rate of transendothelial LDL transport is the formation of a flow-dependent LDL concentration polarization layer on the luminal surface of the arterial endothelium. In this study, the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux (that traverses the endothelium only via interendothelial cell clefts) on such concentration polarization is investigated numerically. Unlike in previous investigations, realistic intercellular cleft dimensions are used here and several values of LDL diffusivity are considered. Particular attention is paid to the spatially averaged LDL concentration adjacent to different regions of the endothelial surface, as such measures may be relevant to the rate of transendothelial LDL transport. It is demonstrated in principle that a heterogeneous transmural water flux can act to enhance such measures, and cause them to develop a shear dependence (in addition to that caused by vascular scale flow features, affecting the overall degree of LDL concentration polarization). However, it is shown that this enhancement and additional shear dependence are likely to be negligible for a physiologically realistic transmural flux velocity of 0.0439 mum s(-1) and an LDL diffusivity (in blood plasma) of 28.67 mum(2) s(-1). Hence, the results imply that vascular scale studies of LDL concentration polarization are justified in ignoring the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux.

  9. Fever during anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Chiharu; Lenhardt, Rainer

    2003-12-01

    Fever occurs when pyrogenic stimulation activates thermal control centres. Fever is common during the perioperative period, but rare during anaesthesia. Although only a limited number of studies are available to explain how anaesthesia affects fever, general anaesthesia seems to inhibit fever by decreasing the thermoregulatory-response thresholds to cold. Opioids also inhibit fever; however, the effect is slightly less than that of general anaesthesia. In contrast, epidural anaesthesia does not affect fever. This suggests that hyperthermia, which is often associated with epidural infusions during labour or in the post-operative period, may be a true fever caused by inflammatory activation. Accordingly, this fever might be diminished in patients who receive opioids for pain treatment. Post-operative fever is a normal thermoregulatory response usually of non-infectious aetiology. Fever may be important in the host defence mechanisms and should not be routinely treated lest the associated risks exceed the benefits.

  10. Transmural expression of ion channels and transporters in human nondiseased and end-stage failing hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltysinska, Ewa; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Christ, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    The cardiac action potential is primarily shaped by the orchestrated function of several different types of ion channels and transporters. One of the regional differences believed to play a major role in the progression and stability of the action potential is the transmural gradient of electrical...... activity across the ventricular wall. An altered balance in the ionic currents across the free wall is assumed to be a substrate for arrhythmia. A large fraction of patients with heart failure experience ventricular arrhythmia. However, the underlying substrate of these functional changes is not well......-established as expression analyses of human heart failure (HF) are sparse. We have investigated steady-state RNA levels by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of ion channels, transporters, connexin 43, and miR-1 in 11 end-stage HF and seven nonfailing (NF) hearts. The quantifications were performed on endo-, mid...

  11. Rheumatic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan; Manjarez; Zabriskie

    1999-10-01

    There have been numerous reports stating that treatment of acute rheumatic fever with either aspirin or corticosteroids does not alter the long-term outcome of rheumatic heart disease. Yet, it should be emphasized that most of these studies were carried out with the first generic corticosteroids before the advent of the more active and more potent corticosteroid agents. In spite of this caveat, there is no question that all the clinical and laboratory parameters of inflammation (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein) return to normal much more rapidly with corticosteroids than with aspirin alone. It is therefore our belief that steroids should be used when clinical and laboratory evidence of carditis exists, and aspirin should be reserved for cases of acute rheumatic arthritis with no evidence of carditis. The incidence of long-term valvular disease in active carditis may be decreased with steroid therapy. For example, the number of valve replacements differs markedly in centers that do use steroids and in those that do not. In Capetown, South Africa, where steroids are routinely used for carditis, valve replacement is quite rare. In contrast, in Johannesburg, where steroids are rarely used, the rate of valve replacement is quite high. The racial backgrounds of both groups of patients are similar, thus eliminating the question of racial differences. Concerning secondary prophylaxis, there is also controversy concerning the best second-line therapy. It is now well known that monthly intramuscular injections of benzathine penicillin are really effective for only 20 days. Thus, there is a window in which penicillin coverage is not adequate. To circumvent this problem, some investigators give benzathine penicillin every 3 weeks. These injections are quite painful, however, and it has been our "rule" that compliance with this treatment is inversely proportional to the ratio of the size of the child to the mother. In our own experience over 30 years with the

  12. Transmural Heterogeneity and Remodeling of Ventricular Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Human Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qing; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Moazami, Nader; Fast, Vladimir G.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling is altered in the end-stage heart failure (HF). However, spatial heterogeneity of this remodeling has not been established at the tissue level in failing human heart. The objective is to study functional remodeling of EC coupling and calcium handling in failing and nonfailing human hearts. Methods and Results We simultaneously optically mapped action potentials (AP) and calcium transients (CaT) in coronary-perfused left ventricular wedge preparations from nonfailing (n = 6) and failing (n = 5) human hearts. Our major findings are: (1) CaT duration minus AP duration was longer at sub-endocardium in failing compared to nonfailing hearts during bradycardia (40 beats/min). (2) The transmural gradient of CaT duration was significantly smaller in failing hearts compared with nonfailing hearts at fast pacing rates (100 beats/min). (3) CaT in failing hearts had a flattened plateau at the midmyocardium; and exhibited a “two-component” slow rise at sub-endocardium in three failing hearts. (4) CaT relaxation was slower at sub-endocardium than that at sub-epicardium in both groups. Protein expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) was lower at sub-endocardium than that at sub-epicardium in both nonfailing and failing hearts. SERCA2a protein expression at sub-endocardium was lower in hearts with ischemic cardiomyopathy compared with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Conclusions For the first time, we present direct experimental evidence of transmural heterogeneity of EC coupling and calcium handling in human hearts. End-stage HF is associated with the heterogeneous remodeling of EC coupling and calcium handling. PMID:21502574

  13. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces leftventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chainactivity and increases oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel eKINDO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular subendocardium (Endo but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi and whether pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure and function were determined with echocardiography and catheterization in sham-operated and LVH rats (n=10 for each group. Mitochondrial respiration rates, coupling, content and ROS production were measured in LV Endo and Epi, using saponin-permeabilised fibres, Amplex Red fluorescence and citrate synthase activity.Results: In sham, a transmural respiratory gradient was observed with decreases in endo maximal oxidative capacity (-36.7%, P<0.01 and complex IV activity (-57.4%, P<0.05. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production was similar in both LV layers.Aortic banding induced mild LVH (+31.7% LV mass, associated with normal LV fractional shortening and end diastolic pressure. LVH reduced maximal oxidative capacity (-23.6 and -33.3%, increased mitochondrial H2O2 production (+86.9 and +73.1%, free radical leak (+27.2% and +36.3% and citrate synthase activity (+27.2% and +36.3% in Endo and Epi, respectively.Transmural mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity was reduced in LVH (-57.4 vs –12.2%; P=0.02. Conclusions: Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities are reduced compared to LV Epi. Mild LVH impairs mitochondrial oxidative capacity, increases oxidative stress and reduces transmural complex IV activity. Further studies will be helpful to determine whether reduced LV transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration might be a new marker of a transition from uncomplicated toward complicated LVH.

  14. [Rheumatic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkashin, D V; Kumchin, A N; Shchulenin, S N; Svistov, A S

    2013-01-01

    This lecture-style paper highlights all major problems pertinent to rheumatic fever Definition of acute RF and chronic rheumatic heart disease is proposed and desirability of the use of these terms in clinical practice is explained. Present-day epidemiology of RF is described with reference to marked differences in its prevalence in developed and developing countries. Modern classification of acute RF is described as adopted by the Russian Association of Rheumatologists and recommended for the use in Russian medical facilities. Discussion of etiological issues is focused on such virulence factors as beta-hemolytic streptococcus A and genetic predisposition confirming hereditary nature of RE Its clinical features are described along with laboratory and instrumental methods applied for its diagnostics. Large and small diagnostic criteria of RF are considered. Special attention is given to the treatment of RF and its complications (antibiotic, pathogenetic, and drug therapy). Its primary and secondary prophylaxis is discussed in detail, preparations for the purpose are listed (with doses and duration of application). In conclusion, criteria for the efficacy of therapy are presented along with indications for hospitalization and emergency treatment.

  15. Familial Mediterranean fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000363.htm Familial Mediterranean fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a rare disorder passed down through ...

  16. Fever due to levamisole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta R

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Fever is rarely caused by levamisole. We report a 26-year-old woman who repeatedly developed fever 4-12 hrs after taking levamisole. The association was confirmed by repeated provocation tests.

  17. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mountain spotted fever is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii (R. Rickettsii) , which is carried by ticks. ... Saunders; 2014:chap 212. Walker DH, Blaton LS. Rickettsia rickettsii and other spotted fever group rickettsiae (Rocky ...

  18. Effect of beam hardening on transmural myocardial perfusion quantification in myocardial CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    The detection of subendocardial ischemia exhibiting an abnormal transmural perfusion gradient (TPG) may help identify ischemic conditions due to micro-vascular dysfunction. We evaluated the effect of beam hardening (BH) artifacts on TPG quantification using myocardial CT perfusion (CTP). We used a prototype spectral detector CT scanner (Philips Healthcare) to acquire dynamic myocardial CTP scans in a porcine ischemia model with partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery guided by pressure wire-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. Conventional 120 kVp and 70 keV projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed from the same projection data and used to compute myocardial blood flow (MBF) using the Johnson-Wilson model. Under moderate LAD occlusion (FFR~0.7), we used three 5 mm short axis slices and divided the myocardium into three LAD segments and three remote segments. For each slice and each segment, we characterized TPG as the mean "endo-to-epi" transmural flow ratio (TFR). BH-induced hypoenhancement on the ischemic anterior wall at 120 kVp resulted in significantly lower mean TFR value as compared to the 70 keV TFR value (0.29+/-0.01 vs. 0.55+/-0.01 pmeasured between 120 kVp and 70 keV mean TFR values on segments moderately affected or unaffected by BH. In the entire ischemic LAD territory, 120 kVp mean endocardial flow was significantly reduced as compared to mean epicardial flow (15.80+/-10.98 vs. 40.85+/-23.44 ml/min/100g; pBH was effectively minimized resulting in mean endocardial MBF of 40.85+/-15.3407 ml/min/100g vs. 74.09+/-5.07 ml/min/100g (p=0.0054) in the epicardium. We also found that BH artifact in the conventional 120 kVp images resulted in falsely reduced MBF measurements even under non-ischemic conditions.

  19. Diagnostic value of transmural perfusion ratio derived from dynamic CT-based myocardial perfusion imaging for the detection of haemodynamically relevant coronary artery stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Coenen (Adriaan); M. Lubbers (Marisa); A. Kurata (Akira); A.K. Kono (Atsushi K.); A. Dedic (Admir); R.G. Chelu (Raluca Gabriela); M.L. Dijkshoorn (Marcel); Rossi, A. (Alexia); R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); K. Nieman (Koen)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To investigate the additional value of transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of haemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared with fractional flow reserve (FFR). Methods: Subjects with suspected or known coro

  20. Q fever in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anders; Svendsen, Claus Bo; Christensen, Jens Jorgen

    2010-01-01

    We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection.......We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection....

  1. Q fever in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anders; Svendsen, Claus Bo; Christensen, Jens Jorgen

    2010-01-01

    We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection.......We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection....

  2. [Acute rheumatic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Alexander; Kommer, Vera

    2016-03-01

    We report on a young women with acute rheumatic fever. Acute rheumatic fever has become a rare disease in Germany, especially in adults. This carries the risk that it can be missed in the differential diagnostic considerations of acute rheumatic disorders and febrile status. If rheumatic fever is not diagnosed and treated correctly, there is a considerable risk for rheumatic valvular heart disease. In this article diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic fever are discussed extensively.

  3. The effects of accentuated eccentric loading on strength, muscle hypertrophy, and neural adaptations in trained individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Jason P; Docherty, David

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the strength and neuromuscular adaptations for dynamic constant external resistance (DCER) training and dynamic accentuated external resistance (DAER) training (resistance training employing an accentuated load during eccentric actions). Male subjects active in resistance training were assigned to either a DCER training group (n = 10) or a DAER training group (n = 8) for 9 weeks. Subjects in the DCER group performed 4 sets of 10 repetitions with a load of 75% concentric 1 repetition maximum (RM). Subjects in the DAER group performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions with a concentric load of 75% of 1RM and an eccentric load of approximately 120% of concentric 1RM. Three measures reflecting adaptation of elbow flexors and extensors were recorded pretraining and posttraining: concentric 1RM, muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), and specific tension. Strength was assessed at midtraining periods. No significant changes in muscle CSA were observed in either group. Both training groups experienced significant increases in concentric 1RM and specific tension of both the elbow flexors and extensors, but compared with DCER training, DAER training produced significantly greater increases in concentric 1RM of the elbow extensors. These results suggest that, for some exercises, DAER training may be more effective than DCER training in developing strength within a 9-week training phase. However, for trained subjects, neither protocol is effective in eliciting muscle hypertrophy.

  4. How long-term memory and accentuation interact during spoken language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqing; Yang, Yufang

    2013-04-01

    Spoken language comprehension requires immediate integration of different information types, such as semantics, syntax, and prosody. Meanwhile, both the information derived from speech signals and the information retrieved from long-term memory exert their influence on language comprehension immediately. Using EEG (electroencephalogram), the present study investigated how the information retrieved from long-term memory interacts with accentuation during spoken language comprehension. Mini Chinese discourses were used as stimuli, with an interrogative or assertive context sentence preceding the target sentence. The target sentence included one critical word conveying new information. The critical word was either highly expected or lowly expected given the information retrieved from long-term memory. Moreover, the critical word was either consistently accented or inconsistently de-accented. The results revealed that for lowly expected new information, inconsistently de-accented words elicited a larger N400 and larger theta power increases (4-6 Hz) than consistently accented words. In contrast, for the highly expected new information, consistently accented words elicited a larger N400 and larger alpha power decreases (8-14 Hz) than inconsistently de-accented words. The results suggest that, during spoken language comprehension, the effect of accentuation interacted with the information retrieved from long-term memory immediately. Moreover, our results also have important consequences for our understanding of the processing nature of the N400. The N400 amplitude is not only enhanced for incorrect information (new and de-accented word) but also enhanced for correct information (new and accented words).

  5. Macroautophagy is regulated by the UPR-mediator CHOP and accentuates the phenotype of SBMA mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Yu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Altered protein homeostasis underlies degenerative diseases triggered by misfolded proteins, including spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, a neuromuscular disorder caused by a CAG/glutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Here we show that the unfolded protein response (UPR, an ER protein quality control pathway, is induced in skeletal muscle from SBMA patients, AR113Q knock-in male mice, and surgically denervated wild-type mice. To probe the consequence of UPR induction, we deleted CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, a transcription factor induced following ER stress. CHOP deficiency accentuated atrophy in both AR113Q and surgically denervated muscle through activation of macroautophagy, a lysosomal protein quality control pathway. Conversely, impaired autophagy due to Beclin-1 haploinsufficiency decreased muscle wasting and extended lifespan of AR113Q males, producing a significant and unexpected amelioration of the disease phenotype. Our findings highlight critical cross-talk between the UPR and macroautophagy, and they indicate that autophagy activation accentuates aspects of the SBMA phenotype.

  6. Macroautophagy is regulated by the UPR-mediator CHOP and accentuates the phenotype of SBMA mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhigang; Wang, Adrienne M; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Yue, Zhenyu; Robins, Diane M; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2011-10-01

    Altered protein homeostasis underlies degenerative diseases triggered by misfolded proteins, including spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a neuromuscular disorder caused by a CAG/glutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Here we show that the unfolded protein response (UPR), an ER protein quality control pathway, is induced in skeletal muscle from SBMA patients, AR113Q knock-in male mice, and surgically denervated wild-type mice. To probe the consequence of UPR induction, we deleted CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein), a transcription factor induced following ER stress. CHOP deficiency accentuated atrophy in both AR113Q and surgically denervated muscle through activation of macroautophagy, a lysosomal protein quality control pathway. Conversely, impaired autophagy due to Beclin-1 haploinsufficiency decreased muscle wasting and extended lifespan of AR113Q males, producing a significant and unexpected amelioration of the disease phenotype. Our findings highlight critical cross-talk between the UPR and macroautophagy, and they indicate that autophagy activation accentuates aspects of the SBMA phenotype.

  7. Eliminating illumination effects by discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients' attenuation and accentuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shan; Shehata, Mohamed; Badawy, Wael; Rahman, Choudhury A.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we proposed a discrete cosine transform (DCT)-based attnuation and accentuation method to remove lighting effects on face images for faciliating face recognition task under varying lighting conditions. In the proposed method, logorithm transform is first used to convert a face image into logarithm domain. Then discrete cosine transform is applied to obtain DCT coefficients. The low-frequency DCT coefficients are attenuated since illumination variations mainly concentrate on the low-frequency band. The high-frequency coefficients are accentuated since when under poor illuminations, the high-frequency features become more important in recognition. The reconstructed log image by inverse DCT of the modified coefficients is used for the final recognition. Experiments are conducted on the Yale B database, the combination of Yale B and Extended Yale B databases and the CMU-PIE database. The proposed method does not require modeling and model fitting steps. It can be directly applied to single face image, without any prior information of 3D shape or light sources.

  8. Transmural myocardial perfusion gradients in relation to coronary artery stenoses severity assessed by cardiac multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jesper James; Kühl, Jørgen Tobias; Hove, Jens Dahlgaard

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between epicardial coronary artery stenosis severity and the corresponding regional transmural perfusion at rest and during adenosine stress, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). We evaluated the relationship between the severity of coronary artery diameter...... = stress - PI/rest - PI), and the transmural perfusion ratio (TPR = subendocardium/subepicardium) were calculated. A coronary artery stenosis ≥50 % was present in 49 patients (25 %). Rest-PI and rest-TPR values were similar in patients with and without a coronary artery stenosis ≥50 %, whereas stress...... stenosis assessed by MDCT angiography and semi-quantitative myocardial MDCT perfusion in 200 symptomatic patients. The perfusion index (PI = mean myocardial attenuation density/mean left ventricular lumen attenuation density) at rest and during adenosine stress, the myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR...

  9. Rat Bite Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who ... ingestion of contaminated food or milk products (Haverhill fever). Most cases in the United States are caused ...

  10. Scarlet Fever (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Scarlet Fever KidsHealth > For Parents > Scarlet Fever Print A A A What's in this article? ... to Call the Doctor en español Escarlatina Scarlet fever is caused by an infection with group A ...

  11. Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) KidsHealth > For Parents > Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) Print A A A What's in this article? ... are at work. Seasonal allergies , sometimes called "hay fever" or seasonal allergic rhinitis, are allergy symptoms that ...

  12. Non-uniform recovery of left ventricular transmural mechanics in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilansky Susan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After a transient ischemic episode, the subendocardial region is more severely injured than outer subepicardial layers and may regain a proportionately greater degree of mechanical function in the longitudinal direction. We sought to explore left ventricular (LV transmural mechanics in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI for determining the mechanism underlying recovery of global LV function after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Methods A total of 42 patients (62 ± 11 years old, 71% male with a first STEMI underwent serial assessments of LV longitudinal, circumferential and radial strains (LS, CS and RS by selective tracking of subendocardial and subepicardial regions within 48 hours and a median of 5 months after PCI. LV mechanical parameters were compared with sixteen age and gender matched normal controls. Results In comparison with controls, endocardial and epicardial LS were markedly attenuated at 48 hours following PCI (P 5% following PCI was seen in 24 (57% patients and was associated with improvement in endocardial and epicardial LS (P Conclusions In patients with STEMI treated by PCI, the recovery of LV subendocardial shortening strain seen in the longitudinal direction underlies the improvement in LV global function despite persistent abnormalities in radial mechanics and wall motion score index.

  13. Greater strength gains after training with accentuated eccentric than traditional isoinertial loading loads in already strength-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eWalker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As training experience increases it becomes more challenging to induce further neuromuscular adaptation. Consequently, strength-trainers seek alternative training methods in order to further increase strength and muscle mass. One method is to utilize accentuated eccentric loading, which applies a greater external load during the eccentric phase of the lift as compared to the concentric phase. Based upon this practice, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 10 weeks of accentuated eccentric loading versus traditional isoinertial resistance training in strength-trained men. Young (22±3 y, 177±6 cm, 76±10 kg, n = 28 strength-trained men (2.6±2.2 y experience were allocated to concentric-eccentric resistance training in the form of accentuated eccentric load (eccentric load = concentric load + 40% or traditional resistance training, while the control group continued their normal unsupervised training program. Both intervention groups performed three sets of 6-RM (session 1 and three sets of 10-RM (session 2 bilateral leg press and unilateral knee extension exercises per week. Maximum force production was measured by unilateral isometric (110° knee angle and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric 30°.s-1 knee extension tests, and work capacity was measured by a knee extension repetition-to-failure test. Muscle mass was assessed using panoramic ultrasound and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Surface electromyogram amplitude normalized to maximum M-wave and the twitch interpolation technique were used to examine maximal muscle activation. After training, maximum isometric torque increased significantly more in the accentuated eccentric load group than control (18±10% vs. 1±5%, p<0.01, which was accompanied by an increase in voluntary activation (3.5±5%, p<0.05. Isokinetic eccentric torque increased significantly after accentuated eccentric load training only (10±9%, p<0.05, whereas concentric torque increased equally in both

  14. [Significance of intermittent slow waves with right posterior accentuation in the EEG's of psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, G; Otto, W

    1984-02-01

    The study was based on the frequent occurrence of intermittent slow waves right-posterior accentuation (IRP) in the EEGs of psychiatric patients. With regard to the EEG-phenomenon we present a detailed morphological and functional description as well as an evaluation from a developmental point of view. According to case histories a clinico-psychopathological characterization of the patients with IRP is given. The IRP-phenomenon can be interpreted electrogenetically against the background of and in connection with the so-called slow alpha variant rhythms as well as the posterior slow waves characteristic of children and adolescents. These patterns have in common a certain tendency to right-sided accentuation. In accord with a hypothesis (which has been derived from other observations and considerations) of a "maturation gradient" which favours the left hemisphere, we try to explain the IRP-phenomenon as an expression of a maturation deficit. Whereas the slow alpha variant rhythms and the posterior slow waves characteristic of children and adolescents appear bilaterally for the most part, IRP by definition, limited to the right hemisphere, may be considered as a less pronounced form in comparison. Deriving from clinico-psychopathological assessment the relationships are as follows: Patients with IRP account for about 5% of the in-patients in our psychiatric hospital. The IRP phenomenon seems to be closely linked to the male sex. Although a clear relationship with nosological categories (ICD) could not be proved, it seems that patients suffering from schizophrenic psychoses (ICD No. 295) are more frequently represented among the patients with the IRP-phenomenon than others. For the group of schizophrenic patients with IRP we found in contrast to a control group of schizophrenics without IRP a tendency to earlier onset of their disease. Compared with the control group it is found that the IRP groups consists of younger patients at the time of conducting this study. The

  15. On the role of familiarity with units of measurement in categorical accentuation: Tajfel and Wilkes (1963) revisited and replicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneille, Olivier; Klein, Olivier; Lambert, Sophie; Judd, Charles M

    2002-07-01

    The present article provides evidence for the role of participants' familiarity with units of measurement in categorical accentuation with unidimensional physical estimates. Belgian and American participants estimated the lengths of lines varying in length. Depending on the condition, the lines were or were not systematically associated with categorical labels, and the estimates were made either in inches or in centimeters. Consistent with our predictions, (a) categorical accentuation was higher when the lines were systematically categorized than when they were not, and (b) this effect was stronger when participants reported their estimates in an unfamiliar measurement unit (i.e., Belgian participants using inches, and American participants using centimeters). These findings support the view that people's reliance on categorical information is more likely to emerge given uncertain contexts of judgment. Additionally, they may help explain why researchers have had difficulties replicating the categorical accentuation effect in the past.

  16. Estimation of premorbid intelligence in Spanish people with the Word Accentuation Test and its application to the diagnosis of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ser, T; González-Montalvo, J I; Martínez-Espinosa, S; Delgado-Villapalos, C; Bermejo, F

    1997-04-01

    The Word Accentuation Test assesses the accentuation of 30 infrequent Spanish words written without the accentuation mark and is an easy-to-use tool for estimating premorbid intelligence of Spanish-speaking people. Its intraobserver (0.97) and interobserver (0.93) reliabilities and its correlation with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (.837) and Raven's Progressive Matrices (.655) are high, offering a good prediction of general intelligence. It is resistant to mental deterioration; 20 demented and 40 controls matched by sex, age, and education obtained similar scores. The discrepancies between current and predicted scores in Raven's scale can diagnose mild-moderate dementia with 0.79 accuracy (sensitivity, 0.78; specificity, 0.82).

  17. Low physical activity accentuates the effect of the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism on body fat accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Camilla H; Stender-Petersen, Kirstine L; Mogensen, Mette S

    2008-01-01

    was examined. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The FTO rs9939609 polymorphism was genotyped in a total of 17,508 Danes from five different study groups. RESULTS: In studies of 3,856 type 2 diabetic case subjects and 4,861 normal glucose-tolerant control subjects, the minor A-allele of rs9939609 associated......(-16)). Furthermore, obesity-related quantitative traits such as body weight, waist circumference, fat mass, and fasting serum leptin levels were significantly elevated in A-allele carriers. An interaction between the FTO rs9939609 genotype and physical activity (P = 0.007) was found, where physically inactive...... activity seems to accentuate the effect of FTO rs9939609 on body fat accumulation....

  18. Antimyosin imaging in acute transmural myocardial infarctions: results of a multicenter clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Becker, L.C.; LaFrance, N.D.; Liberman, H.A.; James, C.; Mattis, J.A.; Dean, R.T.; Brown, J.; Reiter, A.

    1989-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antimyosin antibody has been shown experimentally to bind selectively to irreversibly damaged myocytes. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antimyosin for identifying acute transmural infarction, 50 patients with acute Q wave myocardial infarction were entered into a phase I/II multicenter trial involving three clinical sites. Indium-111 antimyosin was prepared from an instant kit formulation containing 0.5 mg of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-coupled Fab fragment (R11D10) and 1.2 to 2.4 mCi of indium-111. Average labeling efficiency was 92%. Antimyosin was injected 27 +/- 16 h after the onset of chest pain. Planar or tomographic imaging was performed 27 +/- 9 h after injection in all patients, and repeat imaging was done 24 h later in 39 patients. Of the 50 patients entered, 46 showed myocardial uptake of antimyosin (sensitivity 92%). Thirty-one of 39 planar scans performed at 24 h were diagnostic; 8 showed persistent blood pool activity that cleared by 48 h. Focal myocardial uptake of antimyosin corresponded to electrocardiographic infarct localization. No patient had an adverse reaction to antimyosin. In addition, 125 serum samples, including 21 collected greater than 42 days after injection, were tested for human antimouse antibodies, and all samples were assessed as having undetectable titers. Intensity of antimyosin uptake was correlated with infarct location and the presence or absence of collateral vessels. There was a significant correlation between faint uptake and inferoposterior infarct location. In 21 patients who had coronary angiography close to the time of antimyosin injection, there was a significant correlation between faint tracer uptake and closed infarct-related vessel with absent collateral flow.

  19. Survival of stroke patients after introduction of the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol TIA/CVA'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Weerd, Leonie; Groenhof, Feikje; Kollen, Boudewijn J; van der Meer, Klaas

    2013-06-04

    Earlier research showed that healthcare in stroke could be better organized, aiming for improved survival and less comorbidity. Therefore, in 2004 the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG) and the Dutch Association of Neurology (NVN) introduced the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol TIA/CVA' (the LTA) to improve survival, minimize the risk of stroke recurrence, and increase quality of life after stroke. This study examines whether survival improved after implementation of the new protocol, and whether there was an increase in contacts with the general practitioner (GP)/nurse practitioner, registration of comorbidity and prescription of medication. From the primary care database of the Registration Network Groningen (RNG) two cohorts were composed: one cohort compiled before and one after introduction of the LTA. Cohort 1 (n = 131, first stroke 2001-2002) was compared with cohort 2 (n = 132, first stroke 2005-2006) with regard to survival and the secondary outcomes. Comparison of the two cohorts showed no significant improvement in survival. In cohort 2, the number of contacts with the GP was significantly lower and with the nurse practitioner significantly higher, compared with cohort 1. All risk factors for stroke were more prevalent in cohort 2, but were only significant for hypercholesterolemia. In both cohorts more medication was prescribed after stroke, whereas ACE inhibitors were prescribed more frequently only in cohort 2. No major changes in survival and secondary outcomes were apparent after introduction of the LTA. Although, there was a small improvement in secondary prevention, this study shows that optimal treatment after introduction of the LTA has not yet been achieved.

  20. Survival of stroke patients after introduction of the ‘Dutch Transmural Protocol TIA/CVA’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Earlier research showed that healthcare in stroke could be better organized, aiming for improved survival and less comorbidity. Therefore, in 2004 the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG) and the Dutch Association of Neurology (NVN) introduced the ‘Dutch Transmural Protocol TIA/CVA’ (the LTA) to improve survival, minimize the risk of stroke recurrence, and increase quality of life after stroke. This study examines whether survival improved after implementation of the new protocol, and whether there was an increase in contacts with the general practitioner (GP)/nurse practitioner, registration of comorbidity and prescription of medication. Methods From the primary care database of the Registration Network Groningen (RNG) two cohorts were composed: one cohort compiled before and one after introduction of the LTA. Cohort 1 (n = 131, first stroke 2001–2002) was compared with cohort 2 (n = 132, first stroke 2005–2006) with regard to survival and the secondary outcomes. Results Comparison of the two cohorts showed no significant improvement in survival. In cohort 2, the number of contacts with the GP was significantly lower and with the nurse practitioner significantly higher, compared with cohort 1. All risk factors for stroke were more prevalent in cohort 2, but were only significant for hypercholesterolemia. In both cohorts more medication was prescribed after stroke, whereas ACE inhibitors were prescribed more frequently only in cohort 2. Conclusion No major changes in survival and secondary outcomes were apparent after introduction of the LTA. Although, there was a small improvement in secondary prevention, this study shows that optimal treatment after introduction of the LTA has not yet been achieved. PMID:23734793

  1. Rheumatic fever reappraised

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulrik Baandrup

    2005-01-01

    @@ Rheumatic fever is a complication following an episode of group A streptococcal pharyngitis. It is an acute immunologically mediated, multisystem inflammatory disorder. Acute rheumatic heart disease during the active phase of rheumatic fever sometimes progresses to chronic rheumatic heart disease. Despite its declining importance in industrialised countries rheumatic fever remains the leading cause of death from heart disease in children and young adults in less developed regions. Fifteen to twenty million new cases emerge every year in developing countries.1

  2. Multidisciplinary transmural rehabilitation for older persons with a stroke: the design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vluggen Tom PMM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the major causes of loss of independence, decreased quality of life and mortality among elderly people. About half of the elderly stroke patients discharged after rehabilitation in a nursing home still experience serious impairments in daily functioning one year post stroke, which can lead to difficulties in picking up and managing their social life. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of a new multidisciplinary transmural rehabilitation programme for older stroke patients. Methods A two group multicentre randomised controlled trial is used to evaluate the effects of the rehabilitation programme. The programme consists of three care modules: 1 neurorehabilitation treatment for elderly stroke patients; 2 empowerment training for patient and informal caregiver; and 3 stroke education for patient and informal caregiver. The total programme has a duration of between two and six months, depending on the individual problems of the patient and informal caregiver. The control group receives usual care in the nursing home and after discharge. Patients aged 65 years and over are eligible for study participation when they are admitted to a geriatric rehabilitation unit in a nursing home due to a recent stroke and are expected to be able to return to their original home environment after discharge. Data are gathered by face-to-face interviews, self-administered questionnaires, focus groups and registration forms. Primary outcomes for patients are activity level after stroke, functional dependence, perceived quality of life and social participation. Outcomes for informal caregivers are perceived care burden, objective care burden, quality of life and perceived health. Outcome measures of the process evaluation are implementation fidelity, programme deliverance and the opinion of the stroke professionals, patients and informal caregivers about the programme. Outcome measures of the

  3. African tick bite fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Aaquist; Thybo, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The incident of spotted fever imported to Denmark is unknown. We present a classic case of African Tick Bite Fever (ATBF) to highlight a disease, which frequently infects wildlife enthusiasts and hunters on vacation in South Africa. ATBF has a good prognosis and is easily treated with doxycyclin...

  4. Haemoragisk Rift Valley Fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian; Thybo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    A case of fatal hemorrhagic Rift Valley fever during an epidemic in Kenya's North Eastern Province in January 2007 is described.......A case of fatal hemorrhagic Rift Valley fever during an epidemic in Kenya's North Eastern Province in January 2007 is described....

  5. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  6. Neonatal typhoid fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, K C; Simmonds, E J; Tarlow, M J

    1986-01-01

    Three infants of Pakistani immigrant mothers developed typhoid fever in the neonatal period. All three survived, but two became chronic excretors of Salmonella typhi. The risk of an outbreak of typhoid fever in a maternity unit or special care baby unit is emphasized.

  7. Rat bite fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, W.; Boot, R.G.A.; Ho, H.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rat bite fever (RBF) is a bacterial zoonosis for which two causal bacterial species have been identified: Streptobacillis moniliformis and Spirillum minus. Haverhill fever (HF) is a form of S. moniliformis infection believed to develop after ingestion of contaminated food or water. Here the

  8. How and When Accentuation Influences Temporally Selective Attention and Subsequent Semantic Processing during On-Line Spoken Language Comprehension: An ERP Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-qing; Ren, Gui-qin

    2012-01-01

    An event-related brain potentials (ERP) experiment was carried out to investigate how and when accentuation influences temporally selective attention and subsequent semantic processing during on-line spoken language comprehension, and how the effect of accentuation on attention allocation and semantic processing changed with the degree of…

  9. Skeletal and dental Class II malocclusion, with anterior open bite and accentuated overjet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márlio Vinícius de Oliveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Open bite is defined as a deficiency in normal vertical contact between antagonist teeth and may manifest in a limited region, or more rarely throughout the entire dental arch. If the lack of contact between teeth is located in the incisor and/or canine region when occlusion is in centric relation, it is called anterior open bite (AOB. Some studies have demonstrated that AOB is strongly associated with non-nutritional sucking habit. This article relates the treatment of a female African-Brazilian patient, with 20 years and 7 months of age, who presented Angle's Class II, division 1 malocclusion, AOB, accentuated overjet, lingual interposition during swallowing and difficulty with pronouncing some phonemes. Orthodontic treatment began by mounting an Edgewise Standard fixed appliance system, with a fixed palatal crib appliance and extraction of maxillary first premolars. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO, as part of the requisites to become a BBO Diplomate.

  10. Editorial Perspective: The use of person-first language in scholarly writing may accentuate stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2017-07-01

    Numerous style guides, including those issued by the American Psychological and the American Psychiatric Associations, prescribe that writers use only person-first language so that nouns referring to persons (e.g. children) always precede phrases referring to characteristics (e.g. children with typical development). Person-first language is based on the premise that everyone, regardless of whether they have a disability, is a person-first, and therefore everyone should be referred to with person-first language. However, my analysis of scholarly writing suggests that person-first language is used more frequently to refer to children with disabilities than to refer to children without disabilities; person-first language is more frequently used to refer to children with disabilities than adults with disabilities; and person-first language is most frequently used to refer to children with the most stigmatized disabilities. Therefore, the use of person-first language in scholarly writing may actually accentuate stigma rather than attenuate it. Recommendations are forwarded for language use that may reduce stigma. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  11. Study protocol: Cost-effectiveness of transmural nutritional support in malnourished elderly patients in comparison with usual care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren Marian AE

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is a common consequence of disease in older patients. Both in hospital setting and in community setting oral nutritional support has proven to be effective. However, cost-effectiveness studies are scarce. Therefore, the aim of our study is to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of transmural nutritional support in malnourished elderly patients, starting at hospital admission until three months after discharge. Methods This study is a randomized controlled trial. Patients are included at hospital admission and followed until three months after discharge. Patients are eligible to be included when they are ≥ 60 years old and malnourished according to the following objective standards: Body Mass Index (BMI in kg/m2 Conclusion In this randomized controlled trial we will evaluate the effect of transmural nutritional support in malnourished elderly patients after hospital discharge, compared to usual care. Primary endpoints of the study are changes in activities of daily living, body weight, body composition, quality of life, and muscle strength. An economic evaluation will be performed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the intervention in comparison with usual care. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (ISRCTN29617677, registered 14-Sep-2005

  12. Transient transmural reduction of myocardial blood flow, demonstrated by thallium-201 scintigraphy, as a cause of variant angina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maseri, A.; Parodi, O.; Severi, S.; Pesola, A.

    1976-08-01

    In previous studies we demonstrated that variant angina could not be attributed to increased myocardial demands. In order to investigate whether a reduction of regional myocardial blood supply could be responsible for these ischemic episodes, we studied regional myocardial perfusion in six patients admitted to our coronary care unit. Myocardial scintigrams, obtained 5-7 min following i.v. injection of 1 mCi of thallium-201, performed during an episode of ST-segment elevation, showed transmural deficits of tracer uptake in the heart wall corresponding to the leads showing ST-segment elevation. These regional deficits had disappeared by 2 hours because of late uptake in previously ischemic myocardium. One week later, following injections performed in the absence of acute ischemia, no deficit was apparent. Tracer uptake in ischemic areas was 60 percent to 85 percent of that observed a week later. After adjusting for thallium-201 kinetics and counting geometry problems, these scintigrams actually represent large underestimations of actual flow reduction. Thus variant angina appears to be caused by massive transmural reduction of myocardial blood supply.

  13. Effect of Lidocaine and Amiodarone on Transmural Heterogeneityricular Repolarization in Isolated Rabbit Hearts Model of Sustained Global Ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Binquan; PU Jun; LIU Nian; YU Ronghui; RUAN Yanfei; LI Yang; WANG Lin

    2005-01-01

    To study the effect of of lidocaine and amiodarone on the transmural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization in isolated rabbit hearts model of sustained global ischemia and to explore the mechanisms underlying the antiarrhythmic activity of lidocaine and amiodarone, rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group, ischemia group, lidocaine group and amiodarone group. By the monophasic action potential (MAP) recording technique, MAPs of recorded across the left ventricular free wall in rabbit hearts perfused transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) and arrhythmic induced by ischemia. Our results showed that TDR of three myocardial layers in ischemia group were significantly lengthened after ischemia. TDR was increased from 17.5±3.9 ms to 31.2±4.6 ms at the time that concided with the onset of sustained ventricle arrhythmic. Amiodarone could decrease TDR, but lidocaine could increase TDR at initial ischemia, and no significant difference was found at other ischemia time points. 5 cases had ventriclar arrhythmia in ischemia group (62.5 %), but no case in lidocaine group (P<0.01) and only 1 case in amiodarone group had ventrilar arrhythmia (P< 0.01). No significant difference was found between amiodarone group and lidocaine group. It is concluded that TDR of of three myocardial layers increases significantly at ischemia and it is closely associated with development of ventricular arrhythmia, and amiodarone could decrease TDR, but lidocaine could increase TDR at initial ischemia and has no effects at other ischemia time points.

  14. The contribution of ventricular apicobasal and transmural repolarization patterns to the development of the T wave body surface potentials in frogs (Rana temporaria) and pike (Esox lucius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaykshnorayte, Marina A; Azarov, Jan E; Tsvetkova, Alena S; Vityazev, Vladimir A; Ovechkin, Alexey O; Shmakov, Dmitry N

    2011-05-01

    The study aimed at the simultaneous determination of the transmural and apicobasal differences in the repolarization timing and the comparison of the contributions of these two repolarization gradients to the development of the body surface T wave potentials in animals with the single heart ventricle (fishes and amphibians). Unipolar potentials were measured on the body surface, epicardium and in the intramural (subepicardial, Epi; midmyocardial; and subendocardial, Endo) ventricular layers of 9 pike and 8 frogs. Activation times, repolarization times and activation-recovery intervals were determined. A transmural gradient in repolarization durations in frogs (Endo>Epi, Ppike that produces a repolarization sequence from Endo to Epi (Endopike and frogs.

