WorldWideScience

Sample records for fetal bis-diamine syndrome

  1. Neutron induced teratogenesis and spermatogenesis inhibitor fertilysin induced fetal bis-diamine syndrome in the rat. An animal model for DiGeorge and CATCH22 syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Shuneki

    2003-01-01

    To develop preventive and regenerative medicine measures and to clarify the effect of neutron-irradiation and Fertilysin on vasculogenesis and teratogenesis, we decided to investigate the pathogenesis of these abnormalities in this study and compare them to abnormalities reported in humans. Pregnant rats were exposed to graded doses of 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation or Fertilysin on day 10 of gestation. The rats were sacrificed on day 18 of gestation, examined for lethality and surviving fetuses, and were microdissected for malformations. Our studies showed that neutron irradiation of rats commonly induced abnormalities whose types included eye, limb and tail defects, transposition of the great arteries, riding aorta, right aortic arch and aortic arch anomalies. These results suggest that maternal exposure to neutron-irradiation may have caused DNA damage and neural crest deficiency in offspring. These results are similar to those found in animal models with Retinoic acid syndrome and human fetuses with DiGeorge syndrome, a condition considered as a pharyngeal arch syndrome related to a cephalic neurocristopathy. In addition, multi-organ malformations associated with the highest incidences of abnormal vasculogenesis, cardiac outflow tracts and aortic arch anomalies such as right aortic arch and aberrant subclavian artery were found to be consistently produced following maternal exposure to Fertilysin on day 10 of gestation. Evidently the crucial scenario for administering Fertilysin to cause the cardiovascular defects of all surviving fetuses, in which over 80% of the fetuses were persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA) and the remainder was tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), is 200 mg for day 10 of gestation. This corresponds in humans to approximately day 21 after conception. A mechanism involving DNA damage, disruption of neural crest cells and growth and transcription factors, as well as growth failure of the branchial arches from apoptosis and neurocristopathy of the third

  2. Neutron induced teratogenesis and spermatogenesis inhibitor fertilysin induced fetal bis-diamine syndrome in the rat. An animal model for DiGeorge and CATCH22 syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoji, Shuneki [Hiroshima Univ., Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    To develop preventive and regenerative medicine measures and to clarify the effect of neutron-irradiation and Fertilysin on vasculogenesis and teratogenesis, we decided to investigate the pathogenesis of these abnormalities in this study and compare them to abnormalities reported in humans. Pregnant rats were exposed to graded doses of 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation or Fertilysin on day 10 of gestation. The rats were sacrificed on day 18 of gestation, examined for lethality and surviving fetuses, and were microdissected for malformations. Our studies showed that neutron irradiation of rats commonly induced abnormalities whose types included eye, limb and tail defects, transposition of the great arteries, riding aorta, right aortic arch and aortic arch anomalies. These results suggest that maternal exposure to neutron-irradiation may have caused DNA damage and neural crest deficiency in offspring. These results are similar to those found in animal models with Retinoic acid syndrome and human fetuses with DiGeorge syndrome, a condition considered as a pharyngeal arch syndrome related to a cephalic neurocristopathy. In addition, multi-organ malformations associated with the highest incidences of abnormal vasculogenesis, cardiac outflow tracts and aortic arch anomalies such as right aortic arch and aberrant subclavian artery were found to be consistently produced following maternal exposure to Fertilysin on day 10 of gestation. Evidently the crucial scenario for administering Fertilysin to cause the cardiovascular defects of all surviving fetuses, in which over 80% of the fetuses were persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA) and the remainder was tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), is 200 mg for day 10 of gestation. This corresponds in humans to approximately day 21 after conception. A mechanism involving DNA damage, disruption of neural crest cells and growth and transcription factors, as well as growth failure of the branchial arches from apoptosis and neurocristopathy of the third

  3. Teratogenic effects of bis-diamine on early embryonic rat heart: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, S; Nakagawa, M; Fujino, H; Hanato, T; Okamoto, N; Shimada, M

    2000-08-01

    Bis-diamine induces cardiac defects, including conotruncal anomalies in rat embryos when the agent is administered to the mother. To evaluate the teratogenic effects and mechanism of bis-diamine, we performed morphological and immunohistochemical analyses of early rat embryos cultured in medium containing bis-diamine. The embryos were removed from mother rats on gestational day 10.5 and cultured in medium containing 1 mg of bis-diamine for 6 hr. The embryos were then cultured in medium only for another 6, 12, 18, and 42 hr, corresponding to embryonic day (ED) 11.0, 11.25, 11.5, and 12.5, respectively. Some embryos from the same mothers were used as controls and were cultured in medium only for the corresponding periods to the embryos exposed to bis-diamine. Some mother rats were given a single oral dose of 200 mg of bis-diamine on gestational day 10.5. Embryos from these pregnant rats were removed 6 hr after the oral administration of bis-diamine, and were also cultured in medium only for 6, 12, 18, and 42 hr. No cardiac abnormalities were detected in the controls at any stage of development. Thirty-three of 51 (65%) embryos exposed to bis-diamine and 15 of 20 (75%) embryos removed from bis-diamine-administered mothers showed abnormal cardiac development, including dilated ventricle, elongation of outflow tract, and pericardial defect on ED 11.5. Four of six (67%) embryos exposed to bis-diamine, and five of seven (71%) removed from bis-diamine-administered mothers also presented almost the same cardiac abnormalities on ED 12.5. No cardiac abnormalities were detected in bis-diamine-treated embryos before ED 11.5. In addition, the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) was examined using immunohistochemical methods. Fewer N-CAM immunoreactive cells were detected in the third and fourth aortic arches in the bis-diamine-treated embryos than in controls on ED 11.5. However, more N-CAM immunoreactive cells were detected in the bis-diamine-treated embryos

  4. Developmental defects of coronary vasculature in rat embryos administered bis-diamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanato, Takashi; Nakagawa, Masao; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nishijima, Setsuko; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Shimada, Morimi; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko

    2011-02-01

    Conotruncal anomalies are often associated with abnormal coronary arteries. Although bis-diamine is known to induce conotruncal defects, its pathological effects on coronary vascular development have not been demonstrated. This study sought to assess the teratogenic effects of bis-diamine on coronary vascular development and the pathogenesis of this anomalous association. A single 200 mg dose of bis-diamine was administered to pregnant Wistar rats at 10.5 days of gestation. Fifty-two embryos from 10 mother rats underwent morphological analysis of the coronary arteries. Three embryos each were removed from four mothers on embryonic days (ED) 14.5, 15.5, 16.5, and 17.5 and used for immunohistochemical studies using the anti-vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 antibody. Conotruncal anomalies were detected in 48 of 52 embryos, and an aplastic or hypoplastic left coronary artery was found in all of them. In control embryos at ED 16.5, VCAM-1-positive epicardial cells were transformed into mesenchymal cells in vascular plexus, which appeared to differentiate into the endothelial cells of coronary vasculature. In the heart at ED 17.5, coronary vasculature was well developed and connected with coronary ostia near the aorta. However, poor epicardial-mesenchymal transformation and subsequent differentiation was revealed in bis-diamine-treated embryos at EDs 16.5 and 17.5, causing abnormal development of the coronary vasculature and incomplete connections with coronary ostia of the aorta. Anomalous coronary arteries in the bis-diamine-treated embryos are induced by the disruption of epicardial-mesenchymal transformation and subsequent poor development of coronary vasculature. Incomplete hatching of the coronary ostium is associated with abnormal truncal division. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Fetal warfarin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathienkijkanchai, Achara; Wasant, Pornswan

    2005-11-01

    Fetuses exposed to Warfarin in the first trimester of pregnancy have an increased risk of embryopathy which consists of nasal hypoplasia and stippled epiphyses, known as fetal warfarin syndrome or warfarin embryopathy. We herein report a first case of an infant with fetal warfarin syndrome in Thailand. The patient was an offspring of a 34-year-old mother with history of SLE and arterial embolism for several years. She had an unplanned pregnancy while taking warfarin. The patient developed difficulty breathing in the first few hours after birth from severe nasal hypoplasia. He also had short limbs, brachydactyly, nail hypoplasia, and calcifications in the epiphyseal regions of humeri, femora and vertebrae radiographically. The patient eventually died from respiratory failure at 6 months of age.

  6. Fetal varicella syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal varicella syndrome is a rare condition of the newborn, presenting with cutaneous scars, limb defects and ocular and central nervous system abnormalities. It is due to varicella or zoster developing in the fetus following maternal varicella infection during early pregnancy. We are reporting one such patient who presented with a linear, depressed, erythematous scar over the left forearm and axillary fold, with a history of maternal chicken pox during the first trimester of pregnancy.

  7. Fetal Valproate Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu-Albayrak, Hatice; Bulut, Cahide; Çaksen, Hüseyin

    2017-04-01

    There have been several reports of congenital malformations in the offspring of mothers who took valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy as a treatment for epilepsy. Herein, we describe four cases with typically similar facial features of fetal valproate syndrome accompanied to minor skeletal abnormalities. The first case was a 16-month-old girl, presenting with facial dysmorphism, and finger abnormalities. Her mother took VPA (1500 mg/d) up to the 10 th gestational week and at a dosage of 1000 mg/d through the pregnancy. The second patient was 5-year-old boy with speech disability, bilateral cryptorchidism, facial dysmorphism, and finger abnormalities whose mother took VPA (1000 mg/d) through pregnancy. The third 19-month-old patient was the brother of the second patient who had facial dysmorphism, bilateral cryptorchidism, and finger abnormalities. His mother also took VPA (1000 mg/d) through pregnancy. The fourth 3-year and 6 month-old boy with minor facial dysmorphism and sternum deformity was exposed to VPA (500 mg/d) in utero. In conclusion, there is a recognizable spectrum of abnormalities in some infants exposed to VPA without dose-depence and the common facial dysmorphic features and minor skeletal abnormalities that may occur within the both low and high dose VPA use. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you are pregnant or trying to get pregnant. Prevention Avoiding alcohol during pregnancy prevents FAS. Counseling can help women ... the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Read more ... HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A. ...

  9. National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - (800) 66-NOFAS Twitter Facebook Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS Prenatal Alcohol Exposure. No safe ... adults. DONATE Powered by RJD Solutions Twitter Facebook Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS Back to Top

  10. Fetal macrosomia as an important indicator of fetal malformation syndrome: ultrasonic findings of two cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EA Pley; PA de Jong; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    1989-01-01

    Two extraordinary cases of fetal macrosomia are presented. It is discussed that extreme fetal growth should raise the suspicion of a malformation syndrome and deserves thorough antenatal ultrasonographic examination.

  11. Molecular changes in fetal Down syndrome brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engidawork, Ephrem; Lubec, Gert

    2003-03-01

    Trisomy of human chromosome 21 is a major cause of mental retardation and other phenotypic abnormalities collectively known as Down syndrome. Down syndrome is associated with developmental failure followed by processes of neurodegeneration that are known to supervene later in life. Despite a widespread interest in Down syndrome, the cause of developmental failure is unclear. The brain of a child with Down syndrome develops differently from that of a normal one, although characteristic morphological differences have not been noted in prenatal life. On the other hand, a review of the existing literature indicates that there are a series of biochemical alterations occurring in fetal Down syndrome brain that could serve as substrate for morphological changes. We propose that these biochemical alterations represent and/or precede morphological changes. This review attempts to dissect these molecular changes and to explain how they may lead to mental retardation.

  12. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder: diminished responsibility and mitigation of sentence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Russ

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to consider the implications of a recent Western Australia Court of Appeal decision in which an indigenous youth who had been sentenced for the manslaughter of his neonate child was later diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder. The increased use of the 2016 Australian guide to the diagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder should be encouraged to enable clinicians to not only diagnose and manage Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder, but also counsel families to prevent it.

  13. Behavioral Aspects of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Mountain Plains Information Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Karen Stuut

    This paper discusses the symptoms, causes, and diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and fetal alcohol effects (FAE). It then presents information from biological and adopted parents of 14 individuals (ages 4-23 years) diagnosed with FAS or FAE, based on a parent survey concerning behavioral and educational histories of their children.…

  14. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Charkiewicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother’s immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation. For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  15. American Indians' Knowledge about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shostak, Myra; Brown, Lester B.

    1995-01-01

    A survey examined knowledge about fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and about the effects of prenatal maternal drinking on the fetus among 76 American Indians in Los Angeles, including undergraduate and graduate students and participants in a residential alcohol treatment program. Also reviews the literature on FAS symptoms, outcomes, and incidence,…

  16. Postnatal cranial ultrasonographic findings in feto-fetal transfusion syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breysem, L.; Naulaers, G.; Deprest, J.; Schoubroeck, D.V.; Daniels, H.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Smet, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was a retrospective evaluation of cranial US in survivors of twin pregnancy with feto-fetal transfusion syndrome (FFTS), with knowledge of prenatal treatment and neonatal/postnatal clinical data. In 18 pregnancies with FFTS (January 1996 to May 2000), pregnancy management and outcome,

  17. Maternal and fetal outcome of pregnancy complicated by HELLP syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasem, Turki; Al Jama, Fathia E; Burshaid, Sameera; Rahman, Jessica; Al Suleiman, Suleiman A; Rahman, Mohammad S

    2009-12-01

    The study evaluated the maternal and fetal outcome in 64 pregnancies complicated by HELLP syndrome. A retrospective analysis of the medical records was performed of patients with HELLP syndrome managed at this tertiary Obstetric unit between January 1996 and December 2005, who were admitted for preeclamsia/eclampsia and had documented evidence of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count. Maternal and neonatal complications were recorded and analyzed. The incidence of HELLP syndrome in the study was 8.3%. Mean gestational age at delivery was 32.4 +/- 4.2 weeks and mean birth weight was 1851 +/- 810 g. Forty-two percent of the patients had deliveries <32 weeks and 28% IUGR. Respiratory distress syndrome was the main indication for NICU admissions (33.9%). The PNM rate was 20%. Maternal morbidity rate was 34%. The most common maternal complications were abruptio placentae (36.4%) and DIC (31.8%). There was no maternal death. Once the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome is confirmed, the management depends on several obstetric and maternal variables like gestational age, severity of laboratory abnormalities and fetal status. As soon as the maternal condition is stabilized and fetal assessment is obtained, prompt delivery of the fetus is indicated. It is not yet established whether expectant management in preterm pregnancies with HELLP syndrome would improve perinatal outcome.

  18. Fetal programming of the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Marciniak

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal development is currently recognized as a critical period in the etiology of human diseases. This is particularly so when an unfavorable environment interacts with a genetic predisposition. The fetal programming concept suggests that maternal nutritional imbalance and metabolic disturbances may have a persistent and intergenerational effect on the health of offspring and on the risk of diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.

  19. [Fetal and early trauma syndrome-FETS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoroastro, Gastón A

    2006-01-01

    This is a new clinical description for cases of children whose parents are among those who have disappeared and were given birth by women held prisoners and subjected to torture, humiliation and abuses. This description is considered a special case of early, and in many cases fetal distress. These children felt horror when they were violently separated from their parents immediately after being born in captivity or in early infancy during the last military dictatorship (1976-1983). Afterwards they were sold by their captors and raised as adoptive or as their own children by the purchasers. The fact that these cases be included in the existing WHO categories contained in CIE-10: Posttraumatic stress disorder, F43.1, is discussed as they show late responses on the part of the victims to situations of torture, terrorism and rape. However, it is clarified that cases in which the aftereffects of severe stress become evident after decades will have to be classified as Persistent personality disorders, after catastrophic experience, F62.0. It is concluded that it is necessary to consider FETS as a new combination of manifestations of the Persistent Personality Disorders due to its specific idiosyncratic characteristics that go beyond the available clinical descriptions, to its own etiophatic equation and to its recognizable pathognomonic identification. Its pathognomonic identification in some cases was useful to detect children with these alienated identity problems (understood as legally neglected and clinically alienated). Propedeutic and treatment aspects are mentioned in conjunction with the peculiarities of a therapy that restores the illegally deprived personality of these children, who nowadays are adults of approximately 25 to 29 years of age. Finally, a metapsychologic discussion is presented, which is about the resilience of the truth and the fact that when it is rejected it returns, thus constituting ethics of the truth.

  20. Clinical characteristics of mirror syndrome: a comparison of 10 cases of mirror syndrome with non-mirror syndrome fetal hydrops cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Go; Aoki, Shigeru; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate clinical features of mirror syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 71 cases of fetal hydrops with or without mirror syndrome, and compared with respect to maternal age, the body mass index, the primipara rate, the gestational age at delivery, the timing of fetal hydrops onset, the severity of fetal edema, placental swelling, the laboratory data and the fetal mortality. The data are expressed as the medians. Mirror syndrome developed in 29% (10/35) of the cases with fetal hydrops. In mirror group, the onset time of fetal hydrops was significantly earlier (29 weeks versus 31 weeks, p = 0.011), and the severity of fetal hydrops (fetal edema/biparietal diameter) was significantly higher than non-mirror group (0.23 versus 0.16, p syndrome is occurred frequently in early and severe fetal hydrops and cause hemodilution and elevation of serum hCG.

  1. The natural history of fetal long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, Bettina F; Strasburger, Janette F; Wakai, Ronald T

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG), the magnetic analog of ECG, has provided invaluable insight into the mechanisms of fetal arrhythmias. In the past 15years, we have evaluated over 300 fetuses with arrhythmia by fMCG. We review the unique characteristics and natural history of the long QT syndrome (LQTS) rhythms. We reviewed the fMCGs of subjects referred with suspected LQTS based on either a positive family history or echo diagnosis of the LQTS rhythms (sinus bradycardia, ventricular tachycardia, or 2:1 AV conduction) to the Biomagnetism laboratory in the Department of Medical Physics, UW-Madison. We recorded fMCGs using a 37-channel (Magnes, 4D Neuroimaging, Inc., San Diego, CA) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) biomagnetometer, housed in a magnetically-shielded room for 1200-6000s. Signal processing was used to remove maternal interference. Cardiac intervals (R-R, p, QRS, QT) were measured and compared to published normals. We correlated fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns and effects of fetal movement on FHR and rhythm using actocardiography. Thirty-nine fetuses were studied at a mean of 28 (19-38) weeks of gestation. All had structurally normal hearts. One was on amiodarone for suspected supraventricular tachycardia and hydrops. Five had serial fMCGs. Isolated sinus bradycardia with a QTc >490ms was found in 35: 33 had a KCNQ1 mutation There was one false positive and one false negative LQTS diagnosis. Four fetuses had torsades de pointes (TdP) and 3 had periods of 2:1 conduction and either KCNH2 or SCN5A mutations. TdP was rarely initiated with a preceding long-short pattern and did not degenerate into ventricular fibrillation. One fetus with TdP died in utero, 2 with fetal TdP had postnatal cardiac arrest. Fetal LQTS is diagnosed by an fMCG QTc >490ms with an 89% sensitivity and specificity. TdP are seen with uncharacterized, KCNH2 or SCN5A R1623q mutations. Fetal TdP occurs when QTc ≥620ms. Identifying fetal LQTS and defining its rhythms by f

  2. Zika Fetal Neuropathogenesis: Etiology of a Viral Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A Klase

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing Zika virus epidemic in the Americas and the observed association with both fetal abnormalities (primary microcephaly and adult autoimmune pathology (Guillain-Barré syndrome has brought attention to this neglected pathogen. While initial case studies generated significant interest in the Zika virus outbreak, larger prospective epidemiology and basic virology studies examining the mechanisms of Zika viral infection and associated pathophysiology are only now starting to be published. In this review, we analyze Zika fetal neuropathogenesis from a comparative pathology perspective, using the historic metaphor of "TORCH" viral pathogenesis to provide context. By drawing parallels to other viral infections of the fetus, we identify common themes and mechanisms that may illuminate the observed pathology. The existing data on the susceptibility of various cells to both Zika and other flavivirus infections are summarized. Finally, we highlight relevant aspects of the known molecular mechanisms of flavivirus replication.

  3. Zika Fetal Neuropathogenesis: Etiology of a Viral Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klase, Zachary A.; Khakhina, Svetlana; Schneider, Adriano De Bernardi; Callahan, Michael V.; Glasspool-Malone, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing Zika virus epidemic in the Americas and the observed association with both fetal abnormalities (primary microcephaly) and adult autoimmune pathology (Guillain–Barré syndrome) has brought attention to this neglected pathogen. While initial case studies generated significant interest in the Zika virus outbreak, larger prospective epidemiology and basic virology studies examining the mechanisms of Zika viral infection and associated pathophysiology are only now starting to be published. In this review, we analyze Zika fetal neuropathogenesis from a comparative pathology perspective, using the historic metaphor of “TORCH” viral pathogenesis to provide context. By drawing parallels to other viral infections of the fetus, we identify common themes and mechanisms that may illuminate the observed pathology. The existing data on the susceptibility of various cells to both Zika and other flavivirus infections are summarized. Finally, we highlight relevant aspects of the known molecular mechanisms of flavivirus replication. PMID:27560129

  4. Late-onset fetal bilateral pleural effusions associated with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ting Lai

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: Fetuses with Down syndrome may present late-onset bilateral pleural effusions. Prenatal diagnosis of late-onset bilateral pleural effusions should raise the possibility of fetal Down syndrome and cytogenetic investigation is warranted.

  5. Recurrent hydramnios as a result of fetal Bartter′s syndrome (a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available Bartter′s syndrome has been reported as a rare case of hydramnios. A unique case of recurrent hydramnios in pregnancy as a result of fetal Bartter′s syndrome on both occasions is presented.

  6. Fetal Valproate Syndrome with Limb Defects: An Indian Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common disorder and exposure to antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy increases the risk of teratogenicity. Older AEDs such as valproate and phenobarbital are associated with a higher risk of major malformations in the fetus than newer AEDs like lamotrigine and levetiracetam. Exposure to valproic acid during first trimester can result in fetal valproate syndrome (FVS, comprising typical facial features, developmental delay, and a variety of malformations such as neural tube defects, cardiac and genitourinary malformations, and limb defects. We are presenting an Indian case of FVS with major limb defects.

  7. [Ballantyne syndrome caused by materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection: about two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvignes, F; Bourdel, N; Laurichesse-Delmas, H; Savary, D; Gallot, D

    2011-05-01

    Ballantyne's syndrome also known as Mirror syndrome is the association of fetal hydrops and maternal hydric retention. The maternal condition is often misdiagnosed as preeclampsia. We report two cases of Ballantyne syndrome associated with materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection. In the first case, the syndrome occurred at 26GW in a context of premature rupture of membranes. Parents and medical staff opted for termination of pregnancy because of the poor fetal prognosis. Maternal symptoms regressed after delivery. In the second case, the patient presented a Ballantyne's syndrome at 25GW. Intrauterine transfusions reversed symptomatology. Fetal hydrops of any etiology can be associated with this syndrome. Specific treatment of the fetus can avoid maternal complication allowing continuation of the pregnancy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Fetal alcohol syndrome – causes, diagnostic criteria and prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Horecka-Lewitowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS is the outcome of alcohol exposition in the prenatal period. It is irreversible. In Poland, FAS is becoming more and more common, the diagnostic tools are limited though. It is recommended to use the 4-Digit Diagnostic Code, which evaluates the 4 basic FAS symptoms: growth retardation, dysmorphic appearance, damage to the central nervous system and prenatal alcohol exposure. It has been confirmed that there is no safe amount of alcohol for a mother to drink while carrying a baby. To put it another way, only a complete lack of alcohol consumption is a guarantee that the baby will not suffer from FAS. It is necessary for society to know that even the smallest amount of alcohol is bad for the foetus. A number of people still believe that, for example, red wine is good and healthy for both the mother and child.

  9. [Small intestine atresia and abnormal insertion of the umbilicus in a child with fetal alcohol syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourtet, S; Michaud, L; Gottrand, F; Boute, O; Bonnevalle, M; Meyer, N; Turck, D

    1997-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is quite common in our region (incidence: 1/700 live births). It usually associates facial dysmorphism, intra-uterine growth retardation and mental delay. Jonathan, born to an alcoholic mother, presented a typical dysmorphy of fetal alcohol syndrome and a low inserted umbilicus. A small bowel atresia was discovered at the third day of life and operated on. Although never been previously described, this association suggests a common embryological origin between fetal alcohol syndrome, small bowel atresia, and umbilical abnormality.

  10. 77 FR 42768 - Leadership Meeting on Maternal, Fetal, and Infant Opioid Exposure and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY Leadership Meeting on Maternal, Fetal, and Infant Opioid Exposure and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: An ONDCP Leadership Meeting on Maternal, Fetal and Infant Opioid Exposure and Neonatal Abstinence...

  11. Pediatricians' Knowledge, Training, and Experience in the Care of Children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahagan, Sheila; Sharpe, Tanya Telfair; Brimacombe, Michael; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne; Levine, Robert; Mengel, Mark; O'Connor, Mary; Paley, Blair; Adubato, Susan; Brenneman, George

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Prenatal exposure to alcohol interferes with fetal development and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and developmental disabilities. The purpose of this study was to identify current knowledge, diagnosis, prevention, and intervention practices related to fetal alcohol syndrome and related conditions by members of the…

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of Berry syndrome by fetal echocardiography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shui-Hua; Tian, Xiao-Xian; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Zuo-Jian

    2016-10-01

    We report a case in which Berry syndrome is diagnosed by fetal echocardiography. Fetal echocardiography showed that the ascending aorta, main pulmonary artery, left pulmonary artery, and right pulmonary artery were presented as a vascular complexity in the three vessels and pulmonary arterial branches view. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nonimmunologic fetal hydrops and chromosomal disorder : two cases of Down syndrome associated with hematopoietic abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Masue, Michiya; Miyamoto, Satomi; Inoue, Makoto; Haneda, Noriyuki; Hata, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Kohji; Nagasaki, Makoto; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    1997-01-01

    We investigated 6 neonates with nonimmunologic fetal hydrops admitted to Shimane Medical University Hospital between 1979 and 1996. Chromosome analysis revealed that two of these neonates (33%) had trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). Our data may suggest the importance of chromosomal analysis of the fetus and the neonate with nonimmunologic fetal hydrops. It was revealed that each of the two neonates with Down syndrome had hematopoietic disorders including pancytopenia and transient abnormal myelopoi...

  14. Maternal Plasma and Amniotic Fluid Chemokines Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Laudanski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Chemokines exert different inflammatory responses which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of selected chemokines in plasma and amniotic fluid of women with fetal Down syndrome. Method. Out of 171 amniocentesis, we had 7 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation. For the purpose of our control, we chose 14 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the concentration of chemokines in the blood plasma and amniotic fluid, we used a protein macroarray, which allows the simultaneous determination of 40 chemokines per sample. Results. We showed significant decrease in the concentration of 4 chemokines, HCC-4, IL-28A, IL-31, and MCP-2, and increase in the concentration of CXCL7 (NAP-2 in plasma of women with fetal Down syndrome. Furthermore, we showed decrease in concentration of 3 chemokines, ITAC, MCP-3, MIF, and increase in concentration of 4 chemokines, IP-10, MPIF-1, CXCL7, and 6Ckine, in amniotic fluid of women with fetal Down syndrome. Conclusion. On the basis of our findings, our hypothesis is that the chemokines may play role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  15. The HELLP-syndrome; maternal-fetal outcome and follow up of infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsen, AC; van Pampus, MG; Aarnoudse, JG

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate maternal-fetal outcome of infants born after pregnancies complicated by (H)ELLP syndrome. Study design: A retrospective cohort study was performed on patients with the HELLP or ELLP syndrome. Maternal and perinatal complications were recorded. The follow-up period of the

  16. Meconium aspiration syndrome: a role for fetal systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JoonHo; Romero, Roberto; Lee, Kyung A; Kim, Eun Na; Korzeniewski, Steven J; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Yoon, Bo Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in term infants. Meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) occurs in approximately 1 of every 7 pregnancies, but only 5% of neonates exposed to MSAF develop MAS. Why some infants exposed to meconium develop MAS while others do not is a fundamental question. Patients with MSAF have a higher frequency of intraamniotic inflammation/infection than those with clear fluid. We propose that fetal systemic inflammation is a risk factor for the development of MAS in patients with MSAF. We sought to investigate whether intraamniotic inflammation and funisitis, the histopathologic landmark of a fetal inflammatory response, predispose to MAS. A prospective cohort study was conducted from 1995 through 2009. Amniotic fluid (AF) samples (n = 1281) were collected at the time of cesarean delivery from women who delivered singleton newborns at term (gestational age ≥38 weeks). Intraamniotic inflammation was diagnosed if the AF concentration of matrix metalloproteinase-8 was >23 ng/mL. Funisitis was diagnosed by histologic examination if inflammation was present in the umbilical cord. The prevalence of MSAF was 9.2% (118/1281), and 10.2% (12/118) of neonates exposed to MSAF developed MAS. There were no significant differences in the median gestational age or umbilical cord arterial pH at birth between neonates who developed MAS and those who did not (each P > .1). Mothers whose newborns developed MAS had a higher median of AF matrix metalloproteinase-8 (456.8 vs 157.2 ng/mL, P < .05). Newborns exposed to intraamniotic inflammation had a higher rate of MAS than those who were not exposed to intraamniotic inflammation [13.0% (10/77) vs 0% (0/32), P = .03], as did those exposed to funisitis [31.3% (5/16) vs 7.3% (6/82); relative risk, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-12.3]. Among the 89 newborns for whom both AF and placental histology were available, MAS was more common in patients with both intraamniotic

  17. Societal costs of fetal alcohol syndrome in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Lisa; Magnusson, Lennart; Hovstadius, Bo

    2017-06-01

    To estimate the annual societal cost of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) in Sweden, focusing on the secondary disabilities thought feasible to limit via early interventions. Prevalence-based cost-of-illness analysis of FAS in Sweden for 2014. Direct costs (societal support, special education, psychiatric disorders and alcohol/drug abuse) and indirect costs (reduced working capacity and informal caring), were included. The calculations were based on published Swedish studies, including a register-based follow-up study of adults with FAS, reports and databases, and experts. The annual total societal cost of FAS was estimated at €76,000 per child (0-17 years) and €110,000 per adult (18-74 years), corresponding to €1.6 billion per year in the Swedish population using a prevalence of FAS of 0.2 %. The annual additional cost of FAS (difference between the FAS group and a comparison group) was estimated at €1.4 billion using a prevalence of 0.2 %. The major cost driver was the cost of societal support. The cost burden of FAS on the society is extensive, but likely to be underestimated. A reduction in the societal costs of FAS, both preventive and targeted interventions to children with FAS, should be prioritized. That is, the cost of early interventions such as placement in family homes or other forms of housing, and special education, represent unavoidable costs. However, these types of interventions are highly relevant to improve the individual's quality of life and future prospects, and also, within a long-term perspective, to limit the societal costs and personal suffering.

  18. A comprehensive local program for the prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Masis, K B; May, P A

    1991-01-01

    A hospital based, comprehensive approach to the prevention of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects that combines clinical assessment, community outreach, and epidemiologic knowledge to attack alcohol-related birth defects is described. The program includes training of clinicians and members of the community, baseline screening of suspected children, and alcohol consumption screening of pregnant women in prenatal clinics. The major, although not exclusive, focus of the program is o...

  19. Goldenhar syndrome, anterior encephalocele, and aqueductal stenosis following fetal primidone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavson, E E; Chen, H

    1985-08-01

    Fetal exposure to primidone was associated with Goldenhar syndrome, hemifacial microsomia, tetralogy of Fallot, aqueductal stenosis, and anterior encephalocele in this male infant. No similar cases in anticonvulsant-exposed pregnancies were found on literature review, despite the increased incidence of other anomalies following such exposure. Goldenhar syndrome, especially related to rare central nervous system anomalies, is reviewed. Experimental production of hemifacial microsomia by a folic acid antagonist, triaxene, is mediated via hemorrhage in the fetus. Intraventricular hemorrhage was noted in this infant as were dilated lateral and third ventricles. The hemorrhagic diathesis and/or the folic acid depletion of newborns following fetal anticonvulsant exposure may have been the underlying mechanism.

  20. Cardio-STIC (spatio-temporal image correlation) as genetic ultrasound of fetal Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongsong, Theera; Tongprasert, Fuanglada; Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Luewan, Suchaya; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate efficacy of cardio-STIC in detection of fetal Down syndrome. Cardio-STIC volume datasets (VDS) were prospectively collected from women during 16-22 weeks, consisting of 40 VDS acquired from fetuses with Down syndrome and 400 VDS from normal fetuses. All VDS were blindly analyzed. Between both groups, most dimensions were comparable but the right-sided dimensions were significantly greater in fetuses with Down syndrome. Interestingly, shortening fraction was also significantly higher in affected fetuses. Right-to-left disproportion and shortening fraction were used as cardiac markers as well as other eight structural markers to predict fetal Down syndrome. Tricuspid regurgitation had highest sensitivity (30%); followed by VSD (27.5%), right-to-left disproportion (20.0%), and echogenic intra-cardiac foci (EIF; 17.5%). If the test was considered positive in case of the presence of any cardiac marker, cardio-STIC had a detection rate of 72.5% and false-positive rate of 19.5%. Likelihood ratio of each marker for modifying priori risk was also provided. Cardio-STIC as genetic ultrasound for Down syndrome had a detection rate of about 70% and false-positive rate 20%. Cardio-STIC analysis can be helpful in estimation of fetal risk for Down syndrome and counseling when the prenatal diagnosis of the syndrome is made.

  1. Fetal valproate syndrome in a 14-month-old child: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-epileptic drugs administered during pregnancy can cause structural defects in the growing fetus and result in adverse neurodevelopmental outcome later in life. Fetal valproate syndrome (FVS) results from teratogenic effects of valproic acid exposure in the prenatal period. It is characterised by a distinctive dysmorphic ...

  2. Fetal alcohol syndrome among grade-one children in the Northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To describe the prevalence, characteristics and risk factors for fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and partial FAS among schoolgoing children in Grade 1 in Northern Cape Province, South Africa. Design. A cross-sectional study using a two-tiered method for ascertainment of FAS/partial FAS cases, comprising: ...

  3. Fetal valproate syndrome in a 14-month-old child: A case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-epileptic drugs administered during pregnancy can cause structural defects in the growing fetus and result in adverse neuro- developmental outcome later in life. Fetal valproate syndrome (FVS) results from teratogenic effects of valproic acid exposure in the prenatal period. It is characterised by a distinctive dysmorphic ...

  4. Reduced cell number in the neocortical part of the human fetal brain in Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, K.B.; Laursen, H.; Graem, N.

    2008-01-01

    Mental retardation is seen in all individuals with Down syndrome (DS) and different brain abnormalities are reported. The aim of this study was to investigate if mental retardation at least in part is a result of a lower cell number in the neocortical part of the human fetal forebrain. We therefore...

  5. Maternal plasma and amniotic fluid sphingolipids profiling in fetal Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Charkiewicz

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids can be potentially involved in the formation of the central and peripheral nervous systems, which are particularly connected with the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of selected sphingolipids in the plasma and amniotic fluid of pregnant patients with fetal Down syndrome.Out of 190 amniocentesis we had 10 patients with confirmed Down syndrome. For the purpose of our control we chose 14 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the concentration of 11 sphingolipids in the blood plasma and amniotic fluid we used an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS/MS.We showed a significant increase in the concentration of 2 ceramides, C22-Cer and C24:1-Cer, in the plasma of women with fetal Down syndrome. Furthermore we showed a decrease in the concentration of 7 ceramides--C16-Cer, C18-Cer, C18:1-Cer, C20-Cer, C22-Cer, C24:1-Cer, and C24-Cer--in the amniotic fluid of women with fetal Down syndrome. We created ROC curves for all significant sphingolipids in maternal plasma, which set the threshold values and allowed for predicting the likelihood of Down syndrome in the fetus with specific sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrated a significantly higher risk of Down syndrome when the plasma concentration of C22-Cer > 12.66 ng/100 ul (sens. 0.9, sp. 0.79, P value = 0.0007 and C24:1-Cer > 33,19 ng/100 ul (sens. 0.6, sp. 0.86, P value = 0.0194.On the basis of our findings, it seems that the sphingolipids may play a role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome requires further investigation on a larger group of patients.

  6. In an Ovine Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Prenatal Androgens Suppress Female Fetal Renal Gluconeogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Fiona; Rae, Michael T.; Späth, Katharina; Boswell, Lyndsey; McNeilly, Alan S.; Duncan, W. Colin

    2015-01-01

    Increased maternal androgen exposure during pregnancy programmes a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-like condition, with metabolic dysfunction, in adult female offspring. Other in utero exposures associated with the development of insulin resistance, such as intrauterine growth restriction and exposure to prenatal glucocorticoids, are associated with altered fetal gluconeogenesis. We therefore aimed to assess the effect of maternal androgenisation on the expression of PEPCK and G6PC in the ovine fetus. Pregnant Scottish Greyface sheep were treated with twice weekly testosterone propionate (TP; 100mg) or vehicle control from day 62 to day102 of gestation. At day 90 and day 112 fetal plasma and liver and kidney tissue was collected for analysis. PEPCK and G6PC expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting. PEPCK and G6PC were localised to fetal hepatocytes but maternal androgens had no effect on female or male fetuses. PEPCK and G6PC were also localised to the renal tubules and renal PEPCK (P<0.01) and G6PC (P = 0.057) were lower in females after prenatal androgenisation with no change in male fetuses. These tissue and sex specific observations could not be explained by alterations in fetal insulin or cortisol. The sexual dimorphism may be related to the increase in circulating estrogen (P<0.01) and testosterone (P<0.001) in females but not males. The tissue specific effects may be related to the increased expression of ESR1 (P<0.01) and AR (P<0.05) in the kidney when compared to the fetal liver. After discontinuation of maternal androgenisation female fetal kidney PEPCK expression normalised. These data further highlight the fetal and sexual dimorphic effects of maternal androgenisation, an antecedent to adult disease and the plasticity of fetal development. PMID:26148093

  7. Gene expression profiling in a mouse model identifies fetal liver- and placenta-derived potential biomarkers for Down syndrome screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, J.L.A.; Rodenburg, W.; Imholz, S.; Koster, M.P.H.; van Oostrom, C.T.M.; Breit, T.M.; Schielen, P.C.J.I.; de Vries, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: As a first step to identify novel potential biomarkers for prenatal Down Syndrome screening, we analyzed gene expression in embryos of wild type mice and the Down Syndrome model Ts1Cje. Since current Down Syndrome screening markers are derived from placenta and fetal liver, these tissues

  8. Risk of fetal loss associated with invasive testing following combined first-trimester screening for Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, C. B.; Gerds, T. A.; Rode, L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess prospectively the risk of fetal loss associated with chorionic villus sampling (CVS) and amniocentesis (AC) following combined first-trimester screening (cFTS) for Down syndrome. METHODS: This was a nationwide population-based study (Danish Fetal Medicine Database, 2008...

  9. Risk of Fetal Loss Associated With Invasive Testing Following Combined First-Trimester Screening for Down Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, C. B.; Gerds, T. A.; Rode, L.

    2016-01-01

    from being based on maternal age to combined first-trimester screening (cFTS) for trisomy 21. The aim of the study was to assess prospectively the risk of fetal loss associated with CVS and AC after cFTS for Down syndrome. A nationwide population-based study (Danish Fetal Medicine Database, 2008...

  10. Evidence of cardiac involvement in the fetal inflammatory response syndrome: disruption of gene networks programming cardiac development in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Timothy; MacDonald, James W; Srinouanpranchanh, Sengkeo; Bammler, Theodor K; Merillat, Sean; Boldenow, Erica; Coleman, Michelle; Agnew, Kathy; Baldessari, Audrey; Stencel-Baerenwald, Jennifer E; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Green, Richard R; Gale, Michael J; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M

    2018-04-01

    Most early preterm births are associated with intraamniotic infection and inflammation, which can lead to systemic inflammation in the fetus. The fetal inflammatory response syndrome describes elevations in the fetal interleukin-6 level, which is a marker for inflammation and fetal organ injury. An understanding of the effects of inflammation on fetal cardiac development may lead to insight into the fetal origins of adult cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the fetal inflammatory response syndrome is associated with disruptions in gene networks that program fetal cardiac development. We obtained fetal cardiac tissue after necropsy from a well-described pregnant nonhuman primate model (pigtail macaque, Macaca nemestrina) of intrauterine infection (n=5) and controls (n=5). Cases with the fetal inflammatory response syndrome (fetal plasma interleukin-6 >11 pg/mL) were induced by either choriodecidual inoculation of a hypervirulent group B streptococcus strain (n=4) or intraamniotic inoculation of Escherichia coli (n=1). RNA and protein were extracted from fetal hearts and profiled by microarray and Luminex (Millipore, Billerica, MA) for cytokine analysis, respectively. Results were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Statistical and bioinformatics analyses included single gene analysis, gene set analysis, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen, Valencia, CA), and Wilcoxon rank sum. Severe fetal inflammation developed in the context of intraamniotic infection and a disseminated bacterial infection in the fetus. Interleukin-6 and -8 in fetal cardiac tissues were elevated significantly in fetal inflammatory response syndrome cases vs controls (P1.5-fold change, Pfetal heart (analysis of variance). Altered expression of select genes was validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction that included several with known functions in cardiac injury, morphogenesis, angiogenesis

  11. RECURRENT FETAL LOSS IN THE PRIMARY ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME (CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z S Alekberova

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary The patient with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS, who had two out of three pregnancies with intrauterine premature fetus death, was observed. During the last gestation she had corporeal cesarean section, and alive premature girl was extracted. The diagnosis of PAPS was verified basing on relapsing thromboses, repeated premature fetus death and antiphosphilipid antibodies in absence of some autoimmune disease. The peculiarity of this case was late diagnosis of the syndrome, first two episodes of thromboses were not timely diagnosed (diagnoses were as follows: appendicitis, apoplexy of ovary. Only on the background of the third pregnancy the thrombotic genesis of abdominal syndrome was determined. The specter of intensive therapy was suggested which allowed to prevent the development of "catastrophic ” variant of PAPS developing and to keep the child alive.

  12. Fetal valproate syndrome in a 2-month-old male infant

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, Syed A.; Phulsundar, Amol; Shanbag, Preeti; Mauskar, Anupama

    2010-01-01

    Fetal valproate syndrome (FVS) results from prenatal exposure to valproic acid. It is characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, a cluster of minor and major anomalies and central nervous system dysfunction. We describe a 2-month-old male infant with the typical dysmorphic features characteristic of FVS. He had a persistent left superior vena cava draining into a dilated coronary sinus and mild pulmonary hypertension. There was a history of maternal intake of sodium valproate during pr...

  13. Fetal valproate syndrome in a 2-month-old male infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Syed A.; Phulsundar, Amol; Shanbag, Preeti; Mauskar, Anupama

    2010-01-01

    Fetal valproate syndrome (FVS) results from prenatal exposure to valproic acid. It is characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, a cluster of minor and major anomalies and central nervous system dysfunction. We describe a 2-month-old male infant with the typical dysmorphic features characteristic of FVS. He had a persistent left superior vena cava draining into a dilated coronary sinus and mild pulmonary hypertension. There was a history of maternal intake of sodium valproate during pregnancy. PMID:20427941

  14. Gene expression profiling in a mouse model identifies fetal liver- and placenta-derived potential biomarkers for Down Syndrome screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen L A Pennings

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a first step to identify novel potential biomarkers for prenatal Down Syndrome screening, we analyzed gene expression in embryos of wild type mice and the Down Syndrome model Ts1Cje. Since current Down Syndrome screening markers are derived from placenta and fetal liver, these tissues were chosen as target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Placenta and fetal liver at 15.5 days gestation were analyzed by microarray profiling. We confirmed increased expression of genes located at the trisomic chromosomal region. Overall, between the two genotypes more differentially expressed genes were found in fetal liver than in placenta. Furthermore, the fetal liver data are in line with the hematological aberrations found in humans with Down Syndrome as well as Ts1Cje mice. Together, we found 25 targets that are predicted (by Gene Ontology, UniProt, or the Human Plasma Proteome project to be detectable in human serum. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Fetal liver might harbor more promising targets for Down Syndrome screening studies. We expect these new targets will help focus further experimental studies on identifying and validating human maternal serum biomarkers for Down Syndrome screening.

  15. [Prenatal diagnosis of 17q12 microdeletion syndrome in fetal renal abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y L; Qi, Q W; Zhou, X Y; Geng, F F; Bai, J J; Hao, N; Liu, J T

    2017-10-25

    Objectives: To analyze 3 cases of 17q12 microdeletion syndrome diagnosed prenatally, and to demonstrate clinical phenotype of the syndrome in prenatal setting. Methods: From January 2013 to July 2017, 1 370 women received invasive prenatal diagnosis and chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Among them, 3 fetuses were diagnosed as 17q12 microdeletion syndrome. All 3 cases were low-risk pregnancies. Abnormal structures in fetal kidney were found in all 3 cases, including 1 case of multiple renal cysts, 2 cases of bilateral hyperechogenic kidneys. These women accepted invasive prenatal diagnosis followed by karyotyping, parental fluorescence in situ hybridization or CMA validation. Results: The second and third trimester ultrasound showed that all 3 fetuses had bilateral renal structural abnormalities, including hyperechogenic kidney, multiple cysts and renal pelvis dilatation. The karyotyping of the 3 fetuses were normal. CMA examination showed that each case had 1.4-1.6 Mb deletion in 17q12 region. Two cases were de novo deletion and 1 case was inherited from the mother who had mild symptoms. The 3 women decided to terminate pregnancies after genetic counseling. Conclusion: 17q12 microdeletion syndrome is a recurrent chromosome microdeletion syndrome, and the unique phenotype in prenatal setting is the abnormal structure of bilateral kidneys. A few cases of 17q12 microdeletion syndrome even inherited normally phenotypical parents, and prenatal genetic counseling of 17q12 microdeletion syndrome is relatively difficult.

  16. Early bladder outlet obstruction in fetal lambs induces renal dysplasia and the prune-belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, R; Reinberg, Y; Burke, B; Wells, T; Vernier, R L

    1990-03-01

    A model of posterior urethral valves in fetal lambs was developed in order to evaluate the effect of intrauterine urinary obstruction on the developing kidney. Complete urethral obstruction was induced in five fetal lambs at 43 to 45 days of gestation. Two control fetal lambs underwent sham operations. At full term (140 days), two of the five experimental lambs and both control lambs were available for postmortem examination. Results of gross and histological examination of the control lambs were normal. In contrast, the kidneys of the experimental lambs were markedly asymmetrical in size. Histological examination of the kidneys in experimental lambs showed cystic dilatation of the collecting ducts and occasional cystic dilatation of Bowman's spaces, features compatible with obstruction. Also noted were peripheral cortical cysts and primitive tubules lined with cuboidal epithelium and surrounded by fibromuscular collarettes, characteristic of renal dysplasia. One of the infant lambs had many characteristics of the prune-belly syndrome, including a wrinkled, markedly distended abdomen, deficient abdominal wall musculature, flared chest wall, limb deformities, and undescended testes. These results suggest that early in utero urethral obstruction (at the beginning of the second third of gestation) causes renal dysplasia. The results also support the hypothesis that the prune-belly syndrome results from abdominal distention that occurs early in gestation.

  17. Arrhythmia phenotype during fetal life suggests long-QT syndrome genotype: risk stratification of perinatal long-QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, Bettina F; Etheridge, Susan P; Horigome, Hitoshi; Sallee, Denver; Moon-Grady, Anita; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Ackerman, Michael J; Benson, D Woodrow

    2013-10-01

    Fetal arrhythmias characteristic of long QT syndrome (LQTS) include torsades de pointes (TdP) and/or 2° atrioventricular block, but sinus bradycardia, defined as fetal heart ratearrhythmias were reviewed. Fetal echocardiograms, neonatal ECG, and genetic testing were evaluated. We studied 43 subjects exhibiting fetal LQTS arrhythmias: TdP±2° atrioventricular block (group 1, n=7), isolated 2° atrioventricular block (group 2, n=4), and sinus bradycardia (group 3, n=32). Mutations in known LQTS genes were found in 95% of subjects tested. SCN5A mutations occurred in 71% of group 1, whereas 91% of subjects with KCNQ1 mutations were in group 3. Small numbers of subjects with KCNH2 mutations (n=4) were scattered in all 3 groups. Age at presentation did not differ among groups, and most subjects (n=42) were live-born with gestational ages of 37.5±2.8 weeks (mean±SD). However, those with TdP were typically delivered earlier. Prenatal treatment in group 1 terminated (n=2) or improved (n=4) TdP. The neonatal heart rate-corrected QT interval (mean±SE) of group 1 (664.7±24.9) was longer than neonatal heart rate-corrected QT interval in both group 2 (491.2±27.6; P=0.004) and group 3 (483.1±13.7; Pneonatal TdP. Rhythm phenotypes of fetal LQTS have genotype-suggestive features that, along with heart rate-corrected QT interval duration, may risk stratify perinatal management.

  18. Polyhydramnios, fetal overgrowth, and macrocephaly: prenatal ultrasound findings of Costello syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura P; Podraza, John; Proud, Virginia K

    2009-02-15

    Costello syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome consisting of dysmorphic facies, cutis laxa, short stature, developmental delay, and mental retardation. Complications include failure to thrive, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with arrhythmias, and benign and malignant tumors. This report describes a new case of Costello syndrome in a preterm infant born at 27 weeks gestation and diagnosed with Costello syndrome at 7 weeks of life who died at 6 months of age due to cardiac and pulmonary complications. In addition, data were compiled from parent surveys including growth parameters on 16 infants who were subsequently diagnosed with Costello syndrome and had mutation confirmation. The most common prenatal findings in the literature and in this cohort were polyhydramnios and fetal overgrowth with relative macrocephaly. Based on this study, ultrasound identification of polyhydramnios in the context of prenatal overgrowth, especially with relative macrocephaly, needs to raise the possibility of a diagnosis of Costello syndrome in the fetus because of the life-threatening cardiac complications that may occur early in the newborn period.

  19. Altered intrauterine ultrasound, fetal head circumference growth and neonatal outcomes among suspected cases of congenital Zika syndrome in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Souza,Alex Sandro Rolland; Souza,Ariani Impieri de; Faquin,Silvia de Lourdes Loreto; Santos Neto,Orlando Gomes dos; Honorato,Emanuele; Mattos,Alice Góes Liberato; Holanda,Simone Cristina; Figueiroa,José Natal; Schettini,Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: to describe altered intrauterine ultrasound, analyze fetal head circumference (HC) growth and neonates' outcomes among presumed cases of congenital Zika syndrome in Brazil. Methods: 30 women were included in the study with suspected history of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy and fetal's brain altered on ultrasound diagnosis. Sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics, prenatal altered ultrasounds, HC and other perinatal outcomes have been described. The...

  20. Infant dreaming and fetal memory: a possible explanation of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christos, G A

    1995-04-01

    During rapid-eye-movement sleep, when we dream, the brain is thought to be processing stored memory. The memory of a newborn infant is dominated by its fetal experience, and the infant is likely to dream about its life in the womb. Research with lucid (or conscious) dreaming has shown that dream images are supported by the corresponding body actions, using those muscles which remain active during rapid-eye-movement sleep. We suggest that sudden infant death syndrome or cot death may be a result of an infant dreaming about its life (or memory) as a fetus. In the course of that dream, since a fetus does not breathe (in the usual sense) the infant may cease to breathe and may die. This simple hypothesis is consistent with all of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome (pathological and epidemiological), such as the age at death curve (the observed exponential decay and possibly the peak at 2-3 months), the higher risk with the prone sleeping position (but not excluding the supine position), and the observed climatic variation (seasonal and regional) in the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome. Many of these well-established facts have no other known explanation and other theories can generally only account for a few of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome. Our hypothesis is also supported by recent findings that, as a group, sudden infant death syndrome infants have a higher proportion of rapid-eye-movement sleep, and also that they have an average higher heart rate (corresponding to possible fetal dreams) but only during rapid-eye-movement sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Acute Fetal Anemia Diagnosed by Middle Cerebral Artery Doppler Velocimetry in Stage V Twin–Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Salcedo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In stage V twin–twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS, up to 50% of surviving twins die or experience permanent disabilities, likely due to acute intertwin hemorrhage resulting in sudden severe anemia of the survivor. Although fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA Doppler studies demonstrate strong correlation with fetal hemoglobin values, acute hemorrhagic events are more difficult to diagnose, and optimal timing of delivery of the survivor poses an obstetric dilemma. We report a case of newly diagnosed stage V TTTS at 28 weeks gestation, complicated by acute severe anemia diagnosed by significantly abnormal fetal MCA Doppler studies. The anemic twin was urgently delivered and is doing well without significant sequelae.

  2. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome: cerebral ischemia is not the only fetal MR imaging finding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline-Fath, Beth M. [University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; O' Hara, Sara M.; Racadio, Judy M. [University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Crombleholme, Timothy M. [University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-01-15

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a complication of monochorionic/diamniotic twin pregnancies. An imbalance of blood flow occurs through placental anastomoses, causing potentially significant morbidity and mortality in both twins. Although the sonographic findings of TTTS are well documented, we believe that MR imaging is a valuable adjunct. We describe the fetal MR imaging findings associated with TTTS. From 2003 to 2005, 37 consecutive MR imaging studies were performed on multiple-gestation pregnancies. Of the 37, 25 were consistent with TTTS, correlated and confirmed by sonographic criteria. MR fetal abnormalities were documented. Cerebral ischemia, which could not be demonstrated by sonography, was delineated well by MR imaging. New findings noted on fetal MR imaging were enlargement of cerebral venous sinuses in both twins, dilatation of the renal collecting system in the recipient, lung lesions in the recipient and cerebral malformations in the donor. MR imaging is an important adjunct in TTTS imaging. Its benefit over sonography is its clear definition of cerebral pathology, which is important for intervention and counseling. The new findings, particularly in the urinary tract and cerebral venous sinuses, also help support the diagnosis of TTTS and might reveal additional consequences of the altered hemodynamics that occur in TTTS. (orig.)

  3. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome: cerebral ischemia is not the only fetal MR imaging finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; O'Hara, Sara M.; Racadio, Judy M.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2007-01-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a complication of monochorionic/diamniotic twin pregnancies. An imbalance of blood flow occurs through placental anastomoses, causing potentially significant morbidity and mortality in both twins. Although the sonographic findings of TTTS are well documented, we believe that MR imaging is a valuable adjunct. We describe the fetal MR imaging findings associated with TTTS. From 2003 to 2005, 37 consecutive MR imaging studies were performed on multiple-gestation pregnancies. Of the 37, 25 were consistent with TTTS, correlated and confirmed by sonographic criteria. MR fetal abnormalities were documented. Cerebral ischemia, which could not be demonstrated by sonography, was delineated well by MR imaging. New findings noted on fetal MR imaging were enlargement of cerebral venous sinuses in both twins, dilatation of the renal collecting system in the recipient, lung lesions in the recipient and cerebral malformations in the donor. MR imaging is an important adjunct in TTTS imaging. Its benefit over sonography is its clear definition of cerebral pathology, which is important for intervention and counseling. The new findings, particularly in the urinary tract and cerebral venous sinuses, also help support the diagnosis of TTTS and might reveal additional consequences of the altered hemodynamics that occur in TTTS. (orig.)

  4. [The role of fetal echocardiography in the prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy based upon prenatally diagnosed patau syndrome fetuses (case analysis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Krasoń, Aneta; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Respondek-Liberska, Maria

    2002-07-01

    Assessment of usefulness of the fetal echocardiography and genetic sonography in prenatal diagnosis trisomy 13 (retrospective analysis). Between 1994-1999 at the Department for Diagnosis of Congenital Malformation at the Institute of PPMH in 11 fetuses with Patau Syndrome ultrasound and echocardiography examination were performed. In our study the most of cases come from low risk of pregnant women. Fetal heart defect was the most common anomaly diagnosed prenatally in fetuses with Patau Syndrome (7/11), the second one were central nervous system anomalies (6/11) and genitourinary system anomalies (6/11).