  15. Involvement of AMPK in alcohol dehydrogenase accentuated myocardial dysfunction following acute ethanol challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Scott, Glenda I; Ren, Jun

    2010-06-23

    Binge alcohol drinking often triggers myocardial contractile dysfunction although the underlying mechanism is not fully clear. This study was designed to examine the impact of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) on ethanol-induced change in cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, insulin and AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) signaling. ADH transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were acutely challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg/d, i.p.) for 3 days. Oral glucose tolerance test, cardiac AMP/ATP levels, cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling and AMPK signaling (including ACC and LKB1) were examined. Ethanol exposure led to glucose intolerance, elevated plasma insulin, compromised cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties, downregulated protein phosphatase PP2A subunit and PPAR-gamma, as well as phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and LKB1, all of which except plasma insulin were overtly accentuated by ADH transgene. Interestingly, myocardium from ethanol-treated FVB mice displayed enhanced expression of PP2Calpha and PGC-1alpha, decreased insulin receptor expression as well as unchanged expression of Glut4, the response of which was unaffected by ADH. Cardiac AMP-to-ATP ratio was significantly enhanced by ethanol exposure with a more pronounced increase in ADH mice. In addition, the AMPK inhibitor compound C (10 microM) abrogated acute ethanol exposure-elicited cardiomyocyte mechanical dysfunction. In summary, these data suggest that the ADH transgene exacerbated acute ethanol toxicity-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction, intracellular Ca(2+) mishandling and glucose intolerance, indicating a role of ADH in acute ethanol toxicity-induced cardiac dysfunction possibly related to altered cellular fuel AMPK signaling cascade.

  16. Does high muscle temperature accentuate skeletal muscle injury from eccentric exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, John W; Zambraski, Edward J; Sawka, Michael N; Urso, Maria L

    2016-05-01

    Hyperthermia is suspected of accentuating skeletal muscle injury from novel exercise, but this has not been well studied. This study examined if high muscle temperatures alters skeletal muscle injury induced by eccentric exercise (ECC). Eight volunteers (age, 22.5 ± 4.1 year; height, 169.5 ± 10.8 cm; body mass, 76.2 ± 12.6 kg), serving as their own control, and who were not heat acclimatized, completed two elbow flexor ECC trials; in one trial the biceps were heated >40°C (HEAT) and in the other trial there was no heating (NON). HEAT was applied with shortwave diathermy (100 W) for 15 min immediately before the first ECC bout and for 2 min in between each bout. Individuals were followed for 10 days after each ECC session, with a 6-week washout period between arms. The maximal voluntary isometric contraction decreased by 41 ± 17% and 46 ± 20% in the NON and HEAT trials, respectively. Bicep circumference increased by 0.07 ± 0.08 mm (4%, P = 0.04) and relaxed range of motion decreased by 11.5 ± 8.2° (30%, P 40°C muscle temperature does not alter skeletal muscle injury or functional impairments induced by novel ECC. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  17. Q fever - early

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if untreated. Other complications can include: Bone infection ( osteomyelitis ) Brain infection ( encephalitis ) Liver infection (chronic hepatitis) Lung ... 2015:chap 190. Read More Encephalitis Endocarditis Flu Osteomyelitis Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) Q fever Tick bite ...

  18. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that is infected with the virus. The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the main species that spreads this ... especially if you have had dengue fever before. Prevention Because there is no way to prevent dengue ...

  19. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... don't use genetic tests as the sole method of diagnosing familial Mediterranean fever. There's no cure ... may be options, though these treatments are considered experimental. Other medications include rilonacept (Arcalyst) and anakinra (Kineret). ...

  20. [Role of calcineurin in down-regulation of left ventricular transmural voltage- dependent K(+) currents in mice with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen-Xia; Dong, Fang; Chang, Yan-Chao; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yan-Fang

    2015-08-25

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of calcineurin in the down-regulation of left ventricular transmural voltage-dependent K(+) currents in heart failure. Transverse aorta was banded by using microsurgical techniques to create mouse heart failure model. Sham-operated (Sham) or aorta banded (Band) mice were randomized to receive calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) or vehicle. The densities and kinetic properties of voltage-dependent K(+) currents, as well as action potential (AP), of left ventricular subendocardial (Endo) and subepicardial (Epi) myocytes were determined by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that calcineurin activity was significant higher in Endo myocytes than that in Epi ones in all the groups. Compared with Sham group, Band mice showed significantly increased calcineurin activity both in Endo and Epi myocytes. CsA significantly reduced calcineurin activity in Band mice. CsA treatment in Band mice partially reversed the down-regulation of Ito density, completely reversed the down-regulation of IK,slow density both in Endo and Epi myocytes, and Iss density in Endo myocytes. In addition, CsA treatment in Band mice partially antagonized the prolongation of action potential duration (APD), and APD at 50% (APD50) and 90% repolarization (APD90) were significantly reduced. Because of non-parallel shortening of APD in Endo and Epi myocytes, the ratio of Endo/Epi APD90 was reduced from 4.8:1 in Band mice to 2.6:1 in CsA-treated mice, which was close to that in Sham mice. The results suggest that non-parallel activation of calcineurin in Endo and Epi myocytes contributes to the down-regulation of transmural voltage-dependent K(+) currents and the amplification of transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) in left ventricular failure hearts. Inhibition of calcineurin may be a potential new therapeutic strategy to prevent and cure arrhythmias and sudden death in heart failure.

  1. Paracetamol and fever management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, C

    2008-11-01

    Paracetamol is one of the most commonly used legal drugs in the western world. Its availability is good, cost is low, and its uses include 'over-the-counter' (OTC) distribution, primary care prescribed therapy, secondary care 'post-operative' application and emergency treatment. Stated benefits of paracetamol include: the drug's analgesic effects, preference to aspirin in avoidance of Reye's syndrome, good patient tolerance, and iatrogenic complications are infrequent and minor. Stated cautions include hepatotoxic effect following minor doses and short duration use and users may incur compromised immune integrity. This paper is concerned with paracetamol's role in fever management. Public concern regarding, in particular, childhood fever and febrile convulsions is largely unwarranted. Despite paracetamol's reputation as a popular fever-reducing agent the drug is poorly effective in the control of febrility and febrile convulsions showing no important advantage compared with placebo. Paracetamol is probably grossly over-prescribed for fever management and its value more perceived than real. Greater efforts are needed to inform patients of the natural benefits of the biological strategy of fever and of the highly limited and in some cases contraindicated use of paracetamol in fever management.

  2. Emergence of Q Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Angelakis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis with many acute and chronic manifestations caused by the pathogen Coxiella burnetii. Farm animals and pets are the main reservoirs of infection, and transmission to human beings is mainly accomplished through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Persons at greatest risk are those in contact with farm animals and include farmers, abattoir workers, and veterinarians. The organs most commonly affected during Q fever are the heart, the arteries, the bones and the liver. The most common clinical presentation is an influenza-like illness with varying degrees of pneumonia and hepatitis. Although acute disease is usually self-limiting, people do occasionally die from this condition. Endocarditis is the most serious and most frequent clinical presentation of chronic Q fever. Vascular infection is the second most frequent presentation of Q fever. The diagnosis of Q fever is based on a significant increase in serum antibody titers. The treatment is effective and well tolerated, but must be adapted to the acute or chronic pattern with the tetracyclines to be considered the mainstay of antibiotic therapy. For the treatment of Q fever during pregnancy the use of long-term cotrimoxazole therapy is proposed.

  3. Typhoid fever in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Getenet; Asrat, Daniel; Mengistu, Yohannes; Aseffa, Abrham; Wain, John

    2008-12-01

    This review focuses on the reports of salmonellosis by investigators in different parts of Ethiopia, in particular focusing on the levels of typhoid fever. Many of the reports are published in local journals that are not available online. There have been seven studies which diagnosed typhoid fever by laboratory culture and there is no coordinated epidemiological surveillance. All conducted research and reports from different health institutions in Ethiopia indicate that typhoid fever was still a common problem up to the most recent study in 2000 and that the extensive use of first-line drugs has led to the development of multiple drug resistance. In the sites covered by this review, the total number of published cases of typhoid fever dropped over time reflecting the decline in research capacity in the country. Data on the proportion of patients infected by different serovars of Salmonella suggest that the non-Typhi serovars of Salmonella are increasing. The published evidence suggests that typhoid fever is a current public health problem in Ethiopia although population based surveys, based on good microbiological diagnosis, are urgently needed. Only then can the true burden of enteric fever be estimated and the benefit of public health control measures, such as health education, safe water provision, improved food hygienic practices and eventually vaccination, be properly assessed.

  4. Endoscopic, transmural drainage and necrosectomy for walled-off pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis is associated with low mortality--a single-center experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Palle Nordblad; Novovic, Srdan; Roug, Stine

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endoscopic transmural drainage and necrosectomy (ETDN) is a promising alternative to percutaneous drainage and surgical intervention in the treatment of walled-off pancreatic and peripancreatic necroses (WONs). We assessed the outcome and safety profile of ETDN in a single-center patie...... in a single, high-volume center has an acceptable safety profile and is associated with a low mortality....

  5. Health care in patients 1 year post-stroke in general practice : research on the utilisation of the Dutch Transmural Protocol transient ischaemic attack/cerebrovascular accident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd, L.; Rutgers, A.W.F.; Groenier, K.H.; van der Meer, K.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the kind of aftercare that ischaemic stroke patients receive and the extent that aftercare fulfils the criteria of the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol transient ischaemic attack/cerebrovascular accident'. Fifty-seven patients were interviewed 1 year post-stroke about secondary

  6. Greater Strength Gains after Training with Accentuated Eccentric than Traditional Isoinertial Loads in Already Strength-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Simon; Blazevich, Anthony J; Haff, G Gregory; Tufano, James J; Newton, Robert U; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2016-01-01

    As training experience increases it becomes more challenging to induce further neuromuscular adaptation. Consequently, strength trainers seek alternative training methods in order to further increase strength and muscle mass. One method is to utilize accentuated eccentric loading, which applies a greater external load during the eccentric phase of the lift as compared to the concentric phase. Based upon this practice, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 10 weeks of accentuated eccentric loading vs. traditional isoinertial resistance training in strength-trained men. Young (22 ± 3 years, 177 ± 6 cm, 76 ± 10 kg, n = 28) strength-trained men (2.6 ± 2.2 years experience) were allocated to concentric-eccentric resistance training in the form of accentuated eccentric load (eccentric load = concentric load + 40%) or traditional resistance training, while the control group continued their normal unsupervised training program. Both intervention groups performed three sets of 6-RM (session 1) and three sets of 10-RM (session 2) bilateral leg press and unilateral knee extension exercises per week. Maximum force production was measured by unilateral isometric (110° knee angle) and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric 30°.s(-1)) knee extension tests, and work capacity was measured by a knee extension repetition-to-failure test. Muscle mass was assessed using panoramic ultrasonography and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Surface electromyogram amplitude normalized to maximum M-wave and the twitch interpolation technique were used to examine maximal muscle activation. After training, maximum isometric torque increased significantly more in the accentuated eccentric load group than control (18 ± 10 vs. 1 ± 5%, p eccentric torque increased significantly after accentuated eccentric load training only (10 ± 9%, p eccentric load (10 ± 9%, p eccentric load group was significantly greater (p eccentric load group only (28%, p eccentric load training led

  7. [Neurogenic contractions of the rat tail artery under isobaric conditions: effect of transmural pressure and function of the endothelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, O S; Zotov, A V; Rodionov, I M; Golubinskaia, V O; Borovik, A S

    2001-05-01

    In stimulation of the rat nerve with a modulated sine pattern, an increase in the modulating frequency from 0.03 to 0.15 Hz diminished the latency between the stimulating signals and changes in the vessel resistance as well as the amplitude of the flow oscillations, but did not affect tonic contractions of the vessel. A reduction of transmural pressure from 80 to 40 mm Hg increased both the tonic and the phasic components of the vessel contraction. Following the endothelium removal no change in the response latency occurred. The data obtained suggest that, during a rhythmic neurogenic influence, the vascular endothelium may work as an "amplifier" of the vessel's phasic contractions.

  8. Impact of Na⁺ channel blockers on transmural dispersion of refractoriness and arrhythmic susceptibility in guinea-pig left ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2012-09-15

    Clinically, class Ib antiarrhythmic agents (selective I(Na) blockers) are considered to be safe drugs, whereas class Ia and Ic agents (non-selective blockers of both I(Na) and I(Kr), the rapid component of the delayed rectifier) may evoke proarrhythmia. I hypothesized that this difference is accounted for by differential drug effects on transmural dispersion of refractoriness, in the presence of the reciprocal distribution profile of I(Na) and I(Kr) across ventricular wall, as determined in previous studies. Specifically, less epicardial than endocardial I(Na) reserve would likely contribute to a greater prolongation of the effective refractory period (ERP) at epicardium by the I(Na) blocker, thereby reducing epicardial-to-endocardial ERP dispersion, with resulting antiarrhythmic effect. In contrast, less endocardial than epicardial I(Kr) reserve would likely contribute to a greater prolongation of repolarization at the endocardium by the I(Kr) blocker, thereby amplifying transmural ERP dispersion and inducing arrhythmia. In perfused guinea-pig hearts, dofetilide, a specific I(Kr) blocker, as well as class Ia (quinidine, procainamide) and class Ic agents (flecainide), were found to prolong the QT interval and monophasic action potential duration, and elicited greater endocardial than epicardial ERP prolongation, thus markedly increasing transmural ERP dispersion. These changes were associated with episodes of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia in 30-40% of experiments. In contrast, class Ib agents (lidocaine, mexiletine) evoked greater epicardial than endocardial ERP lengthening, thereby decreasing transmural ERP dispersion, and produced no tachyarrhythmia. These findings suggest that transmural ERP dispersion is the electrophysiological determinant which may shape the profile of class I agent effects on arrhythmic susceptibility.

  9. Behavioral fever in ectothermic vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakus, Krzysztof; Ronsmans, Maygane; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Fever is an evolutionary conserved defense mechanism which is present in both endothermic and ectothermic vertebrates. Ectotherms in response to infection can increase their body temperature by moving to warmer places. This process is known as behavioral fever. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the mechanisms of induction of fever in mammals. We further discuss the evolutionary conserved mechanisms existing between fever of mammals and behavioral fever of ectothermic vertebrates. Finally, the experimental evidences supporting an adaptive value of behavioral fever expressed by ectothermic vertebrates are summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Recurrent Fever in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-03-25

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time.

  11. Recurrent Fever in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Torreggiani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time.

  12. The dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor vildagliptin does not accentuate glibenclamide-induced hypoglycemia but reduces glucose-induced glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Ouaghlidi, Andrea; Rehring, Erika; Holst, Jens Juul

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 by vildagliptin enhances the concentrations of the active form of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). The present study asked whether vildagliptin accentuates glibenclamide-induced hy...... of glibenclamide is not accentuated by the coadministration of vildagliptin. This may be explained by a negative feedback regulation of GLP-1 and GIP secretion that limits the degree to which the active incretin levels are enhanced....

  13. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-09

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  14. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Walker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae, is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  15. Vaccines against typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Carlos A; Borsutzky, Stefan; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Pearman, Jon; Collioud, Andre; Favre, Didier; Dietrich, Guido

    2006-05-01

    Because of high infectivity and significant disease burden, typhoid fever constitutes a major global health problem. Implementation of adequate food handling practices and establishment of safe water supplies are the cornerstone for the development of an effective prevention program. However, vaccination against typhoid fever remains an essential tool for the effective management of this disease. Currently, there are two well tolerated and effective licensed vaccines. One is based on defined subunit virulence (Vi) polysaccharide antigen and can be administered either intramuscularly or subcutaneously and the other is based on the use of live attenuated bacteria for oral administration. The advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches taken in the development of a vaccine against typhoid fever are discussed, along with the potential for future vaccine candidates.

  16. [Acute fever in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras-Le Guen, Christèle; Launay, Élise

    2015-05-01

    Fever in children is a very common symptom associated most of the time with a viral infection. However, in 7% of children, fever without source is the first symptom of a serious bacterial infection such as pneumonia, meningitis, pyelonephritis or bacteremia. The key point in clinical examination of these children is the early identification of toxic signs. Because SBI prevalence is higher in very young children (1-3 month-aged), they required a specific management with some systematic complementary investigations and a broad indication of probabilistic antibiotherapy treatment.

  17. [Fever of unknown origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberger, B; Müller-Schilling, M; Fleck, M

    2013-04-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is defined as sustained unexplained fever despite intensive diagnostic evaluation and represents a particular diagnostic challenge. It can be classified into different categories, e.g. classical, nosocomial, neutropenic and HIV-associated FUO, which is based on the patient-specific clinical and immunological situation. Infections, malignant diseases and non-infectious inflammatory diseases have to be considered as the most important causes of FUO; however, no definitive diagnosis can be established in a substantial number of FUO patients despite an extensive diagnostic work-up. The present review focuses on the important diagnostic aspects as well as therapeutic options in FUO patients.

  18. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  19. Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever Fact sheet N°208 January 2013 Key facts ... the principal tick vector. The Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in animals and ticks The hosts of ...

  20. Typhoid Fever, Below the Belt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raveendran, Kamakshi Mahadevan; Viswanathan, Stalin

    2016-01-01

    ... (sexually transmitted infections) aetiologies. Typhoid fever is endemic in the tropics. Except "rose spots", skin manifestations in typhoid fever are unusual, and they are missed due to pigmented skin...

  1. Q Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics Reporting and In-Depth Information Other Ricketssial Zoonosis Diseases Anaplasmosis Ehrlichiosis Other Spotted Fever Rocky Mountain ... 60–64 years. Top of Page Other Ricketssial Zoonosis Diseases Anaplasmosis Ehrlichiosis Other Spotted Fever Rocky Mountain ...

  2. True-3D accentuating of grids and streets in urban topographic maps enhances human object location memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Edler

    Full Text Available Cognitive representations of learned map information are subject to systematic distortion errors. Map elements that divide a map surface into regions, such as content-related linear symbols (e.g. streets, rivers, railway systems or additional artificial layers (coordinate grids, provide an orientation pattern that can help users to reduce distortions in their mental representations. In recent years, the television industry has started to establish True-3D (autostereoscopic displays as mass media. These modern displays make it possible to watch dynamic and static images including depth illusions without additional devices, such as 3D glasses. In these images, visual details can be distributed over different positions along the depth axis. Some empirical studies of vision research provided first evidence that 3D stereoscopic content attracts higher attention and is processed faster. So far, the impact of True-3D accentuating has not yet been explored concerning spatial memory tasks and cartography. This paper reports the results of two empirical studies that focus on investigations whether True-3D accentuating of artificial, regular overlaying line features (i.e. grids and content-related, irregular line features (i.e. highways and main streets in official urban topographic maps (scale 1/10,000 further improves human object location memory performance. The memory performance is measured as both the percentage of correctly recalled object locations (hit rate and the mean distances of correctly recalled objects (spatial accuracy. It is shown that the True-3D accentuating of grids (depth offset: 5 cm significantly enhances the spatial accuracy of recalled map object locations, whereas the True-3D emphasis of streets significantly improves the hit rate of recalled map object locations. These results show the potential of True-3D displays for an improvement of the cognitive representation of learned cartographic information.

  3. True-3D accentuating of grids and streets in urban topographic maps enhances human object location memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, Dennis; Bestgen, Anne-Kathrin; Kuchinke, Lars; Dickmann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive representations of learned map information are subject to systematic distortion errors. Map elements that divide a map surface into regions, such as content-related linear symbols (e.g. streets, rivers, railway systems) or additional artificial layers (coordinate grids), provide an orientation pattern that can help users to reduce distortions in their mental representations. In recent years, the television industry has started to establish True-3D (autostereoscopic) displays as mass media. These modern displays make it possible to watch dynamic and static images including depth illusions without additional devices, such as 3D glasses. In these images, visual details can be distributed over different positions along the depth axis. Some empirical studies of vision research provided first evidence that 3D stereoscopic content attracts higher attention and is processed faster. So far, the impact of True-3D accentuating has not yet been explored concerning spatial memory tasks and cartography. This paper reports the results of two empirical studies that focus on investigations whether True-3D accentuating of artificial, regular overlaying line features (i.e. grids) and content-related, irregular line features (i.e. highways and main streets) in official urban topographic maps (scale 1/10,000) further improves human object location memory performance. The memory performance is measured as both the percentage of correctly recalled object locations (hit rate) and the mean distances of correctly recalled objects (spatial accuracy). It is shown that the True-3D accentuating of grids (depth offset: 5 cm) significantly enhances the spatial accuracy of recalled map object locations, whereas the True-3D emphasis of streets significantly improves the hit rate of recalled map object locations. These results show the potential of True-3D displays for an improvement of the cognitive representation of learned cartographic information.

  4. Q Fever Update, Maritime Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Thomas J.; Campbell, Nancy; McNeil, Shelly A.; Webster, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1990s, reports of Q fever in Nova Scotia, Canada, have declined. Passive surveillance for Q fever in Nova Scotia and its neighboring provinces in eastern Canada indicates that the clinical manifestation of Q fever in the Maritime provinces is pneumonia and that incidence of the disease may fluctuate. PMID:18258080

  5. Fever in acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, P D; Afzal, A; Henry, J W; Villareal, C G

    2000-01-01

    Although fever has been reported in several case series of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), the extent to which fever may be caused by PE, and not associated disease, has not been adequately sorted out. Clarification of the frequency and severity of fever in acute PE may assist in achieving an accurate clinical impression, and perhaps avoid an inadvertent exclusion of the diagnosis. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the extent to which fever is caused by acute PE. Patients participated in the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED). Temperature was evaluated among patients with angiographically proven PE. A determination of whether other causes of fever were present was based on a retrospective analysis of discharge summaries, PIOPED summaries, and a computerized list of all discharge diagnoses. Among patients with PE and no other source of fever, fever was present in 43 of 311 patients (14%). Fever in patients with pulmonary hemorrhage or infarction was not more frequent than among those with no pulmonary hemorrhage or infarction, 39 of 267 patients (15%) vs 4 of 44 patients (9%; not significant). Clinical evidence of deep venous thrombosis was often present in patients with PE and otherwise unexplained fever. Low-grade fever is not uncommon in PE, and high fever, although rare, may occur. Fever need not be accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage or infarction.

  6. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  7. Fever of unknown origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders-Manders, C.; Simon, A.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 years after the first definition of fever of unknown origin (FUO), it still remains a diagnostic challenge. Evaluation starts with the identification of potential diagnostic clues (PDCs), which should guide further investigations. In the absence of PDCs a standardised diagnostic

  8. Breathing Valley Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch in the California Department of Public Health, discusses Valley Fever.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/5/2014.

  9. Lithotrites and postoperative fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, David I; Lipkin, Michael E; Wang, Agnes J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risks of fever from different lithotrites after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PNL database is a prospective, multi-institutional, international PNL registry. Of 5,803 total pa...

  10. [Fever without focus and fever of unknown origin in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Nicole

    2013-01-30

    Fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms in children. In the majority of cases the underlying cause is easily diagnosed and if necessary a treatment initiated. In case of absent localising symptoms and signs (fever without a focus) investigations rapidly need to be undertaken in particular in newborns and infants. Persisting daily fever for more than two weeks are called fever of unknown origin. Diagnosis of etiology of fever of unknown origin is challenging. In approximately half of the cases an infectious cause is found; inflammatory and mailgnant diseases account for 5 to 10% of the cases. Despite a systematic and interdisciplinary approach the etiology remains unknown in up to a quarter of cases. This review discusses differential diagnoses, suggested investigations and treatment for fever without a focus and fever of unknown origin.

  11. Estimating Intelligence in Spanish: Regression Equations With the Word Accentuation Test and Demographic Variables in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra Sanjurjo, Natalia; Montañes, Patricia; Sierra Matamoros, Fabio Alexander; Burin, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Spanish is the fourth most spoken language in the world, and the majority of Spanish speakers have a Latin American origin. Reading aloud infrequently accentuated words has been established as a National Adult Reading Test-like method to assess premorbid intelligence in Spanish. However, several versions have been proposed and validated with small and selected samples, in particular geographical conditions, and they seldom derive a formula for IQ estimation with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ). The objective of this study was to develop equations to estimate WAIS-Third Edition (WAIS-III) FSIQ from the Word Accentuation Test-Revised (WAT-R), demographic variables, and their combination within diverse Latin American samples. Two hundred and forty participants from Argentina and Colombia, selected according to age and years of education strata, were assessed with the WAT-R, the WAIS-III, and a structured questionnaire about demographic and medical information. A combined approach including place of birth, years of education, and WAT-R provided the best equation, explaining 76% of IQ variance. These equations could be useful for estimating premorbid IQ in patients with Latin American Spanish as their birth language.

  12. Determination of location, size, and transmurality of chronic myocardial infarction without exogenous contrast media by using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Avinash; Cokic, Ivan; Tang, Richard L Q; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Sharif, Behzad; Marbán, Eduardo; Li, Debiao; Berman, Daniel S; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2014-05-01

    Late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) cardiac MRI (CMR) is a powerful method for characterizing myocardial infarction (MI), but the requisite gadolinium infusion is estimated to be contraindicated in ≈20% of patients with MI because of end-stage chronic kidney disease. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether T1 CMR obtained without contrast agents at 3 T could be an alternative to LGE CMR for characterizing chronic MIs using a canine model of MI. Canines (n=29) underwent CMR at 7 days (acute MI [AMI]) and 4 months (chronic MI [CMI]) after MI. Infarct location, size, and transmurality measured by using native T1 maps and LGE images at 1.5 T and 3 T were compared. Resolution of edema between AMI and CMI was examined with T2 maps. T1 maps overestimated infarct size and transmurality relative to LGE images in AMI (P=0.016 and P=0.007, respectively), which was not observed in CMI (P=0.49 and P=0.81, respectively) at 3 T. T1 maps underestimated infarct size and transmurality relative to LGE images in AMI and CMI (P0.20) at both field strengths. Histology showed extensive replacement fibrosis within the CMI territories. CMI detection sensitivity and specificity of T1 CMR at 3 T were 95% and 97%, respectively. Native T1 maps at 3 T can determine the location, size, and transmurality of CMI with high diagnostic accuracy. Patient studies are necessary for clinical translation. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Experimental Study of the Effect of Autonomic Nervous System on the Transmural Dispersion of Ventricular Repolarization under Acute Myocardial Ischemia in Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张存泰; 徐大文; 李泱; 刘念; 钟江华; 王琳; 陆再英

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The effect of the autonomic nerves on the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolariza tion (TDR) under acute myocardial ischemia in intact canine was investigated. Using the monophasic action potential (MAP) recording technique, MAPs of the epicardium (Epi), midmyocardium (Mid) and endocardium (Endo) were recorded simultaneously by specially designed plunge-needle electrodes at the left ventricular free wall under acute myocardial ischemia in 12 open-chest dogs.MAPD90 and TDR among three myocardial layers as well as the incidence of the early afterdepolar ization (EAD) before autonomic nervous stimulation and during autonomic nervous stimulation were compared. It was found that 10 min after acute myocardial I~hemia, TDR was increased from 55±8.ms to 86± 15 ms during sympathetic stimulation (P<0. 01). The TDR (53± 9 ms) during parasympathetic stimulation was not significantly different from that of the control (55±8 ms) (P>0.05). The EAD was elicited in the Mid of 2 dogs (16 %) 10 min after acute myocardial ischemia,but the EAD were elicited in the Mid of 7 dogs (58 %) during sympathetic stimulation (P<0. 01).It was concluded that: (1) Sympathetic stimulation can increase the transmural dispersion of repolari zation and induce early afterdepolarizations in the Mid under acute myocardial ischemia, which pro-vide the opportunity for the ventricular arrhythmia developing; (2) Parasympathetic stimulation has no significant effect on the transmural dispersion of repolarization under myocardial ischemia.

  14. Identification and further differentiation of subendocardial and transmural myocardial infarction by fast strain-encoded (SENC) magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Tha, Khin Khin; Terae, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Sapporo (Japan); Ishimori, Naoki; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Van Cauteren, Marc; Okuaki, Tomoyuki [Philips Healthcase, MR Clinical Science, Tokyo (Japan); Kudo, Kohsuke [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Manabe, Osamu [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Ito, Yoichi M. [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido Organization for Translational Research, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    To investigate whether subendocardial and transmural myocardial infarction can be identified and differentiated using the peak circumferential and longitudinal strains measured by fast strain-encoded (SENC). Nineteen patients with ischemic heart diseases underwent imaging with fast SENC and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI at 3 T. Fast SENC measurements were performed in three short-axis slices (basal, mid-ventricular and apical levels) and one long-axis view (four-chamber) to assess peak longitudinal and circumferential systolic strains. All patients showed myocardial infarction with an average of 7 positive LGE segments. A total of 304 segments for longitudinal strains (LS) and 114 segments for circumferential strains (CS) could be analysed. Positive LGE segments showed lower peak CS and LS compared with the no LGE segments (P < 0.0001 for both). Segments with subendocardial infarction showed reduced CS and LS compared with the no LGE segments (P < 0.0001 for both). There was a significant difference in CS between subendocardial and transmural infarct segments (P = 0.03), but no significant difference in LS between them (P = 0.64). Fast SENC can identify old myocardial infarction and differentiate subendocardial from transmural infarction. (orig.)

  15. Time-dependent remodeling of transmural architecture underlying abnormal ventricular geometry in chronic volume overload heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Omens, Jeffrey H; Covell, James W

    2004-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the abnormal ventricular geometry in failing hearts may be accounted for by regionally selective remodeling of myocardial laminae or sheets, we investigated remodeling of the transmural architecture in chronic volume overload induced by an aortocaval shunt. We determined three-dimensional finite deformation at apical and basal sites in left ventricular anterior wall of six dogs with the use of biplane cineradiography of implanted markers. Myocardial strains at end diastole were measured at a failing state referred to control to describe remodeling of myofibers and sheet structures over time. After 9 +/- 2 wk (means +/- SE) of volume overload, the myocardial volume within the marker sets increased by >20%. At 2 wk, the basal site had myofiber elongation (0.099 +/- 0.030; P architecture is regionally heterogeneous in chronic volume overload. The early differences in fiber elongation seem most likely due to a regional gradient in diastolic wall stress, whereas the late differences in wall thickness are most likely related to regional differences in the laminar architecture of the wall. These results suggest that the temporal progression of ventricular remodeling may be anatomically designed at the level of regional laminar architecture.

  16. Fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders-Manders, Catharina; Simon, Anna; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal

    2015-06-01

    More than 50 years after the first definition of fever of unknown origin (FUO), it still remains a diagnostic challenge. Evaluation starts with the identification of potential diagnostic clues (PDCs), which should guide further investigations. In the absence of PDCs a standardised diagnostic protocol should be followed with PET-CT as the imaging technique of first choice. Even with a standardised protocol, in a large proportion of patients from western countries the cause for FUO cannot be identified. The treatment of FUO is guided by the final diagnosis, but when no cause is found, antipyretic drugs can be prescribed. Corticosteroids should be avoided in the absence of a diagnosis, especially at an early stage. The prognosis of FUO is determined by the underlying cause. The majority of patients with unexplained FUO will eventually show spontaneous remission of fever. We describe the definition, diagnostic workup, causes and treatment of FUO. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  17. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  18. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-31

    infectious virus was present in this organ at least 440 days after infection. Virus was recovered from kidney and parotid glands from about 15 to 43...beginning 10-15 days after inoculation. This type of host response provides excellent experimental evidence confirming the long-held epidemiological ...30. Vasyuta, Yu, S. The epidemiology of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in the E.S.F.S.R.Zh. Mikrobiol. Epidemiol. Immunol., 32: 49-56, 1961. 31

  19. Understanding rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Pedro Ming; Pereira, Rosa Rodrigues; Guilherme, Luiza

    2012-05-01

    Through a comprehensive review of the recent findings on rheumatic fever, we intend to propose a new physiopathologic model for this disease. A Medline search was performed for all articles containing the terms rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in title or abstract from 1970 to 2011. Best evidence qualitative technique was used to select the most relevant. The scientific interest on rheumatic fever has notably diminished throughout the twentieth century as evidenced by the comparison of the proportion of articles in which RF was a subject in 1950 (0.26%) and today (0.03%) [Pubmed]. However, RF remains a major medical and social problem in the developing world and in the so-called hotspots, where it still causes around 500.000 deaths each year, not too different from the pre-antibiotic era. The role of genetic factors in RF susceptibility is discussed. Familiar aggregation, similarity of disease patterns between siblings, identical twin, and HLA correlation studies are evidence for a genetic influence on RF susceptibility. The suspect-involved genes fall mainly into those capable of immunologic mediation. Molecular mimicry explains the triggering of RF, but an intense and sustained inflammation is needed to cause sequels. Also, RF patients vary greatly in terms of symptoms. It is likely that a genetic background directing immune response towards a predominantly Th1 or Th2 pattern contributes to these features. The recent findings on rheumatic fever provide important insight on its physiopathology that helps understanding this prototype post-infectious autoimmune disease giving insights on other autoimmune conditions.

  20. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  1. Sadfly fever: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkale, Yasemin; Özkale, Murat; Kiper, Pinar; Çetinkaya, Bilin; Erol, İlknur

    2016-06-01

    Sandfly fever, also known as 'three-day fever' or 'pappataci fever' or 'Phlebotomus fever' is a viral infection that causes self-limited influenza-like symptoms and characterized by a rapid onset. The disease occurs commonly in endemic areas in summer months and especially in August during which sandflies are active. In this article, two siblings who presented with high fever, redness in the eyes, headache, weakness, malaise and inability to walk, who were found to have increased liver function tests and creatine kinase levels and who were diagnosed with sadfly fever with positive sadfly IgM and IgG antibodies are reported because of the rarity of this disease.

  2. Chikungunya fever presenting with protracted severe pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Leonichev, Victoria B; Raza, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Travelers returning from the tropics often present with rash/fever. Those with rash/fever and myalgias/arthralgias are most likely due to chikungunya fever, dengue fever, or Zika virus. In these arthropod viral transmitted infections, the rash may be pruritic. The case presented here is that of chikungunya fever remarkable for the intensity and duration of her pruritis.

  3. Typhoid Fever, Below the Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveendran, Kamakshi Mahadevan; Viswanathan, Stalin

    2016-01-01

    Genital ulcers occur due to infective, inflammatory, malignant and drug-related causes. In tropical countries such as India, such ulcers are due to parasitic, tubercular, rickettsial and bacterial (sexually transmitted infections) aetiologies. Typhoid fever is endemic in the tropics. Except "rose spots", skin manifestations in typhoid fever are unusual, and they are missed due to pigmented skin. Patients do not often complain of genital ulcers due to shame or fear. Genital examination is not routinely performed in typhoid fever. We describe scrotal ulcers as the presenting symptom of typhoid fever, which subsided with appropriate therapy.

  4. Fever in the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Robyn; Dor, Maya R; McQuilkin, Patricia A

    2013-11-01

    Fever is the most common reason that children and infants are brought to emergency departments. Emergency physicians face the challenge of quickly distinguishing benign from life-threatening conditions. The management of fever in children is guided by the patient's age, immunization status, and immune status as well as the results of a careful physical examination and appropriate laboratory tests and radiographic views. In this article, the evaluation and treatment of children with fevers of known and unknown origin are described. Causes of common and dangerous conditions that include fever in their manifestation are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluoroscopy-assisted vs fluoroless endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage of pancreatic fluid collections: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglieri, Claudia F; Gornals, Joan B; Busquets, Juli; Peláez, Nuria; Secanella, Lluis; De-La-Hera, Meritxell; Sanzol, Resurrección; Fabregat, Joan; Castellote, José

    2017-09-04

    The need for fluoroscopy guidance in patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage (EUS-TMD) of peripancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare general outcomes of EUS-TMD of PFCs under fluoroscopy (F) vs fluoroless (FL). This is a comparative study with a retrospective analysis of a prospective and consecutive inclusion database at a tertiary centre, from 2009 to 2015. All patients were symptomatic pseudocyst (PSC) and walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WON). Two groups were assigned depending on availability of fluoroscopy. The groups were heterogeneous in terms of their demographic characteristics, PFCs and procedure. The main outcome measures included technical and clinical success, incidences, adverse events (AEs), and follow-up. Fifty EUS-TMD of PFCs from 86 EUS-guided drainages were included during the study period. Group F included 26 procedures, PSC 69.2%, WON 30.8%, metal stents 61.5% (46.1% lumen-apposing stent) and plastic stents 38.5%. Group FL included 24 procedures, PSC 37.5%, WON 62.5%, and metal stents 95.8% (lumen-apposing stents). Technical success was 100% in both groups, and clinical success was similar (F 88.5%, FL 87.5%). Technical incidences and intra-procedure AEs were only described in group F (7.6% and 11.5%, respectively) and none in group FL. Procedure time was less in group FL (8min, p=0.0341). Fluoroless in the EUS-TMD of PFCs does not involve more technical incidences or intra-procedure AEs. Technical and clinical success was similar in the two groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of time to treatment and other risk factors on infarct size and transmurality in the case of ST-elevated myocardial infarction managed by primary angioplasty and assessed by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the association between time to treatment and to check the effect of various risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension (HTN, smoking, family history of coronary artery disease (CAD and obesity on infarct size (IS, transmurality and ST-segment resolution (STR with DE-MRI (delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging on 3-month follow-up in patients treated for ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI, with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI. Background: Early PPCI decreases IS and transmurality but increases STR. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with STEMI treated with reperfusion therapy in the form of PPCI and underwent cardiac MRI at 3-month interval follow-up. The primary endpoint is final IS and transmurality as assessed by DE-MRI at 3-month follow-up. Results: IS and transmurality increase and STR decreases with increase in duration to percutaneous coronary intervention from the onset of symptoms. Similarly, the effect of various confounding factors such as diabetes mellitus, HTN, smoking, family history of CAD and obesity on IS, transmurality and STR was assessed which did not affect immediate prognosis during treatment. Conclusion: Primary angioplasty is the treatment modality of choice in the case of STEMI when available. Time to treatment directly influences STR, final IS and transmurality, that is, the earlier the intervention done, more will be STR and lesser will be final IS and transmurality. There is no significant effect of confounding variables such as cardiac risk factors except family history of CAD on immediate prognosis during treatment.

  7. Fever's glass ceiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak, P A; Boulant, J A

    1996-03-01

    The importance of an upper limit of the febrile response has been recognized since the time of Hippocrates. Although the precise temperature defining this limit varies according to the site at which body temperature is measured, human core temperature is almost never permitted to rise above 41 degrees C-42 degrees C during fever. There are compelling physiological reasons for such an upper limit of regulated body temperature. The mechanisms by which the limit is maintained are most likely complex and involve special properties of thermoregulatory neurons themselves, circulating endogenous antipyretics (such as arginine vasopressin and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone), and soluble receptors for the (pyrogenic) cytokine mediators of the febrile response.

  8. Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Albayrak

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive genetic disease that affects males and females. FMF gene is on the short arm of chromosome 16. It is most often found in Jews, Arabs, Turks, and Armenians. Amyloidosis is charecterized by the deposition of a particular protein between the cells in the tissue. It is a potentially serious complication of FMF. The kidney is a prime target for the amyloid. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(4.000: 260-267

  9. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers. 2014.

  10. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Share Compartir Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS) On this Page What ... is HFRS prevented? Suggested Reading What is hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome? Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome ( ...