  5. Recognition of clinical characteristics for population-based surveillance of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jennifer G; Galindo, Maureen K; Meaney, F John; Benavides, Argelia; Mayate, Linnette; Fox, Deborah; Pettygrove, Sydney; O'Leary, Leslie; Cunniff, Christopher

    2018-01-25

    The diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) rests on identification of characteristic facial, growth, and central nervous system (CNS) features. Public health surveillance of FAS depends on documentation of these characteristics. We evaluated if reporting of FAS characteristics is associated with the type of provider examining the child. We analyzed cases aged 7-9 years from the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Surveillance Network II (FASSNetII). We included cases whose surveillance records included the type of provider (qualifying provider: developmental pediatrician, geneticist, neonatologist; other physician; or other provider) who evaluated the child as well as the FAS diagnostic characteristics (facial dysmorphology, CNS impairment, and/or growth deficiency) reported by the provider. A total of 345 cases were eligible for this analysis. Of these, 188 (54.5%) had adequate information on type of provider. Qualifying physicians averaged more than six reported FAS characteristics while other providers averaged less than five. Qualifying physicians reported on facial characteristics and developmental delay more frequently than other providers. Also, qualifying physicians reported on all three domains of characteristics (facial, CNS, and growth) in 97% of cases while others reported all three characteristics on two thirds of cases. Documentation in medical records during clinical evaluations for FAS is lower than optimal for cross-provider communication and surveillance purposes. Lack of documentation limits the quality and quantity of information in records that serve as a major source of data for public health surveillance systems. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Maternal and fetal outcomes with aortic dissection in pregnant patients with Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Puyu; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yanna; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Jun

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics of aortic dissection in pregnant patients with Marfan syndrome and the maternal and fetal outcomes in cardiovascular surgery. Seven pregnant women with Marfan syndrome with aortic dissection were identified, who were treated in Beijing Anzhen Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University between January 2012 and September 2014. Patient charts were reviewed for cardiovascular surgery, occurrence of complications, clinical features and the maternal and fetal outcomes. (1) Among 7 patients, 4 cases were diagnosed as type A aortic dissection and 3 were cases diagnosed as type B aortic dissection. The diagnosis mainly depends on CT angiography. New York Heart Association (NYHA) classify into 5 of level II, 1 of level III, 1 of leveI IV. Except for 1 patient with cardiac tamponade lead to heart failure, the remaining 6 cases had no complications. (2) Three patients underwent heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass in second trimester and two patients underwent heart surgery in third trimester. Two patients terminated pregnancy before heart surgery (one of whom underwent artificial abortion, one of whom underwent cesarean section in second trimester). (3) The methods of cardiovascular surgeries were as follow: 3 of Bentall+Sun', 1 of Bentall+Sun'+ right coronary artery bypass grafting, 1 of Bentall, 1 of the whole chest aorta replacement surgery, and 1 of femoral artery catheter chest aorta with membrane mesh stent implantation. The diameter of aortic roots measured during operation were 5 cm in 2 cases, 7 cm in 2 cases and 10 cm in 2 cases respectively. Among the 7 cases, 3 were conducted cesarean sections during cardiovascular surgery, 1 was terminated pregnancy due to intrauterine fetal death after cardiovascular surgery, and 1 was conducted cesarean section due to severe early-onset preeclampsia at 30 weeks of pregnancy after cardiovascular surgery. (4) Among the 7 cases, 3 were conducted cesarean sections during

  7. [Pena-Shokeir syndrome type I--combination of polyhydramnios and pulmonary hypoplasia in fetal akinesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Tamás; Kovács, Tamás

    2010-06-13

    We present the case of an 18-year-old woman with her second pregnancy, whose first pregnancy was complicated by polyhydramnios. At week 30, the dysmorph fetus died in utero and was delivered via cesarean section due to placental abruption, but the exact diagnosis was not recognized at that time. During the patient's second pregnancy, increasing polyhydramnios was detected from the 19th gestational week. Ultrasound signs of fetal malformation also appeared later: abnormal position of limbs, narrow chest, oedema around the skull, and absence of stomach content. At week 34, decompression amniocentesis became necessary. Chromosome analysis was also carried out and a normal karyotype was obtained. At 39th gestational week, amnioscopy proved meconium staining of the amniotic fluid, thus labour was induced. Following amniotomy, sustained fetal bradycardia commenced and an emergency caesarean section was performed. Despite complex resuscitation, the 3000 gram male newborn died 2.5 hours after delivery, due to respiratory failure. Autopsy and histopathologic examination revealed a large, oedematous head, micrognathia, macroglossia, laryngeal oedema, narrow chest with pulmonary hypoplasia, gracile limbs with muscle atrophy, gracile and bent fingers, and a short umbilical cord. Based on the medical history, the course of the disease and the phenotype of the newborn, Pena-Shokeir syndrome type I was diagnosed. In the second part of the article, we review the etiology, pathogenesis, prenatal diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this syndrome, as well as some aspects of genetic counseling in such cases. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Pena-Shokeir syndrome in Hungary.

  8. Congenital Heart Defects and Measures of Fetal Growth in Newborns with Down Syndrome or 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiesen, Niels B; Agergaard, Peter; Henriksen, Tine B; Bach, Cathrine C; Gaynor, J William; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Østergaard, John R

    2016-08-01

    To estimate the association between congenital heart defects (CHD) and indices of fetal growth in Down and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes. We established 2 Danish nationwide cohorts of newborn singletons with either Down syndrome (n = 670) or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n = 155), born 1997-2011. In both cohorts, we analyzed the association between CHD, CHD severity, and indices of fetal growth by multivariable linear regression adjusted for potential confounders. We report mean differences in gestational age specific z-scores compared with newborns without CHD. Down syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were both associated with lower mean birth weight and head circumference z-scores. We found no association between CHD or CHD severity and indices of fetal growth. In Down syndrome, the association between any CHD and the mean difference in head circumference z-score was 0.03 (95% CI -0.12, 0.18), and the estimate regarding birth weight z-score was 0.09 (95% CI -0.08, 0.25). The corresponding estimates in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were 0.00 (95% CI -0.33, 0.32) and -0.09 (95% CI -0.45, 0.26). We found no association between CHD and fetal growth measures in newborns with Down syndrome or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Thus, in certain subtypes of CHD, the contribution of genetic factors to prenatal growth impairment may be more important than circulatory disturbances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Case of Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia, Hemorrhagic Anemia-Induced Fetal Hydrops, Maternal Mirror Syndrome, and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin–Induced Thyrotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venu Jain

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT can be a cause of severe fetal thrombocytopenia, with the common presentation being intracranial hemorrhage in the fetus, usually in the third trimester. A very unusual case of fetal anemia progressed to hydrops. This was further complicated by maternal Mirror syndrome and human chorionic gonadotropin–induced thyrotoxicosis. Without knowledge of etiology, and possibly due to associated cardiac dysfunction, fetal transfusion resulted in fetal demise. Subsequent testing revealed FNAIT as the cause of severe hemorrhagic anemia. In cases with fetal anemia without presence of red blood cell antibodies, FNAIT must be ruled out as a cause prior to performing fetal transfusion. Fetal heart may adapt differently to acute hemorrhagic anemia compared with a more subacute hemolytic anemia.

  10. Pathologic Evaluation of Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection at the Maternal-Fetal Interface of Late Gestation Pregnant Gilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Predrag; Harding, John C. S.; Al-Dissi, Ahmad N.; Ladinig, Andrea; Detmer, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of fetal death caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis by assessing potential relationships between specific histopathological lesions and PRRSV RNA concentration in the fetuses and the maternal-fetal interface. Pregnant gilts were inoculated with PRRSV (n = 114) or sham inoculated (n = 19) at 85±1 days of gestation. Dams and their litters were humanely euthanized and necropsied 21 days later. PRRSV RNA concentration was measured by qRT-PCR in the maternal-fetal interface and fetal thymus (n = 1391). Presence of fetal lesions was positively related to PRRSV RNA concentration in the maternal-fetal interface and fetal thymus (Pgilts induces significant histopathological lesions at maternal-fetal interface, but they are not associated with presence of PRRSV in the maternal-fetal interface at 21 days post infection. Conversely, fetal pathological lesions are associated with presence of PRRSV in the maternal-fetal interface and fetal thymus, and meconium staining is significantly associated with the presence of both fetal and umbilical lesions observed 21 days post infection. PMID:26963101

  11. A Drosophila model for fetal alcohol syndrome disorders: role for the insulin pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D. McClure

    2011-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to ethanol in humans results in a wide range of developmental abnormalities, including growth deficiency, developmental delay, reduced brain size, permanent neurobehavioral abnormalities and fetal death. Here we describe the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a model for exploring the effects of ethanol exposure on development and behavior. We show that developmental ethanol exposure causes reduced viability, developmental delay and reduced adult body size. We find that flies reared on ethanol-containing food have smaller brains and imaginal discs, which is due to reduced cell division rather than increased apoptosis. Additionally, we show that, as in mammals, flies reared on ethanol have altered responses to ethanol vapor exposure as adults, including increased locomotor activation, resistance to the sedating effects of the drug and reduced tolerance development upon repeated ethanol exposure. We have found that the developmental and behavioral defects are largely due to the effects of ethanol on insulin signaling; specifically, a reduction in Drosophila insulin-like peptide (Dilp and insulin receptor expression. Transgenic expression of Dilp proteins in the larval brain suppressed both the developmental and behavioral abnormalities displayed by ethanol-reared adult flies. Our results thus establish Drosophila as a useful model system to uncover the complex etiology of fetal alcohol syndrome.

  12. A case of prenatal diagnosis of fetal hydantoin syndrome by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gollop Thomaz Rafael

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal hydantoin syndrome (FHS is a set of disruptions occasionally present in fetuses exposed in utero to phenytoin or other anticonvulsants. Administration of phenytoin in early pregnancy may impair proper psychomotor performance expected for children's development. Several combined phenotypic markers delineate the syndrome, but the presence of single clinical signs is more common. There is controversy about the etiology of FHS. Associated disruptions may be related to a deficiency in a detoxifying enzyme (epoxide hydrolase, vascular problems, and/or factors not yet known. Genetic causes are believed to influence susceptibility to the drug. This text reports an unusual pattern of malformations detected in an ultrasound scan (gastroschisis, sacral meningomyelocele, and absence of the right lower limb and in the anatomopathological study (left-side gastroschisis, sacral meningomyelocele, scoliosis, left clubfoot, absence of the right lower limb, and pectus carinatum of a fetus whose mother took phenytoin. These defects may have been provoked by exposure to the drug during embryogenesis. In view of similar malformations observed in cases of prenatal exposure to cocaine, a recognized vasoconstrictor, it is suggested that vascular disruptions of hemodynamic origin constituted the event leading to some of the anomalies caused in the developing embryo. A complication of the chorionic villus sampling procedure, used for cytogenetic analysis, is another possibility.

  13. Competition between ethanol clearance and retinoic acid biosynthesis in the induction of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtai, Yehuda; Fainsod, Abraham

    2018-04-01

    Several models have been proposed to explain the neurodevelopmental syndrome induced by exposure of human embryos to alcohol, which is known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). One of the proposed models suggests a competition for the enzymes required for the biosynthesis of retinoic acid. The outcome of such competition is development under conditions of reduced retinoic acid signaling. Retinoic acid is one of the biologically active metabolites of vitamin A (retinol), and regulates numerous embryonic and differentiation processes. The developmental malformations characteristic of FASD resemble those observed in vitamin A deficiency syndrome as well as from inhibition of retinoic acid biosynthesis or signaling in experimental models. There is extensive biochemical and enzymatic overlap between ethanol clearance and retinoic acid biosynthesis. Several lines of evidence suggest that in the embryo, the competition takes place between acetaldehyde and retinaldehyde for the aldehyde dehydrogenase activity available. In adults, this competition also extends to the alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Ethanol-induced developmental defects can be ameliorated by increasing the levels of retinol, retinaldehyde, or retinaldehyde dehydrogenase. Acetaldehyde inhibits the production of retinoic acid by retinaldehyde dehydrogenase, further supporting the competition model. All of the evidence supports the reduction of retinoic acid signaling as the etiological trigger in the induction of FASD.

  14. Rapid Resolution of Polyhydramnios Foretells Circulatory Collapse for the Donor Twin in Feto-Fetal Transfusion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cepero, Ronald; Santoro, Joseph; de la Vega, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Feto-fetal transfusion syndrome is a pathological process unique to diamniotic monochorionic pregnancies. It is the consequence of an unbalanced fetal blood flow through communicating vessels within a shared placenta. When it occurs, a polyuric, hypervolemic recipient twin co-exists with a hypovolemic oliguric donor. The presence of polyhydramnios or oligohydramnios is considered a poor prognostic indicator, whereas normal amniotic fluid volumes indicate a lack of clinically significant twintwin transfusion. In addition, the spontaneous normalization of amniotic fluid volume is usually seen as a favorable prognostic sign. Here, however, we present a case of feto-fetal transfusion in a 31 year-old primigravida at 19 week, in which the spontaneous normalization of amniotic fluid volume in the recipient twin preceded the death of the donor.

  15. Non-invasive prenatal cell-free fetal DNA testing for down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darija Strah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis as definitive diagnostic procedures represent a gold standard for prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. The methods are invasive and lead to a miscarriage and fetal loss in approximately 0.5–1 %. Non-invasive prenatal DNA testing (NIPT is based on the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA from maternal blood. It represents a highly accurate screening test for detecting the most common fetal chromosomal abnormalities. In our study we present the results of NIPT testing in the Diagnostic Center Strah, Slovenia, over the last 3 years.Methods: In our study, 123 pregnant women from 11th to 18th week of pregnancy were included. All of them had First trimester assessment of risk for trisomy 21, done before NIPT testing.Results: 5 of total 6 high-risk NIPT cases (including 3 cases of Down syndrome and 2 cases of Klinefelter’s syndrome were confirmed by fetal karyotyping. One case–Edwards syndrome was false positive. Patau syndrome, triple X syndrome or Turner syndrome were not observed in any of the cases. Furthermore, there were no false negative cases reported. In general, NIPT testing had 100 % sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 46.29 %–100.00 % and 98.95 % specificity (95 % confidence interval: 93.44 %–99.95 %. In determining Down syndrome alone, specificity (95 % confidence interval: 95.25 %- 100.00 % and sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 31.00 %–100.00 % turned out to be 100 %. In 2015, the average turnaround time for analysis was 8.3 days from the day when the sample was taken. Repeated blood sampling was required in 2 cases (redraw rate = 1.6 %.Conclusions: Our results confirm that NIPT represents a fast, safe and highly accurate advanced screening test for most common chromosomal abnormalities. In current clinical practice, NIPT would significantly decrease the number of unnecessary invasive procedures and the rate of fetal

  16. Cognitive and executive functions, social cognition and sense of coherence in adults with fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangmar, Jenny; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren; Aronson, Marita; Fahlke, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    Primary disabilities in children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) are the results of alcohol's teratogen effect on the fetal brain. Reduced cognitive and executive functions and social cognition are examples of such disabilities. Little is known about primary disabilities in adults with FAS as well as their sense of coherence (SoC). There is thus a need for knowledge about FAS in adulthood. To investigate cognitive and executive functions, social cognition and SoC in adults with FAS. Twenty adults with FAS (mean age: 30 years) were compared with 20 individuals matched on gender and age. Berg's Card-sorting Test-64, the Tower of Hanoi, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, Digit Span, Faux Pas and the Swedish version of Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence Scale (SoC-29) were used. The FAS group had a weak SoC and displayed deficits in the neuropsychological tests sensitive to cognitive and executive functions and social cognition. The FAS group's median SoC score was 112, lower than the comparison group's median of 133 (P executive functions and impaired social cognition are assumed to have a major impact on life for adults with FAS. We suggest that the findings showing that adults with FAS had a weak SoC, with particularly low scores on the manageability scale, reflect their experiences of living with those primary disabilities. This study may enhance healthcare for individuals prenatally exposed to alcohol. In general, it contributes with knowledge about this group of individuals who need to be more visible in healthcare, and particularly, it demonstrates some of the neuropsychological disabilities they might have.

  17. Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Children after Fetal Cardiac Intervention for Aortic Stenosis with Evolving Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraja, Kristin; Sadhwani, Anjali; Tworetzky, Wayne; Marshall, Audrey C; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Freud, Lindsay; Hass, Cara; Dunbar-Masterson, Carolyn; Ware, Janice; Lafranchi, Terra; Wilkins-Haug, Louise; Newburger, Jane W

    2017-05-01

    To characterize neurodevelopmental outcomes after fetal aortic valvuloplasty for evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome and determine the risk factors for adverse neurodevelopment. Questionnaires were mailed to families of children who underwent fetal aortic valvuloplasty from 2000 to 2012, and medical records were reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcome was the General Adaptive Composite score of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System Questionnaire-Second Edition. Other questionnaires included the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Ages and Stages, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Among 69 eligible subjects, 52 (75%) completed questionnaires at median age of 5.5 (range 1.3-12) years; 30 (58%) had biventricular status circulation. The General Adaptive Composite mean score (92 ± 17) was lower than population norms (P Behavior Assessment System for Children, Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Ages and Stages, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), most subscale scores for patients with biventricular and single ventricular status were similar. Children who underwent fetal aortic valvuloplasty have neurodevelopmental delay, similar to patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome without fetal intervention. Achievement of biventricular circulation was not associated with better outcomes. We infer that innate patient factors and morbidity during infancy have the greatest effect on neurodevelopmental outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A genome-wide association study of fetal response to type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianfu; Wilkinson, James; Wang, Zhiquan; Ladinig, Andrea; Harding, John; Plastow, Graham

    2016-02-05

    Control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is economically important for the swine industry worldwide. As current PRRS vaccines do not completely protect against heterologous challenge, alternative means of control, including enhanced genetic resilience, are needed. For reproductive PRRS, the genetic basis of fetal response to PRRS virus (PRRSV) infection is poorly understood. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were done here using data from 928 fetuses from pregnant gilts experimentally challenged with type 2 PRRSV. Fetuses were assessed for viral load in thymus (VLT), viral load in endometrium (VLE), fetal death (FD) and fetal viability (FV), and genotyped at a medium density. Collectively, 21 candidate genomic regions were found associated with these traits, seven of which overlap with previously reported QTLs for pig health and reproduction. A comparison with ongoing and related transcriptomic analyses of fetal response to PRRSV infection found differentially expressed genes within 18 candidate regions. Some of these genes have immune system functions, and have been reported to contribute to host response to PRRSV infection. The results provide new evidence about the genetic basis of fetal response to PRRSV challenge, and may ultimately lead to alternative control strategies to reduce the impact of reproductive PRRS.

  19. Cell-free placental DNA beyond Down syndrome: Lessons learned from fetal RHD genotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurik, F.F.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis research is presented on cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA), which is present in plasma and serum of pregnant women. This fetal DNA can be used for fetal genotyping, but may also give indirect information on pregnancy and pregnancy outcome. The research consists of two sections. In the

  20. Field trial of alcohol-server training for prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Jack; Starling, Randall; Woodall, W Gill; Stanghetta, Paula; May, Philip A

    2011-05-01

    An alcohol-server training program to prevent fetal alcohol syndrome was developed, implemented, and evaluated in a comparison study of public drinking establishments in New Mexico and Oregon. The management and serving staffs of 148 establishments licensed for on-premise alcohol sales in the two states studied were trained to discourage alcohol consumption by pregnant customers. Pre- and post-tests of server responses to pregnant-appearing "pseudo-patron" actors ordering alcohol in experimental (n = 148) and comparison (n = 183) establishments were a key method of evaluating the efficacy of this intervention. Within-group chi-square analyses compared rates of service refusal at baseline with 1-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up points for both the trained (experimental) and the comparison establishments. No differences were found between experimental and comparison establishments at baseline at either site, but significant differences were found for New Mexico at each posttraining measurement point. In Oregon, the refusal rate at baseline increased from 1.5% at baseline to 8.3% at 1 month, which only approached significance. In New Mexico, at baseline the refusal rate was 8.6%, and it rose to 39.2% at 6 months (p Mexico establishments.

  1. A propósito de un caso de síndrome fetal alcohólico With regard a case of alcoholic fetal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Mercedes Jiménez López

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un varón de tres años de edad, que fue remitido a la consulta de genética por la especialista de oftalmología. Acudió a consulta por ptosis palpebral y después de la valoración exhaustiva se detectó un cuadro complejo, con multiplicidad de alteraciones oftalmológicas por lo que se decidió la remisión. Después de la investigación correspondiente, se constataron alteraciones funcionales y anatómicas, tanto durante su desarrollo prenatal como postnatal, que permitieron concluir que se trataba de un síndrome fetal alcohólico, previo diagnóstico diferencial con otras enfermedades.This is the case of a male aged three years referred to genetics consultation by an ophthalmology specialist. He came to consultation due to palpebral ptosis and after an exhaustive assessment it was detected a complicated picture with many ophthalmologic alterations thus authors decide the remission. After corresponding research, functional and anatomical alterations were confirmed during its development and in postnatal status allowed us to conclude that it was an alcoholic fetal syndrome, previous differential diagnosis with other diseases.

  2. Altered intrauterine ultrasound, fetal head circumference growth and neonatal outcomes among suspected cases of congenital Zika syndrome in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Sandro Rolland Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: to describe altered intrauterine ultrasound, analyze fetal head circumference (HC growth and neonates' outcomes among presumed cases of congenital Zika syndrome in Brazil. Methods: 30 women were included in the study with suspected history of Zika virus (ZIKV infection during pregnancy and fetal's brain altered on ultrasound diagnosis. Sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics, prenatal altered ultrasounds, HC and other perinatal outcomes have been described. The relation between HC and gestational age was analyzed by using random regression effects based on polynomials fractions. The Z test was calculated to determine an instant variant mean rate of the HC for each gestational age. Results: the mean gestational age of the ultrasound diagnosis was 33.3 + 4.7 weeks and HC at birth was 28.9 + 1.6 cm. The main altered brain ultrasound was microcephaly (96.7%. The analysis of the fetal head circumference showed an estimated increase of the average HC, as to gestational age, it did not occur in a linear form. The instant HC variation rate increased according to gestational age (p<0,001. Conclusions: Fetal's main morphological alteration was microcephaly, observing an increase in the head circumference according to gestational age in a non-linear form and the variation decreased with gestational age.

  3. Fetal Aortic Valvuloplasty for Evolving Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome: Postnatal Outcomes of the First 100 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Lindsay R.; McElhinney, Doff B.; Marshall, Audrey C.; Marx, Gerald R.; Friedman, Kevin G.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Emani, Sitaram M.; Lafranchi, Terra; Silva, Virginia; Wilkins-Haug, Louise E.; Benson, Carol B.; Lock, James E.; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FAV) can be performed for severe mid-gestation aortic stenosis (AS) in an attempt to prevent progression to hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). A subset of patients has achieved a biventricular (BV) circulation after FAV. The postnatal outcomes and survival of the BV patients, compared to those managed as HLHS, have not been reported. Methods and Results We included 100 patients who underwent FAV for severe mid-gestation AS with evolving HLHS from March 2000 to January 2013. Patients were categorized based on postnatal management as BV or HLHS. Clinical records were reviewed. Eighty-eight fetuses were live-born, and 38 had a BV circulation (31 from birth, 7 converted after initial univentricular palliation). Left-sided structures, namely aortic and mitral valve sizes and LV volume, were significantly larger in the BV group at the time of birth (p-values <0.01). After a median follow-up of 5.4 years, freedom from cardiac death among all BV patients was 96±4% at 5 years and 84±12% at 10 years, which was better than HLHS patients (log-rank p=0.04). There was no cardiac mortality in patients with a BV circulation from birth. All but 1 of the BV patients required postnatal intervention; 42% underwent aortic and/or mitral valve replacement. On most recent echocardiogram, the median LV end-diastolic volume z-score was +1.7 (range: -1.3, +8.2), and 80% had normal ejection fraction. Conclusions Short- and intermediate-term survival among patients who underwent FAV and achieved a BV circulation postnatally is encouraging. However, morbidity still exists, and on-going assessment is warranted. PMID:25052401

  4. [Fetal death in utero].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudigoz, R C; Revillard, J P; Audra, P; Luciani, F; Malvolti, B; Griot, J P; Frappart, L; Lafont, S

    1986-11-01

    152 cases of fetal death in utero are reported. The most frequent etiologies were: vasculorenal syndromes: 28.3 p. cent, idiopathic DPPNIs and RCIUs: 28 p. cent, accidental causes (trauma, funicular syndromes): 19.5 p. cent. Cause of death was unknown or imprecise in 18.4 p. cent of cases. Repeated fetal deaths in utero were rare: 5 observations. The authors consider the management of fetal death in utero, associated immunological problems and how to deal with subsequent pregnancies.

  5. Maternal serum unconjugated estriol as a predictor for Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome and other fetal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Edgar; Norem, Carol; O'Keefe, Jennifer; Krieger, Robyn; Walton, David; To, Trinh T

    2003-07-01

    To assess the clinical value of low maternal serum unconjugated estriol (E3) level for diagnosing Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome and other fetal clinical conditions in pregnant members of a large health maintenance organization. We studied serum unconjugated E3 levels in 120,071 gravidas having California Expanded Alpha-Fetoprotein prenatal screening at 15-20 weeks' gestation during a 5-year period. Of the 120,071 women, 323 (0.27%) had low unconjugated E3 levels (less than or equal to 0.2 ng/mL, or 0.15 multiples of the median). Excluding women who were screened too early or who had indeterminate screening results, 103 (0.08%) women with unexplained low unconjugated E3 level remained; of these 103 women, 33 had negative screening results and 68 had positive screening results, and two were tested too late for interpretation. Intrauterine fetal death occurred in 39 (57%) of the 68 women with low unconjugated E3 and positive screening results and occurred in two (6%) of the 33 women with low unconjugated E3 levels and negative screening results, a significant difference (P <.001). Two cases of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome were identified and the patients did not survive the neonatal period; one was a therapeutic abortion for severe oligohydramnios, and the other died at age 48 hours. Low unconjugated E3 level also predicted presence of steroid sulfatase deficiency, a much more common X-linked skin disorder characterized by ichthyosis. Low maternal serum unconjugated E3 diagnosed more cases of steroid sulfatase deficiency and undetected intrauterine fetal death than Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (1:60,000 prevalence), although the clinical importance of having this information prenatally is uncertain.

  6. North American Fetal Therapy Network: intervention vs expectant management for stage I twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Stephen P; Hasley, Steve K; Catov, Janet M; Miller, Russell S; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Baschat, Ahmet A; Johnson, Anthony; Lim, Foong-Yen; Gagnon, Alain L; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W; Ozcan, Tulin; Luks, Francois I

    2016-09-01

    Stage I twin-twin transfusion syndrome presents a management dilemma. Intervention may lead to procedure-related complications while expectant management risks deterioration. Insufficient data exist to inform decision-making. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to describe the natural history of stage I twin-twin transfusion syndrome, to assess for predictors of disease behavior, and to compare pregnancy outcomes after intervention at stage I vs expectant management. Ten North American Fetal Therapy Network centers submitted well-documented cases of stage I twin-twin transfusion syndrome for analysis. Cases were retrospectively divided into 3 management strategies: those managed expectantly, those who underwent amnioreduction at stage I, and those who underwent laser therapy at stage I. Outcomes were categorized as no survivors, 1 survivor, 2 survivors, or at least 1 survivor to live birth, and good (twin live birth ≥30.0 weeks), mixed (single fetal demise or delivery between 26.0-29.9 weeks), and poor (double fetal demise or delivery <26.0 weeks) pregnancy outcomes. Outcomes were analyzed by initial management strategy. A total of 124 cases of stage I twin-twin transfusion syndrome were studied. In all, 49 (40%) cases were managed expectantly while 30 (24%) underwent amnioreduction and 45 (36%) underwent laser therapy at stage I. The overall fetal mortality rate was 20.2% (50 of 248 fetuses). Of those managed expectantly, 11 patients regressed (22%), 4 remained stage I (8%), 29 advanced in stage (60%), and 5 experienced spontaneous previable preterm birth (10%) during observation. The mean number of days from diagnosis of stage I to a change in status (progression, regression, loss, or delivery) was 11.1 (SD 14.3) days. Intervention by amniocentesis or laser therapy was associated with a lower risk of fetal loss (P = .01) than expectant management. The unadjusted odds of poor outcome were 0.33 (95% confidence interval, 0.09-01.20), for

  7. Do clinical and laboratory parameters effect maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnancies complicated with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezircioğlu, Incim; Baloğlu, Ali; Cetinkaya, Burcu; Pirim, Betül

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether the clinical features and laboratory parameters affect maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnancies complicated with HELLP syndrome. The medical records of pregnant patients complicated with HELLP syndrome were analyzed retrospectively between June 01, 2003 and June 01, 2010. The demographic data, medical history, admission symptoms, clinical and laboratory findings and recovery time were evaluated. The adverse maternal outcomes including eclampsia, placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulation, postpartum hemorrhage, pulmonary complications, cerebral edema and visual loss were recorded. Fetal growth restriction, necessity for neonatal intensive care unit admission and perinatal mortality were recorded as an adverse fetal outcome. The incidence of HELLP syndrome was 0.52%. The mean age of the patients was 28.93±7.90 (range 17-45). HELLP syndrome was diagnosed on average in the 33.68±4.41(th) (ranged 24-40) week of gestation. Eighteen cases (40.9%) were nullipara and twenty-six cases (59.1%) multipara. The most common complications were eclampsia (40.9%) and abruption placenta (15.9%). Pregnancy was terminated within 48 hours in all patients. The rate of cesarean section was 90.9%. Perinatal mortality rate in HELLP syndrome was 31.8%. There was no maternal mortality. Neither clinical characteristics nor laboratory parameters was found effective for prediction of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes.

  8. Detection of fetal cell-free DNA in maternal plasma for Down syndrome, Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome of high risk fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Wei-Lin; Zhao, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to validate the efficacy of detection of fetal cell-free DNA in maternal plasma of trisomy 21, 18 and 13 in a clinical setting. A total of 2340 women at high risk for Down syndrome based on maternal age, prenatal history or a positive sesum or sonographic screening test were offered prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test. According to the prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test, the pregnant women at high risk were offered amniocentesis karyotype analysis and the pregnant at low risk were followed up to make sure the newborn outcome. The prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test was positive for trisomy 21 in 17 cases, for trisomy 18 in 6 cases and for trisomy 13 in 1 case, which of all were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Newborns of low risk gestational woman detected by prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy for trisomy 21, 18, 13 were followed up and no one was found with trisomy. The prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test is highly accurate for detection of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, which can be considered as a practical alternative for traditional invasive diagnostic procedures.

  9. Prevalence of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Maternal Characteristics in a Sample of Schoolchildren from a Rural Province of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Barišić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS is a congenital syndrome caused by maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and is entirely preventable by abstinence from alcohol drinking during this time. Little is known about the prevalence of FAS and maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy in Western countries. We present the results of FAS/partial fetal alcohol syndrome (PFAS prevalence study and maternal characteristics in a sample of schoolchildren from a rural province of Croatia. This study involved seven elementary schools with 1,110 enrolled children attending 1st to 4th grade and their mothers. We used an active case ascertainment method with passive parental consent and Clarified IOM criteria. The investigation protocol involved maternal data collection and clinical examination of children. Out of 1,110 mothers, 917 (82.6% answered the questionnaire. Alcohol exposure during pregnancy was admitted by 11.5%, regular drinking by 4.0% and binge drinking by 1.4% of questioned mothers. Clinical examination involved 824 (74.2% schoolchildren and disclosed 14 (1.7% with clinical signs of FAS and 41 (5.0% of PFAS. The observed FAS prevalence, based on 74.2% participation rate, was 16.9, PFAS 49.7 and combined prevalence was 66.7/1,000 examined schoolchildren. This is the first FAS prevalence study based on active ascertainment among schoolchildren and pregnancy alcohol drinking analysis performed in a rural community of Croatia and Europe. High prevalence of FAS/PFAS and pregnancy alcohol consumption observed in this study revealed that FAS is serious health problem in rural regions as well as a need to develop future studies and preventive measures for pregnancy alcohol drinking and FASD.

  10. Changes in leukocyte subsets of pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and relationships with viral load and fetal outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    In spite of more than two decades of extensive research, the understanding of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) immunity is still incomplete. A PRRSv infection of the late term pregnant female can result in abortions, early farrowings, fetal death, and the birth of weak, co...

  11. [Maternal nutrition during pregnancy conditions the fetal pancreas development, hormonal status and diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome biomarkers at birth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Gesteiro, E; Espárrago Rodilla, M; Rodríguez Bernal, B; Bastida, S

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy is a vital period where several hyperplasic, hypertrophic processes together with metabolic adaptation and preparation for extra-uterine life take place. Present review accounts for central aspects of nutrition throughout gestation on the embryonic and fetal periods. It is centered in the major changes occurring in fetal pancreas, with special mention to the susceptibility of this main glucose homeostasis organ to support nutritional changes during maturation and development. Studies performed in animal models as human are commented considering the role of maternal nutrition on β-cell mass size, insulin and other pancreatic hormones production, and insulin sensitivity. Details of both the thrifty genotype and phenotype hypothesis are given, indicating that hypo/subnutrition causes metabolic adaptations that permit the future body to grow and develop itself in limited environmental and energetic conditions. The Barker hypothesis is considered suggesting that this metabolic hypothesis is a double-edged sword in the actual abundance World. Lastly the review, taking into account our own research and other papers, analyses less known aspects that relate maternal diet with insulin resistance/sensitivity markers at delivery. Particularly the role of the saturated fatty acid/carbohydrate and omega-6/omega-3 ratios in the frame of maternal diet is reviewed considering the quality of those diets under the Healthy Eating Index and the Adherence to Mediterranean Diet scores and the relationship with insulin resistance profile at birth. Present review ends indicating that nutritional habits should be strongly stated before gestation in order to assure a proper nutrition since the first moment of pregnancy. This will support an adequate fetal and pancreatic growth and development, and in turn, adequate glucose homeostasis during pregnancy and later in life, slowing down or preventing from degenerative diseases related with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes

  12. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome: case report of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly and hypoplastic left middle cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Ettore; Piccione, Maria; Marrone, Gianluca; Giuffrè, Mario; Corsello, Giovanni

    2013-05-14

    Prenatal ultrasonographic detection of unilateral cerebral ventriculomegaly arises suspicion of pathological condition related to cerebrospinal fluid flow obstruction or cerebral parenchimal pathology. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome is a rare condition characterized by cerebral hemiatrophy, calvarial thickening, skull and facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiparesis, cognitive impairment and seizures. Congenital and acquired types are recognized and have been described, mainly in late childhood, adolescence and adult ages. We describe a female infant with prenatal diagnosis of unilateral left ventriculomegaly in which early brain MRI and contrast enhanced-MRI angiography, showed cerebral left hemiatrophy associated with reduced caliber of the left middle cerebral artery revealing the characteristic findings of the Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome. Prenatal imaging, cerebral vascular anomaly responsible for the cerebral hemiatrophy and the early clinical evolution have never been described before in such a young child and complete the acquired clinical descriptions in older children. Differential diagnosis, genetic investigations, neurophysiologic assessments, short term clinical and developmental follow up are described. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome must be ruled out in differential diagnosis of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly. Early clinical assessment, differential diagnosis and cerebral imaging including cerebral MRI angiography allow the clinicians to diagnose also in early infancy this rare condition.

  13. Case study: using a virtual reality computer game to teach fire safety skills to children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Lynne S; Strickland, Dorothy; Coles, Claire D

    2006-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a computer-based virtual reality (VR) game in teaching five children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) fire safety skills and to generalize these skills to a real world simulation. Children participated in a study by using a multiple baseline, multiple probe design. Before the game, no child could correctly describe what actions to take during a home fire. A computerized game allowed them to learn the recommended safety steps in a virtual world. Skill learning and real-world generalization were tested immediately after the intervention and at 1-week post-test. All children reached 100% accuracy on the computer intervention, defined as successfully completing each of the safety steps. At the 1-week follow-up, all the children were able to perform the steps correctly in a real world simulation. The results suggest that this method of intervention warrants further study as an educational delivery system for children with FAS.

  14. Sildenafil Treatment Ameliorates the Maternal Syndrome of Preeclampsia and Rescues Fetal Growth in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Ellen E; Mooney, Jennifer N; Garrett, Michael R; Granger, Joey P; Sasser, Jennifer M

    2016-03-01

    Preeclampsia, a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, is detrimental to both mother and fetus. There is currently no effective treatment, but sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, has been proposed as a potential therapy to reduce blood pressure and improve uteroplacental perfusion in preeclamptic patients. We hypothesized that sildenafil would improve the maternal syndrome and fetal outcomes in the Dahl S rat model of superimposed preeclampsia. Dahl S rats were mated, and half received sildenafil (50 mg/kg per day, via food) from day 10 through day 20 of pregnancy. The untreated Dahl S rats had a significant rise in blood pressure and a 2-fold increase in urinary protein excretion from baseline to late pregnancy; however, sildenafil-treated Dahl S rats exhibited ≈40 mm Hg drops in blood pressure with no rise in protein excretion. Sildenafil also increased creatinine clearance and reduced nephrinuria and glomerulomegaly. Sildenafil treatment reduced the uterine artery resistance index during late pregnancy in the Dahl S rat and improved fetal outcomes (survival, weight, and litter size). In addition, 19% of all pups were resorbed in untreated rats, with no incidence of resorptions observed in the treated group. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α, endothelin-1, and oxidative stress, which are characteristically increased in women with preeclampsia and in experimental models of the disease, were reduced in treated rats. These data suggest that sildenafil improves the maternal syndrome of preeclampsia and blood flow to the fetoplacental unit, providing preclinical evidence to support the hypothesis that phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibition may be an important therapeutic target for the treatment of preeclampsia. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation and fetal susceptibility to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The severity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome was compared in pregnant gilts originating from high and low birth weight litters. One-hundred and eleven pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus on gestation day 85 (±1) were necrop...

  16. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) : role of androgens and obesity on placental function and fetal development

    OpenAIRE

    Fornes, Romina

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine and metabolic disorder affecting women in childbearing age with a prevalence of up to 17.8%. The syndrome is characterized by hyperandrogenism, irregular cycles and polycystic ovaries. The etiology of PCOS is unclear, but it is thought to be multifactorial. There is a strong association between hyperinsulinemia and hyperandrogenism in PCOS, but the mechanisms behind their relationship with PCOS are not fully understood. Obe...

  17. Fetoplacental cytogenetic discrepancy in a pregnancy with fetal mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Pallister–Killian syndrome detected by amniocentesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Pregnancy with fetal PKS and mosaic tetrasomy 12p may present fetoplacental cytogenetic discrepancy. Therefore, genetic analysis on placenta alone may fail to detect fetal mosaic tetrasomy 12p associated with PKS.

  18. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) in C57BL/6 Mice Detected through Proteomics Screening of the Amniotic Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Susmita; Turner, Delano; Singh, Reetu; Ruest, L. Bruno; Pierce, William M.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a severe consequence of the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, is associated with craniofacial defects, mental retardation, and stunted growth. Previous studies in C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mice provide evidence that alcohol-induced pathogenesis follows early changes in gene expression within specific molecular pathways in the embryonic headfold. Whereas the former (B6J) pregnancies carry a high-risk for dysmorphogenesis following maternal exposure to 2.9 g/kg alcohol (two injections spaced 4.0 h apart on gestation day 8), the latter (B6N) pregnancies carry a low-risk for malformations. The present study used this murine model to screen amniotic fluid for biomarkers that could potentially discriminate between FAS-positive and FAS-negative pregnancies. METHODS B6J and B6N litters were treated with alcohol (exposed) or saline (control) on day 8 of gestation. Amniotic fluid aspirated on day 17 (n = 6 replicate litters per group) was subjected to trypsin digestion for analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption–time of flight mass spectrometry with the aid of denoising algorithms, statistical testing, and classification methods. RESULTS We identified several peaks in the proteomics screen that were reduced consistently and specifically in exposed B6J litters. Preliminary characterization by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and multidimensional protein identification mapped the reduced peaks to alpha fetoprotein (AFP). The predictive strength of AFP deficiency as a biomarker for FAS-positive litters was confirmed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. CONCLUSIONS These findings in genetically susceptible mice support clinical observations in maternal serum that implicate a decrease in AFP levels following prenatal alcohol damage. PMID:18240165

  19. Expanding the scope of noninvasive prenatal testing: detection of fetal microdeletion syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapner, Ronald J; Babiarz, Joshua E; Levy, Brynn; Stosic, Melissa; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Wayham, Nicholas; Ryan, Allison; Banjevic, Milena; Lacroute, Phil; Hu, Jing; Hall, Megan P; Demko, Zachary; Siddiqui, Asim; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Gross, Susan J; Hill, Matthew; Benn, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the performance of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based noninvasive prenatal test for 5 microdeletion syndromes. Four hundred sixty-nine samples (358 plasma samples from pregnant women, 111 artificial plasma mixtures) were amplified with the use of a massively multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and analyzed with the use of the Next-generation Aneuploidy Test Using SNPs algorithm for the presence or absence of deletions of 22q11.2, 1p36, distal 5p, and the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Detection rates were 97.8% for a 22q11.2 deletion (45/46) and 100% for Prader-Willi (15/15), Angelman (21/21), 1p36 deletion (1/1), and cri-du-chat syndromes (24/24). False-positive rates were 0.76% for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (3/397) and 0.24% for cri-du-chat syndrome (1/419). No false positives occurred for Prader-Willi (0/428), Angelman (0/442), or 1p36 deletion syndromes (0/422). SNP-based noninvasive prenatal microdeletion screening is highly accurate. Because clinically relevant microdeletions and duplications occur in >1% of pregnancies, regardless of maternal age, noninvasive screening for the general pregnant population should be considered. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection increases apoptosis at the maternal-fetal interface in late gestation pregnant gilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, John C. S.; Al-Dissi, Ahmad N; Detmer, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of fetal death associated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is hypothesized to be a consequence of PRRS virus-induced apoptosis at the maternal-fetal interface (MFI). The objectives of this study were to evaluate distribution and degree of apoptosis in the uterine and fetal placental tissues during the experimental type 2 PRRS virus (PRRSV) infection and determine associations between apoptosis at the MFI, PRRSV RNA concentration and antigen staining intensity, PRRSV-induced microscopic lesions, and fetal preservation status. A total of 114 naïve, high-health pregnant gilts were inoculated with type 2 PRRSV on gestation day 85±1 with euthanasia 21 days later; 19 sham-inoculated gilts served as controls. Two hundred and fifty samples of uterine tissue with fetal placenta were selected based on negative, low PRRSV RNA, and high PRRSV RNA concentration (0, 2.7 log10 copies/mg, respectively). TUNEL assay was used to detect apoptosis in the endometrium and at the MFI. PRRSV RNA concentration and numbers of PRRSV immunopositive cells in uterine and placental tissue were positively associated with the severity of apoptosis in the endometrium and the MFI (P<0.001, P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively). The number of TUNEL positive cells at the MFI was also positively associated with the severity (P<0.001) of vasculitis, but not total numbers of inflammatory cells in the endometrium. Increased numbers of TUNEL positive cells at the MFI were associated with PRRSV load in the fetal thymus, and greater odds of meconium staining of the fetus at 21 days post infection (P<0.001 for both). These findings suggest an important role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of uterine epithelial and trophoblastic cell death at the MFI. Moreover, apoptosis at the MFI is significantly associated with fetal demise during in utero type 2 PRRSV infection. PMID:28253336

  1. Changes in leukocyte subsets of pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and relationships with viral load and fetal outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Ladinig, Andrea; Gerner, Wilhelm; Saalmüller, Armin; Lunney, Joan K; Ashley, Carolyn; Harding, John CS

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In spite of more than two decades of extensive research, the understanding of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) immunity is still incomplete. A PRRSv infection of the late term pregnant female can result in abortions, early farrowings, fetal death, and the birth of weak, congenitally infected piglets. The objectives of the present study were to investigate changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations in third trimester pregnant fem...

  2. Non-invasive Prenatal Diagnosis of Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Microdeletion Syndrome Using Fetal Nucleated Red Blood Cells Isolated by Nanostructure Microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chun; He, Zhaobo; Cai, Bo; Peng, Jianhong; Song, Jieping; Yu, Xuechen; Sun, Yue; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xingzhong; Zhang, Yuanzhen

    2018-01-01

    Detection of detached fetal nucleated red blood cells (fNRBCs) in the maternal peripheral blood may serve as a prospective testing method competing with the cell-free DNA, in non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). Methods: Herein, we introduce a facile and effective lab-on-a-chip method of fNRBCs detection using a capture-releasing material that is composed of biotin-doped polypyrrole nanoparticles. To enhance local topographic interactions between the nano-components and fNRBC, a specific antibody, CD147, coated on the nanostructured substrate led to the isolation of fNRBCs from maternal peripheral blood. Subsequently, an electrical system was employed to release the captured cells using 0.8 V for 15 s. The diagnostic application of fNRBCs for fetal chromosomal disorders (Trisomy 13/21/18/X syndrome, microdeletion syndrome) was demonstrated. Results: Cells captured by nanostructured microchips were identified as fNRBCs. Twelve cases of chromosomal aneuploidies and one case of 18q21 microdeletion syndrome were diagnosed using the fNRBCs released from the microchips. Conclusion: Our method offers effective and accurate analysis of fNRBCs for comprehensive NIPT to monitor fetal cell development.

  3. Supine hypotensive syndrome as the probable cause of both maternal and fetal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Giorgio, Fabio; Grassi, Vincenzo M; Vetrugno, Giuseppe; d'Aloja, Ernesto; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Arena, Vincenzo

    2012-11-01

    Supine hypotensive syndrome is characterized by severe supine hypotension in late pregnancy, whose clinical presentation ranges from minimal cardiovascular alterations to severe shock, resulting from inferior vena cava compression by gravid uterus. We report a case of a 41-year-old 39-week-pregnant woman found dead supine. Autopsy revealed the following: cyanosis of the limbs; congestion of the jugular and subclavian veins; abundant abdominal subcutaneous fatty tissue; uterus displacing intestine and diaphragm; collapsed inferior vena cava; both femoral veins dilated and filled with blood; edematous and congested lungs; and placenta 790 g, fetus 3475 g, amniotic fluid 800 cm(3). The diagnosis of supine hypotensive syndrome as the probable cause of death is supported by the position of the body and autopsy findings. This syndrome can be considered as the first stage of the physio-pathological mechanism that led to death in the case presented herein and should be considered by pathologists as a cause of sudden death. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Hypermethylated ERG as a cell-free fetal DNA biomarker for non-invasive prenatal testing of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Xiong, Likuan; Zeng, Ting; Xiao, Kelin; Huang, Yanping; Guo, Hui; Ren, Jinghui

    2015-04-15

    Previous reports have shown that the ERG gene is hypermethylated in the placenta and hypomethylated in maternal blood cells. In this study, we explore the feasibility of hypermethylated ERG as a cell-free fetal (cff) DNA biomarker for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) of Down syndrome. We randomly selected 90 healthy pregnant women, including 30 cases at each trimester of pregnancy. In addition, 15 pregnant women were recruited as the case group whose fetuses had been confirmed to have trisomy 21 by amniotic fluid analysis at 18th to 26th week gestation. Using HpaII, MspІ to digest cell-free maternal plasma DNA, we performed SYBR Green PCR to detect methylated sites of ERG sequences, and analyzed the concentrations of cff DNA in maternal plasma in different gestational trimesters and the case group. The ERG median concentrations of the maternal plasma after Hpa II digestion (LG copies/ml) in first, second and third-trimesters were 5.38, 6.10, and 7.04, respectively (Kruskal-Wallis, Psyndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prediction of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in term pregnancies by assessment of fetal lung volume and pulmonary artery resistance index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Mohamed; Mansour, Ghada M; Elsafty, Mohammed S E; Hassanin, Alaa S; EzzElarab, Sahar S

    2015-03-01

    To develop reference cutoff values for mean fetal lung volume (FLV) and pulmonary artery resistance index (PA-RI) for prediction of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in low-risk term pregnancies. As part of a cross-sectional study, women aged 20-35 years were enrolled and admitted to a tertiary hospital in Cairo, Egypt, for elective repeat cesarean at 37-40 weeks of pregnancy between January 1, 2012, and July 31, 2013. FLV was calculated by virtual organ computer-aided analysis, and PA-RI was measured by Doppler ultrasonography before delivery. A total of 80 women were enrolled. Neonatal RDS developed in 11 (13.8%) of the 80 newborns. Compared with neonates with RDS, healthy neonates had significantly higher FLVs (P<0.001) and lower PA-RIs (P<0.001). Neonatal RDS is less likely with FLV of at least 32 cm(3) or PA-RI less than or equal to 0.74. Combining these two measures improved the accuracy of prediction. The use of either FLV or PA-RI predicted neonatal RDS. The predictive value increased when these two measures were combined. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Fetal atrioventricular septal defect associated with Patau and Edwards syndromes, as well as trisomy 22].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesko, I; Hajdú, J; Marton, T; Tóth-Pál, E; Papp, C; Papp, Z

    1998-05-03

    The atrioventricular septal defect is usually associated with trisomy 21 and it may be observed in the heterotaxia syndromes. Atrioventricular septal defect may be associated with 8p deletion. There are reported cases of familial atrioventricular septal defect. Atrioventicular septal defect is rarely associated with other chromosomal abnormalities. We are reporting three unusual cases of atrioventricular septal defect that were associated with trisomy 13, 18 and 22. This association may be due to effect of genetic loci on the 13, 18 and 22 chromosome which could play the role in the development and fusion of endocardial cushion and atrioventricular septal defect.

  7. [Ballantyne syndrome or mirror syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Silva-González, María Eugenia; González-Hernández, Rigoberto

    2010-11-01

    Ballantyne syndrome or mirror syndrome is a triad consisting of the presence of fetal hydrops, generalized edema placentomegaly mother. May be related to any cause of fetal hydrops. The fetal prognosis is poor in untreated cases, the mother has reference to be the cause or the termination of pregnancy. Present the case of a 26-year-old who developed mirror syndrome secondary to non-immune fetal hydrops of unknown origin, accompanied by preeclampsia.

  8. Maternal and fetal insulin levels at birth in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: data from a randomized controlled study on metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helseth, Ragnhild; Vanky, Eszter; Stridsklev, Solhild; Vogt, Christina; Carlsen, Sven M

    2014-05-01

    Metformin is suggested to reduce pregnancy complications in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Metformin crosses the placenta and therapeutic concentrations are measured in the fetal circulation. Whether metformin treatment in pregnant PCOS women affects maternal and fetal insulin concentrations at birth is not clarified. To investigate the possible effect of metformin on insulin concentrations in umbilical cord blood and the possible association between maternal and fetal insulin concentrations. Post-hoc analysis of a subgroup of PCOS women participating in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. University hospital setting. Women with PCOS (n=118), aged 19-39 years. Maternal and umbilical cord insulin concentrations immediately after birth. At delivery women randomized to metformin had lower insulin concentrations than those randomized to placebo (259±209 vs 361±261 pmol/l; P=0.020). No difference was found in insulin concentrations in umbilical venous (P=0.95) and arterial (P=0.39) blood between the metformin and placebo groups. The arteriovenous difference was also equal between the groups (P=0.38). Insulin concentrations were higher in the umbilical vein than in the umbilical artery independent of randomization (70±51 vs 45±48 pmol/l; Pmetformin treatment during pregnancy resulted in lower maternal insulin concentrations at delivery. Metformin treatment did not affect fetal insulin concentrations. Higher insulin concentrations in the umbilical vein indicate that the placenta somehow secretes insulin to the fetus. The possibility of placental insulin secretion to the fetus deserves further investigations.

  9. Elevated second-trimester maternal serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin and amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein as indicators of adverse obstetric outcomes in fetal Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Nava, Francisco; Soto, Marisol; Lanes, Roberto; Pons, Hector; Morales-Machin, Alisandra; Bracho, Ana

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of biochemical analytes to identify adverse outcomes in pregnancies with Turner syndrome. Maternal serum and amniotic fluid (AF) marker concentrations were measured in 73 singleton pregnancies with Turner syndrome (10-22 weeks of gestation). Fetal Turner syndrome was definitively established by cytogenetic analysis. Two subgroups, fetuses with hydrops fetalis versus fetuses with cystic hygroma, were compared. Receiver operating characteristic curves and relative risk were established for a cut-off multiples of the median ≥3.5 for β-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or AF alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Forty-nine (67%) of 73 pregnant women had an abnormal maternal serum. While levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A and free β-subunit (fβ)-hCG were not different to those of the control group, AFP, unconjugated estriol and β-hCG concentrations were significantly different in the study group (P < 0.05), when compared to those of unaffected pregnancies. Levels of β-hCG in pregnancies with hydrops fetalis were significantly higher than in those with cystic hygroma (P <0.0001), as were AF-AFP concentrations (P <0.0015). In addition, abnormalities in both maternal serum β-hCG and AF-AFP predicted fetal death. The relative risk of adverse obstetric outcome was 10.667 (P = 0.0004; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.554-73.203) for β-hCG and 2.19 (P = 0.0256; 95% CI: 1.001 to 4.779), for AF-AFP. Maternal serum β-hCG and AF-AFP levels may preferentially identify those Turner syndrome pregnancies with the highest risk of fetal death. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome with separation of fetal membranes and neonatal asphyxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereksson, Kristjan; Kjartansson, Sveinn; Hjartardóttir, Hulda; Arngrimsson, Reynir

    2012-01-01

    Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS) is a rare inherited skin disorder. Children are born prematurely with thick skin and have been found to develop neonatal asphyxia due to occlusions in the bronchial tree from debris in the amniotic fluid. At 31 weeks of gestation, separation of amniotic and chorionic membranes was identified as well as polyhydramnion. The child was born 2 weeks later, with thickened skin with a granular appearance and required immediate ventilation and intensive care. At 2 years of age, the patient has developed an atopic skin condition with severe itching, recurrent skin infections, food intolerance and periods of wheezing. Prenatal observation of separation of foetal membranes or dense amniotic fluid may be signs of IPS and severe complication immediately after birth. PMID:22927265

  11. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome with separation of fetal membranes and neonatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereksson, Kristjan; Kjartansson, Sveinn; Hjartardóttir, Hulda; Arngrimsson, Reynir

    2012-08-27

    Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS) is a rare inherited skin disorder. Children are born prematurely with thick skin and have been found to develop neonatal asphyxia due to occlusions in the bronchial tree from debris in the amniotic fluid. At 31 weeks of gestation, separation of amniotic and chorionic membranes was identified as well as polyhydramnion. The child was born 2 weeks later, with thickened skin with a granular appearance and required immediate ventilation and intensive care. At 2 years of age, the patient has developed an atopic skin condition with severe itching, recurrent skin infections, food intolerance and periods of wheezing. Prenatal observation of separation of foetal membranes or dense amniotic fluid may be signs of IPS and severe complication immediately after birth.

  12. Current thoughts on maternal nutrition and fetal programming of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenseke, Bonnie; Prater, M Renee; Bahamonde, Javiera; Gutierrez, J Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Although the metabolic syndrome has been defined in various ways, the ultimate importance of recognizing this combination of disorders is that it helps identify individuals at high risk for both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Evidence from observational and experimental studies links adverse exposures in early life, particularly relating to nutrition, to chronic disease susceptibility in adulthood. Such studies provide the foundation and framework for the relatively new field of developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD). Although great strides have been made in identifying the putative concepts and mechanisms relating specific exposures in early life to the risk of developing chronic diseases in adulthood, a complete picture remains obscure. To date, the main focus of the field has been on perinatal undernutrition and specific nutrient deficiencies; however, the current global health crisis of overweight and obesity demands that perinatal overnutrition and specific nutrient excesses be examined. This paper assembles current thoughts on the concepts and mechanisms behind the DOHaD as they relate to maternal nutrition, and highlights specific contributions made by macro- and micronutrients.

  13. Current Thoughts on Maternal Nutrition and Fetal Programming of the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Brenseke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Although the metabolic syndrome has been defined in various ways, the ultimate importance of recognizing this combination of disorders is that it helps identify individuals at high risk for both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Evidence from observational and experimental studies links adverse exposures in early life, particularly relating to nutrition, to chronic disease susceptibility in adulthood. Such studies provide the foundation and framework for the relatively new field of developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD. Although great strides have been made in identifying the putative concepts and mechanisms relating specific exposures in early life to the risk of developing chronic diseases in adulthood, a complete picture remains obscure. To date, the main focus of the field has been on perinatal undernutrition and specific nutrient deficiencies; however, the current global health crisis of overweight and obesity demands that perinatal overnutrition and specific nutrient excesses be examined. This paper assembles current thoughts on the concepts and mechanisms behind the DOHaD as they relate to maternal nutrition, and highlights specific contributions made by macro- and micronutrients.

  14. Fetal syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Anne; Chitayat, David; Blaser, Susan; Keating, Sarah; Shannon, Patrick

    2014-08-06

    We explored the prevalence of syringomyelia in a series of 113 cases of fetal dysraphism and hindbrain crowding, of gestational age ranging from 17.5 to 34 weeks with the vast majority less than 26 weeks gestational age. We found syringomyelia in 13 cases of Chiari II malformations, 5 cases of Omphalocele/Exostrophy/Imperforate anus/Spinal abnormality (OEIS), 2 cases of Meckel Gruber syndrome and in a single pair of pyopagus conjoined twins. Secondary injury was not uncommon, with vernicomyelia in Chiari malformations, infarct like histology, or old hemorrhage in 8 cases of syringomyelia. Vernicomyelia did not occur in the absence of syrinx formation. The syringes extended from the sites of dysraphism, in ascending or descending patterns. The syringes were usually in a major proportion anatomically distinct from a dilated or denuded central canal and tended to be dorsal and paramedian or median. We suggest that fetal syringomyelia in Chiari II malformation and other dysraphic states is often established prior to midgestation, has contributions from the primary malformation as well as from secondary in utero injury and is anatomically and pathophysiologically distinct from post natal syringomyelia secondary to hindbrain crowding.