  11. What about My Child and Rheumatic Fever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Conditions What About My Child and Rheumatic Fever? Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory reaction that can occur after ... strep throat infections don’t lead to rheumatic fever. When they do, the time between the strep ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: familial Mediterranean fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions familial Mediterranean fever familial Mediterranean fever Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial Mediterranean fever is an inherited condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...

  13. Travelers' Health: Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in an Area with Zika? Find a Clinic Yellow Fever Vaccinations Clinics FAQ Disease Directory Resources Resources for ... CE Courses and Training Presentations for Health Professionals Yellow Fever Vaccine Course About the Yellow Fever Vaccine Course ...

  14. Dengue fever presenting as acute acalculus cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshipura, Vismit P; Soni, Harshad N; Patel, Nitin R; Haribhakti, Sanjiv P

    2007-06-01

    Classically dengue fever presents as fever with myalgia. A patient of dengue fever presented with classical symptoms and signs of acute acalculous cholecystitis. Serology and ultrasound examination identified dengue as the aetiology. Patient was treated successfully by conservative measures.

  15. Mayaro fever virus, Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Raimunda S S; Silva, Eliana V P; Carvalho, Valéria L; Rodrigues, Sueli G; Nunes-Neto, Joaquim P; Monteiro, Hamilton; Peixoto, Victor S; Chiang, Jannifer O; Nunes, Márcio R T; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2009-11-01

    In February 2008, a Mayaro fever virus (MAYV) outbreak occurred in a settlement in Santa Barbara municipality, northern Brazil. Patients had rash, fever, and severe arthralgia lasting up to 7 days. Immunoglobulin M against MAYV was detected by ELISA in 36 persons; 3 MAYV isolates sequenced were characterized as genotype D.

  16. Mayaro Fever Virus, Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Raimunda S.S.; Silva, Eliana V.P.; Carvalho, Valéria L.; Rodrigues, Sueli G.; Neto, Joaquim P. Nunes; Monteiro, Hamilton A.O.; Peixoto, Victor S.; Chiang, Jannifer O.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.

    2009-01-01

    In February 2008, a Mayaro fever virus (MAYV) outbreak occurred in a settlement in Santa Barbara municipality, northern Brazil. Patients had rash, fever, and severe arthralgia lasting up to 7 days. Immunoglobulin M against MAYV was detected by ELISA in 36 persons; 3 MAYV isolates sequenced were characterized as genotype D. PMID:19891877

  17. Q fever: The Dutch Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruschke, C.J.M.; Roest, H.I.J.; Coutinho, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2010, the Netherlands experienced an unprecedented outbreak of Q fever of more than 4000 human cases. Q fever infections of dairy goats, leading to abortion waves, were considered to be the cause of this outbreak. Measures to combat the outbreak had to be taken based on limited scie

  18. Febre amarela Yellow fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernando da Costa Vasconcelos

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A febre amarela é doenca infecciosa não-contagiosa causada por um arbovírus mantido em ciclos silvestres em que macacos atuam como hospedeiros amplificadores e mosquitos dos gêneros Aedes na África, e Haemagogus e Sabethes na América, são os transmissores. Cerca de 90% dos casos da doença apresentam-se com formas clínicas benignas que evoluem para a cura, enquanto 10% desenvolvem quadros dramáticos com mortalidade em torno de 50%. O problema mostra-se mais grave em África onde ainda há casos urbanos. Nas Américas, no período de 1970-2001, descreveram-se 4.543 casos. Os países que mais diagnosticaram a doença foram o Peru (51,5%, a Bolívia (20,1% e o Brasil (18,7%. Os métodos diagnósticos utilizados incluem a sorologia (IgM, isolamento viral, imunohistoquímica e RT-PCR. A zoonose não pode ser erradicada, mas, a doença humana é prevenível mediante a vacinação com a amostra 17D do vírus amarílico. A OMS recomenda nova vacinação a cada 10 anos. Neste artigo são revistos os principais conceitos da doença e os casos de mortes associados à vacina.Yellow fever is an infectious and non-contagious disease caused by an arbovirus, the yellow fever virus. The agent is maintained in jungle cycles among primates as vertebrate hosts and mosquitoes, especially Aedes in Africa, and Haemagogus and Sabethes in America. Approximately 90% of the infections are mild or asymptomatic, while 10% course to a severe clinical picture with 50% case-fatality rate. Yellow fever is largely distributed in Africa where urban epidemics are still reported. In South America, between 1970-2001, 4,543 cases were reported, mostly from Peru (51.5%, Bolivia (20.1% and Brazil (18.7%. The disease is diagnosed by serology (detection of IgM, virus isolation, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Yellow fever is a zoonosis and cannot be eradicated, but it is preventable in man by using the 17D vaccine. A single dose is enough to protect an individual for at least

  19. Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www. immunize. org/ vis 1 What is yellow fever? Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the ... serious cases) 2 How can I prevent yellow fever? Yellow fever vaccine Yellow fever vaccine can prevent yellow ...

  20. ETIOLOGY OF YELLOW FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hideyo

    1922-01-01

    Analysis of the records of instances in which non-immune persons contracted yellow fever notwithstanding vaccination shows that the onset of disease occurs soon after vaccination, the longest period being 13 days. Since the average incubation period in yellow fever is 6 days, it seems that infection must have taken place in some instances during the period while protection was developing. These instances led to a study of the possibility of immediate protection by means of the anti-icteroides serum. It had already been shown that the immune serum protects at once against experimental Leptospira icteroides infection, but it remained to determine how long the protection would last. Guinea pigs were given different quantities of the immune serum and subsequently injected, at various intervals, with a virulent strain of Leptospira icteroides. Complete protection enduring 5 days was obtained with as minute a quantity of serum as 0.002 cc. per 1,000 gm. of body weight. After 5 days, however, the immune substance rapidly diminished, and to keep the animal protected for as long as 10 days it was necessary to give 100 times as much, or 0.2 cc. For a man weighing 80 kilos, 0.16 cc. (0.002 x 80) would theoretically be sufficient to protect for at least 5 days, 1.6 cc. for 7 days, and 16 cc. for 10 days. This temporary protection may be a valuable antecedent to that furnished by vaccination, since the final effect of the latter cannot be expected until at least 9 to 10 days have passed. PMID:19868677

  1. Effects of different accentuated eccentric loads on acute neuromuscular, growth hormone, and blood lactate responses during a hypertrophic protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojasto, Timo; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2009-05-01

    This study monitored acute neuromuscular responses and growth hormone (GH) and blood lactate (La) concentrations in the eccentric-concentric (ECC-CON) hypertrophic protocol by using various dynamic accentuated external resistance (DAER) loads in the bench press exercise. Male subjects (age = 32 +/- 4 years; n = 11) performed 4 sets of 10 repetitions with 2 minutes of recovery between the sets. The loads were 70, 80, 90, and 100% of 1 repetition maximum (RM) for the ECC phase, whereas 70% RM was constantly used for the CON phase. Electromyographic activity (EMG), ECC, CON, and isometric (ISOM) forces, serum GH and blood La, were measured at pre- and postloading. Significant reductions occurred in ISOM and CON pre- to postforces in all loading conditions (p 3.5 +/- 1.5 microgxL in the control condition, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. ECC EMG of the agonists increased with the increase in load but significantly only in the deltoid anterior (p exercise protocols in training for muscle hypertrophy and suggest the importance of individualized load selection for DAER exercises.

  2. Impulse noise transiently increased the permeability of nerve and glial cell membranes, an effect accentuated by a recent brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säljö, Annette; Huang, Ying-Lai; Hansson, Hans-Arne

    2003-08-01

    A single exposure to intense impulse noise may cause diffuse brain injury, revealed by increased expression of immediate early gene products, transiently altered distribution of neurofilaments, accumulation of beta-amyloid precursor protein, apoptosis, and gliosis. Neither hemorrage nor any gross structural damage are seen. The present study focused on whether impulse noise exposure increased the permeability of nerve and glial cell membranes to proteins. Also, we investigated whether a preceding, minor focal surgical brain lesion accentuated the leakage of cytosolic proteins. Anaesthetized rats were exposed to a single impulse noise at either 199 or 202 dB for 2 milliseconds. Transiently elevated levels of the cellular protein neuron specific enolase (NSE) and the glial cytoplasmic protein S-100 were recorded in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during the first hours after the exposure to 202 dB. A surgical brain injury, induced the day before the exposure to the impulse noise, was associated with significantly increased concentrations of both markers in the CSF. It is concluded that intense impulse noise damages both nerve and glial cells, an effect aggravated by a preexisting surgical lesion. The impulse of the shock wave, i.e. the pressure integrated over time, is likely to be the injurious mechanism. The abnormal membrane permeability and the associated cytoskeletal changes may initiate events, which eventually result in a progressive diffuse brain injury.

  3. Rhombencephalitis associated with Dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajesh; Bharti, Kavita; Mehta, Mannan; Bansod, Amrit

    2016-05-01

    Dengue infection is gradually disseminating throughout the world in alarming proportions. It is a arbovirus infection,transmitted by aedes mosquitoes. It is a multi-systemic disorder associated with varied neurological complications. There is increased trend of development of neurological complications in dengue fever. The neurological complications arising due to dengue infection can be categorized into central and neuromuscular complications. The central nervous system disorders reported with dengue fever are encephalopathy,encephalitis and myelitis.Here we report a case of rhombencephalitis associated with dengue fever. The literature does not mention rhombencephalitis occurring with dengue illness.

  4. Simulation of Contrast Agent Transport in Arteries with Multilayer Arterial Wall: Impact of Arterial Transmural Transport on the Bolus Delay and Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One assumption of DSC-MRI is that the injected contrast agent is kept totally intravascular and the arterial wall is impermeable to contrast agent. The assumption is unreal for such small contrast agent as Gd-DTPA can leak into the arterial wall. To investigate whether the unreal assumption is valid for the estimation of the delay and dispersion of the contrast agent bolus, we simulated flow and Gd-DTPA transport in a model with multilayer arterial wall and analyzed the bolus delay and dispersion qualified by mean vascular transit time (MVTT and the variance of the vascular transport function. Factors that may affect Gd-DTPA transport hence the delay and dispersion were further investigated, such as integrity of endothelium and disturbed flow. The results revealed that arterial transmural transport would slightly affect MVTT and moderately increase the variance. In addition, although the integrity of endothelium can significantly affect the accumulation of contrast agent in the arterial wall, it had small effects on the bolus delay and dispersion. However, the disturbed flow would significantly increase both MVTT and the variance. In conclusion, arterial transmural transport may have a small effect on the bolus delay and dispersion when compared to the flow pattern in the artery.

  5. Effects of Amiodarone on Transmural Dispersion of Ventricular Effective Refractory Periods across Myocardial Layers in the Normal and Hypertrophic Canine Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lan; L(U) Jiagao; ZHANG Fanzhi; BAI Rong; WANG Lin

    2006-01-01

    The effects of amiodarone on transmural dispersion of ventricular effective refractory periods (ERPs) in the normal and hypertrophic canine heart were investigated in vivo. By using the programmed stimulation protocol, the ERPs of epicardium (Epi), midmyocardium (Mid) and endocardium (Endo) were measured by inserting specially-designed electrodes into the three myocardial layers before and after mainlining of amiodarone. No significant ERPs-dispersion was observed in the three layers before and after mainlining of amiodarone in the normal group. In contrast, ERPs of all the three layers were prolonged in the hypertrophic heart, while the ERPs-dispersion was reduced significantly after mainlining of amiodarone. The ERPs-dispersion was significantly increased in the hypertrophic heart but not in the normal heart using "long-short" and "short-long" interval stimulation technique. It was concluded that (1) the differences in ERPs-dispersion among the three layers were significant in hypertrophic heart, and differences were not significant in normal canine heart;(2) ERPs of each three-myocardial layers were significantly prolonged after using amiodarone, but the ERPs-dispersion decreased in hypertrophic heart and (3) the programmed extrastimulus technique of "long-short" and "short-long" intervals increased the transmural ERPs-dispersion in the hypertrophic heart.

  6. Diagnostic value of transmural perfusion ratio derived from dynamic CT-based myocardial perfusion imaging for the detection of haemodynamically relevant coronary artery stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coenen, Adriaan; Lubbers, Marisa M.; Dedic, Admir; Chelu, Raluca G.; Geuns, Robert-Jan M. van; Nieman, Koen [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kurata, Akira; Kono, Atsushi; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rossi, Alexia [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Barts Health NHS Trust, NIHR Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit at Barts, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London and Department of Cardiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the additional value of transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of haemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared with fractional flow reserve (FFR). Subjects with suspected or known coronary artery disease were prospectively included and underwent a CT-MPI examination. From the CT-MPI time-point data absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) values were temporally resolved using a hybrid deconvolution model. An absolute MBF value was measured in the suspected perfusion defect. TPR was defined as the ratio between the subendocardial and subepicardial MBF. TPR and MBF results were compared with invasive FFR using a threshold of 0.80. Forty-three patients and 94 territories were analysed. The area under the receiver operator curve was larger for MBF (0.78) compared with TPR (0.65, P = 0.026). No significant differences were found in diagnostic classification between MBF and TPR with a territory-based accuracy of 77 % (67-86 %) for MBF compared with 70 % (60-81 %) for TPR. Combined MBF and TPR classification did not improve the diagnostic classification. Dynamic CT-MPI-based transmural perfusion ratio predicts haemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. However, diagnostic performance of dynamic CT-MPI-derived TPR is inferior to quantified MBF and has limited incremental value. (orig.)

  7. Discriminating fever behavior in house flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Anderson

    Full Text Available Fever has generally been shown to benefit infected hosts. However, fever temperatures also carry costs. While endotherms are able to limit fever costs physiologically, the means by which behavioral thermoregulators constrain these costs are less understood. Here we investigated the behavioral fever response of house flies (Musca domestica L. challenged with different doses of the fungal entomopathogen, Beauveria bassiana. Infected flies invoked a behavioral fever selecting the hottest temperature early in the day and then moving to cooler temperatures as the day progressed. In addition, flies infected with a higher dose of fungus exhibited more intense fever responses. These variable patterns of fever are consistent with the observation that higher fever temperatures had greater impact on fungal growth. The results demonstrate the capacity of insects to modulate the degree and duration of the fever response depending on the severity of the pathogen challenge and in so doing, balance the costs and benefits of fever.

  8. Clinical pathogenesis of typhoid fever

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raffatellu, Manuela; Wilson, R Paul; Winter, Sebastian E; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2008-01-01

    ...: gastroenteritis and typhoid fever. Clinical observations suggest that gastroenteritis, caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars, is characterized by a massive neutrophil influx, which keeps the infection localized to the intestinal mucosa...

  9. Q fever in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldin, Carole; Mahamat, Aba; Demar, Magalie; Abboud, Philippe; Djossou, Félix; Raoult, Didier

    2014-10-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is present worldwide. Recent studies have shown that this bacterium is an emerging pathogen in French Guiana and has a high prevalence (24% of community-acquired pneumonia). In this review, we focus on the peculiar epidemiology of Q fever in French Guiana. We place it in the context of the epidemiology of the disease in the surrounding countries of South America. We also review the clinical features of Q fever in this region, which has severe initial presentation but low mortality rates. These characteristics seem to be linked to a unique genotype (genotype 17). Finally, we discuss the issue of the animal reservoir of C. burnetii in French Guiana, which is still unknown. Further studies are necessary to identify this reservoir. Identification of this reservoir will improve the understanding of the Q fever epidemic in French Guiana and will provide new tools to control this public health problem.

  10. Childhood Fever: parental beliefs and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, M J; Rosencrantz, A; Kneller, P

    1988-01-01

    Childhood fever is often seen in family-practice. Clinical experience has shown the authors that parental anxiety often initiates early, aggressive treatment of fever with antipyretics. The authors studied parents' beliefs and practices relating to fever control in their children, and who or what their information sources were. The findings indicate that parents are commonly misinformed about the nature of childhood fever and its management, and that physicians need to learn more about conveying information on fever to patients.

  11. Typhoid Fever, Below the Belt

    OpenAIRE

    Raveendran, Kamakshi Mahadevan; Viswanathan, Stalin

    2016-01-01

    Genital ulcers occur due to infective, inflammatory, malignant and drug-related causes. In tropical countries such as India, such ulcers are due to parasitic, tubercular, rickettsial and bacterial (sexually transmitted infections) aetiologies. Typhoid fever is endemic in the tropics. Except “rose spots”, skin manifestations in typhoid fever are unusual, and they are missed due to pigmented skin. Patients do not often complain of genital ulcers due to shame or fear. Genital examination is not ...

  12. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This revi...

  13. Alcohol dehydrogenase accentuates ethanol-induced myocardial dysfunction and mitochondrial damage in mice: role of mitochondrial death pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-18

    Binge drinking and alcohol toxicity are often associated with myocardial dysfunction possibly due to accumulation of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde although the underlying mechanism is unknown. This study was designed to examine the impact of accelerated ethanol metabolism on myocardial contractility, mitochondrial function and apoptosis using a murine model of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). ADH and wild-type FVB mice were acutely challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg/d, i.p.) for 3 days. Myocardial contractility, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis (death receptor and mitochondrial pathways) were examined. Ethanol led to reduced cardiac contractility, enlarged cardiomyocyte, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, the effects of which were exaggerated by ADH transgene. In particular, ADH exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction manifested as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and accumulation of mitochondrial O(2) (*-). Myocardium from ethanol-treated mice displayed enhanced Bax, Caspase-3 and decreased Bcl-2 expression, the effect of which with the exception of Caspase-3 was augmented by ADH. ADH accentuated ethanol-induced increase in the mitochondrial death domain components pro-caspase-9 and cytochrome C in the cytoplasm. Neither ethanol nor ADH affected the expression of ANP, total pro-caspase-9, cytosolic and total pro-caspase-8, TNF-alpha, Fas receptor, Fas L and cytosolic AIF. Taken together, these data suggest that enhanced acetaldehyde production through ADH overexpression following acute ethanol exposure exacerbated ethanol-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction, cardiomyocyte enlargement, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, indicating a pivotal role of ADH in ethanol-induced cardiac dysfunction possibly through mitochondrial death pathway of apoptosis.

  14. Does Impaired O2 Delivery During Exercise Accentuate Central and Peripheral Fatigue in Patients with Coexistent COPD-CHF?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayron F. Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impairment in oxygen (O2 delivery to the central nervous system (brain and skeletal locomotor muscle during exercise has been associated with central and peripheral neuromuscular fatigue in healthy humans. From a clinical perspective, impaired tissue O2 transport is a key pathophysiological mechanism shared by cardiopulmonary diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and chronic heart failure (CHF. In addition to arterial hypoxemic conditions in COPD, there is growing evidence that cerebral and muscle blood flow and oxygenation can be reduced during exercise in both isolated COPD and CHF. Compromised cardiac output due to impaired cardiopulmonary function/interactions and blood flow redistribution to the overloaded respiratory muscles (i.e., ↑work of breathing may underpin these abnormalities. Unfortunately, COPD and CHF coexist in almost a third of elderly patients making these mechanisms potentially more relevant to exercise intolerance. In this context, it remains unknown whether decreased O2 delivery accentuates neuromuscular manifestations of central and peripheral fatigue in coexistent COPD-CHF. If this holds true, it is conceivable that delivering a low-density gas mixture (heliox through non-invasive positive pressure ventilation could ameliorate cardiopulmonary function/interactions and reduce the work of breathing during exercise in these patients. The major consequence would be increased O2 delivery to the brain and active muscles with potential benefits to exercise capacity (i.e., ↓central and peripheral neuromuscular fatigue, respectively. We therefore hypothesize that patients with coexistent COPD-CHF stop exercising prematurely due to impaired central motor drive and muscle contractility as the cardiorespiratory system fails to deliver sufficient O2 to simultaneously attend the metabolic demands of the brain and the active limb muscles.

  15. Personality disorders and accentuations in at-risk persons with and without conversion to first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Michel, Chantal; Winkler, Karen; Ruhrmann, Stephan

    2012-11-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Cluster A personality disorders (PDs), particularly schizotypal PD, are considered a part of the schizophrenia spectrum and a risk factor of psychosis. The role of PDs and personality accentuations (PAs) in predicting conversion to psychosis was studied in patients symptomatically considered at risk, assuming a major role of the schizotypal subtype. PDs and PAs, assessed at baseline with a self-report questionnaire, were compared between risk-, gender- and age-matched at-risk patients with (n = 50) and without conversion to psychosis (n = 50). Overall, Cluster A-PDs were the least frequent cluster (14%), and schizotypal PD was rare (7%). Yet, PDs in general were frequent (46%), especially Cluster B- (31%) and C-PDs (23%). Groups did not differ in frequencies of PDs, yet converters tended to have a higher expression of schizoid (P = 0.057) and Cluster A-PAs (P = 0.027). In regression analyses, schizoid PA was selected as sole but weak predictor of conversion (OR = 1.685; 95% CIs: 1.134/2.504). Unexpectedly, schizotypal PD was infrequent and did not predict conversion. Conversion was best predicted by schizoid PA, indicating more severe, persistent social deficits already at baseline in later converters. This corresponds to premorbid social deficits reported for genetic high-risk children and low social functioning in at-risk patients later converting to psychosis. Further, PDs occurred frequently in at-risk patients irrespective of conversion. As psychopathology and personality relate closely to one another, this result highlights that, beyond the current narrow focus on schizotypal PD, personality-related factors should be considered more widely in the prevention of psychosis. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Treatment of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajapakse S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Senaka Rajapakse,1,2 Chaturaka Rodrigo,1 Anoja Rajapakse31Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka; 2Lincoln County Hospital, United Lincolnshire NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK; 3Kings Mill Hospital, Sherwood Forest NHS Foundation Trust, Mansfield, UKAbstract: The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decades at an alarming rate. In the endemic areas, waves of infection occur in epidemics, with thousands of individuals affected, creating a huge burden on the limited resources of a country's health care system. While the illness passes off as a simple febrile episode in many, a few have a severe illness marked by hypovolemic shock and bleeding. Iatrogenic fluid overload in the management may further complicate the picture. In this severe form dengue can be fatal. Tackling the burden of dengue is impeded by several issues, including a lack of understanding about the exact pathophysiology of the infection, inability to successfully control the vector population, lack of specific therapy against the virus, and the technical difficulties in developing a vaccine. This review provides an overview on the epidemiology, natural history, management strategies, and future directions for research on dengue, including the potential for development of a vaccine.Keywords: dengue, treatment, fluid resuscitation

  17. Fever in Children and Fever of Unknown Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Rajeshwar; Agarwal, Dipti

    2016-01-01

    Fever is the most common symptom in children and can be classified as fever with or without focus. Fever without focus can be less than 7 d and is subclassified as fever without localizing signs and fever of unknown origin (FUO). FUO is defined as a temperature greater than 38.3 °C, for more than 3 wk or failure to reach a diagnosis after 1 wk of inpatient investigations. The most common causes of FUO in children are infections, connective tissue disorders and neoplasms. Infectious diseases most commonly implicated in children with FUO are salmonellosis, tuberculosis, malaria and rickettsial diseases. Juvenile rheumatic arthritis is the connective tissue disease frequently associated with FUO. Malignancy is the third largest group responsible for FUO in children. Diagnostic approach of FUO includes detailed history and examination supported with investigations. Age, history of contact, exposure to wild animals and medications should be noted. Examination should include, apart from general appearance, presence of sweating, rashes, tonsillitis, sinusitis and lymph node enlargement. Other signs such as abdominal tenderness and hepatosplenomegly should be looked for. The muscles and bones should be carefully examined for connective tissue disorders. Complete blood count, blood smear examination and level of acute phase reactants should be part of initial investigations. Radiological imaging is useful aid in diagnosing FUO. Trials of antimicrobial agents should not be given as they can obscure the diagnosis of the disease in FUO.

  18. Antipyretic Effect of Cinnamomum burmannii (Nees & T.Nees Blume Infusion in Fever-induced Rat Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qatrunnada Zaino

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fever is a frequent clinical sign encountered in human especially in children. Unfortunately, access to health care and medications (antipyretics are hampered by shortage of services and affordability, which are accentuated by local resources mainly for those living in remote areas. Therefore, using herbal medicineas an alternative in treating fever should be developed as substituent reliance on synthetic antipyretic. This study is conducted to observe antipyretic effect of Cinnamomum burmannii (Nees & T.Nees Blume infusion using Diphtheria Tetanus Pertussis (DTP vaccine-induced fever in rats. Methods: Twenty-eight male Wistar rats (150200 g were randomly allocated into control and treatment groups. Fever was induced with DTP vaccine intramuscularly injected (0.7 mL/200 g body weight and 4 hours later, distilled water (5 mL was administered orally to the control group while the treatment group received 5 mL of 3%, 6%, and 12% of cinnamon infusion. Rectal temperature was measured before the pretreatment, 4 hours afterDTP vaccine-induced fever injection and at a 30-minute interval during 180 minutes after the infusion administration. All procedures and protocols were performed in October 2012 at the Pharmacology Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung. Results: Data analysis using the one way analysis of variance (ANOVA showed significant reduction (p<0.001 of rectal temperature after 30 minutes and Duncan Post-Hoc test showed significant effect for 6% and 12% of cinnamon infusion groups. Conclusion The antipyretic effect of 6% and 12% of Cinnamomum burmannii (Nees & T.Nees Blume infusion in fever-induced rat models is found in the first 30 minutes.

  19. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  20. Cotton Fever: Does the Patient Know Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yingda; Pope, Bailey A; Hunter, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    Fever and leukocytosis have many possible etiologies in injection drug users. We present a case of a 22-year-old woman with fever and leukocytosis that were presumed secondary to cotton fever, a rarely recognized complication of injection drug use, after an extensive workup. Cotton fever is a benign, self-limited febrile syndrome characterized by fevers, leukocytosis, myalgias, nausea and vomiting, occurring in injection drug users who filter their drug suspensions through cotton balls. While this syndrome is commonly recognized amongst the injection drug user population, there is a paucity of data in the medical literature. We review the case presentation and available literature related to cotton fever.

  1. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  2. Historical aspects of rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Few diseases have experienced such a remarkable change in their epidemiology over the past century, without the influence of a vaccine, than rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever has all but disappeared from industrialised countries after being a frequent problem in the 1940s and 1950s. That the disease still occurs at high incidence in resource limited settings and in Indigenous populations in industrialised countries, particularly in Australia and New Zealand, is an indication of the profound effect of socio-economic factors on the disease. Although there have been major changes in the epidemiology of rheumatic fever, diagnosis remains reliant on careful clinical judgement and management is remarkably similar to that 50 years ago. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been given to rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease as public health issues, including in Australia and particularly in New Zealand, as well as in selected low and middle income countries. Perhaps the greatest hope for public health control of rheumatic fever is the development of a vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes, and there are encouraging initiatives in this area. However, an effective vaccine is some time away and in the meantime public health efforts need to focus on effective translation of the known evidence around primary and secondary prophylaxis into policy and practice.

  3. Management of acute childhood fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuten, Polly; Paul, Siba Prosad; Heaton, Paul Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Feverish illnesses commonly affect children and are the second most frequent reason for a child to be admitted to hospital. Most cases are viral in origin, usually with a good prognosis. Fever can be caused by severe and rapidly progressive illness which needs urgent referral to hospital for potentially life-saving treatment, and community practitioners must be able to identify such cases showing 'red flag'features. The fear of serious disease among parents and carers may result in 'fever phobia' leading to minor illnesses being managed inappropriately. Community practitioners are well placed to reassure and support families, and to provide education regarding the facts about fever, the appropriate use of antipyretic medication, how to avoid dehydration, and the beneficial role of immunisation in preventing infection.

  4. Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viali, Satupaitea; Saena, Puleiala; Futi, Vailogoua

    2011-02-11

    Rheumatic fever is very common in Samoa. The following paper describes the Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa and looks at the incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The incidence of ARF has decreased to 30 per 100,000 in 2005, 12.8 per 100,000 in 2007, 7.3 per 100,000 in 2008, and 9.5 per 100,000 in 2009. The incidence of RHD has decreased to 40.2 per 100,000 in 2007, 34 per 100,000 in 2008, and 31.8 per 100,000 in 2009. Cardiac surgery in New Zealand is expensive, but is cheaper to perform in Samoa. RHD screening with echocardiogram at schools may be the best way to reduce the burden and suffering from RHD.

  5. Bilateral retinitis following typhoid fever

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhushanker, M.; Topiwalla, Tasneem T.; Ganesan, Geetha; Appandaraj, Sripal

    2017-01-01

    Background Post typhoid fever immune related reactions affecting the eye is a rare finding which can have various presentations in which typhoid retinopathy is not a well recognized sequelae. Case presentation Here we present a case of 59?year old male who presented with right eye sudden painless loss of vision 4?weeks after typhoid fever which was diagnosed and treated successfully. His BCVA was 2/60 in right eye and 6/6 in left eye. Fundus examination showed retinitis along with macular ser...

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of chikungunya fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharam, K A; Sridevi, K; Vidyasagar, P

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging RNA viral infection produces different cutaneous manifestations in children compared to adults. 52 children with chikungunya fever, confirmed by positive IgM antibody test were seen during 2009-2010. Pigmentary lesions were common (27/52) followed by vesiculobullous lesions (16/52) and maculopapular lesions (14/52). Vesiculobullous lesions were most common in infants, although rarely reported in adults. Psoriasis was exacerbated in 4 children resulting in more severe forms. In 2 children, guttate psoriasis was observed for the first time.

  7. Scarlet Fever: A Group A Streptococcal Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Scarlet Fever: A Group A Streptococcal Infection Language: English Español ( ... red rash that feels rough, like sandpaper. Scarlet Fever Podcast A pediatrician explains the cause, treatment, and ...

  8. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancel Submit Search The CDC Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is caused by infection with a tick- ...

  9. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Statistics ...

  10. Hyperthermia and fever control in brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjatia, Neeraj

    2009-07-01

    Fever in the neurocritical care setting is common and has a negative impact on outcome of all disease types. Meta-analyses have demonstrated that fever at onset and in the acute setting after ischemic brain injury, intracerebral hemorrhage, and cardiac arrest has a negative impact on morbidity and mortality. Data support that the impact of fever is sustained for longer durations after subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. Recent advances have made eliminating fever and maintaining normothermia feasible. However, there are no prospective randomized trials demonstrating the benefit of fever control in these patient populations, and important questions regarding indications and timing remain. The purpose of this review is to analyze the data surrounding the impact of fever across a range of neurologic injuries to better understand the optimal timing and duration of fever control. Prospective randomized trials are needed to determine whether the beneficial impact of secondary injury prevention is outweighed by the potential risks of prolonged fever control.

  11. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  12. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-31

    Meningo- Fever, chills, headache, encepha- stiff neck, myalgia, litis conjunctival infection, back pain, dysuria, facial palsy (died 6 day) 3. Isolation of... Central Africa (23-26) and more recently in Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Fiji, Hawaii, Argentine, Uruguay and Paraguay

  13. A timely reminder--rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilic, Nikola; Kumar, Priyanka

    2013-04-19

    Rheumatic fever is a disease diagnosed using the Jones criteria. The Jones criteria were designed using data from areas with a low prevalence of rheumatic fever. In New Zealand there is a high prevalence of rheumatic fever amongst Maori and Pacific peoples. A case is presented where a child of Samoan ethnicity is diagnosed and treated for rheumatic fever without fulfilling the Jones criteria. Evidence supporting the broadening of the diagnostic criteria in high prevalence areas is highlighted.

  14. A Case of Olanzapine-Induced Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cho-Hsiang; Chen, Ying-Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Olanzapine, a frequently used second-generation antipsychotic, has rarely been implicated as a cause of drug-induced fever in the absence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who developed isolated fever following olanzapine monotherapy, which subsided after discontinuation of olanzapine. Blockade of dopaminergic receptors and elevated cytokines concentration are possible mechanisms of fever development during treatment with olanzapine. This case calls for attention to olanzapine-induced fever in clinical practice. PMID:28138204

  15. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever KidsHealth > For Parents > Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Print A A A What's in ... en español La rickettsiosis maculosa About RMSF Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial infection that's ...

  16. Hereditary periodic fever and reactive amyloidosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, J.C.H. van der; Simon, A.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF) are a group of diseases characterised by recurrences of fever and inflammation separated by symptom-free intervals. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most frequent entity within this group of disorders which further consists of

  17. First Outbreak of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Rahman, Khalilur; Siddque, A. K.; Shoma, Shereen; A. H. M. Kamal; Ali, K.S.; Nisaluk, Ananda; Breiman, Robert F

    2002-01-01

    During the first countrywide outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Bangladesh, we conducted surveillance for dengue at a hospital in Dhaka. Of 176 patients, primarily adults, found positive for dengue, 60.2% had dengue fever, 39.2% dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 0.6% dengue shock syndrome. The Dengue virus 3 serotype was detected in eight patients.

  18. Radiological observation in typhoid fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, K. Y.; Park, H. Y.; Kim, J. D.; Rhee, H. S. [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Radiographic findings in plain abdominal films, chest PA and liver scanning are considered to be ancillary diagnostic methods for uncomplicated typhoid fever and a valuable method for detection of complication such as intestinal perforation. 189 cases of clinically proven typhoid fever from Mar. 1973 to Feb. 1979 in this Hospital were reviewed and radiographic findings were analyzed carefully. The results are as follows: 1. Most (73.6%) cases were between 20 and 40 years of age. 2. Three of the most common radiographic findings were as follows: 1) Localized paralytic ileus in RLQ or diffuse paralytic ileus (96.3%). 2) Hepatomegaly (56.5%). 3) Splenomegaly (49.7%). 3. In cases of typhoid fever with intestinal perforation there were additional significant findings such as free air under diaphragm (85%), free fluid in peritoneal cavity (90%) and air fluid levels in RLQ (80%). 4. The most frequent chest x-ray finding was elevation of diaphragm (11.1%). 5. 8 cases of complicated typhoid fever which eventually came to operation were diagnosed only by radiographic method.

  19. Abdominal Complications of Typhoid Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Ketan Vagholkar; Jimmy Mirani; Urvashi Jain; Madhavan Iyengar; Rahul Kumar Chavan

    2015-01-01

    The natural history of typhoid fever poses both a diagnostic and a therapeutic challenge. Awareness of the clinical features of the primary presentation and of the complications are pivotal to early diagnosis. Typically, aggressive supportive care is all that is needed. However abdominal complications do occur and proper surgical care is required to lower morbidity and mortality.

  20. Nature Inspired Hay Fever Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrei P.Sommer; Dan Zhu

    2008-01-01

    The survival oriented adaptation of evolved biosystems to variations in their environment is a selective optimization process. Recognizing the optimised end product and its functionality is the classical arena of bionic engineering. In a primordial world, however, the molecular organization and functions of prebiotic systems were solely defined by formative processes in their physical and chemical environment, for instance, the interplay between interracial water layers on surfaces and solar light. The formative potential of the interplay between light (laser light) and interfacial water layers on surfaces was recently exploited in the formation of supercubane carbon nanocrystals. In evolved biosystems the formative potential of interracial water layers can still be activated by light. Here we report a case of hay fever, which was successfully treated in the course of a facial reju-venation program starting in November 2007. Targeting primarily interfacial water layers on elastin fibres in the wrinkled areas, we presumably also activated mast cells in the nasal mucosa, reported to progressively decrease in the nasal mucosa of the rabbit, when frequently irradiated. Hay fever is induced by the release of mediators, especially histamine, a process associated with the degranulation of mast cells. Decrease in mast cells numbers implies a decrease in the release of histamine. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the treatment of hay fever with visible light. This approach was inspired by bionic thinking, and could help ameliorating the condition of millions of people suffering from hay fever world wide.

  1. Cardiac Manifestation in Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Mohit; Patil, Rekha S

    2016-07-01

    To study the cardiac manifestations of the dengue fever. This one year descriptive study was undertaken at KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belgaum under the Department of Medicine. A total of 120 patients with either dengue IgM or IgM and IgG were studied. The assessment of cardiac manifestations was done based on electrocardiogram, 2D echocardiography and cardiac enzymes. Of the 120 patients, 85 (70.83%) were males and the male to female ratio was 2.4:1. The mean age of the patients was 33.02 ± 12.71 years. The commonest clinical presentation was myalgia (97.5%) followed by fever (92.5%). On clinical examination 33.33% of the patients had petecheia and only 9 patients having active bleeding manifestation at the time of presentation. A raised CK-MB and Troponin I was observed in 33.3% and 26.7% patients ECG findings revealed normal rhythm among 95% with 15.8% of them having an abnormal heart rate. Rhythm disturbance was noted in 5% of the patients with AV block being the most common (66.67%). Cardiac manifestation in the form of myocarditis was observed in 37.50% of the patients with a positive correlation with the severity of the dengue fever defined as by W.H.O. criteria. Patients with dengue fever are at high risk of developing myocarditis and rhythm disturbance and therefore require a close cardiac monitoring.

  2. [Sacroiliitis in familial Mediterranean fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connemann, B J; Steinhoff, J; Benstein, R; Sack, K

    1991-11-22

    A 15-year-old girl of Turkish descent had for one year complained of severe recurrent fever-associated deep back pains. Since she was three years of age she had suffered from repeated attacks of fever and severe abdominal pain which ceased spontaneously in 1-3 days. On physical examination the sacrum and iliosacral joints were very painful to percussion, and she limped. Radiography revealed symmetric destructive sacroiliitis. Despite the unusual location of the arthritis, the triad of fever, abdominal pain and arthritis, as well as her belonging to an ethnic "at risk" group, pointed to the diagnosis of familial mediterranean fever (FML) or recurrent hereditary polyserositis. This diagnosis was confirmed by a positive metaraminol provocation test in that infusion of metaraminol reproduced the typical pains. Collagen diseases, rheumatic disease, acute porphyria and chronic infectious processes were excluded. The sacroiliitis quickly responded to long-term administration of colchicine, 0.5 mg twice daily. The patient also has Hageman factor deficiency whose significance remains unclear.

  3. Sandfly Fever Sicilian Virus, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izri, Arezki; Temmam, Sarah; Moureau, Grégory; Hamrioui, Boussad; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV) is present in Algeria, we tested sandflies for phlebovirus RNA. A sequence closely related to that of SFSV was detected in a Phlebotomus ariasi sandfly. Of 60 human serum samples, 3 contained immunoglobulin G against SFSV. These data suggest SFSV is present in Algeria. PMID:18439364

  4. Fever in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a high fever?YesNoDoes it hurt or burn when your child urinates and does he or she or have ... CareMild cases of croup can be treated at home. Make sure your child gets plenty of rest and lots of fluids. ...

  5. Fever of unknown origin: a clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Lortholary, Olivier; Cunha, Cheston B

    2015-10-01

    Fevers of unknown origin remain one of the most difficult diagnostic challenges in medicine. Because fever of unknown origin may be caused by over 200 malignant/neoplastic, infectious, rheumatic/inflammatory, and miscellaneous disorders, clinicians often order non-clue-based imaging and specific testing early in the fever of unknown origin work-up, which may be inefficient/misleading. Unlike most other fever-of-unknown-origin reviews, this article presents a clinical approach. Characteristic history and physical examination findings together with key nonspecific test abnormalities are the basis for a focused clue-directed fever of unknown origin work-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adult-onset acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Dainari; Ueda, Kohei; Tsukuda, Kyozo; Utsu, Noriaki; Kohki, Shimazu; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Kazuho

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was hospitalized for acute rheumatic fever. He had previously suffered from rheumatic fever at 15 years of age. The rheumatic fever was complicated by carditis, which caused valve disease that required surgical treatment. The incidence of rheumatic fever has decreased in most developed countries with improvements in sanitary conditions. The low incidence of this disease makes a timely and accurate diagnosis difficult. Due to the fact that both the first occurrence and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever can occur in the elderly and adults, this potential disease should not be overlooked when making a differential diagnosis.