  15. Variation in Fetal Outcome, Viral Load and ORF5 Sequence Mutations in a Large Scale Study of Phenotypic Responses to Late Gestation Exposure to Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladinig, Andrea; Wilkinson, Jamie; Ashley, Carolyn; Detmer, Susan E.; Lunney, Joan K.; Plastow, Graham; Harding, John C. S.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of extensive research, the mechanisms of reproductive disease associated with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) are still poorly understood. The objectives of this large scale study were to evaluate associations between viral load and fetal preservation, determine the impact of type 2 PRRSv on fetal weights, and investigate changes in ORF5 PRRSv genome in dams and fetuses during a 21-day period following challenge. At gestation day 85 (±1), 114 gilts were experimentally infected with type 2 PRRSv, while 19 gilts served as reference controls. At necropsy, fetuses were categorized according to their preservation status and tissue samples were collected. PRRSv RNA concentrations were measured in gilt serum collected on days 0, 2, 6, and 21 post-infection, as well as in gilt and fetal tissues collected at termination. Fetal mortality was 41±22.8% in PRRS infected litters. Dead fetuses appeared to cluster in some litters but appeared solitary or random in others. Nine percent of surviving piglets were meconium-stained. PRRSv RNA concentration in fetal thymus, fetal serum and endometrium differed significantly across preservation category and was greatest in tissues of meconium-stained fetuses. This, together with the virtual absence of meconium staining in non-infected litters indicates it is an early pathological condition of reproductive PRRS. Viral load in fetal thymus and in fetal serum was positively associated with viral load in endometrium, suggesting the virus exploits dynamic linkages between individual maternal-fetal compartments. Point mutations in ORF5 sequences from gilts and fetuses were randomly located in 20 positions in ORF5, but neither nucleotide nor amino acid substitutions were associated with fetal preservation. PRRSv infection decreased the weights of viable fetuses by approximately 17%. The considerable variation in gilt and fetal outcomes provides tremendous opportunity for more detailed investigations of

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the transcriptional response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection at the maternal/fetal interface and in the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jamie M; Bao, Hua; Ladinig, Andrea; Hong, Linjun; Stothard, Paul; Lunney, Joan K; Plastow, Graham S; Harding, John C S

    2016-05-20

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) infection of pregnant pigs can result in congenital infection and ultimately fetal death. Little is known about immune responses to infection at the maternal-fetal interface and in the fetus itself, or the molecular events behind virus transmission and disease progression in the fetus. To investigate these processes, RNA-sequencing of two sites, uterine endothelium with adherent placental tissue and fetal thymus, was performed 21 days post-challenge on four groups of fetuses selected from a large PRRSV challenge experiment of pregnant gilts: control (CON), uninfected (UNINF), infected (INF), and meconium-stained (MEC) (n = 12/group). Transcriptional analyses consisted of multiple contrasts between groups using two approaches: differential gene expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Biological functions, pathways, and regulators enriched for differentially expressed genes or module members were identified through functional annotation analyses. Expression data were validated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTqPCR) carried out for 16 genes of interest. The immune response to infection in endometrium was mainly adaptive in nature, with the most upregulated genes functioning in either humoral or cell-mediated immunity. In contrast, the expression profile of infected fetal thymus revealed a predominantly innate immune response to infection, featuring the upregulation of genes regulated by type I interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Fetal infection was associated with an increase in viral load coupled with a reduction in T cell signaling in the endometrium that could be due to PRRSV-controlled apoptosis of uninfected bystander cells. There was also evidence for a reduction in TWIST1 activity, a transcription factor involved in placental implantation and maturation, which could facilitate virus transmission or fetal pathology

  17. Fetal MRI; Fetales MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, D. [Inst. fuer Diagn. Radiologie, Uniklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany); Turowski, B. [Inst. fuer Diagn. Radiologie, Neuroradiologie, Uniklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany); Schaper, J. [Inst. fuer Diagn. Radiologie, Kinderradiologie, Uniklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Ultrasonography is the method of choice for prenatal malformation screening, but it does not always provide sufficient information for correct diagnosis or adequate abnormality evaluation. Fetal MRI is increasingly being used to complete sonographic findings. It was initially used for evaluation of cerebral abnormalities but is increasingly being applied to other fetal areas. In vivo investigation of fetal brain maturation has been enhanced by MRI. An adequate analysis of fetal chest and abdomen can be achieved with fast T2-, T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The advantages include the great field of view and the excellent soft tissue contrast. This allows correct diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and evaluation of the consequences on pulmonary growth. Other pulmonary malformations, such as cystic adenomatoid malformation, sequestration and brochogenic cysts, can also be easily identified. Renal position can be quickly determined using DWI sequences and renal agenesia can be easily diagnosed with only one sequence. Prenatal MRI is virtually as effective as postnatal examination, dispenses with transport of a potentially very ill newborn, and provides logistic advantages. Therefore, prenatal MRI is useful for adequate postnatal treatment of newborns with malformations. (orig.)

  18. Changes in leukocyte subsets of pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and relationships with viral load and fetal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladinig, Andrea; Gerner, Wilhelm; Saalmüller, Armin; Lunney, Joan K; Ashley, Carolyn; Harding, John C S

    2014-12-14

    In spite of more than two decades of extensive research, the understanding of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) immunity is still incomplete. A PRRSv infection of the late term pregnant female can result in abortions, early farrowings, fetal death, and the birth of weak, congenitally infected piglets. The objectives of the present study were to investigate changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations in third trimester pregnant females infected with type 2 PRRSv (NVSL 97-7895) and to analyze potential relationships with viral load and fetal mortality rate. PRRSv infection caused a massive, acute drop in total leukocyte counts affecting all PBMC populations by two days post infection. Except for B cells, cell counts started to rebound by day six post infection. Our data also show a greater decrease of naïve B cells, T-helper cells and cytolytic T cells than their respective effector or memory counterparts. Absolute numbers of T cells and γδ T cells were negatively associated with PRRSv RNA concentration in gilt serum over time. Additionally, absolute numbers of T helper cells may be predictive of fetal mortality rate. The preceding three leukocyte populations may therefore be predictive of PRRSv-related pathological outcomes in pregnant gilts. Although many questions regarding the immune responses remain unanswered, these findings provide insight and clues that may help reduce the impact of PRRSv in pregnant gilts.

  19. Fetal echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaubal, Nitin G.; Chaubal, Jyoti

    2009-01-01

    USG performed with a high-end machine, using a good cine-loop facility is extremely helpful in the diagnosis of fetal cardiac anomalies. In fetal echocardiography, the four-chamber view and the outflow-tract view are used to diagnose cardiac anomalies. The most important objective during a targeted anomaly scan is to identify those cases that need a dedicated fetal echocardiogram. Associated truncal and chromosomal anomalies need to be identified. This review shows how fetal echocardiography, apart from identifying structural defects in the fetal heart, can be used to look at rhythm abnormalities and other functional aspects of the fetal heart

  20. Neonatology oxidative status in preterm infants with premature preterm rupture of membranes and fetal inflammatuar response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özalkaya, Elif; Karatekin, Güner; Topçuoğlu, Sevilay; Karatepe, Hande Özgün; Hafızoğlu, Taner; Baran, Pervin; Ovalı, Fahri

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study, to determine an index of oxidative stress index in preterm infants less than 34 weeks gestational age with premature preterm rupture of membrane (PPROM) and fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS). This study was designed as a prospective study. Fifty-one premature infants less than 35 weeks of gestational age were included in the study. The umbilical cord blood concentrations of IL-6, TAC (total antioxidant capacity) and PON-1 (paraoxonase-1) levels and TOS (total oxidative stress) were studied. The oxidative stress index (OSI = TAC/TOS) was calculated in all of prematüre infants. PPROM was defined as rupture of membranes at least 24 hours before the onset of labor. FIRS was defined by an umbilical cord IL-6 level greater than 11 pg/mL. Premature infants included in the study were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 included preterm infants without FIRS and with PPROM (n = 16), while Group 2 included preterm infants without PPROM and with FIRS (n = 9), Group 3 consisted of premature infants with PPROM and FIRS (n = 21) and Group 4 included premature infants without PPROM or FIRS (n = 5). Umbilical cord TOS level was found to be higher in the preterm infants without FIRS and with PPROM (36.1 μmol H 2 O 2 Equiv./L) compared to the preterm infants without PPROM or FIRS (11.9 μmol H 2 O 2 Equiv./L) (p = 0.03). Umbilical cord PON-1 level was found to be lower in the preterms without FIRS and with PPROM (32 U/L), preterms without PPROM and with FIRS (30. 3 U/L) and the preterm infants with both PPROM and FIRS (48.6 U/L) compared to the preterm infants having no PPROM or FIRS (85.6 U/L) (p = 0.001). High pro-oxidant capacity was found in PPROM and low antioxidant capacity in PPROM and FIRS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein as marker of fetal inflammatory response syndrome after preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavcnik-Arnol, Maja; Lucovnik, Miha; Kornhauser-Cerar, Lilijana; Premru-Srsen, Tanja; Hojker, Sergej; Derganc, Metka

    2014-01-01

    Intra-amniotic inflammation with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) is a risk factor for fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) and adverse neonatal outcome. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) for detecting FIRS in preterm neonates born after PPROM. This was a prospective study in the level III neonatal intensive care unit (42 neonates; 23 + 6 to 31 + 6 weeks' gestation) of mothers with PPROM. Umbilical cord blood concentrations of LBP, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6 and white blood cell count with differential were measured at delivery and 24 h after birth. Neonates were classified into FIRS (n = 22) and no FIRS (n = 20) groups according to clinical criteria and IL-6 level (≥17.5 pg/ml). Histological examination of the placenta and umbilical cord was performed. Neurological examination at 12 months' corrected age was performed. Umbilical cord blood concentration of LBP was significantly higher in the FIRS group than in the no FIRS group at delivery (median 21.6 mg/l vs. median 2.3 mg/l; p < 0.0001) and 24 h after birth (median 17.2 mg/l vs. median 20.0 mg/l; p < 0.001). The area under the ROC curve for FIRS at delivery was 0.98 (95% CI 0.88-1.0) for LBP, 0.92 (95% CI 0.80-0.99) for CRP and 0.82 (95% CI 0.64-0.94) for immature to total neutrophil ratio. Similar results were obtained if FIRS was defined by funisitis. Umbilical cord blood concentration of LBP at delivery was significantly higher in neonates with abnormal neurological exam at 12 months than in those with normal exam (median 19.5 mg/l vs. median 3.75 mg/l; p < 0.015). In preterm neonates born to asymptomatic women with PPROM, LBP in cord blood at delivery is an excellent diagnostic biomarker of FIRS/funisitis with prognostic potential. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Mandibulofacial dysostosis (Treacher-Collins syndrome) in the fetus: novel association with Pectus carinatum in a molecularly confirmed case and review of the fetal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidou, Anastasia E; Tasoulas, Jason; Kallipolitis, Georgios; Gasparatos, Spyros; Velissariou, Voula; Paraskevakou, Helen

    2013-12-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is the most common mandibulofacial dysostosis of autosomal dominant or, rarely, recessive inheritance. Affected fetuses may be identified by prenatal ultrasound or diagnosed at autopsy in case of perinatal death or pregnancy termination. We describe the ultrasonographic, autopsy, and molecular findings in a 25-week-gestation affected fetus, and review the clinical, prenatal, and postmortem findings in 15 previously reported fetal and perinatal cases. A nearly complete spectrum of the typical facial characteristics can be present by the early second trimester of gestation, including subtle defects such as lower eyelid colobomas. Mandibular hypoplasia and bilateral auricle defects were constant findings in the affected fetal population. Downslanting palpebral fissures were the second more common feature, followed by midface hypoplasia, polyhydramnios, and ocular defects. Association with Pierre Robin sequence was common (38%) in the reviewed series. Previously unreported pectus carinatum was noted in our case bearing a heterozygous TCOF1 mutation. Other unique reported findings include salivary gland hyperplasia, single umbilical artery, and tracheo-esophageal fistula, all in molecularly unconfirmed cases. Treacher Collins syndrome can be prenatally detected by ultrasound and should be included in the wide range of genetic syndromes that can be diagnosed at perinatal autopsy. Affected fetuses tend to have a more severe phenotype than living patients. The reported association of Treacher Collins syndrome type 1 with pectus carinatum expands the phenotype, provides information on genotype-phenotype correlation, and suggests possible pathogenetic interactions between neural crest cell disorders and the formation of the sternum that merit investigation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fetal echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007340.htm Fetal echocardiography To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fetal echocardiography is a test that uses sound waves ( ultrasound ) ...

  4. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also been reported. Growth and developmental delays, behavioral problems, learning disabilities and neurocognitive disorders affecting IQ (mild to severe) occur in association with FAS and FASD. The effects of FAS extend beyond childhood. The changes caused by prenatal alcohol exposure can ...

  5. Fetal Valproate Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Mutlu-Albayrak

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, there is a recognizable spectrum of abnormalities in some infants exposed to VPA without dose-depence and the common facial dysmorphic features and minor skeletal abnormalities that may occur within the both low and high dose VPA use.

  6. Fetal Valproate Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1993-01-01

    The high frequency of minor abnormalities and major malformations, the withdrawal manifestations, and hypoglycemia in infants born to mothers who received sodium valproate during pregnancy are reported from the Department of Paediatrics, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a hole in the heart. Delayed development. Vision or hearing problems. As they grow older, these children may have behavior problems. They may experience learning disabilities, trouble with memory and attention, and hyperactivity. Symptoms tend to get ...

  8. Pathophysiology of Increased Fetal Nuchal Translucency Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased fetal nuchal translucency thickness is associated with trisomy 13, trisomy 18, trisomy 21, Turner syndrome, other sex chromosome abnormalities, as well as many fetal anomalies and genetic syndromes. This article provides a comprehensive review of the cardinal proposed pathophysiology including altered composition of the extracellular matrix, abnormalities of the heart and great arteries, and disturbed or delayed lymphatic development.

  9. Evaluating the Agreement of Risk Categorization for Fetal Down Syndrome Screening between Ultrasound-Based Gestational Age and Menstrual-Based Gestational Age by Maternal Serum Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaksuwat, Pakorn; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Luewan, Suchaya; Tongsong, Theera

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the agreement of risk categorization for Down syndrome screening between ultrasound scan-based gestational age (GA) and last menstrual period-based gestational age in both first and second trimesters by maternal serum markers. Data comprising 4,055 and 4,016 cases of first and second trimester screening were used. The maternal serum markers were analyzed using the ultrasound-based GA and menstrual age. The subjects whose menstrual age and ultrasound-based GA fell in different trimesters were excluded because the risk could not be calculated due to the different serum markers used in each trimester. The agreement of risk categorization for fetal Down syndrome was evaluated. The agreement of Down syndrome screening in the first and the second trimesters were 92.7% and 89%, respectively. The study found a good agreement of risk categorization by Kappa index, which was 0.615 for the overall screening. The menstrual age had a slight decrease in the detection rate and a lower false-positive rate. Menstrual age is acceptable in cases of accurate last menstrual period. However, in places where ultrasonography is not readily available, gestational age estimation by menstrual age along with clinical examination that corresponds to the gestational age can be reliable.

  10. Interleukin-6 and C-Reactive Protein Are Overexpressed in the Liver of Perinatal Deaths Diagnosed with Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Helena M. Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomopathologic studies have failed to define the fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS as a cause of fetal death. Here, liver fragments of perinatal autopsies were collected at a university hospital from 1990 to 2009 and classified according to the cause of death, perinatal stress, and gestational age (GA of the fetus. IL-6, TNF-α, and C-reactive protein (CRP expression were immunostained, respectively, with primary antibody. Cases with congenital malformation, ascending infection, and perinatal anoxia showed increased IL-6, CRP, and TNF-α, respectively. Prematures presented higher expression of IL-6 whereas term births showed higher expression of CRP. Cases classified as acute stress presented higher expression of IL-6 and TNF-α and cases with chronic stress presented higher expression of CRP. GA correlated negatively with IL-6 and positively with CRP and TNF-α. Body weight correlated negatively with IL-6 and positively with CRP and TNF-α. Despite the diagnosis of FIRS being clinical and based on serum parameters, the findings in the current study allow the inference of FIRS diagnosis in the autopsied infants, based on an in situ liver analysis of these markers.

  11. Fetal alcohol syndrome, chemo-biology and OMICS: ethanol effects on vitamin metabolism during neurodevelopment as measured by systems biology analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltes, Bruno César; de Faria Poloni, Joice; Nunes, Itamar José Guimarães; Bonatto, Diego

    2014-06-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a prenatal disease characterized by fetal morphological and neurological abnormalities originating from exposure to alcohol. Although FAS is a well-described pathology, the molecular mechanisms underlying its progression are virtually unknown. Moreover, alcohol abuse can affect vitamin metabolism and absorption, although how alcohol impairs such biochemical pathways remains to be elucidated. We employed a variety of systems chemo-biology tools to understand the interplay between ethanol metabolism and vitamins during mouse neurodevelopment. For this purpose, we designed interactomes and employed transcriptomic data analysis approaches to study the neural tissue of Mus musculus exposed to ethanol prenatally and postnatally, simulating conditions that could lead to FAS development at different life stages. Our results showed that FAS can promote early changes in neurotransmitter release and glutamate equilibrium, as well as an abnormal calcium influx that can lead to neuroinflammation and impaired neurodifferentiation, both extensively connected with vitamin action and metabolism. Genes related to retinoic acid, niacin, vitamin D, and folate metabolism were underexpressed during neurodevelopment and appear to contribute to neuroinflammation progression and impaired synapsis. Our results also indicate that genes coding for tubulin, tubulin-associated proteins, synapse plasticity proteins, and proteins related to neurodifferentiation are extensively affected by ethanol exposure. Finally, we developed a molecular model of how ethanol can affect vitamin metabolism and impair neurodevelopment.

  12. Fetal Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  13. Fetal MSCs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Derived from extra embryonic tissues (amniotic fluid, placenta, cord blood, Wharton's Jelly) and fetal tissues (aborted fetuses). Derived from extra embryonic tissues (amniotic fluid, placenta, cord blood, Wharton's Jelly) and fetal tissues (aborted fetuses). In comparison ...

  14. The International society for developmental psychobiology 39th annual meeting symposium: Alcohol and development: beyond fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Juan Carlos; Spear, Norman E; Spear, Linda P; Mennella, Julie A; Lewis, Michael J

    2007-04-01

    As has been repeatedly demonstrated, alcohol can exert deleterious morphological and physiological effects during early stages in development. The present review examines nonteratological links existing between alcohol and ontogeny. Human and animal studies are taken into consideration for the analysis of fetal, neonatal, infantile, adolescent, and adult responsiveness to the drug. Sensitivity to alcohol's chemosensory and postabsorptive properties, as well as learning and memory processes mediated by such properties, are examined from this developmental perspective. The studies under discussion indicate that, within each stage in development, we can trace alcohol-related experiences capable of determining or modulating alcohol seeking and intake patterns. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Excess pregnancy weight gain leads to early indications of metabolic syndrome in a swine model of fetal programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily J; Buhman, Kimberly K; Ajuwon, Kolapo; Donkin, Shawn S

    2014-03-01

    Few data exist on the impact of maternal weight gain on offspring despite evidence demonstrating that early-life environment precipitates risks for metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that excessive weight gain during pregnancy results in programming that predisposes offspring to obesity and metabolic syndrome. We further hypothesized that early postweaning nutrition alters the effects of maternal weight gain on indications of metabolic syndrome in offspring. Pregnant sows and their offspring were used for these experiments due to similarities with human digestive physiology, metabolism, and neonatal development. First parity sows fed a high-energy (maternal nutrition high energy [MatHE]) diet gained 12.4 kg (42%) more weight during pregnancy than sows fed a normal energy (maternal nutrition normal energy) diet. Birth weight and litter characteristics did not differ, but offspring MatHE gilts weighed more (P metabolic syndrome in offspring that are further promoted by a high-energy postweaning diet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding fetal factors that contribute to preterm birth: Sjögren-Larsson syndrome as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staps, Pippa; Hogeveen, Marije; Fuijkschot, Joris; van Drongelen, Joris; Willemsen, Michèl A A P

    2017-09-15

    Preterm birth is the world's leading cause of neonatal death. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology of preterm birth remains poorly understood. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is a rare, neurometabolic disorder caused by a fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency. A majority of patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is born preterm. Data of all known Dutch patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome and all cases reported in literature were analyzed to learn from preterm birth in context of this rare disease. Exact gestational age was known in 33 Dutch patients; 24 (73%) of them were born preterm, with a median gestational age of 36 weeks. The literature search confirmed our findings: 13 (59%) of 22 cases was born preterm. Preterm birth is a hallmark of Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, presumably caused by the abnormal lipid metabolism of the fetus. At least five additional rare genetic disorders (namely Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, ichthyosis prematurity syndrome, congenital analbuminemia, osteogenesis imperfecta type II and restrictive dermopathy) were found in literature that lead to preterm birth of the affected fetus. These disorders are in fact "experiments of nature" and as such they shed new lights on the mechanisms causing preterm birth.

  17. Contribution of Histologic Chorioamnionitis and Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome to Increased Risk of Brain Injury in Infants With Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Qiu-Xia; Lu, Jun-Ying

    2016-08-01

    To determine the association of histologic chorioamnionitis (HCA) and fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) with brain injuries in infants born to mothers with preterm premature rupture of membranes. A total of 103 singleton infants born to mothers with preterm premature rupture of membranes were enrolled. The placental inflammation was confirmed by HCA, and FIRS was defined in fetuses with preterm labor and an elevation of the fetal plasma interleukin-6 concentration. Examination of brain images was conducted to confirm the existence of brain injuries. Based on placental HCA and umbilical cord blood interleukin-6 level, all patients were divided into three groups: HCA(-)FIRS(+), HCA(+)FIRS(-), and HCA(+)FIRS(+). Among all infants with preterm premature rupture of membranes, 53.40% were exposed to HCA, 20.38% experienced FIRS, and the overall incidence of brain injuries was 38.83%. The incidence of brain injury in HCA(-)FIRS(+), HCA(+)FIRS(-), and HCA(+)FIRS(+) groups were 20.83%, 41.18%, and 76.19%, respectively. HCA at the advanced grades and stages was associated with increased risk of brain injury. Umbilical cord blood levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in premature infants with brain injuries were significantly higher than in those without brain injuries. Infants diagnosed with both HCA and FIRS showed significantly higher levels of IL-8, TNF-α, and G-CSF than those with HCA alone. Preterm infants exposed to severe chorioamnionitis had an increased risk of brain injury. IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and G-CSF in cord blood were associated with brain injuries in preterm infants and may be used as extradiagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fetal Macrosomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lifestyle counts Fetal macrosomia Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  19. Fetal Macrosomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... identification of fetal macrosomia useful? European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology. 2012;161:170. Negrato CA, et al. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with diabetes. 2012;4:41. Frequently ...

  20. A enfermeira pediatra cuidando de crianças/ adolescentes com Síndrome Alcoólica Fetal (SAF La enfermera pediatra cuidando de niños/adolescentes con el Síndrome Alcohólico Fetal (SAF The pediatrician nurse taking care of children/adolescents with Fetal Alcoholic Syndrome (SAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Atanazio do Nascimento

    2007-12-01

    negación en verbalizar y mantener contacto visual, hiperactividad; dificultad de aprendizaje; dificultad en la coordinación motora; timidez y agitación psicomotora. Las necesidades afectadas fueron: hidratación, higiene oral, higiene corpórea, comunicación, coordinación motora, aprendizaje, educación alimentar, visión. Todos presentaron gran defasaje cuanto a la edad cronológica, edad de desarrollo y edad gráfica y cociente de desarrollo bajo.Study accomplished in a public Institution of Neurology, with six children with Fetal Alcoholic Syndrome (SAF. The Objectives were: To describe the basic human needs affected in children with Fetal Alcoholic Syndrome (SAF. To identify the areas of development harmed. To evaluate the children's development with Fetal Alcoholic Syndrome (SAF. Methodology: Researches qualitative. The study was approved by the Committee of Ethics and Research of Hospital Escola São Francisco de Assis (HESFA and school of Nurse Anna Nery. The development was evaluated by the scale of development of Heloisa Marinho. Results: All of the children presented discrepancy in the Mental; Social and Physical area. Children presented alienation, shyness, and refuse in to verbalize and to maintain visual contact and hyperactivity; learning difficulty; difficulty in the motive coordination; shyness; motive agitation. The affected needs were: hydration, oral hygiene, corporal hygiene, communication, motive coordination, learning, alimentary education, vision. All presented great discrepancy in relation to the chronological age, development age, graphic age and low development quotient.

  1. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome: case report of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly and hypoplastic left middle cerebral artery

    OpenAIRE

    Piro, Ettore; Piccione, Maria; Marrone, Gianluca; Giuffr?, Mario; Corsello, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ultrasonographic detection of unilateral cerebral ventriculomegaly arises suspicion of pathological condition related to cerebrospinal fluid flow obstruction or cerebral parenchimal pathology. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome is a rare condition characterized by cerebral hemiatrophy, calvarial thickening, skull and facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiparesis, cognitive impairment and seizures. Congenital and acquired types are recognized and have been described, mainly in late childhood...

  2. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. The Prevalence of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Its Impact on a Child’s Classroom Performance: A Case Study of a Rural South African School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Lubbe

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is high among farm labourers in the Western and Northern Cape of South Africa. Excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy is common, resulting in a high prevalence of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS among children. FAS causes intellectual and behavioural problems, which create considerable obstacles to a child’s education. The aim of this study is to provide a prevalence estimate of FAS in a rural school and to examine the effects of FAS on learners’ educational outcomes. The study was conducted at a farm school near Clanwilliam in the Western Cape of South Africa. The sample comprises 166 learners from Grades 1 to 4. Educational outcomes include class scores (Afrikaans Home Language and Mathematics, reading ability, and classroom behaviour. A physician diagnosed FAS using a three-stage process. We find FAS prevalence of 127 per 1000 (12.7%. Children with FAS score significantly lower (at the 10% level for home language and behaviour than children who do not have FAS. Large-scale interventions in rural areas of the Western and Northern Cape that specifically target females of child-bearing age, as well aschildren with FAS, are necessary.

  4. A new look at the pathogenesis of the meconium aspiration syndrome: a role for fetal pancreatic proteolytic enzymes in epithelial cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vadim A; Gewolb, Ira H; Uhal, Bruce D

    2010-09-01

    We hypothesized that fetal pancreatic digestive enzymes play a role in the lung damage after meconium aspiration. We studied the effect of meconium on the A549 alveolar epithelial cell line. The exposure of the cells to 0.5 to 5% meconium resulted in significant disruption of connections between A549 cells and caused dose-dependent cell detachment, without signs of cell death. A protease inhibitor cocktail prevented the A549 cell detachment induced by meconium. After the exposure to 2.5% meconium, a protective effect was quantified by measuring light absorbance by gentian violet stain of still attached cells. The protease inhibitor cocktail and chymostatin showed significant protective effects, increasing the number of attached cells by 135 and 123%, respectively (p meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). We speculate that disruption of intercellular connections and cell detachment from the basement membrane are key events in the pathology associated with MAS. The observed protective effects of protease inhibitors suggest that they may be useful in the treatment and/or prophylaxis of MAS.

  5. Fetal valproat sendromu Olgu Sunumu

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyoncu, Derya; Çetinçelik, Ümran; Çetinkaya, Feyzullah

    2009-01-01

    Fetal valproate syndrome which is seen in children of epileptic mothers who have taken sodium valproate during their pregnancy is characterized by typical facial appearance major and minor malformations and neurodevelopmental delay A case with facial features including epicanthal folds depressed nasal bridge hypertelorism retrognathia low set ears and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis patent ductus arteriosus and overlapping toes is presented for reminding this syndrome Turk Arch Ped 2009;...

  6. Ethanol-induced impairment of polyamine homeostasis – A potential cause of neural tube defect and intrauterine growth restriction in fetal alcohol syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighi Poodeh, Saeid, E-mail: saeid.haghighi@oulu.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Alhonen, Leena [Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, Kuopio (Finland); School of Pharmacy, Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Salonurmi, Tuire; Savolainen, Markku J. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

    2014-03-28

    stage is so vulnerable to the development of neural tube defect, and growth restriction, the findings previously observed in fetal alcohol syndrome.

  7. Hydrocephalus, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and cleft lip/palate represent frequent associations in fetuses with Peters' plus syndrome and B3GALTL mutations. Fetal PPS phenotypes, expanded by Dandy Walker cyst and encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoner, Katharina; Kohlhase, Juergen; Müller, Annette M; Schramm, Thomas; Plassmann, Margit; Schmitz, Ralf; Neesen, Juergen; Wieacker, Peter; Rehder, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Fetal pathology aims to recognize syndromal patterns of anomalies for goal-directed mutation analyses, genetic counseling, and early prenatal diagnosis in consecutive pregnancies. Here, we report on five fetuses with Peters' plus syndrome (PPS) from two distinct families aborted after prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of hydrocephaly. We performed fetal autopsies and molecular analyses. Among 44 fetuses with prenatally diagnosed hydrocephaly, four fetuses of 16 to 21 gestational weeks presented with additional cleft lip/palate and/or agenesis of the corpus callosum. Other features were growth retardation, hypertelorism, anomalies of the eyes, in part consistent with Peters' anterior chamber anomalies, mild brachymelia, brachydactyly, and also internal anomalies. Suspected PPS was confirmed by detection of B3GALTL mutation in these four fetuses and in one additional sib fetus, revealing homozygosity for the common c.660 + 1G > A donor splice site mutation in intron 8. Autosomal-recessive PPS has not yet been diagnosed prenatally. We want to alert ultrasonographers to the diagnosis of this disorder in growth-retarded fetuses with (recurrent) hydrocephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and cleft lip/palate and stress the more severe fetal manifestation, describing a first such case with additional Dandy-Walker cyst and occult meningoencephalocele. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Fetal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adama van Scheltema, Phebe

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the fetus is capable of exhibiting a stress response to intrauterine needling, resulting in alterations in fetal stress hormone levels. Intrauterine transfusions are performed by inserting a needle either in the umbilical cord root at the placental surface (PCI),

  9. Model-based analysis of costs and outcomes of non-invasive prenatal testing for Down's syndrome using cell free fetal DNA in the UK National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Stephen; Karlsen, Saffron; Chung, Nancy; Hill, Melissa; Chitty, Lyn S

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for Down's syndrome (DS) using cell free fetal DNA in maternal blood has the potential to dramatically alter the way prenatal screening and diagnosis is delivered. Before NIPT can be implemented into routine practice, information is required on its costs and benefits. We investigated the costs and outcomes of NIPT for DS as contingent testing and as first-line testing compared with the current DS screening programme in the UK National Health Service. We used a pre-existing model to evaluate the costs and outcomes associated with NIPT compared with the current DS screening programme. The analysis was based on a hypothetical screening population of 10,000 pregnant women. Model inputs were taken from published sources. The main outcome measures were number of DS cases detected, number of procedure-related miscarriages and total cost. At a screening risk cut-off of 1∶150 NIPT as contingent testing detects slightly fewer DS cases, has fewer procedure-related miscarriages, and costs the same as current DS screening (around UK£280,000) at a cost of £500 per NIPT. As first-line testing NIPT detects more DS cases, has fewer procedure-related miscarriages, and is more expensive than current screening at a cost of £50 per NIPT. When NIPT uptake increases, NIPT detects more DS cases with a small increase in procedure-related miscarriages and costs. NIPT is currently available in the private sector in the UK at a price of £400-£900. If the NHS cost was at the lower end of this range then at a screening risk cut-off of 1∶150 NIPT as contingent testing would be cost neutral or cost saving compared with current DS screening. As first-line testing NIPT is likely to produce more favourable outcomes but at greater cost. Further research is needed to evaluate NIPT under real world conditions.

  10. Valproic acid silencing of ascl1b/Ascl1 results in the failure of serotonergic differentiation in a zebrafish model of fetal valproate syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, John; Ribes, Vanessa; Moore, Steven; Constable, Sean C; Sasai, Noriaki; Gerety, Sebastian S; Martin, Darren J; Sergeant, Chris P; Wilkinson, David G; Briscoe, James

    2014-01-01

    Fetal valproate syndrome (FVS) is caused by in utero exposure to the drug sodium valproate. Valproate is used worldwide for the treatment of epilepsy, as a mood stabiliser and for its pain-relieving properties. In addition to birth defects, FVS is associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which is characterised by abnormal behaviours. Valproate perturbs multiple biochemical pathways and alters gene expression through its inhibition of histone deacetylases. Which, if any, of these mechanisms is relevant to the genesis of its behavioural side effects is unclear. Neuroanatomical changes associated with FVS have been reported and, among these, altered serotonergic neuronal differentiation is a consistent finding. Altered serotonin homeostasis is also associated with autism. Here we have used a chemical-genetics approach to investigate the underlying molecular defect in a zebrafish FVS model. Valproate causes the selective failure of zebrafish central serotonin expression. It does so by downregulating the proneural gene ascl1b, an ortholog of mammalian Ascl1, which is a known determinant of serotonergic identity in the mammalian brainstem. ascl1b is sufficient to rescue serotonin expression in valproate-treated embryos. Chemical and genetic blockade of the histone deacetylase Hdac1 downregulates ascl1b, consistent with the Hdac1-mediated silencing of ascl1b expression by valproate. Moreover, tonic Notch signalling is crucial for ascl1b repression by valproate. Concomitant blockade of Notch signalling restores ascl1b expression and serotonin expression in both valproate-exposed and hdac1 mutant embryos. Together, these data provide a molecular explanation for serotonergic defects in FVS and highlight an epigenetic mechanism for genome-environment interaction in disease.

  11. Valproic acid silencing of ascl1b/Ascl1 results in the failure of serotonergic differentiation in a zebrafish model of fetal valproate syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal valproate syndrome (FVS is caused by in utero exposure to the drug sodium valproate. Valproate is used worldwide for the treatment of epilepsy, as a mood stabiliser and for its pain-relieving properties. In addition to birth defects, FVS is associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD, which is characterised by abnormal behaviours. Valproate perturbs multiple biochemical pathways and alters gene expression through its inhibition of histone deacetylases. Which, if any, of these mechanisms is relevant to the genesis of its behavioural side effects is unclear. Neuroanatomical changes associated with FVS have been reported and, among these, altered serotonergic neuronal differentiation is a consistent finding. Altered serotonin homeostasis is also associated with autism. Here we have used a chemical-genetics approach to investigate the underlying molecular defect in a zebrafish FVS model. Valproate causes the selective failure of zebrafish central serotonin expression. It does so by downregulating the proneural gene ascl1b, an ortholog of mammalian Ascl1, which is a known determinant of serotonergic identity in the mammalian brainstem. ascl1b is sufficient to rescue serotonin expression in valproate-treated embryos. Chemical and genetic blockade of the histone deacetylase Hdac1 downregulates ascl1b, consistent with the Hdac1-mediated silencing of ascl1b expression by valproate. Moreover, tonic Notch signalling is crucial for ascl1b repression by valproate. Concomitant blockade of Notch signalling restores ascl1b expression and serotonin expression in both valproate-exposed and hdac1 mutant embryos. Together, these data provide a molecular explanation for serotonergic defects in FVS and highlight an epigenetic mechanism for genome-environment interaction in disease.

  12. The Source for Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  13. Model-based analysis of costs and outcomes of non-invasive prenatal testing for Down's syndrome using cell free fetal DNA in the UK National Health Service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Morris

    Full Text Available Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT for Down's syndrome (DS using cell free fetal DNA in maternal blood has the potential to dramatically alter the way prenatal screening and diagnosis is delivered. Before NIPT can be implemented into routine practice, information is required on its costs and benefits. We investigated the costs and outcomes of NIPT for DS as contingent testing and as first-line testing compared with the current DS screening programme in the UK National Health Service.We used a pre-existing model to evaluate the costs and outcomes associated with NIPT compared with the current DS screening programme. The analysis was based on a hypothetical screening population of 10,000 pregnant women. Model inputs were taken from published sources. The main outcome measures were number of DS cases detected, number of procedure-related miscarriages and total cost.At a screening risk cut-off of 1∶150 NIPT as contingent testing detects slightly fewer DS cases, has fewer procedure-related miscarriages, and costs the same as current DS screening (around UK£280,000 at a cost of £500 per NIPT. As first-line testing NIPT detects more DS cases, has fewer procedure-related miscarriages, and is more expensive than current screening at a cost of £50 per NIPT. When NIPT uptake increases, NIPT detects more DS cases with a small increase in procedure-related miscarriages and costs.NIPT is currently available in the private sector in the UK at a price of £400-£900. If the NHS cost was at the lower end of this range then at a screening risk cut-off of 1∶150 NIPT as contingent testing would be cost neutral or cost saving compared with current DS screening. As first-line testing NIPT is likely to produce more favourable outcomes but at greater cost. Further research is needed to evaluate NIPT under real world conditions.

  14. 'A problem shared is a problem halved': success of a statewide collaborative approach to fetal therapy. Outcomes of fetoscopic laser photocoagulation for twin-twin transfusion syndrome in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Mark; Walker, Sue; Cole, Stephen; Edwards, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the performance of a collaborative fetal therapy service for treatment for twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). The Victorian Fetal Therapy Service (VFTS) was developed in 2006. It is a state-based three-centre collaborative service comprising a surgical team and clinical leadership group, designed to optimise access to, and performance of, fetoscopic procedures in Victoria. This is a prospective cohort study of VFTS patients referred for fetoscopic laser photocoagulation (FLP) for TTTS since 2006. Forty-nine consecutive women with advanced (stage 2-4) TTTS between 2006 and 2011 were included in this study. Overall survival was 67 of 98 (68%), and survival of ≥1 twin was seen in 42 of 49 pregnancies (86%). There was no difference in survival by disease stage at diagnosis (≥1 survivor: 66% (stage 2 or 3 TTTS) vs 77% (stage 4 TTTS), P = 0.44), nor by surgical era (≥1 survivor: 60% (2006-2008) vs 74% of cases (2009-2011), P = 0.21). The median gestation gained post-FLP was 10.5 weeks. These results are consistent with published series and confirm the success of a novel service delivery model for fetal therapy in Victoria. We suggest that collaborative models such as ours should be considered for fetal conditions where treatment is complex and the total number of cases is small to ensure a consistent approach to assessment, management and follow-up of patients and to optimise training and research opportunities. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Medio ambiente fetal Fetal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Bernardo Ospina Arcila

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Con base en el artículo clásico "Monte Everest in utero" se hace un análisis de la situación que afronta el feto con respecto a la disponibilidad de oxígeno; para una mejor comprensión del sufrimiento fetal se revisan los siguientes conceptos: presión barométrica, presión parcial del oxígeno atmosférico, presión parcial del oxígeno inspirado, presión barométrica intranasal, ecuación del gas alveolar y difusión de gases a través de la membrana alvéolo capilar. Based on the classical paper by Eastman "Mount Everest in utero" an analysis is made of the situation faced by the fetus with respect to the availability of oxygen; for a better under. standing of fetal distress the following concepts are reviewed: barometric pressure, partial pressure of atmosferic oxygen, partial pressure of inspired oxygen, barometric intranasal pressure, alveolar gas equation and gas diffusion through alveolo-capilar membrane.

  16. Impact of fetal echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, John M

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease is now well established for a wide range of cardiac anomalies. Diagnosis of congenital heart disease during fetal life not only identifies the cardiac lesion but may also lead to detection of associated abnormalities. This information allows a detailed discussion of the prognosis with parents. For continuing pregnancies, appropriate preparation can be made to optimize the postnatal outcome. Reduced morbidity and mortality, following antenatal diagnosis, has been reported for coarctation of the aorta, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and transposition of the great arteries. With regard to screening policy, most affected fetuses are in the “low risk” population, emphasizing the importance of appropriate training for those who undertake such obstetric anomaly scans. As a minimum, the four chamber view of the fetal heart should be incorporated into midtrimester anomaly scans, and where feasible, views of the outflow tracts should also be included, to increase the diagnostic yield. Newer screening techniques, such as measurement of nuchal translucency, may contribute to identification of fetuses at high risk for congenital heart disease and prompt referral for detailed cardiac assessment

  17. Impact of fetal echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson John

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease is now well established for a wide range of cardiac anomalies. Diagnosis of congenital heart disease during fetal life not only identifies the cardiac lesion but may also lead to detection of associated abnormalities. This information allows a detailed discussion of the prognosis with parents. For continuing pregnancies, appropriate preparation can be made to optimize the postnatal outcome. Reduced morbidity and mortality, following antenatal diagnosis, has been reported for coarctation of the aorta, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and transposition of the great arteries. With regard to screening policy, most affected fetuses are in the "low risk" population, emphasizing the importance of appropriate training for those who undertake such obstetric anomaly scans. As a minimum, the four chamber view of the fetal heart should be incorporated into midtrimester anomaly scans, and where feasible, views of the outflow tracts should also be included, to increase the diagnostic yield. Newer screening techniques, such as measurement of nuchal translucency, may contribute to identification of fetuses at high risk for congenital heart disease and prompt referral for detailed cardiac assessment.

  18. Laser for the treatment of twin to twin transfusion syndrome Laser na terapia da síndrome de transfusão feto-fetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Araújo Lapa Pedreira

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report the initial experience in our country with a new technique for twin to twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS treatment, using laser to coagulate the placental vessels responsible for the twin transfusion during gestation. METHODS: Prospective study of eight cases diagnosed with TTTS evaluated in our service from january 2001 to june 2005. Through percutaneous introduction of a 2,0mm diameter fetoscope in the uterine cavity, placental surface vessels where directly visualized. Those identified as responsible for the transfusion were laser coagulated. The procedure combines ultrasonography and fetoscopy, in a so-called sonoendoscopic technique (FETENDO. RESULTS: Among the eight pregnancies evaluated, five cases were submitted to the procedure (10 fetuses. All fetuses survived for at least five weeks after surgery. A total of eight fetuses were born alive and five survived the neonatal period. In a 18 months follow-up after birth, all five are still alive and well and their mean age is now 10,6 months. The total survival rate was 50% and in three pregnancies, at least one fetus survived. CONCLUSIONS: Laser fetoscopy is actually the "gold-standard" treatment of TTTS. Nevertheless is a sophisticated technique that epends of proper training. Our service is the first in our country to offer this therapeutic technique. Our success rate is comparable with the international literature.OBJETIVO: Nosso objetivo é relatar a experiência inicial no país com uma nova técnica de tratamento para a síndrome de transfusão feto-fetal (STT, onde se utiliza o raio laser para coagulação dos vasos placentários responsáveis pela transfusão entre gêmeos durante a gravidez. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo de 8 casos com diagnóstico de STT avaliados pelo nosso serviço de janeiro de 2001 a junho de 2005. Introduzindo-se um fetoscópio de 2,0 mm de diâmetro na cavidade uterina, por via percutânea, foram diretamente visualizados os vasos da superf

  19. mRNA Quantification of NIPBL Isoforms A and B in Adult and Fetal Human Tissues, and a Potentially Pathological Variant Affecting Only Isoform A in Two Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Puisac

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by craniofacial dysmorphia, growth retardation, limb malformations, and intellectual disability. Approximately 60% of patients with CdLS carry a recognizable pathological variant in the NIPBL gene, of which two isoforms, A and B, have been identified, and which only differ in the C-terminal segment. In this work, we describe the distribution pattern of the isoforms A and B mRNAs in tissues of adult and fetal origin, by qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Our results show a higher gene expression of the isoform A, even though both seem to have the same tissue distribution. Interestingly, the expression in fetal tissues is higher than that of adults, especially in brain and skeletal muscle. Curiously, the study of fibroblasts of two siblings with a mild CdLS phenotype and a pathological variant specific of the isoform A of NIPBL (c.8387A > G; P.Tyr2796Cys, showed a similar reduction in both isoforms, and a normal sensitivity to DNA damage. Overall, these results suggest that the position of the pathological variant at the 3´ end of the NIPBL gene affecting only isoform A, is likely to be the cause of the atypical mild phenotype of the two brothers.

  20. mRNA Quantification of NIPBL Isoforms A and B in Adult and Fetal Human Tissues, and a Potentially Pathological Variant Affecting Only Isoform A in Two Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisac, Beatriz; Teresa-Rodrigo, María-Esperanza; Hernández-Marcos, María; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Gil-Rodríguez, María-Concepción; Visnes, Torkild; Bot, Christopher; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Kaiser, Frank J; Ramos, Feliciano J; Ström, Lena; Pié, Juan

    2017-02-23

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by craniofacial dysmorphia, growth retardation, limb malformations, and intellectual disability. Approximately 60% of patients with CdLS carry a recognizable pathological variant in the NIPBL gene, of which two isoforms, A and B, have been identified, and which only differ in the C-terminal segment. In this work, we describe the distribution pattern of the isoforms A and B mRNAs in tissues of adult and fetal origin, by qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction). Our results show a higher gene expression of the isoform A, even though both seem to have the same tissue distribution. Interestingly, the expression in fetal tissues is higher than that of adults, especially in brain and skeletal muscle. Curiously, the study of fibroblasts of two siblings with a mild CdLS phenotype and a pathological variant specific of the isoform A of NIPBL (c.8387A > G; P.Tyr2796Cys), showed a similar reduction in both isoforms, and a normal sensitivity to DNA damage. Overall, these results suggest that the position of the pathological variant at the 3´ end of the NIPBL gene affecting only isoform A, is likely to be the cause of the atypical mild phenotype of the two brothers.

  1. Natural history of 107 cases of fetal aortic stenosis from a European multicenter retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardiner, H. M.; Kovacevic, A.; Tulzer, G.; Sarkola, T.; Herberg, U.; Dangel, J.; Öhman, A.; Bartrons, J.; Carvalho, J. S.; Jicinska, H.; Fesslova, V.; Averiss, I.; Mellander, M.; Bulock, Frances; Shebani, Suhair; Clur, Sally Ann; Daehnert, Ingo; Salvo, Giovanni Di; Heying, Ruth; Gewillig, Marc; Grijseels, Els; Koopmann, Laurens; Makikallio, Kaarin; Tekay, Aydin; Leskinen, Markku; Manning, Nicky; Archer, Nick; Oberhoffer, Renate; Romeo, Cristina; Sørensen, Keld Ejvind; Richens, Trevor; Schmidt, Klaus; Seale, Anna; Jowett, Victoria; Tissot, Cecile; Tomek, Viktor; Uhlemann, Frank; Vejlstrup, Niels; Weil, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FV) aims to prevent fetal aortic valve stenosis progressing into hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), which results in postnatal univentricular (UV) circulation. Despite increasing numbers of FVs performed worldwide, the natural history of the disease in fetal life

  2. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C.; Kasprian, Gregor; Witzani, Linde; Helmer, Hanns; Dietrich, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Langer, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images

  3. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Pitale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke. It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD. These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ′Barker′s Hypothesis′. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological.

  4. Schwangerschafts Protein 1 (SP1) adds little to the age-related detection of fetal Down syndrome in the first trimester of pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornman, LH; Morssink, LP; Ten Hoor, KA; De Wolf, BTHM; Kloosterman, MD; Beekhuis, [No Value; Mantingh, A

    1998-01-01

    Schwangerschafts Protein 1 (SP1), being a placental protein appearing in the maternal circulation early in pregnancy, has been investigated as a potential marker for Down syndrome in the first trimester. Our study compared SP1 levels in 15 pregnancies with a Down syndrome fetus and 97 matched

  5. Challenge of Fetal Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Technical Information Service NCHS The Challenge of Fetal Mortality Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NCHS Data ... and ethnicity What is the impact of fetal mortality on U.S. families? In 2005, a total of ...

  6. Cytokine profiles in pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and relationships with viral load and fetal outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    In spite of extensive research, immunologic control mechanisms against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) remain poorly understood. Cytokine responses have been exhaustively studied in nursery pigs and show contradictory results. Since no detailed reports on cytokine respons...

  7. A de novo duplication of chromosome 21q22.11→qter associated with Down syndrome: Prenatal diagnosis, molecular cytogenetic characterization and fetal ultrasound findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: SKY, FISH and aCGH are useful in prenatal investigation of the nature of a de novo aberrant derivative chromosome. Partial trisomy 21q encompassing the DSCR may present characteristic Down syndrome features on prenatal ultrasound.

  8. Differences in Whole Blood Gene Expression Associated with Infection Time-Course and Extent of Fetal Mortality in a Reproductive Model of Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jamie M.; Ladinig, Andrea; Bao, Hua; Kommadath, Arun; Stothard, Paul; Lunney, Joan K.; Harding, John C. S.; Plastow, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) infection of pregnant females causes fetal death and increased piglet mortality, but there is substantial variation in the extent of reproductive pathology between individual dams. This study used RNA-sequencing to characterize the whole blood transcriptional response to type 2 PRRSV in pregnant gilts during the first week of infection (at 0, 2, and 6 days post-inoculation), and attempted to identify gene expression signatures associated with a low or high level of fetal mortality rates (LFM and HFM; n = 8/group) at necropsy, 21 days post-inoculation. The initial response to infection measured at 2 days post-inoculation saw an upregulation of genes involved in innate immunity, such as interferon-stimulated antiviral genes and inflammatory markers, and apoptosis. A concomitant decrease in expression of protein synthesis and T lymphocyte markers was observed. By day 6 the pattern had reversed, with a drop in innate immune signaling and an increase in the expression of genes involved in cell division and T cell signaling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with extremes of litter mortality rate were identified at all three time-points. Among the 15 DEGs upregulated in LFM gilts on all three days were several genes involved in platelet function, including integrins ITGA2B and ITGB3, and the chemokine PF4 (CXCL4). LFM gilts exhibited a higher baseline expression of interferon-stimulated and pro-inflammatory genes prior to infection, and of T cell markers two days post-infection, indicative of a more rapid progression of the immune response to PRRSV. This study has increased our knowledge of the early response to PRRSV in the blood of pregnant gilts, and could ultimately lead to the development of a biomarker panel that can be used to predict PRRSV-associated reproductive pathology. PMID:27093427

  9. Differences in Whole Blood Gene Expression Associated with Infection Time-Course and Extent of Fetal Mortality in a Reproductive Model of Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie M Wilkinson

    Full Text Available Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV infection of pregnant females causes fetal death and increased piglet mortality, but there is substantial variation in the extent of reproductive pathology between individual dams. This study used RNA-sequencing to characterize the whole blood transcriptional response to type 2 PRRSV in pregnant gilts during the first week of infection (at 0, 2, and 6 days post-inoculation, and attempted to identify gene expression signatures associated with a low or high level of fetal mortality rates (LFM and HFM; n = 8/group at necropsy, 21 days post-inoculation. The initial response to infection measured at 2 days post-inoculation saw an upregulation of genes involved in innate immunity, such as interferon-stimulated antiviral genes and inflammatory markers, and apoptosis. A concomitant decrease in expression of protein synthesis and T lymphocyte markers was observed. By day 6 the pattern had reversed, with a drop in innate immune signaling and an increase in the expression of genes involved in cell division and T cell signaling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs associated with extremes of litter mortality rate were identified at all three time-points. Among the 15 DEGs upregulated in LFM gilts on all three days were several genes involved in platelet function, including integrins ITGA2B and ITGB3, and the chemokine PF4 (CXCL4. LFM gilts exhibited a higher baseline expression of interferon-stimulated and pro-inflammatory genes prior to infection, and of T cell markers two days post-infection, indicative of a more rapid progression of the immune response to PRRSV. This study has increased our knowledge of the early response to PRRSV in the blood of pregnant gilts, and could ultimately lead to the development of a biomarker panel that can be used to predict PRRSV-associated reproductive pathology.

  10. Differences in Whole Blood Gene Expression Associated with Infection Time-Course and Extent of Fetal Mortality in a Reproductive Model of Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jamie M; Ladinig, Andrea; Bao, Hua; Kommadath, Arun; Stothard, Paul; Lunney, Joan K; Harding, John C S; Plastow, Graham S

    2016-01-01

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) infection of pregnant females causes fetal death and increased piglet mortality, but there is substantial variation in the extent of reproductive pathology between individual dams. This study used RNA-sequencing to characterize the whole blood transcriptional response to type 2 PRRSV in pregnant gilts during the first week of infection (at 0, 2, and 6 days post-inoculation), and attempted to identify gene expression signatures associated with a low or high level of fetal mortality rates (LFM and HFM; n = 8/group) at necropsy, 21 days post-inoculation. The initial response to infection measured at 2 days post-inoculation saw an upregulation of genes involved in innate immunity, such as interferon-stimulated antiviral genes and inflammatory markers, and apoptosis. A concomitant decrease in expression of protein synthesis and T lymphocyte markers was observed. By day 6 the pattern had reversed, with a drop in innate immune signaling and an increase in the expression of genes involved in cell division and T cell signaling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with extremes of litter mortality rate were identified at all three time-points. Among the 15 DEGs upregulated in LFM gilts on all three days were several genes involved in platelet function, including integrins ITGA2B and ITGB3, and the chemokine PF4 (CXCL4). LFM gilts exhibited a higher baseline expression of interferon-stimulated and pro-inflammatory genes prior to infection, and of T cell markers two days post-infection, indicative of a more rapid progression of the immune response to PRRSV. This study has increased our knowledge of the early response to PRRSV in the blood of pregnant gilts, and could ultimately lead to the development of a biomarker panel that can be used to predict PRRSV-associated reproductive pathology.

  11. Fetal abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prefumo, Federico; Izzi, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    The most common fetal abdominal wall defects are gastroschisis and omphalocele, both with a prevalence of about three in 10,000 births. Prenatal ultrasound has a high sensitivity for these abnormalities already at the time of the first-trimester nuchal scan. Major unrelated defects are associated with gastroschisis in about 10% of cases, whereas omphalocele is associated with chromosomal or genetic abnormalities in a much higher proportion of cases. Challenges in management of gastroschisis are related to the prevention of late intrauterine death, and the prediction and treatment of complex forms. With omphalocele, the main difficulty is the exclusion of associated conditions, not all diagnosed prenatally. An outline of the postnatal treatment of abdominal wall defects is given. Other rarer forms of abdominal wall defects are pentalogy of Cantrell, omphalocele, bladder exstrophy, imperforate anus, spina bifida complex, prune-belly syndrome, body stalk anomaly, and bladder and cloacal exstrophy; they deserve multidisciplinary counselling and management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biglycan and decorin differentially regulate signaling in the fetal membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiping; Horgan, Casie E.; Carr, Olivia; Owens, Rick T.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Lechner, Beatrice E.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of newborn mortality in the United States and about one third of cases are caused by preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes, a complication that is frequently observed in patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Notably, a subtype of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is caused by expression of abnormal biglycan and decorin proteoglycans. As compound deficiency of these two small leucine-rich proteoglycans is a model of preterm birth, we investigated the fetal membranes of Bgn−/−;Dcn−/− double-null and single-null mice. Our results showed that biglycan signaling supported fetal membrane remodeling during early gestation in the absence of concomitant changes in TGFβ levels. In late gestation, biglycan signaling acted in a TGFβ–dependent manner to aid in membrane stabilization. In contrast, decorin signaling supported fetal membrane remodeling at early stages of gestation in a TGFβ–dependent manner, and fetal membrane stabilization at later stages of gestation without changes in TGFβ levels. Furthermore, exogenous soluble decorin was capable of rescuing the TGFβ signaling pathway in fetal membrane mesenchymal cells. Collectively, these findings provide novel targets for manipulation of fetal membrane extracellular matrix stability and could represent novel targets for research on preventive strategies for preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes. PMID:24373743

  13. A enfermeira pediatra cuidando de crianças/ adolescentes com Síndrome Alcoólica Fetal (SAF) La enfermera pediatra cuidando de niños/adolescentes con el Síndrome Alcohólico Fetal (SAF) The pediatrician nurse taking care of children/adolescents with Fetal Alcoholic Syndrome (SAF)

    OpenAIRE

    Flávia Atanazio do Nascimento; Mariana Coutinho de Almeida; Jurema Gouvea de Souza; José Mauro Braz de Lima; Rosângela da Silva Santos

    2007-01-01

    Estudo realizado em uma instituição pública de Neurologia com seis crianças que apresentavam diagnóstico de síndrome alcoólica fetal (SAF). Os Objetivos foram: Descrever as necessidades humanas básicas afetadas em crianças com SAF; identificar as áreas de desenvolvimento defasadas; e avaliar o desenvolvimento das crianças. Metodologia: Pesquisa qualitativa, aprovada pelo Comitê de Ética e Pesquisa do Hospital Escola São Francisco de Assis (HESFA) e Escola de Enfermagem Anna Nery. O desenvolvi...