  7. [Clinical aspects of viral hemorrhagic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Masayuki

    2005-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) is defined as virus infections that usually cause pyrexia and hemorrhagic symptoms with multiple organ failure. VHF includes following viral infections: Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) and Lassa fever. In particular, the causative agents of EHF, MHF, CCHF, and Lassa fever are Ebola, Marburg, CCHF, Lassa viruses, respectively, and regarded as biosafety level-4 pathogens because of their high virulence to humans. Recently, relatively large outbreaks of EHF and MHF have occurred in Africa, and areas of EHF- and MHF-outbreaks seem to be expanding. Although outbreaks of VHF have not been reported in Japan, there is a possibility that the deadly hemorrhagic fever viruses would be introduced to Japan in future. Therefore, preparedness for possible future outbreaks of VHF is necessary in areas without VHF outbreaks.

  8. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) in a renal transplant recipient due to drug fever from sirolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Sairah; Kong, May W; Drakakis, James; Cunha, Burke A

    2016-08-01

    A variety of medications may cause drug fever. Drug fevers may persist for days to weeks until diagnosis is considered. The diagnosis of drug fever is confirmed when there is resolution of fever within 3 days after the medication is discontinued. Only rarely do undiagnosed drug fevers persist for over 3 weeks to meet fever of unknown origin (FUO) criteria. FUOs due to drug fever are uncommon, and drug fevers due to immunosuppressive drugs are very rare. This is a case of a 58-year-old female renal transplant recipient who presented with FUO that remained undiagnosed for over 8 weeks. We believe this is the first reported case of an FUO due to drug fever from sirolimus in a renal transplant recipient.

  9. Accentuated lines in the enamel of primary incisors from skeletal remains: A contribution to the explanation of early childhood mortality in a medieval population from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żądzińska, Elżbieta; Lorkiewicz, Wiesław; Kurek, Marta; Borowska-Strugińska, Beata

    2015-07-01

    Physiological disruptions resulting from an impoverished environment during the first years of life are of key importance for the health and biological status of individuals and populations. Studies of growth processes in archaeological populations point to the fact that the main causes of childhood mortality in the past are to be sought among extrinsic factors. Based on this assumption, one would expect random mortality of children, with the deceased individuals representing the entire subadult population. The purpose of this study is to explore whether differences in early childhood survival are reflected in differences in deciduous tooth enamel, which can provide an insight into the development of an individual during prenatal and perinatal ontogeny. Deciduous incisors were taken from 83 individuals aged 2.0-6.5 years from a medieval inhumation cemetery dated AD 1300-1600. Prenatal and postnatal enamel formation time, neonatal line width, and the number of accentuated lines were measured using an optical microscope. The significantly wider neonatal line and the higher frequency of accentuated lines in the enamel of the incisors of children who died at the age of 2-3 years suggest the occurrence of stronger or more frequent stress events in this group. These results indicate that in skeletal populations mortality was not exclusively determined by random external factors. Individuals predisposed by an unfavorable course of prenatal and perinatal growth were more likely to die in early childhood.

  10. Bilateral retinitis following typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhushanker, M; Topiwalla, Tasneem T; Ganesan, Geetha; Appandaraj, Sripal

    2017-01-01

    Post typhoid fever immune related reactions affecting the eye is a rare finding which can have various presentations in which typhoid retinopathy is not a well recognized sequelae. Here we present a case of 59 year old male who presented with right eye sudden painless loss of vision 4 weeks after typhoid fever which was diagnosed and treated successfully. His BCVA was 2/60 in right eye and 6/6 in left eye. Fundus examination showed retinitis along with macular serous detachment in right eye and retinitis in left eye. Significant improvement in BCVA in right eye was observed after treatment with oral steroid with resolving retinitis lesions. Diagnosis of post typhoid immune mediated retinitis was made with good resolution following treatment. Immune mediated retinitis is a rare sequelae to typhoid infection which can be successfully treated with systemic steroids with good resolution of the lesions.

  11. Familial Mediterranean fever: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Hafize Emine; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Özen, Seza

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most frequent monogenic autoinflammatory disease, and it is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and polyserositis. The disease is associated with mutations in the MEFV gene encoding pyrin, which causes exaggerated inflammatory response through uncontrolled production of interleukin 1. The major long-term complication of FMF is amyloidosis. Colchicine remains the principle therapy, and the aim of treatment is to prevent acute attacks and the consequences of chronic inflammation. With the evolution in the concepts about the etiopathogenesis and genetics of the disease, we have understood that FMF is more complicated than an ordinary autosomal recessive monogenic disorder. Recently, recommendation sets have been generated for interpretation of genetic testing and genetic diagnosis of FMF. Here, we have reviewed the current perspectives in FMF in light of recent recommendations. PMID:27051312

  12. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments.

  13. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Céline M; Brewster, Amy L; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Baram, Tallie Z

    2007-10-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This review builds on recent advances derived from animal models and summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying febrile seizures and of changes in neuronal gene expression and function that facilitate the enduring effects of prolonged febrile seizures on neuronal and network excitability. The review also discusses the relevance of these findings to the general mechanisms of epileptogenesis during development and points out gaps in our knowledge, including the relationship of animal models to human febrile seizures and epilepsy.

  14. Familial Mediterranean Fever and Hypercoagulability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayer-Shifman, Oshrat E.; Ben-Chetrit, Eldad

    2011-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease which is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and peritonitis, pleuritis, arthritis, or erysipelas-like skin disease. As such, FMF is a prototype of autoinflammatory diseases where genetic changes lead to acute inflammatory episodes. Systemic inflammation – in general - may increase procoagulant factors, and decrease natural anticoagulants and fibrinolytic activity. Therefore, it is anticipated to see more thrombotic events among FMF patients compared with healthy subjects. However, reviewing the current available literature and based upon our personal experience, thrombotic events related purely to FMF are very rare. Possible explanation for this discrepancy is that along with the procoagulant activity during FMF acute attacks, anticoagulant and fibrinolytic changes are also taking place. Colchicine which is the treatment of choice in FMF may also play a role in reducing inflammation thereby decreasing hypercoagulability. PMID:21713077

  15. African swine fever : transboundary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M-L. Penrith

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever (ASF is a devastating haemorrhagic fever of pigs that causes up to 100 % mortality, for which there is no vaccine. It is caused by a unique DNA virus that is maintained in an ancient cycle between warthogs and argasid ticks, making it the only known DNA arbovirus. ASF has a high potential for transboundary spread, and has twice been transported from Africa to other continents - Europe and subsequently the Caribbean and Brazil (1957, 1959 and the Caucasus (2007. It is also a devastating constraint for pig production in Africa. Research at Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute has made and is making important contributions to knowledge of this disease, focusing on the cycle in warthogs and tampans and transmission from that cycle to domestic pigs, resistance to its effects in domestic pigs, and the molecular genetic characterisation and epidemiology of the virus.

  16. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Moaz; Aleem, Numra A.; Zahid, Mohammad F.; Rahman, Arshalooz J.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is an acute febrile illness that follows a self-limiting course. However, some patients suffer from complications, including myocarditis, due to the involvement of other organs. A child presented at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, in June 2013 with a high-grade fever, malaise and epigastric pain radiating to the chest. Positive DF antigen and immunoglobulin M assays confirmed the diagnosis of DF. Persistent bradycardia with low blood pressure led to further cardiac investigations which showed a decreased ejection fraction and raised serum cardiac enzymes, indicating myocardial damage. With supportive care and use of inotropes, the spontaneous normalisation of cardiac enzyme levels and ejection fraction was observed. The child was discharged five days after admission. This case highlights the importance of identifying myocarditis in DF patients suffering from cardiac symptoms that are not explained by other potential aetiologies. Awareness, early suspicion and supportive care are essential to ensure favourable outcomes. PMID:26909198

  17. Mucocutaneous manifestations of Chikungunya fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandyopadhyay Debabrata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya fever (CF is an arboviral acute febrile illness transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. After a quiescence of more than three decades, CF has recently re-emerged as a major public health problem of global scale. CF is characterized by an acute onset of high fever associated with a severe disabling arthritis often accompanied by prominent mucocutaneous manifestations. The disease is usually self-limiting, but the joint symptoms and some of the cutaneous features may persist after the defervescence. A wide range of mucocutaneous changes has been described to occur in association with CF during the current epidemic. Besides a morbilliform erythema, hyperpigmentation, xerosis, excoriated papules, aphthous-like ulcers, vesiculobullous and lichenoid eruptions, and exacerbation of pre-existing or quiescent dermatoses had been observed frequently. These unusual features may help in the clinical differential diagnosis of acute viral exanthems mimicking CF.

  18. Imported chikungunya fever in Madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richi Alberti, Patricia; Steiner, Martina; Illera Martín, Óscar; Alcocer Amores, Patricia; Cobo Ibáñez, Tatiana; Muñoz Fernández, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya Fever is a mosquito-transmitted viral disease that causes fever, rash and musculoskeletal complaints. The latest may persist for several months, or even years or developed a relapsing course, that deserve an adequate treatment. Due to the large outbreak declared in the Caribbean in 2013, imported cases of Chikungunya as well as the risk of autochthonous transmission in case of available vectors have increased in non-endemic countries, like Spain. We described four cases of Chikungunya treated in our clinic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Prolonged fever after Infliximab infusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer; Katz; Michael; Frank

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacologic management for ulcerative colitis (UC) has recently been expanded to include antitumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for severe disease. Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed again TNF α was first tested in patients with Crohn’s disease. In addition to serious infections, malignancy, drug induced lupus and other autoimmune diseases, serum sickness-like reactions, neurological disease, and infusion reactions further complicate the use of Infliximab. We report a case of prolonged fever after Infliximab infusion to treat steroid refractory UC.

  20. Azathioprine-induced fever in autoimmune hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Tawfik; Ollech, Jacob E; Chen, Shmuel; Mizrahi, Meir; Shalit, Meir

    2013-01-01

    Underdiagnosis of drug-induced fever leads to extensive investigation and prolongation of hospitalization, and may lead to multiple unnecessary invasive procedures and a wrong diagnosis. Azathioprine is a widely used immunosuppressive drug. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis treated with azathioprine, who presented to the emergency room with a 6-wk history of fever and chills without other associated symptoms. Since the patient’s fever was of unknown origin, she was hospitalized. All treatment was stopped and an extensive workup to explore the source of fever and chills was performed. Results of chest X-ray, viral, urine, and blood cultures, autoimmune serology, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and abdominal ultrasound revealed no source of infection. A rechallenge test of azathioprine was performed and the fever and chills returned within a few hours. Azathioprine was established as the definite cause following rechallenge. Fever as an adverse drug reaction is often unrecognized. Azathioprine has been reported to cause drug-induced fever in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and sarcoidosis. To the best of our knowledge there have been no previous reports documenting azathioprine-induced fever in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. The occurrence of fever following the readministration of azathioprine suggests the diagnosis of drug-induced fever, particularly after the exclusion of other causes. A careful rechallenge is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:23840156

  1. Why Fever Phobia Is Still Common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Suzan; Usak, Esma; Koksal, Tulin; Canbal, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is a reliable sign of illness, but it also evokes fear and anxiety. It is not the fever itself but the fear of possible complications and accompanying symptoms that is important for pediatricians and parents. Objectives We aimed to investigate maternal understanding of fever, its potential consequences, and impacts on the treatment of children. Patients and Methods A questionnaire was use to explore the attitudes, knowledge, and practices of mothers of 861 children brought to four medical centers in different regions of Turkey in 2012, with fever being the chief complaint. All the children were aged 3 months - 15 years. Results Among the 861 mothers, 92.2% favored antipyretics for fever, either alone or in addition to external cooling measures. Most favored paracetamol or ibuprofen. In this study, the appropriate use of antipyretics was 75.2%, which was higher than that reported in the literature. In common with previous reports, seizures and brain damage were perceived as the most frightening and harmful effects of fever. All the mothers expressed concerns about fever, but they were most common among the highly educated or those with one child. Conclusions Fever phobia remains common, not only among low socioeconomic status mothers but also among those of high socioeconomic status. Healthcare providers should take fever phobia into account and provide correct information to caregivers about fever at all visits. PMID:27781110

  2. Familial Mediterranean fever: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sönmez HE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hafize Emine Sönmez,* Ezgi Deniz Batu,* Seza ÖzenDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is the most frequent monogenic autoinflammatory disease, and it is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and polyserositis. The disease is associated with mutations in the MEFV gene encoding pyrin, which causes exaggerated inflammatory response through uncontrolled production of interleukin 1. The major long-term complication of FMF is amyloidosis. Colchicine remains the principle therapy, and the aim of treatment is to prevent acute attacks and the consequences of chronic inflammation. With the evolution in the concepts about the etiopathogenesis and genetics of the disease, we have understood that FMF is more complicated than an ordinary autosomal recessive monogenic disorder. Recently, recommendation sets have been generated for interpretation of genetic testing and genetic diagnosis of FMF. Here, we have reviewed the current perspectives in FMF in light of recent recommendations.Keywords: familial Meditarranean fever, recommendation, child

  3. The Effects of Nicorandil and Nifekalant, Which Were Injected into the Pericardial Space, for Transmural Dispersion of Repolarization in the Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Ito, MD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some studies have reported that transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR is involved in the onset of ventricular arrhythmia. We investigated the effects of nicorandil (NIC and nifekalant (NIF injected into the pericardial space, on TDR and T waves in the pig. Methods and Results: We injected NIC 4 or 8 mg and NIF 50 or 100 mg at intervals into the pericardial space for eleven pigs. The effects of these drugs were investigated on the effective refractory period (ERP between the endocardial and epicardial myocardial cells, as well as on QT time, QT peak-end (QTcpe as an index of TDR, and T waveforms, respectively. QTcpe increased from 91 ± 21 to 116 ± 19 msec, 2.8 min after injection of NIC (p < 0.01, although corrected QT (QTc interval did not changed. But 5.5 min after injection, QTc decreased while QTcpe recovered. T wave amplitude significantly increased, and epicardium ERP decreased. When NIF was injected, TDR decreased from 55 ± 10 msec to 44 ± 8 msec (p < 0.01 although QTc did not change. In a later phase, QTc increased (p < 0.01 and QTcpe recovered. T wave amplitude rapidly decreased and became negative. Conclusion: Injected into the pericardial space, NIC and NIF brought about certain changes in ERP, QT and T waveform. Furthermore, NIC increased TDR while NIF decreased TDR.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of a novel method for detection of acute transmural myocardial ischemia based upon a self-applicable 3-lead configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haddad, Milad; Vervloet, Delphine; Taeymans, Yves; De Buyzere, Marc; Bové, Thierry; Stroobandt, Roland; Duytschaever, Mattias; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Gheeraert, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Delayed medical attendance is a leading cause of death in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We aimed to introduce, develop, and validate a novel method (RELF method) for detection of transmural ischemia based on a new and easy-to-use 3-lead configuration and orthonormalization of ST reference vectors (STDVN). The study included 60 patients undergoing coronary artery occlusion (CAO) during balloon inflation and 30 healthy subjects. STDVN was significantly different and an optimal discriminator between CAO patients and healthy subjects (respectively 8.00±4.50 vs. 1.90±0.86 normalized units, pmethod was sensitive (90 vs. 73%, p=0.13) and more specific (91 vs. 75%, pmethod is highly accurate for early detection of acute occlusion related ischemia and it outperforms the conventional 12-lead ECG criteria for STEMI. This method provides a platform for self-detection of CAO with handheld devices or smart phones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Health care in patients 1 year post-stroke in general practice: research on the utilisation of the Dutch Transmural Protocol transient ischaemic attack/cerebrovascular accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Weerd, L; Rutgers, A W F; Groenier, K H; van der Meer, K

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the kind of aftercare that ischaemic stroke patients receive and the extent that aftercare fulfils the criteria of the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol transient ischaemic attack/cerebrovascular accident'. Fifty-seven patients were interviewed 1 year post-stroke about secondary prevention and aftercare. Forty general practitioners (GPs) completed a questionnaire about guidance and secondary prevention (concerning medication and lifestyle advice). Most patients would like to see their GP more regularly. More aftercare was required than was planned. The use of aspirin remained the same, fewer patients used statins and more used antihypertensives. Of the 40 GPs who participated, 12% did not apply prevention. Blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol were measured in 84%, 28% and 40% of patients. All of these measures were often elevated, but treatment was not given. Lifestyle advice was offered to one-quarter of patients. Considering all of the advice given in the Dutch Protocol, several aspects can be improved in relation to secondary prevention. Too little attention is paid to giving lifestyle advice, stricter medical checkups by GPs are necessary and there is a decrease in use of preventive medication, partly because GPs monitors use of medication inadequately. The use of the Dutch Protocol in aftercare can be improved by a more detailed description of advice.

  6. Typhoid fever: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza Palma, Natalia Carolina; Farías Molina, Solange; Calzadilla Riveras, Jeannette; Hermoso, Amalia

    2016-06-21

    Typhoid fever remains a major health problem worldwide, in contrast to Chile, where this disease is an isolated finding. Clinical presentation is varied, mainly presenting with fever, malaise, abdominal discomfort, and nonspecific symptoms often confused with other causes of febrile syndrome. We report a six-year-old, male patient presenting with fever of two weeks associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, malaise, hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzymes. Differential diagnoses were considered and a Widal reaction and two blood cultures were requested; both came back positive, confirming the diagnosis of typhoid fever caused by Salmonella typhi. Prior to diagnosis confirmation, empirical treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole, with partial response; then drug therapy was adjusted according to ciprofloxacin susceptibility testing with a favorable clinical response. We discuss diagnostic methods and treatment of enteric fever with special emphasis on typhoid fever.

  7. Prevention of lassa Fever in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inegbenebor, Ute; Okosun, John; Inegbenebor, Josephine

    2010-01-01

    Although specific treatment is available for Lassa fever, early diagnosis is still difficult in most Nigerian primary and secondary health centers. This study was carried out to compare the case-fatality rates of Lassa fever and other medical diseases commonly seen in adult medical wards, to determine the community habits that make Lassa fever endemic in Edo Central District of Nigeria, with the aim of prescribing preventive measures for its control in Nigeria. The records of 908 inpatients in the adult medical wards of Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua and responses from respondents interviewed by trained interviewers on their knowledge, attitudes and practices pertaining to Lassa fever were used for this study. The case-fatality rate of Lassa fever in this center was 28%. Cultural factors and habits were found to favor endemicity of Lassa fever in Edo Central District of Nigeria. Preventive measures were prescribed for families and communities.

  8. Fever of unknown origin in returning travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Gaweł, Bartłomiej; Krankowska, Dagny; Wasilczuk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to discuss issues associated with the occurrence of febrile illnesses in leisure and business travellers, with a particular emphasis on fevers of unknown origin (FUO). FUO, apart from diarrhoeas, respiratory tract infections and skin lesions, are one of the most common health problems in travellers to tropical and subtropical countries. FUO are manifestations of various diseases, typically of infectious or invasive aetiology. In one out of 3 cases, the cause of a fever in travellers returning from the hot climate zone is malaria, and therefore diagnostic tests should first aim at ruling out this specific disease entity. Other illnesses with persistent fever include dengue, enteric fever, viral hepatitis A, bacterial diarrhoeas and rickettsioses. Fever may also occur in travellers suffering from diseases of non-tropical origin, e.g. cosmopolitan respiratory tract or urinary tract infections, also, fever may coexist with other illnesses or injuries (skin rashes, bites, burns).

  9. relapsing fever, a disappearing cause of fever and maternal death in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-01

    Apr 1, 2013 ... Objective: To study the incidence of tick borne relapsing fever (TBRF) during the last. 50 years ... fever was a disease of major worldwide importance, affecting ... of Diseases (ICD) of the World Health Organization. Reporting ...

  10. [Postoperative fever in orthopedic and urologic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Federico; Myburg, Cristina; Lanfranconi, Marisa B; Urtasun, Martin; De Oca, Luis Montes; Silberman, Andres; Lambierto, Alberto; Gnocchi, Cesar A

    2008-01-01

    Post-operative fever incidence varies widely. In clean and clean-contaminated surgery the non-infectious fever is more frequent than the infectious fever. We performed a prospective study including 303 patients who underwent orthopedic and urologic elective surgery. The aims of our study were to investigate the incidence of post-operative fever, its etiology, the relationship between time of onset and the etiology, and the usefulness of extensive fever work-up to determine post-operative infection. The incidence of post-operative fever was 14% (42/303) of which 81% (34/42) was noninfectious and 19% (8/42) was infectious. The etiology of the fever in the first 48 hours after surgery was always non-infectious (p fever work-up was performed in patients who presented fever only after the initial 48 hours of surgery with normal physical examination (n = 19) consisting of chest x-ray, blood (2) and urine cultures. The chest x-ray was normal in all the patients, the urine cultures were positive in four cases (21%, IC 95%: 6-45) and the blood cultures in only one case (5%, IC 95%: 0.1-26). Seven patients had post-operative infections without fever as a clinical sign. The most frequently observed etiology of post-operative fever was non-infectious, related to the normal inflammatory host response to surgery. Based on the present results, the extensive fever work-up performed to investigate post-operative infection does not seem to be a useful tool. The diagnosis of post-operative infection was based on clinical follow up and the correct interpretation of the patient's symptoms and signs.

  11. Fever of Unknown Origin: An Unusual Case

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, R. A.; Hayman, G. R.; Bansal, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent episodic fever of unknown origin (FUO) arising from tumour of the gastrointestinal tract is rare. We report an otherwise healthy 62-year-old man with recurrent circumscribed bouts of fever and raised CRP for 3 years who has remained well and fever-free 2 years after the removal of a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon. Occult colonic neoplasm should be considered and sought when routine investigations for FUO are negative.

  12. Advanced heart block in acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubail, Zakariya; Ebrahim, Ishaq M

    2016-04-01

    First degree heart block is considered a minor criterion for the diagnosis of this condition. The cases presented here demonstrate that higher degrees of heart block do occur in rheumatic fever. Children presenting with acquired heart block should be worked-up for rheumatic fever. Likewise, it is imperative to serially follow the electrocardiogram in patients already diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever, as the conduction abnormalities can change during the course of the disease.

  13. Advanced heart block in acute rheumatic fever

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    First degree heart block is considered a minor criterion for the diagnosis of this condition. The cases presented here demonstrate that higher degrees of heart block do occur in rheumatic fever. Children presenting with acquired heart block should be worked-up for rheumatic fever. Likewise, it is imperative to serially follow the electrocardiogram in patients already diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever, as the conduction abnormalities can change during the course of the disease.

  14. Vaccines for preventing typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Elspeth; Goldberg, Elad; Fraser, Abigail; Acosta, Camilo J; Paul, Mical; Leibovici, Leonard

    2014-01-02

    Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever continue to be important causes of illness and death, particularly among children and adolescents in south-central and southeast Asia. Two typhoid vaccines are commercially available, Ty21a (oral) and Vi polysaccharide (parenteral), but neither is used routinely. Other vaccines, such as a new, modified, conjugated Vi vaccine called Vi-rEPA, are in development. To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of vaccines used to prevent typhoid fever. In June 2013, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and mRCT. We also searched relevant conference proceedings up to 2013 and scanned the reference lists of all included trials. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing typhoid fever vaccines with other typhoid fever vaccines or with an inactive agent (placebo or vaccine for a different disease). Two review authors independently applied inclusion criteria and extracted data. We computed vaccine efficacy per year of follow-up and cumulative three-year efficacy, stratifying for vaccine type and dose. The outcome addressed was typhoid fever, defined as isolation of Salmonella typhi in blood. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) and efficacy (1-RR as a percentage) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In total, 18 RCTs were included in this review; 12 evaluated efficacy (Ty21a: five trials; Vi polysaccharide: six trials; Vi-rEPA: one trial), and 11 reported on adverse events. Ty21a vaccine (oral vaccine, three doses) A three-dose schedule of Ty21a vaccine prevents around one-third to one-half of typhoid cases in the first two years after vaccination (Year 1: 35%, 95% CI 8% to 54%; Year 2: 58%, 95% CI 40% to 71%; one trial, 20,543 participants; moderate quality evidence; data taken from a single trial conducted in Indonesia in the 1980s). No benefit was detected in the third year after vaccination. Four additional cluster-RCTs have been conducted, but the

  15. [Differential diagnosis in fever of unknown origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, H-I

    2006-11-01

    Fever is one of the most frequent and important symptoms in pediatrics. Most cases are caused by self-limiting viral or easily treatable bacterial infections. If after 5-7 days no cause of the ongoing fever has been found, the condition is termed fever of unknown origin, a working diagnosis which often poses a diagnostic challenge. The ultimate cause may be an infectious disease, a chronic inflammatory disorder, a malignancy, or another rare disease. The cause may also remain obscure or the fever can finally disappear. Here we elaborate the diagnostic work-up and symptomatic treatment.

  16. Describing the Breakbone Fever: IDODEN, an Ontology for Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitraka, Elvira; Topalis, Pantelis; Dritsou, Vicky; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Louis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Background Ontologies represent powerful tools in information technology because they enhance interoperability and facilitate, among other things, the construction of optimized search engines. To address the need to expand the toolbox available for the control and prevention of vector-borne diseases we embarked on the construction of specific ontologies. We present here IDODEN, an ontology that describes dengue fever, one of the globally most important diseases that are transmitted by mosquitoes. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed IDODEN using open source software, and modeled it on IDOMAL, the malaria ontology developed previously. IDODEN covers all aspects of dengue fever, such as disease biology, epidemiology and clinical features. Moreover, it covers all facets of dengue entomology. IDODEN, which is freely available, can now be used for the annotation of dengue-related data and, in addition to its use for modeling, it can be utilized for the construction of other dedicated IT tools such as decision support systems. Conclusions/Significance The availability of the dengue ontology will enable databases hosting dengue-associated data and decision-support systems for that disease to perform most efficiently and to link their own data to those stored in other independent repositories, in an architecture- and software-independent manner. PMID:25646954

  17. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  18. Fever-Induced Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Manohar MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is increasingly recognized as a cause of sudden cardiac death. Many of these patients do not get diagnosed due its dynamic and often hidden nature. We have come a long way in understanding the disease process, and its electrophysiology appears to be intimately linked with sodium channel mutations or disorders. The cardiac rhythm in these patients can deteriorate into fatal ventricular arrhythmias. This makes it important for the clinician to be aware of the conditions in which arrhythmogenicity of Brugada syndrome is revealed or even potentiated. We present such an instance where our patient’s Brugada syndrome was unmasked by fever.

  19. Fever Through a Jaundiced Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina C. Kennelly MD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic liver abscess (PLA is an important clinical entity to consider in a patient with fever and abdominal pain. Previously, the condition was difficult to diagnose and treat, but with the introduction of widely available and reliable imaging techniques, its diagnosis has become more straightforward. Although uncommon, PLA should especially be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with specific predisposing conditions such as underlying biliary tract disease, whether as a result of chronic inflammatory disease or malignancy. The introduction of percutaneous drainage has revolutionized the management of PLA, and thus, this disease has become largely correctable.

  20. The Effect of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage After a Bout of Accentuated Eccentric Load Drop Jumps and the Repeated Bout Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Lee A; Gill, Nicholas D; Dulson, Deborah K; McGuigan, Michael R

    2017-02-01

    Bridgeman, LA, Gill, ND, Dulson, DK, and McGuigan, MR. The effect of exercise induced muscle damage after a bout of accentuated eccentric load drop jumps and the repeated bout effect. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 386-394, 2017-Although previous studies have investigated exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) after a bout of unloaded drop jumps (DJs), none have investigated the effects of accentuated eccentric load (AEL) DJs on EIMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 30 and 50 AEL DJs on strength, jump performance, muscle soreness, and blood markers. Eight resistance trained athletes participated in this study. In week 1, baseline countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), concentric and eccentric peak force (PF), creatine kinase, and muscle soreness were assessed. Subjects then completed 30 AEL DJs and baseline measures were retested immediately postintervention, 1, 24, and 48 hours later. Two weeks later, the subjects completed the same protocol with an increase in AEL DJ volume (50). Subjects' SJ height was reduced in week 1 compared with week 3, postintervention, 1, 24, and 48 hours later (ES = -0.34, -0.44, -0.38, and -0.40). Subjects' CMJ height was reduced in week 1 compared with week 3, postintervention, 1, and 24 hours later (ES = -0.37, -0.29, and -0.39). Concentric PF was reduced in week 1 compared with week 3, postintervention and 24 and 48 hours later (ES = -0.02, -0.23, and -0.32). Eccentric PF was reduced in week 1 compared with week 3, postintervention, 24, and 48 hours later (ES = -0.24, -0.16, and -0.50). In this sample, 30 AEL DJs attenuated the effects of EIMD following which 50 AEL DJs completed 2 weeks later.

  1. Caregivers' perceptions of childhood fever in Ilorin, North-Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caregivers' perceptions of childhood fever in Ilorin, North-Central Nigeria. ... The aim was to determine knowledge and attitudes of parents regarding fever in their ... at all contacts with the healthcare system on fever, and its management.

  2. [Q fever: a cause of fever of unknown origin in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, L; Garin, N; Péter, O; Praz, G

    2012-10-10

    We describe two cases of Q fever in previously healthy women presenting with fever of unknown origin. The diagnosis was made after several days of investigations. Symptoms and signs of acute or chronic Coxiella burnetii infection are protean and non-specific. Q fever should be included in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin and appropriate serologic studies should be done. We review the clinical presentation of Q fever. Use of serology for the diagnosis and the follow-up is discussed.

  3. Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child is overdressed or in a hot place. Febrile seizures do occur in some children. Most febrile seizures are over quickly and do not mean your ... the flu - what to ask your doctor - child Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor When your baby ...

  4. Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1, use an oral rehydration solution such as Pedialyte. These solutions contain water and salts proportioned to replenish fluids and electrolytes. Pedialyte ice pops also are available. Rest. You need ...

  5. Leptospirosis presenting as honeymoon fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sainte Marie, B; Delord, M; Dubourg, G; Gautret, P; Parola, P; Brouqui, P; Lagier, J C

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of travelers from western countries visit tropical regions, questioning western physicians on the prophylaxis, the diagnosis and the therapeutic management of patients with travel-associated infection. In July 2014, a French couple stayed for an adventure-travel in Columbia without malaria prophylaxis. A week after their return the woman presented with fever, myalgia, and retro-orbital pain. Three days later, her husband presented similar symptoms. In both patients, testing for malaria, arboviruses and blood cultures remained negative. An empirical treatment with doxycycline and ceftriaxone was initiated for both patients. Serum collected from the female patient yielded positive IgM for leptospirosis but was negative for her husband. Positive Real-Time PCR were observed in blood and urine from both patients, confirming leptospirosis. Three lessons are noteworthy from this case report. First, after exclusion of malaria, as enteric fever, leptospirosis and rickettsial infection are the most prevalent travel-associated infections, empirical treatment with doxycycline and third generation cephalosporin should be considered. In addition, the diagnosis of leptospirosis requires both serology and PCR performed in both urine and blood samples. Finally, prophylaxis using doxycycline, also effective against leptospirosis, rickettsial infections or travellers' diarrhea should be recommended for adventure travelers in malaria endemic areas.

  6. A model of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutayeb A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a disease which is now endemic in more than 100 countries of Africa, America, Asia and the Western Pacific. It is transmitted to the man by mosquitoes (Aedes and exists in two forms: Dengue Fever and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. The disease can be contracted by one of the four different viruses. Moreover, immunity is acquired only to the serotype contracted and a contact with a second serotype becomes more dangerous. Methods The present paper deals with a succession of two epidemics caused by two different viruses. The dynamics of the disease is studied by a compartmental model involving ordinary differential equations for the human and the mosquito populations. Results Stability of the equilibrium points is given and a simulation is carried out with different values of the parameters. The epidemic dynamics is discussed and illustration is given by figures for different values of the parameters. Conclusion The proposed model allows for better understanding of the disease dynamics. Environment and vaccination strategies are discussed especially in the case of the succession of two epidemics with two different viruses.

  7. Rheumatic fever in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Rachel; Wilson, Nigel

    2013-03-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and its sequel rheumatic heart disease remain major unsolved problems in New Zealand, causing significant morbidity and premature death. The disease burden affects predominantly indigenous Māori and Pacific Island children and young adults. In the past decade these ethnic disparities are even widening. Secondary prophylaxis using 28-day intramuscular penicillin has been the mainstay of disease control. In the greater Auckland region, audit shows community nurse-led penicillin delivery rates of 95% and recurrence rates of less than 5%. The true penicillin failure rate of 0.07 per 100 patient years supports 4 weekly penicillin rather than more frequent dose regimens. Landmark primary prevention research has been undertaken supporting sore throat primary prevention programmes in regions with very high rheumatic fever rates. Echocardiographic screening found 2.4% previously undiagnosed rheumatic heart disease in socially disadvantaged children. Combined with secondary prevention, echocardiography screening has the potential to reduce the prevalence of severe rheumatic heart disease.

  8. FAMILIAL MEDITERRANEAN FEVER AND HYPERCOAGULABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshrat E. Tayer-Shifman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease which is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and peritonitis, pleuritis, arthritis, or erysipelas-like skin disease. As such, FMF is a prototype of autoinflammatory diseases where genetic changes lead to acute inflammatory episodes. Systemic inflammation – in general - may increase procoagulant factors, and decrease natural anticoagulants and fibrinolytic activity. Therefore, it is anticipated to see more thrombotic events among FMF patients compared with healthy subjects. However, reviewing the current available literature and based upon our personal experience, thrombotic events related purely to FMF are very rare. Possible explanation for this discrepancy is that along with the procoagulant activity during FMF acute attacks, anticoagulant and fibrinolytic changes are also taking place. Furthermore, it may well be that during the acute attack of FMF the procoagulant factors are consumed or used for the purpose of inflammation so that nothing is left for their role in the coagulation pathway. Colchicine may also play a role in reducing inflammation thereby decreasing hypercoagulabilty

  9. Biomarkers of fever: from bench to bedside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Limper (Maarten)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis aims to study biomarkers in inflammation and infection, with a special focus on the distinction between infectious and non-infectious fever. The thesis consists of three parts, part I being this introduction, in which the concept of fever in infectious and n

  10. Chronic Q fever in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    From 2007-2010, during the recent Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands, over 4000 cases of acute Q fever were registered, which is an underestimation of the total amount of Coxiella burnetii infections due to a high amount of asymptomatic primary infections. In the literature it is stated that 1-5% o

  11. The immune response in Q fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelen, T.

    2015-01-01

    Q fever is an infection caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. A large outbreak of Q fever occurred in the Netherlands between 2007 and 2010, in which infected goats and sheep were the source of human infections. In some people, so-called ‘chronic Q fever’ develops, which mainly manifests as end

  12. Classical Swine Fever Virus-Rluc Replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Belsham, Graham J.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the etiologic agent of the severe porcine disease, classical swine fever. Unraveling the molecular determinants of efficient replication is crucial for gaining proper knowledge of the pathogenic traits of this virus. Monitoring the replication competence within...

  13. Unexpected Rift Valley fever outbreak, northern Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mamy, Ahmed B O; Baba, Mohamed Ould; Barry, Yahya; Isselmou, Katia; Dia, Mamadou L; El Kory, Mohamed O B; Diop, Mariam; Lo, Modou Moustapha; Thiongane, Yaya; Bengoumi, Mohammed; Puech, Lilian; Plee, Ludovic; Claes, Filip; de La Rocque, Stephane; Doumbia, Baba

    2011-10-01

    During September-October 2010, an unprecedented outbreak of Rift Valley fever was reported in the northern Sahelian region of Mauritania after exceptionally heavy rainfall. Camels probably played a central role in the local amplification of the virus. We describe the main clinical signs (hemorrhagic fever, icterus, and nervous symptoms) observed during the outbreak.

  14. Rift Valley fever outbreak, southern Mauritania, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, Abdourahmane; Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Ba, Hampathé; Diallo, Diawo; Faye, Oumar; Loucoubar, Cheikh; Boushab, Mohamed; Barry, Yahya; Diallo, Mawlouth; Sall, Amadou Alpha

    2014-02-01

    After a period of heavy rainfall, an outbreak of Rift Valley fever occurred in southern Mauritania during September-November 2012. A total of 41 human cases were confirmed, including 13 deaths, and 12 Rift Valley fever virus strains were isolated. Moudjeria and Temchecket Departments were the most affected areas.

  15. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old.

  16. [Familial Mediterranean fever: not to be missed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, J.; Bemelman, F.J.; Potter van Loon, B.J.; Simon, A.

    2013-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is common among Turkish and Moroccan migrants. We describe three patients with FMF. A 3-year-old girl with recurrent fever and abdominal pain who was diagnosed early with FMF and treated effectively with colchicine. An adolescent girl who required interleukin

  17. Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis) Risk and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fungal spores. The following are some common-sense methods that may be helpful to avoid getting Valley fever. It’s important to know that although these steps are recommended, they haven’t been proven to prevent Valley fever. ... information about respirators. Stay inside during dust storms and ...

  18. Dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Ricardo Gonzalez Fontal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an atypical complication of dengue fever and is rarely described. We are reporting a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute pancreatitis in a patient with history of diabetes mellitus type 1 and end stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

  19. Ask Dr. Sue: "Children and Fevers."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1989-01-01

    Considers aspects of children's fevers. Answers questions concerning: (1) the temperature at which a fever is infectious; (2) the point at which a feverish child in care should be sent home; (3) the length of time a parent should wait before returning the child to day care; and (4) the way to take a child's temperature. (RJC)

  20. [Diagnostic approach to fever of unknown origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, fever of unknown origin (FUO) is generally defined as a fever higher than 38-3 degrees C lasting for a period of at least three weeks, in which no definitive diagnosis has been made after a number of obligatory tests. A diagnostic algorithm is proposed in which history taking, physical

  1. Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis associated with typhoid fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Wali, G M

    1991-01-01

    A 14 year old boy developed the syndrome of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis during the course of bacteriologically proved typhoid fever. The clinical course and the results of various neurological investigations are detailed. This report adds a further manifestation to the published neuropsychiatric complications of typhoid fever.

  2. The immune response in Q fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelen, T.

    2015-01-01

    Q fever is an infection caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. A large outbreak of Q fever occurred in the Netherlands between 2007 and 2010, in which infected goats and sheep were the source of human infections. In some people, so-called ‘chronic Q fever’ develops, which mainly manifests as

  3. Chronic Q fever in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    From 2007-2010, during the recent Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands, over 4000 cases of acute Q fever were registered, which is an underestimation of the total amount of Coxiella burnetii infections due to a high amount of asymptomatic primary infections. In the literature it is stated that 1-5%

  4. Phase-contrast magnet resonance imaging reveals regional, transmural, and base-to-apex dispersion of mechanical dysfunction in patients with long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brado, Johannes; Dechant, Markus J; Menza, Marius; Komancsek, Adriana; Lang, Corinna N; Bugger, Heiko; Foell, Daniela; Jung, Bernd A; Stiller, Brigitte; Bode, Christoph; Odening, Katja E

    2017-09-01

    Regional dispersion of prolonged repolarization is a hallmark of long QT syndrome (LQTS). We have also revealed regional heterogeneities in mechanical dysfunction in transgenic rabbit models of LQTS. In this clinical pilot study, we investigated whether patients with LQTS exhibit dispersion of mechanical/diastolic dysfunction. Nine pediatric patients with genotyped LQTS (12.2 ± 3.3 years) and 9 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (10.6 ± 1.5 years) were subjected to phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to analyze radial (Vr) and longitudinal (Vz) myocardial velocities during systole and diastole in the left ventricle (LV) base, mid, and apex. Twelve-lead electrocardiograms were recorded to assess the heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval. The QTc interval was longer in patients with LQTS than in controls (469.1 ± 39.4 ms vs 417.8 ± 24.4 ms; P dispersion of contraction duration was increased in the LV apex (TTPVz_max-min: 38.9 ± 25.5 ms vs 20.2 ± 14.7 ms; P = .07; TTPVz-Vr: -21.7 ± 14.5 ms vs -8.7 ± 11.3 ms; P dispersion is increased in LQTS with an increased regional and transmural dispersion of contraction duration and altered apicobasal longitudinal relaxation sequence. LQTS is an electromechanical disorder, and phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging Heterogeneity in mechanical dysfunction enables a detailed assessment of mechanical consequences of LQTS. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Typhoid fever: the experience of last decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kovalenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is about analyses of diagnostics and treatment of the modern typhoid fever. In the past typhoid fever was critical and lifethreatening inflectional disease. But nowadays thanks to using of chloramphenicol and other antimicrobial preparations, typhoid fever is serious but well curable disease. In the second part of the 20th century the number of typhoid fever cases has decreased. As a result a new generation of physicians, who has never come across this disease, appeared. Nowadays typhoid fever is still actual for practical public health in Russia. There are two causes: first, there is a risk of delivery of infections with tourists and immigrants. Second, the small number of physicians, who possess well knowledge of clinical features and modern therapy.

  6. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ftika, L; Maltezou, H C

    2013-03-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound haemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. VHFs that have the potential for human-to-human transmission and onset of large nosocomial outbreaks include Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Ebola haemorrhagic fever, Marburg haemorrhagic fever and Lassa fever. Nosocomial outbreaks of VHFs are increasingly reported nowadays, which likely reflects the dynamics of emergence of VHFs. Such outbreaks are associated with an enormous impact in terms of human lives and costs for the management of cases, contact tracing and containment. Surveillance, diagnostic capacity, infection control and the overall preparedness level for management of a hospital-based VHF event are very limited in most endemic countries. Diagnostic capacities for VHFs should increase in the field and become affordable. Availability of appropriate protective equipment and education of healthcare workers about safe clinical practices and infection control is the mainstay for the prevention of nosocomial spread of VHFs.

  7. Familial Mediterranean Fever: An Unusual Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soora, Raksha; Nicandri, Katrina

    2015-12-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever is a heritable illness typically characterized by recurrent fevers and serositis. Triggers of this illness include many things, such as cold or stress. This case describes a teenager who initially presented to the gynecologist office because of recurrent fevers with menses. Because she only had symptoms with menses, was healthy between attacks, and met the Livneh criteria, treatment with colchicine and combined oral contraceptive pills was initiated, with improvement of her symptoms. There are multiple etiologies for febrile illness during menses, and one should consider familial Mediterranean fever as a possible cause of cyclic fevers. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Educational Fever and South Korean Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Kyu Lee

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the influence of educational fever on the development of the Republic of Korea education and economy in the context of the cultural history of this country. In order to examine this study, the author explains the concept of educational fever and discusses the relation between Confucianism and education zeal. Educational fever and human capitalization in South Korean higher education are analyzed from a comparative viewpoint. The study evaluates the effects and problems of education fever this country’s current higher education, and it concludes that Koreans’ educational fever has been a core factor by which to achieve the development of the national economy as well as the rapid expansion of higher education.

  9. The geographical distribution of Q fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAPLAN, M M; BERTAGNA, P

    1955-01-01

    The results of a WHO-assisted survey of the distribution of Q fever in 32 countries and an analysis of reports published to date indicate that Q fever exists in 51 countries on five continents. Q-fever infection was most often reported in man and the domestic ruminants, such as cattle, sheep, and goats.The disease was found to exist in most countries where investigations were carried out. Notable exceptions were Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, and the Scandinavian countries. With the exception of Poland, where the results were inconclusive, all these countries import relatively few domestic ruminants-the most important animal reservoirs of human Q-fever infection. It seems, therefore, that the traffic of infected ruminants may be one of the most important, if not the most important, means for the geographical spread of Q fever. The importance, if any, of ticks associated with such traffic needs to be defined.

  10. Fever management: Evidence vs current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Radhi, A Sahib Mehdi

    2012-12-08

    Fever is a very common complaint in children and is the single most common non-trauma-related reason for a visit to the emergency department. Parents are concerned about fever and it's potential complications. The biological value of fever (i.e., whether it is beneficial or harmful) is disputed and it is being vigorously treated with the belief of preventing complications such as brain injury and febrile seizures. The practice of alternating antipyretics has become widespread at home and on paediatric wards without supporting scientific evidence. There is still a significant contrast between the current concept and practice, and the scientific evidence. Why is that the case in such a common complaint like fever The article will discuss the significant contrast between the current concepts and practice of fever management on one hand, and the scientific evidence against such concepts and practice.

  11. Milk fever control principles: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsing-Hansen, T; Jørgensen, R J; Østergaard, S

    2002-01-01

    Three main preventive principles against milk fever were evaluated in this literature review, and the efficacy of each principle was estimated from the results of controlled investigations. Oral calcium drenching around calving apparently has a mean efficacy of 50%-60% in terms of milk fever...... prevention as well as prevention of milk fever relapse after intravenous treatment with calcium solutions. However, some drenches have been shown to cause lesions in the forestomacs. When using the DCAD (dietary cation-anion difference) principle, feeding rations with a negative DCAD (measured as (Na + K......)-(Cl + S)) significantly reduce the milk fever incidence. Calculating the relative risk (RR) of developing milk fever from controlled experiments results in a mean RR between 0.19 and 0.35 when rations with a negative versus positive DCAD are compared. The main drawback from the DCAD principle...

  12. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated.

  13. Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever: Systematic review to estimate global morbidity and mortality for 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Geoffrey C.; Walker, Christa L. Fischer; Black, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Typhoid and paratyphoid fever remain important causes of morbidity worldwide. Accurate disease burden estimates are needed to guide policy decisions and prevention and control strategies. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review of the PubMed and Scopus databases using pre-defined criteria to identify population-based studies with typhoid fever incidence data published between 1980 and 2009. We also abstracted data from annual reports of notifiable diseases in countries with advanced surveillance systems. Typhoid and paratyphoid fever input data were grouped into regions and regional incidence and mortality rates were estimated. Incidence data were extrapolated across regions for those lacking data. Age-specific incidence rates were derived for regions where age-specific data were available. Crude and adjusted estimates of the global typhoid fever burden were calculated. Results Twenty-five studies were identified, all of which contained incidence data on typhoid fever and 12 on paratyphoid fever. Five advanced surveillance systems contributed data on typhoid fever; 2 on paratyphoid fever. Regional typhoid fever incidence rates ranged from typhoid fever episodes in 2010 was 13.5 million (interquartile range 9.1–17.8 million). The adjusted estimate accounting for the low sensitivity of blood cultures for isolation of the bacteria was 26.9 million (interquartile range 18.3–35.7 million) episodes. These findings are comparable to the most recent analysis of global typhoid fever morbidity, which reported crude and adjusted estimates of 10.8 million and 21.7 million typhoid fever episodes globally in 2000. Conclusion Typhoid fever remains a significant health burden, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the availability of more recent data on both enteric fevers, additional research is needed in many regions, particularly Africa, Latin America and other developing countries. PMID:23198130

  14. Fever after percutaneous nephrolithotomy: contributing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Aghdas, Farzaneh; Akhavizadegan, Hamed; Aryanpoor, Aryan; Inanloo, Hassan; Karbakhsh, Mojgan

    2006-08-01

    The exact mechanism of fever and urosepsis after percutaneous procedures has not been established. This research studied the frequency of fever after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and the contributing factors. In a cross-sectional study, from September 2003 to March 2004, all 217 patients with nephrolithiasis treated with PCNL at the Labbafinegad Specialized Urology Center were studied. Data were collected before, during, and after surgery. The frequency of fever after PCNL was 25.8% (n=56) although in 62.2% of the cases (n=135), no prophylactic antibiotics had been administered. The mean durations of hospitalization in patients with and without fever were 5.4+/-2.3 and 3.4+/-1.7 days, respectively (p=0.001). Significant correlations were observed between fever and female sex (p=0.005), positive urine culture (p=0.02), and nephrostomy tube insertion (p=0.041). Other variables did not prove to be significant. In logistic regression analysis, female sex and nephrostomy tube insertion were independently related to post-operative fever. Although a considerable proportion of our patients had not received prophylactic antibiotics, the rate of fever after PCNL was no higher than is reported in the literature. Use of only a short course of antibiotics before surgery for staghorn stones did not result in a higher rate of fever. Female sex created a higher risk for fever, probably because of the greater propensity to urinary tract infection. The significant relation of a nephrostomy tube to fever could be attributed to its role as a foreign body or to use in more complicated cases.

  15. ACUTE UNDIFFERENTIATED FEVER IN INTENSIVE CARE UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Ram Mohan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute undifferentiated fever (AUF is common in tropical regions of the developing world, its specific etiology is often unknown. It’s common causes include malaria, dengue fever, enteric fever, leptospirosis, rickettsial infection. AUF is defined as fever without any localised source of infection, of 14 days or less in duration. The objective of the study was to focus on identifying the causes of AUF in patients admitted to Intensive care units & to determine importance of clinical examination in identifying the cause. It was a prospective study done in our Medical college Hospital at Kolar, Karnataka between 1-11-2010 to 30-11-2011. Cases presenting to hospital aged >18 years with complaints of Fever & admitted in Intensive care units were included in study. A total of 558 cases were enrolled. The clinical findings were noted and subsequent Investigations required were asked for. The study compromised of approximately equal number of Male & Female patients & age varied from 18 – 100 years. There was a clear seasonal variation – More no of cases were admitted between April & November. Majority presented with Fever of Short duration (1-3 days. Certain well defined syndromes were identified like:  Fever with Thrombocytopenia – the most common of all the syndromes.  Fever with Myalgia & Arthralgia,  Fever with Hepatorenal dysfunction,  Fever with Encephalopathy,  Fever with Pulmonary - Renal dysfunction and  Fever with Multiorgan dysfunction (MODS. Out of 558 cases AUF was noted in 339 cases (60.86%. An etiological diagnosis could be made for 218 cases (39.06%. Leptospirosis was the commonest cause with 72 cases (12.9%. The no of cases with Dengue were 48(8.6%, Malaria –25 (4.4%, Viral fever –35 (6.2%, Mixed infections – 12 (2.1%, Pulmonary Tuberculosis -25 ( 4.4% and one case of Rickettsial Infection. MODS was the most common presentation in AUF patients, seen in 108 cases (31.8% and 40 cases expired. A study of AUF

  16. Brugada syndrome unmasked by fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Scott P; Cube, Regino P; Edwards, John A

    2011-08-01

    Brugada syndrome (BS) is a cardiac rhythm disturbance that predisposes patients to sudden cardiac death. Brugada is classically described with specific electrocardiographic (EKG) findings of ST elevation and right bundle branch block in precordial leads and is an often unrecognized contributor to sudden cardiac death. We present a case of BS with cyclic EKG findings in a febrile 20-year-old active duty, Vietnamese male who presented following a witnessed syncopal event. His classic findings of Brugada pattern on EKG demonstrated reversibility with clinical defervescence. In patients with a suggestive history, a normal EKG cannot definitively rule out BS as the Brugada pattern can be unmasked by stress, which in this case was represented by a pneumonia-induced fever.

  17. FAMILIAL MEDITERRANEAN FEVER AND HYPERCOAGULABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshrat E. Tayer-Shifman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease which is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and peritonitis, pleuritis, arthritis, or erysipelas-like skin disease. As such, FMF is a prototype of autoinflammatory diseases where genetic changes lead to acute inflammatory episodes. Systemic inflammation – in general - may increase procoagulant factors, and decrease natural anticoagulants and fibrinolytic activity. Therefore, it is anticipated to see more thrombotic events among FMF patients compared with healthy subjects. However, reviewing the current available literature and based upon our personal experience, thrombotic events related purely to FMF are very rare. Possible explanation for this discrepancy is that along with the procoagulant activity during FMF acute attacks, anticoagulant and fibrinolytic changes are also taking place. Furthermore, it may well be that during the acute attack of FMF the procoagulant factors are consumed or used for the purpose of inflammation so that nothing is left for their role in the coagulation pathway. Colchicine may also play a role in reducing inflammation thereby decreasing hypercoagulabilty

  18. Fever in Children: Pearls and Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbi, Egidio; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Neri, Elena; Naviglio, Samuele; Krauss, Baruch S

    2017-09-01

    Fever in children is a common concern for parents and one of the most frequent presenting complaints in emergency department visits, often involving non-pediatric emergency physicians. Although the incidence of serious infections has decreased after the introduction of conjugate vaccines, fever remains a major cause of laboratory investigation and hospital admissions. Furthermore, antipyretics are the most common medications administered to children. We review the epidemiology and measurement of fever, the meaning of fever and associated clinical signs in children of different ages and under special conditions, including fever in children with cognitive impairment, recurrent fevers, and fever of unknown origin. While the majority of febrile children have mild, self-resolving viral illness, a minority may be at risk of life-threatening infections. Clinical assessment differs markedly from adult patients. Hands-off evaluation is paramount for a correct evaluation of breathing, circulation and level of interaction. Laboratory markers and clinical prediction rules provide limited help in identifying children at risk for serious infections; however, clinical examination, prudent utilization of laboratory tests, and post-discharge guidance ("safety netting") remain the cornerstone of safe management of febrile children.

  19. Isolated fever induced by mesalamine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slim, Rita; Amara, Joseph; Nasnas, Roy; Honein, Khalil; Jaoude, Joseph Bou; Yaghi, Cesar; Daniel, Fady; Sayegh, Raymond

    2013-02-21

    Adverse reactions to mesalamine, a treatment used to induce and maintain remission in inflammatory bowel diseases, particularly ulcerative colitis, have been described in the literature as case reports. This case illustrates an unusual adverse reaction. Our patient developed an isolated fever of unexplained etiology, which was found to be related to mesalamine treatment. A 22-year-old patient diagnosed with ulcerative colitis developed a fever with rigors and anorexia 10 d after starting oral mesalamine while his colitis was clinically resolving. Testing revealed no infection. A mesalamine-induced fever was considered, and treatment was stopped, which led to spontaneous resolution of the fever. The diagnosis was confirmed by reintroducing the mesalamine. One year later, this side effect was noticed again in the same patient after he was administered topical mesalamine. This reaction to mesalamine seems to be idiosyncratic, and the mechanism that induces fever remains unclear. Fever encountered in the course of a mesalamine treatment in ulcerative colitis must be considered a mesalamine-induced fever when it cannot be explained by the disease activity, an associated extraintestinal manifestation, or an infectious etiology.

  20. Fever in Children: Pearls and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbi, Egidio; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Neri, Elena; Krauss, Baruch S.

    2017-01-01

    Fever in children is a common concern for parents and one of the most frequent presenting complaints in emergency department visits, often involving non-pediatric emergency physicians. Although the incidence of serious infections has decreased after the introduction of conjugate vaccines, fever remains a major cause of laboratory investigation and hospital admissions. Furthermore, antipyretics are the most common medications administered to children. We review the epidemiology and measurement of fever, the meaning of fever and associated clinical signs in children of different ages and under special conditions, including fever in children with cognitive impairment, recurrent fevers, and fever of unknown origin. While the majority of febrile children have mild, self-resolving viral illness, a minority may be at risk of life-threatening infections. Clinical assessment differs markedly from adult patients. Hands-off evaluation is paramount for a correct evaluation of breathing, circulation and level of interaction. Laboratory markers and clinical prediction rules provide limited help in identifying children at risk for serious infections; however, clinical examination, prudent utilization of laboratory tests, and post-discharge guidance (“safety netting”) remain the cornerstone of safe management of febrile children. PMID:28862659

  1. Fever in Children: Pearls and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio Barbi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fever in children is a common concern for parents and one of the most frequent presenting complaints in emergency department visits, often involving non-pediatric emergency physicians. Although the incidence of serious infections has decreased after the introduction of conjugate vaccines, fever remains a major cause of laboratory investigation and hospital admissions. Furthermore, antipyretics are the most common medications administered to children. We review the epidemiology and measurement of fever, the meaning of fever and associated clinical signs in children of different ages and under special conditions, including fever in children with cognitive impairment, recurrent fevers, and fever of unknown origin. While the majority of febrile children have mild, self-resolving viral illness, a minority may be at risk of life-threatening infections. Clinical assessment differs markedly from adult patients. Hands-off evaluation is paramount for a correct evaluation of breathing, circulation and level of interaction. Laboratory markers and clinical prediction rules provide limited help in identifying children at risk for serious infections; however, clinical examination, prudent utilization of laboratory tests, and post-discharge guidance (“safety netting” remain the cornerstone of safe management of febrile children.

  2. Diagnostic criteria of acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Rebecca J; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever is an inflammatory sequela of Group A Streptococcal pharyngitis that affects multiple organ systems. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever has been declining even before the use of antibiotics became widespread, however the disease remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children, particularly in developing countries and has been estimated to affect 19 per 100,000 children worldwide. Acute rheumatic fever is a clinical diagnosis, and therefore subject to the judgment of the clinician. Because of the variable presentation, the Jones criteria were first developed in 1944 to aid clinicians in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. The Jones criteria have been modified throughout the years, most recently in 1992 to aid clinicians in the diagnosis of initial attacks of acute rheumatic fever and to minimize overdiagnosis of the disease. Diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever is based on the presence of documented preceding Group A Streptococcal infection, in addition to the presence of two major manifestations or one major and two minor manifestations of the Jones criteria. Without documentation of antecedent Group A Streptococcal infection, the diagnosis is much less likely except in a few rare scenarios. Carditis, polyarthritis and Sydenham's chorea are the most common major manifestations of acute rheumatic fever. However, despite the predominance of these major manifestations of acute rheumatic fever, there can be significant overlap with other disorders such as Lyme disease, serum sickness, drug reactions, and post-Streptococcal reactive arthritis. This overlap between disease processes has led to continued investigation of the pathophysiology as well as development of new biomarkers and laboratory studies to aid in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever and distinction from other disease processes.

  3. Fluoroquinolones for treating typhoid and paratyphoid fever (enteric fever).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effa, Emmanuel E; Lassi, Zohra S; Critchley, Julia A; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David; Olliaro, Piero L; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2011-10-05

    Typhoid and paratyphoid are febrile illnesses, due to a bacterial infection, which remain common in many low- and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends the fluoroquinolone antibiotics in areas with known resistance to the older first-line antibiotics. To evaluate fluoroquinolone antibiotics for treating children and adults with enteric fever. We searched The Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register (February 2011); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in The Cochrane Library (2011, Issue 2); MEDLINE (1966 to February 2011); EMBASE (1974 to February 2011); and LILACS (1982 to February 2011). We also searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) in February 2011. Randomized controlled trials examining fluoroquinolone antibiotics, in people with blood, stool or bone marrow culture-confirmed enteric fever. Two authors independently assessed the trial's methodological quality and extracted data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data and mean difference for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI).Comparative effectiveness has been interpreted in the context of; length of treatment, dose, year of study, known levels of antibiotic resistance, or proxy measures of resistance such as the failure rate in the comparator arm. Twenty-six studies, involving 3033 patients, are included in this review.Fluoroquinolones versus older antibiotics (chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole, amoxicillin and ampicillin)In one study from Pakistan in 2003-04, high clinical failure rates were seen with both chloramphenicol and co-trimoxazole, although resistance was not confirmed microbiologically. A seven-day course of either ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin were found to be superior. Older studies of these comparisons failed to show a difference (six trials, 361 participants).In small studies conducted almost two decades ago, the fluoroquinolones were demonstrated to have fewer

  4. Clinical and molecular aspects of malaria fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Miranda S; Gerald, Noel; McCutchan, Thomas F; Aravind, L; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-10-01

    Although clinically benign, malaria fever is thought to have significant relevance in terms of parasite growth and survival and its virulence which in turn may alter the clinical course of illness. In this article, the historical literature is reviewed, providing some evolutionary perspective on the genesis and biological relevance of malaria fever, and the available molecular data on the febrile-temperature-inducible parasite factors that may contribute towards the regulation of parasite density and alteration of virulence in the host is also discussed. The potential molecular mechanisms that could be responsible for the induction and regulation of cyclical malaria fevers caused by different species of Plasmodium are also discussed.

  5. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever.

  6. Lassa fever: another threat from West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosh-Nissimov, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever, a zoonotic viral infection, is endemic in West Africa. The disease causes annual wide spread morbidity and mortality in Africa, and can be imported by travelers. Possible importation of Lassa fever and the potential for the use of Lassa virus as an agent of bioterrorism mandate clinicians in Israel and other countries to be vigilant and familiar with the basic characteristics of this disease. The article reviews the basis of this infection and the clinical management of patients with Lassa fever. Special emphasis is given to antiviral treatment and infection control.

  7. Clara Maass, yellow fever and human experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Carballo, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Clara Louise Maass, a 25-year-old American nurse, died of yellow fever on August 24, 1901, following experimental inoculation by infected mosquitoes in Havana, Cuba. The human yellow fever experiments were initially conducted by MAJ Walter Reed, who first used written informed consent and proved the validity of Finlay's mosquito-vector hypothesis. Despite informed consent form and an incentive of $100 in U.S. gold, human subjects were exposed to a deadly virus. The deaths of Clara Maass and two Spanish immigrants resulted in a public outcry and the immediate cessation of yellow fever human experiments in Cuba.

  8. Appendicular perforation in dengue fever: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Desai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections have become one of major emerging infectious diseases in the tropics. Acute abdomen occurring in dengue viral infection is not uncommon. The spectrums of acute surgical emergencies which raise suspicion of an abdominal catastrophe in patients presenting with dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, non-specific peritonitis and very rarely acute appendicitis. The presence of low white cell count and platelet count can raise suspicion of a diagnosis of dengue in a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain, during a dengue epidemic. We herein report three patients with dengue fever who had appendicular perforation during the course of their viral fever.

  9. Familial Mediterranean fever presenting as fever of unknown origin in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Jong Hyun; Shim, Jung Ok; Lee, Kwang Chul; Lee, Joo Won; Lee, Jung Hwa; Chae, Jae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common Mendelian autoinflammatory disease, characterized by uncontrolled activation of the innate immune system that manifests as recurrent brief fever and polyserositis (e.g., peritonitis, pleuritic, and arthritis). FMF is caused by autosomal recessive mutations of the Mediterranean fever gene, MEFV which encodes the pyrin protein. Although FMF predominantly affects people from Mediterranean and Middle Eastern ethnic origins, 3 cases of FMF have...

  10. Phenotypical characterization, distribution and quantification of different mast cell subtypes in transmural biopsies from the gastrointestinal tract of cats with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Sven; Harder, Jasmine; Nolte, Ingo; Marsilio, Sina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2010-10-15

    In this study subtypes, distribution and number of mast cells were investigated within mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract of 24 cats with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in comparison to 11 control cats. Paraffin sections of formalin-fixed transmural gastrointestinal biopsies from stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon were examined. Mast cells were phenotyped and quantified based on their chymase and tryptase content, by applying a combined enzyme-histochemical and immunohistochemical double-labeling technique and on their heparin content by a metachromatic staining method (kresylecht-violet, MC(KEV)). Mast cells containing both chymase and tryptase were not found in any of the samples examined. Furthermore, in the stomach neither chymase (MC(C)) nor tryptase (MC(T)) bearing mast cells were detected. In cats with lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis or enterocolitis elevated numbers of MC(T) or MC(C) were identified in comparison to controls mainly located in the inflamed segments. The highest quantity of MC(C) was found in cats with eosinophilic gastroenterocolitis or enterocolitis in comparison to other IBD forms, but only minor numbers of MC(T) were detected in these cases. In cats with fibrosing enteropathy (FE) a decrease of MC(C) and mast cells containing heparin was detected in affected segments, while increased numbers of MC(T) were detected in all locations. The elevation in the number of MC(T) was higher in unaffected areas than in fibrotic regions. Regarding all IBD cases higher counts of MC(C) were found especially in the inflamed locations, whereas in unaffected segments increased numbers of MC(T) were detected. The clear predominance of MC(C) and MC(T) within the mucosa and of MC(KEV) within the submucosa of all cats examined possibly represents differences of the cytokine milieu within the intestinal layers. In FE, mast cells are possibly pivotal for the containment of the inflammatory process because of their antiinflammatory

  11. Intrapartum fever and the risk for perinatal complications - the effect of fever duration and positive cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwal, Eran; Salman, Lina; Tzur, Yossi; Aviram, Amir; Ben-Mayor Bashi, Tali; Yogev, Yariv; Hiersch, Liran

    2017-04-24

    To estimate the association between intrapartum fever and adverse perinatal outcome. A retrospective cohort study of women attempting vaginal delivery at term in a tertiary hospital (2012-2015). Perinatal outcome of deliveries complicated by intrapartum fever (≥38.0 °C) were compared to women with no intrapartum fever matched by parity and gestational age at delivery in a 1:2 ratio. Maternal outcome included cesarean section (CS), operative vaginal delivery (OVD), retained placenta or post-partum hemorrhage. Neonatal outcome included 5-minute Apgar score fever and 618 served as controls. Women with intrapartum fever had higher rates of OVD (34.3 versus 19.6%, p fever was independently associated with adverse maternal (3.75, 95%CI 2.65-5.30, p fever duration was related to maternal complications, specifically to CS. In addition, maternal bacteremia and positive placental cultures were risk factors for neonatal complications compared to those with negative cultures (23.3 versus 9.8%, p = .01). Intrapartum fever was associated with adverse perinatal complications. The duration of intrapartum fever, maternal bacteremia, and positive cultures further increase this risk.

  12. Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever: Systematic review to estimate global morbidity and mortality for 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Buckle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid and paratyphoid fever remain important causes of morbidity worldwide. Accurate disease burden estimates are needed to guide policy decisions and prevention and control strategies.

  13. Patterns of accentuated grey-white differentiation on diffusion-weighted imaging or the apparent diffusion coefficient maps in comatose survivors after global brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E., E-mail: xmida@hanmail.ne [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, C.-H.; Chang, K.-H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, H.-W. [Departement of Radiology, Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D.H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Aim: To determine what disease entities show accentuated grey-white differentiation of the cerebral hemisphere on diffusion-weighted images (DWI) or apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and whether there is a correlation between the different patterns and the cause of the brain injury. Methods and materials: The DWI and ADC maps of 19 patients with global brain injury were reviewed and evaluated to investigate whether there was a correlation between the different patterns seen on the DWI and ADC maps and the cause of global brain injury. The ADC values were measured for quantitative analysis. Results: There were three different patterns of ADC decrease: a predominant ADC decrease in only the cerebral cortex (n = 8; pattern I); an ADC decrease in both the cerebral cortex and white matter (WM) and a predominant decrease in the WM (n = 9; pattern II); and a predominant ADC decrease in only the WM (n = 3; pattern III). Conclusion: Pattern I is cerebral cortical injury, suggesting cortical laminar necrosis in hypoxic brain injury. Pattern II is cerebral cortical and WM injury, frequently seen in brain death, while pattern 3 is mainly WM injury, especially found in hypoglycaemic brain injury. It is likely that pattern I is decorticate injury and pattern II is decerebrate injury in hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.Patterns I and II are found in severe hypoxic brain injury, and pattern II is frequently shown in brain death, whereas pattern III was found in severe hypoglycaemic injury.

  14. Dual mechanisms underlying accentuation of risky drinking via fraternity/sorority affiliation: the role of personality, peer norms, and alcohol availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Aesoon; Sher, Kenneth J; Wood, Phillip K; Krull, Jennifer L

    2009-05-01

    Heavy drinkers prior to college have been shown to increase their drinking in college via their self-selection into the Greek societies and subsequent Greek influence on their drinking. This study characterized the dual mechanisms underlying these processes: (a) the Greek selection on the basis of personality and precollege drinking and (b) the Greek influence through alcohol-conducive environmental factors. Prospective data obtained in the summer prior to college and over the first 6 semesters of college (N = 3,099) indicated strong precollege drinking-based selection, strong initial influence immediately after college entrance, and sustained influence afterward. Impulsivity/novelty seeking was associated with Greek affiliation both directly and indirectly via precollege drinking, whereas extraversion and neuroticism were associated with Greek affiliation largely independent of precollege drinking. Greek affiliation was related to higher levels of drinking norms immediately after college entrance and alcohol availability by the sophomore year, but not afterward, after controlling for prior drinking. Findings highlight the diverse mechanisms underlying accentuation of risky drinking over the transition to college and during the college years, through dynamic interplay between individuals and high-risk environments.

  15. The global burden of typhoid fever

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crump, John A; Luby, Stephen P; Mintz, Eric D

    2004-01-01

    To use new data to make a revised estimate of the global burden of typhoid fever, an accurate understanding of which is necessary to guide public health decisions for disease control and prevention efforts...

  16. Transfusion support in patients with dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever has emerged as a global public health problem in the recent decades. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from dengue fever to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The disease is characterized by increased capillary permeability, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Thrombocytopenia with hemorrhagic manifestations warrants platelet transfusions. There is lack of evidence-based guidelines for transfusion support in patients with dengue fever. This contributes to inappropriate use of blood components and blood centers constantly face the challenge of inventory management during dengue outbreaks. The current review is aimed to highlight the role of platelets and other blood components in the management of dengue. The review was performed after searching relevant published literature in PubMed, Science Direct, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles.

  17. A Physician's Nightmare: Fever of Unknown Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Sana; Anwer, Farrukh; Beg, Mirza

    2016-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains to be a challenge despite advancement in diagnostic technologies and procedures. FUO is considered when fever presents intermittently without an explanation. It has been linked to various etiologies, which makes it difficult to diagnose. We present the case of 18-month-old female with recurrent fever, splenomegaly, abdominal pain, and constipation. The workup for her symptoms revealed wandering spleen. Wandering spleen is a result from excessive laxity or absence of splenic ligaments. The patient underwent splenectomy and was advised to continue on Senna, Miralax, and high fiber diet. Her mother reported that the fever is no longer present and there is marked improvement in her constipation and abdominal pain after splenectomy.

  18. Travelers' Health: Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or convalescent person or a chronic, asymptomatic carrier. Transmission through sexual contact, especially among men who have sex with ... fever even during visits of countries where the disease is highly endemic (such as India, Pakistan, or ...

  19. Mothers' Perception of Fever Management in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    Department of Paediatrics, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt,. Nigeria. ... commonest reasons parents bring their children for medical attention. ... 2,4,12-13 skills regarding fever and its management. These fears. 2.

  20. Subacute fulminant hepatic failure with intermittent fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong-Xin Chen; Bo Liu; Yong Hu; Joyce E. Johnson; Yi-Wei Tang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Viral hepatitis B accounts for over 80%of acute hepatic failures in China and the patients die mainly of its complications. A patient with hepatic failure and fever is not uncommon, whereas repeated fever is rare. METHODS:A 32-year-old female was diagnosed with subacute hepatic failure and hepatitis B viral infection because of hyperbilirubinemia, coagulopathy, hepatic encephalopathy, serum anti-HBs-positive without hepatitis B vaccination, and typical intrahepatic pathological features of chronic hepatitis B. Plasma exchange was administered twice and she awoke with hyperbilirubinemia and discontinuous fever. RESULTS:Urethritis was conifrmed and medication-induced fever and/or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (Gram-negative bacillus infection) was suspected. The patient was treated with antibiotics, steroids and a Chinese herbal medicine, matrine, for three months and she recovered. CONCLUSION:The survival rate of patients with hepatic failure might be improved with comprehensive supporting measures and appropriate, timely management of com-plications.

  1. Typhoid Fever: The Challenges of Medical Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bowel. Typhoid fever still remains a major public health problem in ... Health Education. Knowledge is limited about many infectious diseases ... equate doses of antibiotics. Another maj or ... Resistance to chloramphenicol developed two years.

  2. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    particle for some), the haemorrhagic fever (HF)-causing viruses have to be handled .... The filoviruses. The filoviruses, EVD and MVD viruses, are known to cause highly .... attributed to a previously unknown arenavirus, dubbed the Lujo virus.

  3. FastStats: Allergies/Hay Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Disease and Cirrhosis Kidney Disease Oral and Dental Health Respiratory and Allergies Allergies and Hay Fever Asthma ... Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ...

  4. When the child has a fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Fever in a child is usually due to a self-limiting viral infection, with recovery occurring quickly without intervention. However, fever may also be the presenting feature of severe illnesses such as meningitis, septicaemia, urinary tract infections and pneumonia, and trying to exclude such causes is a key part of management. In a review 17 years ago, we concluded that there was no evidence that reducing fever improved the outcome of childhood infections, but that it probably alleviated distress and discomfort caused by fever. We also advised that parents should give paracetamol only if the child seemed uncomfortable or had previously had a febrile convulsion, and said that tepid sponging may further comfort the child, while recognising evidence that it added little to the effect of paracetamol alone. Does this advice still hold?

  5. Spontaneous splenic rupture in typhoid fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, G; Kamili, M. A.; Rashid, S; Mansoor, A; Lone, B. A.; Allaqaband, G. Q.

    1994-01-01

    Three cases of multidrug-resistant Salmonella typhi infection presenting as spontaneous splenic rupture are presented. One patient died and two recovered completely. This is a previously unreported presentation of typhoid fever.

  6. A case of ADEM following Chikungunya fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Pranab; Roy, Pinaki; Basu, Arindam; Das, Biman; Ghosh, U S

    2014-05-01

    Chikungunya most often is a self-limiting febrile illness with polyarthritis and the virus is not known to be neurotropic. We are reporting a case of chikugunya fever presenting as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis(ADEM) which is very rare.

  7. Tick-borne relapsing fever in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, C T

    1980-12-01

    Three cases of tick-borne fever diagnosed during the summer of 1979 are reported and the ecoepidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of this infection are reviewed. Although challenging, the diagnosis can be made easily if specific historical clues are sought and the patient's blood smear is carefully examined. The diagnosis of this condition early in its course can save clinicians and patients the anxiety and cost of the work-up of a "fever of unknown origin." Since vacationing in the national parks and forests has become increasingly popular among many American families, tick-borne relapsing fever should be considered in any patient with an acute or recurrent fever of unknown origin who exhibits nonspecific symptoms of an undifferentiated "viral illness," and who gives a history of sleeping overnight in log cabins in the coniferous forests of the Western mountains of the United States.

  8. Ebola haemorrhagic fever among hospitalised children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ebola haemorrhagic fever among hospitalised children and adolescents in nothern Uganda ... African Health Sciences ... Conclusion : Similar to previous Ebola outbreaks, a relative sparing of children in this outbreak was observed. The under ...

  9. Lassa fever presenting as acute abdomen: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Dongo, Andrew E.; Kesieme, Emeka B.; Iyamu, Christopher E; Okokhere, Peter O.; Akhuemokhan, Odigie C.; Akpede, George O.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa fever, an endemic zoonotic viral infection in West Africa, presents with varied symptoms including fever, vomiting, retrosternal pain, abdominal pain, sore-throat, mucosal bleeding, seizures and coma. When fever and abdominal pain are the main presenting symptoms, and a diagnosis of acute abdomen is entertained, Lassa fever is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis, even in endemic areas. Rather the diagnosis of Lassa fever is suspected only after surgical intervention. Therefo...

  10. Vaccines for preventing typhoid fever (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Anwar, Elspeth; Goldberg, Elad; Fraser, Abigail; Acosta, Camilo J.; Paul, Mical; Leibovici, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Background\\ud Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever continue to be important causes of illness and death, particularly among children and adolescents in south-central and southeast Asia. Two typhoid vaccines are commercially available, Ty21a (oral) and Vi polysaccharide (parenteral), but neither is used routinely. Other vaccines, such as a new, modified, conjugated Vi vaccine called Vi-rEPA, are in development.\\ud \\ud Objectives\\ud To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of vaccines used t...

  11. Isolated fever induced by mesalamine treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Slim, Rita; Amara, Joseph; Nasnas, Roy; Honein, Khalil; Jaoude, Joseph Bou; Yaghi, Cesar; Daniel, Fady; Sayegh, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Adverse reactions to mesalamine, a treatment used to induce and maintain remission in inflammatory bowel diseases, particularly ulcerative colitis, have been described in the literature as case reports. This case illustrates an unusual adverse reaction. Our patient developed an isolated fever of unexplained etiology, which was found to be related to mesalamine treatment. A 22-year-old patient diagnosed with ulcerative colitis developed a fever with rigors and anorexia 10 d after starting oral...

  12. Malignant causes of fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foggo, Vanessa; Cavenagh, Jamie

    2015-06-01

    The presence of fever in malignancy usually indicates infection, though transfusion, thrombosis and drugs are also culprits. However, particularly in some tumour types, fever can also be a paraneoplastic syndrome, caused by the malignancy itself. This can be a difficult diagnosis to establish and presents a therapeutic challenge to the physician when the underlying malignancy is not easily treated. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  13. Fever of unknown origin caused by tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofinger, Jason J; Schlossberg, David

    2007-12-01

    Tuberculosis is an important cause of fever of unknown origin. Travel, age, dialysis, diabetes, birth in a country with a high prevalence of tuberculosis, and immunoincompetence are among the most salient risks. Associated physical findings, radiologic evaluation, and hematologic and endocrinologic abnormalities may provide clues to the diagnosis. Both noninvasive and invasive diagnostic modalities are reviewed. Because diagnosis may be elusive, therapeutic and diagnostic trials of antituberculous therapy should be considered in all patients with fever of unknown origin who defy diagnosis.

  14. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veloso Henrique Horta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  15. Evaluation of Children with Recurrent Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Sertan Kara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Data on recurrent fever in children is limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the children with this common symptom. Material and Method: We enrolled 138 patients with frequent fever. Twelve febrile episodes/year was determined as the cut-off for %u201Crecurrent fever%u201D. Children with %u226412 and >12 febrile episodes/year were included in Group I and Group II, respectively. Their demographic data, symptoms, and clinical and laboratory findings were compared. All children were followed for two years for definitive diagnosis.Results: Fifty-four (39.1% children experienced recurrent fever according to our criteria. Group I children experienced more frequent sneezing, whereas Group II children experienced more frequent vomiting compared to the other group (p=0.05 and p=0.02, respectively. Febrile episodes were seen more frequently in the winter season in Group I compared to Group II (p=0.03. Age, sex, other clinical symptoms, physical examination findings, and attendance at day care center/school in two groups were not different. Group II children had higher C-reactive protein levels (p=0.001. There was no difference in other laboratory parameters between the two groups. After two years, two patients in Group II were diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever syndrome and immunoglobulin-G2 subgroup deficiency, while one patient in Group I was diagnosed with periodic fever, aphtous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis syndrome. Discussion: To investigate only those children presenting with fever episodes of at least once a month may not be discriminative. To construct an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment, it would be better to follow recurrent fever patients for a longer duration rather than initially categorizing them according to the number of episodes.

  16. Familial Mediterranean fever--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohat, Mordechai; Halpern, Gabrielle J

    2011-06-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. There are two phenotypes: types 1 and 2. Familial Mediterranean fever type 1 is characterized by recurrent short episodes of inflammation and serositis, including fever, peritonitis, synovitis, pleuritis, and, rarely, pericarditis. The symptoms and severity vary among affected individuals, sometimes even among members of the same family. Amyloidosis, which can lead to renal failure, is the most severe complication. Familial Mediterranean fever type 2 is characterized by amyloidosis as the first clinical manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever in an otherwise asymptomatic individual. Routine treatment of end-stage renal disease, including renal transplantation, is advised. Lifelong treatment with colchicine is required for homozygotes for the p.Met694Val mutation or compound heterozygotes for p.Met694Val and another disease-causing allele; this prevents the inflammatory attacks and the deposition of amyloid. Individuals who do not have the p.Met694Val mutation and who are only mildly affected should be either treated with colchicine or monitored every 6 months for the presence of proteinuria. Molecular genetic testing of the MEFV gene, the only gene currently known to be associated with familial Mediterranean fever, can be offered to family members, especially when the p.Met694Val allele is present, because renal amyloidosis can be prevented by colchicine.