  14. Glycosylation defects underlying fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: a novel pathogenetic model. "When the wine goes in, strange things come out" - S.T. Coleridge, The Piccolomini.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binkhorst, M.; Wortmann, S.B.; Funke, S.; Kozicz, L.T.; Wevers, R.A.; Morava, E.

    2012-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term used to describe the craniofacial dysmorphic features, malformations, and disturbances in growth, neurodevelopment and behavior occurring in individuals prenatally exposed to alcohol. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) represents the severe end of

  15. Fetal breathing and movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, K.; Marsal, K.

    1983-01-01

    Objective investigation of fetal motor activity largely depends on the availability of non-invasive, safe and reliable measurement techniques. Until recently such methods were not available, and therefore most of their knowledge concerning fetal physiology had to be derived from experiments on animals. Introduction of modern techniques, particularly those based on ultrasound, into perinatal research opened up new possibilities of objectively measuring fetal motor function in humans. The development of the ultrasound real-time B-mode technique rapidly attracted the interest of physiologists and clinicians in this field of fetal medicine

  16. Characterization of the fetal blood transcriptome and proteome in maternal anti-fetal rejection: evidence of a distinct and novel type of human fetal systemic inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonho; Romero, Roberto; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Dong, Zhong; Tarca, Adi L; Xu, Yi; Chiang, Po Jen; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Hassan, Sonia S; Yeo, Lami; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Than, Nandor Gabor; Kim, Chong Jai

    2013-10-01

    The human fetus is able to mount a systemic inflammatory response when exposed to microorganisms. This stereotypic response has been termed the 'fetal inflammatory response syndrome' (FIRS), defined as an elevation of fetal plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6). FIRS is frequently observed in patients whose preterm deliveries are associated with intra-amniotic infection, acute inflammatory lesions of the placenta, and a high rate of neonatal morbidity. Recently, a novel form of fetal systemic inflammation, characterized by an elevation of fetal plasma CXCL10, has been identified in patients with placental lesions consistent with 'maternal anti-fetal rejection'. These lesions include chronic chorioamnionitis, plasma cell deciduitis, and villitis of unknown etiology. In addition, positivity for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) in maternal sera can also be used to increase the index of suspicion for maternal anti-fetal rejection. The purpose of this study was to determine (i) the frequency of pathologic lesions consistent with maternal anti-fetal rejection in term and spontaneous preterm births; (ii) the fetal serum concentration of CXCL10 in patients with and without evidence of maternal anti-fetal rejection; and (iii) the fetal blood transcriptome and proteome in cases with a fetal inflammatory response associated with maternal anti-fetal rejection. Maternal and fetal sera were obtained from normal term (n = 150) and spontaneous preterm births (n = 150). A fetal inflammatory response associated with maternal anti-fetal rejection was diagnosed when the patients met two or more of the following criteria: (i) presence of chronic placental inflammation; (ii) ≥80% of maternal HLA class I PRA positivity; and (iii) fetal serum CXCL10 concentration >75th percentile. Maternal HLA PRA was analyzed by flow cytometry. The concentrations of fetal CXCL10 and IL-6 were determined by ELISA. Transcriptome analysis was undertaken after the extraction of total RNA

  17. Pearson bone marrow-pancreas syndrome with insulin-dependent diabetes, progressive renal tubulopathy, organic aciduria and elevated fetal haemoglobin caused by deletion and duplication of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superti-Furga, A; Schoenle, E; Tuchschmid, P; Caduff, R; Sabato, V; DeMattia, D; Gitzelmann, R; Steinmann, B

    1993-01-01

    We report a patient with a clinical picture consisting of small birth weight, connatal hypoplastic anaemia, vacuolised bone marrow precursors, failure to thrive, and, subsequently, by insulin-dependent diabetes, renal Fanconi syndrome, lactic acidosis, complex organic aciduria, and elevation of haemoglobin F and of adenosine deaminase activity. The clinical course was progressive and death occurred at age 19 months. A high proportion of mitochondrial (mt) DNA molecules with a deletion of nucleotides 9238 to 15575 were identified in several tissues; about half of the shortened mtDNA molecules were concatenated to form circular dimers. The clinical and laboratory findings support recent conclusions that Pearson syndrome is not confined to bone marrow and pancreas, as originally described, but is a multi-organ disorder associated with deletions in part of the mtDNA molecules. The tissue distribution and the relative proportions of the abnormal mtDNA molecules apparently determine the phenotype and clinical course.

  18. GLIA AND NEURODEVELOPMENT: FOCUS ON FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Marina eGuizzetti; Marina eGuizzetti; Marina eGuizzetti; Xiaolu eZhang; Xiaolu eZhang; Calla eGoeke; Calla eGoeke; David P. Gavin; David P. Gavin

    2014-01-01

    During the last 20 years new and exciting roles for glial cells in brain development have been described. Moreover, several recent studies implicated glial cells in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders including Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Rett Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD).Abnormalities in glial cell development and proliferation and increased glial cell apoptosis contribute to the adverse effects of ethanol on the develop...

  19. Glia and Neurodevelopment: Focus on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Guizzetti, Marina; Zhang, Xiaolu; Goeke, Calla; Gavin, David P.

    2014-01-01

    During the last 20 years, new and exciting roles for glial cells in brain development have been described. Moreover, several recent studies implicated glial cells in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders including Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Rett Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Abnormalities in glial cell development and proliferation and increased glial cell apoptosis contribute to the adverse effects of ethanol on the devel...

  20. First trimester diagnosis and screening for fetal aneuploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Driscoll, Deborah A.; Gross, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Maternal serum screening for neural tube defects and fetal aneuploidy in the second trimester has been incorporated into obstetrical practice over the past two decades. Now, as a result of several multicenter trials, first trimester screening between 11 and 14 weeks has been shown to be an effective and reliable screening test for Down syndrome and trisomy 18. Benefits of first trimester screening include earlier identification of the pregnancy at risk for fetal aneuploidy and anatomic defect...

  1. Accounting for Fetal Origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Hansen, Casper Worm; Strulik, Holger

    2017-01-01

    The Fetal Origins hypothesis has received considerable empirical support, both within epidemiology and economics. The present study compares the ability of two rival theoretical frameworks in accounting for the kind of path dependence implied by the Fetal Origins Hypothesis. We argue that while...

  2. Incidence of fetal chromosome abnormalities in insulin dependent diabetic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriques, C U; Damm, P; Tabor, A

    1991-01-01

    In order to screen for fetal neural tube defects and chromosome abnormalities, amniocentesis was carried out in 334 women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) between 1979 and 1987. Two cases (0.6%; 95% confidence limits 0.1-2.2%) of fetal chromosome abnormality were found: one case...... of Klinefelter's syndrome and one case of de novo translocation. This is comparable to the overall incidence of chromosome abnormality found at birth and is also comparable to the incidence of fetal chromosome abnormality (1.0%) found by amniocentesis at our Department in a group of 2,264 young non...

  3. Fetal body movement monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, W F

    1990-03-01

    Recording fetal activity serves as an indirect measure of central nervous system integrity and function. The coordination of whole body movement, which requires complex neurologic control, is likely similar to that of the newborn infant. Short-term observations of the fetus are best performed using real-time ultrasound imaging. Monitoring fetal motion has been shown to be clinically worthwhile in predicting impending death or compromise, especially when placental insufficiency is longstanding. The presence of a vigorous fetus is reassuring. Perceived inactivity requires a reassessment of any underlying antepartum complication and a more precise evaluation by fetal heart rate testing or real-time ultrasonography before delivery is contemplated.

  4. [FETAL PROGRAMMING OF METABOLIC DISORDERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadinova, M R; Metodieva, R; Boyadzhieva, N

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of fetal programming has developed notably over the years and recent data suggest that an unbalanced diet prior and during pregnancy can have early-onset and long-lasting consequences on the health of the offspring. Specific negative influences of high dietary glucose and lipid consumption, as well as undernutrition, are associated with development of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and diabetes in the offspring. The mechanisms underlying the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on the fetus may involve structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes. The aim of this review is to illustrate how adverse intrauterine environment may influence molecular modifications in the fetus and cause epigenetic alterations in particular. It has been demonstrated that prenatal epigenetic modifications may be linked to the pathogenesis and progression of the adult chronic disorders. Studies on epigenetic alterations will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term effects of in utero exposure and may open new perspectives for disease prevention and treatment.

  5. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol can harm your baby at any stage during a pregnancy. That includes the earliest stages, before ... can cause a group of conditions called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Children who are born with ...

  6. Differences in neural crest sensitivity to ethanol account for the infrequency of anterior segment defects in the eye compared with craniofacial anomalies in a zebrafish model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Jessica; Williams, Antionette L; Chawla, Bahaar; Apsey, Christian; Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2017-09-01

    Ethanol (ETOH) exposure during pregnancy is associated with craniofacial and neurologic abnormalities, but infrequently disrupts the anterior segment of the eye. In these studies, we used zebrafish to investigate differences in the teratogenic effect of ETOH on craniofacial, periocular, and ocular neural crest. Zebrafish eye and neural crest development was analyzed by means of live imaging, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay, immunostaining, detection of reactive oxygen species, and in situ hybridization. Our studies demonstrated that foxd3-positive neural crest cells in the periocular mesenchyme and developing eye were less sensitive to ETOH than sox10-positive craniofacial neural crest cells that form the pharyngeal arches and jaw. ETOH increased apoptosis in the retina, but did not affect survival of periocular and ocular neural crest cells. ETOH also did not increase reactive oxygen species within the eye. In contrast, ETOH increased ventral neural crest apoptosis and reactive oxygen species production in the facial mesenchyme. In the eye and craniofacial region, sod2 showed high levels of expression in the anterior segment and in the setting of Sod2 knockdown, low levels of ETOH decreased migration of foxd3-positive neural crest cells into the developing eye. However, ETOH had minimal effect on the periocular and ocular expression of transcription factors (pitx2 and foxc1) that regulate anterior segment development. Neural crest cells contributing to the anterior segment of the eye exhibit increased ability to withstand ETOH-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. These studies explain the rarity of anterior segment dysgenesis despite the frequent craniofacial abnormalities in fetal alcohol syndrome. Birth Defects Research 109:1212-1227, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pregnancy-induced thrombocytopenia and TTP, and the risk of fetal death, in Upshaw-Schulman syndrome: a series of 15 pregnancies in 9 genotyped patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Masanori; Kokame, Koichi; Isonishi, Ayami; Soejima, Kenji; Akiyama, Nobu; Tomiyama, Junji; Natori, Kazuhiko; Kuranishi, Yasunobu; Imamura, Yutaka; Inoue, Nobumasa; Higasa, Satoshi; Seike, Masako; Kozuka, Teruhiko; Hara, Masamichi; Wada, Hideo; Murata, Mitsuru; Ikeda, Yasuo; Miyata, Toshiyuki; George, James N

    2009-03-01

    Upshaw-Schulman syndrome (USS) is a congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) due to mutations in the gene that encodes for ADAMTS13 (ADAMTS13), but its clinical signs may be mild or absent during childhood. We have identified 37 patients with USS (24 females, 13 males) belonging to 32 families. The nine women from six families who were diagnosed during their first pregnancy are the focus of this report. Six of the nine women had episodes of thrombocytopenia during childhood misdiagnosed as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Thrombocytopenia occurred during the second-third trimesters in each of their 15 pregnancies, with 16 babies (one twin pregnancy), often followed by TTP. Of 15 pregnancies, eight babies were stillborn or died soon after birth, and the remaining seven were all premature except one, who was born naturally following plasma infusions to the mother that had started at 8 weeks' gestation. All nine USS women had severely deficient ADAMTS13 activity. ADAMTS13 analyses demonstrated that eight women were compound heterozygotes of Y304C/G525D (2 siblings), R125VfsX6/Q1302X (2 siblings), R193W/R349C (2 siblings), I178T/Q929X, and R193W/A606P; one woman was homozygous for R193W. Only the R193W mutation has been previously reported. These observations emphasize the importance of measuring ADAMTS13 activity in the evaluation of thrombocytopenia during childhood and pregnancy.

  8. Rates of 47, + 13 amd 46 translocation D/13 Patau syndrome in live births and comparison with rates in fetal deaths and at amniocentesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, E B

    1980-11-01

    Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) is rare in newborns. Data on rates in 167,774 live births from 17 separate studies are reviewed, and the following pooled rates found for: (1) 47,trisomy 13, 8.3 X 10(-5) (1/12,000); and (2) 46, (D/13 Robertsonian translocations), 4.2 X 10(-5) (1/24,000)--mutants, 1.2 X 10(-5) (1/80,000) to 1.8 X 10(-5) (1/56,000); and familial cases, 2.4 X 10(-5) (1/42,000) to 3.0 X 10(-5) (1/33,000). The rate of trisomy 13 (47, + 13) in liveborns (ignoring possible biases in studies and heterogeneity in rates) is, with 95% confidence, between 4.6 X 10(-5) (1/21,700) and 14.0 X 10(-5) (1/7,000), with the most likely figure close to 8 X 10(-5) (1/12,000). Numbers are insufficient to construct a comparably narrow confidence interval for translocation cases. The rates of 47, + 13 may be estimated in (1) spontaneous abortuses, about 0.8%--1.0% (100-fold greater than in liveborns); (2) early neonatal deaths, about 0.4% (50-fold greater than in liveborns); and (3) amniocentesis, higher than in liveborns, at least for mothers 40 years and over.

  9. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandar Mohan Batra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave′s disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20 th week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30 th week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant′s specific signs and symptoms.

  10. Fetal akinesia-hypokinesia deformation sequence (FADS) in 2 siblings with congenital myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidang Jensen, M; Rix, M; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    1995-01-01

    Two premature siblings described herein had clinical features comparable to the fetal akinesia-hypokinesia deformation sequence (Pena-Shokeir syndrome) with polyhydramnios, intrauterine growth retardation, pulmonary hypoplasia, short umbilical cord and lethality. Autopsy revealed no thoracal...

  11. Incidence of fetal chromosome abnormalities in insulin dependent diabetic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriques, C U; Damm, P; Tabor, A

    1991-01-01

    In order to screen for fetal neural tube defects and chromosome abnormalities, amniocentesis was carried out in 334 women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) between 1979 and 1987. Two cases (0.6%; 95% confidence limits 0.1-2.2%) of fetal chromosome abnormality were found: one case...... of Klinefelter's syndrome and one case of de novo translocation. This is comparable to the overall incidence of chromosome abnormality found at birth and is also comparable to the incidence of fetal chromosome abnormality (1.0%) found by amniocentesis at our Department in a group of 2,264 young non......-diabetic women with little risk of contracting genetic disorders. The results suggest that maternal IDDM does not increase the risk of fetal chromosome abnormality and consequently screening by amniocentesis for chromosome abnormalities among diabetic women does not seem to be indicated....

  12. Invasive Fetal Therapy: Global Status and Local Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available There are few congenital anomalies that can be treated in utero, despite the rapid development of fetal medicine. The number of available antenatal treatments is growing with the advance of supplementary tools, especially ultrasound and endoscopy. Disorders involving accumulation of excessive fluid in the amniotic cavity (polyhydramnios, chest (hydrothorax, abdomen (ascites and urinary system (obstructive uropathy are regularly treated using aspiration or shunt drainage under ultrasound monitoring. Electrolyte solutions or concentrated blood component supplements are used to treat oligohydramnios (amnioinfusion and amniopatch and fetal anemia (fetal transfusion. Placental tumor (chorioangioma and fetal tumors (cystic hygroma and sacrococcygeal teratoma are also successfully treated by antenatal injection of medications. Fetoscopic procedures, especially obstetric endoscopy, are now used regularly in North America, Europe, Australasia and Japan after the validity was established in the treatment of twin-twin transfusion syndrome when compared with traditional amnioreduction. However, most procedures involving surgical fetoscopy or open fetal surgery remain experimental. Their validity and efficacy are not confirmed in a number of fetal diseases for which they were claimed to be effective. A brief review of the global status and history of invasive fetal therapy is given, and its status in Taiwan is also described. Future development in this field relies on greater understanding of the basic physiology and pathology of the diseases involved, as well as on the progress of sophisticated instrumentation.

  13. Intrapartum fetal heart rate profiles with and without fetal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, J A; Pancham, S R; Worthington, D N

    1977-04-01

    Fetal heart rate profiles for periods up to 12 hours prior to delivery have been reviewed in 515 patients with a fetus at risk. Mechanisms other than fetal asphyxia will cause fetal heart rate decelerations, and fetal asphyxia may in some instances develop in the absence of total or late decelerations. However, an increasing incidence of total decelerations and late decelerations and particularly a marked pattern of total decelerations and late decelerations are of value in the prediction of fetal asphyxia. Fetal heart rate deceleration patterns can predict the probability of fetal asphyxia at the time of initial intervention, while a progression of fetal heart rate deceleration patterns in the individual fetus can be of assistance in the subsequent scheduling of serial acid-base assessments during labor.

  14. First trimester diagnosis and screening for fetal aneuploidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Deborah A.; Gross, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Maternal serum screening for neural tube defects and fetal aneuploidy in the second trimester has been incorporated into obstetrical practice over the past two decades. Now, as a result of several multicenter trials, first trimester screening between 11 and 14 weeks has been shown to be an effective and reliable screening test for Down syndrome and trisomy 18. Benefits of first trimester screening include earlier identification of the pregnancy at risk for fetal aneuploidy and anatomic defects, in particular, cardiac anomalies, and the option of earlier diagnosis by chorionic villus sampling, if available. This policy updates the American College of Medical Genetics policy statement entitled Second Trimester Maternal Serum Screening for Fetal Open Neural Tube Defects and Aneuploidy (2004) and complements the sections of American College of Medical Genetic’s Standards and Guidelines for Clinical Genetics Laboratories entitled “Prenatal screening for Down syndrome that includes first trimester biochemistry and/or ultrasound measurements.” PMID:18197059

  15. Fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism confers no susceptibility to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maternal methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism is reported as risk factor for Down syndrome (DS) pregnancy but fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not well studied as risk factor for DS. Some studies were published, but results were controversial. Hence a meta-analysis of all published ...

  16. Fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism confers no susceptibility to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vandana Rai

    for Down syndrome (DS) pregnancy but fetal MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not well studied as risk factor for DS. ... In conclusion, present meta-analysis suggests that MTHFR C677T polymorphism of fetus is not risk factor for DS. ..... IQ and etiology of DS. In the brain, epigenetic programming appears to be most sensi-.

  17. Feto portador de síndrome de turner e tetralogia de fallot associadas à elevação de alfafetoproteína materna Fetal turner syndrome and tetralogy of fallot associated with elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vieira Neto

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Turner fetal e suas complicações, a hidropisia e o higroma cístico, podem produzir alteração dos marcadores bioquímicos de soro materno inicialmente utilizados no rastreamento de síndrome de Down e de defeitos de tubo neural (DTN. Os autores relatam o caso de uma gestante de 37 anos, que foi rastreada para síndrome de Down e DTN no início do 2º trimestre. Foi constatado aumento da alfafetoproteína de soro materno (MSAFP e o rastreamento foi considerado positivo para DTN. Foi realizado exame ultra-sonográfico tridimensional, que não demonstrou nenhuma anormalidade fetal ou placentária, caracterizando o caso como elevação idiopática de MSAFP. No 3º trimestre, a gravidez evoluiu com acentuada oligoidrâmnia e alteração do fluxo uteroplacentário, obrigando à instituição de terapia com corticosteróides e parto cesáreo na 34ª semana gestacional. O concepto do sexo feminino foi encaminhado à UTI neonatal, onde foram diagnosticadas tetralogia de Fallot e síndrome de Turner. Esse caso incentivou os autores a rever a literatura sobre marcadores bioquímicos de soro materno na síndrome de Turner e nas malformações cardíacas congênitas. Ao final, propõe-se um protocolo para elevação idiopática de MSAFP.Turner syndrome and its complications, hydrops and cystic hygroma, can produce alterations in maternal serum biochemical markers used in screening for Down's syndrome and neural tube defects (NTD. The authors report the case of a 37-year-old pregnant woman, screened for Down's syndrome and NTD in the second trimester of pregnancy. The maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP level was increased and the test was considered screen positive for NTD. A three-dimensional ultrasound investigation was performed, but no fetal or placental anomalies were found, indicating a case of unexplained increased msafp. In the third trimester severe oligohydramnios and disturbances in uteroplacental arterial circulation

  18. Model-Based Analysis of Costs and Outcomes of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing for Down’s Syndrome Using Cell Free Fetal DNA in the UK National Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Stephen; Karlsen, Saffron; Chung, Nancy; Hill, Melissa; Chitty, Lyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for Down’s syndrome (DS) using cell free fetal DNA in maternal blood has the potential to dramatically alter the way prenatal screening and diagnosis is delivered. Before NIPT can be implemented into routine practice, information is required on its costs and benefits. We investigated the costs and outcomes of NIPT for DS as contingent testing and as first-line testing compared with the current DS screening programme in the UK National Health Service. Methods We used a pre-existing model to evaluate the costs and outcomes associated with NIPT compared with the current DS screening programme. The analysis was based on a hypothetical screening population of 10,000 pregnant women. Model inputs were taken from published sources. The main outcome measures were number of DS cases detected, number of procedure-related miscarriages and total cost. Results At a screening risk cut-off of 1∶150 NIPT as contingent testing detects slightly fewer DS cases, has fewer procedure-related miscarriages, and costs the same as current DS screening (around UK£280,000) at a cost of £500 per NIPT. As first-line testing NIPT detects more DS cases, has fewer procedure-related miscarriages, and is more expensive than current screening at a cost of £50 per NIPT. When NIPT uptake increases, NIPT detects more DS cases with a small increase in procedure-related miscarriages and costs. Conclusions NIPT is currently available in the private sector in the UK at a price of £400-£900. If the NHS cost was at the lower end of this range then at a screening risk cut-off of 1∶150 NIPT as contingent testing would be cost neutral or cost saving compared with current DS screening. As first-line testing NIPT is likely to produce more favourable outcomes but at greater cost. Further research is needed to evaluate NIPT under real world conditions. PMID:24714162

  19. Human fetal anatomy: MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, J C; Lowe, T; Cohen, J M; Kutler, M

    1985-12-01

    Twenty-four pregnant women carrying 26 fetuses (two sets of twins) were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 0.35 T following sonographic evaluation. Each study was retrospectively evaluated to determine which of 33 normal fetal structures were visible on the images and which imaging parameters were most useful for depicting fetal anatomy. Fetal motion degraded fetal images in all but two cases, both with oligohydramnios and in the third trimester of gestation. Nevertheless, many fetal structures were identifiable, particularly in the third trimester. Visualization of fetal anatomy improved with intravenous maternal sedation in five cases. Relatively T1-weighted images occasionally offered the advantage of less image degradation owing to fetal motion and improved contrast between different fetal structures. More T2 weighting was believed to be advantageous in one case for outlining the fetal head and in one case for delineation of the brain. In many cases, structures were similarly identifiable (though with different signal intensities) regardless of the parameters selected. The authors conclude that MR imaging of many fetal structures is currently unsatisfactory and is probably of limited value, particularly in the first and second trimesters. However, the relative frequency and detail with which the fetal head and liver can be depicted indicate that these may be areas for further investigation, and the potential utility of imaging fetal fat warrants further investigation.

  20. Noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal common sex chromosome aneuploidies from maternal blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Lu, Bei-Yi; Yu, Bin; Zheng, Fang-Xiu; Zhou, Qin; Chen, Ying-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of high-throughput massively parallel genomic DNA sequencing technology for the noninvasive prenatal detection of fetal sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). Methods The study enrolled pregnant women who were prepared to undergo noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in the second trimester. Cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) was extracted from the mother's peripheral venous blood and a high-throughput sequencing procedure was undertaken. Patients identified as having pregnancies associated with SCAs were offered prenatal fetal chromosomal karyotyping. Results The study enrolled 10 275 pregnant women who were prepared to undergo NIPT. Of these, 57 pregnant women (0.55%) showed fetal SCA, including 27 with Turner syndrome (45,X), eight with Triple X syndrome (47,XXX), 12 with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) and three with 47,XYY. Thirty-three pregnant women agreed to undergo fetal karyotyping and 18 had results consistent with NIPT, while 15 patients received a normal karyotype result. The overall positive predictive value of NIPT for detecting SCAs was 54.54% (18/33) and for detecting Turner syndrome (45,X) was 29.41% (5/17). Conclusion NIPT can be used to identify fetal SCAs by analysing cffDNA using massively parallel genomic sequencing, although the accuracy needs to be improved particularly for Turner syndrome (45,X).

  1. Imaging of fetal thymus in pregnant women with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warby, Ann-Christin; Amler, Susanne; Jacobi, Annett M; Hammer, Kerstin; Möllmann, Ute; Falkenberg, Maria K; Möllers, Mareike; Kiesel, Ludwig; Klockenbusch, Walter; Schmitz, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether certain rheumatic diseases will affect the fetal thymus diameter when compared to uncomplicated singleton pregnancies. Additionally, we created a reference chart for fetal thymus size in healthy singleton pregnancies from 19 to 37 weeks of gestation. Sonographic fetal thymus size was retrospectively evaluated in 190 healthy pregnant women, and 84 pregnancies of mothers suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), or Sjögren's syndrome between 19 and 37 weeks of gestation. These fetuses were matched one-to-one for gestational age with control fetuses. The thymic-thoracic ratio (TT-ratio) was defined as the quotient of the anteroposterior thymic and the intrathoracic mediastinal diameter. Rheumatic diseases often affect pregnancy outcome, especially in case of primary APS. The TT ratio of fetuses of mothers suffering from rheumatic disease was equal to controls (P=0.807). Ours is the first study to assess the correlation of fetal thymus size in high-risk pregnancies with rheumatic diseases in comparison to controls. Women with rheumatic diseases deal with pregnancy complications more frequently than controls. Our data suggest that maternal rheumatic diseases do not affect the fetal thymus size.

  2. Diagnosis, treatment and long-term outcome in fetal hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Mami; Nonaka, Masahiro; Bamba, Yohei; Teramoto, Chika; Ban, Chiaki; Pooh, Ritsuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the method of prenatally estimating an appropriate clinical outcome in fetal hydrocephalus. Retrospective study, single institute (Osaka National Hospital). Hundred and seventeen cases with fetal hydrocephalus treated at Osaka National Hospital from 1992 to 2010 were analysed. Of the 117 cases analysed, 38% are diagnosed as isolated ventriculomegaly (IVM), 51% as other types of malformation (30 cases of myelomeningocele, 4 cases of holoprosencephaly, 4 of Dandy Walker syndrome, 10 of arachnoid cyst and 6 of encephalocele etc.) and 11% as secondary hydrocephalus. They are diagnosed between 17 and 40 weeks of gestation (average 27 weeks), 17% diagnosed between 17 and 21 weeks, 30% between 22 and 27 weeks and 53% after 28 weeks. With the exception of 9 aborted cases and 30 unknown cases too young to be evaluated or lost due to lack of follow-up, final outcome was analyzed in 78 cases. Of these 78 cases, 15% died in utero or after birth, 23% showed severe retardation, 17% moderate retardation, 26% mild retardation, and 19% showed good outcome. Long term consequences were mostly influenced by basic disease and accompanied anomalies. Hydrocephalus associated with arachnoid cyst, atresia of Monro, corpus callosum agenesis and hydrocephalus due to fetal intracranial hemorrhage are categorized in the good outcome group. On the other hand, holoprosencephaly, hydrocephalus associated with encephalocele, syndromic hydrocephalus and hydrocephalus due to fetal virus infection are categorized in the poor outcome group. In order to accurate diagnosis and proper counseling, establishment of diagnosis protocol and treatment policy for fetal hydrocephalus including not only fetal sonography, fetal MRI, toxoplasma, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex (TORCH) screening test but also chromosomal and gene testing is required. (author)

  3. Elevated fetal steroidogenic activity in autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Cohen, S; Auyeung, B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Hougaard, D M; Abdallah, M W; Melgaard, L; Cohen, A S; Chakrabarti, B; Ruta, L; Lombardo, M V

    2015-01-01

    Autism affects males more than females, giving rise to the idea that the influence of steroid hormones on early fetal brain development may be one important early biological risk factor. Utilizing the Danish Historic Birth Cohort and Danish Psychiatric Central Register, we identified all amniotic fluid samples of males born between 1993 and 1999 who later received ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision) diagnoses of autism, Asperger syndrome or PDD-NOS (pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified) (n=128) compared with matched typically developing controls. Concentration levels of Δ4 sex steroids (progesterone, 17α-hydroxy-progesterone, androstenedione and testosterone) and cortisol were measured with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. All hormones were positively associated with each other and principal component analysis confirmed that one generalized latent steroidogenic factor was driving much of the variation in the data. The autism group showed elevations across all hormones on this latent generalized steroidogenic factor (Cohen's d=0.37, P=0.0009) and this elevation was uniform across ICD-10 diagnostic label. These results provide the first direct evidence of elevated fetal steroidogenic activity in autism. Such elevations may be important as epigenetic fetal programming mechanisms and may interact with other important pathophysiological factors in autism. PMID:24888361

  4. Maternal-fetal outcomes in prolonged pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucco, C; Osborne, M A; Cibils, L A

    1989-10-01

    The intrapartum fetal heart rate changes, type of labor, mode of delivery, and neonatal outcome were evaluated in 379 consecutive continuously monitored prolonged pregnancies (greater than 42 weeks by history and early examination). These represent only a fraction of the total prolonged gestation population. There were 56% multiparous women, 33% less than 20 years of age, and 95% with cephalic presentation. Oxytocin was given to 76% (48% induced, 28% enhanced). Delivery was by cesarean section in 13% of patients (9% of induced cases), and 15% had forceps deliveries. Fetal heart rate alterations were observed in high proportion. Cesarean section for cephalopelvic disproportion was indicated in 60% of operations, and 13% of the fetuses weighed greater than 4000 gm. Depression occurred in 15% of infants at 1 minute and in 4% at 5 minutes. Prolonged hospital stay was seen in 9%, and postmaturity syndrome in 19%. There were four perinatal deaths (two corrected). Active induction does not appear to increase the cesarean section rate. The durations of predelivery observation may be longer because the cervices are frequently unripe. There is a high incidence of fetal heart rate alterations. Induction appears justified as an active intervention to prevent some sudden unexplained deaths.

  5. Edwards syndrome: prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedea, A.; Riazuelo, G.; Mota, J.; Canon, R.; Garcia, S.

    1997-01-01

    Edwards syndrome is the second most common trisomy syndrome occurring in 0.3/1,000 births. The prenatal diagnosis of this trisomy may be suspected in the routine ultrasound exam of the pregnancy by means of the recognition of a constellation of findings: fetal structural anomalies, intrauterine growth retardation (CIR) and umbilical cord or amniotic fluid volume abnormalities. The diagnosis is then confirmed by chromosome analysis of either amniotic fluid or fetal blood or tissue. We present six cases of Edwards syndrome suspected by fetal ultrasonography exam, all of them confirmed by karyotype, describing the major sonographic findings. (Author) 15 refs

  6. Fetal cardiac assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    The better understanding of fetal cardiovascular physiology coupled with improved technology for non-invasive study of the fetus now enable much more detailed assessment of fetal cardiac status than by heart rate alone. Even the latter, relatively simple, measurement contains much more information than was previously realized. It is also increasingly clear that no single measurement will provide the answer to all clinical dilemmas either on cardiac function or the welfare of the fetus as a whole. There are obvious clinical advantages in measuring several variables from one signal and the measurement of heart rate, heart rate variation and waveform from the ECG in labour is a potentially useful combination. Systolic time intervals or flow measurements could easily be added or used separately by combining real-time and Doppler ultrasound probes

  7. Bloqueo auriculoventricular completo fetal

    OpenAIRE

    Bustos,Paola; Santiago,Claudia; Bahamondes,Francisco; Jaramillo,Luis

    2002-01-01

    Uno de los disturbios más graves del ritmo cardíaco fetal es el bloqueo aurículoventricular completo o de 3er grado (BAVC), condición de fácil detección clínica y ecocardiográfica, y muchas veces de altísima mortalidad fetal, que indica la necesidad de intervención terapéutica urgente. Se presenta el caso clínico de una paciente que teniendo el antecedente de un RN anterior con el mismo diagnóstico, se envía a nuestro servicio con bradiarritmia en el feto actual, para realizar estudio y trata...

  8. Aging and Intellectual Disability: Insights from Mouse Models of Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Aarti; Pearn, Matthew L.; Mobley, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of many causes of intellectual disability (ID), others including but not limited to, fetal alcohol syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, Williams syndrome, hypoxia, and infection. Down syndrome is characterized by a number of neurobiological problems resulting in learning and memory deficits and early onset…

  9. Can postmortem fetal MR imaging replace autopsy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Song, Mi Jin; Kim, Seoung Hyup

    2001-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare postmortem fetal MRI findings with autopsy findings and to assess whether postmortem MRI can replace autopsy. The study group consisted of 13 stillborn fetuses, seven that died immediately after birth, and five terminated because of anomalies seen on prenatal sonograms. A total 17 were male, and eight were female, and their gestational ages were from 20 to 41 (average;28.2) weeks. Spin-echo T1-and T2-weighted axial, sagittal, and coronal MR images were obtained, and autopsy findings were divided into major and minor. A major finding was defined as an anomaly or syndrome which caused fetal death or termination of the pregnancy: minor findings were classified, on the basis of gross inspection, as internal or external. MR images were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists unaware of the autopsy findings, and by comparison with these, the postmortem MRI detection rates for major and minor findings was then determined. In seven of 25 fetuses, MR imaging revealed major findings, a dietction rate of 100%. There were two cases of anencephaly, two of trisomy-18, and one each of hydrops fetalis with large cystic hygroma, diaphragmatic hernia, and Dandy-Walker malformation. Twenty-three of 60 minor findings (38.3%) were detected by MRI. The detection rates for external and internal findings were 29.6%(8/27) and 45.5%(15/33), respectively. Although a limitation of our study is the low detection rate for minor findings, postmortem fetal MRI may help diagnose the major cause of fetal death

  10. Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Building Strengths, Creating Hope. Programming for Students with Special Needs. Book 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarren, Sandra G. Bernstein

    2004-01-01

    "Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Building Strengths, Creating Hope" is Book 10 in the Programming for Students with Special Needs series; a revision and expansion of the 1997 Alberta Learning teacher resource, "Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Possible Prenatal Alcohol-Related Effects."…

  11. Nonprimary Cytomegalovirus Fetal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sofia; Gonçalves, Daniela; Taipa, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Maria do Céu

    2016-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common congenital viral infection, causing hearing, visual and psychomotor impairment. Preexisting maternal CMV immunity substantially reduces, but not eliminates, the risk of fetal infection and affectation. This article is about a case of nonprimary maternal CMV infection during pregnancy, with vertical transmission, resulting in severe fetal affectation. Preconceptional analysis indicated maternal CMV past infection. Pregnancy progressed uneventfully until the 20th week ultrasound (US), which revealed cerebral abnormalities: thin and hyperechogenic cerebral cortex with prominent lateral ventricles, bilateral periventricular hyperechogenicities, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia and absent corpus callosum. The MRI suggested these findings were compatible with congenital infection rather than primary brain malformation.The fetal karyotype was normal. The title of CMV's IgG antibodies almost tripled. Since the first semester, analysis of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for CMV DNA in the amniotic fluid was negative. The pregnancy was terminated at 23 weeks. Neuropathological findings at autopsy showed severe brain lesions associated with CMV infection. Thieme Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  12. [Fetal uropathies: anatomo-pathologic background].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, G; Pece, A; Botticella, M A; Caniglia, A

    1997-06-01

    The kidney malformations are complex anatomo-clinical entities that can be described with different classification approaches, based on morphological or etiopathogenetic criteria. The most serious fetal uropathies can be associated with the oligohydramnios sequence, due to insufficient urine escretion, related, for example to bilateral renal agenesis. A second malformation sequence can also be present, the so-called prune belly syndrome, in which an early urethral obstruction can produce abnormal bladder distension and finally renal dysplasia and globous dilation of the abdomen. The anatomo-pathological experience of the last ten years in the Institute of Pathological Anatomy of the University of Bari is based upon 154 cases of congenital uropathies in second trimester fetuses. Almost 80% of these cases presented also other associated anomalies, both chromosomal and non chromosomal syndromic or in casual combination. The possible echographic recognition of these pathologies, together with genetic and anatomopathological studies allow to categorize the fetal uropathies in two groups: the first characterized by an early or late obstruction of the urinary tract, in "sensu strictu" the true obstructive uropathies, and the second, formed by different morphologies all genetically determined.

  13. Fetal magnetic resonance: technique applications and normal fetal anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Darnell, A.; Duran, C.; Mellado, F.; Corona, M

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasonography is the preferred diagnostic imaging technique for intrauterine fetal examination. Nevertheless, circumstances sometimes dictate the use of other techniques in order to analyze fetal structures. The advent of ultra rapid magnetic resonance (MR) sequencing has led to the possibility of doing MR fetal studies, since images are obtained in an extradordiarily short time and are not affected by either maternal or fetal movements. It does not employ ionizing radiations, it provides high-contrast images and it can obtain such images in any plane of space without being influenced by either the child bearer's physical characteristics of fetal position. MR provides good quality images of most fetal organs. It is extremely useful in analysing distinct structures, as well as permitting an evaluation of cervical structures, lungs, diaphragms, intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal structures, and fetal extremities. It can also provide useful information regarding the placenta,umbilical cord, amniotic fluid and uterus. The objective of this work is to describe MR technique as applied to intrauterine fetal examination, and to illustrate normal fetal anatomy as manifested by MR and its applications. (Author) 42 refs

  14. Cirugía fetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. B. Juan Luis Leiva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available El campo de la cirugía fetal es de reciente comienzo y rápida evolución. Con el avance en las herramientas de diagnóstico antenatal, la capacidad de diagnóstico de condiciones fetales susceptibles de ser tratadas in utero ha dado paso a una serie de procedimientos destinados a dar solución a situaciones que, de no ser por estas intervenciones, terminarían en un resultado adverso perinatal. Las técnicas descritas para la terapia fetal incluyen procedimientos percutáneos guiados por ultrasonido, cirugía fetal abierta y cirugía mínimamente invasiva. En este artículo se presentan las diversas condiciones fetales tributarias de cirugía fetal y se discuten las opciones terapéuticas actuales para cada una.

  15. MRI of the fetal spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Erin M.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal spine is a vital complement to fetal sonographic examination. Assessing the wide spectrum of spinal dysraphism, as well as spinal neoplasia, allows for more correct prenatal diagnoses, patient care planning, and patient counselling. Proper appraisal of the value of experimental procedures, such as fetal myelomeningocoele repair, requires a high level of diagnostic accuracy for the selection and follow-up of appropriate candidates. (orig.)

  16. Hypoxia and Fetal Heart Development

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, A.J.; Zhang, L

    2010-01-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not th...

  17. MRI of the fetal spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Erin M. [Departement of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal spine is a vital complement to fetal sonographic examination. Assessing the wide spectrum of spinal dysraphism, as well as spinal neoplasia, allows for more correct prenatal diagnoses, patient care planning, and patient counselling. Proper appraisal of the value of experimental procedures, such as fetal myelomeningocoele repair, requires a high level of diagnostic accuracy for the selection and follow-up of appropriate candidates. (orig.)

  18. Severe hydrocephalus associated with congenital varicella syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzella, Massimo; Arioni, Cesare; Bellini, Carlo; Allegri, Anna Elsa Maria; Savioli, Cesarina; Serra, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    CONGENITAL VARICELLA SYNDROME refers to the spectrum of fetal anomalies associated with maternal varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection during the first trimester of pregnancy. The syndrome is rare and the risk to the fetus uncertain. We describe an unusual case of congenital varicella syndrome in which hydrocephalus was the main consequence and likely represented VZV reactivation in utero.

  19. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring during Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ015 LABOR, DELIVERY, AND POSTPARTUM CARE Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring During Labor • What is fetal heart rate monitoring? • Why is fetal heart rate monitoring ...

  20. Fetal Echocardiography/Your Unborn Baby's Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Fetal Echocardiography / Your Unborn Baby's Heart Updated:Oct 6,2016 ... Your Risk • Symptoms & Diagnosis Introduction Common Tests Fetal Echocardiography/Your Unborn Baby's Heart - Fetal Echocardiogram Test - Detection ...

  1. Massive Fetal Ascites: Vaginal Delivery After Trans- Abdominal Fetal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a care of acute fetal acites diagnosed by ultrasonograhy at 29 weeks gestation in a primigravida who used herbel fertility drugs for conception and through the fist 8 weeks of gestation. Under ultrasound guidance the fetal peritoneal cavity was canulated via the material abdomen with an 18G intravenous canular.

  2. Fetal Tachyarrhythmia - Part II: Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn A. Oudijk

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The decision to initiate pharmacological intervention in case of fetal tachycardia depends on several factors and must be weighed against possible maternal and/or fetal adverse effects inherent to the use of antiarrhythmics. First, the seriousness of the fetal condition must be recognized. Many studies have shown that in case of fetal tachycardia, there is a significant predisposition to congestive heart failure and subsequent development of fetal hydrops and even sudden cardiac death1,2,3 Secondly, predictors of congestive heart failure have been suggested in several studies, such as the percentage of time that the tachycardia is present, the gestational age at which the tachycardia occurs4, the ventricular rate5 and the site of origin of the tachycardia6. However, the sensitivity of these predictors is low and they are therefore clinically not very useful. In addition, hemodynamic compromise may occur in less than 24 - 48 hours as has been shown in the fetal lamb7 and in tachycardic fetuses8,9. On the other hand, spontaneous resolution of the tachycardia has also been described10. Thirdly, transplacental management of fetuses with tricuspid regurgitation11, congestive heart failure or fetal hydrops is difficult12,13, probably as a result of limited transplacental transfer of the antiarrhythmic drug14,15. In case of fetal hydrops, conversion rates are decreased and time to conversion is increased13. Treatment of sustained fetal tachycardia is therefore to be preferred above expectant management, although some centers oppose this regimen and suggest that in cases with (intermittent fetal SVT not complicated by congestive heart failure or fetal hydrops, conservative management and close surveillance might be a reasonable alternative16,17,18.

  3. HEPATITIS ALOINMUNE FETAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Álvarez C., Dr.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available La hepatitis aloinmune fetal, conocida anteriormente como hemocromatosis neonatal, ha demostrado en los últimos años ser una enfermedad completamente distinta a la hemocromatosis del adulto, tanto en su etiología como en su la fisiopatología. Este conocimiento abre nuevas perspectivas tanto en la prevención de la enfermedad en futuros embarazos, así como en el tratamiento con inmunoglobulina endovenosa en la madre durante el embarazo y eventualmente el tratamiento postnatal, en el que el trasplante de hígado juega un rol primordial.

  4. Fetal and Neonatal Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, Edgar; Öhman, Annika

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an important aspect of fetal and neonatal medicine. Premature complexes of atrial or ventricular origin are the main cause of an irregular heart rhythm. The finding is typically unrelated to an identifiable cause and no treatment is required. Tachyarrhythmia most commonly relates to supraventricular reentrant tachycardia, atrial flutter, and sinus tachycardia. Several antiarrhythmic agents are available for the perinatal treatment of tachyarrhythmias. Enduring bradycardia may result from sinus node dysfunction, complete heart block and nonconducted atrial bigeminy as the main arrhythmia mechanisms. The management and outcome of bradycardia depend on the underlying mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fetal ascites. A report of 3 autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, A; Matsuo, K; Kawai, K; Yoshida, K; Fukuda, K; Nakano, M; Nakatani, A; Tsuchiyama, H; Tagawa, H

    1987-09-01

    Three rare autopsy cases of fetal ascites were presented and the etiology of each case was described. Case 1 was a male neonate, delivered by cesarean section at 32 weeks' gestation, and died of respiratory failure. The abdomen was remarkably distended with 1020 ml of ascites. The etiology of Case 1 remained unknown even after macroscopic and microscopic examinations. We considered this as "idiopathic" fetal ascites. Case 2 was a female neonate, delivered at 31 weeks' gestation, with marked abdominal distension and cyanosis. Autopsy revealed 435 ml of ascites, and she was considered to have had "polysplenia syndrome" with cardiovascular malformations. Intrauterine heart failure due to cardiac anomalies was thought to be the cause of this ascites. In case 3 embryotomy was carried out under the diagnosis of fetal ascites by ultrasound examination at 22 weeks' gestation. An urachal cyst connected to the dilated urinary bladder and deficiency of musculature of the abdominal wall composed of loose connective tissue with calcification were observed. The abdominal wall was ruptured and 1,960 ml of ascites was measured. Polycystic kidney with renal dysplasia was also found. Case 3 showed "Prune-Berry syndrome" and fetal ascites may have arisen from these anomalies.

  6. The effects of Fetal Surgery on Retinopathy of Prematurity Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Nallasamy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Fetal surgery is selectively offered for severe or life-threatening fetal malformations. These infants are often born prematurely and are thus at risk for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. It is not known whether fetal surgery confers an increased risk of developing severe ROP relative to published rates in standard premature populations ≤37 weeks of age grouped by birth weight (<1500 grams or ≥1500 grams. Design This is a retrospective chart review. Methods We reviewed the charts of 137 patients who underwent open fetal/fetoscopic surgery from 1996–2004. Surgical indications included twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS, myelomeningocele (MMC, congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH, sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT, cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung (CCAM, and twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP. Of these, 17 patients had local ROP examination data. Binomial tests were performed to assess whether rates of ROP in our fetal/fetoscopic surgery cohort were significantly different from published rates. Results There were 5 patients each with an underlying diagnosis of TTTS and MMC, 2 patients each with CDH and TRAP, and 1 patient each with SCT, CCAM, and mediastinal teratoma. The mean gestational age at surgery was 23 4 / 7 ± 2 3 / 7 weeks, mean gestational age at birth was 30 ± 2 5 / 7 weeks, and mean birth weight was 1449 ± 510 grams (610–2485. Compared to published rates of ROP and threshold ROP, our fetal surgery patients had significantly higher rates of ROP and threshold ROP in both the <1500 grams and the ≥1500 grams group (all p-values <0.05. Conclusions Fetal/fetoscopic surgery appears to significantly increase the rate of ROP and threshold ROP development. Greater numbers are needed to confirm these observations.

  7. Fetal alcohol effects in alcoholic veteran patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishler, P V; Henschel, C E; Ngo, T A; Walters, E E; Worobec, T G

    1998-11-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is often associated with severe physical and neuropsychiatric maldevelopment. On the other hand, some offspring of women who drank during pregnancy appear to be affected in minimal ways and function relatively well within society. We questioned whether this effect of prenatal alcohol in the adult is generally minimal. To bear on this, we determined whether we could distinguish alcohol-exposed from nonexposed individuals in a population of male veterans, selected because of both their accepted level of function within society (e.g., honorable discharge from the military) and their admission to an alcohol treatment unit (thus, a greater likelihood of parental alcoholism, because of its familial aggregation). Consecutively admitted alcoholics (cases; n = 77) with likely maternal alcohol ingestion during their pregnancy or the first 10 years of life were matched with alcoholics with no maternal alcohol exposure during these periods (controls; n = 161). Each subject completed questionnaires regarding personal birthweight, alcohol, drug, educational and work histories, and family (including parental) alcohol and drug histories. We measured height, weight, and head circumference; checked for facial and hand anomalies; and took a frontal facial photograph, from which measurements of features were made. Data were analyzed by univariate statistics and stepwise logistic regression. No case had bona fide fetal alcohol syndrome. With univariate statistical analyses, the cases differed from the controls in 10 variables, including duration of drinking, width of alae nasae, being hyperactive or having a short attention span, and being small at birth. By stepwise logistic regression, the variables marital status, small size at birth, duration of drinking, and the presence of a smooth philtrum were marginally (the first two) or definitely (the last two) significant predictors of case status. Analysis of only the 37 cases in whom maternal prenatal drinking was

  8. Restrictive dermopathy and fetal behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, EJH; Beemer, FA; Stoutenbeek, P

    We report three siblings from consecutive pregnancies affected with restrictive dermopathy (RD). During the second pregnancy, fetal behavioural development and growth were studied extensively using ultrasound at 1-4 week intervals. Dramatic and sudden changes occurred in fetal body movements and

  9. Ultrasonic Fetal Cephalometry: Percentiles Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamme, P.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements by ultrasound of the biparietal diameter of the fetal head during pregnancy are a reliable guide to fetal growth. As a ready means of comparison with the normal we constructed from 4,170 measurements in 1,394 cases a curve showing the percentiles distribution of biparietal diameters for each week of gestation. PMID:5070162

  10. Drug treatment of fetal tachycardias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudijk, Martijn A.; Ruskamp, Jopje M.; Ambachtsheer, Barbara E.; Ververs, Tessa F. F.; Stoutenbeek, Philip; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Meijboom, Erik J.

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of fetal tachycardia (FT) has been described in various publications. We present a study reviewing the necessity for treatment of FT, the regimens of drugs used in the last two decades and their mode of administration. The absence of reliable predictors of fetal hydrops

  11. HELLP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  12. [Maternal-placental interactions and fetal programming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyrov, M; Moser, G; Rath, W; Kweider, N; Wruck, C J; Pufe, T; Huppertz, B

    2013-06-01

    Pregnancy-related complications not only represent a risk for maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, but are also a risk for several diseases later in life. Many epidemiological studies have shown clear associations between an adverse intrauterine environment and an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, depression, obesity, and other chronic diseases in the adult. Some of these syndromes could be prevented by avoiding adverse stimuli or insults including psychological stress during pregnancy, intake of drugs, insufficient diet and substandard working conditions. Hence, all of these stimuli have the potential to alter health later in life. The placenta plays a key role in regulating the nutrient supply to the fetus and producing hormones that control the fetal as well as the maternal metabolism. Thus, any factor or stimulus that alters the function of the hormone producing placental trophoblast will provoke critical alterations of placental function and hence could induce programming of the fetus. The factors that change placental development may interfere with nutrient and oxygen supply to the fetus. This may be achieved by a direct disturbance of the placental barrier or more indirectly by, e. g., disturbing trophoblast invasion. For both path-ways, the respective pathologies are known: while preeclampsia is caused by alterations of the villous trophoblast, intra-uterine growth restriction is caused by insufficient invasion of the extravillous trophoblast. In both cases the effect can be undernutrition and/or fetal hypoxia, both of which adversely affect organ development, especially of brain and heart. However, the mechanisms responsible for disturbances of trophoblast differentiation and function remain elusive. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. MR evaluation of fetal demise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, Teresa; Chauvin, Nancy Anne; Johnson, Ann M.; Kramer, Sandra Sue; Epelman, Monica; Capilla, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Fetal demise is an uncommon event encountered at MR imaging. When it occurs, recognition by the interpreting radiologist is important to initiate appropriate patient management. To identify MR findings of fetal demise. Following IRB approval, a retrospective search of the radiology fetal MR database was conducted searching the words ''fetal demise'' and ''fetal death.'' Fetuses with obvious maceration or no sonographic confirmation of death were excluded. Eleven cases formed the study group. These were matched randomly to live fetuses of similar gestational age. Images were reviewed independently by three pediatric radiologists. The deceased fetus demonstrates decreased MR soft-tissue contrast and definition of tissue planes, including loss of gray-white matter differentiation in the brain. The signal within the cardiac chambers, when visible, is bright on HASTE sequences from the stagnant blood; the heart is small. Pleural effusions and decreased lung volumes may be seen. Interestingly, the fetal orbits lose their anatomical round shape and become smaller and more elliptical; a dark, irregular rim resembling a mask may be seen. Although fetal demise is uncommonly encountered at MR imaging, radiologists should be aware of such imaging findings so prompt management can be instituted. (orig.)

  14. Fetal growth disorders in twin gestations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Breathnach, Fionnuala M

    2012-06-01

    Twin growth is frequently mismatched. This review serves to explore the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underlie growth aberrations in twin gestations, the prenatal recognition of abnormal twin growth, and the critical importance of stratifying management of abnormal twin growth by chorionicity. Although poor in utero growth of both twins may reflect maternal factors resulting in global uteroplacental dysfunction, discordant twin growth may be attributed to differences in genetic potential between co-twins, placental dysfunction confined to one placenta only, or one placental territory within a shared placenta. In addition, twin-twin transfusion syndrome represents a distinct entity of which discordant growth is a common feature. Discordant growth is recognized as an independent risk factor for adverse perinatal outcome. Intertwin birth weight disparity of 18% or more should be considered to represent a discordance threshold, which serves as an independent risk factor for adverse perinatal outcome. At this cutoff, perinatal morbidity is found to increase both for the larger and the smaller twin within a discordant pair. There remains uncertainty surrounding the sonographic parameters that are most predictive of discordance. Although heightening of fetal surveillance in the face of discordant twin growth follows the principles applied to singleton gestations complicated by fetal growth restriction, the timing of intervention is largely influenced by chorionicity.

  15. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Ricard

    2017-03-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the development of venous and/or arterial thromboses, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity (mainly, recurrent fetal losses), in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Some estimates indicate that the incidence of the APS is around 5 new cases per 100,000 persons per year and the prevalence around 40-50 cases per 100,000 persons. The aPL are positive in approximately 13% of patients with stroke, 11% with myocardial infarction, 9.5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis and 6% of patients with pregnancy morbidity. Currently, there is consensus in treating APS patients with thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation and to prevent obstetric manifestations with the use of aspirin and heparin. This review summarizes the main knowledge on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison between human fetal and adult skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, N.A.; Schouten, K.C.; Middelkoop, E.; Ulrich, M.

    2010-01-01

    Healing of early-gestation fetal wounds results in scarless healing. Since the capacity for regeneration is probably inherent to the fetal skin itself, knowledge of the fetal skin composition may contribute to the understanding of fetal wound healing. The aim of this study was to analyze the

  17. The Danish Fetal Medicine database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Charlotte; Kopp, Tine Iskov; Tabor, Ann

    2016-01-01

    trimester ultrasound scan performed at all public hospitals in Denmark are registered in the database. Main variables/descriptive data: Data on maternal characteristics, ultrasonic, and biochemical variables are continuously sent from the fetal medicine units’Astraia databases to the central database via...... analyses are sent to the database. Conclusion: It has been possible to establish a fetal medicine database, which monitors first-trimester screening for chromosomal abnormalities and second-trimester screening for major fetal malformations with the input from already collected data. The database...

  18. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...

  19. Abnormal fetal head shape: aetiology and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Olav Bjørn; David, Anna; Thomasson, Louise

    2007-01-01

    and define management pathways for fetuses with an abnormal skull shape. Methods: Our FMU databases were searched to ascertain all fetuses with an abnormal skull shape. Sonographic findings, diagnosis and outcome were reviewed. Results: Of the 370 cases identified, 31.6% were associated with spinabifida......Background: Abnormal head shape is an uncommon finding on prenatal ultrasound, often associated with breech presentation, spinabifida, aneuploidy or secondary to oligohydramnios or fetal position. Other aetiologies are rarer and may be more difficult to define. Objective: To determine the aetiology...... incidence of genetic syndromes, in the absence of a clear diagnosis, referral to a tertiary centre and genetic input is advised as detection of subtle sonographic features may aid diagnosis, allowing for targeted molecular analysis. An algorithm for management will be proposed....

  20. Epigenetic medicine and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendiz, Marisol; Chen, Yuanyuan; Öztürk, Nail C; Zhou, Feng C

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic medicine is still in its infancy. To date, only a handful of diseases have documented epigenetic correlates upstream of gene regulation including cancer, developmental syndromes and late-onset diseases. The finding that epigenetic markers are dynamic and heterogeneous at tissue and cellular levels, combined with recent identification of a new form of functionally distinct DNA methylation has opened a wider window for investigators to pry into the epigenetic world. It is anticipated that many diseases will be elucidated through this epigenetic inquiry. In this review, we discuss the normal course of DNA methylation during development, taking alcohol as a demonstrator of the epigenetic impact of environmental factors in disease etiology, particularly the growth retardation and neurodevelopmental deficits of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. PMID:23414322

  1. Epidemiological studies on disturbances of human fetal development in areas with various doses of natural background radiation. I. Relationship between incidences of Down's syndrome or visible malformation and gonad dose equivalent rate of natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujeno, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between environmental radiation to the gonads and incidences of Down's syndrome and visible malformation was analyzed using Kendall's rank correlation method. The subjects, studied during a 3-yr period (1979-1981), were inhabitants of 46 prefectures in Japan that had various dose rates of natural background ionizing radiation. Results showed that the natural background very low-dose radiation rate was not a predominant factor responsible for inducing Down's syndrome or other visible malformations

  2. Primary care fetal assessment - low-cost fetal arousal testing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tic cells iver utopsy l ever, . 1990; fr J mphasis ry. 1971;. lQ Dis oducmg. IVe phoma: 1993; rd·. 3rd ed. ant of ,ts. 10: ,th. 83: 51: SAMJ. SHORT. REPORT. Primary care fetal ... Education of mothers about the importance of fetal movements is used to ... thumb and middle finger supporting the rim of the top of the can. The index ...