  17. Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougeron, V; Feldmann, H; Grard, G; Becker, S; Leroy, E M

    2015-03-01

    Ebolaviruses and Marburgviruses (family Filoviridae) are among the most virulent pathogens for humans and great apes causing severe haemorrhagic fever and death within a matter of days. This group of viruses is characterized by a linear, non-segmented, single-stranded RNA genome of negative polarity. The overall burden of filovirus infections is minimal and negligible compared to the devastation caused by malnutrition and other infectious diseases prevalent in Africa such as malaria, dengue or tuberculosis. In this paper, we review the knowledge gained on the eco/epidemiology, the pathogenesis and the disease control measures for Marburg and Ebola viruses developed over the last 15 years. The overall progress is promising given the little attention that these pathogen have achieved in the past; however, more is to come over the next decade given the more recent interest in these pathogens as potential public and animal health concerns. Licensing of therapeutic and prophylactic options may be achievable over the next 5-10 years.

  18. Familial Mediterranean fever in siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özçakar, Z Birsin; Erdogan, Beyza Doganay; Elhan, Atilla H; Yalçinkaya, Fatoş

    2012-11-01

    Genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in disease severity and development of amyloidosis in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). We investigated similarities in clinical characteristics, disease severity, and treatment response within siblings with FMF. The study group consisted of 2 or more siblings who were followed in our center with the diagnosis of FMF. Siblings were evaluated for demographic data, clinical and laboratory disease features, genetic analysis of MEFV mutations, and disease severity score. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), which can be interpreted as the expected correlation between 2 siblings, was used to reflect within-family similarity. The study included 67 pediatric patients from 31 different families. When we investigated the similarity of siblings after adjusting for genetic effects, we found very low ICC with p > 0.05 in the majority of clinical features, disease severity, and colchicine dosages. However, age at disease onset, age at onset of therapy, attack-free acute-phase reactant levels, and presence of amyloidosis were found to be similar within siblings (relatively high ICC with p < 0.05). Siblings with FMF had different clinical findings and disease severity. They had similar amyloidogenic potential, proven by both similar presence of amyloid and increased levels of acute-phase reactants between attacks. Our findings strongly support that genetic factors may be more dominant in the development of amyloidosis.

  19. Fever and abdominal tumoral masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustin C. Dima

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available 49 year-old man presented to our clinic for pain in the right hypochondrium, diarrhea, and fever. The clinical examination highlights a tumoral formation in the right side of the abdomen, with firm consistency, poorly defined margins, and present mobility in the deep structures. On biological exams, leukocytosis with neutrophilia, inflammatory syndrome, and hypoalbuminaemia were identified. The first computed tomography exam described parietal thickening of the ascending colon, with infiltrative aspect, and multiple local adenopathies, lomboaortic and interaortocave. Moreover, four nodular liver tumors, with hypodense image in native examination, were identified. The lab tests for infectious diseases were all inconclusives: three hemocultures, three stool samples, and three coproparasitological exams were all negatives. Interdisciplinary examinations, internal medicine and infectious diseases, sustained the diagnosis of colonic neoplasm with peritumoral abscess and liver pseudo-tumoral masses. The colonoscopy did not revealed any bowel lesions relevant for neoplasia. This result as well as the bio-clinical context imposed abstention from surgical intervention. Wide spectrum antibiotics and symptomatic treatment were initiated. But, ten days after hospitalization, the second computed tomography exam showed reduction of the ascending colon wall thickness associated with significant increases of the liver tumors is so revealed. The investigations for other possible etiologies were so continued.

  20. Accentuation-suppression and scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Alrik; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The limitations of the visual short-term memory (VSTM) system have become an increasingly popular field of study. One line of inquiry has focused on the way attention selects objects for encoding into VSTM. Using the framework of the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA; Bundesen, 1990 Psychological...

  1. The Oral Accentuation of Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, W. Sidney

    1967-01-01

    A brief review of theory and traditional approaches to the problem of oral reading of Greek dating from the fall of Constantinople (1453) focuses on the importance of two major linguistic features of Byzantine pronunciation. The first examines the nature of the dynamic (stress) accent and the second is concerned with differences in vowel lengths…

  2. Bilingualism Accentuates Children's Conversational Understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Siegal; Luca Surian; Ayumi Matsuo; Alessandra Geraci; Laura Iozzi; Yuko Okumura; Shoji Itakura

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although bilingualism is prevalent throughout the world, little is known about the extent to which it influences children's conversational understanding. Our investigation involved children aged 3-6 years exposed to one or more of four major languages: English, German, Italian, and Japanese. In two experiments, we examined the children's ability to identify responses to questions as violations of conversational maxims (to be informative and avoid redundancy, to speak the truth, be...

  3. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  4. [Surveillance data on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever in 2015, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F F; Zhao, S L; Chen, Q; Chang, Z R; Zhang, J; Zheng, Y M; Luo, L; Ran, L; Liao, Q H

    2017-06-10

    Objective: Through analyzing the surveillance data on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever in 2015 to understand the related epidemiological features and most possible clustering areas of high incidence. Methods: Individual data was collected from the passive surveillance program and analyzed by descriptive statistic method. Characteristics on seasonal, regional and distribution of the diseases were described. Spatial-temporal clustering characteristics were estimated, under the retrospective space-time method. Results: A total of 8 850 typhoid fever cases were reported from the surveillance system, with incidence rate as 0.65/100 000. The number of paratyphoid fever cases was 2 794, with incidence rate as 0.21/100 000. Both cases of typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever occurred all year round, with high epidemic season from May to October. Most cases involved farmers (39.68%), children (15.89%) and students (12.01%). Children under 5 years showed the highest incidence rate. Retrospective space-time analysis for provinces with high incidence rates would include Yunnan, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hunan and Guangdong, indicating the first and second class clusters were mainly distributed near the bordering adjacent districts and counties among the provinces. Conclusion: In 2015, the prevalence rates of typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever were low, however with regional high prevalence areas. Cross regional transmission existed among provinces with high incidence rates which might be responsible for the clusters to appear in these areas.

  5. Tick bite fever and Q fever — a South African perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lnirnctii, the cause of Q fever, is also widespread in the region, it is far less often identified as a cause of human disease. These two conditions are the focus of this brief review. ... Molecular taxonomic methods based on ribosomal and other ..... unknown origin. .... with clinical and serological evidence of African tick-bite fever.

  6. Chronic Q fever in the Netherlands 5 years after the start of the Q fever epidemic: results from the Dutch chronic Q fever database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, L.M.; Delsing, C.E.; Groenwold, R.H.; Wegdam-Blans, M.C.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; Jager-Leclercq, M.G. De; Hoepelman, A.I.; Kasteren, M.E.E. van; Buijs, J.; Renders, N.H.; Nabuurs-Franssen, M.H.; Oosterheert, J.J.; Wever, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii causes Q fever, a zoonosis, which has acute and chronic manifestations. From 2007 to 2010, the Netherlands experienced a large Q fever outbreak, which has offered a unique opportunity to analyze chronic Q fever cases. In an observational cohort study, baseline characteristics and

  7. Yellow fever vaccination in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Outbreaks of yellow fever in recent years in the Americas have prompted concern about the possible urbanization of jungle fever. Vaccination, using the 17D strain of yellow fever virus, provides an effective, practical method of large scale protection against the disease. Because yellow fever can reappear in certain areas after a 2-year dormancy period, some countries maintain routine vaccination programs in areas where jungle yellow fever is endemic. The size of the endemic area (approximately half of South America), transportation and communication difficulties, and the inability to ensure a reliable cold chain are problems facing these programs. In addition, the problem of reaching dispersed and isolated populations has been addressed by the use of mobile teams, radio monitoring, and educational methods. During yellow fever outbreaks, many countries institute massive vaccination campaigns, targeted at temporary workers and migrants. Because epidemics in South America may involve extensive areas, these campaigns may not effectively address the problem. The ped-o-jet injector method, used in Brazil and Colombia, should be used in outbreak situations, as it is effective for large-scale vaccination. Vaccine by needle, suggested for maintenance programs, should be administered to those above 1 year of age. An efficient monitoring method to avoid revaccination, and to assess immunity, should be developed. The 17D strain produces seroconversion in 95% of recipients, and most is prepared in Brazil and Colombia. But, problems with storage methods, instability in seed lots, and difficulties in large-scale production were identified in 1981 by the Pan American Health Organization and WHO. The group recommended modernization of current production techniques and further research to develop a vaccine that could be produced in cell cultures. Brazil and Colombia have acted on these recommendations, modernizing vaccine production and researching thermostabilizing media for

  8. Hepatic involvement in dengue Fever in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadishkumar, Kalenahalli; Jain, Puja; Manjunath, Vaddambal G; Umesh, Lingappa

    2012-06-01

    Hepatic dysfunction is common in dengue infection and the degree of liver dysfunction in children varies from mild injury with elevation of transaminases to severe injury with jaundice. This study was undertaken to assess the spectrum of hepatic involvement in dengue infection. 110 children with serologically positive dengue fever aged between 2 months - 14 years were studied for their hepatic functions both clinically and biochemically after excluding malaria, enteric fever, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B with relevant investigations. All cases were grouped into DF (Dengue fever), DHF (Dengue hemorrhagic fever) and DSS (Dengue shock syndrome) according to WHO criteria. The spectrum of hepatic manifestations included hepatomegaly (79%), hepatic tenderness (56%), jaundice (4.5%), raised levels of aspartate transaminase (AST)(93%), alanine transaminase (ALT)(78%), alkaline phosphatase (AP) (57%), prolonged prothrombin time (PT) (20%), reduced levels of serum albumin (66%) and abnormal abdomen ultrasound (65%). Hepatic dysfunction was observed more in DHF and DSS group compared to DF group. About 17.27% of children had >10 fold increase in the liver enzymes. There was no correlation between the degree of hepatic enlargement or hepatic tenderness with the abnormalities of liver functions. Any child with fever, jaundice and tender hepatomegaly in geographical areas where dengue is endemic, the diagnosis of dengue infection should be strongly considered.

  9. Fever after maxillofacial surgery: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christabel, Amelia; Sharma, Ravi; Manikandhan, R; Anantanarayanan, P; Elavazhagan, N; Subash, Pramod

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the pathophysiology of thermoregulation mechanism, various causes of fever after maxillofacial surgery and the different treatment protocols advised in the literature. Fever is one of the most common complaints after major surgery and is also considered to be an important clinical sign which indicates developing pathology that may go unnoticed by the clinician during post operative period. Several factors are responsible for fever after the maxillofacial surgery, inflammation and infection being the commonest. However, other rare causes such as drug allergy, dehydration, malignancy and endocrinological disorders, etc. should be ruled out prior to any definite diagnosis and initiate the treatment. Proper history and clinical examination is an essential tool to predict the causative factors for fever. Common cooling methods like tepid sponging are usually effective alone or in conjunction with analgesics to reduce the temperature. Fever is a common postoperative complaint and should not be underestimated as it may indicate a more serious underlying pathology. A specific guideline towards the management of such patients is necessary in every hospital setting to ensure optimal care towards the patients during post operative period.

  10. Fever and antipyretic use in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Janice E; Farrar, Henry C

    2011-03-01

    Fever in a child is one of the most common clinical symptoms managed by pediatricians and other health care providers and a frequent cause of parental concern. Many parents administer antipyretics even when there is minimal or no fever, because they are concerned that the child must maintain a "normal" temperature. Fever, however, is not the primary illness but is a physiologic mechanism that has beneficial effects in fighting infection. There is no evidence that fever itself worsens the course of an illness or that it causes long-term neurologic complications. Thus, the primary goal of treating the febrile child should be to improve the child's overall comfort rather than focus on the normalization of body temperature. When counseling the parents or caregivers of a febrile child, the general well-being of the child, the importance of monitoring activity, observing for signs of serious illness, encouraging appropriate fluid intake, and the safe storage of antipyretics should be emphasized. Current evidence suggests that there is no substantial difference in the safety and effectiveness of acetaminophen and ibuprofen in the care of a generally healthy child with fever. There is evidence that combining these 2 products is more effective than the use of a single agent alone; however, there are concerns that combined treatment may be more complicated and contribute to the unsafe use of these drugs. Pediatricians should also promote patient safety by advocating for simplified formulations, dosing instructions, and dosing devices.

  11. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Manuel; Karanikas, Georgios; Kerschbaumer, Andreas; Winkler, Stefan; Aletaha, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) was originally characterised in 1961 by Petersdorf and Beeson as a disease condition of temperature exceeding 38.3 °C on at least three occasions over a period of at least three weeks, with no diagnosis made despite one week of inpatient investigation. However, since underlying diseases are often reported for classical FUO, these presentations may not be considered to be of "unknown origin". Rather, the aetiology of prolonged fever may resolve, or not resolve. The definition of fever with unresolved cause (true FUO) is difficult, as it is a moving target, given the constant advancement of imaging and biomarker analysis. Therefore, the prevalence of fever with unresolved cause (FUO) is unknown.In this review, we report such a case of prolonged fever, which initially has presented as classical FUO, and discuss current literature. Furthermore, we will give an outlook, how a prospective study on FUO will allow to solve outstanding issues like the utility of different diagnostic investigations, and the types and prevalence of various underlying diseases.

  12. Differentiating PFAPA syndrome from monogenic periodic fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattorno, Marco; Caorsi, Roberta; Meini, Antonella; Cattalini, Marco; Federici, Silvia; Zulian, Francesco; Cortis, Elisabetta; Calcagno, Giuseppina; Tommasini, Alberto; Consolini, Rita; Simonini, Gabriele; Pelagatti, Maria Antonietta; Baldi, Maurizia; Ceccherini, Isabella; Plebani, Alessandro; Frenkel, Joost; Sormani, Maria Pia; Martini, Alberto

    2009-10-01

    To analyze whether there were clinical differences between genetically positive and negative patients fulfilling periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome criteria and to test the accuracy of the Gaslini diagnostic score for identifying patients with PFAPA syndrome with higher probabilities of carrying relevant mutations in genes associated with periodic fevers. Complete clinical and genetic information was available for 393 children with periodic fever; 82 had positive genetic test results, 75 had incomplete genetic test results, and 236 had negative results for MVK, TNFRSF1A, and MEFV mutations. Current diagnostic criteria for PFAPA syndrome were applied. Of 393 children, 210 satisfied PFAPA syndrome criteria; 43 carried diagnostic mutations (mevalonate kinase deficiency: n = 33; tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome: n = 3; familial Mediterranean fever: n = 7), 37 displayed low-penetrance mutations or incomplete genotypes, and 130 demonstrated negative genetic testing results. Genetically positive patients had higher frequencies of abdominal pain and diarrhea (P < .001), vomiting (P = .006), and cutaneous rash and arthralgia (P = .01). Genetically negative patients had a higher frequency of exudative pharyngitis (P = .010). Genetically undetermined patients showed the same pattern of symptom frequency as genetically negative patients. The Gaslini diagnostic score was able to identify 91% of genetically positive patients correctly, with a global accuracy of 66%. The Gaslini diagnostic score represents a useful tool to identify patients meeting PFAPA syndrome criteria and at low risk of carrying relevant mutations in genes associated with periodic fevers.

  13. Optimal Repellent Usage to Combat Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsett, Chasity; Oh, Hyunju; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Rychtář, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Dengue fever is one of the most important vector-borne diseases. It is transmitted by Aedes Stegomyia aegypti, and one of the most effective strategies to combat the disease is the reduction of exposure to bites of these mosquitoes. In this paper, we present a game-theoretical model in which individuals choose their own level of protection against mosquito bites in order to maximize their own benefits, effectively balancing the cost of protection and the risk of contracting the dengue fever. We find that even when the usage of protection is strictly voluntary, as soon as the cost of protection is about 10,000 times less than the cost of contracting dengue fever, the optimal level of protection will be within 5 % of the level needed for herd immunity.

  14. Lost trust: a yellow fever patient response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, John S

    2013-12-13

    In the 19th century, yellow fever thrived in the tropical, urban trade centers along the American Gulf Coast. Industrializing and populated, New Orleans and Memphis made excellent habitats for the yellow fever-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the virulence they imparted on their victims. Known for its jaundice and black, blood-filled vomit, the malady terrorized the region for decades, sometimes claiming tens of thousands of lives during the near annual summertime outbreaks. In response to the failing medical community, a small, pronounced population of sick and healthy laypeople openly criticized the efforts to rid the Gulf region of yellow jack. Utilizing newspapers and cartoons to vocalize their opinions, these critics doubted and mocked the medical community, contributing to the regional and seasonal dilemma yellow fever posed for the American South. These sentient expressions prove to be an early example of patient distrust toward caregivers, a current problem in clinical heath care.

  15. Fever: suppress or let it ride?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Juliet J; Schulman, Carl I

    2015-12-01

    While our ability to detect and manage fever has evolved since its conceptualization in the 5(th) century BC, controversy remains over the best evidence-based practices regarding if and when to treat this physiologic derangement in the critically ill. There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic benefit in an already stressed host; vs. (II) fever is a protective adaptive response that should be allowed to run its course under most circumstances. The latter approach, sometime referred to as the "let it ride" philosophy, has been supported by several recent randomized controlled trials like that of Young et al. [2015], which are challenging earlier observational studies and may be pushing the pendulum away from the Pavlovian treatment response.

  16. Rift Valley fever: the Nigerian story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale A. Adeyeye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF is an arthropod-borne zoonotic disease of livestock. It is characterised by fever, salivation, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, mucopurulent to bloody nasal discharge, abortion, rapid decrease in milk production and death in animals. Infected humans experience an influenza-like illness that is characterised by fever, malaise, headaches, nausea and epigastric pain followed by recovery, although mortality can occur. RVF was thought to be a disease of sub-Saharan Africa but with the outbreaks in Egypt and the Arabian Peninsula, it may be extending its range further afield. Virological and serological evidence indicates that the virus exists in Nigeria and, with the warning signal sent by international organisations to countries in Africa about an impending outbreak, co-ordinated research between veterinarians and physicians in Nigeria is advocated.

  17. A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, Barry S

    2007-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious, generalized infection that is spread to humans through the bite of infected ticks. It can be lethal but it is curable. The disease gets its name from the Rocky Mountain region where it was first identified in 1896. The fever is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii and is maintained in nature in a complex life cycle involving ticks and mammals. Humans are considered to be accidental hosts and are not involved in the natural transmission cycle of this pathogen. The author examined a 47-year-old woman during a periodic recall appointment. The patient had no dental problems other than the need for routine prophylaxis but mentioned a recent problem with swelling of her extremities with an accompanying rash and general malaise and soreness in her neck region. Tests were conducted and a diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was made.

  18. Hemophagocytic syndrome in classic dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantan Ray

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old previously healthy girl presented with persistent fever, headache, and jaundice. Rapid-test anti-dengue virus IgM antibody was positive but anti-dengue IgG was nonreactive, which is suggestive of primary dengue infection. There was clinical deterioration during empiric antibiotic and symptomatic therapy. Bone marrow examination demonstrated the presence of hemophagocytosis. Diagnosis of dengue fever with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome was made according to the diagnostic criteria of the HLH 2004 protocol of the Histiocyte Society. The patient recovered with corticosteroid therapy. A review of literature revealed only a handful of case reports that showed the evidence that this syndrome is caused by dengue virus. Our patient is an interesting case of hemophagocytic syndrome associated with classic dengue fever and contributes an additional case to the existing literature on this topic. This case highlights the need for increased awareness even in infections not typically associated with hemophagocytic syndrome.

  19. Hemophagocytic syndrome in classic dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sayantan; Kundu, Supratip; Saha, Manjari; Chakrabarti, Prantar

    2011-10-01

    A 24-year-old previously healthy girl presented with persistent fever, headache, and jaundice. Rapid-test anti-dengue virus IgM antibody was positive but anti-dengue IgG was nonreactive, which is suggestive of primary dengue infection. There was clinical deterioration during empiric antibiotic and symptomatic therapy. Bone marrow examination demonstrated the presence of hemophagocytosis. Diagnosis of dengue fever with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome was made according to the diagnostic criteria of the HLH 2004 protocol of the Histiocyte Society. The patient recovered with corticosteroid therapy. A review of literature revealed only a handful of case reports that showed the evidence that this syndrome is caused by dengue virus. Our patient is an interesting case of hemophagocytic syndrome associated with classic dengue fever and contributes an additional case to the existing literature on this topic. This case highlights the need for increased awareness even in infections not typically associated with hemophagocytic syndrome.

  20. Effect of (social) media on the political figure fever model: Jokowi-fever model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Benny; Samat, Nor Azah

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, political figures begin to utilize social media as one of alternative to engage in communication with their supporters. Publics referred to Jokowi, one of the candidates in Indonesia presidential election in 2014, as the first politician in Indonesia to truly understand the power of social media. Social media is very important in shaping public opinion. In this paper, effect of social media on the Jokowi-fever model in a closed population will be discussed. Supporter population is divided into three class sub-population, i.e susceptible supporters, Jokowi infected supporters, and recovered supporters. For case no positive media, there are two equilibrium points; the Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio less than one and the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio greater than one. For case no negative media, there is only the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if the condition is satisfied. Generally, for case positive media proportion is positive, there is no Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point. The numerical result shows that social media gives significantly effect on Jokowi-fever model, a sharp increase or a sharp decrease in the number of Jokowi infected supporters. It is also shown that the boredom rate is one of the sensitive parameters in the Jokowi-fever model; it affects the number of Jokowi infected supporters.

  1. Familial Mediterranean fever: An updated review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, İsmail; Birlik, Merih; Kasifoğlu, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder characterised by acute attacks of fever and serosal inflammation. FMF primarily affects Jewish, Armenian, Turkish, and Arab populations. The disease is accompanied by a marked decrease in quality of life due to the effects of attacks and subclinical inflammation in the attack-free periods. Untreated or inadequately treated patients run the risk of amyloidosis, which is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. In this review, the current information available on FMF is summarised. PMID:27708867

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Rift Valley fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobbelaar, Antoinette A; Weyer, Jacqueline; Leman, Patricia A; Kemp, Alan; Paweska, Janusz T; Swanepoel, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were examined for 198 Rift Valley fever virus isolates and 5 derived strains obtained from various sources in Saudi Arabia and 16 countries in Africa during a 67-year period (1944-2010). A maximum-likelihood tree prepared with sequence data for a 490-nt section of the Gn glycoprotein gene showed that 95 unique sequences sorted into 15 lineages. A 2010 isolate from a patient in South Africa potentially exposed to co-infection with live animal vaccine and wild virus was a reassortant. The potential influence of large-scale use of live animal vaccine on evolution of Rift Valley fever virus is discussed.

  3. [Q fever, a zoonosis often overlooked].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaloye, J; Greub, G

    2013-04-24

    Q fever is a zoonosis caused by an intracellular Gram-negative bacteria, Coxiella burnetii. Animals are the main reservoir and transmission to men generally is occurring by inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Acute Q fever generally is benign and usually resolves spontaneously. When symptomatic, the clinical presentation typically includes one of the following three syndromes: a flu-like illness, a granulomatous hepatitis or an atypical pneumonia. Individuals presenting risk factors such as patients with valvular heart diseases and vascular prostheses, as well as pregnant women and immuno-suppressed patients represent a population at risk of chronic infection, with endocarditis as the most common clinical form.

  4. Infectious causes of fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Alastair C; Moore, David A

    2015-06-01

    The causes of fever of unknown origin (FUO) are changing because advances in clinical practice and diagnostics have facilitated the identification of some infections. A variety of bacterial infections can cause FUO, and these can be divided into those that are easy to identify using culture and those that require serological or molecular tests for identification. A number of viral, parasitic and fungal infections can also cause prolonged fever. This article summarises the clinical features and diagnostic strategy of these infections. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  5. [Fever of unknown origin in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertucci, José Roberto; Avila, Renata Eliane de; Voieta, Izabela

    2005-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin has been defined as axillary temperature higher than 37.8 degrees C on several occasions, persisting without diagnosis for at least 3 weeks in spite of at least 1 week's investigation in hospital. Lately, the definition has been modified and extended to reflect evolutionary changes in clinical practice. In response to this new evolving environment, cases of fever of unknown origin are currently classified as: classic, nosocomial, in neutropenia, and human immunodeficiency virus-related. The objective of our review was to try and define and to update the information on the subject.

  6. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) revised

    OpenAIRE

    Unger, Manuel; Karanikas, Georgios; Kerschbaumer, Andreas; Winkler, Stefan; Aletaha, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Fever of unknown origin (FUO) was originally characterised in 1961 by Petersdorf and Beeson as a disease condition of temperature exceeding 38.3 °C on at least three occasions over a period of at least three weeks, with no diagnosis made despite one week of inpatient investigation. However, since underlying diseases are often reported for classical FUO, these presentations may not be considered to be of “unknown origin”. Rather, the aetiology of prolonged fever may resolve, or not res...

  7. [What is happening to acute rheumatic fever?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stéphan, J L

    1994-12-01

    Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease of the heart, joints, central nervous system and subcutaneous tissues that develops after a nasopharyngeal infection by one of the group A beta-haemolytic streptococci. The pathogenesis remains an enigma. As the disease has been less florid and some of the more characteristic manifestations less common in developed countries, it has become more difficult to establish the diagnosis on clinical grounds. Rheumatic fever and its sequellae are still active in developing countries. Carditis is a dominant feature of this social disease. Renewed educational efforts concerning this preventable disorder are needed among both physicians and the public.

  8. Chikungunya fever: current status in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Nava-Frías

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya fever is a tropical vector-borne disease that has been spreading rapidly around the world during the last 10 years, and which has been usually misdiagnosed as dengue. Nowadays, this disease is increasing in Mexico, mainly in the southern and central zones of the country, being significantly more common in women, children and young adults (28% in < 20 years of age. The classical presentation includes fever, arthralgia, polyarthritis, back-pain, and skin rashes. Although symptoms and treatment are similar to those for dengue, there are key clinical features to differentiate these two diseases.

  9. Reducing Fever in Children: Safe Use of Acetaminophen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Reducing Fever in Children: Safe Use of Acetaminophen Share Tweet ... re in the drug store, looking for a fever-reducing medicine for your children. They range in ...

  10. Typhoid Fever in Southern Taiwan: A Medical Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ren Yu

    2008-08-01

    Conclusion: Pediatric patients with typhoid fever in southern Taiwan had less history of travel and developed fewer chills than adult patients. Careful examination and familiarity with the clinical manifestations are important factors in the early diagnosis of typhoid fever.

  11. Management of acute fever in children: Guideline for community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of acute fever in children: Guideline for community healthcare ... Therefore, it is essential to distinguish between a child with fever who is at high risk ... the appropriate use of antipyretic medication and how to advise parents and ...

  12. Mothers' perception and management of childhood fevers at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of her anxiety and fear, and reflect on the way the fever is managed at home. ... common cause of fever while some reported teething (80%), witchcraft (26%), ... it could lead to blindness, anaemia, weakness, brain damage and death.

  13. Medical cost of Lassa fever treatment in Irrua Specialist Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical cost of Lassa fever treatment in Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Of Lassa Fever Research and Control, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH) Irrua, in Edo State, ...

  14. Controlling Hay Fever Symptoms with Accurate Pollen Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... counts Share | Controlling Hay Fever Symptoms with Accurate Pollen Counts This article has been reviewed by Thanai ... rhinitis known as hay fever is caused by pollen carried in the air during different times of ...

  15. Mayaro fever in an HIV-infected patient suspected of having Chikungunya fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Fernanda Estofolete

    Full Text Available Abstract Arboviruses impose a serious threat to public health services. We report a case of a patient returning from a work trip to the Amazon basin with myalgia, arthralgia, fever, and headache. During this travel, the patient visited riverside communities. Both dengue and Chikungunya fevers were first suspected, tested for, and excluded. Mayaro fever was then confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by next-generation sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction. The increased awareness of physicians and consequent detection of Mayaro virus in this case was only possible due a previous surveillance program with specific health personnel training about these neglected arboviruses.

  16. Mayaro fever in an HIV-infected patient suspected of having Chikungunya fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estofolete, Cássia Fernanda; Mota, Mânlio Tasso Oliveira; Vedovello, Danila; Góngora, Delzi Vinha Nunes de; Maia, Irineu Luiz; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses impose a serious threat to public health services. We report a case of a patient returning from a work trip to the Amazon basin with myalgia, arthralgia, fever, and headache. During this travel, the patient visited riverside communities. Both dengue and Chikungunya fevers were first suspected, tested for, and excluded. Mayaro fever was then confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by next-generation sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction. The increased awareness of physicians and consequent detection of Mayaro virus in this case was only possible due a previous surveillance program with specific health personnel training about these neglected arboviruses.

  17. Unusual presentation of familial Mediterranean fever: role of genetic diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nir-Paz, R; Ben-Chetrit, E; Pikarsky, E; Hassin, D.; Hasin, Y; Chajek-Shaul, T.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To describe the role of molecular analysis in the diagnosis of an unusual presentation of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF).
CASE REPORT—Two patients presenting with prolonged fever without signs and symptoms of serositis are described. FMF was diagnosed by genetic analysis, which disclosed that both patients were homozygous for the M694V mutation of the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene.
CONCLUSION—Molecular analysis of FMF should complement the investigation of patients with fever ...

  18. Nursing experience of patients with epidemic hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-yan ZHANG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the nursing methods of patients with epidemic hemorrhagic fever. Methods: Through careful nursing, 1 case of patients with epidemic hemorrhagic fever, summed up the experience. Results: Patients with epidemic hemorrhagic fever were 2 days later improved, within 6 months to fully recover. Conclusion: With proper treatment and careful nursing, patients with epidemic hemorrhagic fever are able to fully recover.

  19. 激光心肌血运重建术在晚期缺血性心脏病中的应用%Percutaneous transmural laser revascularization for end-stage ischemia heart diaease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗惠兰; 周云飞; 卢才义

    2001-01-01

    Percutaneous myocardial revascularization (PMR),building on the succeeds of transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR),has developed that allows TMR-like channels to be cradated via a percutaneous approach.This catheter based approach avoids the morbidity associated with general anesthesia and thoractomy or thoracoscopy.It also avoids transmural treatment of the myocardium by the laser.Although its mechanism remains unclear,many patients with intractable angina and non-bypassable coronary artery disease have benefited from the new system.It is hoped that PMR will mimic the clinical benefit of TMR,and will gradually become a main method in treating end-staged coronary artery disease.

  20. public health importance of lassa fever epidemiolggy, clinical features

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    important precautive measures to take when handling a patient with Lassa fever. ... protective devices are important preventive measures when managing a patient with Lassa fever infection. As Lassa fever ... ness, as well as sexual contact with a partner during ... countries in Africa have reported Lassa outbreaks and.

  1. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control.

  2. Familial Mediterranean fever presenting as fever of unknown origin in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Jong Hyun; Shim, Jung Ok; Lee, Kwang Chul; Lee, Joo Won; Lee, Jung Hwa; Chae, Jae Jin

    2016-11-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common Mendelian autoinflammatory disease, characterized by uncontrolled activation of the innate immune system that manifests as recurrent brief fever and polyserositis (e.g., peritonitis, pleuritic, and arthritis). FMF is caused by autosomal recessive mutations of the Mediterranean fever gene, MEFV which encodes the pyrin protein. Although FMF predominantly affects people from Mediterranean and Middle Eastern ethnic origins, 3 cases of FMF have been reported in Korea since 2012. We report another case of FMF in Korea in which the patient presented with a month-long fever without serositis. After treatment with colchicine was initiated, the patient's symptoms quickly subsided. The response to colchicine was helpful for diagnosis. We compare the FMF genotypes in Korea with in other countries. Studying FMF cases in Korea will help establish the best MEFV exons to use for screening and diagnosis of Korean FMF.

  3. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnóstico Legionellosis can present as two types of illness: Legionnaires’ disease and Pontiac fever. The two illnesses can be ... every 10 people who get sick with Legionnaires’ disease will die due to complications from their illness.[ 1 ] For those who get Legionnaires’ disease during ...

  4. Host-pathogen interactions in typhoid fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella Typhi and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections and explores the interplay between these bacteria and the innate immune system. Typhoid fever is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in low-income countries. With adequate

  5. Typhoid Fever on the Half Shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, Linda; Hellerstedt, John

    2017-02-01

    Protecting the public from communicable infectious disease outbreaks is one of the most important, and most challenging, functions of public health. Foodborne outbreaks are not uncommon, and they can be especially difficult. This true story of the epidemiologic investigation into a typhoid fever outbreak illustrates the critical importance of timely reporting by front-line clinicians, extensive interprofessional teamwork, and statewide coordination.

  6. immunisation fever amongst infants receiving Diphtheria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-08-06

    Aug 6, 2013 ... common concern for parents and health-care profession- als fuelled by fears ... digital thermometer and a fever diary card, and was taught how to ... Place of delivery. Home. Public health facility. Private health facility. 61 (8.9).

  7. Diagnostic approaches for Rift Valley Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disease outbreaks caused by arthropod-borne animal viruses (arboviruses) resulting in significant livestock and economic losses world-wide appear to be increasing. Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus (RVFV) is an important arbovirus that causes lethal disease in cattle, camels, sheep and goats in Sub-Saha...

  8. Reemergence of Rift Valley fever, Mauritania, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Hampathé; Ba, Yamar; Freire, Caio C M; Faye, Oumar; Ndiaye, Oumar; Elgady, Isselmou O; Zanotto, Paolo M A; Diallo, Mawlouth; Sall, Amadou A

    2014-02-01

    A Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreak in humans and animals occurred in Mauritania in 2010. Thirty cases of RVF in humans and 3 deaths were identified. RVFV isolates were recovered from humans, camels, sheep, goats, and Culex antennatus mosquitoes. Phylogenetic analysis of isolates indicated a virus origin from western Africa.

  9. Imported Lassa fever, Pennsylvania, USA, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorosa, Valerianna; MacNeil, Adam; McConnell, Ryan; Patel, Ami; Dillon, Katherine E; Hamilton, Keith; Erickson, Bobbie Rae; Campbell, Shelley; Knust, Barbara; Cannon, Deborah; Miller, David; Manning, Craig; Rollin, Pierre E; Nichol, Stuart T

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of Lassa fever in a US traveler who visited rural Liberia, became ill while in country, sought medical care upon return to the United States, and subsequently had his illness laboratory confirmed. The patient recovered with supportive therapy. No secondary cases occurred.

  10. Host-pathogen interactions in typhoid fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella Typhi and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections and explores the interplay between these bacteria and the innate immune system. Typhoid fever is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in low-income countries. With adequate

  11. Cases of typhoid fever in Copenhagen region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrett, Freja Cecille; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Johansen, Isik Somuncu

    2013-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a systemic illness which in high-income countries mainly affects travellers. The incidence is particularly high on the Indian subcontinent. Travellers who visit friends and relatives (VFR) have been shown to have a different risk profile than others. We wished to identify main ch...

  12. Rift Valley fever: A neglected zoonotic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a serious viral disease of animals and humans in Africa and the Middle East that is transmitted by mosquitoes. First isolated in Kenya during an outbreak in 1930, subsequent outbreaks have had a significant impact on animal and human health, as well as national economies. ...

  13. Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in Saudi Arabia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-28

    This podcast looks at the epidemiologic characteristics of Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in humans in Najran City, Saudi Arabia. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Adam MacNeil discusses the severity and risk factors for the illness.  Created: 10/28/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/17/2010.

  14. [Arbovirus causing hemorrhagic fever at IMSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor

    2006-01-01

    To know the arbovirus causing hemorrhagic fever in patients at the Mexican Institute of Social Security. A follow-up study was made in patients with probable diagnosis of hemorrhagic dengue. Blood samples were taken to look for dengue fever, yellow fever and San Luis, Tonate and Mayaro encephalitis viruses. Frequencies and proportions of the interest variables were analyzed. 35 patients were studied. Isolation and PCR results of the 13 samples were negative in 12 of them and positive to denguevirus-3 in one of them. The determination of IgM was positive for dengue fever in 25 cases; 2 were positive to Mayaro virus and 8 were negative to what was looked for. Hemorrhages and thrombocytopenia were more frequent in patients infected with dengue and Mayaro viruses; jaundice and encephalopathy were more frequent in the latter, and renal dysfunction, in patients with a negative result. Evolution was satisfactory in all cases, except for one (Mayaro), which presented hemorrhages, thrombocytopenia, jaundice and encephalopathy that lead to death. The results show the risk of appearance and dissemination of several vector-born diseases in Mexico. Thus, they require intensive epidemiological surveillance to identify them and to know their real occurrence and specific clinical profile.

  15. Enzootic transmission of yellow fever virus, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguste, Albert J; Lemey, Philippe; Bergren, Nicholas A; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Morón, Dulce; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of yellow fever virus (YFV) strains isolated from Venezuela strongly supports YFV maintenance in situ in Venezuela, with evidence of regionally independent evolution within the country. However, there is considerable YFV movement from Brazil to Venezuela and between Trinidad and Venezuela.

  16. Dengue fever with unusual thalamic involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Asim Kumar; Purkait, Radheshyam; Sinhamahapatra, Tapan Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease in the world and is caused by four distinct viruses (type 1 to 4) that are closely related antigenically. Infection by dengue virus may be asymptomatic or may lead to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever or dengue haemorrhagic fever. Recent observations indicate that the clinical profile of dengue is changing and the neurological complications are being reported more frequently. The neurological features includeheadache, seizures, neck stiffness, depressed sensorium, behavioural disorders, delirium, paralysis and cranial nerve palsies. Such neurological symptoms in dengue fever wereattributed to cerebral oedema, haemorrhage, haemoconcentration due to increasing vascular permeability, coagulopathy and release of toxic substances. Cerebral oedema, encephalitis-like changes (oedema and scattered focal lesions), intracranial haemorrhages as well as selective involvement of bilateral hippocampus in dengue infection have been reported previously on selective neuro-imaging but thalamic involvement is rare. We here report a case of a typical presentation of encephalopathy with left sided complete hemiplegia due to thalamic involvement in dengue infection.

  17. Facing dengue fever - our first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvjetković Dejan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne disease caused by dengue virus, endemic in tropical and subtropical regions, where it is mostly imported from. The most common clinical form is classic dengue fever. We presented the first dengue case microbiologically confirmed in Serbia. Case report. A 34-year-old male got classic dengue fever after arrival from Cuba. The disease occurred suddenly with fever, myalgias, skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, abnormal aminotransferase and creatine kinase levels. The diagnosis was confirmed with virological diagnostic methods. Significant leukopenia and thrombocytopenia as well as elevation of serum creatine kinase activity were recorded from the very beginning of hospitalization, but were gradually normalized. The whole duration of hospitalization was accompanied by laboratory signs of liver lesion. The disease had favourable outcome. At hospital discharge, the patient was afebrile, asymptomatic, with discrete erythematous rash on torso and arms, normal hemathological values and creatine kinase level and moderately elevated alanine-aminotransferase level. Conclusion. Considering global climate changes and growing international traffic, our health care service needs to be ready for possible massive outbreaks of dengue and other tropical infectious diseases in forthcoming years.

  18. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: Indian perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U C Chaturvedi; Rachna Nagar

    2008-11-01

    The relationship of this country with dengue has been long and intense. The first recorded epidemic of clinically dengue-like illness occurred at Madras in 1780 and the dengue virus was isolated for the first time almost simultaneously in Japan and Calcutta in 1943–1944. After the first virologically proved epidemic of dengue fever along the East Coast of India in 1963–1964, it spread to allover the country. The first full-blown epidemic of the severe form of the illness, the dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome occurred in North India in 1996. Aedes aegypti is the vector for transmission of the disease. Vaccines or antiviral drugs are not available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic degure fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) is to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti and prevent its bite. This country has few virus laboratories and some of them have done excellent work in the area of molecular epidemiology, immunopathology and vaccine development. Selected work done in this country on the problems of dengue is presented here.