  3. Syndromes, Disorders and Maternal Risk Factors Associated With Neural Tube Defects (VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs may be associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of the syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, including maternal fumonisin consumption, periconceptional zinc deficiency, parental occupational exposure and residential proximity to pesticides, lower socioeconomic status, fetal alcohol syndrome, mutations in the VANGL1 gene, human athymic Nude/SCID fetus, and single nucleotide polymorphism in the NOS3 gene. NTDs associated with these syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors may be different from those of nonsyndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal diagnosis of NTDs should alert doctors to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling.

  4. Clinical implications from monitoring fetal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, W F

    1982-12-15

    The monitoring of fetal motion in high-risk pregnancies has been shown to be worthwhile in predicting fetal distress and impending fetal death. The maternal recording of perceived fetal activity is an inexpensive surveillance technique which is most useful when there is chronic uteroplacental insufficiency or when a stillbirth may be expected. The presence of an active, vigorous fetus is reassuring, but documented fetal inactivity required a reassessment of the underlying antepartum complication and further fetal evaluation with real-time ultrasonography, fetal heart rate testing, and biochemical testing. Fetal distress from such acute changes as abruptio placentae or umbilical cord compression may not be predicted by monitoring fetal motion. Although not used for routine clinical investigation, electromechanical devices such as tocodynamometry have provided much insight into fetal behavioral patterns at many stages of pregnancy and in pregnancies with an antepartum complication.

  5. Prognostic Value of Fetal Thymus Size in Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekin, Atalay; Gezer, Cenk; Taner, Cuneyt Eftal; Solmaz, Ulas; Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Ozeren, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the size of the fetal thymus by sonography in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and to search for a possible relationship between a small fetal thymus and adverse perinatal outcomes. The transverse diameter of the fetal thymus was prospectively measured in 150 healthy and 143 IUGR fetuses between 24 and 40 weeks' gestation. The fetuses with IUGR were further divided according to normal or abnormal Doppler assessment of the umbilical and middle cerebral arteries and ductus venosus. Measurements were compared with reference ranges from controls. To determine which perinatal outcomes were independently associated with a small fetal thymus, a multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Thymus size was significantly lower in IUGR fetuses compared to controls (P thymus size was significantly smaller in IUGR fetuses with abnormal Doppler flow compared to normal flow (P thymus in IUGR fetuses was independently associated with early delivery (odds ratio [OR], 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.49; P= .023), respiratory distress syndrome (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.09-1.78; P= .005), early neonatal sepsis (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.11-2.42; P= .001), and a longer stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.08-1.71; P = .017). Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with fetal thymic involution, and a small fetal thymus is an early indicator of adverse perinatal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by IUGR. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  6. The Danish Fetal Medicine Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Charlotte K; Petersen, Olav B; Jørgensen, Finn S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the establishment and organization of the Danish Fetal Medicine Database and to report national results of first-trimester combined screening for trisomy 21 in the 5-year period 2008-2012. DESIGN: National register study using prospectively collected first-trimester screening...... data from the Danish Fetal Medicine Database. POPULATION: Pregnant women in Denmark undergoing first-trimester screening for trisomy 21. METHODS: Data on maternal characteristics, biochemical and ultrasonic markers are continuously sent electronically from local fetal medicine databases (Astraia Gmbh......%. The national screen-positive rate increased from 3.6% in 2008 to 4.7% in 2012. The national detection rate of trisomy 21 was reported to be between 82 and 90% in the 5-year period. CONCLUSION: A national fetal medicine database has been successfully established in Denmark. Results from the database have shown...

  7. Fetal programming of renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dötsch, Jörg; Plank, Christian; Amann, Kerstin

    2012-04-01

    Results from large epidemiological studies suggest a clear relation between low birth weight and adverse renal outcome evident as early as during childhood. Such adverse outcomes may include glomerular disease, hypertension, and renal failure and contribute to a phenomenon called fetal programming. Other factors potentially leading to an adverse renal outcome following fetal programming are maternal diabetes mellitus, smoking, salt overload, and use of glucocorticoids during pregnancy. However, clinical data on the latter are scarce. Here, we discuss potential underlying mechanisms of fetal programming, including reduced nephron number via diminished nephrogenesis and other renal (e.g., via the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) and non-renal (e.g., changes in endothelial function) alterations. It appears likely that the outcomes of fetal programming may be influenced or modified postnatally, for example, by the amount of nutrients given at critical times.

  8. Analysis of fetal movements by Doppler actocardiogram and fetal B-mode imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, K; Tatsumura, M; Utsu, M

    1999-12-01

    We have presented that fetal surveillance may be enhanced by use of the fetal actocardiogram and by computerized processing of fetal motion as well as fetal B-mode ultrasound imaging. Ultrasonic Doppler fetal actogram is a sensitive and objective method for detecting and recording fetal movements. Computer processing of the actograph output signals enables powerful, detailed, and convenient analysis of fetal physiologic phenomena. The actocardiogram is a useful measurement tool not only in fetal behavioral studies but also in evaluation of fetal well-being. It reduces false-positive, nonreactive NST and false-positive sinusoidal FHR pattern. It is a valuable tool to predict fetal distress. The results of intrapartum fetal monitoring are further improved by the antepartum application of the actocardiogram. Quantified fetal motion analysis is a useful, objective evaluation of the embryo and fetus. This method allows monitoring of changes in fetal movement, as well as frequency, amplitude, and duration. Furthermore, quantification of fetal motion enables evaluation of fetal behavior states and how these states relate to other measurements, such as changes in FHR. Numeric analysis of both fetal actogram and fetal motion from B-mode images is a promising application in the correlation of fetal activity or behavior with other fetal physiologic measurements.

  9. Maternal Intuition of Fetal Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael McFadzen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Fetal gender speculation is a preoccupation of many expecting parents, and pregnant women commonly profess to intuitively know the gender of their unborn babies. This study objectively compared pregnant mothers’ perceptions of fetal gender to sonographically proven gender determinations. Also, success rates from previously published studies, noninvasive prenatal testing and a myriad of gender determination methods were observed and reported for context. Methods: All pregnant women presenting for second-trimester screening ultrasound (at 17–23 weeks gestation in the obstetrics department of a single health center were asked to participate. A medical sonographer described the ultrasound examination, obtained appropriate consent and medical history. Each mother was asked if she had any perception as to the fetal gender and her answer documented. Mothers who had foreknowledge of fetal gender were excluded. Frequencies of actual gender were compared with observed frequencies of the maternal prediction using chi-squared test. Results: Approximately 40% (n = 411 of our study population (N = 1,026 indicated having an intuition or perception of fetal gender. These women correctly predicted the gender of their babies 51% of the time (P = 0.6571. Women who expressed a “strong” degree of intuition (n = 53 fared better, accurately predicting fetal gender at a rate of 62%, though the difference in this smaller subcohort also failed to demonstrate statistical significance (P = 0.0741. Conclusions: Intuition of fetal gender is professed by almost half of mothers though, when present, is no better at accurately predicting fetal gender than flipping a coin.

  10. Epigenetic regulation and fetal programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, Christine; El-Osta, Assam; Le Bouc, Yves

    2008-02-01

    Fetal programming encompasses the role of developmental plasticity in response to environmental and nutritional signals during early life and its potential adverse consequences (risk of cardiovascular, metabolic and behavioural diseases) in later life. The first studies in this field highlighted an association between poor fetal growth and chronic adult diseases. However, environmental signals during early life may lead to adverse long-term effects independently of obvious effects on fetal growth. Adverse long-term effects reflect a mismatch between early (fetal and neonatal) environmental conditions and the conditions that the individual will confront later in life. The mechanisms underlying this risk remain unclear. However, experimental data in rodents and recent observations in humans suggest that epigenetic changes in regulatory genes and growth-related genes play a significant role in fetal programming. Improvements in our understanding of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms at play in fetal programming would make it possible to identify biomarkers for detecting infants at high risk of adult-onset diseases. Such improvements should also lead to the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  11. Screening for fetal aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Britton D; Norton, Mary E

    2016-02-01

    Screening is currently recommended in pregnancy for a number of genetic disorders, chromosomal aneuploidy, and structural birth defects in the fetus regardless of maternal age or family history. There is an overwhelming array of sonographic and maternal serum-based options available for carrying out aneuploidy risk assessment in the first and/or second trimester. As with any screening test, the patient should be made aware that a "negative" test or "normal" ultrasound does not guarantee a healthy baby and a "positive" test does not mean the fetus has the condition. The woman should have both pre- and post-test counseling to discuss the benefits, limitations, and options for additional testing. Rapid advancements of genetic technologies have made it possible to screen for the common aneuploidies traditionally associated with advanced maternal age with improved levels of accuracy beyond serum and ultrasound based testing. Prenatal screening for fetal genetic disorders with cell-free DNA has transformed prenatal care with yet unanswered questions related to the financial, ethical, and appropriate application in the provision of prenatal risk assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Noninvasive Fetal ECG analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Gari D.; Silva, Ikaro; Behar, Joachim; Moody, George B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important advances achieved in the field of adult electrocardiography signal processing, the analysis of the non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram (NI-FECG) remains a challenge. Currently no gold standard database exists which provides labelled FECG QRS complexes (and other morphological parameters), and publications rely either on proprietary databases or a very limited set of data recorded from few (or more often, just one) individuals. The PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2013 enables to tackle some of these limitations by releasing a set of NI-FECG data publicly to the scientific community in order to evaluate signal processing techniques for NI-FECG extraction. The Challenge aim was to encourage development of accurate algorithms for locating QRS complexes and estimating the QT interval in noninvasive FECG signals. Using carefully reviewed reference QRS annotations and QT intervals as a gold standard, based on simultaneous direct FECG when possible, the Challenge was designed to measure and compare the performance of participants’ algorithms objectively. Multiple challenge events were designed to test basic FHR estimation accuracy, as well as accuracy in measurement of inter-beat (RR) and QT intervals needed as a basis for derivation of other FECG features. This editorial reviews the background issues, the design of the Challenge, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. PMID:25071093

  13. A noninvasive method for the prediction of fetal hemolytic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Kravchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve the diagnosis of fetal hemolytic disease.Subjects and methods. A study group consisted of 42 pregnant women whose newborn infants had varying degrees of hemolytic disease. The women were divided into 3 subgroups according to the severity of neonatal hemolytic disease: 1 pregnant women whose neonates were born with severe hemolytic disease (n = 14; 2 those who gave birth to babies with moderate hemolytic disease (n = 11; 3 those who delivered infants with mild hemolytic disease (n = 17. A comparison group included 42 pregnant women whose babies were born without signs of hemolytic disease. Curvesfor blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery were analyzed in a fetus of 25 to 39 weeks’ gestation.Results. The peak systolic blood flow velocity was observed in Subgroup 1; however, the indicator did not exceed 1.5 MoM even in severe fetal anemic syndrome. The fetal middle artery blood flow velocity rating scale was divided into 2 zones: 1 the boundary values of peak systolic blood flow velocity from the median to the obtained midscore; 2 the boundary values of peak systolic blood flow velocity of the obtained values of as high as 1.5 MoM.Conclusion. The value of peak systolic blood flow velocity being in Zone 2, or its dynamic changes by transiting to this zone can serve as a prognostic factor in the development of severe fetal hemolytic disease. 

  14. Maternal and fetal outcomes of pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Francis M; Whalen, Phoebe S; Lee, Vanessa R; Caughey, Aaron B

    2015-10-01

    This study examined maternal and neonatal outcomes that are associated with pancreatitis in pregnancy, in particular preeclampsia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all singleton nonanomalous pregnancies in California from 2005-2008 with an identification of all cases of pancreatitis. Outcomes of interest included preeclampsia, intrauterine fetal death, preterm delivery, and neonatal or infant death. Univariate and multivariable analyses were then conducted to examine the association of pancreatitis in pregnancy and maternal characteristics and fetal outcomes. Our cohort of 2,039,870 pregnant women included 342 women (0.017%) with pancreatitis. Pancreatitis in pregnancy was not associated significantly with neonatal or infant death. When assessing fetal outcomes, pancreatitis was associated with preterm delivery, small for gestational age, jaundice, respiratory distress syndrome, and intrauterine fetal death (P pregnancy-associated pancreatitis was found to be associated with preeclampsia and severe preeclampsia in both univariate (P pancreatitis in pregnancy was associated with several adverse maternal outcomes; in particular, a strong association existed with preeclampsia, which has its own implications and complications surrounding pregnancy management. Pancreatitis in pregnancy was also associated with increased risk for preterm delivery but not neonatal or infant death, which is consistent with the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The amniotic band syndrome: antenatal sonographic diagnosis and potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, B S; Filly, R A; Callen, P W; Golbus, M S

    1985-05-01

    Amniotic band syndrome causes a variety of fetal malformations involving the limbs, craniofacial region, and trunk. Six prenatally diagnosed cases of amniotic band syndrome are discussed. The diagnosis was based on sonographic visualization of either amniotic sheets or bands associated with fetal deformation or deformities in nonembryologic distributions known to characterize the amniotic band syndrome. Seven additional cases are considered in which an aberrant sheet of tissue with a free edge was visualized within the amniotic cavity but no restriction of fetal motion or subsequent deformity was demonstrated.

  16. Fetal red blood cell parameters in thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnpean, Rossarin; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Fucharoen, Supan; Ratanasiri, Thawalwong

    2013-01-01

    With the lack of fetal blood specimens in routine practice, little is known about red blood cell (RBC) parameters of fetuses with various thalassemia syndromes. This study aimed to describe these in various forms of thalassemia. The study was performed on 93 fetal blood specimens obtained from pregnant women by cordocentesis during 18-24 weeks of gestation. RBC parameters were recorded on automated analyzer. Hemoglobin (Hb) and DNA analyses were performed for definite genotyping. No significant difference in RBC parameters was observed between non-thalassemic fetuses and those with β-thalassemia trait, Hb E trait, homozygous Hb E and β-thalassemia/Hb E disease. However, in those with α(0)-thalassemia trait and double heterozygous α(0)-thalassemia/Hb E, slight reduction in mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was noted. Fetuses with the Hb H disease showed significant reductions in Hb, MCV and mean corpuscular Hb (MCH). Marked reductions in Hb, hematocrit, MCH and mean cell Hb concentration and increased RBC distribution width with numerous nucleated RBC were clearly observed in Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis. Simple analysis of fetal RBC parameters is useful for making presumptive prenatal diagnosis of α-thalassemia syndromes including Hb H disease and Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis which can then be confirmed by Hb and DNA analyses. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Antenatal fetal magnetocardiography: a new method for fetal surveillance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, A; Weir, A; Shahani, U; Bain, R; Maas, P; Donaldson, G

    1994-10-01

    To establish the reliability of fetal magnetocardiography as a method of measuring the time intervals of the fetal heart during the antenatal period. A prospective study. Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit, Southern General Hospital. One hundred and six low risk pregnant women at 20 to 42 weeks gestation. Success in obtaining QRS complexes, P waves and T waves. Correlation of time intervals with fetal outcome. The technique was acceptable to pregnant women. A QRS complex was successfully demonstrated in 68 (67%) of the unaveraged traces. Using off-line averaging techniques on these 68 cases, P waves were obtained in 75% and T waves in 72%. Although good quality traces were obtained throughout the range of gestational ages, in general it was more difficult below 28 weeks. QRS duration (R2 = 7%, P = 0.02) demonstrated a positive linear correlation with increasing gestation. Of the 35 (51%) cases with umbilical vein pH analysis available, only one result was less than 7.2. No significant relation was found between measurements of the fetal waveforms and the pH results. The technique of fetal magnetocardiography provides a significant advance in the technological field for the demonstration of QRS complexes and the full PQRST waveforms in gestations from 20 weeks onwards. With further technical improvements the clinical impact of this technique can be assessed more fully.

  18. Tracheal Agenesis: A Challenging Prenatal Diagnosis—Contribution of Fetal MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charline Bertholdt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly. The prevalence is less than 1 : 50 000 with a male to female ratio of 2 : 1. This anomaly may be isolated but, in 93% of cases, it is part of polymalformative syndrome. The most evocative diagnosis situation is the ultrasonographic congenital high airway obstruction syndrome. Dilated airways, enlarged lungs with flattened diaphragm, fetal ascites and severe nonimmune hydrops can be observed. In the absence of a congenital high airway obstruction syndrome, the antenatal diagnosis of tracheal agenesis is difficult. Tracheal agenesis should be suspected in the presence of an unexplained polyhydramnios associated with congenital malformations. The fetal airway exploration should then be systematically performed by fetal thoracic magnetic resonance imaging. A case of Floyd’s type II tracheal agenesis, detected during the postnatal period, is reported here. The retrospective reexamination of fetal magnetic resonance images showed that the antenatal diagnosis would have been easy if a systematical examination of upper airways had been performed. Prenatal diagnosis of tracheal agenesis is possible with fetal MRI but the really challenge is to think about this pathology.

  19. Maternal obesity affects gene expression and cellular development in fetal brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Ewa K; Oommen, Saji; Vasu, Vihas T; Srinivasan, Malathi; Stachowiak, Michal; Gohil, Kishorchandra; Patel, Mulchand S

    2013-05-01

    Female rat neonates reared on a high carbohydrate (HC) milk formula developed chronic hyperinsulinemia and adult-onset obesity (HC phenotype). Furthermore, we have shown that fetal development in the HC intrauterine environment (maternal obesity complicated with hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, and increased levels of proinflammatory markers) resulted in increased levels of serum insulin and leptin in term HC fetuses and the spontaneous transfer of the HC phenotype to the adult offspring. The objectives of this study are to identify changes in global gene expression pattern and cellular development in term HC fetal brains in response to growth in the adverse intrauterine environment of the obese HC female rat. GeneChip analysis was performed on total RNA obtained from fetal brains for global gene expression studies and immunohistochemical analysis was performed on fetal brain slices for investigation of cellular development in term HC fetal brains. Gene expression profiling identified changes in several clusters of genes that could contribute to the transfer of the maternal phenotype (chronic hyperinsulinemia and adult-onset obesity) to the HC offspring. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated diminished proliferation and neuronal maturation of stem-like cells lining the third ventricle, hypothalamic region, and the cerebral cortex in HC fetal brains. These results suggest that maternal obesity during pregnancy could alter the developmental program of specific fetal brain cell-networks. These defects could underlie pathologies such as metabolic syndrome and possibly some neurological disorders in the offspring at a later age.

  20. Syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors associated with neural tube defects (III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2008-06-01

    Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs) may be associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as omphalocele, OEIS (omphalocele-exstrophy-imperforate anus-spinal defects) complex, pentalogy of Cantrell, amniotic band sequence, limb-body wall complex, Meckel syndrome, Joubert syndrome, skeletal dysplasia, diabetic embryopathy, and single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes of glucose metabolism. NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors may be different from those of nonsyndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert the clinician to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling.

  1. Two cases of fetal goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Saini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anterior fetal neck masses are rarely encountered. Careful routine ultrasound screening can reveal intrauterine fetal goiters (FGs. The incidence of goitrous hypothyroidism is 1 in 30,000-50,000 live births. The consequences of both FG and impaired thyroid function are serious. Aims and Objectives: To emphasize role of ultrasound in both invasive and non-invasive management of FG. Materials and Methods: Two pregnant patients, during second trimester, underwent routine antenatal ultrasound revealing FG, were investigated and managed. Results: Case 1: Revealed FG with fetal hypothyroidism. Intra-amniotic injection l-thyroxine given. Follow-up ultrasound confirmed the reduction of the goiter size. At birth, thyroid dyshormogenesis was suspected and neonate discharged on 50 mcg levothyroxine/day with normal growth and development so far. Case 2: Hypothyroid mother with twin pregnancy revealed FG, in twin 1, confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 × 1.63 cm. The other twin had no thyroid swelling. Cordocentesis confirmed hypothyroidism in twin 1. Maternal thyroxine dose increased as per biochemical parameters leading to reduction in FG size. Mother delivered preterm and none of the twins had thyroid swelling. Fetal euthyroidism was confirmed on biochemical screening. Conclusion: FG during pregnancy should be thoroughly evaluated, diagnosed and immediately treated; although in utero options for fetal hypothyroidism management are available, emphasis should be laid on non-invasive procedures. Newer and better resolution techniques in ultrasonography are more specific and at the same time are less harmful.

  2. Fetal Programming and Cardiovascular Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2016-01-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25880521

  3. Fetal programming and cardiovascular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara T; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2015-04-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption, or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes, and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology, and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress, and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  4. Parietal dysfunction during number processing in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.J. Woods

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Number processing deficits are frequently seen in children prenatally exposed to alcohol. Although the parietal lobe, which is known to mediate several key aspects of number processing, has been shown to be structurally impaired in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD, effects on functional activity in this region during number processing have not previously been investigated. This fMRI study of 49 children examined differences in activation associated with prenatal alcohol exposure in five key parietal regions involved in number processing, using tasks involving simple addition and magnitude comparison. Despite generally similar behavioral performance, in both tasks greater prenatal alcohol exposure was related to less activation in an anterior section of the right horizontal intraparietal sulcus known to mediate mental representation and manipulation of quantity. Children with fetal alcohol syndrome and partial fetal alcohol syndrome appeared to compensate for this deficit by increased activation of the angular gyrus during the magnitude comparison task.

  5. Liquid-Diet with Alcohol Alters Maternal, Fetal and Placental Weights and the Expression of Molecules Involved in Integrin Signaling in the Fetal Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujjwal K. Rout

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy causes wide range of behavioral and structural deficits in children, commonly known as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS. Children with FAS may suffer behavioral deficits in the absence of obvious malformations. In rodents, the exposure to alcohol during gestation changes brain structures and weights of offspring. The mechanism of FAS is not completely understood. In the present study, an established rat (Long-Evans model of FAS was used. The litter size and the weights of mothers, fetuses and placentas were examined on gestation days 18 or 20. On gestation day 18, the effects of chronic alcohol on the expression levels of integrin receptor subunits, phospholipase-Cγ and N-cadherin were examined in the fetal cerebral cortices. Presence of alcohol in the liquid-diet reduced the consumption and decreased weights of mothers and fetuses but increased the placental weights. Expression levels of β1 and α3 integrin subunits and phospholipase-Cγ2 were significantly altered in the fetal cerebral cortices of mothers on alcohol containing diet. Results show that alcohol consumption during pregnancy even with protein, mineral and vitamin enriched diet may affect maternal and fetal health, and alter integrin receptor signaling pathways in the fetal cerebral cortex disturbing the development of fetal brains.

  6. The role of phosphatidyl-glycerol in the determination of fetal lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phosphatidyl-glycerot (PG) and the lecithin/sphingomyelin (LIS) ratio were determined on amniotic fluid from 140 patients to evaluate the role of PG estimation as a functional fetal lung maturity test. PG was absent without associated respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in 17 cases (12%).and present in 123; 3 of the infants ...

  7. Increased ventricular preload is compensated by myocyte proliferation in normal and hypoplastic fetal chick left ventricle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dealmeida, A.; McQuinn, T. C.; Sedmera, David

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 100, - (2007), s. 1363-1370 ISSN 0009-7330 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : chick embryo * hemodynamics * fetal surgery * hypoplastic left heart syndrome Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 9.721, year: 2007

  8. Fetal exposure in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.L.; Vandergrift, J.F.; Dalrymple, G.V.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of possible radiation damage to the fetus or embryo as a result of diagnostic radiography during pregnancy, particularly in the early stages, is discussed. Recommendations of therapeutic abortion after fetal exposure require an adequate knowledge of the doses involved. In the absence of actual dose measurements or estimates, approximate exposure levels may be determined from the literature. A summary of published values for radiography involving the lower abdomen is given. Data is also presented from a series of fetal exposures resulting mostly from routine diagnostic radiography when pregnancy was not known at the time but was established later. Results of actual dose measurements using a phantom and of dose calculations based on published values are in reasonable agreement indicating that literature values of dose provide a satisfactory alternative to measurement. These data suggest that diagnostic radiography rarely, if ever, results in fetal exposures high enough to justify therapeutic abortion. (author)

  9. Case report: Short rib polydactyly syndrome - type 2 (Majewski syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jutur, Pramod Setty; Kumar, Chandan Pramod; Goroshi, Shetteppa

    2010-01-01

    Short rib polydactyly syndrome (SRPS) type 2 (Majewski syndrome) is a rare inherited, autosomal recessive, lethal skeletal dysplasia characterized by horizontally located short ribs, pre- and postaxial polysyndactyly, and micromelia, with characteristic short ovoid tibiae. There may or may not be visceral involvement. We report a case of SRPS type 2 that was diagnosed by antenatal USG at 28 weeks of gestation; the diagnosis was subsequently confirmed by postnatal radiography, fetal autopsy, and histopathology

  10. 3D ultrasound in fetal spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, T; Gloning, K-P; Minderer, S; Tutschek, B

    2008-12-01

    3D ultrasound can be used to study the fetal spine, but skeletal mode can be inconclusive for the diagnosis of fetal spina bifida. We illustrate a diagnostic approach using 2D and 3D ultrasound and indicate possible pitfalls.

  11. Fetal scalp blood sampling during labor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandraharan, Edwin; Wiberg, Nana

    2014-01-01

    Fetal cardiotocography is characterized by low specificity; therefore, in an attempt to ensure fetal well-being, fetal scalp blood sampling has been recommended by most obstetric societies in the case of a non-reassuring cardiotocography. The scientific agreement on the evidence for using fetal...... scalp blood sampling to decrease the rate of operative delivery for fetal distress is ambiguous. Based on the same studies, a Cochrane review states that fetal scalp blood sampling increases the rate of instrumental delivery while decreasing neonatal acidosis, whereas the National Institute of Health...... and Clinical Excellence guideline considers that fetal scalp blood sampling decreases instrumental delivery without differences in other outcome variables. The fetal scalp is supplied by vessels outside the skull below the level of the cranial vault, which is likely to be compressed during contractions...

  12. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  13. Metabolic requirements for fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milley, J R; Simmons, M A

    1979-09-01

    Table 1 outlines a metabolic balance sheet for the sheep fetus. It is clear that maternal substrate concentrations as well as placental function are important in assuring the provision of adequate substrate to meet fetal metabolic and growth requirements. It is intriguing that the fetus appears to use substrates not usually regarded as important in extrauterine diets (lactate) and to use substrates for catabolic purposes normally thought to be primarily anabolic substrates (amino acids). This information emphasizes the hazards of extrapolating metabolic and nutritional patterns seen in extrauterine life in reaching conclusions concerning the fetus. It likewise emphasizes the importance of ongoing studies in maternal and fetal nutrition and metabolism.

  14. Fetal dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, Keith

    2002-01-01

    One of the most difficult areas in which to provide radiation protection advice is in the area of the exposure of the fetus. Both staff and patients may be exposed to ionizing radiation. Dosimetry approaches for both cases are different and the advice to the exposed individual varies. Irrespective of whether the irradiation of the fetus is unintended, the fetal dose must be calculated. This requires detailed knowledge of the radiographic technique used. The method of estimation will be described in detail as well as estimation of fetal risks

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of fetal cardiac disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donofrio, Mary T; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Hornberger, Lisa K; Copel, Joshua A; Sklansky, Mark S; Abuhamad, Alfred; Cuneo, Bettina F; Huhta, James C; Jonas, Richard A; Krishnan, Anita; Lacey, Stephanie; Lee, Wesley; Michelfelder, Erik C; Rempel, Gwen R; Silverman, Norman H; Spray, Thomas L; Strasburger, Janette F; Tworetzky, Wayne; Rychik, Jack

    2014-05-27

    The goal of this statement is to review available literature and to put forth a scientific statement on the current practice of fetal cardiac medicine, including the diagnosis and management of fetal cardiovascular disease. A writing group appointed by the American Heart Association reviewed the available literature pertaining to topics relevant to fetal cardiac medicine, including the diagnosis of congenital heart disease and arrhythmias, assessment of cardiac function and the cardiovascular system, and available treatment options. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association classification of recommendations and level of evidence for practice guidelines were applied to the current practice of fetal cardiac medicine. Recommendations relating to the specifics of fetal diagnosis, including the timing of referral for study, indications for referral, and experience suggested for performance and interpretation of studies, are presented. The components of a fetal echocardiogram are described in detail, including descriptions of the assessment of cardiac anatomy, cardiac function, and rhythm. Complementary modalities for fetal cardiac assessment are reviewed, including the use of advanced ultrasound techniques, fetal magnetic resonance imaging, and fetal magnetocardiography and electrocardiography for rhythm assessment. Models for parental counseling and a discussion of parental stress and depression assessments are reviewed. Available fetal therapies, including medical management for arrhythmias or heart failure and closed or open intervention for diseases affecting the cardiovascular system such as twin-twin transfusion syndrome, lung masses, and vascular tumors, are highlighted. Catheter-based intervention strategies to prevent the progression of disease in utero are also discussed. Recommendations for delivery planning strategies for fetuses with congenital heart disease including models based on classification of disease severity and delivery room

  16. Pathophysiological mechanisms in antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Brock E; Wills, Rohan; Pierangeli, Silvia S

    2013-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease associated with thrombosis and recurrent fetal loss in the setting of detectable antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. The major antigenic target has been identifed as β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), which mediates binding of aPL antibodies to target cells including endothelial cells, monocytes, platelets and trophoblasts, leading to prothrombotic and proinfammatory changes that ultimately result in thrombosis and fetal loss. This article summarizes recent insights into the role of β2GPI in normal hemostasis, interactions between aPL antibodies, β2GPI and cell-surface molecules, molecular prothrombotic and proinfammatory changes induced by aPL antibodies and pathogenic changes leading to fetal loss in antiphospholipid syndrome. New directions in therapy using these insights are examined. PMID:23487578

  17. Sotalol in the treatment of fetal dysrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudijk, M. A.; Michon, M. M.; Kleinman, C. S.; Kapusta, L.; Stoutenbeek, P.; Visser, G. H.; Meijboom, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Background-Fetal tachycardia may cause hydrops fetalis and lead to fetal death. No unanimity of opinion exists regarding the optimum treatment. This study evaluates our experience with transplacental sotalol therapy to treat fetal tachycardias in terms of safety and efficacy. Methods and Results-The

  18. Use of fetal analgesia during prenatal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellieni, Carlo V; Tei, M; Stazzoni, G; Bertrando, S; Cornacchione, S; Buonocore, G

    2013-01-01

    Recent progresses in fetal surgery have raised concern on fetal pain, its long-term consequences and the risks of sudden fetal movements induced by pain. In several studies, surgeons have directly administered opioids to the fetus, while others have considered sufficient the maternally administered analgesics. We performed a review of the literature to assess the state of the art. We performed a PubMed search to retrieve the papers that in the last 10 years reported studies of human fetal surgery and that described whether any fetal analgesia was administered. We retrieved 34 papers. In three papers, the procedure did not hurt the fetus, being performed on fetal annexes, in two papers, it was performed in the first half of pregnancy, when pain perception is unlikely. In 10 of the 29 remaining papers, fetal surgery was performed using direct fetal analgesia, while in 19, analgesia was administered only to the mother. In most cases, fetal direct analgesia was obtained using i.m. opioids, and muscle relaxant. Rare drawbacks on either fetuses or mothers due to fetal analgesia were reported. Fetal direct analgesia is performed only in a minority of cases and no study gives details about fetal reactions to pain. More research is needed to assess or exclude its possible long-term drawbacks, as well as the actual consequences of pain during surgery.

  19. Practice Bulletin No. 173: Fetal Macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Suspected fetal macrosomia is encountered commonly in obstetric practice. As birth weight increases, the likelihood of labor abnormalities, shoulder dystocia, birth trauma, and permanent injury to the neonate increases. The purpose of this document is to quantify those risks, address the accuracy and limitations of methods for estimating fetal weight, and suggest clinical management for a pregnancy with suspected fetal macrosomia.

  20. Nelson's syndrome in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surrey, E.S.; Chang, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The therapeutic considerations in the management of Nelson's syndrome in a 29 year old primigravida are described. CT scans revealed a 2-cm solid pituitary lesion with suprasellar extension and chiasmatic encroachment. A transsphenoidal hypophysectomy was performed to remove a eosinophilic pituitary adenoma. The patient's symptoms improved following surgery. Fetal growth was followed by ultrasound and a female infant was delivered by cesarean section. Follow-up CT scan 2 weeks after delivery revealed no evidence of tumor recurrence

  1. Ultrasonic prediction of fetal mass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-02-19

    Feb 19, 1983 ... A reliable and cost-effective method of establishing fetal maturity ... This is the optimal time since during this period the rate of growth is .... error. Larger errors could not specifically be related to longer intervals. On the contrary,S out of the 10 correct estimates were calculated more than 3 weeks before birth.

  2. Accidental Haemorrhage and Fetal Prognosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-17

    Apr 17, 1974 ... perinatal mortality associated with accidental haemorrhage. The importance of clinical signs in determining fetal ... presented with antepartum haemorrhage, and where a retroplacental clot was found postpartum. .... rupture of membranes and oxytocin infusion. This was done in spite of intra-uterine death in ...

  3. Fetal programming and environmental exposures ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs from uterine tissue, the placenta, the maternal blood supply, and other sources. Recent evidence has made clear that the process is not based entirely on genetics, but rather on a delicate series of interactions between genes and the environment. It is likely that epigenctic (“above the genome”) changes are responsible for modifying gene expression in the developing fetus, and these modifications can have long-lasting health impacts. Determining which epigenetic regulators are most vital in embryonic development will improve pregnancy outcomes and our ability to treat and prevent disorders that emerge later in life. “Fetal Programming and Environmental Exposures: Implications for Prenatal Care and Preterm Birth’ began with a keynote address by Frederick vom Saal, who explained that low-level exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) perturbs hormone systems in utero and can have negative effects on fetal development. vom Saal presented data on the LOC bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-mimicking compound found in many plastics. He suggested that low-dose exposure to LOCs can alter the development process and enhance chances of acquiring adult diseases, such as breastcancer, diabetes, and even developmental disorders such as attention deficit disorder (ADHD).’ Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs

  4. Fetal programming of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faa, Gavino; Manchia, Mirko; Pintus, Roberta; Gerosa, Clara; Marcialis, Maria Antonietta; Fanos, Vassilios

    2016-09-01

    Starting from the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypotheses proposed by David Barker, namely fetal programming, in the past years, there is a growing evidence of the major role played by epigenetic factors during the intrauterine life and the perinatal period. Furthermore, it has been assessed that these factors can affect the health status in infancy and even in adulthood. In this review, we focus our attention on the fetal programming of the brain, analyzing the most recent literature concerning the epigenetic factors that can influence the development of neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorders, major depressive disorders, and schizophrenia. The perinatal epigenetic factors have been divided in two main groups: maternal factors and fetal factors. The maternal factors include diet, smoking, alcoholism, hypertension, malnutrition, trace elements, stress, diabetes, substance abuse, and exposure to environmental toxicants, while the fetal factors include hypoxia/asphyxia, placental insufficiency, prematurity, low birth weight, drugs administered to the mother or to the baby, and all factors causing intrauterine growth restriction. A better comprehension of the possible mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases may help researchers and clinicians develop new diagnostic tools and treatments to offer these patients a tailored medical treatment strategy to improve their quality of life. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 108:207-223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Leptospirosis in pregnancy with pathological fetal cardiotocography changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koe, Suan-Li Liana; Tan, Kim Teng; Tan, Thiam Chye

    2014-02-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old primigravida who presented at 37 weeks of gestation with symptoms suggestive of acute fatty liver of pregnancy, but was later diagnosed with leptospirosis (i.e. Weil’s disease or syndrome) on serological testing. Cardiotocography showed fetal distress, and an emergency Caesarean section was performed. A healthy neonate with no evidence of congenital leptospirosis was delivered. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone and discharged well 13 days after admission. Herein, we discuss the patient’s clinical presentation and the cardiotocography changes observed in leptospiral infection, and review the current literature.

  6. Fetal programming and early identification of newborns at high risk of free radical-mediated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Serafina; Santacroce, Antonino; Picardi, Anna; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2016-05-08

    Nowadays metabolic syndrome represents a real outbreak affecting society. Paradoxically, pediatricians must feel involved in fighting this condition because of the latest evidences of developmental origins of adult diseases. Fetal programming occurs when the normal fetal development is disrupted by an abnormal insult applied to a critical point in intrauterine life. Placenta assumes a pivotal role in programming the fetal experience in utero due to the adaptive changes in structure and function. Pregnancy complications such as diabetes, intrauterine growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, and hypoxia are associated with placental dysfunction and programming. Many experimental studies have been conducted to explain the phenotypic consequences of fetal-placental perturbations that predispose to the genesis of metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. In recent years, elucidating the mechanisms involved in such kind of process has become the challenge of scientific research. Oxidative stress may be the general underlying mechanism that links altered placental function to fetal programming. Maternal diabetes, prenatal hypoxic/ischaemic events, inflammatory/infective insults are specific triggers for an acute increase in free radicals generation. Early identification of fetuses and newborns at high risk of oxidative damage may be crucial to decrease infant and adult morbidity.

  7. Estimation of fetal weight by ultrasonic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mei; Shao, Guangrui; Zhang, Feixue; Ruan, Zhengmin; Xu, Ping; Ding, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the accuracy and clinical application of a new technique in the fetal weight estimation by ultrasound. The fetal biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC) and femur length (FL) were measured by ultrasound examination within one week before delivery. Two different fetal abdominal sectors were measured for the assessment of abdominal circumference (AC). The fetal weight of 516 singleton fetuses was estimated according to above measurements and their actual birth weight was recorded after delivery. There were no significant differences in the fetal AC or body weight evaluated before delivery and recorded after delivery. This new technique is more convenient and applicable for the evaluation of fetal AC as compared to standard method, and seems to be reliable and accurate for the assessment of fetal weight.

  8. Fetal anatomy revealed with fast MR sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, D; Hatabu, H; Gaa, J; Atkinson, M W; Edelman, R R

    1996-10-01

    Although all the imaging studies in this pictorial essay were done for maternal rather than fetal indications, fetal anatomy was well visualized. However, when scans are undertaken for fetal indications, fetal motion in between scout views and imaging sequences may make specific image planes difficult to obtain. Of the different techniques described in this review, we preferred the HASTE technique and use it almost exclusively for scanning pregnant patients. The T2-weighting is ideal for delineating fetal organs. Also, the HASTE technique allows images to be obtained in 430 msec, limiting artifacts arising from maternal and fetal motion. MR imaging should play a more important role in evaluating equivocal sonographic cases as fast scanning techniques are more widely used. Obstetric MR imaging no longer will be limited by fetal motion artifacts. When complex anatomy requires definition in a complicated pregnant patient, MR imaging should be considered as a useful adjunct to sonography.

  9. Antithyroid drug-induced fetal goitrous hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh; Sundberg, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Maternal overtreatment with antithyroid drugs can induce fetal goitrous hypothyroidism. This condition can have a critical effect on pregnancy outcome, as well as on fetal growth and neurological development. The purpose of this Review is to clarify if and how fetal goitrous hypothyroidism can...... be prevented, and how to react when prevention has failed. Understanding the importance of pregnancy-related changes in maternal thyroid status when treating a pregnant woman is crucial to preventing fetal goitrous hypothyroidism. Maternal levels of free T(4) are the most consistent indication of maternal...... and fetal thyroid status. In patients with fetal goitrous hypothyroidism, intra-amniotic levothyroxine injections improve fetal outcome. The best way to avoid maternal overtreatment with antithyroid drugs is to monitor closely the maternal thyroid status, especially estimates of free T(4) levels....

  10. Maternal buprenorphine treatment and fetal neurobehavioral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Lauren M; Velez, Martha; McConnell, Krystle; Spencer, Nancy; Tuten, Michelle; Jones, Hendree E; King, Van L; Gandotra, Neeraj; Milio, Lorraine A; Voegtline, Kristin; DiPietro, Janet A

    2017-05-01

    Gestational opioid use/misuse is escalating in the United States; however, little is understood about the fetal effects of medications used to treat maternal opioid use disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of maternal buprenorphine administration on longitudinal fetal neurobehavioral development. Forty-nine buprenorphine-maintained women who attended a substance use disorder treatment facility with generally uncomplicated pregnancies underwent fetal monitoring for 60 minutes at times of trough and peak maternal buprenorphine levels. Data were collected at 24, 28, 32, and 36 weeks gestation. Fetal neurobehavioral indicators (ie, heart rate, motor activity, and their integration [fetal movement-fetal heart rate coupling]) were collected via an actocardiograph, digitized and quantified. Longitudinal data analysis relied on hierarchic linear modeling. Fetal heart rate, heart rate variability, and heart rate accelerations were significantly reduced at peak vs trough maternal buprenorphine levels. Effects were significant either by or after 28 weeks gestation and tended to intensify with advancing gestation. Fetal motor activity and fetal movement-fetal heart rate coupling were depressed from peak to trough at 36 weeks gestation. Polysubstance exposure did not significantly affect fetal neurobehavioral parameters, with the exception that fetuses of heavier smokers moved significantly less than those of lighter smokers at 36 weeks gestation. By the end of gestation, higher maternal buprenorphine dose was related to depression of baseline fetal cardiac measures at trough. Maternal buprenorphine administration has acute suppressive effects on fetal heart rate and movement, and the magnitude of these effects increases as gestation progresses. Higher dose (≥13 mg) appears to exert greater depressive effects on measures of fetal heart rate and variability. These findings should be balanced against comparisons to gestational methadone effects

  11. Fetal body weight and the development of the control of the cardiovascular system in fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasch, M G; Müller, T; Wicher, C; Weiss, C; Löhle, M; Schwab, K; Schubert, H; Nathanielsz, P W; Witte, O W; Schwab, M

    2007-03-15

    Reduced birth weight predisposes to cardiovascular diseases in later life. We examined in fetal sheep at 0.76 (n = 18) and 0.87 (n = 17) gestation whether spontaneously occurring variations in fetal weight affect maturation of autonomic control of cardiovascular function. Fetal weights at both gestational ages were grouped statistically in low (LW) and normal weights (NW) (P fetal sheep not constituting a major malnutritive condition. Mean fetal blood pressure (FBP) of all fetuses was negatively correlated to fetal weight at 0.76 but not 0.87 gestation (P fetal heart rate depended on fetal weight (P fetal weight within the normal weight span is accompanied by a different trajectory of development of sympathetic blood pressure and vagal heart rate control. This may contribute to the development of elevated blood pressure in later life. Examination of the underlying mechanisms and consequences may contribute to the understanding of programming of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Uterine Diverticulum With Fetal Leg Entrapment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Nirmala; Yudin, Mark H; Berger, Howard

    2017-10-01

    Uterine anomalies causing fetal complications are very rarely encountered in obstetric practice and thus pose a diagnostic dilemma. A multigravid patient attended the clinic for an ultrasound examination in the third trimester following a recent hospital admission for abdominal pain. Ultrasound imaging revealed a large uterine diverticulum in the right cornu of the uterus with evidence of fetal leg entrapment. Because of concerns of increased soft tissue edema in the entrapped leg, the patient was delivered at 35 weeks' gestation by elective CS. The CS was complicated by uterine rupture at the diverticular portion. The neonatal course was complicated by compartment syndrome of the leg, and the infant underwent surgery on post-delivery day one with good outcome. Uterine diverticula are rare anomalies, and once they are diagnosed, the possibility of entrapment of fetal parts or placenta in pregnancy should be considered. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging clues in the prenatal diagnosis of syndromes and aneuploidy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estroff, Judy A.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in fetal sonography and MRI have increased both the range and diagnostic accuracy of detectable fetal anomalies, with many anomalies detectable earlier in pregnancy. The presence of structural anomalies greatly raises the risk that the fetus has a syndrome or abnormal karyotype. In addition, new techniques in maternal serum screening have greatly increased the ability to identify pregnant patients at risk for anomalies and syndromes. This paper reviews maternal first- and second-trimester serum screening and imaging and covers many of the most common fetal karyotypic and structural anomalies. (orig.)

  14. Imaging clues in the prenatal diagnosis of syndromes and aneuploidy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estroff, Judy A. [Harvard Medical School, Fetal-Neonatal Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, Advanced Fetal Care Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Advances in fetal sonography and MRI have increased both the range and diagnostic accuracy of detectable fetal anomalies, with many anomalies detectable earlier in pregnancy. The presence of structural anomalies greatly raises the risk that the fetus has a syndrome or abnormal karyotype. In addition, new techniques in maternal serum screening have greatly increased the ability to identify pregnant patients at risk for anomalies and syndromes. This paper reviews maternal first- and second-trimester serum screening and imaging and covers many of the most common fetal karyotypic and structural anomalies. (orig.)

  15. Pulmonary Hypoplasia Caused by Fetal Ascites in Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection Despite Fetal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumichi Fujioka

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of pulmonary hypoplasia due to fetal ascites in symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV infections despite fetal therapy. The patients died soon after birth. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypoplasia in our cases might be thoracic compression due to massive fetal ascites as a result of liver insufficiency. Despite aggressive fetal treatment, including multiple immunoglobulin administration, which was supposed to diminish the pathogenic effects of CMV either by neutralization or immunomodulatory effects, the fetal ascites was uncontrollable. To prevent development of pulmonary hypoplasia in symptomatic congenital CMV infections, further fetal intervention to reduce ascites should be considered.

  16. Fetal evaluation of spine dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulas, Dorothy [George Washington University Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Spinal dysraphism or neural tube defects (NTD) encompass a heterogeneous group of congenital spinal anomalies that result from the defective closure of the neural tube early in gestation with anomalous development of the caudal cell mass. Advances in ultrasound and MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and therapy of spinal dysraphism and caudal spinal anomalies both prenatally and postnatally. Advances in prenatal US including high frequency linear transducers and three dimensional imaging can provide detailed information concerning spinal anomalies. MR imaging is a complementary tool that can further elucidate spine abnormalities as well as associated central nervous system and non-CNS anomalies. Recent studies have suggested that 3-D CT can help further assess fetal spine anomalies in the third trimester. With the advent of fetal therapy including surgery, accurate prenatal diagnosis of open and closed spinal dysraphism becomes critical in appropriate counselling and perinatal management. (orig.)

  17. Idiopathic polyhydramnios and fetal gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, A D; Banica, R; Olaru, G; Ghinda, E; Birdir, Cahit

    2015-05-01

    To determine the relationship between idiopathic polyhydramnios and fetal gender in the absence of fetal or maternal abnormalities. This was a retrospective population-based register study. 295 women with singleton pregnancies complicated by idiopathic polyhydramnios (amniotic fluid index (AFI) higher than 24 cm) who were delivered at our institution from January 2002 till December 2012 were included. Only pregnancies with an uncomplicated outcome were accepted in this study. The incidence of the male to female fetuses was compared with the one in the general population. Among pregnancies complicated by idiopathic polyhydramnios, the following gender distribution was found: 72.9% male and 37.1% female. The distribution in the general population was 51.5% female and 48.5% male. The mean AFI was significantly increased in male fetuses (p polyhydramnios is more frequent in male normal fetuses than in female ones.

  18. Clinical significance of perceptible fetal motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, W F

    1980-09-15

    The monitoring of fetal activity during the last trimester of pregnancy has been proposed to be useful in assessing fetal welfare. The maternal perception of fetal activity was tested among 82 patients using real-time ultrasonography. All perceived fetal movements were visualized on the scanner and involved motion of the lower limbs. Conversely, 82% of all visualized motions of fetal limbs were perceived by the patients. All combined motions of fetal trunk with limbs were preceived by the patients and described as strong movements, whereas clusters of isolated, weak motions of the fetal limbs were less accurately perceived (56% accuracy). The number of fetal movements perceived during the 15-minute test period was significantly (p fetal motion was present (44 of 45 cases) than when it was absent (five of 10 cases). These findings reveal that perceived fetal motion is: (1) reliable; (2) related to the strength of lower limb motion; (3) increased with ruptured amniotic membranes; and (4) reassuring if considered to be active.

  19. Zika Virus Infection in Pregnancy, Microcephaly, and Maternal and Fetal Health: What We Think, What We Know, and What We Think We Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Maria Gabriela; Schwartz, David A

    2017-01-01

    -The global epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has emerged as an important public health problem affecting pregnant women and their infants. -To review the causal association between ZIKV infection during pregnancy and intrauterine fetal infection, microcephaly, brain damage, congenital malformation syndrome, and experimental laboratory models of fetal infection. Many questions remain regarding the risk factors, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and timing of maternal-fetal transmission and disease. These include mechanisms of fetal brain damage and microcephaly; the role of covariables, such as viral burden, duration of viremia, and host genetics, on vertical transmission; and the clinical and pathologic spectrum of congenital Zika syndrome. Additional questions include defining the potential long-term physical and neurobehavioral outcomes for infected infants, whether maternal or fetal host genetics influence the clinical outcome, and whether ZIKV infection can cause maternal morbidity. Finally, are experimental laboratory and animal models of ZIKV infection helpful in addressing maternal-fetal viral transmission and the development of congenital microcephaly? This communication provides current information and attempts to address some of these important questions. -Comprehensive review of published scientific literature. -Recent advances in epidemiology, clinical medicine, pathology, and experimental studies have provided a great amount of new information regarding vertical ZIKV transmission and the mechanisms of congenital microcephaly, brain damage, and congenital Zika syndrome in a relatively short time. However, much work still needs to be performed to more completely understand the maternal and fetal aspects of this new and emerging viral disease.

  20. Fetal programming in meat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min; Wang, Bo; Fu, Xing; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Nutrient fluctuations during the fetal stage affects fetal development, which has long-term impacts on the production efficiency and quality of meat. During the early development, a pool of mesenchymal progenitor cells proliferate and then diverge into either myogenic or adipogenic/fibrogenic lineages. Myogenic progenitor cells further develop into muscle fibers and satellite cells, while adipogenic/fibrogenic lineage cells develop into adipocytes, fibroblasts and resident fibro-adipogenic progenitor cells. Enhancing the proliferation and myogenic commitment of progenitor cells during fetal development enhances muscle growth and lean production in offspring. On the other hand, promoting the adipogenic differentiation of adipogenic/fibrogenic progenitor cells inside the muscle increases intramuscular adipocytes and reduces connective tissue, which improves meat marbling and tenderness. Available studies in mammalian livestock, including cattle, sheep and pigs, clearly show the link between maternal nutrition and the quantity and quality of meat production. Similarly, chicken muscle fibers develop before hatching and, thus, egg and yolk sizes and hatching temperature affect long-term growth performance and meat production of chicken. On the contrary, because fishes are able to generate new muscle fibers lifelong, the impact of early nutrition on fish growth performance is expected to be minor, which requires further studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fetal growth and developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galjaard, Sander; Devlieger, Roland; Van Assche, Frans A

    2013-01-01

    The environment in utero and in early neonatal life may induce a permanent response in the fetus and the newborn, leading to enhanced susceptibility to later diseases. This review concentrates on the role and mechanisms of events during the antenatal and immediate postnatal period resulting in later life diseases, concentrating on abnormal growth patterns of the fetus. Fetal overgrowth is related to exposure to a diabetic intra uterine environment, increasing the vulnerability to transgenerational obesity and hence an increased sensitivity to more diabetic mothers. This effect has been supported by animal data. Fetal growth restriction is complex due to malnutrition in utero, catch up growth due to a high caloric intake and low physical activity in later life. Metabolic changes and a transgenerational effect of intra uterine malnutrition has been supported by animal data. In recent years the discovery of alterations of the genome due to different influences during embryonic life, called epigenetics, has led to the phenomenon of fetal programming resulting in changing transgenerational metabolic effects.

  2. The usage and current approaches of cell free fetal DNA (cffDNA as a prenatal diagnostic method in fetal aneuploidy screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Erbaba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal diagnosis of invasive and noninvasive tests can be done in a way (NIPT, but because of the invasive methods have risks of infection and abortion, diagnosing non-invasive procedure increasing day by day. One of the widespread cell free fetal DNA in maternal blood test (cffDNA that is increasing in clinical use has been drawing attention. The incidence of aneuploidy chromosomal anomaly of the kind in which all live births; Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome 1/800, trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome 1 /10,000, trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome is a form of 1/6000. Because of the high mortality and morbidity, it is vital that congenital anomalies should be diagnosed in prenatal period. Aneuploidy testing for high-risk pregnant women after the 10th week of pregnancy in terms of the blood sample is taken and free fetal DNA in maternal plasma is based on the measurement of the relative amount. Knowledge of the current criteria for use by healthcare professionals in the field test will allow the exclusion of maternal and fetal risks. In this study, it is aimed to demonstrate current international approaches related to the positive and negative sides of non-invasive that is one of the prenatal diagnostic methods of cffDNA test. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (4: 414-417

  3. Fetal biometry: Relevance in obstetrical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronius Žaliūnas

    Full Text Available Ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology dates back to 1958 when The Lancet published the first article about the use of ultrasonography for fetal and gynecological assessments. It is now almost inconceivable, 60 years later, to think of effective performance in obstetrics and gynecology without the variety of ultrasound, for example, real time imaging, power and color Doppler, 3D/4D ultrasonography, etc. Such examinations facilitate the assessment of intrauterine fetal growth and development during pregnancy, provide alerts about the risk of pre-eclampsia and preterm birth, help identify anatomic reasons for infertility, diagnose ectopic pregnancies, uterine, ovary and tubal pathology. Ultrasonography is also used for diagnostic and treatment procedures during pregnancy or for the treatment of infertility. This article is an overview of the development of fetal ultrasound, the methodology and interpretation of ultrasound in the assessment of intrauterine fetal growth and fetal biometry standards both worldwide and in Lithuania. Keywords: Fetal biometry, Ultrasound, Intrauterine growth restriction

  4. The World Health Organization Fetal Growth Charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiserud, Torvid; Piaggio, Gilda; Carroli, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal mortality and morbidity continue to be major global health challenges strongly associated with prematurity and reduced fetal growth, an issue of further interest given the mounting evidence that fetal growth in general is linked to degrees of risk of common noncommunicable...... nature of the study, sample size is a limiting factor for generalization of the charts. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides WHO fetal growth charts for EFW and common ultrasound biometric measurements, and shows variation between different parts of the world....

  5. Noninvasive Fetal Electrocardiography Part I: Pan-Tompkins' Algorithm Adaptation to Fetal R-peak Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinelli, Angela; Marcantoni, Ilaria; Moretti, Elisa; Sbrollini, Agnese; Fioretti, Sandro; Di Nardo, Francesco; Burattini, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Indirect fetal electrocardiography is preferable to direct fetal electrocardiography because of being noninvasive and is applicable also during the end of pregnancy, besides labor. Still, the former is strongly affected by noise so that even R-peak detection (which is essential for fetal heart-rate evaluations and subsequent processing procedures) is challenging. Some fetal studies have applied the Pan-Tompkins' algorithm that, however, was originally designed for adult applications. Thus, this work evaluated the Pan-Tompkins' algorithm suitability for fetal applications, and proposed fetal adjustments and optimizations to improve it. Both Pan-Tompkins' algorithm and its improved version were applied to the "Abdominal and Direct Fetal Electrocardiogram Database" and to the "Noninvasive Fetal Electrocardiography Database" of Physionet. R-peak detection accuracy was quantified by computation of positive-predictive value, sensitivity and F1 score. When applied to "Abdominal and Direct Fetal Electrocardiogram Database", the accuracy of the improved fetal Pan-Tompkins' algorithm was significantly higher than the standard (positive-predictive value: 0.94 vs. 0.79; sensitivity: 0.95 vs. 0.80; F1 score: 0.94 vs. 0.79; P<0.05 in all cases) on indirect fetal electrocardiograms, whereas both methods performed similarly on direct fetal electrocardiograms (positive-predictive value, sensitivity and F1 score all close to 1). Improved fetal Pan-Tompkins' algorithm was found to be superior to the standard also when applied to "Noninvasive Fetal Electrocardiography Database" (positive-predictive value: 0.68 vs. 0.55, P<0.05; sensitivity: 0.56 vs. 0.46, P=0.23; F1 score: 0.60 vs. 0.47, P=0.11). In indirect fetal electrocardiographic applications, improved fetal Pan-Tompkins' algorithm is to be preferred over the standard, since it provides higher R-peak detection accuracy for heart-rate evaluations and subsequent processing.