  19. Studies on Typhus and Spotted Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    Heterogeneity among Rickettsia tsutsugamushi isolates: A protein analysis. 8. David J. Silverman, Charles L. Wisseman, Jr. and Anna Waddell. Envelopment and...the Conference and are also in press. 10. Paul Fiset, Charles L. Wisseman, Jr., A. Farhang-Azad, Harvey Fischman . Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in

  20. Epidemiology and control of bovine ephemeral fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Peter J; Klement, Eyal

    2015-10-28

    Bovine ephemeral fever (or 3-day sickness) is an acute febrile illness of cattle and water buffaloes. Caused by an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus, bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV), the disease occurs seasonally over a vast expanse of the globe encompassing much of Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. Although mortality rates are typically low, infection prevalence and morbidity rates during outbreaks are often very high, causing serious economic impacts through loss of milk production, poor cattle condition at sale and loss of traction power at harvest. There are also significant impacts on trade to regions in which the disease does not occur, including the Americas and most of Europe. In recent years, unusually severe outbreaks of bovine ephemeral fever have been reported from several regions in Asia and the Middle East, with mortality rates through disease or culling in excess of 10-20%. There are also concerns that, like other vector-borne diseases of livestock, the geographic distribution of bovine ephemeral fever could expand into regions that have historically been free of the disease. Here, we review current knowledge of the virus, including its molecular and antigenic structure, and the epidemiology of the disease across its entire geographic range. We also discuss the effectiveness of vaccination and other strategies to prevent or control infection.

  1. [Prospective study of patients with prolonged fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, E; Legorreta, J; Sztabinski, G; Hernández, M; Wilkins, A; Gómez, D; Dávila, A

    1975-01-01

    A prospective study was made in 283 patients who attended IMAN's Children's Hospital, with fever the main symptom. A clinical and paraclinical procedure was designed for the study of each patient. 112 patients were eliminated because they did not follow the established criteria. All patients had acute infectious diseases considered trivial; 85% were 3 weeks to 2 years of age. They all had an antibacterial treatment without precise diagnosis. It was considered that on admission the patients showed a normal course in the natural history of the basic disease. The study group included 171 patients 2 months to 13 years of age; 62.5% had fever due to infection, 12.2% to collagenopathies, 7% to neoplasias 5.2% to miscellaneous causes and 12.8% were not diagnosed. The most common infectious causes for prolonged fever were tuberculosis, upper respiratory infections, amoebic liver abscess, typhoid fever and malaria. Careful questioning and clinical examination were enough to enlighten diagnosis in more than 80% of the patients.

  2. Dengue Fever in the United States

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-09

    Dr. Amesh Adalja, an associate at the Center for Biosecurity and clinical assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School, of Medicine, discusses dengue fever outbreaks in the United States.  Created: 4/9/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/16/2012.

  3. Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever: Systematic review to estimate global morbidity and mortality for 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Buckle, Geoffrey C; Fischer Walker, Christa L.; Black, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Typhoid and paratyphoid fever remain important causes of morbidity worldwide. Accurate disease burden estimates are needed to guide policy decisions and prevention and control strategies. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review of the PubMed and Scopus databases using pre-defined criteria to identify population-based studies with typhoid fever incidence data published between 1980 and 2009. We also abstracted data from annual reports of notifiable diseases in countries ...

  4. Typhoid fever in a 7 month old infant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karande S

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical profile of typhoid fever in an infant is variable and non-specific. A rare case of typhoid fever in a 7 month old infant is reported. The child presented with only a day′s history of fever and loose motions which resulted in severe dehydration, acute tubular necrosis and death. The diagnosis of typhoid fever was made only on post-mortem study. The problem in diagnosing typhoid fever in a young infant is highlighted with a brief literature review on the subject.

  5. Dengue Fever with rectus sheath hematoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anurag; Bhatia, Sonia; Singh, Rajendra Pratap; Malik, Gaurav

    2014-04-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  6. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever Leading to Unnecessary Appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lovekesh; Singh, Mahendra; Saxena, Ashish; Kolhe, Yuvraj; Karande, Snehal K; Singh, Narendra; Venkatesh, P; Meena, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arbovirus illness with an estimated incidence of 50-100 million cases per year. The common symptoms of dengue include fever, rash, malaise, nausea, vomiting, and musculoskeletal pain. Dengue fever may present as acute abdomen leading to diagnostic dilemma. The acute surgical complications of dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, nonspecific peritonitis, and acute appendicitis. We report a case of dengue fever that mimicked acute appendicitis leading to unnecessary appendectomy. A careful history examination for dengue-related signs, and serial hemogram over the first 3-4 days of disease may prevent unnecessary appendectomy.

  7. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever Leading to Unnecessary Appendectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovekesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the most important arbovirus illness with an estimated incidence of 50–100 million cases per year. The common symptoms of dengue include fever, rash, malaise, nausea, vomiting, and musculoskeletal pain. Dengue fever may present as acute abdomen leading to diagnostic dilemma. The acute surgical complications of dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, nonspecific peritonitis, and acute appendicitis. We report a case of dengue fever that mimicked acute appendicitis leading to unnecessary appendectomy. A careful history examination for dengue-related signs, and serial hemogram over the first 3-4 days of disease may prevent unnecessary appendectomy.

  8. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever Leading to Unnecessary Appendectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lovekesh; Singh, Mahendra; Saxena, Ashish; Kolhe, Yuvraj; Karande, Snehal K.; Singh, Narendra; Venkatesh, P.; Meena, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arbovirus illness with an estimated incidence of 50–100 million cases per year. The common symptoms of dengue include fever, rash, malaise, nausea, vomiting, and musculoskeletal pain. Dengue fever may present as acute abdomen leading to diagnostic dilemma. The acute surgical complications of dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, nonspecific peritonitis, and acute appendicitis. We report a case of dengue fever that mimicked acute appendicitis leading to unnecessary appendectomy. A careful history examination for dengue-related signs, and serial hemogram over the first 3-4 days of disease may prevent unnecessary appendectomy. PMID:26167314

  9. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula Gomes Mourão

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  10. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula Gomes Mourão

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  11. Parental perception and management of school-age children's fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A R

    1988-05-01

    Fever is a major childhood complaint. Parents have numerous means at their disposal to assess and manage childhood fevers. Previous studies of parents of infants and preschoolers have uncovered parental fears and misconceptions surrounding fever ("fever phobia"). A study of 84 parents of otherwise well school-age children revealed that these misconceptions remain, regardless of the child's age or parental level of education. The nurse practitioner must understand both parental fears and the body-temperature dynamics of children to successfully access and manage fever in the school-age child.

  12. Dengue fever with rectus sheath hematoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  13. Q Fever: An Old but Still a Poorly Understood Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Honarmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by infected animals and drinking raw milk. People at highest risk for this infection are farmers, laboratory workers, sheep and dairy workers, and veterinarians. Chronic Q fever develops in people who have been infected for more than 6 months. It usually takes about 20 days after exposure to the bacteria for symptoms to occur. Most cases are mild, yet some severe cases have been reported. Symptoms of acute Q fever may include: chest pain with breathing, cough, fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pains, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of chronic Q fever may include chills, fatigue, night sweats, prolonged fever, and shortness of breath. Q fever is diagnosed with a blood antibody test. The main treatment for the disease is with antibiotics. For acute Q fever, doxycycline is recommended. For chronic Q fever, a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine is often used long term. Complications are cirrhosis, hepatitis, encephalitis, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, meningitis, and pneumonia. People at risk should always: carefully dispose of animal products that may be infected, disinfect any contaminated areas, and thoroughly wash their hands. Pasteurizing milk can also help prevent Q fever.

  14. [Risks and benefits of paracetamol in children with fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bont, Eefje G P M; Brand, Paul L P; Dinant, Geert-Jan; van Well, Gijs T J; Cals, Jochen W L

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, paracetamol is the most commonly used antipyretic for children and the drug of first choice for reducing fever named in the majority of practice guidelines. However, whether or not it is necessary or desirable to treat fever is questionable. The provision of accurate information on the causes and treatment of fever can decrease the help-seeking behaviour of parents. Paracetamol is both effective and advisable when there is a combination of fever and pain. Fever on its own does not require treatment and doctors should therefore show caution about advising paracetamol for children who have just this symptom. The effect of paracetamol on the general well-being of children with fever on its own has not been unequivocally proven. Treatment with paracetamol for the prevention of febrile convulsions has been proven ineffective. There are indications that inhibiting fever through paracetamol can adversely affect the immune response. The use of paracetamol can produce mild side effects and hepatotoxicity.

  15. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we revi...

  16. Infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Raabe Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website.

  17. The unrecognized burden of typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaro, Stephen K; Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Mintz, Eric Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Typhoid fever (TF), caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is the most common cause of enteric fever, responsible for an estimated 129,000 deaths and more than 11 million cases annually. Although several reviews have provided global and regional TF disease burden estimates, major gaps in our understanding of TF epidemiology remain. Areas covered: We provide an overview of the gaps in current estimates of TF disease burden and offer suggestions for addressing them, so that affected communities can receive the full potential of disease prevention offered by vaccination and water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions. Expert commentary: Current disease burden estimates for TF do not capture cases from certain host populations, nor those with atypical presentations of TF, which may lead to substantial underestimation of TF cases and deaths. These knowledge gaps pose major obstacles to the informed use of current and new generation typhoid vaccines.

  18. Brazilian spotted fever: a reemergent zoonosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Greca

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian spotted fever is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, which is the most pathogenic species of the spotted-fever rickettsiae group and is transmitted by the bite of infected ticks. Amblyomma cajennense is the most important tick species involved in the cycle of this zoonosis in Brazil as it presents low host specificity, great number of natural reservoirs and wide geographic distribution. It was first described in the state of São Paulo in 1929 and later in Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais and Bahia. The number of cases decreased in the 1940's with the development of new plague control techniques and antibiotics. In the last decades, the number of new cases has increased. The current review aimed at reporting some of the epidemiological and public health aspects of this reemergent disease with new foci, mainly in the southeastern region of Brazil.

  19. Diagnostic criteria of familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkun, Yackov; Eisenstein, Eli M

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most prevalent monogenic autoinflammatory disease, mainly affecting ethnic groups living at Mediterranean basin. FMF is characterized by recurrent, self-limited episodes of fever and serositis. The diagnosis is difficult in the presence of atypical signs, which may result in significant delay in initiating treatment. As autoinflammatory diseases may have overlapping symptoms, strict diagnostic criteria are essential. Since the discovery that mutations in the gene MEFV underlie FMF, molecular genetic testing has been used as a diagnostic adjunct, especially in atypical cases. However, despite progress in the understanding of FMF disease mechanisms during the past 15 years; the diagnosis is still based on clinical criteria. Several sets of diagnostic criteria have been proposed and used. Existing diagnostic criteria should be modified to include genetic data, and need to be more widely validated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Severe Dengue Fever Outbreak in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Ko; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Yen, Chia-Hung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is a vector-borne disease caused by dengue viruses (DENVs). Epidemic dengue occurs intermittently in Taiwan. In 2014, Taiwan experienced its largest DF outbreak. There were 15,732 DF cases reported. There were a total of 136 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases, of which 20 resulted in death. Most DF cases were reported in southern Taiwan. A total of 15,043 (96%) cases were from Kaohsiung, a modern city in southern Taiwan. This report reviews DF epidemics in Taiwan during 2005–2014. The correlation between DF and DHF along with temperature and precipitation were conjointly examined. We conclude that most dengue epidemics in Taiwan resulted from imported DF cases. Results indicate three main factors that may have been associated with this DF outbreak in Kaohsiung: an underground pipeline explosion combined with subsequent rainfall and higher temperature. These factors may have enhanced mosquito breeding activity, facilitating DENV transmission. PMID:26572871

  1. DAY 1 DIAGNOSIS OF DENGUE FEVER

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    Shyam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue is an RNA virus of the family Flaviviridae transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes particularly Aedes aegypti. It is widely distributed throughout the tropics and subtropics and in a small proportion of cases the virus leads to life threatening complications dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. OBJECTIVES: To study the early diagnosis of Dengue on day 1 as there is no vaccine or specific antiviral treatment available. METHODS: A prospective study of 104 patients was done based on clinical criteria of Dengue. RESULTS: Out of 104 serum samples 46 (44% were positive by NSI Ag MICROELISA, 37 (35% by NSI antigen IMMUNO CHROMATOGRAPHY. 3 (2% samples are positive by IgM IMMUNO CHROMATOGRAPHY and only one sample was positive for IgG IMMUNOCHROMATOGRAPHY. CONCLUSION: The present study has established the significance of NSI Ag MICROELISA with NSI antigen IMMUNO CHROMATOGRAPHY in increasing the diagnostic efficiency in the day 1 diagnosis of Dengue fever.

  2. Epidural Analgesia and Fever at Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. M. Shifman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence of labor fever under epidural analgesia (EA and to evaluate its impact on the courses of puerperium and early neonatality. Subjects and methods. The paper presents the data of a prospective study of the course of labor, puerperium, and early neonatality in 397 women in whom labors occurred at the Republican Peritoneal Center in 2006. A study group included 324 parturients in whom labor pain was relieved by EA. A comparison group comprised 55 parturients in whom no analgesics were used at labor. Results. There were no significant statistical differences between the groups in the incidence of labor fever and complicated puerperium and in that of neonatal pyoseptic diseases. Key words: labor hyperthermia, epidural analgesia, labor pain relief.

  3. Chikungunya fever presenting with acute optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Abhijit Anand; Agius-Fernandez, Adriana

    2015-07-28

    Chikungunya fever is a vector borne virus that typically causes a self-limiting systemic illness with fever, skin rash and joint aches 2 weeks after infection. We present the case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with an acute unilateral optic neuropathy as a delayed complication of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection contracted during a recent trip to the West Indies. She presented to our ophthalmology department with acute painless visual field loss in the right eye and a recent flu-like illness. She was found to have a right relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) with unilateral optic disc swelling. Serology confirmed recent CHIKV infection. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone was delayed while awaiting MRI scans and serology results. At 5-month follow-up, there was a persistent right RAPD and marked optic atrophy with a corresponding inferior scotoma in the visual field. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, CN; Kama, M.; Acharya, S; Bera, U; Clemens, J.; Crump, JA; Dawainavesi, A; Dougan, G; Edmunds, WJ; Fox, K; Jenkins, K.; Khan, MI; Koroivueta, J.; Levine, MM; Martin, LB

    2014-01-01

    : The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Mini...

  5. Host-pathogen interactions in typhoid fever

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella Typhi and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections and explores the interplay between these bacteria and the innate immune system. Typhoid fever is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in low-income countries. With adequate antibiotic treatment it has a low mortality rate. Melioidosis also commonly causes community-acquired sepsis in Southeast Asia and northern Australia but even with appropriate antibiotic treatment ...

  6. Argentine hemorrhagic fever: a primate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenbacher, M C; Calello, M A; Colillas, O J; Rondinone, S N; Frigerio, M J

    1979-01-01

    Experimental Junin virus infection of a New World primate, Callithrix jacchus, was evaluated. The virus produced anorexia, loss of weight, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, and hemorrhagic and neurological symptoms and terminated in death. Virus was recovered from urine, blood samples and all tissues taken at autopsy. These preliminary observations show that several aspects of the experimental disease in C. jacchus are quite similar to severe natural Argentine hemorrhagic fever of man.

  7. Surgical complications of typhoid fever: enteric perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, M

    1991-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains a prevalent disease in developing nations as the result of adverse socioeconomic factors. The most frequent complication, and principal cause of mortality, is perforation of the terminal ileum. This report presents our experience with 96 patients surgically treated at Cayetano Heredia University Hospital in Lima, Peru from 1972 to 1986. The clinical characteristics and the diverse surgical procedures utilized in the management of these patients are reviewed.

  8. Behavioral fever in anuran amphibian larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casterlin, M.E.; Reynolds, W.W.

    1977-02-15

    Following intraperitoneal injection with killed gram-negative bacteria, Aeromonas hydrophila, tadpoles of Rana catesbeiana and of R. pipiens showed significant mean increases in preferred temperature of 2.6/sup 0/C and 2.7/sup 0/C, respectively, in an electronic thermoregulatory shuttlebox device. This ''behavioral fever'' is similar to elevations in preferred temperature previously demonstrated for fishes, reptiles and mammals, although both normal and febrile thermal preferenda vary among vertebrates.

  9. [Fever of unknown origin. Infectious causes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberger, B; Schneidewind, A; Hanses, F; Birkenfeld, G; Müller-Schilling, M

    2012-12-01

    Infectious diseases remain one of the most important causes of fever of unexplained origin (FUO). We review the spectrum of infectious diseases in the different clinical situations of patients with FUO, namely in classical FUO, in patients with HIV infection, in health care-associated or nosocomial FUO, and in immunocompromised patients with FUO. The most important question is which clinical features make a specific disease a candidate to cause FUO.

  10. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Sudan, 2008

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-15

    This podcast describes the emergence of the first human cases of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Sudan in 2008. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Stuart Nichol discusses how the disease was found in Sudan and how it spread in a hospital there.  Created: 4/15/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infections (proposed).   Date Released: 4/15/2010.

  11. Paratyphoid fever- Emerging problem in South India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ragini Bekur; KEVandana; KN Shivashankara; Rohit Valsalan; Vishwanath Sathyanarayanan

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To review the clinical profile and drug susceptibilities ofSalmonella paratyphiA in a tertiary care hospital.Methods: Retrospective analyses of113patients with paratyphoid fever and101 culture provenSalmonella paratyphi A infection were included in the study. The study extended over a period of3 years(2006-2008). Diagnosis of patients were based on clinical features, serology and blood culture. The drug susceptibility testing of the isolates were performed by the disc diffusion method. Clinical presentation, laboratory parameters, susceptibility patterns of isolates, treatment and clinical response were studied.Results: Of the 113 cases, 77 (68.4 %) were males and36 were females(32.8%), which included2 pediatric patients. Fever was the most common symptom(100.0%) followed by loose stools(37.2%), headache(35.4%), myalgia(31.9%), pain abdomen (29.2%), dry cough (19.5%) and vomiting(13.3%). All patients were clinically cured. Majority of the isolates (46%)were resistant to cotrimoxazole in2006, however they became 100% sensitive in2007and2008. whereas the strains became100% sensitive to ampicillin and chloramphenicol only in 2008. In2006 the sensitivity of organisms to ciprofloxacin was89% but in2007and2008there has been an increasing resistance to ciprofloxacin (46% and86%) respectively . Surprisingly3isolates (8.1%) were resistant to ceftriaxone in2006, showed100% sensitivity in2008. Common drugs used were ceftriaxone in100 cases(88.4%) and ciprofloxacin in13cases(11.6%).One patient had relapse of paratyphoid fever after treatment with ciprofloxacin which responded to ceftriaxone.Conclusions:Paratyphoid fever A is one of the emerging infections and a significant problem in India. An increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones is noted. Continuous monitoring of drug susceptibilities is mandatory in instituting appropriate therapy.

  12. Fever of unknown origin in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkulov Vesna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Causes of fever of unknown origin are different. It is considered that it can be caused with over 200 different clinical entities. Aetiological causes differ according to different categories of age. Febricity in the elderly is at most the result of autoimmune processes, malignancies, bacterial infections and vasculitis. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the most common characteristics of fever, the most common laboratory, bacterial and viral tests and to analyze applied therapy in patients with unknown febrile state, and to affirm final diagnosis in elderly patients, as well as younger than 65 years old, and to define outcome of disease in both groups of patients. Methods. Research comprised 100 patients who had been treated at the Infectious Disease Clinic of the Clinical Centre of Vojvodina in Novi Sad, during a three-year period, and in whom fever of unknown origin had been diagnosed. Patients were divided into two homogenous groups of 50 people. The first one (S consisted of patients older than 65 years, and the second, control group (K was constituted of patients younger than the age of 65. All of them were chosen by random sample method. Results. Average results of standard laboratory parameters of infection were obtained, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, fibrinogen, CRP, and especially leukocyte, and those were significantly higher in the group of elderly patients. The cause had not been found in 10% of elderly patient group, and in the younger group, not even in the third of patients. Among known causative agents dominant were infections, usually of respiratory and urinary tract, in both tested groups. Even 28% of the elderly had sepsis, and 10% endocarditis. Malignant diseases were more frequent in group of the elderly patients, and immune i.e. systematic disorders were evenly noticed in both groups of patients. Conclusion. Despite advanced studies in medicine, and existence of modern

  13. Review of current typhoid fever vaccines, cross-protection against paratyphoid fever, and the European guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Hatz, Christoph; Kantele, Anu

    2017-10-01

    Typhoid and paratyphoid fever remain a global health problem, which - in non-endemic countries - are mainly seen in travelers, particularly in VFRs (visiting friends and relatives), with occasional local outbreaks occurring. A rise in anti-microbial resistance emphasizes the role of preventive measures, especially vaccinations against typhoid and paratyphoid fever for travelers visiting endemic countries. Areas covered: This state-of-the-art review recapitulates the epidemiology and mechanisms of disease of typhoid and paratyphoid fever, depicts the perspective of non-endemic countries and travelers (VFRs), and collectively presents current European recommendations for typhoid fever vaccination. We provide a brief overview of available (and developmental) vaccines in Europe, present current data on cross-protection to S. Paratyphi, and aim to provide a background for typhoid vaccine decision-making in travelers. Expert commentary: European recommendations are not harmonized. Experts must assess vaccination of travelers based on current country-specific recommendations. Travel health practitioners should be aware of the issues surrounding vaccination of travelers and be motivated to increase awareness of typhoid and paratyphoid fever risks.

  14. Post-operative fever in orthopaedic surgery: How effective is the 'fever workup?'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Blair; Spiegel, David A; Cahill, Patrick; Talwar, Divya; Baldwin, Keith D

    2017-01-01

    Defining the appropriate threshold at which to initiate a fever workup is imperative to promote patient safety, appropriate resource utilization, and antibiotic stewardship. Our group performed a systematic review of the available literature on perioperative fever (POF) workups in orthopaedic patients to evaluate the frequency, timing and utility of blood cultures (BC) and other investigations in the POF workup, to determine the clinical relevance of any infections and to evaluate their cost effectiveness. Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Pubmed, Cochrane and Google Scholar for articles through September 2016. Forty-nine articles were retrieved and 22 articles met the pre-determined inclusion criteria. Proportions of positive studies were noted and averaged using random effects analysis. Post-operative pyrexia ranged in prevalence between 8.1% and 87.3%. The studies routinely performed during a fever workup had wide ranges of diagnostic yield, including chest X-rays from 0% to 40%, urinalyses from 8.2% to 38.7%, urine cultures from 0% to 22.4% and BC from 0% to 13.3%. Only two patients with positive BC developed clinical sepsis. Cost per fever evaluation ranged from $350 to $950. The findings of this review suggest that early post-operative fever is an expected event following orthopaedic surgery. Based on the available literature, any kind of workup in the absence of localizing symptoms in the third post-operative day or before is unwarranted and is an inappropriate use of hospital resources.

  15. Effectiveness of fever education in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mark D; Monroe, Kathy W; King, William D; Sorrentino, Annalise; Glaeser, Peter W

    2009-09-01

    This study was designed to assess the impact of a brief educational video shown to parents during an emergency department visit for minor febrile illnesses. We hypothesized that a video about home management of fever would reduce medically unnecessary return emergency department visits for future febrile episodes. A convenience sample of 280 caregivers presenting to one urban pediatric emergency department was enrolled in this prospective, randomized cohort study. All the caregivers presented with a child aged 3 to 36 months with complaint of fever and were independently triaged as nonemergent. A pretest and posttest were administered to assess baseline knowledge and attitudes about fever. One hundred forty subjects were randomized to view either an 11-minute video about home management of fever or a control video about child safety. Subjects were tracked prospectively, and all return visits for fever complaints were independently reviewed by 3 pediatric emergency physicians to determine medical necessity. There were no differences between the fever video and the control groups in baseline demographics (eg, demographically comparable). The fever video group had a significant improvement in several measures relating to knowledge and attitudes about childhood fever. There was no statistical difference between the intervention and control groups in subsequent return visits or in the determination of medical necessity. A brief standardized video about home management of fever improved caregiver knowledge of fever but did not decrease emergency department use or increase medical necessity for subsequent febrile episodes.

  16. Management of childhood fever by parents: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne; Edwards, Helen

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports a review which draws together findings from studies targeting parents' temperature-taking, antipyretic administration, attitudes, practices and information-seeking behaviours. Parents' concerns about the harmful effects of fever have been reported for more than two decades. These concerns remain despite successful educational interventions. Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES and Web of Science databases were searched from 1980 to 2004 during November 2004. The search terms were fever, child, parent, education, knowledge, belief, concern, temperature, antipyretic and information, and combinations of these. In the 1980s, studies were mainly descriptive of small single site samples of parents with a febrile child seeking assistance from healthcare professionals. From 1990, sample sizes increased and multi-site studies were reported. Educational interventions were designed to increase knowledge and reduce unnecessary use of health services. One 2003 study targeted knowledge and attitudes. Parental knowledge about normal body temperature and the temperature that indicates fever is poor. Mild fever is misclassified by many as high, and they actively reduce mild fever with incorrect doses of antipyretics. Although some parents acknowledge the benefits of mild fever, concerns about brain damage, febrile convulsions and death from mild to moderate fever persist irrespective of parental education or socio-economic status. Many base their fever management practices on inaccurate temperature readings. Increased use of antipyretics to reduce fever and waking sleeping febrile children for antipyretics or sponging reflects heightened concern about harmful effects of fever. Educational interventions have reduced unnecessary use of healthcare services, improved knowledge about fever and when to implement management strategies, and reduced incorrect parental accuracy of antipyretic dosing. Information-seeking behaviours in fever management differ according to

  17. Advanced Vaccine Candidates for Lassa Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor S. Lukashevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF. LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered.

  18. Advanced vaccine candidates for Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-10-29

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered.

  19. Pathogenesis of lassa fever in cynomolgus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz Elizabeth A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lassa virus (LASV infection causes an acute and sometimes fatal hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman primates; however, little is known about the development of Lassa fever. Here, we performed a pilot study to begin to understand the progression of LASV infection in nonhuman primates. Methods Six cynomolgus monkeys were experimentally infected with LASV. Tissues from three animals were examined at an early- to mid-stage of disease and compared with tissues from three animals collected at terminal stages of disease. Results Dendritic cells were identified as a prominent target of LASV infection in a variety of tissues in all animals at day 7 while Kupffer cells, hepatocytes, adrenal cortical cells, and endothelial cells were more frequently infected with LASV in tissues of terminal animals (days 13.5-17. Meningoencephalitis and neuronal necrosis were noteworthy findings in terminal animals. Evidence of coagulopathy was noted; however, the degree of fibrin deposition in tissues was less prominent than has been reported in other viral hemorrhagic fevers. Conclusion The sequence of pathogenic events identified in this study begins to shed light on the development of disease processes during Lassa fever and also may provide new targets for rational prophylactic and chemotherapeutic interventions.

  20. Splenic abscess in typhoid fever -Surgical management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Col Prasan Kumar Hota

    2009-01-01

    Splenic abscess is an uncommon clinical presentation in surgical practice,associated with high morbidity and mortality.Mortality may be 100 % if left untreated.Splenic abscess is also rarely encountered as a complica-tion of typhoid fever.We present here a case of multiple splenic abscesses with neuropsychiatric complications due to typhoid fever,which was managed successfully with splenectomy and other supportive therapies.Anoth-er case of single splenic abscess due to enteric fever was treated successfully with CT-guided aspiration and ap-propriate antibiotics.Being a rare entity in clinical practice,splenic abscess has been poorly studied.Haemat-ogenous seeding of the spleen due to typhoid is a common cause of splenic abscess in the tropical countries.In multiple or multiloculated abscesses aspiration usually does not succeed,which happened in our case.Sple-nectomy remains the definitive choice of treatment.However,Ultra sonography (USG)or CT-guided aspira-tion may be tried in selective cases.

  1. Epidemiology of African swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, S; Mur, L; Lubroth, J; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Pfeiffer, D U

    2013-04-01

    African swine fever virus used to occur primarily in Africa. There had been occasional incursions into Europe or America which apart from the endemic situation on the island of Sardinia always had been successfully controlled. But following an introduction of the virus in 2007, it now has expanded its geographical distribution into Caucasus and Eastern Europe where it has not been controlled, to date. African swine fever affects domestic and wild pig species, and can involve tick vectors. The ability of the virus to survive within a particular ecosystem is defined by the ecology of its wild host populations and the characteristics of livestock production systems, which influence host and vector species densities and interrelationships. African swine fever has high morbidity in naïve pig populations and can result in very high mortality. There is no vaccine or treatment available. Apart from stamping out and movement control, there are no control measures, thereby potentially resulting in extreme losses for producers. Prevention and control of the infection requires good understanding of its epidemiology, so that targeted measures can be instigated.

  2. Cutting edge issues in rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    Although the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease has decreased significantly in regions of the world where antibiotics are easily accessible, there remains a high incidence in developing nations as well as in certain regions where there is a high incidence of genetic susceptibility. These diseases are a function of poverty, low socioeconomic status, and barriers to healthcare access, and it is in the developing world that a comprehensive prevention program is most critically needed. Development of group A streptococcal vaccines has been under investigation since the 1960s and 50 years later, we still have no vaccine. Factors that contribute to this lack of success include a potential risk for developing vaccine-induced rheumatic heart disease, as well as difficulties in covering the many serological subtypes of M protein, a virulence factor found on the surface of the bacterium. Yet, development of a successful vaccine program for prevention of group A streptococcal infection still offers the best chance for eradication of rheumatic fever in the twenty-first century. Other useful approaches include continuation of primary and secondary prevention with antibiotics and implementation of health care policies that provide patients with easy access to antibiotics. Improved living conditions and better hygiene are also critical to the prevention of the spread of group A streptococcus, especially in impoverished regions of the world. The purpose of this article is to discuss current and recent developments in the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

  3. [Chikungunya fever - A new global threat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Antonio

    2015-08-07

    The recent onset of epidemics caused by viruses such as Ebola, Marburg, Nipah, Lassa, coronavirus, West-Nile encephalitis, Saint Louis encephalitis, human immunodeficiency virus, dengue, yellow fever and Venezuelan hemorrhagic fever alerts about the risk these agents represent for the global health. Chikungunya virus represents a new threat. Surged from remote African regions, this virus has become endemic in the Indic ocean basin, the Indian subcontinent and the southeast of Asia, causing serious epidemics in Africa, Indic Ocean Islands, Asia and Europe. Due to their epidemiological and biological features and the global presence of their vectors, chikungunya represents a serious menace and could become endemic in the Americas. Although chikungunya infection has a low mortality rate, its high attack ratio may collapse the health system during epidemics affecting a sensitive population. In this paper, we review the clinical and epidemiological features of chikungunya fever as well as the risk of its introduction into the Americas. We remark the importance of the epidemiological control and mosquitoes fighting in order to prevent this disease from being introduced into the Americas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Chikungunya Fever Presenting as a Systemic Disease with Fever. Arthritis and Rash: Our Experience in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanay, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CHIK-F) has been increasingly documented among Western travelers returning from areas with chikungunya virus transmission, which are also popular tourist sites. We present three Israeli travelers who developed fever, maculopapular rash and long-standing arthralgias while visiting northern Indian states not known to be involved in the chikungunya fever epidemic. We also present an epidemiological review of the chikungunya epidemic over the past decades. Rare systemic manifestations of this disorder, like catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) and adult-onset Still's syndrome, are discussed. The present era of international travel poses a new diagnostic and epidemiologic challenge that demands increased awareness to the possibility of an exotic tropical infectious disease.

  5. The significance of post-operative fever following airway reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraff, Scott A; Brumbaugh, Cheryl; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Willging, J Paul

    2010-05-01

    Post-operative management of children undergoing airway reconstruction has been well-described. However, many of these patients develop post-operative fevers. We conducted a retrospective review in an attempt to define the significance of post-operative fever following pediatric airway reconstruction. Retrospective analysis of 78 pediatric laryngotracheoplasties (LTPs) from May 1, 2006 - April 30, 2007 at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Fever was defined as temperature >or=38.5. A fever was "significant" if accompanied by a positive sputum, blood or urine culture, or an elevated WBC. Chest radiograph (CXR) results and co-morbidities were examined. Forty-five percent of cases (35/78) had fever. Of those febrile, 46% (n=16) had significant fever. Overall, 20.5% had significant fevers. Fifty-two cases were single-stage LTP (SSLTP) with 31 febrile and 26 cases were double-stage LTP (DSLTP) with 4 febrile. SSLTP cases were at a significantly greater risk for post-operative fever compared with DSLTP, 59% vs 15% respectively (p=0.0002). 42% of febrile SSLTPs (n=13) had significant fevers compared to 50% (n=2) of febrile DSLTPs (Fisher's Exact p=1.0). 81.5% of cases with CXR findings had fevers, but only 50% of these fevers were significant. Subjects with post-operative atelectasis were more likely to have a fever compared to subjects with no post-operative atelactasis (93% vs. 33% respectively, pfever, compared to 52% of those without atelectasis (p=0.2) and 25 of SSLTPs vs. 3.9% of DSLTPs had atelactasis (p=0.027). No comorbidities were shown to be significant risk factors for post-operative fever. Based on our review, most children undergoing LTPs will have insignificant fevers. Those children undergoing SSTLP and/or having post-operative atelectasis are at higher risk for post-operative fever. Fevers in children with double-stage procedures or all reconstruction cases with CXR findings other than atelectasis should have a thorough fever work-up. Copyright (c) 2010

  6. Study on the possible use of Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine to control endemic typhoid fever in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Karki

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This review of literature was conducted to explore the various aspects of typhoid fever in Nepal and to identify the factors concerned in the possible use of the Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine in Nepal as the tool for prevention and control. There are hotspots of Typhoid fever in developing countries, urban areas and slums, where poor conditions of safe drinking water and sanitation prevail. The use of currently available typhoid fever vaccines, especially the Vi polysaccharide vaccine has been recommended by World Health Organization to control typhoid fever in endemic areas. However, factors like, the burden and the changing epidemiological pattern of the disease, efficacy of the vaccines, ease for intervention, cost effectiveness, financing, and programmatic issues should be considered in local settings before the introduction of vaccines as a public health tool for prevention. We concluded that the possible use of currently available Vi polysaccharide vaccine to control endemic typhoid fever in Nepal might not have the same positive impact as reported in trials from different Asian countries. The major issues to be considered are emergence of Salmonella Paratyphi A as a major cause of enteric fever, no difference in prevalence of typhoid fever in preschool and school children, similar clinical profiles and severity of typhoid and paratyphoid fever. So, an ideal vaccine that can provide the protection both to typhoid and paratyphoid fever, and the vaccination programs that also includes preschool children would be the best option for Nepal.

  7. [Fever monitoring program in areas with high incidence of typhoid and paratyphoid fever in Guizhou province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guang-hai; Tang, Guang-peng; Tian, Ke-cheng; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Jun-ling; Wang, Zi-jun; Jiang, You-qin; Zhao, Qi-liang; Chen, Xue; Chen, Shao-fen; Liu, Ming-qiang; Lu, Rong; Li, Ming; Wang, Ding-ming

    2013-03-01

    To understand the incidence rates of both typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever in the high prevalent areas of Guizhou province so as to provide evidence for the development of programs on comprehensive intervention and effectiveness evaluation. Six townships in Pingba county were selected as intervention areas while six townships in Kaiyang county were taken as control. All hospitals and clinics were classified into A, B and C types according to its level and the capacity of the blood culture. Surveillance on typhoid and paratyphoid fever was conducted based on all population and all hospitals, clinics and county CDCs among the patients with unknown fever. In the surveillance area in those two counties, there were 12 944 blood samples from patients with unknown fever which have been tested and cultured. Among them, 200 strains of Salmonella including 16 typhoid strains, 184 paratyphoid A strains were identified, with the total positive rate as 1.55%. The positive rate before the intervention program was higher than the after. The detection rate was 1.91% in the type A hospitals. 39 strains of Salmonella have been cultured from 2039 samples which accounting for 19.50% (39/200) of the total strains. 4315 blood samples were cultured at the 'Class B' sites which isolated 82 strains of Salmonella, accounting for 41.00% (82/200), with a detection rate as 1.90%. 6590 samples were cultured at the 'Class C' sites, which identified 79 strains of Salmonella, accounting for 39.50% (79/200), with a detection rate as 1.20%. The detection rate was much higher before the use of antibiotics than after using them (P typhoid and paratyphoid fever were not typical. Typhoid and paratyphoid monitoring programs which covered primary health care institutions in the high incidence area seemed to be effective in reflecting the pictures as well as the burden of both typhoid and paratyphoid.

  8. Prevention of fall incidents in patients with a high risk of falling: design of a randomised controlled trial with an economic evaluation of the effect of multidisciplinary transmural care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouter Lex M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annually, about 30% of the persons of 65 years and older falls at least once and 15% falls at least twice. Falls often result in serious injuries, such as fractures. Therefore, the prevention of accidental falls is necessary. The aim is to describe the design of a study that evaluates the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of multiple fall risk factors in independently living older persons with a high risk of falling. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomised controlled trial (RCT with an economic evaluation. Independently living persons of 65 years and older who recently experienced a fall are interviewed in their homes and screened for risk of recurrent falling using a validated fall risk profile. Persons at low risk of recurrent falling are excluded from the RCT. Persons who have a high risk of recurrent falling are blindly randomised into an intervention (n = 100 or usual care (n = 100 group. The intervention consists of a multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of multifactorial fall risk factors. The transmural multidisciplinary appraoch entails close cooperation between geriatrician, primary care physician, physical therapist and occupational therapist and can be extended with other specialists if relevant. A fall calendar is used to record falls during one year of follow-up. Primary outcomes are time to first and second falls. Three, six and twelve months after the home visit, questionnaires for economic evaluation are completed. After one year, during a second home visit, the secondary outcome measures are reassessed and the adherence to the interventions is evaluated. Data will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle and also an on-treatment analysis will be performed. Discussion Strengths of this study are the selection of persons at high risk of recurrent falling followed by a multidisciplinary intervention, its transmural character and

  9. [Diagnostic approach of recurrent fevers of unknown origin in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenone, T

    2015-07-01

    Recurrent fever of unknown origin is probably the most difficult to diagnose subtype of fever of unknown origin. It represents between 18 and 42% of the cases in large series of patients with fever of unknown origin. The limited literature data do not allow one to construct a diagnostic algorithm. However, the diagnostic strategy is different from classic fever of unknown origin. The spectrum of causative disorders is different from continuous fever with less infections and tumors. Among systemic inflammatory diseases, adult-onset Still's disease is the most common cause. More than 50% of the cases remain unexplained. Hereditary recurrent fevers, the prototype of autoinflammatory diseases, are now more easily discuss in a young adult. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Knowledge and management of fever among Latino parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Michael; Sabath, Bruce; Cranmer, Lisa; Gubser, Sasha; Dooley, Danielle

    2009-03-01

    Fever is a common childhood condition that is often misunderstood and incorrectly managed by parents. This study uses a questionnaire about fever administered to a convenience sample of Spanish-speaking-only parents bringing their child to a hospital-based urban pediatric clinic. The questionnaire elicits information about definition and cause of fever, concerns about fever, methods of temperature measurement, and treatment modalities used by the parents. Latino parents have numerous misconceptions about fever and its role in illness. Educational interventions should target fever definition, clarification of cause and potential harm of elevated temperatures, temperature monitoring, and safe treatment modalities. Owning a thermometer is strongly associated with correct knowledge of temperature values. Providing parents with a thermometer and educating them about its proper use may lead to an increase in appropriate monitoring and medical treatment of the febrile child.

  11. Typhoid Fever Complicated By Multiple Organ Involvement In A Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Taskesen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year old girl was admitted to our clinic because of fever, headache, diarrhea and weakness for 10 days. Dyspne, tachycardia, hypotension, fever and letargy were determined in physical examination. The levels of urea, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase were found to be increased. In echocardiography, myocardial dysfunction and low systolic functions were detected. Blood culture was positive for S.typhi. We report multiple organ involvement in a patient with typhoid fever and review the literature.