  6. Increasing fetal ovine number per gestation alters fetal plasma clinical chemistry values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywicki, Micaela; Blohowiak, Sharon E; Magness, Ronald R; Segar, Jeffrey L; Kling, Pamela J

    2016-08-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is interconnected with developmental programming of lifelong pathophysiology. IUGR is seen in human multifetal pregnancies, with stepwise rises in fetal numbers interfering with placental nutrient delivery. It remains unknown whether fetal blood analyses would reflect fetal nutrition, liver, and excretory function in the last trimester of human or ovine IUGR In an ovine model, we hypothesized that fetal plasma biochemical values would reflect progressive placental, fetal liver, and fetal kidney dysfunction as the number of fetuses per gestation rose. To determine fetal plasma biochemical values in singleton, twin, triplet, and quadruplet/quintuplet ovine gestation, we investigated morphometric measures and comprehensive metabolic panels with nutritional measures, liver enzymes, and placental and fetal kidney excretory measures at gestational day (GD) 130 (90% gestation). As anticipated, placental dysfunction was supported by a stepwise fall in fetal weight, fetal plasma glucose, and triglyceride levels as fetal number per ewe rose. Fetal glucose and triglycerides were directly related to fetal weight. Plasma creatinine, reflecting fetal renal excretory function, and plasma cholesterol, reflecting placental excretory function, were inversely correlated with fetal weight. Progressive biochemical disturbances and growth restriction accompanied the rise in fetal number. Understanding the compensatory and adaptive responses of growth-restricted fetuses at the biochemical level may help explain how metabolic pathways in growth restriction can be predetermined at birth. This physiological understanding is important for clinical care and generating interventional strategies to prevent altered developmental programming in multifetal gestation. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  7. Contribution of fetal MRI to the diagnosis of inner ear abnormalities: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilea, Bogdana; Garel, Catherine; Elmaleh-Berges, Monique; Sebag, Guy; Menez, Francoise; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Vuillard, Edith

    2006-01-01

    We report two cases of fetal inner ear abnormalities diagnosed by MRI. Cerebral MRI was performed on two fetuses, at 32 and 30 weeks gestation, following US that demonstrated multiple malformations suggestive of CHARGE syndrome in one fetus and ventriculomegaly and poor visibility of the posterior fossa in the other. MRI revealed vestibular hypoplasia and agenesis of the semicircular canals in one fetus and cystic cochleas, partial vermian agenesis and an occipital meningocele in the second fetus. Both pregnancies were terminated and there was good correlation between fetal MRI, ex utero CT and fetopathological findings. The inner ears should be carefully examined when performing fetal cerebral MRI because abnormalities of the inner ear may be associated with cerebral anomalies. (orig.)

  8. Contribution of fetal MRI to the diagnosis of inner ear abnormalities: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilea, Bogdana; Garel, Catherine; Elmaleh-Berges, Monique; Sebag, Guy [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Paris (France); Menez, Francoise; Delezoide, Anne-Lise [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Developmental Biology, Paris (France); Vuillard, Edith [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Paris (France)

    2006-02-01

    We report two cases of fetal inner ear abnormalities diagnosed by MRI. Cerebral MRI was performed on two fetuses, at 32 and 30 weeks gestation, following US that demonstrated multiple malformations suggestive of CHARGE syndrome in one fetus and ventriculomegaly and poor visibility of the posterior fossa in the other. MRI revealed vestibular hypoplasia and agenesis of the semicircular canals in one fetus and cystic cochleas, partial vermian agenesis and an occipital meningocele in the second fetus. Both pregnancies were terminated and there was good correlation between fetal MRI, ex utero CT and fetopathological findings. The inner ears should be carefully examined when performing fetal cerebral MRI because abnormalities of the inner ear may be associated with cerebral anomalies. (orig.)

  9. Prenatal ultrasound and fetal MRI: the comparative value of each modality in prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugash, Denise; Brugger, Peter C; Bettelheim, Dieter; Prayer, Daniela

    2008-11-01

    Fetal MRI is used with increasing frequency as an adjunct to ultrasound (US) in prenatal diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the relative value of both prenatal US and MRI in evaluating fetal and extra-fetal structures for a variety of clinical indications. Advantages and disadvantages of each imaging modality are addressed. In summary, MRI has advantages in demonstrating pathology of the brain, lungs, complex syndromes, and conditions associated with reduction of amniotic fluid. At present, US is the imaging method of choice during the first trimester, and in the diagnosis of cardiovascular abnormalities, as well as for screening. In some conditions, such as late gestational age, increased maternal body mass index, skeletal dysplasia, and metabolic disease, neither imaging method may provide sufficient diagnostic information.

  10. Interstitial pregnancy undetected during earlier first-trimester screening for fetal aneuploidy at 13 weeks' gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, David M; Dalloul, Mudar; Sokolovski, Margarita; Borawski, Dorota; Granderson, Freda; Abulafia, Ovadia

    2009-01-01

    First-trimester screening for fetal aneuploidy using nuchal translucency (NT), pregnancy-associated plasma protein A, free or total beta-hCG, and maternal age constitutes a very effective screening test for fetal Down syndrome. We describe a case in which a patient presented at 14 weeks' gestation with an acute abdomen 1 week after first-trimester screening (including NT measurement) performed elsewhere, which was negative for trisomies 21 and 18. Sonographic examination revealed an interstitial pregnancy with a singleton fetus with present cardiac activity, which had not been noted 1 week earlier at the time of earlier transabdominal NT measurement. This case indicates that successful acquisition of a NT measurement during first-trimester screening for fetal aneuploidy does not negate the rare possibility of an unusual ectopic pregnancy. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Hemorrhage Near Fetal Rat Bone: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Timothy A.; Miller, Rita J.; Blue, James P.; O'Brien, William D.

    2006-05-01

    High-intensity ultrasound has shown potential in treating many ailments requiring noninvasive tissue necrosis. However, little work has been done on using ultrasound to ablate pathologies on or near the developing fetus. For example, Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation (cyst on lungs), Sacrococcygeal Teratoma (benign tumor on tail bone), and Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome (one twin pumps blood to other twin) are selected problems that will potentially benefit from noninvasive ultrasound treatments. Before these applications can be explored, potential ultrasound-induced bioeffects should be understood. Specifically, ultrasound-induced hemorrhage near the fetal rat skull was investigated. An f/1 spherically focused transducer (5.1-cm focal length) was used to expose the skull of 18- to 19-day-gestation exteriorized rat fetuses. The ultrasound pulse had a center frequency of 0.92 MHz and pulse duration of 9.6 μs. The fetuses were exposed to 1 of 4 exposure conditions (denoted A, B, C, and D) in addition to a sham exposure. Three of the exposures consisted of a peak compressional pressure of 10 MPa, a peak rarefactional pressure of 6.7 MPa, and pulse repetition frequencies of 100 Hz (A), 250 Hz (B), and 500 Hz (C), corresponding to time-average intensities of 1.9 W/cm2, 4.7 W/cm2, and 9.4 W/cm2, respectively. Exposure D consisted of a peak compressional pressure of 6.7 MPa, a peak rarefactional pressure of 5.0 MPa, and a PRF of 500 Hz corresponding to a time-average intensity of 4.6 W/cm2. Hemorrhage occurrence increased slightly with increasing time-average intensity (i.e., 11% for A, 28% for B, 31% for C, and 19% for D with a 9% occurrence when the fetuses were not exposed). The low overall occurrence of hemorrhaging may be attributed to fetal motion (observed in over half of the fetuses from the backscattered echo during the exposure). The mean hemorrhage sizes were 3.1 mm2 for A, 2.5 mm2 for B, 2.7 mm2 for C, and 5.1 mm2 for D. The larger lesions at D may

  12. Intrapulmonary perfluorooctyl bromide instillation in fetal rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muensterer, Oliver J; Klis, Verena J; Till, Holger; Bergmann, Florian; Metzger, Roman; Simbruner, Georg

    2005-07-01

    Instilling perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) into the fetal lung may lead to alveolar distension. The aim of the study was to evaluate the safety of PFOB instillation into fetal lungs and to determine the radiographic distribution and tissue concentration of PFOB in New Zealand white rabbits. Sibling fetuses of pregnant (day 27) New Zealand white rabbits were randomized to intratracheal instillation of 1 mL PFOB with tracheal ligation, instillation without ligation, and unmanipulated controls. The maternal animals were killed directly after instillation, at 3 or 6 hours (n = 10 each). For each study cohort, we determined fetal lung/body weight (FLBW) ratios, the radiographic distribution of PFOB, as well as pulmonary PFOB and water content by tissue distillation. PFOB concentrations in maternal and fetal tissues were assessed by gas chromatography. The relative amount of fetal lung PFOB recovered by fractional distillation was highest in ligated (25%) and lower in unligated lungs (9%). Extrapulmonary PFOB was found in the fetal brain (2.0 +/- 0.7 ppm), but not in any other fetal or maternal tissues. Mean FLBW ratios were highest in ligated fetuses, followed by unligated fetuses and controls. PFOB partially displaced fetal lung water. PFOB was visible in the lungs of all treated fetuses. Fetal survival between manipulated and unmanipulated fetuses did not differ. After prenatal intrapulmonary instillation, some PFOB remains in the lung, even if the trachea is not ligated, and may exert distending pressure on the alveoli.

  13. Normal MR imaging of fetal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, Ichiro; Tamaya, Teruhiko (Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-12-01

    MR imaging has recently been used in medical scene, especially in obstetrics. The definite prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomaly using MR imaging has proved to be useful. But MR imaging of normal fetal organs remains to be understood. There have been not complete systemical research works about normal fetus by MR imaging, up to date. MR imaging on 25 pregnant cases were carried out to get the definite diagnosis of the possible fetal anomalies. MR imaging in fetus is usually disturbed by fetal movement. Generally, diazepam to mother or muscle relaxants to fetus have been used in given cases in order to obtain good quality of imaging. Mothers were requested to walk around the lobby in hospital before examination and fetal movement was decreased, resulting in 85% good imaging. The understanding of normal findings of fetal organs by MR imagings is important for diagnosis of the fetal anomalies. For example, brain and bowel showed high signals in T{sub 1} weighted images. Lung showed high signal in T{sub 2} weighted images. Liver was demonstrated clearly in T{sub 1} weighted images and proton density images. Heart and vessels showed low signals because of flow void phenomenon. Thus, it is necessary to detect and diagnose fetal anomalies after understanding the normal findings of fetal organs in MR imaging. (author).

  14. MR imaging of the fetal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, Orit A. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Fetal MRI is clinically performed to evaluate the brain in cases where an abnormality is detected by prenatal sonography. These most commonly include ventriculomegaly, abnormalities of the corpus callosum, and abnormalities of the posterior fossa. Fetal MRI is also increasingly performed to evaluate fetuses who have normal brain findings on prenatal sonogram but who are at increased risk for neurodevelopmental abnormalities, such as complicated monochorionic twin pregnancies. This paper will briefly discuss the common clinical conditions imaged by fetal MRI as well as recent advances in fetal MRI research. (orig.)

  15. Fetal Endoscopic Surgery for Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Neural Tube Defects; Spina Bifida, Open; Myelomeningocele; Fetal Disease; Hydrocephalus; Chiari Malformation Type 2; Congenital Abnormality; Surgery; Maternal, Uterus or Pelvic Organs, Affecting Fetus

  16. Syndromes and Disorders Associated with Omphalocele (III: Single Gene Disorders, Neural Tube Defects, Diaphragmatic Defects and Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Omphalocele can be associated with single gene disorders, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic defects, fetal valproate syndrome, and syndromes of unknown etiology. This article provides a comprehensive review of omphalocele-related disorders: otopalatodigital syndrome type II; Melnick–Needles syndrome; Rieger syndrome; neural tube defects; Meckel syndrome; Shprintzen–Goldberg omphalocele syndrome; lethal omphalocele-cleft palate syndrome; cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome; fetal valproate syndrome; Marshall–Smith syndrome; fibrochondrogenesis; hydrolethalus syndrome; Fryns syndrome; omphalocele, diaphragmatic defects, radial anomalies and various internal malformations; diaphragmatic defects, limb deficiencies and ossification defects of skull; Donnai–Barrow syndrome; CHARGE syndrome; Goltz syndrome; Carpenter syndrome; Toriello–Carey syndrome; familial omphalocele; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; C syndrome; Elejalde syndrome; Malpuech syndrome; cervical ribs, Sprengel anomaly, anal atresia and urethral obstruction; hydrocephalus with associated malformations; Kennerknecht syndrome; lymphedema, atrial septal defect and facial changes; and craniosynostosis- mental retardation syndrome of Lin and Gettig. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert one to the possibility of omphalocele-related disorders and familial inheritance and prompt a thorough genetic counseling for these disorders.

  17. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  18. Prenatal smoking exposure and asymmetric fetal growth restriction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delpisheh, Ali; Brabin, Loretta; Drummond, Sandra; Brabin, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Prenatal smoking exposure causes intrauterine fetal growth restriction ( IUGR), although its effects on fetal proportionality are less clearly defined. Aim: The present study assessed fetal proportionality in babies with IUGR using maternal salivary cotinine to indicate maternal smoking

  19. Placental fetal vascular thrombosis lesions and maternal thrombophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeksma, F. A.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; Khong, T. Y.

    Aims: Following intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), the placental fetal vessels undergo regressive changes. These changes are virtually indistinguishable from lesions that are the result of fetal vascular thrombosis (FVT). This study investigated the relation between these lesions and maternal

  20. Fetal cardiac rhabdomyoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Ghavami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary manifestation of cardiac tumors in embryonic period is a very rare condition. Cardiac rhabdomyomas most frequently arise in the ventricular myocardium, they may also occur in the atria and the epicardial surface. In spite of its benign nature, the critical location of the tumor inside the heart can lead to lethal arrhythmias and chamber obstruction. Multiple rhabdomyomas are strongly associated with tuberous sclerosis which is associated with mental retardation and epilepsy of variable severity. Ultrasonography as a part of routine prenatal screening, is the best method for the diagnosis of cardiac rhabdomyomas. In the review of articles published in Iran, fetal cardiac rhabdomyoma was not reported. Case presentation: We report a case of cardiac rhabdomyoma on a 24-year-old gravid 1, referred to Day Medical Imaging Center for routine evaluation of fetal abnormalities at 31 weeks of her gestational age. Ultrasonographic examination displayed a homogenous echogenic mass (13×9mm, originating from the left ventricle of the fetal heart. It was a normal pregnancy without any specific complications. Other organs of the fetus were found normal and no cardiac abnormalities were appeared. No Pericardial fluid effusion was found. The parents did not have consanguineous marriage. They did not also have any specific disease such as tuberous sclerosis. Conclusion: The clinical features of cardiac rhabdomyomas vary widely, depending on the location, size, and number of tumors in the heart. Although cardiac rhabdomyoma is a benign tumor in many affected fetuses, an early prenatal diagnosis of the tumor is of great significance in making efficient planning and providing adequate follow up visits of the patients and the complications such as, heart failure and outlet obstruction of cardiac chambers.

  1. Imaging of fetal chest masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Richard A. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Prenatal imaging with high-resolution US and rapid acquisition MRI plays a key role in the accurate diagnosis of congenital chest masses. Imaging has enhanced our understanding of the natural history of fetal lung masses, allowing for accurate prediction of outcome, parental counseling, and planning of pregnancy and newborn management. This paper will focus on congenital bronchopulmonary malformations, which account for the vast majority of primary lung masses in the fetus. In addition, anomalies that mimic masses and less common causes of lung masses will be discussed. (orig.)

  2. Screening for fetal chromosome abnormalities during the second trimester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Hui; Li Ming; Li Ping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a pre -natal screening program for fetal chromosome abnormalities based on risk values calculated from maternal serum markers levels during the second trimester. Methods: Serum levels of AFP, β-HCG, uE 3 were determined with CLIA in 1048 pregnant women during 14-21w gestation period and the results were analyzed with a specific software (screening program for Down' s syndrome developed by Beckman) for the risk rate. In those women defined as being of high risk rate, cells from amniotic fluid or umbilical cord blood were studied for karyotype analysis. Results: Of these 1048 women, 77 were designated as being of high risk rate for several chromosome abnormalities i.e. Down's syndrome, open spina bifida and trisomy -18 syndrome (overall positive rate 7.3%). Further fetal chromosome study in 31 of them revealed three proven cases of abnormality. Another cord blood study was performed in a calculated low risk rate case but with abnormal sonographic finding at 31 w gestation and proved to be abnormal (software study false negative). The remaining 46 high risk rate cases either refused future study (n=35) or were lost for follow-up (n=11). Fortunately, all the 35 women refused further study gave birth to normal babies without any chromosome abnormalities discovered on peripheral blood study. Besides, in a trial study, five high risk rate women were again evaluated a few weeks later but with tremendous difference between the results. Conclusion: The present program proves to be clinically useful but needs further study and revision. Many factors may influence the result of the analysis and the duration of gestation period in weeks should be as accurate as possible. At present, in order to avoid getting false negatives, we don't advise a second check in 'high risk' cases. (authors)

  3. [Coffin-Siris syndrome. Critical study of the literature apropos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foasso, M F; Hermier, M; Descos, B; Collet, J P; Perron, F

    1983-03-01

    The authors report a case of the Coffin Siris syndrome which associates a ungueo-digital syndrome (special by the bilateral aplasia or severe hypoplasia of nails and third phalanx of fifth toes and fingers) to other anomalies: facies with thinly fine hairs contrasting with bushy and dense eyebrows and body hypertrichosis, hypotonia and mental retardation. The connections of the Coffin Siris syndrome with the trisomy 9 p+ syndrome and the fetal hydantoïn syndrome are discussed.

  4. Altered Decorin and Smad Expression in Human Fetal Membranes in PPROM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Casie E.; Roumimper, Hailey; Tucker, Richard; Lechner, Beatrice E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Humans with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a subtype of which is caused by abnormal decorin expression, are at increased risk of preterm birth due to preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes (PPROM). In the mouse model, the absence of decorin leads to fetal membrane abnormalities, preterm birth, and dysregulation of decorin's downstream pathway components, including the transcription factor p-Smad-2. However, the role of decorin and p-Smad-2 in idiopathic human PPROM is unknown. Fetal membranes from 20–25 pregnancies per group were obtained as a cross-sectional sample of births at one institution between January 2010 and December 2012. The groups were term, preterm without PPROM, and preterm with PPROM. Immunohistochemical analysis of fetal membranes was performed for decorin and p-Smad-2 using localization and quantification assessment. Decorin expression is developmentally regulated in fetal membranes and is decreased in preterm birth with PPROM compared to preterm birth without PPROM. In preterm with PPROM samples, the presence of infection is associated with significant decorin downregulation compared to preterm with PPROM samples without infection. The preterm with PPROM group exhibited decreased p-Smad-2 staining compared to both the term controls and the preterm-without-PPROM group. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of decorin and its downstream pathway component p-Smad-2 occurs in fetal membranes during the second trimester in pathological pregnancies, thus supporting a role for decorin and p-Smad-2 in the pathophysiology of fetal membranes and adverse pregnancy outcomes. These findings may lead to the discovery of new targets for the diagnosis and treatment of PPROM. PMID:25232019

  5. Quantitative ultrasound texture analysis of fetal lungs to predict neonatal respiratory morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet-Carne, E; Palacio, M; Cobo, T; Perez-Moreno, A; Lopez, M; Piraquive, J P; Ramirez, J C; Botet, F; Marques, F; Gratacos, E

    2015-04-01

    To develop and evaluate the performance of a novel method for predicting neonatal respiratory morbidity based on quantitative analysis of the fetal lung by ultrasound. More than 13,000 non-clinical images and 900 fetal lung images were used to develop a computerized method based on texture analysis and machine learning algorithms, trained to predict neonatal respiratory morbidity risk on fetal lung ultrasound images. The method, termed 'quantitative ultrasound fetal lung maturity analysis' (quantusFLM™), was then validated blindly in 144 neonates, delivered at 28 + 0 to 39 + 0 weeks' gestation. Lung ultrasound images in DICOM format were obtained within 48 h of delivery and the ability of the software to predict neonatal respiratory morbidity, defined as either respiratory distress syndrome or transient tachypnea of the newborn, was determined. Mean (SD) gestational age at delivery was 36 + 1 (3 + 3) weeks. Among the 144 neonates, there were 29 (20.1%) cases of neonatal respiratory morbidity. Quantitative texture analysis predicted neonatal respiratory morbidity with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 86.2%, 87.0%, 62.5% and 96.2%, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound fetal lung maturity analysis predicted neonatal respiratory morbidity with an accuracy comparable to that of current tests using amniotic fluid. Copyright © 2014 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Exome sequencing for gene discovery in lethal fetal disorders--harnessing the value of extreme phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Isabel; Friedman, Jan M

    2015-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of Mendelian disorders, and many novel genes have been discovered to cause disease phenotypes when mutant. At the same time, next-generation sequencing approaches have enabled non-invasive prenatal testing of free fetal DNA in maternal blood. However, little attention has been paid to using whole exome and genome sequencing strategies for gene identification in fetal disorders that are lethal in utero, because they can appear to be sporadic and Mendelian inheritance may be missed. We present challenges and advantages of applying next-generation sequencing approaches to gene discovery in fetal malformation phenotypes and review recent successful discovery approaches. We discuss the implication and significance of recessive inheritance and cross-species phenotyping in fetal lethal conditions. Whole exome sequencing can be used in individual families with undiagnosed lethal congenital anomaly syndromes to discover causal mutations, provided that prior to data analysis, the fetal phenotype can be correlated to a particular developmental pathway in embryogenesis. Cross-species phenotyping allows providing further evidence for causality of discovered variants in genes involved in those extremely rare phenotypes and will increase our knowledge about normal and abnormal human developmental processes. Ultimately, families will benefit from the option of early prenatal diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Early detection of fetal structural abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisz, Boaz; Pajkrt, Eva; Jauniaux, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Most published data on the detection of fetal anomalies at 11-14 weeks are from specialized centres with considerable experience in fetal anomaly scanning. However, there is still limited information on the feasibility and limitations of the screening of these anomalies compared with the now

  8. Digital atlas of fetal brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Teresa; Weinberger, E. [Department of Radiology, Seattle Children' s Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States); Matesan, Manuela [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Bulas, Dorothy I. [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Fetal MRI can be performed in the second and third trimesters. During this time, the fetal brain undergoes profound structural changes. Interpretation of appropriate development might require comparison with normal age-based models. Consultation of a hard-copy atlas is limited by the inability to compare multiple ages simultaneously. To provide images of normal fetal brains from weeks 18 through 37 in a digital format that can be reviewed interactively. This will facilitate recognition of abnormal brain development. T2-W images for the atlas were obtained from fetal MR studies of normal brains scanned for other indications from 2005 to 2007. Images were oriented in standard axial, coronal and sagittal projections, with laterality established by situs. Gestational age was determined by last menstrual period, earliest US measurements and sonogram performed on the same day as the MR. The software program used for viewing the atlas, written in C, permits linked scrolling and resizing the images. Simultaneous comparison of varying gestational ages is permissible. Fetal brain images across gestational ages 18 to 37 weeks are provided as an interactive digital atlas and are available for free download. Improved interpretation of fetal brain abnormalities can be facilitated by the use of digital atlas cataloging of the normal changes throughout fetal development. Here we provide a description of the atlas and a discussion of normal fetal brain development. (orig.)

  9. Fetal extraperitoneal rectal perforation: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fetal extraperitoneal rectal perforation is a very rare condition, but prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment produce overall good outcome. Its etiology and pathophysiology are poorly understood. Only 16 cases have been reported worldwide. We report another case of fetal extraperitoneal rectal perforation managed by ...

  10. Digital atlas of fetal brain MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Teresa; Weinberger, E.; Matesan, Manuela; Bulas, Dorothy I.

    2010-01-01

    Fetal MRI can be performed in the second and third trimesters. During this time, the fetal brain undergoes profound structural changes. Interpretation of appropriate development might require comparison with normal age-based models. Consultation of a hard-copy atlas is limited by the inability to compare multiple ages simultaneously. To provide images of normal fetal brains from weeks 18 through 37 in a digital format that can be reviewed interactively. This will facilitate recognition of abnormal brain development. T2-W images for the atlas were obtained from fetal MR studies of normal brains scanned for other indications from 2005 to 2007. Images were oriented in standard axial, coronal and sagittal projections, with laterality established by situs. Gestational age was determined by last menstrual period, earliest US measurements and sonogram performed on the same day as the MR. The software program used for viewing the atlas, written in C, permits linked scrolling and resizing the images. Simultaneous comparison of varying gestational ages is permissible. Fetal brain images across gestational ages 18 to 37 weeks are provided as an interactive digital atlas and are available for free download. Improved interpretation of fetal brain abnormalities can be facilitated by the use of digital atlas cataloging of the normal changes throughout fetal development. Here we provide a description of the atlas and a discussion of normal fetal brain development. (orig.)

  11. Ultrasonic Diagnosis of Fetal Ascites and Toxoplasmosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaakær, Jan

    1986-01-01

    The ultrasonic diagnosis of fetal ascites caused by Toxoplasma Gondii is presented. When a diagnosis of fetal ascites without obvious etiological malformation is established, toxoplasmosis should be suspected. A serological test should be performed, in view of the possibility of antenatal treatment...

  12. New treatment of early fetal chylothorax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ulrikka; Sundberg, Karin; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate OK-432, a preparation of Streptococcus pyogenes, in the treatment of early fetal chylothorax. METHODS: A prospective study of all fetuses (n=7) with persistent early chylothorax (gestational ages 16-21 weeks) referred to the tertiary center of fetal medicine in Denmark...

  13. Fetal behavior in normal dichorionic twin pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, E. J. H.; Derks, J. B.; de Laat, M. W. M.; Visser, G. H. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A prospective study was performed to compare fetal behavioral development in healthy dichorionic twins and singletons, and identify twin intra-pair associations (synchrony) of fetal movements and rest-activity cycles using different criteria to define synchrony. Subjects and methods:

  14. The World Health Organization Fetal Growth Charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiserud, Torvid; Piaggio, Gilda; Carroli, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal mortality and morbidity continue to be major global health challenges strongly associated with prematurity and reduced fetal growth, an issue of further interest given the mounting evidence that fetal growth in general is linked to degrees of risk of common noncommunicable d...

  15. Maternal attitudes to fetal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, P K; Smith, S F; Nim, J; Neldam, S; Osler, M

    1985-07-01

    During a randomized clinical trial concerning alternative methods of intrapartum fetal surveillance (electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) and auscultation (AUS)) an investigatory interview was carried out. Out of 655 expecting mothers the antepartum preference of EFM was 39.5%, of AUS 32.3% and 28.1% were undecided (UD). EFM was especially preferred by obstetrical high-risk patients. Reasons for preference of AUS were a natural childbirth, a non-technological milieu, and the lack of supposed discomfort from sensors and belts. The pregnant women found as major advantages of EFM continuous observation and the possibility of quick intervention. Postpartum 385 patients were again interviewed. The majority upheld the original preference if that method was used. If the non-preferred method had been applied many would stick to the primary preference although a tendency to prefer the experienced method was seen. The patients who antepartum preferred AUS, but had EFM, became more positive toward the method, and a significantly increased number were positively influenced by the EFM signal/trace and found the method promoting their partner's involvement in labor. Enforced immobility, however, was a major disadvantage as well as the technical milieu. If EFM is to be accepted by a majority of women giving birth it is necessary to increase the pregnant women's knowledge of the method and to take milieu factors into consideration in order to reduce the intrinsic depersonalization of EFM.

  16. Inequality in Fetal Autopsy in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Nathalie; Tiandrazana, Rémi-Claude; Healy-Profitós, Jessica; Costopoulos, André

    2016-01-01

    Inequality in use of fetal autopsy is poorly understood, despite the importance of autopsy in establishing the cause of stillbirth for future prevention. We examined fetal autopsy rates between linguistic minorities in Quebec, Canada, and assessed trends over three decades. Using registry data on 11,992 stillbirths from 1981-2011, we calculated fetal autopsy rates for Francophones, Anglophones, and Allophones by decade. We found lower fetal autopsy rates for Allophones (54.4%) than Francophones (68.5%) and Anglophones (63.4%), but rates decreased over time for all language groups. After 2000, Allophones had 25% higher risk of non-autopsy relative to Francophones, with 8.8 fewer autopsies for every 100 stillbirths. Allophones who were not autopsied had 32% higher risk of having an undetermined cause of death. Inequality in use of fetal autopsy may be widespread for minorities in Canada. Efforts to decrease stillbirth in minorities may require policies to increase autopsy rates.

  17. Fetal activity patterns in hypertensive pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, W F

    1982-01-01

    This prospective investigation attempts to determine whether the maternal recording of perceived fetal motion is useful for fetal assessment in pregnancies complicated by hypertension. During a 21 month period, 124 patients whose pregnancies were complicated by either chronic or pregnancy-induced hypertension participated. The number of perceived movements per hour (24 +/- 11, mean +/- S.D.) and evidence for fetal inactivity (7 cases, 6%) did not vary significantly from a control group of normotensive pregnancies (p greater than 0.05). Fetal inactivity was predictive of an unfavorable perinatal outcome in 6 of 7 cases, including the three stillborn infants. No perinatal deaths occurred among the 117 hypertensive pregnancies with active fetuses, and the 6 cases with an unfavorable outcome were associated with mild intrauterine growth delay, prematurity, or acute changes such as placental abruption or umbilical cord accidents. Realizing these limitations, a record of fetal inactivity is worthwhile in managing the pregnancy complicated by hypertension.

  18. Choriodecidual group B streptococcal inoculation induces fetal lung injury without intra-amniotic infection and preterm labor in Macaca nemestrina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M Adams Waldorf

    symptoms and before the onset of the fetal systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

  19. A High-Fat/High-Cholesterol Diet Inhibits Growth of Fetal Hippocampal Transplants via Increased Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, L. R.; Small, B. J.; Bickford, P. C.; Umphlet, C.; Granholm, A.-Ch.

    2011-01-01

    A diet containing high levels of saturated fat and cholesterol is detrimental to many aspects of health and is known to lead to obesity, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. However, the effects of a diet rich in saturated fat and cholesterol on the brain are not currently well understood. In order to determine direct effects of a high saturated fat and cholesterol diet upon fetal hippocampal tissue, we transplanted hippocampal grafts from embryonic day 18 rats to the ante...

  20. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  1. The impact of vitamin D on fetal and neonatal lung maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkedegn, Sine; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Beck-Nielsen, Signe Sparre

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are major complications to preterm birth. Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent in pregnancy. We systematically reviewed the evidence of the impact of vitamin D on lung development, surfactant synthesis, RDS and BPD searching Pub......Med, Embase and Cochrane databases with the terms vitamin D AND (surfactant OR lung maturation OR lung development OR respiratory distress syndrome OR fetal lung OR prematurity OR bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Three human studies, ten animal studies, two laboratory studies and one combined animal...

  2. Body Stalk Syndrome: A Curiosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Javalgi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Limb body wall complex (LBWC /Body stalk syndrome anomaly refers to a rare complicated polymalformative fetal malformation syndrome of uncertain etiology firstly described by Van Allen et al in 1987. There are very few cases reported in literature and thus we report a rare case of LBWC. Twenty seven years female presented to labour room with 32 weeks of gestation with no prenatal care and delivered a low birth weight still born fetus weighing 1100gms. On fetal autopsy large abdominal wall defect was noted with difficulty in identifying abdomino-pelvic organs and ambiguous genitalia. Placenta weighed 250gms with attached short umbilical cord measuring 7cms, arising from periphery. A cyst noted attached to placental membrane measuring 9x5cms which on dissection retrieved partially maldeveloped organs. Post mortem radiological findings included Absence of right femur with short tibia and right fibula, Complex vestibral malformation, Craniosynostosis and Overcrowding of ribs.

  3. Cryptorchidism as part of the testicular dysgenesis syndrome: the environmental connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K M; Skakkebaek, N E; Toppari, J

    2009-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is part of the testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), which includes other male reproductive disorders such as hypospadias, testis cancer and reduced semen quality. These diseases appear to be linked by common pathogenic mechanisms, interfering with normal fetal testis development...

  4. Respiratory Development and Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubarth, Lori Baas; Quinn, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory development is crucial for all newborn infants. Premature infants may be born at an early stage of development and lack sufficient surfactant production. This results in respiratory distress syndrome. This article reviews the normal fetal development of the lung as well as the disorder that develops because of an early birth.

  5. Fetal stimulation by pulsed diagnostic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, M; Ogburn, P L; Greenleaf, J F

    2001-08-01

    To show that pulsed ultrasound from a clinical ultrasonic imaging system can stimulate the fetus. Stimulation is defined mainly as increased fetal gross body movements in response to excitation. Fetuses of a group of 9 volunteer women (mean gestational age, 33.37 weeks; range, 25-40 weeks) were evaluated for body movement under 3 different conditions: (1) control, with no ultrasound exposure; (2) ultrasound in continuous wave Doppler mode; and (3) pulsed ultrasound in pulsed Doppler and B modes. A conventional external fetal monitor, with negligible ultrasonic output, was used to monitor fetal gross body motions. After an initial rest period of 3 minutes with 1 or no fetal motion, fetuses were monitored for an additional 3 minutes under the exposure criterion defined for each condition. Resulting fetal motions under the 3 conditions were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The test showed that fetuses moved significantly more frequently under condition 3 (mean +/- SD, 3.43 +/- 1.93 movements per minute) than under condition 1 (0.40 +/- 7.33 movements per minute) or condition 2 (0.63 +/- 7.67 movements per minute); P = .004 and .016, respectively. Fetal movements under conditions 1 and 2 did not differ significantly. Diagnostic ultrasound may stimulate fetal body motion.

  6. Fetal Primary Cardiac Tumors During Perinatal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal primary cardiac tumors are rare, but they may cause complications, which are sometimes life threatening, including arrhythmias, hydrops fetalis, ventricular outflow/inflow obstruction, cardiac failure, and even sudden death. Among fetal primary cardiac tumors, rhabdomyomas are most common, followed by teratomas, fibromas, hemangiomas, and myxomas. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, has been reported to be an effective drug to cause tumor remission in three neonates with multiple cardiac rhabdomyomas. Neonatal cardiac surgery for the resection of primary cardiac tumors found by fetal echocardiography has been reported sporadically. However, open fetal surgery for pericardial teratoma resection, which was performed successfully via a fetal median sternotomy in one case report, could be a promising intervention to rescue these patients with large pericardial effusions. These recent achievements undoubtedly encourage further development in early management of fetal cardiac tumors. Owing to the rarity of fetal primary cardiac tumors, relevant information in terms of prenatal diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis remains to be clarified.

  7. Hypoxia: From Placental Development to Fetal Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajersztajn, Lais; Veras, Mariana Matera

    2017-10-16

    Hypoxia may influence normal and different pathological processes. Low oxygenation activates a variety of responses, many of them regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 complex, which is mostly involved in cellular control of O 2 consumption and delivery, inhibition of growth and development, and promotion of anaerobic metabolism. Hypoxia plays a significant physiological role in fetal development; it is involved in different embryonic processes, for example, placentation, angiogenesis, and hematopoiesis. More recently, fetal hypoxia has been associated directly or indirectly with fetal programming of heart, brain, and kidney function and metabolism in adulthood. In this review, the role of hypoxia in fetal development, placentation, and fetal programming is summarized. Hypoxia is a basic mechanism involved in different pregnancy disorders and fetal health developmental complications. Although there are scientific data showing that hypoxia mediates changes in the growth trajectory of the fetus, modulates gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, and determines the health status later in adulthood, more mechanistic studies are needed. Furthermore, if we consider that intrauterine hypoxia is not a rare event, and can be a consequence of unavoidable exposures to air pollution, nutritional deficiencies, obesity, and other very common conditions (drug addiction and stress), the health of future generations may be damaged and the incidence of some diseases will markedly increase as a consequence of disturbed fetal programming. Birth Defects Research 109:1377-1385, 2017.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Awareness of fetal echo in Indian scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrier, Dhanya; Saraf, Rahul; Maheshwari, Sunita; Suresh, PV; Shah, Sejal

    2012-01-01

    Fetal echocardiography is a well established sensitive tool to diagnose congenital heart disease (CHD) in utero. One of the determinants of effective utilization of fetal echocardiography is its awareness in the general population. The present hospital based study was undertaken to assess the awareness of the need for fetal echocardiography amongst Indian parents. One thousand one hundred and thirty eight consecutive parents who visited the pediatric cardiology outpatient department of a tertiary care centre over a period of two months were asked to fill up a questionnaire that included their demographic data, educational status, history of CHD in children, awareness of fetal echocardiography and source of information and timing of fetal echocardiogram if performed. The data was categorized and awareness was noted in different groups. The awareness in the study population was 2.2%. Awareness was found to be similar across the study population irrespective of the demographics and high risk status of the parents. The awareness of fetal echocardiography, an important tool in reducing the incidence of complex CHD, thereby impacting public health, is alarmingly low in the population studied. Appropriate action to increase awareness of fetal echocardiography needs to be looked into

  9. The Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Qazi, Q H; Heckman, L S; Markouizos, D; Verma, R S

    1990-01-01

    We report a white female infant with typical features of Coffin-Siris syndrome including thick eyebrows, flat nasal bridge, anteverted, wide nose tip, generalised hypertrichosis, scalp hypotrichosis, absence of the fifth fingernails and toenails, absence of the distal phalanges of the fifth fingers and of the second to fifth toes, small patellae, inguinal hernia, and sucking and feeding difficulties. There was decreased fetal activity and intrauterine growth retardation.

  10. Maternal-fetal cholesterol transport in the second half of mouse pregnancy does not involve LDL receptor-related protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwier, M V; Baardman, M E; van Dijk, T H; Jurdzinski, A; Wisse, L J; Bloks, V W; Berger, R M F; DeRuiter, M C; Groen, A K; Plösch, T

    2017-08-01

    LDL receptor-related protein type 2 (LRP2) is highly expressed on both yolk sac and placenta. Mutations in the corresponding gene are associated with severe birth defects in humans, known as Donnai-Barrow syndrome. We here characterized the contribution of LRP2 and maternal plasma cholesterol availability to maternal-fetal cholesterol transport and fetal cholesterol levels in utero in mice. Lrp2 +/- mice were mated heterozygously to yield fetuses of all three genotypes. Half of the dams received a 0.5% probucol-enriched diet during gestation to decrease maternal HDL cholesterol. At E13.5, the dams received an injection of D7-labelled cholesterol and were provided with 1- 13 C acetate-supplemented drinking water. At E16.5, fetal tissues were collected and maternal cholesterol transport and fetal synthesis quantified by isotope enrichments in fetal tissues by GC-MS. The Lrp2 genotype did not influence maternal-fetal cholesterol transport and fetal cholesterol. However, lowering of maternal plasma cholesterol levels by probucol significantly reduced maternal-fetal cholesterol transport. In the fetal liver, this was associated with increased cholesterol synthesis rates. No indications were found for an interaction between the Lrp2 genotype and maternal probucol treatment. Maternal-fetal cholesterol transport and endogenous fetal cholesterol synthesis depend on maternal cholesterol concentrations but do not involve LRP2 in the second half of murine pregnancy. Our results suggest that the mouse fetus can compensate for decreased maternal cholesterol levels. It remains a relevant question how the delicate system of cholesterol transport and synthesis is regulated in the human fetus and placenta. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Fetal liver iron overload: the role of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassart, Marie; Avni, Freddy Efraim [Erasme Hospital, Medical imaging, Brussels, Brabant (Belgium); Guibaud, Laurent [Hopital femme mere enfant, Imagerie Pediatrique et Foetale, Lyon-Bron (France); Molho, Marc [C.H.I Poissy/St Germain-en-Laye, Imagerie Medicale, Poissy (France); D' Haene, Nicky [Erasme Hospital, Anatomopathology Department, Brussels (Belgium); Paupe, Alain [C.H.I Poissy/St Germain-en-Laye, Pediatrie, Poissy (France)

    2011-02-15

    To assess the potential role of MR imaging in the diagnosis of fetal liver iron overload. We reviewed seven cases of abnormal liver signal in fetuses referred to MR imaging in a context of suspected congenital infection (n = 2), digestive tract anomalies (n = 3) and hydrops fetalis (n = 2). The average GA of the fetuses was 31 weeks. The antenatal diagnoses were compared with histological data (n = 6) and postnatal work-up (n = 1). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated unexpected abnormal fetal liver signal suggestive of iron overload in all cases. The iron overload was confirmed on postnatal biopsy (n = 2) and fetopathology (n = 4). The final diagnosis was hepatic hemosiderosis (haemolytic anaemia (n = 2) and syndromal anomalies (n = 2)) and congenital haemochromatosis (n = 3). In all cases, the liver appeared normal on US. Magnetic resonance is the only imaging technique able to demonstrate liver iron overload in utero. Yet, the study outlines the fundamental role of MR imaging in cases of congenital haemochromatosis. The antenatal diagnosis of such a condition may prompt ante - (in the case of recurrence) or neonatal treatment, which might improve the prognosis. (orig.)

  12. Prenatal Diagnosis of Transient Abnormal Myelopoiesis in a Down Syndrome Fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Jun; Lee, Eun Sil

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of transient abnormal myelopoiesis in a Down syndrome fetus diagnosed at 28 +3 weeks of gestation that rapidly progressed to intrauterine death 10 days later. Fetal hepatosplenomegaly with cerebral ventriculomegaly, although not specific, may be a suggestive finding of Down syndrome with transient abnormal myelopoiesis. Prompt fetal blood sampling for liver function test and chromosomal analysis are mandatory for early detection and management

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of caudal regression syndrome and omphalocele in a fetus of a diabetic mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchahda, Haifa; El Mhabrech, Houda; Hamouda, Hechmi Ben; Ghanmi, Sobhi; Bouchahda, Rim; Soua, Habib

    2017-01-01

    The caudal regression syndrome is defined as total or partial agenesis of the sacrum and lumbar spine, frequently associated with other developmental malformations (orthopedic, neurological, genito-urinary, gastrointestinal…). Prenatal diagnosis is possible through fetal ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A case of fetal caudal regression syndrome with omphalocele from a diabetic mother is presented, demonstrating the sonographic, MRI, CT and X-Ray features diagnostic. We will also discuss neonatal findings, risk factors and prognosis of this condition.

  14. Clinical experience with the Hewlett-Packard M-1350A fetal monitor: correlation of Doppler-detected fetal body movements with fetal heart rate parameters and perinatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoe, L; Boehm, F; Paul, R; Frigoletto, F; Penso, C; Goldenberg, R; Rayburn, W; Smith, C

    1994-02-01

    Our purpose was to correlate measures of Doppler-detected fetal movements with standard fetal heart rate parameters and perinatal outcomes. This prospective, multiinstitutional trial used the Hewlett-Packard M1350A monitor to record simultaneous fetal heart rate baseline, variability, accelerations, decelerations, and number of fetal movements, and duration and percent of total time. These data were compared at 10- and 30-minute intervals during nonstress tests and were correlated with fetal heart rate baseline parameters and maternally perceived fetal movements and with outcomes of infants delivered within 7 days of the last test. At six centers 1704 actocardiograms from 884 third-trimester patients were analyzed. Doppler-detected fetal movement counts, durations, and percent of total time correlated weakly with all baseline fetal heart rate parameters (all values < 0.20). All fetal movement parameters increased significantly in successive 10-minute blocks and in periods of increased or normal fetal heart rate variability compared with those with fetal heart rate variability. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the percent of total movement time were comparable to those of standard nonstress test parameters. The risk of poor perinatal outcomes after nonreactive nonstress tests was lower in cases with fetal movements than in those without. Doppler actocardiography may help to discriminate fetal states during antepartum testing. It may prevent inappropriate diagnosis of fetal compromise when the nonstress test is nonreactive or nonreassuring.

  15. Six consecutive false positive cases from cell-free fetal DNA testing in a single referring centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Nella; Padula, Francesco; Mobili, Luisa; Brizzi, Cristiana; D’Emidio, Laura; Cignini, Pietro; Mesoraca, Alvaro; Bizzoco, Domenico; Cima, Antonella; Giorlandino, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction recent studies have proposed the introduction of cell-free fetal DNA testing (NIPT-Non Invasive Prenatal Testing) in routine clinical practice emphasizing its high sensibility and specificity. In any case, false positive and false negative findings may result from placental mosaicism, because cell-free fetal DNA originates mainly from placenta. Case we report six cases of women who underwent chorionic villus sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis to confirm the results from NIPT: two Turner syndromes, two Triple X, one Patau syndrome, one Edward syndrome. Results using classic cytogenetic analysis and, also, Array - Comparative Genomic Hybridization (Array CGH) the karyotype of all 5 fetuses was found to be normal. Conclusion results from NIPT must always be confirmed by invasive prenatal diagnosis. It is mandatory to inform the patient that the CVS and amniocentesis still represent the only form of prenatal diagnostic test available. PMID:25332757

  16. Acquired CNS lesions in fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Pogledic, I.

    2013-01-01

    Acquired central nervous system (CNS) lesions are often subtle; therefore, the prenatal diagnosis of these lesions is extremely important. The fetal ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are two important imaging methods that give an insight into these types lesions. The method of choice during pregnancy is still fetal ultrasound; however, fetal MRI is important when there are certain pathologies, e.g. periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) or malformations of the vein of Galen. In this manner clinicians can plan further therapy after childbirth in advance (e.g. cerebral angiography or embolization). (orig.) [de

  17. High risk of unexpected late fetal death in monochorionic twins despite intensive ultrasound surveillance: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rationale for fetal surveillance in monochorionic twin pregnancies is timely intervention to prevent the increased fetal/perinatal morbidity and mortality attributed to twin-twin transfusion syndrome and intrauterine growth restriction. We investigated the residual risk of fetal death after viability in otherwise uncomplicated monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched an electronic database of 480 completed monochorionic pregnancies that underwent fortnightly ultrasound surveillance in our tertiary referral fetal medicine service between 1992 and 2004. After excluding pregnancies with twin-twin transfusion syndrome, growth restriction, structural abnormalities, or twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence, and monoamniotic and high-order multiple pregnancies, we identified 151 uncomplicated monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancies with normal growth, normal liquor volume, and normal Doppler studies on fortnightly ultrasound scans. Ten unexpected intrauterine deaths occurred in seven (4.6% of 151 previously uncomplicated monochorionic diamniotic pregnancies, within 2 wk of a normal scan, at a median gestational age of 34(+1 wk (weeks(+days; range 28(+0 to 36(+3. Two of the five cases that underwent autopsy had features suggestive of acute late onset twin-twin transfusion syndrome, but no antenatal indicators of transfusional imbalance or growth restriction, either empirically or in a 1:3 gestation-matched case-control comparison. The prospective risk of unexpected antepartum stillbirth after 32 wk was 1/23 monochorionic diamniotic pregnancies (95% confidence interval 1/11 to 1/63. CONCLUSION: Despite intensive fetal surveillance, structurally normal monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancies without TTTS or IUGR are complicated by a high rate of unexpected intrauterine death. This prospective risk of fetal death in otherwise uncomplicated monochorionic diamniotic pregnancies after 32 wk of

  18. Prospective risk of fetal death in uncomplicated monochorionic twins.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Farah, Nadine

    2012-03-01

    A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a university teaching hospital to determine the prospective risk of unexpected fetal death in uncomplicated monochorionic diamniotic (MCDA) twin pregnancies after viability. All MCDA twins delivered at or after 24 weeks\\' gestation from July 1999 to July 2007 were included. Pregnancies with twin-twin transfusion syndrome, growth restriction, structural abnormalities, or twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence were excluded. Of the 144 MCDA twin pregnancies included in our analysis, the risk of intrauterine death was 4.9%. The prospective risk of unexpected intrauterine death was 1 in 43 after 32 weeks\\' gestation and 1 in 37 after 34 weeks\\' gestation. Our results demonstrate that despite close surveillance, the unexpected intrauterine death rate in uncomplicated MCDA twin pregnancies is high. This rate seems to increase after 34 weeks\\' gestation, suggesting that a policy of elective preterm delivery warrants evaluation.

  19. Tracing the origins of "fetal origins" of adult diseases: programming by oxidative stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Z C; Fraser, W D; Julien, P; Deal, C L; Audibert, F; Smith, G N; Xiong, X; Walker, M

    2006-01-01

    Too small size at birth (due to poor fetal growth and/or preterm delivery) has been associated with substantially elevated risks of the metabolic syndrome (dislipidemia, insulin resistance, hypertension), type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. The mechanisms of such "fetal origins" or "programming" of disease phenomenon remain unresolved. Too large size at birth seems also associated with an increased risk. Many known or suspected causes of or conditions associated with adverse (poor or excessive) fetal growth or preterm birth have been associated with oxidative stress. Plausibly, oxidative stress may be a common link underlying the superficial "programming" associations between adverse fetal growth or preterm birth and elevated risks of certain chronic diseases. The mechanisms of oxidative stress programming may be through directly modulating gene expression or indirectly through the effects of certain oxidized molecules. Experimental investigations have well demonstrated the role of redox balance in modulating gene expression, and recent studies indicate that both the insulin functional axis and blood pressure could be sensitive targets to oxidative stress programming. Adverse programming may occur without affecting fetal growth, but more frequently among low birth weight infants merely because they more frequently experienced known or unknown conditions with oxidative insults. As oxidative stress levels are easily modifiable during pregnancy and early postnatal periods (which are plausible critical windows), the hypothesis, if proved valid, will suggest new measures that could be very helpful on fighting the increasing epidemic of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Currently, there are several ongoing large randomized trials of antioxidant supplementation to counter oxidative stress during pregnancy for the prevention of preeclampsia. It would be invaluable if long-term follow-ups of infants born to women in

  20. Real-Time Automatic Fetal Brain Extraction in Fetal MRI by Deep Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi, Seyed Sadegh Mohseni; Hashemi, Seyed Raein; Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Ouaalam, Abdelhakim; Estroff, Judy A.; Erdogmus, Deniz; Warfield, Simon K.; Gholipour, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Brain segmentation is a fundamental first step in neuroimage analysis. In the case of fetal MRI, it is particularly challenging and important due to the arbitrary orientation of the fetus, organs that surround the fetal head, and intermittent fetal motion. Several promising methods have been proposed but are limited in their performance in challenging cases and in real-time segmentation. We aimed to develop a fully automatic segmentation method that independently segments sections of the feta...

  1. International Fetal Cardiac Intervention Registry: A Worldwide Collaborative Description and Preliminary Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon-Grady, Anita J; Morris, Shaine A; Belfort, Michael; Chmait, Ramen; Dangel, Joanna; Devlieger, Roland; Emery, Stephen; Frommelt, Michele; Galindo, Alberto; Gelehrter, Sarah; Gembruch, Ulrich; Grinenco, Sofia; Habli, Mounira; Herberg, Ulrike; Jaeggi, Edgar; Kilby, Mark; Kontopoulos, Eftichia; Marantz, Pablo; Miller, Owen; Otaño, Lucas; Pedra, Carlos; Pedra, Simone; Pruetz, Jay; Quintero, Ruben; Ryan, Greg; Sharland, Gurleen; Simpson, John; Vlastos, Emanuel; Tworetzky, Wayne; Wilkins-Haug, Louise; Oepkes, Dick

    2015-07-28

    Invasive fetal cardiac intervention (FCI) has been reported in single-institution series, promoting technical and physiologic success. This study describes the creation of an international registry of cases presenting for FCI, intended to compile technical and outcome data from a multicenter cohort. For this initial analysis, the entire database of the International Fetal Cardiac Intervention Registry (IFCIR) was queried for details of diagnoses, procedures, and outcomes. Maternal-fetal dyads from January 2001 through June 2014 were included. Eighteen institutions submitted data by data harvest. Of 370 cases entered, 245 underwent FCI: 100 aortic valvuloplasties from a previous single-center report (excluded from additional reporting here), an additional 86 aortic and 16 pulmonary valvuloplasties, 37 atrial septal cases, and 6 unclassified cases. FCI did not appear to affect overall survival to hospital discharge. Among live-born infants with a fetal diagnosis of aortic stenosis/evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, more than twice as many were discharged with biventricular circulation after successful FCI versus those meeting institutional criteria but without any or successful FCI (42.8% vs. 19.4%, respectively). When fetal deaths were counted as treatment failures, the percentages were similar: biventricular circulation at discharge was 31.3% versus 18.5% for those discharged with univentricular palliation. Survival to discharge for live-born fetuses with atrial restriction was similar to that of those undergoing technically successful versus unsuccessful FCI (63.6% vs. 46.7%, respectively), although criteria for diagnosis were nonuniform. We describe the contents of the IFCIR and present post-natal data to suggest potential benefit to fetal therapy among pregnancies considered for possible intervention and support proposals for additional work. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging: methods and techniques; Fetale Magnetresonanztomographie: Methoden und Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, P.C. [Zentrum fuer Anatomie und Zellbiologie, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Arbeitsgruppe Integrative Morphologie; Stuhr, F.; Lindner, C.; Prayer, D. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik

    2006-02-15

    Since the introduction of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) into prenatal diagnostics, advances in coil technology and development of ultrafast sequences have further enhanced this technique. At present numerous sequences are available to visualize the whole fetus with high resolution and image quality, even in late stages of pregnancy. Taking into consideration the special circumstances of examination and adjusting sequence parameters to gestational age, fetal anatomy can be accurately depicted. The variety of sequences also allows further characterization of fetal tissues and pathologies. Fetal MRI not only supplies additional information to routine ultrasound studies, but also reveals fetal morphology and pathology in a way hitherto not possible. (orig.) [German] Seit Einfuehrung der fetalen Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) in die praenatale Diagnostik wurde das Verfahren durch neue Spulentechniken und die Entwicklung ultraschneller Sequenzen kontinuierlich weiter entwickelt. Gegenwaertig steht eine Vielzahl von Sequenzen zur Verfuegung, die es erlauben, mit hoher Bildqualitaet und raeumlicher Aufloesung selbst in fortgeschrittenen Schwangerschaftsstadien den gesamten Feten darzustellen. Unter Beruecksichtigung der speziellen Untersuchungsbedingungen und des Schwangerschaftsalters kann so die fetale Anatomie genau abgebildet werden. Die Vielfalt an Sequenzen und deren gezielter Einsatz ermoeglichen es weiter, fetale Gewebe und Pathologien naeher zu charakterisierten. Auf diese Weise liefert die fetale MRT nicht nur Zusatzinformationen zur Routineultraschalluntersuchung, sie gibt auch Aufschluss ueber bestimmte fetale Morphologien und Pathologien, die bisher nicht darstellbar waren. (orig.)

  3. Maternal plasma fetal DNA fractions in pregnancies with low and high risks for fetal chromosomal aneuploidies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Hudecova

    Full Text Available Recently published international guidelines recommend the clinical use of noninvasive prenatal test (NIPT for aneuploidy screening only among pregnant women whose fetuses are deemed at high risk. The applicability of NIPT to aneuploidy screening among average risk pregnancies requires additional supportive evidence. A key determinant of the reliability of aneuploidy NIPT is the fetal DNA fraction in maternal plasma. In this report, we investigated if differences in fetal DNA fractions existed between different pregnancy risk groups. One hundred and ninety-five singleton pregnancies with male fetuses divided into 3 groups according to first trimester screening parameters were examined for fetal DNA percentage by counting Y chromosome DNA sequences using massively parallel sequencing. Fetal DNA fractions were compared between risk groups and assessed for correlations with first trimester screening parameters. There was no statistically significant difference in fetal DNA fractions across the high, intermediate and low risk groups. Fetal DNA fraction showed a strong negative correlation with maternal weight. Fetal DNA fraction also showed weak but significant correlations with gestational age, crown-rump length, multiple of medians of free β-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A. Similar fetal DNA fractions in maternal plasma between high, intermediate and low risk pregnant women is a precondition for uniform performance of the aneuploidy NIPTs for the general population. This study thus shows that the aneuploidy screening by NIPT is likely to offer similar analytical reliability without respect to the a priori fetal aneuploidy risk.

  4. Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Nelson, Priscilla; Gurewitsch, Edith D.; Laudenslager, Mark L.

    2007-01-01

    Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during the 32nd week of pregnancy were recorded in 100 maternal-fetal pairs using a digitized data collection system. The 18-minute guided imagery relaxation manipulation generated significant changes in maternal heart rate, skin conductance, respiration period, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Significant alterations in fetal neurobehavior were observed, including decreased fetal heart rate (FHR), increased FHR variability, suppression of fetal...

  5. Fetal valproate syndrome: is there a recognisable phenotype?

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, R M; Donnai, D; Burn, J; Tucker, S M

    1987-01-01

    Four infants who were exposed to sodium valproate or valproic acid during pregnancy are described. Common facial features in the three surviving infants include epicanthic folds, a flat nasal bridge, a broad nasal base, anteverted nostrils, a shallow philtrum, and a thin upper lip with a thick lower lip. Ridging of the metopic suture, congenital heart defect, postaxial polydactyly, and hypospadias were additional features in individual cases. In agreement with previous authors, we feel that t...

  6. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome & Effects: A Continuing Education Offering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    drunkard" (Medelson, 1980). A generation Later in 1899, William Sullivan , physician at a Liverpool prison, published the first recognized scientific...shows ip at the party, he arrives in time to see George, a football fanatic, break out a keg of beer to toast what he hopes will be his middle...lirnebacer son. He draws a large mugful for his pregnant wife-- after all, on TV all football jocks drink beer! His son might as well get an early head-sart

  7. Message in a bottle: the making of fetal alcohol syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Golden, Janet Lynne

    2005-01-01

    ... of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle in 1973. Shirley Anderson, a physician who ran the pediatric outpatient department at Harborview Medical Center, the county hospital, asked him to come se...