  12. Haematological Alterations Due to Typhoid Fever in Enugu Urban- Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okafor, A. I.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Some specific haematological changes that accompany chronic and severe typhoid fever were investigated in an endemic area of Enugu Urban-Nigeria. The results established that typhoid fever infections led to a statistically significant leucopenia (p < 0.05. In acute, chronic cases, leucopenia is accompanied with significant oligocythaemia, thrombocytopenia, anaemia and lowered haematocrit (p < 0.05. The importance of the results in the diagnosis and treatment of typhoid fever are discussed.

  13. Yellow fever cases in Asia: primed for an epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Wasserman; Paul Anantharajah Tambyah; Poh Lian Lim

    2016-01-01

    There is currently an emerging outbreak of yellow fever in Angola. Cases in infected travellers have been reported in a number of other African countries, as well as in China, representing the first ever documented cases of yellow fever in Asia. There is a large Chinese workforce in Angola, many of whom may be unvaccinated, increasing the risk of ongoing importation of yellow fever into Asia via busy commercial airline routes. Large parts of the region are hyperendemic for the related Flavivi...

  14. Clinical Features and Patient Management of Lujo Hemorrhagic Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Sewlall, Nivesh H.; Guy Richards; Adriano Duse; Robert Swanepoel; Janusz Paweska; Lucille Blumberg; Thu Ha Dinh; Daniel Bausch

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2008 a nosocomial outbreak of five cases of viral hemorrhagic fever due to a novel arenavirus, Lujo virus, occurred in Johannesburg, South Africa. Lujo virus is only the second pathogenic arenavirus, after Lassa virus, to be recognized in Africa and the first in over 40 years. Because of the remote, resource-poor, and often politically unstable regions where Lassa fever and other viral hemorrhagic fevers typically occur, there have been few opportunities to undertake in-depth st...

  15. Yellow Fever Outbreaks in Unvaccinated Populations, Brazil, 2008–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Pecego Martins Romano; Zouraide Guerra Antunes Costa; Daniel Garkauskas Ramos; Maria Auxiliadora Andrade; Valéria de Sá Jayme; Marco Antônio Barreto de Almeida; Kátia Campomar Vettorello; Melissa Mascheretti; Brendan Flannery

    2014-01-01

    Author Summary Yellow fever is a viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by mosquitos, endemic in tropical regions of Africa and South America. Large urban outbreaks of yellow fever have been eliminated in the Americas, where most yellow fever cases result from human exposure to jungle or forested environments. Vaccination is effective but carries a risk of potentially fatal adverse events in a small number of vaccinees. In a large country such as Brazil, vaccination is recommended only in area...

  16. Anesthesia experience along with familial Mediterranean fever and celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Sargın; Hale Borazan; Gülçin Hacıbeyoğlu; Şeref Otelcioğlu

    2015-01-01

    (Anesthetic management in patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac Disease) Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive transmitted disease which often seen at Mediterranean origin society and it goes by deterioration at inflammation control. Celiac disease is a proximal small intestine disease which develops gluten intolerance by autoimmune mechanism in sensitive people. Association of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease is a rare situation. In this art...

  17. Yellow fever in China is still an imported disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-05-23

    Yellow fever is a vector-borne disease endemic to tropical regions of Africa and South America. A recent outbreak in Angola caused hundreds of deaths. Six cases of yellow fever imported from Angola were reported recently in China. This raised the question of whether it will spread in China and how it can be prevented. This article discusses the possibility of yellow fever transmission in China and the strategies to counter it.

  18. Parental knowledge, concerns, and management of childhood fever in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Chuan; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Huang, Mei-Chih

    2013-12-01

    Childhood fever is a commonly treated condition in medical settings. Many studies around the world have reported on the phenomenon of parental fever phobia. Studies of parental knowledge regarding childhood fever are lacking in Taiwan. This study explores parental knowledge, concerns, and management of childhood fever and their correlates in Taiwan. This study used a cross-sectional survey and self-administered questionnaire. Six hundred forty-nine parents were recruited as participants from pediatric clinics and kindergartens in southern Taiwan. Nearly half (47.2%) of participants incompletely understood the healthcare information about childhood fever provided by physicians and nurses. Furthermore, 41.6% of parents were dissatisfied with the information provided. The median score of parental knowledge was 10 (interquartile range [IQR] = [8, 12] out of a maximum of 23). Parent gender, religion, education level, and occupation were independent predictors of knowledge scores. Parents who were never or sometimes concerned about childhood fever had significantly higher knowledge scores than those who were always concerned about childhood fever (median knowledge score: 11, IQR = [9, 13] vs. 10, IQR = [8, 11]). Most parents followed Western medical advice to manage childhood fever; however, 31.1% of parents combined this with traditional folk treatments. Levels of concern among parents included 86.6% of parents who frequently or always worried about their children's fever. Fever-induced anxiety was reported by 68.8% of the parents. Participants' lack of fever-related knowledge was because, in part, of either their not understanding or their dissatisfaction with provided information. The higher level of concern compared with other countries and studies indicates that parents in Taiwan need appropriate information about fever management to alleviate their concerns and guide them in caring for their febrile children.

  19. Influences on parents' fever management: beliefs, experiences and information sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne; Edwards, Helen; Fraser, Jenny

    2007-12-01

    To identify parents' knowledge, beliefs, management and sources of information about fever management. Despite numerous studies exploring parents' management of childhood fever; negative beliefs about fever and overuse of antipyretics and health services for mild fevers and self-limiting viral illnesses continue to be reported. Qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and discussions. Fifteen metropolitan parents whose children were aged six months to five years, volunteered to participate in individual interviews or group discussions. Recruitment was through Playgroup Queensland's online newsletter and letters from two childcare centres to all parents. Verbatim and audio data were collected by an experienced moderator using a semi-structured interview guide. Two transcripts were independently analysed by two researchers; categories, sub-headings and codes were independently developed, crosschecked and found comparable. Remaining transcripts were analysed using developed categories and codes. Fever, determined through behavioural changes, was perceived as 'good', a warning that something was wrong. High fever, reported as 38.0-39.1 degrees C, was considered harmful; it must be prevented or reduced irrespective of concerns about antipyretics. Positive febrile experiences reduced concern about fever. Negative experiences such as febrile convulsions, media reports of harm, not receiving a definitive diagnosis, inaccessibility to regular doctors and receiving conflicting information about fever management increased the concerns. Parents seek information about fever from multiple sources such as doctors, books and other parents. Parents' experiences with and information sources about fever and fever management influenced their knowledge, beliefs and practices. Positive experiences reduce concerns, health service usage and sometimes antipyretic usage. Negative experiences increase concerns, monitoring and antipyretic and health service usage. Health

  20. Doxycycline-induced drug fever: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hai-Ling; Lu, Ning-Wei; Xie, Hua; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Qiu-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Drug fever is a febrile reaction induced by a drug without additional clinical symptoms. This adverse reaction is not rare but under diagnosed and under reported. Doxycycline is a tetracycline compound with broad-spectrum antibiotic activity. Drug fever induced by doxycycline is rarely reported. In this study, we describe a patient in whom doxycycline induced drug fever after 17 days of therapy for brucellosis.

  1. Epidemiology and Epizootiological Investigations of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-30

    in East Africa. Dengue virus type 2 has Deen isolated in Coastal Kenya once out with no haemorrhagic manifestations. Marourg virus was initially...virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Congo-Crimean haemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa virus, Dengue virus, West Nile viruq or fellow Fever virus). Electron...to conduct the proposed field investigations. I. Office of the President 2. Ministry of Tourism and Wildlife 3. Ministry of Research, Science and

  2. Rheumatic Fever Associated with Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the clinical associations between rheumatic fever and antiphospholipid syndrome and the impact of coexistence of these two diseases in an individual. Methods. Systematic review in electronics databases, regarding the period from 1983 to 2012. The keywords: “Rheumatic Fever,” “Antiphospholipid Syndrome,” and “Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome” are used. Results. were identified 11 cases described in the literature about the association of rheumatic fever and antiphospho...

  3. Q fever: a case with a vascular infection complication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edouard, Sophie; Labussiere, Anne-Sophie; Guimard, Yves; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    The most common clinical presentation of chronic Q fever is endocarditis with infections of aneurysms or vascular prostheses being the second most common presentation. Here, the authors report a case of vascular chronic Q fever. In this patient, a renal artery aneurysm was discovered by abdominal and pelvic CT during a systematic investigation to identify predisposing factors to chronic Q fever because of high antibody titres in a patient with valve disease. PMID:22767654

  4. Juan-Ron fever: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sourya; Shukla, Samarth

    2015-01-01

    Juan-Ron fever named after Juan Rosai and Ronald Dorfman is the fever associated with Rosai-Dorfman disease also known as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML). It is a rare disorder of unknown etiology that is characterized by abundant macrophages in the lymph nodes throughout the body. Usually patient presents with painless lymphadenopathy. We present a case of a 45-year-old male who presented to us with bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy and fever, later on diagnosed to have SHML.

  5. Seir Model for Transmission of Dengue Fever in Selangor Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafruddin, S.; Noorani, M. S. M.

    In this paper, we study a system of differential equations that models the population dynamics of SEIR vector transmission of dengue fever. The model studied breeding value based on the number of reported cases of dengue fever in Selangor because the state had the highest case in Malaysia. The model explains that maximum level of human infection rate of dengue fever achieved in a very short period. It is also revealed that there existed suitability result between theoretical and empirical calculation using the model. The result of SEIR model will hopefully provide an insight into the spread of dengue fever in Selangor Malaysia and basic form for modeling this area.

  6. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (PFAPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cryopyrin-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndrome (CAPS) (Juvenile) Dermatomyositis (Juvenile) Familial Mediterranean Fever (Juvenile) Fibromyalgia Giant Cell Arteritis Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoperosis ...

  7. Anesthesia experience along with familial Mediterranean fever and celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sargın

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available (Anesthetic management in patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac Disease Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive transmitted disease which often seen at Mediterranean origin society and it goes by deterioration at inflammation control. Celiac disease is a proximal small intestine disease which develops gluten intolerance by autoimmune mechanism in sensitive people. Association of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease is a rare situation. In this article we present our anesthesia experience on a bilateral septic arthritis case who also have Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease association.

  8. Lassa fever presenting as acute abdomen: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongo, Andrew E; Kesieme, Emeka B; Iyamu, Christopher E; Okokhere, Peter O; Akhuemokhan, Odigie C; Akpede, George O

    2013-04-19

    Lassa fever, an endemic zoonotic viral infection in West Africa, presents with varied symptoms including fever, vomiting, retrosternal pain, abdominal pain, sore-throat, mucosal bleeding, seizures and coma. When fever and abdominal pain are the main presenting symptoms, and a diagnosis of acute abdomen is entertained, Lassa fever is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis, even in endemic areas. Rather the diagnosis of Lassa fever is suspected only after surgical intervention. Therefore, such patients often undergo unnecessary surgery with resultant delay in the commencement of ribavirin therapy. This increases morbidity and mortality and the risk of nosocomial transmission to hospital staff. We report 7 patients aged between 17 months and 40 years who had operative intervention for suspected appendicitis, perforated typhoid ileitis, intussuception and ruptured ectopic pregnancy after routine investigations. All seven were post-operatively confirmed as Lassa fever cases. Four patients died postoperatively, most before commencement of ribavirin, while the other three patients eventually recovered with appropriate antibiotic treatment including intravenous ribavirin. Surgeons working in West Africa should include Lassa fever in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen, especially appendicitis. The presence of high grade fever, proteinuria and thrombocytopenia in patients with acute abdomen should heighten the suspicion of Lassa fever. Prolonged intra-operative bleeding should not only raise suspicion of the disease but also serve to initiate precautions to prevent nosocomial transmission.

  9. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okokhere Peter O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented. Both patients developed severe sensorineural hearing loss at acute phases of the infections. Conclusion Sensorineural hearing loss from Lassa fever infections can occur in both acute and convalescent stages and is probably induced by an immune response.

  10. A Patient with Dengue Fever Presenting with Rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masayuki; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Nagahara, Hiroyuki; Hitsumoto, Tatsurou; Matsui, Shogo; Kadota, Hisaki; Shimizu, Hideaki; Ohshima, Kiyotaka; Yakushiji, Naoki; Hamada, Mareomi

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy stayed in Tokyo near Yoyogi Park for extracurricular high school activities. After returning home, he experienced an episode of fever and visited our emergency outpatient unit. He initially exhibited symptoms of leukopenia, thrombocytopenia and concomitant rhabdomyolysis and after admission simultaneously developed a biphasic fever and systemic erythema. Based on the results of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction testing, he was finally diagnosed with dengue fever. After an absence of 70 years, dengue fever has reemerged as a domestic infection. Awareness of this trend led to our diagnosis.

  11. Familial mediterranean fever in an Iranian patient with behcet disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most prevalent disorder among the hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes. This disorder is characterized by fever and some painful attacks such as abdominal, chest or joint pain and potentially development of AA amyloidosis. Several vasculitis are more common in FMF than general population. There are some reports about association of FMF with Behcet Disease (BD). In this study, we describe a 27 year old patient with BD who suffered from attacks of fever, arthralgia, abdominal pain and genetic study confirmed the diagnosis of FMF. FMF should be considered in a patient with Behcet disease who is suffering from attacks of fever, arthralgia and abdominal pain.

  12. Urbanisation of yellow fever in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Stuyft, P; Gianella, A; Pirard, M; Cespedes, J; Lora, J; Peredo, C; Pelegrino, J L; Vorndam, V; Boelaert, M

    1999-05-08

    Until recently, urban yellow fever had not been reported from the Americas since 1954, but jungle yellow fever increasingly affects forest dwellers in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. The reinvasion by Aedes aegypti of cities in the Americas now threatens to urbanize yellow fever. After yellow fever infection was identified in a resident of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, in December 1997, all subsequent suspected cases were investigated. Active surveillance of yellow fever was introduced in the Santa Cruz area, with hospitals and selected urban and rural health centers reporting all suspected cases. Patients were serologically screened for yellow fever, dengue, hepatitis A and B, and leptospirosis; clinical and epidemiological data were collected from patients' records and through interviews; and a population-based serosurvey was conducted in the neighborhood of one case. Between December 1997 and June 1998, symptomatic yellow fever infection was confirmed in 6 residents of Santa Cruz, of whom 5 died. 5 lived in the southern sector of the city. 2 cases did not leave the city during their incubation period, and 1 had visited only an area in which sylvatic transmission was deemed impossible. Of the 281 people covered in the serosurvey, 16 (6%) were positive for IgM antibody to yellow fever. Among 5 people for whom that result could not be explained by recent vaccination, there were 2 pairs of neighbors. This instance of urban yellow fever transmission was limited in both time and space.

  13. Fever of unknown origin in aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S-M

    2017-05-01

    Aortic dissection is the most devastating sequela of thoracic aortic disorder. Patients with acute aortic dissection typically manifest as an acute onset of severe chest pain, but occasionally present with atypical symptoms including fever of unknown origin. A total of 50 patients from 41 articles based on a complete literature retrieval were included in this study. More patients had a fever prior to pain. The time to presentation was 40.7 ± 105.6 days, the time to diagnosis was 52.9 ± 110.1 days, and the time to surgery/intervention was 1.8 ± 5.6 days. The patients' temperature on admission was 38.2 ± 0.6 °C and the maximal temperature recorded was 38.8 ± 0.4 °C. Laboratory findings showed increased white blood cell counts, cardiac enzymes, and inflammatory biomarkers. More pronounced laboratory findings of the infectious type than the inflammatory type aortic dissection could be helpful in the differential diagnosis. Half of patients warrant aortic repair with or without valve replacement, less than half of patients were conservatively managed, and a few were interventionally treated or were being followed up. The mortality rate was 9.5 %. Physicians should always bear in mind aortic dissection when patients present with fever of unknown origin particularly in those without chest pain. Laboratory findings may offer inflammatory evidence for the diagnosis. An early diagnosis as well as subsequent treatment is indispensable for patients' outcomes.

  14. [Effects of fever education on changing parental concepts and management of fever in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei-Chih; Shih, Chao-Jung

    2004-12-01

    "Fever phobia" has been found to decrease parents' ability to assess and manage febrile children appropriately, increase the utilization of emergency health care services, and add to the burden of family finances. Educational intervention is an important means of changing parents' knowledge, attitudes, and practices in order to counteract their misconceptions and over-anxiety, and improve the children's health. Parent-oriented education programs can be conducted in various ways, both inside and outside the clinic. However, evidence of the efficacy of given interventions from systematic evaluation of the literature is required to convince pediatric experts what content to teach and what methods to employ daily. The relevant literature from 1980 to 2004 were collected and reorganized to present the theories, contents, methods, effects, and influencing factors of various fever educational interventions. Accordingly, this article could provide healthcare professionals more information about the efficacy, accurate and reliable of various fever education programs. Thus, impel healthcare professionals provide more information to parents for improving parents' actions and decision making on fever management.

  15. Ciprofloxacin resistant osteomyelitis following typhoid fever

    OpenAIRE

    Ayeni, Itunuayo V; Calver, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella typi is a rare cause of chronic osteomyelitis in a non-sickle cell patient. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old gentleman with a history of typhoid fever and an infected skin nodule on his left forearm 5 years prior to the diagnosis. He was referred to our orthopaedic colleagues with chronic osteomyelitis and underwent debridement of the bone for which samples grew Salmonella typhi. He was commenced on intravenous ceftriaxone 2 g once daily for 6 weeks followed by oral azi...

  16. A common pathway in periodic fever syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Michael F

    2004-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease due to mutations in pyrin, which normally inhibits pro-interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) cytokine processing to the active form. A novel role for pyrin has been proposed by Shoham et al., who studied patients with an autosomal dominant disease called pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome. They demonstrated an interaction between pyrin and proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1), the protein involved in PAPA, and thus revealed a biochemical pathway common to both FMF and PAPA.

  17. Fever of Unknown Origin in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusid, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    Childhood fever of unknown origin (FUO) is most often related to an underlying infection but can also be associated with a variety of neoplastic, rheumatologic, and inflammatory conditions. Repeated, focused reviews of patient history and physical examination are often helpful in suggesting a likely diagnosis. Diagnostic workup should be staged, usually leaving invasive testing for last. Advances in molecular genetic techniques have increased the importance of these assays in the diagnosis of FUO in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fever of unknown origin in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizidou, A; Aoun, M; Klastersky, J

    2016-05-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains a challenging clinical problem, namely in patients with cancer. In cancer patients, FUO may be due to the cancer itself, as it is the case of hematological malignancies; digestive tumors (colon cancer, liver metastases) are significantly associated with FUO and infection can be demonstrated in some cases. Prevention with G-CSF and empirical antimicrobial therapy are essential approaches for the management of FUO in cancer patients. New diagnostic approaches, such as PET imaging, should be further evaluated in cancer patients with FUO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. STUDY OF ULTRASOUND FINDING IN DENGUE FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Bajaj

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dengue fever (DF is a viral haemorrhagic fever causing severe morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The aim of the study is to describe the role of ultrasonography (USG in the assessment of patients with Dengue fever, and its complications and to prove ultrasound is useful in the diagnosis during an epidemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is a prospective study was conducted in 2016 comprising of 178 patients who were serologically positive for dengue, radiological investigations were conducted in all cases. RESULTS Out of 178 patients Males (N=117 are more effected subjects in the study. female: Male ratio is 1:2. Hepatomegaly 74.1% which is most common findings in study, 113 (63.4% had GB wall thickening 98 had ascites (55%, 32 had pleural effusion (17.9%. most commonly seen in the age group of 20-39 years. Hepatomegaly was the most common finding noted in 67 patients (37.6%, followed by GB wall thickening in 65 patients (36.1%. Hepatomegaly was more common in 0-19 is 56 patients with 31.4% years age group Ascites in >40 years age group (16.8%. Hepatomegaly was seen in most of the patients whose platelet count was <40,000. (94.7%. GB wall thickening (88.5% common findings seen in patients whose platelet count was <40,000. In patients with platelet count of 40,000-80,000, Ascites is most common finding (87.5%, followed by Splenomegaly (60.7%. In patients whose platelet count was 80,000-150,000, Ascites (50% was more common than Splenomegaly (45.8%. In three patients with platelet count more than 150,000, no sonological abnormality was detected. CONCLUSIONS Ultrasound findings of hepatic changes, GB wall oedema, splenomegaly, ascites and pleural effusion in patients presenting with signs and symptoms of Dengue fever during an epidemic are diagnostic. Contributing in the differential diagnosis with other causes of febrile disease.

  20. [Antigenic diversity of African swine fever viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, A D; Balyshev, V M

    2011-01-01

    Data on the seroimmunotypic and hemadsorbing characteristics of African swine fever virus (ASF) are summarized. According to the results of immunological sampling in pigs and those of hemagglutination inhibition test, the known ASFV strains and isolates were divided into 11 groups, 8 were characterized as seroimmunogroups having their specific reference strains. A 110-140-kD ASFV serotype-specific nonstructural major glycoprotein was identified. It is suggested that it is the glycoprotein that corresponds to the genetic engineering detected virus-specific homolog of lymphocyte membrane protein CD2, gene deletion of which results in the loss of hemadsorbing properties by ASFV.

  1. [Conjugate vaccines against bacterial infections: typhoid fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, J; García, J A; López, C R; González, C R; Isibasi, A; Kumate, J

    1992-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides have been studied as possible vaccines against infectious diseases. However, they are capable to induce only short-run protection because of their T-independent properties and they would not be protective against infection in high-risk populations. The alternative to face this problem is to develop methods to join covalently the polysaccharide and proteins to both increase the immunogenicity of and to confer the property of T-dependence to this antigen. In order to obtain a conjugate vaccine against typhoid fever, in our laboratory we have tried to synthesize a conjugate immunogen between the Vi antigen and porins from Salmonella typhi.

  2. Chikungunya fever in Los Angeles, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Katherine R; Bhatt, Sanjay; Kim, Hyung T; Mallon, William K

    2014-11-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old woman returning from Haiti, presenting to our emergency department (ED) with fever, rash and arthralgia. Following a broad workup that included laboratory testing for dengue and malaria, our patient was diagnosed with Chikungunya virus, which was then reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for initiation of infection control. This case demonstrates the importance of the ED for infectious disease case identification and initiation of public health measures. This case also addresses public health implications of Chikungunya virus within the United States, and issues related to the potential for local spread and autochthonous cases.

  3. Fever after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : relation with extent of hydrocephalus and amount of extravasated blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, Sanne M; Luitse, Merel J A; van den Bergh, Walter M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Fever after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is associated with poor outcome. Because hydrocephalus and extravasated blood may influence thermoregulation, we determined whether these factors increase the risk for fever after subarachnoid hemorrhage. METHODS: Fever within 14

  4. Evidence-based provisional clinical classification criteria for autoinflammatory periodic fevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Federici, Silvia; Sormani, Maria Pia; Ozen, Seza; Lachmann, Helen J; Amaryan, Gayane; Woo, Patricia; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Dewarrat, Natacha; Cantarini, Luca; Insalaco, Antonella; Uziel, Yosef; Rigante, Donato; Quartier, Pierre; Demirkaya, Erkan; Herlin, Troels; Meini, Antonella; Fabio, Giovanna; Kallinich, Tilmann; Martino, Silvana; Butbul, Aviel Yonatan; Olivieri, Alma; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Neven, Benedicte; Simon, Anna; Ozdogan, Huri; Touitou, Isabelle; Frenkel, Joost; Hofer, Michael; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Gattorno, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and validate a set of clinical criteria for the classification of patients affected by periodic fevers. Patients with inherited periodic fevers (familial Mediterranean fever (FMF); mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD); tumour necrosis factor

  5. Parents' Perception, Knowledge and Self-Efficacy in Management of Childhood Fever

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeong, Yong-Sun; Oh, Hyun-Ei; Kim, Jin-Sun

    2010-01-01

    .... The purposes of this study were to investigate perception, knowledge of childhood fever and fever management and self-efficacy in fever management by parents and to identify the relationship between...

  6. Fever in a traveler returning from the Amazon. Do not forget hepatitis A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Teper, Rina Seerke; Raza, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Travelers returning from the tropics with fever remain a diagnostic challenge. Fever and chills suggest malaria, but may be present in dengue, chikungunya and influenza, and splenomegaly favors malaria or typhoid fever. In terms of laboratory tests, leukopenia suggests dengue fever, chikungunya fever or influenza. Atypical lymphocytes are present in malaria, dengue fever, chikungunya fever and influenza HAV, but not typhoid fever. Thrombocytopenia is profound in dengue fever, is also present in influenza and malaria. Mildly increased serum transaminases are common in malaria, typhoid fever, dengue fever, chikungunya fever and influenza while very high serum transaminases point to HAV. We present a case of a young woman traveler returning from the Amazon with splenomegaly, leukopenia, atypical lymphocytes, elevated LDH and minimally elevated serum transaminases who was found to have acute hepatitis A infection.

  7. Fever in a traveler returning from the Amazon. Do not forget hepatitis A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Travelers returning from the tropics with fever remain a diagnostic challenge. Fever and chills suggest malaria, but may be present in dengue, chikungunya and influenza, and splenomegaly favors malaria or typhoid fever. In terms of laboratory tests, leukopenia suggests dengue fever, chikungunya fever or influenza. Atypical lymphocytes are present in malaria, dengue fever, chikungunya fever and influenza HAV, but not typhoid fever. Thrombocytopenia is profound in dengue fever, is also present in influenza and malaria. Mildly increased serum transaminases are common in malaria, typhoid fever, dengue fever, chikungunya fever and influenza while very high serum transaminases point to HAV. We present a case of a young woman traveler returning from the Amazon with splenomegaly, leukopenia, atypical lymphocytes, elevated LDH and minimally elevated serum transaminases who was found to have acute hepatitis A infection.

  8. A prospective study of fever in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circiumaru, B; Baldock, G; Cohen, J

    1999-07-01

    To determine the epidemiology of fever on the intensive care unit (ICU). Prospective, observational study. Nine-bed general ICU in a 500-bed tertiary care inner city institution. 100 consecutive admissions of 93 patients over a 4-month period between July and October 1996. All patients were seen and examined by one investigator within 24 h of ICU admission. Patients were followed up on a daily basis throughout their ICU stay, and all clinical and laboratory data were recorded during the admission. Fever (core temperature > or = 38.4 degrees C) was present in 70% of admissions, and it was caused by infective and non-infective processes in approximately equal number. Most fevers occurred early in the course of the admission, within the first 1-2 days, and most lasted less than 5 days. The median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 15 (+/- 0.6). The 70 episodes associated with fever at any time were associated with a significantly higher APACHE II score on admission than the afebrile episodes (15.8 +/- 6.1 vs 12.1 +/- 6.7, p = 0.04). The most common cause of non-infective fever was in the group designated post-operative fever (n = 34). All the patients in the post-operative fever group were febrile on day 0 or day 1; their mean admission APACHE score was 12.4 (+/- 4.4) compared to 15.9 (+/- 7.1) for the remaining patients (p = 0.01). Fever alone was not associated with a higher mortality: 26/70 (37%) of febrile patients died, compared to 8/30 (27%) of afebrile patients, (chi 2 = 1.23, p = 0.38). Prolonged fever (> 5 days) occurred in 16 patients. In 13 cases, fever was due to infection, and in the remaining 3 both infective and non-infective processes occurred concurrently. The mortality in the group with prolonged fever was 62.5% (10/16) compared to 29.6% (16/54) in patients with fever of less than 5 days' duration, a highly significant difference (p Fever is a common event on the intensive care unit. It usually occurs early in the

  9. Typhoid Fever in South Africa in an Endemic HIV Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddy, Karen H; Sooka, Arvinda; Smith, Anthony M; Musekiwa, Alfred; Tau, Nomsa P; Klugman, Keith P; Angulo, Frederick J

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains an important disease in Africa, associated with outbreaks and the emerging multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (Salmonella Typhi) haplotype, H58. This study describes the incidence of, and factors associated with mortality due to, typhoid fever in South Africa, where HIV prevalence is high. Nationwide active laboratory-based surveillance for culture-confirmed typhoid fever was undertaken from 2003-2013. At selected institutions, additional clinical data from patients were collected including age, sex, HIV status, disease severity and outcome. HIV prevalence among typhoid fever patients was compared to national HIV seroprevalence estimates. The national reference laboratory tested Salmonella Typhi isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility and haplotype. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression analyses were conducted determining factors associated with typhoid fever mortality. We identified 855 typhoid fever cases: annual incidence ranged from 0.11 to 0.39 per 100,000 population. Additional clinical data were available for 369 (46.8%) cases presenting to the selected sites. Among typhoid fever patients with known HIV status, 19.3% (29/150) were HIV-infected. In adult females, HIV prevalence in typhoid fever patients was 43.2% (19/44) versus 15.7% national HIV seroprevalence (P Typhoid fever incidence in South Africa was largely unchanged from 2003-2013. Typhoid fever mortality was associated disease severity. HIV infection may be a contributing factor. Interventions mandate improved health care access, including to HIV management programmes as well as patient education. Further studies are necessary to clarify relationships between HIV infection and typhoid fever in adults.

  10. Differentiation of Acute Q Fever from Other Infections in Patients Presenting to Hospitals, the Netherlands 1

    OpenAIRE

    Keijmel, S.P.; Krijger, E.; Delsing, C.E.; Sprong, T; Nabuurs-Franssen, M.H.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating acute Q fever from infections caused by other pathogens is essential. We conducted a retrospective case-control study to evaluate differences in clinical signs, symptoms, and outcomes for 82 patients with acute Q fever and 52 control patients who had pneumonia, fever and lower respiratory tract symptoms, or fever and hepatitis, but had negative serologic results for Q fever. Patients with acute Q fever were younger and had higher C-reactive protein levels but lower leukocyte c...

  11. Phylogeography of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimentov, Alexander S.; Dzagurova, Tamara K.; Drexler, Jan Felix; Gmyl, Anatoly P.

    2016-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is one of the most severe viral zoonozes. It is prevalent throughout Africa, Asia and southern Europe. Limited availability of sequence data has hindered phylogeographic studies. The complete genomic sequence of all three segments of 14 Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus strains isolated from 1958–2000 in Russia, Central Asia and Africa was identified. Each genomic segment was independently subjected to continuous Bayesian phylogeographic analysis. The origin of each genomic segment was traced to Africa about 1,000–5,000 years ago. The virus was first introduced to South and Central Asia in the Middle Ages, and then spread to China, India and Russia. Reverse transfers of genomic segments from Asia to Africa were also observed. The European CCHFV genotype V was introduced to Europe via the Astrakhan region in South Russia 280–400 years ago and subsequently gradually spread westward in Russia, to Turkey and the Balkans less than 150 years ago. Only a few recombination events could be suggested in S and L genomic segments, while segment reassortment was very common. The median height of a non-reassortant phylogenetic tree node was 68–156 years. There were reassortment events within the European CCHFV lineage, but not with viruses from other locations. Therefore, CCHFV in Europe is a recently emerged zoonosis that represents a spillover from the global gene pool. PMID:27880794

  12. Ciprofloxacin resistant osteomyelitis following typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayeni, Itunuayo V; Calver, Graeme

    2012-07-13

    Salmonella typi is a rare cause of chronic osteomyelitis in a non-sickle cell patient. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old gentleman with a history of typhoid fever and an infected skin nodule on his left forearm 5 years prior to the diagnosis. He was referred to our orthopaedic colleagues with chronic osteomyelitis and underwent debridement of the bone for which samples grew Salmonella typhi. He was commenced on intravenous ceftriaxone 2 g once daily for 6 weeks followed by oral azithromycin 500 mg once daily for a further 6 weeks. The purpose of this case report is to consider the possible mode for antibiotic resistance. In this patient, the authors believe that partial treatment of the typhoid fever 5 years prior to diagnosis of osteomyelitis enabled antibiotic resistance to ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, the authors believe that the infected nodule was the result of direct inoculation with the Salmonella organism which then acted as a focus for further infections.

  13. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Corinne N; Kama, Mike; Acharya, Shrish; Bera, Una; Clemens, John; Crump, John A; Dawainavesi, Aggie; Dougan, Gordon; Edmunds, W John; Fox, Kimberley; Jenkins, Kylie; Khan, M Imran; Koroivueta, Josefa; Levine, Myron M; Martin, Laura B; Nilles, Eric; Pitzer, Virginia E; Singh, Shalini; Raiwalu, Ratu Vereniki; Baker, Stephen; Mulholland, Kim

    2014-10-01

    The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Ministry of Health, with support from Australian Aid, hosted a meeting in August 2012 to develop comprehensive control and prevention strategies for typhoid fever in Fiji. International and local specialists were invited to share relevant data and discuss typhoid control options. The resultant recommendations focused on generating a clearer sense of the epidemiology of typhoid in Fiji and exploring the contribution of potential transmission pathways. Additionally, the panel suggested steps such as ensuring that recommended ciprofloxacin doses are appropriate to reduce the potential for relapse and reinfection in clinical cases, encouraging proper hand hygiene of food and drink handlers, working with water and sanitation agencies to review current sanitation practices and considering a vaccination policy targeting epidemiologically relevant populations. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Typhoid fever as cellular microbiological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Dahir Ramos de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge about typhoid fever pathogenesis is growing in the last years, mainly about the cellular and molecular phenomena that are responsible by clinical manifestations of this disease. In this article are discussed several recent discoveries, as follows: a Bacterial type III protein secretion system; b The five virulence genes of Salmonella spp. that encoding Sips (Salmonella invasion protein A, B, C, D and E, which are capable of induce apoptosis in macrophages; c The function of Toll R2 and Toll R4 receptors present in the macrophage surface (discovered in the Drosophila. The Toll family receptors are critical in the signalizing mediated by LPS in macrophages in association with LBP and CD14; d The lines of immune defense between intestinal lumen and internal organs; e The fundamental role of the endothelial cells in the inflammatory deviation from bloodstream into infected tissues by bacteria. In addition to above subjects, the authors comment the correlation between the clinical features of typhoid fever and the cellular and molecular phenomena of this disease, as well as the therapeutic consequences of this knowledge.

  15. Clinical genetic testing of periodic fever syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Kleiner, Giulio; Tommasini, Alberto; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Monasta, Lorenzo; Crovella, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes (PFSs) are a wide group of autoinflammatory diseases. Due to some clinical overlap between different PFSs, differential diagnosis can be a difficult challenge. Nowadays, there are no universally agreed recommendations for most PFSs, and near half of patients may remain without a genetic diagnosis even after performing multiple-gene analyses. Molecular analysis of periodic fevers' causative genes can improve patient quality of life by providing early and accurate diagnosis and allowing the administration of appropriate treatment. In this paper we focus our discussion on effective usefulness of genetic diagnosis of PFSs. The aim of this paper is to establish how much can the diagnostic system improve, in order to increase the success of PFS diagnosis. The mayor expectation in the near future will be addressed to the so-called next generation sequencing approach. Although the application of bioinformatics to high-throughput genetic analysis could allow the identification of complex genotypes, the complexity of this definition will hardly result in a clear contribution for the physician. In our opinion, however, to obtain the best from this new development a rule should always be kept well in mind: use genetics only to answer specific clinical questions.

  16. Acetaminophen: beyond pain and fever-relieving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eBlough

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen, also known as APAP or paracetamol, is one of the most widely used analgesics (pain reliever and antipyretics (fever reducer. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA, currently there are 235 approved prescription and over-the-counter drug products containing acetaminophen as an active ingredient. When used as directed, acetaminophen is very safe and effective; however when taken in excess or ingested with alcohol hepatotoxicity and irreversible liver damage can arise. In addition to well known use pain relief and fever reduction, recent laboratory and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that acetaminophen may also have beneficial effects on blood glucose levels, skeletal muscle function, and potential use as cardioprotective and neuroprotective agents. Extensive laboratory and pre-clinical studies have revealed that these off label applications may be derived from the ability of acetaminophen to function as an antioxidant. Herein, we will highlight these novel applications of acetaminophen, and attempt, where possible, to highlight how these findings may lead to new directions of inquiry and clinical relevance of other disorders.

  17. Biologic therapy in familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Tomohiro; Migita, Kiyoshi; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common autoinflammatory hereditary disease characterized by self-limited attacks of fever and serositis. Although colchicine is the gold standard treatment for the attacks ∼10% of cases of FMF are resistant or intolerant to effective doses of colchicine. In such cases, however, there are increasing numbers of case reports or clinical trials treated by biologic agents which directly target the proinflammatory cytokines. Anti-interleukin-1 (IL-1) treatment has proven beneficial in improving the inflammation in terms of clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in clinical trials. Furthermore, anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment has also revealed the efficacy and safety in patients with colchicine-resistant FMF. More recently, cases of successful treatment with IL-6 inhibitor, tocilizumab (TCZ), has been reported from Japan and Turkey. Of note, TCZ may be preferable in the treatment as well as the prevention of secondary amyloidosis of FMF patients since it significantly suppresses acute inflammatory response. In the present review, we summarize the literatures regarding the efficacy of biologic therapy in colchicine-resistant or -intolerant patients with FMF.

  18. Familial Mediterranean fever and cryptogenic cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweezer-Zaks, Nurit; Doron-Libner, Anat; Weiss, Perez; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Barshack, Iris; Lidar, Merav; Livneh, Avi

    2007-11-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a febrile disease characterized by acute, spontaneously resolving episodes of fever and pain caused by serosal inflammation and associated with mutations in the FMF gene, MEFV. Prophylaxis is maintained with colchicine. To our knowledge, no study has yet shown an association between FMF and cirrhosis of the liver. We conducted the current study to describe cryptogenic cirrhosis in FMF and to examine the possible relationship between the 2 entities. Patients with chronic liver disease were retrospectively identified through a computer search of a registry of 6000 patients with FMF followed in the clinics of the National Center for FMF. Data pertaining to FMF phenotype and genotype and characteristics of the liver disease were abstracted from patients' charts. Cryptogenic cause of cirrhosis was determined by exclusion of known causes of liver disease. Nine patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis were identified, comprising 0.15% of the FMF patient population, a rate significantly higher than the rate of 0.015% of cirrhosis of all types expected in the total population of Israel (p cirrhosis diagnosis, and was classified as A in 4 of them. These findings suggest that MEFV may serve as a modifier gene in cryptogenic cirrhosis. Genetic analysis in patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis unrelated to FMF, particularly patients of a Mediterranean origin, may be warranted in future studies.

  19. African swine fever: an epidemiological update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Mur, L; Martínez-López, B

    2012-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is one of the most important swine diseases, mainly because of its significant sanitary and socioeconomic consequences. This review gives an update on the epidemiology of the disease and reviews key issues and strategies to improve control of the disease and promote its eradication. Several characteristics of ASF virus (ASFV) make its control and eradication difficult, including the absence of available vaccines, marked virus resistance in infected material and contaminated animal products, and a complex epidemiology and transmission involving tick reservoir virus interactions. The incidence of ASF has not only increased on the African continent over the last 15 years, so that it now affects West African countries, Mauritius and Madagascar, but it has also reached new areas, such as the Caucasus region in 2007. In fact, the rapid spread of the disease on the European continent and the uncontrolled situation in the Russian Federation places all countries at great risk as a result of intense global trade. The proximity of some affected areas to the European Union (EU) borders (African swine fever -free countries should be aware of the potential risk of ASF incursion and implement risk reduction measures such as trade controls and other sanitary measures. This review will discuss lessons learnt so far about ASF control, current challenges to its control and future studies needed to support global efforts at prevention and control.

  20. Care for patients with vascular chronic Q fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, J.C.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Q fever is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a Gram-negative and intracellular bacterium. From 2007 to 2010, the Netherlands was confronted with the world’s largest Q fever outbreak. Dairy goats were identified to be the source. At the end of 2009, the outbreak expanded enormously (with 1000 patients in