  8. Fetal scalp pH testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sometimes fetal heart monitoring doesn't provide enough information about the well-being of a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus is getting enough oxygen ...

  9. Piracetam for fetal distress in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Kulier, Regina

    2012-06-13

    Piracetam is thought to promote the metabolism of brain cells when they are hypoxic. It has been used to prevent adverse effects of fetal distress. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of piracetam for suspected fetal distress in labour on method of delivery and perinatal morbidity. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (15 February 2012). Randomised trials of piracetam compared with placebo or no treatment for suspected fetal distress in labour. Both review authors assessed eligibility and trial quality. One study of 96 women was included. Piracetam compared with placebo was associated with a trend to reduced need for caesarean section (risk ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 1.03). There were no statistically significant differences between the piracetam and placebo group for neonatal morbidity (measured by neonatal respiratory distress) or Apgar score. There is not enough evidence to evaluate the use of piracetam for fetal distress in labour.

  10. Metabolomics Application in Maternal-Fetal Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Fanos, Vassilios; Atzori, Luigi; Makarenko, Karina; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics in maternal-fetal medicine is still an “embryonic” science. However, there is already an increasing interest in metabolome of normal and complicated pregnancies, and neonatal outcomes. Tissues used for metabolomics interrogations of pregnant women, fetuses and newborns are amniotic fluid, blood, plasma, cord blood, placenta, urine, and vaginal secretions. All published papers highlight the strong correlation between biomarkers found in these tissues and fetal malformations, prete...

  11. Fetal tissue research and the misread compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, W; Vawter, D E; Gervais, K G

    1991-01-01

    The bill to restore federal funding for human fetal tissue research has been passed by the House and awaits Senate approval. But it requires women who are willing to donate fetal tissue to certify that they did not have an abortion with the intent to donate. It further requires researchers to keep the certifications on file and available for government audit. Both requirements spell trouble.

  12. Epidemiology of fetal death in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Agudelo, A; Belizán, J M; Díaz-Rossello, J L

    2000-05-01

    To identify risk factors associated with fetal death, and to measure the rate and the risk of fetal death in a large cohort of Latin American women. We analyzed 837,232 singleton births recorded in the Perinatal Information System Database of the Latin American Center for Perinatology and Human Development (CLAP) between 1985 and 1997. The risk factors analyzed included fetal factors and maternal sociodemographic, obstetric, and clinical characteristics. Adjusted relative risks were obtained, after adjustment for potential confounding factors, through multiple logistic regression models based on the method of generalized estimating equations. There were 14,713 fetal deaths (rate=17.6 per 1000 births). The fetal death risk increased exponentially as pregnancy advanced. Thirty-seven percent of all fetal deaths occurred at term, and 64% were antepartum. The main risk factors associated with fetal death were lack of antenatal care (adjusted relative risk [aRR]=4.26; 95% confidence interval, 3.84-4.71) and small for gestational age (aRR=3.26; 95% CI, 3.13-3.40). In addition, the risk of death during the intrapartum period was almost tenfold higher for fetuses in noncephalic presentations. Other risk factors associated with stillbirth were: third trimester bleeding, eclampsia, chronic hypertension, preeclampsia, syphilis, gestational diabetes mellitus, Rh isoimmunization, interpregnancy interval or =4, maternal age > or =35 years, illiteracy, premature rupture of membranes, body mass index > or =29.0, maternal anemia, previous abortion, and previous adverse perinatal outcomes. There are several preventable factors that should be dealt with in order to reduce the gap in fetal mortality between Latin America and developed countries.

  13. Impact of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Loren P.; Al-Hasan, Yazan

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine stress induces increased risk of adult disease through fetal programming mechanisms. Oxidative stress can be generated by several conditions, such as, prenatal hypoxia, maternal under- and overnutrition, and excessive glucocorticoid exposure. The role of oxidant molecules as signaling factors in fetal programming via epigenetic mechanisms is discussed. By linking oxidative stress with dysregulation of specific target genes, we may be able to develop therapeutic strategies that pr...

  14. The impact of fetal growth restriction on latency in the setting of expectant management of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, David; Boyd, Heather; Langager, Amanda; Oswald, Michael; Pfister, Abbey; Warshak, Carri R

    2016-03-01

    Fetal growth restriction is a common complication of preeclampsia. Expectant management for qualifying patients has been found to have acceptable maternal safety while improving neonatal outcomes. Whether fetal growth restriction influences the duration of latency during expectant management of preeclampsia is unknown. The objective of the study was to determine whether fetal growth restriction is associated with a reduced interval to delivery in women with preeclampsia being expectantly managed prior to 34 weeks. We performed a retrospective cohort of singleton, live-born, nonanomalous deliveries at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center between 2008 and 2013. Patients were included in our analysis if they were diagnosed with preeclampsia prior to 34 completed weeks and if the initial management plan was to pursue expectant management beyond administration of steroids for fetal lung maturity. Two study groups were determined based on the presence or absence of fetal growth restriction. Patients were delivered when they developed persistent neurological symptoms, severe hypertension refractory to medical therapy, renal insufficiency, nonreassuring fetal status, pulmonary edema, or hemolysis elevated liver low platelet syndrome or when they reached 37 weeks if they remained stable without any other indication for delivery. Our primary outcome was the interval from diagnosis of preeclampsia to delivery, measured in days. Secondary outcomes included indications for delivery, rates of induction and cesarean delivery, development of severe morbidities of preeclampsia, and select neonatal outcomes. We performed a multivariate logistic regression analysis comparing those with fetal growth restriction with those with normally grown fetuses to determine whether there is an association between fetal growth restriction and a shortened interval to delivery, neonatal intensive care unit admission, prolonged neonatal stay, and neonatal mortality. A total of 851 patients met

  15. Maternal methadone dosing schedule and fetal neurobehavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Lauren M.; DiPietro, Janet A.; Velez, Martha; Elko, Andrea; Knauer, Heather; Kivlighan, Katie T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Daily methadone maintenance is the standard of care for opiate dependency during pregnancy. Previous research has indicated that single-dose maternal methadone administration significantly suppresses fetal neurobehaviors. The purpose of this study was to determine if split-dosing would have less impact on fetal neurobehavior than single-dose administration. Methods Forty methadone-maintained women were evaluated at peak and trough maternal methadone levels on single- and split-dosing schedules. Monitoring sessions occurred at 36 and 37 weeks gestation in a counterbalanced study design. Fetal measures included heart rate, variability, accelerations, motor activity and fetal movement-heart rate coupling (FM-FHR). Maternal measures included heart period, variability, skin conductance, respiration and vagal tone. Repeated measure analysis of variance was used to evaluate within-subject changes between split- and single-dosing regimens. Results All fetal neurobehavioral parameters were suppressed by maternal methadone administration, regardless of dosing regimen. Fetal parameters at peak were significantly lower during single vs. split methadone administration. FM-FHR coupling was less suppressed from trough to peak during split-dosing vs. single-dosing. Maternal physiologic parameters were generally unaffected by dosing condition. Conclusion Split- dosed fetuses displayed less neurobehavioral suppression from trough to peak maternal methadone levels as compared to single-dosed fetuses. Split-dosing may be beneficial for methadone-maintained pregnant women. PMID:19085624

  16. The Use of Fetal Noninvasive Electrocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Lakhno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is one of the severe complications of pregnancy that leads to fetal deterioration. The aim was to survey the validity of fetal distress diagnostics in case of Doppler ultrasonic umbilical vein and arteries blood flow velocity investigation and ECG parameters analysis obtained from maternal abdominal signal before labor in preeclamptic patients. Fetal noninvasive ECG and umbilical arterial and venous Doppler investigation were performed in 120 patients at 34–40 weeks of gestation. And 30 of them had physiological gestation and were involved in Group I. In Group II 52 pregnant women with mild-moderate PE were observed. 38 patients with severe PE were monitored in Group III. The most considerable negative correlation was determined in pair Apgar score 1 versus T/QRS (R=-0.50; p<0.05. So the increased T/QRS ratio was the most evident marker of fetal distress. Fetal noninvasive ECG showed sensitivity of 96.6% and specificity of 98.4% and, therefore, was determined as more accurate method for fetal monitoring.

  17. Maternal feeding controls fetal biological clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenobu Ohta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that circadian physiological rhythms of the fetus are affected by oscillators in the maternal brain that are coupled to the environmental light-dark (LD cycle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the link between fetal and maternal biological clocks, we investigated the effects of cycles of maternal food availability on the rhythms of Per1 gene expression in the fetal suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and liver using a transgenic rat model whose tissues express luciferase in vitro. Although the maternal SCN remained phase-locked to the LD cycle, maternal restricted feeding phase-advanced the fetal SCN and liver by 5 and 7 hours respectively within the 22-day pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that maternal feeding entrains the fetal SCN and liver independently of both the maternal SCN and the LD cycle. This indicates that maternal-feeding signals can be more influential for the fetal SCN and particular organ oscillators than hormonal signals controlled by the maternal SCN, suggesting the importance of a regular maternal feeding schedule for appropriate fetal molecular clockwork during pregnancy.

  18. Biomedical Instruments for Fetal and Neonatal Surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolfe, P [Oxford BioHorizons Ltd. (United Kingdom); Scopesi, F [Gaslini Institute, University of Genoa (Italy); Serra, G [Gaslini Institute, University of Genoa (Italy)

    2006-10-15

    Specialised instruments have been developed to aid the care of the fetus and the newborn baby. Miniature sensors using optical, electrical, chemical, mechanical and magnetic principles have been produced for capturing key measurands. These include temperature, pressure, flow and dimension, as well as several specific molecules such as glucose, oxygen and carbon dioxide. During pregnancy ultrasound imaging and blood flow techniques provide valuable information concerning fetal abnormalities, fetal growth, fetal breathing and fetal heart rate. Signal processing and pattern recognition can be useful for deriving indicators of fetal distress and clinical status, based on biopotentials as well as ultrasound signals. Fetal pH measurement is a critical requirement during labour and delivery. The intensive care of ill preterm babies involves provision of an optimal thermal environment and respiratory support. Monitoring of blood gas and acid-base status is essential, and this involves both blood sampling for in vitro analysis as well as the use of invasive or non-invasive sensors. For the future it will be vital that the technologies used are subjected to controlled trials to establish benefit or otherwise.

  19. Biomedical Instruments for Fetal and Neonatal Surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolfe, P; Scopesi, F; Serra, G

    2006-01-01

    Specialised instruments have been developed to aid the care of the fetus and the newborn baby. Miniature sensors using optical, electrical, chemical, mechanical and magnetic principles have been produced for capturing key measurands. These include temperature, pressure, flow and dimension, as well as several specific molecules such as glucose, oxygen and carbon dioxide. During pregnancy ultrasound imaging and blood flow techniques provide valuable information concerning fetal abnormalities, fetal growth, fetal breathing and fetal heart rate. Signal processing and pattern recognition can be useful for deriving indicators of fetal distress and clinical status, based on biopotentials as well as ultrasound signals. Fetal pH measurement is a critical requirement during labour and delivery. The intensive care of ill preterm babies involves provision of an optimal thermal environment and respiratory support. Monitoring of blood gas and acid-base status is essential, and this involves both blood sampling for in vitro analysis as well as the use of invasive or non-invasive sensors. For the future it will be vital that the technologies used are subjected to controlled trials to establish benefit or otherwise

  20. Prenatal Diagnosis of WAGR Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrin Tezcan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilm’s tumour, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation (WAGR syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 500,000 to 1 million. It is a contiguous gene syndrome due to deletion at chromosome 11p13 in a region containing WT1 and PAX6 genes. Children with WAGR syndrome mostly present in the newborn/infancy period with sporadic aniridia. The genotypic defects in WAGR syndrome have been well established. However, antenatal ultrasonographic presentation of this syndrome has never been reported. Prenatal diagnosis of this condition is possible in some cases with careful ultrasound examination of classical and nonclassical manifestations of this syndrome. The key point for this rare diagnosis was the decision to perform chromosomal microarray analysis after antenatal diagnosis of absent corpus callosum and absent cavum septum pellucidum, as this finding mandates search for potentially associated genetic disorders. We report a case of WAGR syndrome diagnosed prenatally at 29-week gestation. The diagnosis of the anomaly was based on two- and three-dimensional ultrasound as well as fetal MRI scan and microarray analysis. The ultrasonographic findings included borderline ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, and absent cavum septum pellucidum. Cytogenetic results from the amniotic fluid confirmed WAGR syndrome. Parental karyotype was normal, with no evidence of copy number change, deletion, or rearrangement of this region of chromosome 11.

  1. Fetal and neonatal endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unüvar, Tolga; Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2012-06-01

    Endocrine disruptors are substances commonly encountered in every setting and condition in the modern world. It is virtually impossible to avoid the contact with these chemical compounds in our daily life. Molecules defined as endocrine disruptors constitute an extremely heterogeneous group and include synthetic chemicals used as industrial solvents/lubricants and their by-products. Natural chemicals found in human and animal food (phytoestrogens) also act as endocrine disruptors. Different from adults, children are not exposed only to chemical toxins in the environment but may also be exposed during their intrauterine life. Hundreds of toxic substances, which include neuro-immune and endocrine toxic chemical components that may influence the critical steps of hormonal, neurological and immunological development, may affect the fetus via the placental cord and these substances may be excreted in the meconium. Children and especially newborns are more sensitive to environmental toxins compared to adults. Metabolic pathways are immature, especially in the first months of life. The ability of the newborn to metabolize, detoxify and eliminate many toxins is different from that of the adults. Although exposures occur during fetal or neonatal period, their effects may sometimes be observed in later years. Further studies are needed to clarify the effects of these substances on the endocrine system and to provide evidence for preventive measures.

  2. [Natural history of fetal pyelocaliectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Sofia; Carvalho, G; Antunes, A; Brito, M; Morais, C; Barros, J S

    2005-01-01

    It is estimated that genitourinary anomalies comprise 20% of all antenatally detected fetal anomalies, and pyelocaliectasia is the most common one. Detection of antenatal dilatation of the urinary tract does not always indicate postnatal urinary tract obstruction or even a significant genitourinary anomaly. Most cases will improve spontaneously, representing a temporary physiologic impedence and do not require surgery. In a two-year period we studied 197 newborns, with prenatal pyelocaliectasia, without concomitant anomaly, delivered at Maternidade Dr. Daniel de Matos. In the postnatal follow-up period, the infants were followed at Pediatrics Department, at our Center. A male predilection was found. Ultrasonic follow-up of the 197 infants showed that pyelocaliectasia resolved in 97%, while 3% still presented it in the postnatal ultrasound. Complementary renal evaluation, with voiding cystourethrography and radionuclide imaging, was realised in 29 (15%) infants to further characterize the abnormality detected in postnatal ultrasound. Surgery was performed in four (2%) children. Prenatally diagnosed pyelocaliectasia may be safely observed, and surgical correction should be performed only if renal compromise occurs.

  3. Non-invasive prenatal testing of fetal whole chromosome aneuploidy by massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Desheng; Lv, Weigang; Wang, Hua; Xu, Liangpu; Liu, Jing; Li, Haoxian; Hu, Liang; Peng, Ying; Wu, Lingqian

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether non-invasive prenatal testing by maternal plasma DNA sequencing can uncover all fetal chromosome aneuploidies in one simple sequencing event. Plasma samples from 435 pregnant women at high risk for Down syndrome were collected prior to amniocentesis in three hospitals in China between March 2009 and June 2011. We sequenced the plasma DNA extracted from these samples at low coverage. We discovered that the genome representation of each of the 24 chromosomes obeyed a linear relationship to its GC content. Applying this relationship, we analysed the copy number of each of the 24 chromosomes. Full fetal karyotyping was compared with maternal plasma DNA sequencing results. Among the 435 samples, 412 samples (94.7%) have full karyotyping and sequencing results. Sixty-seven samples containing a fetal chromosome aneuploidy, including trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, trisomy 9, monosomy X or others, can be accurately identified with a detection sensitivity of 100% and a detection specificity of 99.71%. Normalization of the chromosome representation values against chromosomal guanine/cytosine base content is the key issue to ensure the accuracy. Our results indicate that non-invasive detection of fetal chromosome aneuploidies for all 24 chromosomes in one single sequencing event is feasible. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Maternal fructose drives placental uric acid production leading to adverse fetal outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Zeenat A.; Thompson, Alysha; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Saben, Jessica L.; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal metabolic diseases increase offspring risk for low birth weight and cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. Excess fructose consumption may confer metabolic risks for both women and their offspring. However, the direct consequences of fructose intake per se are unknown. We assessed the impact of a maternal high-fructose diet on the fetal-placental unit in mice in the absence of metabolic syndrome and determined the association between maternal serum fructose and placental uric acid levels in humans. In mice, maternal fructose consumption led to placental inefficiency, fetal growth restriction, elevated fetal serum glucose and triglyceride levels. In the placenta, fructose induced de novo uric acid synthesis by activating the activities of the enzymes AMP deaminase and xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the placentas had increased lipids and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress. Treatment of mothers with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduced placental uric acid levels, prevented placental inefficiency, and improved fetal weights and serum triglycerides. Finally, in 18 women delivering at term, maternal serum fructose levels significantly correlated with placental uric acid levels. These findings suggest that in mice, excess maternal fructose consumption impairs placental function via a xanthine oxidase/uric acid-dependent mechanism, and similar effects may occur in humans. PMID:27125896

  5. [Management of women with a previous late fetal loss (14 to 22weeks of gestation)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmas, P; Thellier, E; Carcopino, X; Huchon, C; Deffieux, X; Fernandez, H

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidelines concerning management after a late fetal pregnancy loss: etiological assessment, follow-up and therapeutic management for subsequent pregnancy. French and English publications led to guidelines. In case of a previous late fetal loss, exploration of cavity has to be done (grade C), except hysterosalpingography, which is not recommended (grade A). If uterine anomalies are found, it is recommended to correct them (grade C). In case of stillbirth or unknown foetal vitality before expulsion, antiphospholipid syndrome has to be looked for (grade A). In pregnant women, measurement of cervical length has to be done between 15 and 24weeks of gestation (grade B); in case of singleton pregnancy and short cervix (less than 25mm), a Mc Donald cerclage has to be done (grade A). A cerclage is also recommended in case of three previous fetal loss (grade B). In case of failure of a previous Mc Donald cerclage, a cervico-isthmic cerclage is recommended (grade C). In case of a previous fetal loss, uterine cavity has to be explored. In subsequent pregnancy, cervical length has to be evaluated between 15 and 24SA to indicate a cervical cerclage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  7. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  8. Hunter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in girls. There's no cure for Hunter syndrome. Treatment of Hunter syndrome involves management of symptoms and complications. Symptoms Hunter syndrome is one type of a group of inherited metabolic disorders called mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs), and Hunter syndrome is ...

  9. Characterization of fetal body movement recorded by the Hewlett-Packard M-1350-A fetal monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, T D; Rayburn, W F; Smith, C V

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a commercially available monitor, the Hewlett-Packard M-1350-A fetal monitor, to record and discriminate between various fetal body movements. Twenty-four patients between 29 and 42 weeks' gestation were monitored over a 20 to 30 minute period simultaneously by the Hewlett-Packard instrument and ultrasonography. All 593 single or clustered fetal movements recorded by the monitor were seen ultrasonographically as being extremity movements that were either isolated or combined with trunk motion. Discriminating between these two types of movements was not possible on the basis of the duration of recorded movements. All adequate fetal heart rate accelerations were attributed to combined trunk and extremity movements. Detection of fetal hiccups was less exact, and recording of fetal hand, mouth, breathing, and rapid eye movements was beyond the sensitivity of the monitor. Signal artifacts were attributable to either motion of the maternal abdomen or Doppler transducer and became less of a problem with experience. Fetal extremity movements were recorded with accuracy by this new fetal monitor.

  10. Abnormalities of fetal rib number and associated fetal anomalies using three dimensional ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Ahmad Khodair

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Abnormal number of fetal ribs more to be an isolated finding (4.3% but it may also be seen with other anomalies (3.7% in this study. 3DUS is useful for scanning the fetal ribs in the mid trimester of the pregnancy for early detection of associated genetic aberrations.

  11. Intrapartum fetal monitoring by ST-analysis of the fetal ECG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, M.E.M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Intrapartum fetal monitoring aims to identify fetuses at risk for neonatal and long-term injury due to asphyxia. To serve this purpose, cardiotocography (CTG) combined with ST-analysis of the fetal electrocardiogram (ECG), which is a relatively new method, may be used. The main aim of this

  12. Prenatal Diagnosis of Isolated Fetal Hydrocolpos Secondary to Congenital Imperforate Hymen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenn-Jhy Tseng

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old primigravida was referred to our hospital at 36 weeks of gestation with a fetal pelvic mass. Ultrasonography showed the fluid-filled area to be a 9 × 4 × 5-cm pear-shaped retrovesical mass with a funnel-shaped blind pouch at the distal end of the fetal vagina. Marked left hydronephrosis resulting from mass compression was also detected. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging further defined a pelvic lesion extending cephalically into the abdomen and caudally into the vagina. Membranal protrusion of the introitus was clearly identified. Therefore, the diagnosis of congenital imperforate hymen with hydrocolpos was established. At 38 weeks of gestation, a 2,966-g female infant was delivered vaginally with good Apgar scores. Physical examination of the neonate revealed a bulging membrane covering the vaginal opening. The presence of syndromic disorders (McKusick-Kaufman, Ellis-van Creveld or Bardet-Biedl syndromes, genitourinary and anorectal anomalies were excluded. The karyotype was 46, XX. A hymenotomy was performed on the second day of life. The infant recovered fully after hymenotomy.

  13. Revised estimates of the risk of fetal loss following a prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 13 or trisomy 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadino, Alana; Morris, Joan K

    2017-04-01

    Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) both have high natural fetal loss rates. The aim of this study was to provide estimates of these fetal loss rates by single gestational week of age using data from the National Down Syndrome Cytogenetic Register. Data from all pregnancies with Edwards or Patau syndrome that were prenatally detected in England and Wales from 2004 to 2014 was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival estimates. Pregnancies were entered into the analysis at the time of gestation at diagnosis, and were considered "under observation" until the gestation at outcome. There were 4088 prenatal diagnoses of trisomy 18 and 1471 of trisomy 13 in the analysis. For trisomy 18, 30% (95%CI: 25-34%) of viable fetuses at 12 weeks will result in a live birth and at 39 weeks gestation 67% (60-73%) will result in a live birth. For trisomy 13 the survival is 50% (41-58%) at 12 weeks and 84% (73-90%) at 39 weeks. There was no significant difference in survival between males and females when diagnosed at 12 weeks for trisomy 18 (P-value = 0.27) or trisomy 13 (P-value = 0.47). This paper provides the most precise gestational age-specific estimates currently available for the risk of fetal loss in trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 pregnancies in a general population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Fetal Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Models: Systems Information on Fetal Biometry and Gross Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduljalil, Khaled; Johnson, Trevor N; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2017-12-20

    Postulating fetal exposure to xenobiotics has been based on animal studies; however, inter-species differences can make this problematic. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models may capture the rapid changes in anatomical, biochemical, and physiological parameters during fetal growth over the duration of pregnancy and help with interpreting laboratory animal data. However, these models require robust information on the longitudinal variations of system parameter values and their covariates. The objective of this study was to present an extensive analysis and integration of the available biometric data required for creating a virtual human fetal population by means of equations that define the changes of each parameter with gestational age. A comprehensive literature search was carried out on the parameters defining the growth of a fetus during in-utero life including weight, height, and body surface area in addition to other indices of fetal size, body fat, and water. Collated data were assessed and integrated through a meta-analysis to develop mathematical algorithms to describe growth with fetal age. Data for the meta-analysis were obtained from 97 publications, of these, 15 were related to fetal height or length, 32 to fetal weight, 4 to fetal body surface area, 8 to crown length, 5 to abdominal circumference, 12 to head circumference, 14 to body fat, and 12 to body water. Various mathematical algorithms were needed to describe parameter values from the time of conception to birth. The collated data presented in this article enabled the development of mathematical functions to describe fetal biometry and provide a potentially useful resource for building anthropometric features of fetal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models.

  15. [Neonatal staphylococcal epidermolysis due to maternal-fetal transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léauté-Labrèze, C; Sarlangue, J; Pedespan, L; Doermann, H P; Taïeb, A

    1999-10-01

    The staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is due to exfoliative toxins A or B excreted by some strains of Staphylococcus aureus. This syndrome is exceptional in the first hours of life. We report a case of SSSS due to materno-fetal infection. At 31 weeks of pregnancy a 40-year-old mother was febrile (39 degrees C) and a premature rupture of the amniotic sac occurred the following day. SSSS was diagnosed at 6 hours of life in the newborn, a 1760 g female. Staphylococcus aureus grew on the blood and vaginal bacterial cultures of the mother, as well as, from cultures of skin, nose, throat, and umbilical catheter in the newborn. The strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated in the mother and the child had identical characteristic antibiotype and genotype by Random-PCR. The genes for both exfoliations A and B were present. Epidermization was rapidly obtained and no septicemia or septic complication was noted. Staphylococcus aureus is usually responsible for nosocomial infections which occur in the early newborn period. In most cases, the infection is transmitted by a carrier who manipulates the child (family, visitors, nurse or medical staff). In our case, onset of SSSS early after birth suggested a perinatal transmission, due to lower genital tract infection in the mother. The presence of SSSS in the child and not in the mother may be explained by a massive perinatal infection and low elimination of the toxin in the newborn resulting in higher concentrations of exfoliative toxins in the blood.

  16. Noninvasive diagnosis of fetal aneuploidy by shotgun sequencing DNA from maternal blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H. Christina; Blumenfeld, Yair J.; Chitkara, Usha; Hudgins, Louanne; Quake, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    We directly sequenced cell-free DNA with high-throughput shotgun sequencing technology from plasma of pregnant women, obtaining, on average, 5 million sequence tags per patient sample. This enabled us to measure the over- and underrepresentation of chromosomes from an aneuploid fetus. The sequencing approach is polymorphism-independent and therefore universally applicable for the noninvasive detection of fetal aneuploidy. Using this method, we successfully identified all nine cases of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), two cases of trisomy 18 (Edward syndrome), and one case of trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) in a cohort of 18 normal and aneuploid pregnancies; trisomy was detected at gestational ages as early as the 14th week. Direct sequencing also allowed us to study the characteristics of cell-free plasma DNA, and we found evidence that this DNA is enriched for sequences from nucleosomes. PMID:18838674

  17. Intrauterine management of fetal supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) with cardiac failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniswaran, G; Japaraj, R P; Asri Ranga, A R; Cheong, H K

    2015-12-01

    Fetal arrhythmias are not uncommon in pregnancy. The diagnosis can be established on routine ultrasound scan. Fetal supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is the most common cause of fetal tachycardia. If left undiagnosed and untreated, these fetuses may develop cardiac failure, hydrops fetalis and eventually death. We report two fetuses diagnosed antenatally to have fetal SVT. Both fetuses were in cardiac failure and were successfully treated with maternal administration of antiarrhythmic medications. Digoxin, and in severe instances, a combination with flecanaide significantly improved fetal outcomes and prevented fetal mortality. The long term prognosis of such patients are good.

  18. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  19. INTRAUTERINE FETAL DEATH CASES AT TERTIARY CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Lal Bishnoi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Intrauterine fetal death is a tragic event for the parents and a great cause of stress for the caregiver. It is an important indicator of maternal and perinatal health of a given population. This study was undertaken to study the maternal and fetal factors associated with intrauterine fetal death. Aim and Objective- This was an Analytical study aimed to evaluate and understand the prevalence, socio-epidemiological and etiological factors of IUFD methodology should not be mixed with aims and objectives MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was carried out at March 2017 to June 2017 (4 months study which was conducted at Dr. S. N. Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan. The details were entered in a preformed proforma. IUD is defined as fetal death beyond 20 weeks of gestation and/or birth weight >500g. The details of complaints at admission, obstetrics history, menstrual history, examination findings, per vaginal examination findings, mode and method of delivery and fetal outcomes and investigation reports were recorded. RESULTS A total of 227 intrauterine fetal deaths were reported amongst 6264 deliveries conducted during the study period. The incidence rate of intrauterine fetal death was 36/1000 live births. 192 (84.56% deliveries were unbooked and unsupervised and 133 (58.59% belonged to rural population and 126 (55.5% were preterm and 221 (97.55% were singleton pregnancy. Among the identifiable causes hypertensive disorders (24.22% and severe anemia (13.10% were most common followed by placental causes (9.97%. Congenital malformations were responsible for 12.39% and unidentifiable causes were 11.01%. Induction was done in 103 patients, 94 patients had spontaneous onset of labour and caesarean section was done in 30 patients. Incidence of intrauterine foetal demise gradually decreased as parity advanced. CONCLUSION Institutional deliveries should be promoted to prevent intrapartum fetal deaths. Decrease in the incidence of IUD would

  20. Maternal undernutrition and fetal developmental programming of obesity: the glucocorticoid connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-Branco, Ana; Keating, Elisa; Martel, Fátima

    2015-02-01

    An adequate maternal nutrition during pregnancy is crucial for the health outcome of offspring in adulthood. Maternal undernutrition during critical periods of fetal development can program the fetus for metabolic syndrome (MetS) later in life, especially when postnatally challenged with a hypernutritive diet. Adipogenesis, which begins in utero and accelerates in neonatal life, is a major candidate for developmental programming. During fetal development, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is extremely susceptible to programming, and the HPA tone is increased throughout life in undernourished conditions. As a consequence, an alteration in the expression and function of glucocorticoid (GC) receptors and of the major GC regulatory enzymes (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and -2) occurs. In this review, we will give insights into the role of maternoplacental adverse interactions under the specific context of maternal undernutrition, for later-in-life MetS development, with a special emphasis on the role of GCs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. The relationship between maternal and fetal vitamin D, insulin resistance, and fetal growth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2013-05-01

    Evidence for a role of vitamin D in maintaining normal glucose homeostasis is inconclusive. We sought to clarify the relationship between maternal and fetal insulin resistance and vitamin D status. This is a prospective cohort study of 60 caucasian pregnant women. Concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), glucose, insulin, and leptin were measured in early pregnancy and at 28 weeks. Ultrasound at 34 weeks assessed fetal anthropometry including abdominal wall width, a marker of fetal adiposity. At delivery birth weight was recorded and fetal 25-OHD, glucose, C-peptide, and leptin measured in cord blood. Insulin resistance was calculated using the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) equation. We found that those with lower 25-OHD in early pregnancy had higher HOMA indices at 28 weeks, (r = -.32, P = .02). No significant relationship existed between maternal or fetal leptin and 25-OHD, or between maternal or fetal 25-OHD and fetal anthropometry or birth weight. The incidence of vitamin D deficiency was high at each time point (15%-45%). These findings lend support to routine antenatal supplementation with vitamin D in at risk populations.

  2. Comparison between antenatal neurodevelopmental test and fetal Doppler in the assessment of fetal well being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjak, Asim; Talic, Amira; Honemeyer, Ulrich; Stanojevic, Milan; Zalud, Ivica

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to compare circulatory changes in the fetal brain under certain pathological conditions with alterations in fetal behavior. A prospective longitudinal cohort study on fetal behavior of fetuses from singleton pregnancies between the 28th and 38th gestational week in the period from March 2009 to October 2011 was undertaken. There were 596 fetuses in the high-risk group and 273 fetuses in the low-risk group. Elevated umbilical artery Doppler pulsatility index and reduced middle cerebral artery pulsatility index obtained in the absence of fetal movements were considered abnormal. The Kurjak Antenatal Neurodevelopmental Test (KANET) was used to assess fetal behavior. Statistically significant differences in the distribution of normal, abnormal, and borderline KANET scores between low-risk and high-risk groups were found. Furthermore, 596 fetuses from the high-risk group were subdivided into subgroups according to the risk factor. The largest proportion of abnormal KANET scores (23.9%) was in the subgroup of fetuses whose mothers had an offspring diagnosed with cerebral palsy (23.9%), followed by the proportion of borderline KANET scores in the subgroup of fetuses from febrile mothers (12.7%). Fetal behavior was significantly different between the normal group and the following subgroups of fetuses: fetal growth restriction (FGR), gestational diabetes mellitus, threatened preterm birth, antepartal hemorrhage, maternal fever, sibling with cerebral palsy, and polyhydramnios. A new clinical application of the KANET test in early identification of fetuses at risk for adverse neurological outcome was demonstrated.

  3. Maternal sickle cell trait and fetal hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, S

    2000-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell trait (SCT) usually run a benign course. But they may develop vaso-occlusive crisis, which may lead to hypoxia. During these episodes, pregnant women with SCT may effect the developing fetus. This report describes an interesting finding of subtle degree of fetal hypoxia associated with maternal SCT. Twenty mothers with SCT were compared with 20 controls for the amount of circulating nucleated red blood cells (NRBC) and marker of fetal hypoxia at birth. Elevated number of circulating NRBC were noted in the cord blood of neonates born to mother with SCT as compared with controls, suggesting evidence of intrauterine fetal hypoxia. A larger prospective study is needed to elaborate further on this association.

  4. Effect of Placenta Previa on Fetal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARPER, Lorie M.; ODIBO, Anthony O.; MACONES, George A.; CRANE, James P.; CAHILL, Alison G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between placenta previa and abnormal fetal growth. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of consecutive women undergoing ultrasound between 15–22 weeks. Groups were defined by the presence or absence of complete or partial placenta previa. The primary outcome was intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), defined as a birth weight placenta previa on fetal growth restriction. Results Of 59,149 women, 724 (1.2%) were diagnosed with a complete or partial previa. After adjusting for significant confounding factors (black race, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and single umbilical artery,), the risk of IUGR remained similar (adjusted odds ratio 1.1, 95% CI 0.9–1.5). The presence of bleeding did not impact the risk of growth restriction. Conclusion Placenta previa is not associated with fetal growth restriction. Serial growth ultrasounds are not indicated in patients with placenta previa. PMID:20599185

  5. Updates in fetal spina bifida repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Yair J; Belfort, Michael A

    2018-04-01

    To examine updates in fetal spina bifida surgical repair, as well as promising results emerging from translational medicine. Although the Management of Myelomeningocele Study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health helped establish the neonatal benefits of prenatal spina bifida repair via uterine hysterotomy, also known as 'open' fetal surgery, fetoscopic approaches may yield better maternal and obstetric outcomes. Spina bifida is a severe congenital malformation associated with significant neonatal and childhood morbidity and mortality. Although 'open' fetal spina bifida repair has become the standard prenatal surgical approach due to proven neonatal benefit, this approach is associated with significant maternal and obstetric risks. Recent developments from multidisciplinary clinical and translational research have highlighted the potential for novel fetoscopic surgical approaches to decrease maternal morbidity and reduce obstetric risks. Moreover, novel stem cell therapies coupled with in-utero medical approaches targeting the pathophysiological pathways associated with spina bifida are likely to make additional significant impact.

  6. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 1: Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Fetal development is a critical period for shaping the lifelong health of an individual. However, the fetus is susceptible to internal and external stimuli that can lead to adverse long-term health consequences. Glucocorticoids are an important developmental switch, driving changes in gene regulation that are necessary for normal growth and maturation. The fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is particularly susceptible to long-term programming by glucocorticoids; these effects can persist throughout the life of an organism. Dysfunction of the HPA axis as a result of fetal programming has been associated with impaired brain growth, altered behaviour and increased susceptibility to chronic disease (such as metabolic and cardiovascular disease). Moreover, the effects of glucocorticoid-mediated programming are evident in subsequent generations, and transmission of these changes can occur through both maternal and paternal lineages.

  7. Fetal programming and eating disorder risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Candace; Pearce, Brad; Barrera, Ingrid; Mummert, Amanda

    2017-09-07

    Fetal programming describes the process by which environmental stimuli impact fetal development to influence disease development later in life. Our analysis summarizes evidence for the role of fetal programming in eating disorder etiology through review of studies demonstrating specific obstetric complications and later eating risk of anorexia or bulimia. Using Pubmed, we found thirteen studies investigating obstetric factors and eating disorder risk published between 1999 and 2016. We then discuss modifiable maternal risk factors, including nutrition and stress, that influence anorexia or bulimia risk of their offspring. Translation of these findings applies to preventative strategies by health organizations and physicians to provide optimal health for mothers and their children to prevent development of medical and psychiatric illnesses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms of Fetal Programming in Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Edward Jones

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Events that occur in the early fetal environment have been linked to long-term health and lifespan consequences in the adult. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, which may occur as a result of nutrient insufficiency, exposure to hormones, or disruptions in placental structure or function, may induce the fetus to alter its developmental program in order to adapt to the new conditions. IUGR may result in a decrease in the expression of genes that are responsible for nephrogenesis as nutrients are rerouted to the development of more essential organs. Fetal survival under these conditions often results in low birth weight and a deficit in nephron endowment, which are associated with hypertension in adults. Interestingly, male IUGR offspring appear to be more severely affected than females, suggesting that sex hormones may be involved. The processes of fetal programming of hypertension are complex, and we are only beginning to understand the underlying mechanisms.

  9. ARHGEF11 affecting the placental insulin signaling pathway in fetal macrosomia of normal glucose tolerance pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanyi; Su, Rina; Lin, Li; Yang, Huixia

    2018-03-01

    Fetal macrosomia has confirmed be related to multiple labor complications and metabolism syndromes later in life. However, the mechanism of fetal macrosomia in normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) pregnant women is still obscure. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 11 (ARHGEF11) and the insulin signaling pathway in placenta affecting fetal overgrowth in NGT and GDM pregnant women. Eighty-nine pregnant women with paired antepartum BMI were recruited and divided into four groups: NGT with normal birth weight (NGT-N, n = 30) or macrosomia (NGT-M, n = 22) and GDM with normal birth weight (GDM-N, n = 22) or macrosomia (GDM-M, n = 15). Placenta tissue was collected to examine the expression of ARHGEF11, ROCK1, the phosphorylation of Tyr612 IRS-1 (p-Y612), Ser307 IRS-1 (p-S307), PI3K, AKT, pAKT, GLUT4 and S6K. Gene expression of ARHGEF11, ROCK1, p-S307 and S6K in placenta was significantly increased in the NGT-M group (p macrosomia in NGT pregnant women. The insulin signaling pathway was suppressed in GDM placenta, but was not closely related to fetal macrosomia, indicated different mechanism in fetal overgrowth in NGT and GDM pregnant women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pierre Robin sequence associated with first trimester fetal tamoxifen exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joel C; Clericuzio, Carol L

    2008-08-15

    Tamoxifen is a nonsteroidal antiestrogen used as the current adjuvant endocrine treatment of choice for premenopausal women treated for breast cancer and its potential for causing fetal harm during pregnancy remains inconclusive. While the evidence of tamoxifen's effects on humans in utero is minimal, animal studies have shown evidence of teratogenicity, hence the FDA's class D categorization of the drug. In 1994 Cullins et al. published a case report entitled "Goldenhar's Syndrome Associated with Tamoxifen Given to the Mother During Gestation." At the time of publication, the authors noted that the manufacturer of tamoxifen knew of two cases associated with tamoxifen administration which resulted in congenital craniofacial defects. Cullins' case of Goldenhar syndrome is also a craniofacial disorder and thus represented the third such case. We report on the fourth case of a tamoxifen-associated craniofacial anomaly. The mother became pregnant while undergoing tamoxifen therapy for breast cancer. A child with severe micrognathia and cleft palate was born. It is noteworthy that the two patterns of craniofacial malformations in tamoxifen exposed infants--Goldenhar syndrome in Cullins' et al. case and Pierre Robin sequence reported here--have also both been observed in isotretinoin exposed infants. While a larger spectrum of anomalies is characteristic of retinoic acid embryopathy, the specific craniofacial anomalies include facial asymmetry, microtia, micrognatha and U-shaped cleft of the secondary palate, that is, malformations seen in the two tamoxifen exposed infants. Therefore, it is conceivable that these two agents could produce comparable embryotoxic effects if they function in a like way during embryogenesis. While the majority of tamoxifen exposed infants are normal, the ascertainment of teratogenic effects from tamoxifen will best be determined by data from teratogen registries. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Fetal dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology examinations are frequently performed in all countries because of the benefit that the patient derives from the resultant diagnosis. Given that so many examinations are performed it is inevitable that there will be occasions when the planned exposure of a woman who is known to be pregnant is contemplated. In these circumstances, there must be rigorous justification of the examination and the procedure itself must be optimised as well. Radiation risks from fetal irradiation are well established. These risks fall into three categories: 1) a cancer induction risk (mainly leukaemia); 2) hereditary effects (as the fetus is a potential parent); 3) a risk of serious mental retardation (if the fetus is exposed in the critical 8-15 weeks period when the forebrain is being developed). Risk factors for these effects have been reviewed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Special rules apply to the radiology of women who are or who may be pregnant. These rules have been developed to avoid he unintended irradiation of the fetus. These rules have been variously referred to as the 10-day rule and the 28-day rules, in which radiology of potentially pregnant women is restricted to the first 10 or 28 days following menstruation. It is apparent that the advice provided by national bodies varies, as different rules apply internationally, due presumably to a lack of an international consensus on the subject. The advice from the National Radiological Protection Board, the College of Radiographers and the Royal College of Radiologists applies in the United Kingdom. In summary, the advice is that women of child bearing age are asked before a diagnostic radiology examination in which the pelvis is in, or near, the primary beam are asked if they are, or may be, pregnant. If pregnancy can be excluded then the examination can proceed. If it is likely that the patient is pregnant, then the proposed examination must undergo rigorous justification. If

  12. Only a minority of sex chromosome abnormalities are detected by a national prenatal screening program for Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, Mette Hansen; Krag, Kirstine Stochholm; Uldbjerg, Niels

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: How does a national prenatal screening program for Down syndrome (DS) perform in detecting sex chromosome abnormalities (SCAs)-Turner syndrome (TS), Klinefelter syndrome, 47,XXX and 47,XYY syndromes. SUMMARY ANSWER: The SCA detection rate resulting from DS screening was below 50...... of accompanying conditions. There is limited information about pre- and perinatal status that distinguishes SCA embryogenesis from normal fetal development. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A register-based case-control study from the Danish Central Cytogenetic Register (DCCR), cross-linked with the Danish Fetal...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  14. Role of fetal surgery in spinal dysraphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martina Messing-Jünger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Open spinal dysraphism is a common and clinically challenging organo-genetic malformation. Due to the well-known multi-organ affection with significant implication on the lives of patients and their families, abortion after prenatal diagnosis became reality in most parts of the world. After publication of the Management of Myelomeningocele Study (MOMS results fetal surgery seems to be a new option and a broad discussion arose regarding advantages and risks of in utero treatment of spina bifida. This paper tries to evaluate objectively the actual state of knowledge and experience. This review article gives a historical overview as well as the experimental and pathophysiological background of fetal surgery in open spinal dysraphism. Additionally clinical follow-up experience of foetoscopically treated patients are presented and discussed. After carefully outweighing all available information on fetal surgery for spina bifida, one has to conclude, in accordance with the MOMS investigators, that in utero surgery cannot be considered a standard option at present time. But there is clear evidence of the hypothesis that early closure of the spinal canal has a positive influence on spinal cord function and severity of Chiari malformation type II, has been proven. A persisting problem is the fetal risk of prematurity and the maternal risk of uterus damage. There is also evidence that due to technical restrictions, fetal closure of the spinal canal bears unsolved problems leading to a higher postnatal incidence of complication surgery. Finally, missing long-term results make a definite evaluation impossible so far. At the moment, fetal surgery in open spinal dysraphism is not a standard of care despite promising results regarding central nervous system protection due to early spinal canal closure. Many technical problems need to be solved in the future in order to make this option a safe and standard one.

  15. Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, Janet A; Costigan, Kathleen A; Nelson, Priscilla; Gurewitsch, Edith D; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during the 32nd week of pregnancy were recorded in 100 maternal-fetal pairs using a digitized data collection system. The 18-min guided imagery relaxation manipulation generated significant changes in maternal heart rate, skin conductance, respiration period, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Significant alterations in fetal neurobehavior were observed, including decreased fetal heart rate (FHR), increased FHR variability, suppression of fetal motor activity (FM), and increased FM-FHR coupling. Attribution of the two fetal cardiac responses to the guided imagery procedure itself, as opposed to simple rest or recumbency, is tempered by the observed pattern of response. Evaluation of correspondence between changes within individual maternal-fetal pairs revealed significant associations between maternal autonomic measures and fetal cardiac patterns, lower umbilical and uterine artery resistance and increased FHR variability, and declining salivary cortisol and FM activity. Potential mechanisms that may mediate the observed results are discussed.

  16. Fetal megacystis : prediction of spontaneous resolution and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanella, F.; Duin, L.; Adama van Scheltema, P. N.; Cohen-Overbeek, T. E.; Pajkrt, E.; Bekker, M.; Willekes, C.; Bax, C. J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the natural history of fetal megacystis from diagnosis in utero to postnatal outcome, and to identify prognostic indicators of spontaneous resolution and postnatal outcome after resolution. Methods: This was a national retrospective cohort study. Fetal megacystis was

  17. Maternal and fetal outcomes among women with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansil, Pooja; Kuklina, Elena V; Meikle, Susan F; Posner, Samuel F; Kourtis, Athena P; Ellington, Sascha R; Jamieson, Denise J

    2010-02-01

    To compare maternal and fetal outcomes among women with and without diagnosed depression at the time of delivery. Hospital discharge data from the 1998-2005 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) were used to examine delivery-related hospitalizations for select maternal and fetal outcomes by depression diagnosis. The rate of depression per 1000 deliveries increased significantly from 2.73 in 1998 to 14.1 in 2005 (p depression were significantly more likely to have cesarean delivery, preterm labor, anemia, diabetes, and preeclampsia or hypertension compared with women without depression. Fetal outcomes significantly associated with maternal depression were fetal growth restriction, fetal abnormalities, fetal distress, and fetal death. These findings suggest that depression is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Our results provide additional impetus to screen for depression among women of reproductive age, especially those who plan to become pregnant.

  18. Prenatal ultrasound findings of fetal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Song, Mi Jin; Min, Jee Yeon; Han, Byoung Hee; Lee, Young Ho; Cho, Byung Jae; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neoplasms can develop in each tetal organ. Most fetal neoplasms can be detected by careful prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Some neoplosms show specific ultrasonographic findings suggesting the differential diagnosis, but others do not. Knowledge of the presence of a neoplasm in the fetus may alter the prenatal management of a pregnancy and the mode of delivery, and facilitates immediate postnatal treatment. During the last five years, we experienced 32 cases of fetal neoplasms in a variety of organs. We describe their typical and ultrasonographic findings with correlating postnatal CT, MRI, and pathologic findings

  19. Fetal absorbed doses by radiopharmaceutical administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M; Gomez Parada, Ines M.; Di Trano, Jose L.

    2000-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author)

  20. Pontomedullary disconnection: fetal and neonatal considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, Emma; Sweeney, Elizabeth [Royal Liverpool Children' s Hospital, Department of Clinical Genetics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Pilling, David [Royal Liverpool Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hesseling, Markus; Subhedar, Nim [Liverpool Women' s Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Roberts, Devender [Liverpool Women' s Hospital, Department of Fetal Medicine, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The cerebellar and pontocerebellar hypoplasias present a unique challenge when detected in the developing fetus. A diverse aetiology and prognosis make counselling of these families difficult. Advances in fetal imaging allow for more accurate diagnosis and counselling, but postnatal MRI is still required. A case is presented in which cerebellar hypoplasia was detected at 20 weeks gestation. Later fetal imaging provided further information, but a diagnosis of pontomedullary disconnection was not made until the postnatal MRI scan. The clinical findings and possible causes of such pontocerebellar abnormalities are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Tumours of the fetal body: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avni, Fred E.; Massez, Anne; Cassart, Marie [University Clinics of Brussels - Erasme Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-11-15

    Tumours of the fetal body are rare, but lesions have been reported in all spaces, especially in the mediastinum, the pericardial space, the adrenals, the kidney, and the liver. Lymphangioma and teratoma are the commonest histological types encountered, followed by cardiac rhabdomyoma. Adrenal neuroblastoma is the commonest malignant tumour. Imaging plays an essential role in the detection and work-up of these tumours. In addition to assisting clinicians it also helps in counselling parents. Most tumours are detected by antenatal US, but fetal MRI is increasingly used as it brings significant additional information in terms of tumour extent, composition and complications. (orig.)

  2. Disproportionate fetal growth and fingerprint patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, T; Godfrey, K; Atkinson, C; Badger, J; Kay, R; Owens, R; Osmond, C

    1998-05-01

    Fingerprint whorl patterns are formed during fetal life. In a group of 180 term infants, those with more fingerprint whorls tended to have a small abdominal circumference (P = 0.09) and high ratio of head to abdominal circumference (P = 0.008). These associations were independent of the relation between the whorl counts of the mothers and their infants. We also found an independent correlation between the babies' whorl count and the combination of increasing subscapular (P = 0.03) and decreasing triceps (P = 0.02) skinfold thicknesses of the mothers. Whorl patterns are associated with adult hypertension; maternal nutritional status may influence their common origin during fetal development.

  3. Left Ventricular Diastolic Function and Characteristics in Fetal Aortic Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kevin G.; Schidlow, David; Freud, Lindsay; Escobar-Diaz, Maria; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FAV) has shown promise in averting progression of mid-gestation aortic stenosis (AS) to hypoplastic left heart syndrome in a subset of patients. Patients who achieve biventricular circulation after FAV frequently have left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction (DD). This study evaluates DD in fetuses with AS by comparing echocardiographic indices of LV diastolic function in fetuses undergoing FAV (n=20) to controls (n=40) and evaluates for LV factors associated with DD in FAV patients. We also compared pre- and post-FAV DD variables (n=16). Median gestational age (24 weeks, range 18–29 weeks) and fetal heart rate were similar between FAV and controls. Compared to controls, FAV patients had universally abnormal LV diastolic parameters including fused mitral inflow E and A waves (p=0.008), higher E velocity(p<0.001), shorter mitral inflow time (p=0.001), lower LV lateral annulus E′ (p<0.001), septal E′ (p=0.003) and higher E/E′ (p<0.001) than controls. FAV patients had abnormal right ventricular mechanics with higher tricuspid inflow E velocity (p<0.001), and shorter tricuspid inflow time (p=0.03). Worse LV diastolic function (lower LV E′) was associated with higher endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE) grade (r=0.74, p<0.001), large LV volume (r=0.55, p=0.013) and sphericity (r=0.58, P=0.009) and with lower LV pressure by mitral regurgitation jet (r=−0.68, p<0.001). Post-FAV, fewer patients had fused mitral inflow E and A than pre-FAV (p=0.05) and septal E′ was higher (=0.04). In conclusion, fetuses with mid-gestation AS have evidence of marked DD. Worse DD is associated with larger, more spherical LV, with more extensive EFE and lower LV pressure. PMID:24819899

  4. Fetal ultrasound findings in trisomy 18 at midpregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Bojana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trisomy 18 (Edwards' syndrome, a lethal chromosomal aberration, is the second most common autosomal trisomy with an incidence 1: 8000. The aim of this study is to evaluate the sonographic findings in fetuses with trisomy 18. In ten years period (2002-2012 we analyzed fetal blood samples for chromosome abnormalities. Samples were taken by cordocentesis and processed using standard techniques. Sixteen metaphase cells were analyzed for chromosomal constitution in each sample after tripsin-Giemsa banding. A retrospective review of the cytogenetic laboratory database identified all cases of trisomy 18 in ten years period. The prenatal sonographic studies in fetuses at 16 to 22 weeks' gestation, done before invasive testing for the karyotype were reviewed for anatomic findings. From 2100 samples of fetal blood analyzed for chromosomal abnormalities, there were 16 (0,8% with complete trisomy 18. We found no mosaicism, or partial trisomy 18. The women that carried fetuses with trisomy 18 were 17 to 42 years of age. Four of them were above 35. From 16 fetuses with trisomy 18, 14 (87,5% had some anomaly detected by ultrasound, and other two were tested because of advanced maternal age. The most common findings in trisomy 18 were intrauterine growth retardation, polyhidramnios and anomalies of central nervous system, in 29% respectively. Multiple anomalies, including central nervous system, hart and gastrointestinal system anomalies, were also frequent (21%. Therapeutic termination of pregnancy was done in all cases after genetic counseling. Screening for chromosomal abnormalities using ultrasound is at utmost importance in cases of nonhereditary aberrations. Detailed ultrasonographic examinations of fetuses will enable health care providers to form the appropriate management plan for each patient.

  5. Noninvasive Prenatal Screening of Fetal Aneuploidy without Massively Parallel Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenming; Wang, Ting; Liu, Chao; Li, Hong; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Huanhuan; Chen, Songchang; Xin, Qiuhong; Tao, Jing; Huang, Liming; Jiang, Zhengwen

    2017-04-01

    Noninvasive prenatal screening (NIPS) using plasma cell-free DNA has gained tremendous popularity in the clinical assessment of fetal aneuploidy. Most, if not all, of these tests rely on complex and expensive massively parallel sequencing (MPS) techniques, hindering the use of NIPS as a common screening procedure. We have developed and optimized an MPS-independent noninvasive genetic test that can rapidly detect fetal aneuploidy at considerably lower costs. We used the high-throughput ligation-dependent probe amplification (HLPA) assay with standard z score statistics to identify the minute copy number change of targeted chromosomal regions. HLPA was modified from multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to allow quantification of up to 200 genomic loci in a single multiplex PCR. As a proof of principle, we conducted Down syndrome screening in 1182 women with singleton pregnancies [maternal age (SD): 32.7 (4.6)] using whole-genome sequencing-based NIPS and our method. Nineteen fetuses with trisomy 21 were detected by both methods and confirmed by karyotyping of amniotic fluid. Overall, our method showed 100.0% sensitivity (19/19) and 99.7% specificity (1076/1079) in trisomy 21 screening, generating a positive predictive value of 86.4% (19/22) and a 7.1% (84/1182) no-call rate. Our technique potentially opens new avenues for the development of inexpensive, yet effective, prenatal aneuploidy tests. The simplicity and accuracy of this method make it a good candidate for clinical implementation as a standard screening procedure. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  6. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho

    1998-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs

  8. Programación fetal de la hipertensión arterial del adulto: mecanismos celulares y moleculares Fetal programming of adult arterial hypertension: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Ramírez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cambios metabólicos in utero establecen patrones fisiológicos y estructurales a largo plazo que pueden "programar" la salud durante la vida adulta, teoría popularmente conocida como "hipótesis de Barker". La programación fetal implica que durante los períodos críticos del crecimiento prenatal, ciertos cambios en el entorno hormonal y nutricional del embrión, pueden alterar la expresión del genoma fetal, en tejidos con funciones fisiológicas y metabólicas en la etapa adulta. La evidencia sugiere que patologías como enfermedad vascular (por ejemplo, hipertensión, síndrome metabólico y diabetes mellitus tipo 2, pueden "programarse" durante las primeras etapas del desarrollo fetal y manifestarse en etapas tardías, al interactuar con el estilo de vida y otros factores de riesgo adquiridos convencionales con el medio ambiente. El objetivo de esta revisión es presentar evidencia adicional que apoye la asociación entre el bajo peso al nacer, con el aumento en la prevalencia de la hipertensión arterial en la edad adulta. Se revisan la función endotelial, el estrés oxidativo, la resistencia a la insulina y la función mitocondrial, como posibles mecanismos celulares y moleculares.Metabolic changes in utero establish long-term physiological and structural patterns which can "program" health in adulthood, theory popularly known as "Barker hypothesis". The fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, some changes in hormonal and nutritional environment of the embryo can alter fetal genome expression in tissues with physiological and metabolic functions in adulthood. Evidence suggests that pathologies like vascular disease (eg, hypertension, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus, may "be programmed" during the early stages of fetal development and manifest in later stages, when interacting with lifestyle and other conventional acquired risk factors with the environment. The aim of this review is to

  9. Nonhuman primate models of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, David H; Nicol, Lindsey E; Levine, Jon E; Xu, Ning; Goodarzi, Mark O; Dumesic, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    With close genomic and phenotypic similarity to humans, nonhuman primate models provide comprehensive epigenetic mimics of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), suggesting early life targeting for prevention. Fetal exposure to testosterone (T), of all nonhuman primate emulations, provides the closest PCOS-like phenotypes, with early-to-mid gestation T-exposed female rhesus monkeys exhibiting adult reproductive, endocrinological and metabolic dysfunctional traits that are co-pathologies of PCOS. Late gestational T exposure, while inducing adult ovarian hyperandrogenism and menstrual abnormalities, has less dysfunctional metabolic accompaniment. Fetal exposures to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or diethylstilbestrol (DES) suggest androgenic and estrogenic aspects of fetal programming. Neonatal exposure to T produces no PCOS-like outcome, while continuous T treatment of juvenile females causes precocious weight gain and early menarche (high T), or high LH and weight gain (moderate T). Acute T exposure of adult females generates polyfollicular ovaries, while chronic T exposure induces subtle menstrual irregularities without metabolic dysfunction. PMID:23370180

  10. Sheep models of polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Lopez, Almudena

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a fertility disorder affecting 5–7% of reproductive-aged women. Women with PCOS manifest both reproductive and metabolic defects. Several animal models have evolved, which implicate excess steroid exposure during fetal life in the development of the PCOS phenotype. This review addresses the fetal and adult reproductive and metabolic consequences of prenatal steroid excess in sheep and the translational relevance of these findings to PCOS. By comparing findings in various breeds of sheep, the review targets the role of genetic susceptibility to fetal insults. Disruptions induced by prenatal testosterone excess are evident at both the reproductive and metabolic level with each influencing the other thus creating a self-perpetuating vicious cycle. The review highlights the need for identifying a common mediator of the dysfunctions at the reproductive and metabolic levels and developing prevention and treatment interventions targeting all sites of disruption in unison for achieving optimal success. PMID:23084976

  11. Pre- and postnatal imaging of Pai syndrome with spontaneous intrauterine closure of a frontal cephalocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrocky, Tomas; Ebner, Lukas; Stranzinger, Enno [Inselspital University Hospital, University of Bern, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Liniger, Benjamin [Inselspital University Hospital, University of Bern, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Bern (Switzerland); Weisstanner, Christian [Inselspital University Hospital, University of Bern, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Pai syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by cutaneous polyps of the face, pericallosal lipoma and median cleft lip. We report on a newborn girl with a variant of Pai syndrome presenting with all typical findings except a median cleft. In addition, fetal sonography and MRI showed the unique intrauterine evolution of a cephalocele into an atretic cephalocele. (orig.)

  12. Diagnosis of Apert syndrome in the second-trimester using 2D and 3D ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David, A. L.; Turnbull, C.; Scott, R.; Freeman, J.; Bilardo, C. M.; van Maarle, M.; Chitty, L. S.

    2007-01-01

    To illustrate how Apert syndrome, a rare autosomal dominant genetic syndrome, can be detected in the second-trimester of pregnancy using 2D ultrasound, and how 3D ultrasound examination may provide parents with a better understanding of the structural defects affecting their baby. Fetal Medicine

  13. Correlation of ultrasonographic estimated fetal weight with actual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Sonographic fetal weight estimation is an important component of antenatal care. Aim: To sonographically estimate fetal weight at term and to compare estimated with actual birth weights to determine the validity of estimated fetal weights. Subjects and methods: In the prospective study, a convenience ...

  14. Prognostic Significance of Preterm Isolated Decreased Fetal Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Karahanoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim is to evaluate the prognostic significance of isolated, preterm decreased fetal movement following normal initial full diagnostic workup. Study design: A retrospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary centre. The applied protocol was approved by the Medical Research Ethics Department of the hospital where the research was conducted. Obstetrics outcomes of preterm- and term-decreased fetal movement were compared following an initial, normal diagnostic work up. Evaluated outcomes were birth weight, mode of delivery, stillbirth rate, induction of labour, development of gestational hypertension, small for gestational age and oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios during the follow up period. Result: Obstetric complications related to placental insufficiency develops more frequently for decreased fetal movement in preterm cases with respect to that of in term cases. Following the diagnosis of decreased fetal movement, pregnancy hypertension occurred in 17% of preterm decreased fetal movement cases and in 4.7% of term decreased fetal movement cases. Fetal growth restriction developed in 6.6% of preterm decreased fetal movement and in 2.3% of term decreased fetal movement. Amniotic fluid abnormalities more frequently developed in preterm decreased fetal movement. Conclusion: Following an initial normal diagnostic workup, preterm decreased fetal movement convey a higher risk for the development of pregnancy complications associated with placental insufficiency. The patient should be monitored closely and management protocols must be developed for initial normal diagnostic workups in cases of preterm decreased fetal movement.

  15. Fetal Ascites and Second Trimester Maternal Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Ling

    2006-09-01

    Conclusion: Second trimester perinatal HCV infection with possible CMV coinfection associated with fetal ascites is a rare event. Fetal therapy resulting in a successful outcome has not been reported. Prompt fetal therapy with paracentesis in this case led to the delivery of a healthy term liveborn baby with anti-HCV seropositivity.

  16. 21 CFR 884.4340 - Fetal vacuum extractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal vacuum extractor. 884.4340 Section 884.4340....4340 Fetal vacuum extractor. (a) Identification. A fetal vacuum extractor is a device used to... means of a suction cup attached to the scalp and is powered by an external vacuum source. This generic...

  17. Longitudinal study of computerized cardiotocography in early fetal growth restriction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, H.; Arabin, B.; Lees, Christoph C.; Oepkes, D.; Prefumo, Federico; Thilaganathan, B.; Todros, T.; Visser, G.H.A.; Bilardo, Caterina M.; Derks, J. B.; Diemert, A.; Duvekot, Johannes J.; Ferrazzi, E.; Frusca, T.; Hecher, K.; Marlow, N.; Martinelli, P.; Ostermayer, E.; Papageorghiou, Aris T.; Scheepers, Hubertina C. J.; Schlembach, D.; Schneider, K. T M; Valcamonico, A.; van Wassenaer-Leemhuis, A.; Ganzevoort, W.; Aktas, Ayse; Borgione, Silvia; Brezinka, Christoph; Calvert, Sandra; Chaoui, Rabih; Cornette, Jerome M J; Diehl, Thilo; van Eyck, Jim; Fratelli, Nicola; van Haastert, Inge Lot; Johnson, Samantha; Lobmaier, Silvia; Lopriore, Enrico; Mansi, Giuseppina; Missfelder-Lobos, Hannah; Martelli, Paola; Maso, Gianpaolo; Maurer-Fellbaum, Ute; Van Charante, Nico Mensing; De Tollenaer, Susanne Mulder; Moore, Tamanna; Napolitano, Raffaele; Oberto, Manuela; Ogge, Giovanna; van der Post, Joris Am; Preston, Lucy; Raimondi, Francesco; Reiss, Irwin K M; Rigano, Serena; Schuit, Ewoud; Skabar, Aldo; Spaanderman, Marc E.; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; Zimmermann, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To explore whether, in early fetal growth restriction (FGR), the longitudinal pattern of fetal heart rate (FHR) short-term variation (STV) can be used to identify imminent fetal distress and whether abnormalities of FHR recordings are associated with 2-year infant outcome. Methods: The

  18. Perspectives of fetal dystocia in cattle and buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Narayan Purohit

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We review the causes of fetal dystocia in cows and buffalo. Two fetal causes are distinct fetal oversize and fetal abnormalities. Fetal oversize is common in heifers, cows of beef cattle breeds, prolonged gestations, increased calf birth weight, male calves and perinatal fetal death with resultant emphysema. Fetal abnormalities include monsters, fetal diseases and fetal maldispositions, and it is difficult to deliver such fetuses because of their altered shape. Although monsters are rare in cattle, a large number of monstrosities have been reported in river buffalo; yet also here, overall incidence is low. Diseases of the fetus resulting in dystocia include hydrocephalus, ascites, anasarca and hydrothorax. The most common cause of dystocia in cattle seems to be fetal maldispositions, of which limb flexion and head deviation appear to be the most frequent. We provide a brief description of the management of dystocia from different causes in cattle and buffalo. A case analysis of 192 and 112 dystocia in cattle and buffalo, respectively, at our referral center revealed that dystocia is significantly higher (P<0.05 in first and second parity cows and buffalo, and that dystocia of fetal origin is common in cows (65.62% but less frequent (40.17% in buffalo. In buffalo, the single biggest cause of dystocia was uterine torsion (53.57%. Fetal survival was significantly (P<0.05 higher both in cows and buffalo when delivery was completed within 12 h of second stage of labor.

  19. Extraction of fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) by extended state ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring is a routine work for obtaining significant information about the fetal condition during pregnancy and labor. During pregnancy, the motivation for monitoring the fetal is to recognize pathological conditions, typically asphyxia with sufficient warning to enable intervention by the clinician.

  20. Non-invasive epigenetic detection of fetal trisomy 21 in first trimester maternal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyae Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Down syndrome (DS is the most common known aneuploidy, caused by an extra copy of all or part of chromosome 21. Fetal-specific epigenetic markers have been investigated for non-invasive prenatal detection of fetal DS. The phosphodiesterases gene, PDE9A, located on chromosome 21q22.3, is completely methylated in blood (M-PDE9A and unmethylated in the placenta (U-PDE9A. Therefore, we estimated the accuracy of non-invasive fetal DS detection during the first trimester of pregnancy using this tissue-specific epigenetic characteristic of PDE9A. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A nested, case-control study was conducted using maternal plasma samples collected from 108 pregnant women carrying 18 DS and 90 normal fetuses (each case was matched with 5 controls according to gestational weeks at blood sampling. All pregnancies were singletons at or before 12 weeks of gestation between October 2008 and May 2009. The maternal plasma levels of M-PDE9A and U-PDE9A were measured by quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. M-PDE9A and U-PDE9A levels were obtained in all samples and did not differ between male and female fetuses. M-PDE9A levels did not differ between the DS cases and controls (1854.3 vs 2004.5 copies/mL; P = 0.928. U-PDE9A levels were significantly elevated in women with DS fetuses compared with controls (356.8 vs 194.7 copies/mL, P<0.001. The sensitivities of U-PDE9A level and the unmethylation index of PDE9A for non-invasive fetal DS detection were 77.8% and 83.3%, respectively, with a 5% false-positive rate. In the risk assessment for fetal DS, the adjusted odds ratios of U-PDE9A level and UI were 46.2 [95% confidence interval: 7.8-151.6] and 63.7 [95% confidence interval: 23.2-206.7], respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that U-PDE9A level and the unmethylation index of PDE9A may be useful biomarkers for non-invasive fetal DS detection during the first trimester of pregnancy, regardless of fetal

  1. Predictive value of increased nuchal translucency as a screening test for the detection of fetal chromosomal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexioy, Eleni; Alexioy, Eleni; Trakakis, Eftihios; Kassanos, Demetrios; Farmakidis, George; Kondylios, Antonios; Laggas, Demetrios; Salamalekis, Emmanuel; Florentin, Lia; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Basios, George; Trompoukis, Pantelis; Georgiadoy, Lina; Panagiotopoulos, Takis

    2009-10-01

    The study aimed to estimate the incidence of increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester ultrasound scan results (cut-off limit 2.5 mm) and to evaluate the predictive value of increased nuchal translucency as a screening test for the detection of fetal chromosomal abnormalities. We used the ultrasound scan results of nuchal translucency evaluation and the results of chromosomal analysis of the invasive prenatal control performed as a result of increased nuchal translucency. We collected 2183 nuchal translucency ultrasound scans in which we detected 21 embryos with a pathologic value (0.96%). We collected the data of 168 cases of invasive prenatal control due to increased nuchal translucency from which 122 cases were found. A total of 122 cases of pregnant women undergone an invasive prenatal diagnostic method due to increased nuchal translucency, of which 11 fetuses were found with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) (9%), 3 fetuses with trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) (2.45%), 3 fetuses with monosomy 45XO (Turner syndrome) (2.45%) and 1 fetus with translocation (0.8%). The positive predictive value of the increased fetal nuchal translucency as a screening test for the detection of fetal chromosomal abnormalities based on the results of the chromosomal-genetic analysis of the invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures is 14.8%.

  2. Fetal goiter and bilateral ovarian cysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Pernille; Sundberg, Karin; Juul, Anders

    2008-01-01

    by each injection and followed by a gradual reduction of fetal goiter as well as the left ovarian cyst. The right cyst ruptured spontaneously. At 36 weeks + 4 days, the patient underwent elective caesarean section and gave birth to a female, weighing 2,880 g with 1- and 5-min Apgar scores of 10...

  3. Infertility, infertility treatment, and fetal growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Hammer Bech, Bodil

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between infertility, with or without treatment, and fetal growth, as well as perinatal and infant mortality. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51,041 singletons born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy 12 months or le...

  4. Noninvasive fetal RhD genotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Damkjær, Merete Berthu; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against RhD is the major cause of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), which causes fetal or neonatal death. The introduction of postnatal immune prophylaxis in the 1960s drastically reduced immunization incidents in pregnant, D-negative women. In several countries...

  5. Octreotide therapy and restricted fetal growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geilswijk, Marianne; Andersen, Lise Lotte Torvin; Frost, Morten

    2017-01-01

    hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, type 3. During the patient's first pregnancy with a viable fetus octreotide treatment was instituted in gestational age 23 weeks to prevent severe hypoglycemic incidences. Fetal growth velocity declined, and at 37 weeks of gestation, intrauterine growth retardation was evident...

  6. Normal renal development investigated with fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzani, Linde; Brugger, Peter Christian; Hoermann, Marcus; Kasprian, Gregor; Csapone-Balassy, Csilla; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate age-dependent changes in fetal kidney measurements with MRI. Patients and methods: Fetal MRI examinations were used to study the kidney length (218 fetuses), signal intensities of renal tissue, renal pelvis, and liver tissue on T2-weighted images (223 fetuses), and the whole-kidney apparent diffusion coefficient (107 fetuses). A 1.5 T superconducting unit with a phased array coil was used in patients from 16 to 39 weeks' gestation. The imaging protocol included T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo, T2-weighted balanced angiography and diffusion-weighted sequences. Slice thickness ranged from 3 to 5 mm. Results: Fetal kidney length as a function of gestational age was expressed by the linear regression: kidney length (mm) = 0.190 x gestational age (d) - 8.034 (R 2 0.883, p 2 /s) = 0.0302 x square (gestational age (d)) - 14.202 x gestational age (d) + 2728.6 (R 2 = 0.225, p < 0.001). Conclusion: The length, signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and apparent diffusion coefficient of the fetal kidney change significantly with gestational age. The presented data may help in the prenatal diagnosis of renal anomalies

  7. What does fetal autopsy unmask in oligohydramnios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Shalini S; Shukla, Anju; Kodandapani, Sreelakshmi; Adiga, Prashanth K; Girisha, Katta M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the value of autopsy in fetuses with antenatally diagnosed oligohydramnios. We evaluated all fetal losses over a period of 6.5 years. Those with oligohydramnios on antenatal scan were critically analyzed. Oligohydramnios was defined as amniotic fluid index of less than five objectively or as an obvious lack of liquor at subjective assessment. A detailed postmortem examination was carried out in all the fetuses after obtaining an informed consent. Fetal autopsy was conducted in 255 cases. Fifty-five (21.5%) fetuses were diagnosed to have oligohydramnios on antenatal ultrasonography. On analysis of antenatal causes of oligohydramnios, maternal/placental factors were noted in 18%, ultrasound findings known to affect amniotic fluid in 27% while cause remained unidentified in 54.5% of cases. On autopsy, fetal malformations were noted in 61.8% cases, intrauterine growth retardation in 21.8% fetuses and no obvious malformations in 16.3% fetuses. Renal anomalies were noted in 40% cases and non-renal malformations in 21.8% cases. The postmortem examination helped us to identify the cause of fetal loss in 46 (83.6%) fetuses with antenatal oligohydramnios. A working diagnosis could not have been established without autopsy in 19 (34.5%) cases.

  8. Macrosomia - maternal and fetal risk factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infant weighing 4 000 g or more in a black population. Identifiable maternal risk factors included a ... of the high perinatal mortality and morbidity rates, as well as maternal morbidity, are discussed. S Afr Med J 1995; 85: 43-46. Little attention has been paid to fetal macrosomia in black. African populations, despite the fact that ...

  9. Can Fetal Macrosomia be Prevented? | Inegbenebor | International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Basic, Applied and Innovative Research ... Fetal macrosomia is an obstetric complication that makes child birth hazardous to women in labor, and sometimes an enigma to medical practitioners. It tasks the skills of obstetricians and places a burden on human and material medical resources. There is ...

  10. fetal survival and neonatal growth with intramuscular

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FETAL SURVIVAL AND NEONATAL GROWTH WITH INTRAMUSCULAR. INJECTIONS OF FOLATE DURING GESTATION IN THE RAT. 1s. c. lkpo, 1e. o. Agu* and 22M. Ofuya. DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY,. 20EPARTMENT or HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY. UNIVERSITY or PORT HARCOURT, ...

  11. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  12. Is fetal cardiac function gender dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A. B.; Oude Rengerink, K.; Mol, B. W.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    An increased nuchal translucency (NT) is more common in males. A delayed diastolic cardiac function maturation has been proposed to explain this and the reported gender-related differences in ductus venosus (DV) flow. To investigate gender-related differences in fetal cardiac function. One hundred

  13. Is fetal cardiac function gender dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A. B.; Rengerink, K. Oude; Mol, B. W.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    Introduction An increased nuchal translucency (NT) is more common in males. A delayed diastolic cardiac function maturation has been proposed to explain this and the reported gender-related differences in ductus venosus (DV) flow. Objective To investigate gender-related differences in fetal cardiac

  14. Fetal growth in rats treated with lapachol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, André Carvalho; Chang, Cláudia Veiga; Brandão, Marcos Antônio; Peters, Vera Maria; Guerra, Martha de Oliveira

    2002-10-01

    Lapachol is a naphthoquinone well known for its therapeutic potential. Previous studies have shown that lapachol does not interfere with embryonic development during the pre-implantation period. However, when administered during the organogenic period at the same dose level, it induces a high fetal death incidence. To evaluate the effect of lapachol during fetogenesis, 20 pregnant Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: vehicle (10 mL of a 50% aqueous ethanol solution/kg body weight) and treated (100 mg of lapachol/kg body weight). Lapachol was administered from the 17th to 20th day of pregnancy. The following variables were analyzed: maternal body weight from 16th to 21st day of pregnancy, food intake from 17th to 21st day of pregnancy, clinical signs of physical discomfort, ovarian weights, implantations, resorptions and mortality indices, fetal and placenta weights, external malformations, and fetal organ weights. Results indicated that lapachol was not toxic to mothers, although it was fetotoxic leading to fetal growth retardation.

  15. Fetal Umbilical Cord Length and Associated Intrapatum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoulder dystocia, hand prolapse in a transverse lying fetus, abruptio placentae and prolonged second stage of labour had shorter cords while fetal distress, cord prolapse and mecunium stained liquor had longer cords when compared with the mean umbilical cord length of the study population. Conclusion: Umbilical cord ...

  16. National natality and fetal mortality surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roney, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    A project is described in which the Epidemiologic Studies Branch, DBE, is cooperating with the National Center for Health Statistics in a National Natality Survey and a National Fetal Mortality Survey of a sample of live births and of late fetal deaths (28 or more weeks gestation) in 1979. Questionnaires will be sent to a sample of mothers who had a live born infant or late fetal death in 1979, to hospitals in which the deliveries took place, to attending physicians, and all other possible sources of health care. The survey will provide quantitative information regarding use of ionizing and nonionizing radiation, including ultrasound, during pregnancy and possible associations between radiation and late fetal mortality. Specifically the study will provide information on the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the mothers and complications of pregnancy, labor, and delivery. The physical condition of the infant at birth is also included. This is one of many health surveys conducted routinely by the NCHS under the National Health Survey program

  17. Fetal Intracranial Hemorrhage (Fetal Stroke: Report of Four Antenatally Diagnosed Casesand Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Fen Huang

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: This small series demonstrate that an antenatal diagnosis of fetal stroke with intraventricular hemorrhage Grades III and IV or with brain parenchymal involvement appears to be associated with poor neurologic outcome. Due to the significant neonatal neurologic impairment and potential medicolegal implications of antepartum fetal ICH, it follows that obstetricians and sonographers should be familiar with predisposing factors and typical diagnostic imaging findings of rare in utero ICH events.

  18. Prolonged expression of the c-kit receptor in germ cells of intersex fetal testes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Jørgensen, N; Müller, Jørn

    1996-01-01

    conditions which included 45,X/46,XY mosaicism; androgen insensitivity syndrome; and 46,XY/iso(p)Y mosaicism. Individuals with such disorders of sexual differentiation and Y-chromosome material carry a very high risk of developing testicular neoplasms. Fetal testicular germ cells of the intersex subjects...... expressed Kit at a later developmental age than controls, in which no Kit protein was detectable beyond the 15th week of gestation. This finding may indicate a disturbance of the chronology of germ cell development, or it may suggest a change of the regulation of c-kit expression in subjects with disorders...

  19. Predictive Models for Normal Fetal Cardiac Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anita; Pike, Jodi I; McCarter, Robert; Fulgium, Amanda L; Wilson, Emmanuel; Donofrio, Mary T; Sable, Craig A

    2016-12-01

    Clinicians rely on age- and size-specific measures of cardiac structures to diagnose cardiac disease. No universally accepted normative data exist for fetal cardiac structures, and most fetal cardiac centers do not use the same standards. The aim of this study was to derive predictive models for Z scores for 13 commonly evaluated fetal cardiac structures using a large heterogeneous population of fetuses without structural cardiac defects. The study used archived normal fetal echocardiograms in representative fetuses aged 12 to 39 weeks. Thirteen cardiac dimensions were remeasured by a blinded echocardiographer from digitally stored clips. Studies with inadequate imaging views were excluded. Regression models were developed to relate each dimension to estimated gestational age (EGA) by dates, biparietal diameter, femur length, and estimated fetal weight by the Hadlock formula. Dimension outcomes were transformed (e.g., using the logarithm or square root) as necessary to meet the normality assumption. Higher order terms, quadratic or cubic, were added as needed to improve model fit. Information criteria and adjusted R 2 values were used to guide final model selection. Each Z-score equation is based on measurements derived from 296 to 414 unique fetuses. EGA yielded the best predictive model for the majority of dimensions; adjusted R 2 values ranged from 0.72 to 0.893. However, each of the other highly correlated (r > 0.94) biometric parameters was an acceptable surrogate for EGA. In most cases, the best fitting model included squared and cubic terms to introduce curvilinearity. For each dimension, models based on EGA provided the best fit for determining normal measurements of fetal cardiac structures. Nevertheless, other biometric parameters, including femur length, biparietal diameter, and estimated fetal weight provided results that were nearly as good. Comprehensive Z-score results are available on the basis of highly predictive models derived from gestational

  20. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  1. WIEDEMANN SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    BILATERAL BENIGN HAEMORRHAGIC ADRENAL CYSTS IN BECKWITH - WIEDEMANN. SYNDROME: CASE REPORT. P. ANOOP and M. A. ANJAY. SUMMARY. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is the most common overgrowth malformation syndrome. The classical features include macrosomia, macroglossia, ...

  2. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  3. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  4. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Piriformis Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Piriformis syndrome ...

  5. TERRAIN: FETAL GROWTH TELEHEALTH SYSTEM BASED ON 2D FETAL HEAD IMAGE USING RANDOMIZED HOUGH TRANSFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robeth Rahmatullah

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is one of many fetal abnormalities, which has high contribution on maternal mortality rate and perinatal mortality rate in Indonesia. Apparently, IUGR impact can be reduced if only the symptoms are detected earlier and the correct treatment is applied. However, fetal growth detection and monitoring process in Indonesia is obstructed because the number of physicians is very limited and ultrasonography (USG devices are expensive. Moreover, both the physicians and USG devices are only available in big cities. To answer those problems, this research proposed an intelligent system that can provide fetal growth telemonitoring in rural areas. This system consists of three components: portable USG device, mobile application which is developed using Android operating system, and server application which is developed using Django. The main feature of this system is automatic fetal head parameter detection and its ability to operate in the limited internet access environment. In this system, automatic fetal head parameter detection uses RHT method to approximate fetal head’s ellipse shape. Experiment result shows that RHT detection ability with ∆ellipse average of 79.564 and running time average of 0.373 second.

  6. Does ST analysis of fetal ECG reduce cesarean section rate for fetal distress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straface, Gianluca; Scambia, Giovanni; Zanardo, Vincenzo

    2017-08-01

    Each pregravidic, gestational or intrapartum complication may, per se, have a different impact on the operative delivery rate, regardless of which fetal monitoring system was adopted. We wanted to verify if CTG plus ST interval analysis (STAN) of fetal ECG might be able to reduce the number of operative delivery for fetal distress in high-risk pregnancies compared to low-risk women monitored with CTG alone. In this cohort study, we evaluated 100 high-risk pregnancies consecutively with STAN® S31 (Neoventa Medical, Gotenburg, Sweden) and 160 low-risk pregnancies consecutively with continuous CTG (Hewlett Packard, 50 IP, Palo Alto, CA). We found that STAN monitoring, although associated with a higher total operativity rate, both vaginal (11% versus 3.12%, p = 0.015) and cesarean (17% versus 4.37%, p = 0.001), reduced the cesarean section rate performed for fetal distress (29.41% versus 85.71%, p = 0.023) compared with low-risk CTG monitoring group. CTG plus ST interval analysis of fetal ECG reduced the risk of operative cesarean delivery for fetal distress in high-risk gestations.

  7. Chromosome 11-linked determinant controls fetal globin expression and the fetal-to-adult globin switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melis, M.; Demopulos, G.; Najfeld, V.; Zhang, J.W.; Brice, M.; Papayannopoulou, T.; Stamatoyannopoulos, G.

    1987-01-01

    Hybrids formed by fusing mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells with human fetal erythroid cells produce human fetal globin, but they switch to adult globin production as culture time advances. To obtain information on the chromosomal assignment of the elements that control γ-to-β switching, the authors analyzed the chromosomal composition of hybrids producing exclusively or predominantly human fetal globin and hybrids producing only adult human globin. No human chromosome was consistently present in hybrids expressing fetal globin and consistently absent in hybrids expressing adult globin. Subcloning experiments demonstrated identical chromosomal compositions in subclones displaying the fetal globin program and those that had switched to expression of the adult globin program. These data indicate that retention of only one human chromosome -- i.e., chromosome 11 -- is sufficient for expression of human fetal globin and the subsequent γ-to-β switch. The results suggest that the γ-to-β switch is controlled either cis to the β-globin locus of by a trans-acting mechanism, the genes of which reside on human chromosome 11

  8. Estimation of fetal gestational age from ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Valiollah

    1992-06-01

    Estimation of fetal gestational age, weight, and determination of fetal growth from the measurements of certain parameters of fetal head, abdomen, and femur have been well established in prenatal sonography. The measurements are made from the two dimensional, B- mode, ultrasound images of the fetus. The most common parameters measured are, biparietal diameter, occipital frontal diameter, head circumference, femur diaphysis length, and abdominal circumference. Since the fetal head has an elliptical shape and the femur has a linear shape, fitting the ellipse on the image of the fetal head, a line on the image of the femur are the tasks of image processing which are discussed in this paper.

  9. Identification of circulating fetal cell markers by microarray analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Marie; Hatt, Lotte; Singh, Ripudaman

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Different fetal cell types have been found in the maternal blood during pregnancy in the past, but fetal cells are scarce, and the proportions of the different cell types are unclear. The objective of the present study was to identify specific fetal cell markers from fetal cells found...... identified by XY fluorescence in situ hybridization and confirmed by reverse-color fluorescence in situ hybridization were shot off microscope slides by laser capture microdissection. The expression pattern of a subset of expressed genes was compared between fetal cells and maternal blood cells using stem...

  10. Sonographic features of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 14 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chan, Gavin Shueng Wai; Lee, Chin Peng; Tang, Mary Hoi Yin

    2005-06-01

    Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome is a rare inherited disorder. Previous reports suggest that the diagnosis may be based on prenatal sonographic demonstration of severe limb flexion, absence of fetal motion, and a large cystic hygroma in the second and third trimesters. We present the sonographic features and postmortem features of a fetus with lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 13 weeks of gestation, which shows that the condition can possibly be diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  11. Triploidia fetal associada à diminuição da subunidade beta e do estriol não-conjugado no soro materno Fetal triploidy associated with low levels of unconjugated estriol and beta-subunit in maternal serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vieira Neto

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos um caso de triploidia fetal não-molar detectada na 20ª semana gestacional por cordocentese realizada em razão de estudo ultra-sonográfico que revelou retardo do crescimento intra-uterino e grave oligoidrâmnio. Na 19ª semana foram verificados acentuada diminuição da subunidade beta livre da gonadotrofina coriônica humana e do estriol não-conjugado e níveis de alfa-fetoproteína normais, apontando para um risco aumentado de síndrome de Edwards. Houve morte fetal um dia após a cordocentese e a resolução do caso foi por parto vaginal induzido com misoprostol e ocitocina, sob analgesia peridural. Estudo cromossômico das células sangüíneas fetais revelou o cariótipo 69,XXX. O grave retardo do crescimento intra-uterino, a macrocefalia, constatada no estudo anatomopatológico do feto, e os níveis muito baixos de hCG e de estriol não-conjugado sugerem um caso de triploidia por diginia, fertilização de um óvulo diplóide por um espermatozóide haplóide.We report a case of nonmolar fetal triploidy detected by fetal blood sampling at 20 weeks of gestation, performed as an investigation of intrauterine growth retardation and severe oligohydramnios found by ultrasound scan. At 19 weeks of gestation very low levels of maternal free serum beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin and unconjugated estriol, and normal levels of alpha-fetoprotein were found, which were interpreted as a high risk of fetal Edwards syndrome. Fetal death supervened the day after fetal blood sampling, and the pregnancy was terminated by vaginal delivery induced by misoprostol and oxytocin, under epidural anesthesia. Chromosome study of the fetal blood cells showed a 69,XXX karyotype. The severe intrauterine growth retardation and macrocephaly noted on pathological review plus the very low levels of hCG and unconjugated estriol suggest a fetal gynoid triploidy case, caused by the fertilization of a diploid egg by a haploid sperm.

  12. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  13. Ultrasound Presentation of a Disseminated Fetal and Neonatal Rhabdoid Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolaine Joueidi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a disseminated fetal rhabdoid tumor discovered at 32 weeks of gestation in a 29-year-old woman on immunosuppressive therapy. The mother consulted for a decrease in fetal movement. Fetal ultrasound showed signs of a disseminated tumor affecting the left armpit, liver, spleen, and limbs. A caesarian section was performed because of signs of fetal distress. Immunohistochemical analysis of a fetal biopsy showed deletion of the SMARCB1 gene. Pathological analysis of the placenta showed a rhabdoid tumor invading both fetal and maternal compartments. The mother underwent a whole-body MRI, and no metastasis was found. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a disseminated rhabdoid tumor invading both fetal and maternal compartments.

  14. Fetal monitoring during nonobstetric surgery: revisiting guidelines: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Tod J; Morel, Bruce; Pace, Benjamin; Fuks, Aleksandr M

    2015-01-01

    Nonobstetric surgery during pregnancy is not an infrequent occurrence. Guidelines for fetal monitoring during nonobstetric surgery are limited. We describe a case of appendectomy during third trimester, complicated by in utero fetal demise (IUFD). A 30-year-old, Caucasian woman underwent open appendectomy for suspected acute appendicitis. The procedure was complicated by IUFD. Fetal monitoring was done prior to but not during surgery. Guidelines for fetal monitoring were revised, recommending continuous electronic fetal monitoring when possible during third trimester nonobstetric surgery after appropriate patient counseling. A subsequent series of 5 uncomplicated appendectomies demonstrated no difficulty in implementing these guidelines. Continuous electronic fetal monitoring during third trimester nonobstetric surgery should be available and implemented after appropriate patient counseling. This approach reduces the risk of fetal mortality.

  15. Prenatal diagnostic evaluation of fetal ventricular dilatation by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Ichiro; Tamaya, Teruhiko; Iwata, Tatsuo; Ando, Takashi; Yamada, Hiromu

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in MRI have contributed to the antenatal confirmatory diagnosis of fetal anomalies, especially in the fetal brain and central nervous system. In this study, eight infants with fetal ventricular dilatation, suggested by prenatal ultrasonography, were evaluated with confirmatory diagnosis by MRI (SIGNA; General Electric Company, 1.5 tesla). These anomalies were demonstrated at 19 to 36 weeks by ultrasonography. One of the eight died in utero at 22 weeks of gestation, another one day after birth (33 weeks of gestation). Two were delivered by Cesarean section. It has been proved that clear and effective images can be obtained by mother's walking without sedative drugs. Fetal MRI gave clear images not only in fetal horizontal section, but also in sagittal section, which is usually difficult to obtain by ultrasonography. Confirmatory diagnosis of eight cases were obtained by MRI. Fetal MRI can provide an effective prenatal diagnosis, especially in cases of fetal brain anomaly, even when compared with postnatal CT findings. (author)

  16. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-01

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced `modified' Sensitivity (SE°) and `modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV°) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  17. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome: mechanistic insights and potential new downstream effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharpe, R.M.; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive disorders of newborn (cryptorchidism, hypospadias) and young adult males (low sperm counts, testicular germ cell cancer) are common and/or increasing in incidence. It has been hypothesized that these disorders may comprise a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) with a common origin...... androgen production/action during fetal testis development, may play in the origin of downstream disorders Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  18. Obstetric aspects of the Guillan-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, N; Weingold, A B

    1975-01-01

    Two additional cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome complicating pregnancy are reported and the 25 previously published cases reviewed. While fetal prognosis is generally favorable, the occurrence of the disease in late pregnancy is a high-rish maternal condition. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonitis may result in premature labor and maternal mortality.

  19. Familial Peters Plus syndrome with absent anal canal, sacral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2013-07-23

    Jul 23, 2013 ... Hydrocephalus, agenesis of the corpus callosum, · and cleft lip/palate represent frequent associations in fetuses with · Peters' plus syndrome and B3GALTL mutations. Fetal PPS · phenotypes, expanded by Dandy Walker cyst and encephalocele. Prenat Diagn 2013;33:75–80. 428. R.M. Shawky et al.

  20. In-utero treatment of hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lytzen, Rebekka; Helvind, Morten; Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    2015-01-01

    In-utero treatment of fetal aortic stenosis (AS) may prevent hypoplastic left heart syndrome. A girl was diagnosed prenatally with severe AS and was referred to the Women's and Children's Hospital in Linz, Austria, where she underwent an intrauterine valvuloplasty of the aortic valve. Postnatally...

  1. Autistic Traits in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herguner, Sabri; Harmanci, Hatice; Hergner, Arzu; Toy, Harun

    2012-01-01

    Several studies suggested that prenatal androgen exposure might contribute to development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The androgen theory of autism proposes that autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are in part due to elevated fetal testosterone levels. Furthermore, higher rates of androgen-related conditions including PCOS are reported in…

  2. Prenatal sonographic measurement of the fetal thyroid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Young Cheol; Kim, Young Hwa; Cho, Won Soo; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young [Chunan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    To investigate whether the fetal thyroid gland could be examined by prenatal ultrasonography and to established the normal range of fetal thyroid width according to the gestational age. The width of the fetal thyroid was determined by prenatal ultrasonography from 118 pregnant women. Three of the mothers had current or previous thyroid disease and the widths of the fetal thyroid were determined from 115 normal subjects. The width of the fetal thyroid was defined by a maximum transverse distance of the thyroid gland between two carotid arteries on transverse scan of the fetal neck. We analyzed the cause of non-measurable cases. The width of the fetal thyroid and Neo-TSH were compared in 19 subjects, including 3 subjects will current or previous thyroid disease. We could measure the fetal thyroid widths in 95 cases (80%). The fetal thyroid widths of mothers without current or previous thyroid disease was 0.9-2.36 cm,which showed linear correlation with gestational age (Y=0.0506 X + 0.0439, r{sup 2}=0.5661). Causes of non-measurable cases were neck flexion (65%), prone position (22%), and overlapped fetal neck by arm or shoulder (13%). Of the 19 neonates with Neo-TSH level, one case had a mother with a thyroid disease and showed increased width of the fetal and high Neo-TSH. The fetal thyroid was measured in 80% of prenatal ultrasonography and the width of the fetal thyroid showed linear correlated with gestational age. We assumed that the width of the thyroid could be useful for diagnosing fetal thyroid disorder when maternal thyroid disease exists.

  3. Prenatal sonographic measurement of the fetal thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Young Cheol; Kim, Young Hwa; Cho, Won Soo; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young

    2001-01-01

    To investigate whether the fetal thyroid gland could be examined by prenatal ultrasonography and to established the normal range of fetal thyroid width according to the gestational age. The width of the fetal thyroid was determined by prenatal ultrasonography from 118 pregnant women. Three of the mothers had current or previous thyroid disease and the widths of the fetal thyroid were determined from 115 normal subjects. The width of the fetal thyroid was defined by a maximum transverse distance of the thyroid gland between two carotid arteries on transverse scan of the fetal neck. We analyzed the cause of non-measurable cases. The width of the fetal thyroid and Neo-TSH were compared in 19 subjects, including 3 subjects will current or previous thyroid disease. We could measure the fetal thyroid widths in 95 cases (80%). The fetal thyroid widths of mothers without current or previous thyroid disease was 0.9-2.36 cm,which showed linear correlation with gestational age (Y=0.0506 X + 0.0439, r 2 =0.5661). Causes of non-measurable cases were neck flexion (65%), prone position (22%), and overlapped fetal neck by arm or shoulder (13%). Of the 19 neonates with Neo-TSH level, one case had a mother with a thyroid disease and showed increased width of the fetal and high Neo-TSH. The fetal thyroid was measured in 80% of prenatal ultrasonography and the width of the fetal thyroid showed linear correlated with gestational age. We assumed that the width of the thyroid could be useful for diagnosing fetal thyroid disorder when maternal thyroid disease exists.

  4. Syndromes, Disorders and Maternal Risk Factors Associated with Neural Tube Defects (III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs may be associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as omphalocele, OEIS (omphalocele-exstrophy-imperforate anus-spinal defects complex, pentalogy of Cantrell, amniotic band sequence, limb-body wall complex, Meckel syndrome, Joubert syndrome, skeletal dysplasia, diabetic embryopathy, and single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes of glucose metabolism. NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors may be different from those of nonsyndromic multi facto rial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert the clinician to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling. [Taiwan J Obstet Cynecol 2008;47(2:131-140

  5. Pregnancy and Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Karen; Hunt, Beverley J

    2016-10-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is classified as the association of thrombotic events and/or obstetric morbidity in patients persistently positive for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). APS is also the most frequently acquired risk factor for a treatable cause of recurrent pregnancy loss and increases the risk of conditions associated with ischemic placental dysfunction, such as stillbirth, intrauterine death, preeclampsia, premature birth, and fetal growth restriction. The use of low-dose aspirin and heparin has improved the pregnancy outcome in obstetric APS and approximately 70% of pregnant women with APS will deliver a viable live infant. However, current management does not prevent all maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications of APS and the current treatment fails in 20 to 30% of APS pregnancies, raising the need to explore other treatments to improve obstetrical outcome. Two clinical studies of retrospective design have suggested that the immunomodulator hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) may play a role in the prevention of pregnancy complications in women with aPL and APS. The randomized controlled multicenter trial of hydroxychloroquine versus placebo during pregnancy in women with antiphospholipid antibodies (HYPATIA) of HCQ versus placebo will provide scientific evidence on the use of HCQ in pregnant women with aPL. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Differential diagnosis between fetal extrarenal pelvis and obstructive uropathy on fetal ultrasonogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Hee; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Cho, Byung Jae; Lee, Kyung Sang

    2003-01-01

    To establish the standard guideline for differentiating the extrarenal pelvis from obstructive uropathy on fetal ultrasonogram (US) to avoid unnecessary postnatal follow-up and other additional examinations. From July 2000 to July 2001, Thirty-four kidneys with hydronephrosis diagnosed on fetal ultrasonogram performed during the third trimester of pregnancy were included in this study. Hydronephrosis was defined as the pelvic anteroposterior (AP) diameter being 4 mm or greater before 33 weeks of gestation while 7 mm or greater at or after 33 weeks of gestation. The size of the renal pelvis was measured at intrarenal, intra-extrarenal junctional and extrarenal portions in every kidney on the transverse view of the fetal renal hiluin. Postnatally, all neonates underwent renal ultrasonogram 2 to 8 days after birth, and renal pelvic diameters were measured using the same method as the fetal US in 28 kidneys. We then compared the extrarenal-intrarenal ratio (E/I ratio) of pelvic diameter between fetal and neoatal kidneys. We presumed that the extrarenal pelvis in fetal US was the pelvis showing the normal intrarenal pelvic diameter accompanied by the most dilated exrtarenal pelvic diameter. Follow-up ultrasonograms were measured using the same method as the fetal US in 28 kidneys. We then compared the extrarenal intrarenal ratio (E/I ratio) of pelvic diameter between fetal and neonatal kidneys. We presumed that the extrarenal pelvis on fetal US was the pelvis showing the normal intrarenal pelvic diameter accompanied by the most dilated extrarenal pelvic diameter. Follow-up ultrasonograms were performed in 12 of 17 neonates who had the maximal diameter at extrarenal portion on fetal ultrasonogram. VCUG and IVU were taken in 2 patients with a persistent dilatation of the renal pelvis on follow-up ultrasonograms. On fetal US, 17/34 kidneys showed the extrarenal portion with the most dilatation while in 12/34 kidneys, the intra-extra renal junction portion was the most

  7. Treatment of mouse zygotic or pregastrulation stages to 5-azacytidine produced embryonic death and fetal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellarco, V.L.; Kimmel, G.L. [EPA, Washington, DC (United States); Shourbaji, A.G.; Generoso, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Rutledge, J.C. [Children`s Hospital and Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Several studies have shown that the mouse zygote and the two-cell embryo are susceptible to the induction of congenital anomalies with certain genotoxic agents. The mechanisms by which the pathogenesis of these development defects arise are not known. In certain cases, it is possible that a nonconventional, perhaps epigenetic, mechanism is involved. To provide indirect evidence for this possibility, we conducted studies with 5-azacytidine (AzaC), an agent known to selectively activate transcription. Female mice were given a single ip injection of 20 mg/kg of AzaC at various postmating intervals to expose the zygotic and subsequent pregastrulation stages (i.e., 1 to 144 hrs post-mating). Females were killed on gestational day 17, the uterine contents scored and the live fetuses examined for external anomalies. AzaC treatment during 1 to 20 hrs after mating produced slight increases in embryonic death and in the incidence of fetal anomalies. The responses significantly increased with treatment at 25 hrs after mating. This interval corresponds approximately to the time when embryonic genes are beginning to be switched on. The frequency of fetal anomalies remained elevated at subsequent intervals until 64 hrs (blastocyst stage) when a further increase in the incidence of fetal anomalies occurred. Exposures after 64 hrs produced extreme embryoethality, thus, relatively lower doses were used. A stage dependent spectrum of anomalies were found which include anterior region affects of the fetus (e.g., exencephaly, eye defects, cleft palate, frontal nasal syndrome).

  8. Predictors of Fetal and Maternal Outcome in the Crucible of Hepatic Dysfunction During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Indrajit; Tr, Vijaykumar; Hp, Nandeesh

    2017-02-01

    Hepatic dysfunction during pregnancy places both the mother and the fetus at risk. Investigations which are efficient, cost effective and easily available for prognostication are required to tackle this global problem. We studied the etiologies and evaluated investigations for predictive efficiency. One hundred ninety-seven pregnant women with hepatic dysfunction during pregnancy were identified. All patients were followed up till 8 weeks after termination of pregnancy or death. Clinico-demographic, biochemical and hematological data were collected and analyzed. One hundred ninety-seven of 6,122 females had abnormal liver function tests. Pre-eclampsia (57%), eclampsia (19%), HELLP syndrome (8%), viral infection (6%), hyperemesis gravidarum (5%), intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (4%), chronic liver disease (1%) and sepsis were encountered. There were 41 fetal deaths, 42% preterm deliveries, and NICU admission rate was 27%. Five maternal deaths occurred. Maternal anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperbilirubinemia and coagulopathy were statistically significant in adverse fetal outcomes. Serum bilirubin performed better than INR as a predictor of both maternal and fetal outcomes. Hepatic dysfunction during pregnancy is associated with adverse events for both the mother and the fetus and hypertensive disorders remain the major cause. Maternal bilirubin levels and INR have a role in predicting adverse feto-maternal outcome.

  9. A case of Pallister-Killian syndrome associated with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Miho; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kamiyama, Noriko; Miyamoto, Yusaku

    2007-09-01

    We report the case of a 19-month-old boy with Pallister-Killian syndrome associated with West syndrome. The child was born at term to a healthy mother after an uneventful pregnancy. He was born by cesarean section because of fetal macrosomia. He was observed to have nystagmus, craniofacial dysmorphism, and mental retardation. Intractable epileptic spasms developed 17 months after birth, and electroencephalography revealed a modified hypsarrhythmia. The seizures were uncontrollable with sodium valproate monotherapy. At the age of 19 months, the child was diagnosed with Pallister-Killian syndrome of mosaic tetrasomy 12p by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Combination treatment with high-dose pyridoxal phosphate and sodium valproate eliminated seizures and improved the electroencephalographic abnormalities. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Pallister-Killian syndrome associated with West syndrome.

  10. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnostics in congenital diaphragmatic hernia; Fetale Magnetresonanztomographie. Diagnostik bei kongenitaler Zwerchfellhernie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, A.K.; Buesing, K.A.; Neff, K.W. [Fakultaet fuer Klinische Medizin der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany); Schaible, T. [Fakultaet fuer Klinische Medizin der Universitaet Heidelberg, Kinderklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    Ultrasonography is the primary imaging modality for the evaluation of fetal or maternal anomalies. This method is safe, relatively inexpensive, easily accessible, and allows real-time imaging. Continuous technical improvements in ultrasonography in the last 10-15 years have led to improved diagnostic accuracy for fetal malformations. In cases of complex anomalies magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide additional information. MRI has evolved as a valuable diagnostic method for evaluating fetal pathology. Particularly with regard to similarity of liver and lung parenchyma in ultrasonography, diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) can be difficult. Beside morphological aspects, e.g., herniation of abdominal contents into the chest, small amounts of compressed lung can be visualized on MRI. The feasibility of using volumetric measurement on MRI may be helpful to predict high-risk fetuses and facilitate decisions to assure adequate prenatal and postnatal management to improve postnatal outcome. (orig.) [German] Der Ultraschall dient in der Schwangerschaft routinemaessig als Screeningmethode fuer fetale und maternale Anomalien, da dieser als sicher fuer Kind und Mutter, guenstig, allseits verfuegbar gilt und die Moeglichkeit einer Real-time-Darstellung bietet. Insbesondere aufgrund der Weiterentwicklung in den letzten 10-15 Jahren verfuegt der Ultraschall ueber eine hohe Aussagekraft bzgl. fetaler Fehlbildungen. In einzelnen Faellen, z. B. bei komplexen Fehlbildungen, kann die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) suffiziente Zusatzinformationen liefern. Aus diesem Grund hat sich die fetale MRT zur Diagnostik fetaler Fehlbildungen bewaehrt. Die Diagnose einer kongenitalen Zwerchfellhernie (congenital diaphragmatic hernia, CDH) kann im Ultraschall gerade durch sonographische Aehnlichkeit von Leber und Lunge erschwert sein. Im Falle einer CDH bietet die MRT neben der reinen Morphologie, u. a. der Ausdehnung der nach intrathorakal hernierten Abdominalorgane, die

  11. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with adrenal hemorrhage in a child : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Han Wook; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    1999-01-01

    Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a disease that is clinically diagnosed if a patient suffers recurrent thromboses, stroke, recurrent fetal loss, livedo reticularis, and thrombocytopenia, without evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective diseases. Adrenal hemorrhage in a patient with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a rarely recognized, but potentially catastrophic disorder. We recently encountered bilateral adrenal hemorrhaging in a child with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and casem as well as reviewing the literature

  12. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with adrenal hemorrhage in a child : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Han Wook; Yoon, Chong Hyun [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a disease that is clinically diagnosed if a patient suffers recurrent thromboses, stroke, recurrent fetal loss, livedo reticularis, and thrombocytopenia, without evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective diseases. Adrenal hemorrhage in a patient with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a rarely recognized, but potentially catastrophic disorder. We recently encountered bilateral adrenal hemorrhaging in a child with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and casem as well as reviewing the literature.

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome by two- and three-dimensional ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Araujo Junior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is a genetic syndrome characterized by macroglossia, omphalocele, fetal gigantism and neonatal hypoglycemia. The authors report a case of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome diagnosed in a 32-year-old primigravida in whom two-dimensional ultrasonography revealed the presence of abdominal wall cyst, macroglossia and polycystic kidneys. Three-dimensional ultrasonography in rendering mode was of great importance to confirm the previous two-dimensional ultrasonography findings.

  14. THE PREVENTION OF FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER: THE NEED FOR A COORDINATED SERVICE BY ROLE PLAYERS IN THE WINE PRODUCING AREAS IN THE BREEDE RIVER VALLEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries, Marlene

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS is seen as the leading preventable birth defect in the western world (May, Miller, Goodhart, Maestas, Buckley, Trujillo & Gossage, 2007. FAS is the severe end of a spectrum of effects caused by alcohol intake during pregnancy and is characterised by unique facial features, growth retardation and developmental delays (May, Gossage, Marais, Adnams, Hoyme, Jones, Robinson, Khaole, Snell, Kalberg, Hendricks, Brooke, Stellavato & Viljoen, 2007; Urban, Chersich, Fourie, Chetty, Olivier & Viljoen, 2008. Drinking alcohol during pregnancy has physical, behavioural and mental consequences for the developing fetus. These effects last throughout the lifespan of the individual with a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD

  15. A pregnancy with discordant fetal and placental chromosome 18 aneuploidies revealed by invasive and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Cram, David S; Xie, Fanni; Wang, Ping; Xu, Xueqin; Li, Huanzheng; Song, Zhuo; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jianguang; Tang, Shaohua

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated a pregnancy where the fetus was diagnosed with monosomy 18p by invasive amniocentesis and karyotyping. Additional noninvasive prenatal diagnosis, which detects fetal chromosome abnormalities in the circulating cell-free plasma DNA originating from the placenta revealed a related 18p monosomy/18q trisomy, suggesting confined placental mosaicism. Based on recent observations of chromosomal instability in the early preimplantation embryo, this study speculates on the possible embryonic origin(s) of these related but discordant chromosome 18 aneuploidies in the placental and fetal tissues. The findings highlight the potential for both false-positive and -negative noninvasive prenatal diagnosis results in pregnancies where there is either confined placental mosaicism or placental mosaicism. The study investigated a pregnancy involving a fetus with a chromosome disease syndrome called monosomy 18p where part of the short arm of chromosome 18 was missing in the fetal tissues. Using non-invasive prenatal diagnosis which detects fetal chromosome abnormalities in the circulating cell free plasma DNA originating from the placenta, we also detected monosomy 18p as well a related chromosome 18 abnormality involving duplication of the long arm of chromosome 18. This suggested confined placental mosaicism where the constitution of the chromosomes are different between fetal and placental tissues. We speculated that these related chromosome 18 abnormalities arose during preimplantation embryo development, leading to the formation of different chromosome abnormalities observed in the placental and fetal tissues of this pregnancy. Our findings highlight the potential for both false positive and negative non-invasive prenatal diagnosis test results in pregnancies where there is confined placental mosaicism. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. No. 261-Prenatal Screening for Fetal Aneuploidy in Singleton Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitayat, David; Langlois, Sylvie; Wilson, R Douglas

    2017-09-01

    To develop a Canadian consensus document on maternal screening for fetal aneuploidy (e.g., Down syndrome and trisomy 18) in singleton pregnancies. Pregnancy screening for fetal aneuploidy started in the mid 1960s, using maternal age as the screening test. New developments in maternal serum and ultrasound screening have made it possible to offer all pregnant patients a non-invasive screening test to assess their risk of having a fetus with aneuploidy to determine whether invasive prenatal diagnostic testing is necessary. This document reviews the options available for non-invasive screening and makes recommendations for Canadian patients and health care workers. To offer non-invasive screening for fetal aneuploidy (trisomy 13, 18, 21) to all pregnant women. Invasive prenatal diagnosis would be offered to women who screen above a set risk cut-off level on non-invasive screening or to pregnant women whose personal, obstetrical, or family history places them at increased risk. Currently available non-invasive screening options include maternal age combined with one of the following: (1) first trimester screening (nuchal translucency, maternal age, and maternal serum biochemical markers), (2) second trimester serum screening (maternal age and maternal serum biochemical markers), or (3) 2-step integrated screening, which includes first and second trimester serum screening with or without nuchal translucency (integrated prenatal screen, serum integrated prenatal screening, contingent, and sequential). These options are reviewed, and recommendations are made. Studies published between 1982 and 2009 were retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline and CINAHL and the Cochrane Library, using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (aneuploidy, Down syndrome, trisomy, prenatal screening, genetic health risk, genetic health surveillance, prenatal diagnosis). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, and relevant observational

  17. Ultrasound diagnosis and perinatal management of fetal genito-urinary abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjak, A; Latin, V; Mandruzzato, G; D'Addario, V; Rajhvajn, B

    1984-01-01

    Approximately 50% of fetal abdominal masses originate in the urinary system and those recognizable ultrasonically include renal dysplasia, renal agenesis and obstruction of the lower excretory channels. Fetal renal anomalies may be discovered co-incidentally during the course of sonographic evaluation of uterine size-dates discrepancy, because they are commonly associated with fetal growth retardation and/or oligohydramnios, or during a planned sonographic follow-up of pregnancies in patients who are at risk of recurrence of such anomalies. The sonographic demonstration of renal anomalies under these circumstances may allow for elective termination of pregnancy, may modify the obstetric management and/or facilitate pediatric and surgical care of the newborn. In the collaboration study at three ultrasonic centers there were 81 cases of genito-urinary tract anomalies detected antenatally in a five years period. Among the detected anomalies there were 30 hydronephrotic fetuses, 12 with multicystic disease, 15 with Potter's syndrome, 10 with polycystic kidney, 9 with Prune Belly syndrome, 4 with isolated renal cysts and 1 with an ovarian cyst. Perinatal management of the fetus with urinary tract abnormalities greatly depends on the accuracy of the diagnosis. It would be justifiable to suggest that an inexperienced observer should not make the final diagnosis. He could be of great help, if one kept a high index of suspicion in patients with a significant family history of oligohydramnios and of unexplained abnormal cystic structures in the fetal abdomen and seek the help of a special referral center where experience in related cases is concentrated. Once an accurate diagnosis is made, various alternatives are open to the obstetrician. This is primarily dependent upon the type and degree of the abnormality. Unilateral multicystic kidney and hydronephrosis due to obstruction above the level of the urethra appear to be compatible with extrauterine life and should be

  18. Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in spontaneous abortion with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyae Lim

    Full Text Available Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in maternal circulation have been proposed as potential markers for noninvasive monitoring of the placental condition during the pregnancy. However, the correlation of and change in cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in spontaneous abortion (SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy have not yet been reported. Therefore, we investigated cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy.A nested case-control study was conducted with maternal plasma collected from 268 women in their first trimester of pregnancy. Subjects included 41 SA with normal fetal karyotype, 26 SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy, and 201 normal controls. The unmethylated PDE9A gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free fetal DNA. The GAPDH gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free total DNA. The diagnostic accuracy was measured using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curves. Levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were significantly higher in both SA women with normal fetal karyotype and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy in comparison with the normal controls (P<0.001 in both. The correlation between cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels was stronger in the normal controls (r = 0.843, P<0.001 than in SA women with normal karyotype (r = 0.465, P = 0.002 and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy (r = 0.412, P = 0.037. The area under the ROC curve for cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA was 0.898 (95% CI, 0.852-0.945 and 0.939 (95% CI, 0.903-0.975, respectively.Significantly high levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were found in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Our findings suggest that cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA may be useful biomarkers for the prediction of SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy, regardless of fetal

  19. Barth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  20. Sudden Unexpected Death in Fetal Life Through Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Richard D; Kinney, Hannah C; Willinger, Marian

    2016-06-01

    In March 2015, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development held a workshop entitled "Sudden Unexpected Death in Fetal Life Through Early Childhood: New Opportunities." Its objective was to advance efforts to understand and ultimately prevent sudden deaths in early life, by considering their pathogenesis as a potential continuum with some commonalities in biological origins or pathways. A second objective of this meeting was to highlight current issues surrounding the classification of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and the implications of variations in the use of the term "SIDS" in forensic practice, and pediatric care and research. The proceedings reflected the most current knowledge and understanding of the origins and biology of vulnerability to sudden unexpected death, and its environmental triggers. Participants were encouraged to consider the application of new technologies and "omics" approaches to accelerate research. The major advances in delineating the intrinsic vulnerabilities to sudden death in early life have come from epidemiologic, neural, cardiac, metabolic, genetic, and physiologic research, with some commonalities among cases of unexplained stillbirth, SIDS, and sudden unexplained death in childhood observed. It was emphasized that investigations of sudden unexpected death are inconsistent, varying by jurisdiction, as are the education, certification practices, and experience of death certifiers. In addition, there is no practical consensus on the use of "SIDS" as a determination in cause of death. Major clinical, forensic, and scientific areas are identified for future research. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.