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Sample records for fescue-endophyte association response

  1. Characterization of Epichloë coenophiala within the U.S.: are all tall fescue endophytes created equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Carolyn; Charlton, Nikki; Takach, Johanna; Swoboda, Ginger; Trammell, Michael; Huhman, David; Hopkins, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) is a valuable and broadly adapted forage grass that occupies approximately 14 million hectares across the United States. A native to Europe, tall fescue was likely introduced into the U.S. around the late 1800’s. Much of the success of tall fescue can be attributed to Epichloë coenophiala (formerly Neotyphodium coenophialum) a seed borne symbiont that aids in host persistence. Epichloë species are capable of producing a range of alkaloids (ergot alkaloids, indole-diterpenes, lolines and peramine) that provide protection to the plant host from herbivory. Unfortunately, most tall fescue within the U.S., commonly referred to as KY31, harbors the endophyte E. coenophiala that causes toxicity to grazing livestock due to the production of ergot alkaloids. Molecular analyses of tall fescue endophytes have identified four independent associations, representing tall fescue with E. coenophiala, Epichloë sp. FaTG-2, Epichloë sp. FaTG-3 or Epichloë sp. FaTG-4. Each of these Epichloë species can be further distinguished based on genetic variation that equates to differences in the alkaloid gene loci. Tall fescue samples were evaluated using markers to SSR and alkaloid biosynthesis genes to determine endophyte strain variation present within continental U.S. Samples represented seed and tillers from the Suiter farm (Menifee County, KY), which is considered the originating site of KY31, as well as plant samples collected from 14 states, breeder’s seed and plant introduction lines (National Plant Germplasm System, NPGS). This study revealed two prominent E. coenophiala genotypes based on presence of alkaloid biosynthesis genes and SSR markers and provides insight into endophyte variation within continental U.S. across historical and current tall fescue samples.

  2. Tall fescue endophyte effects on tolerance to water-deficit stress

    OpenAIRE

    Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Dinkins, Randy D; Wood, Constance L; Bacon, Charles W.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The endophytic fungus, Neotyphodium coenophialum, can enhance drought tolerance of its host grass, tall fescue. To investigate endophyte effects on plant responses to acute water deficit stress, we did comprehensive profiling of plant metabolite levels in both shoot and root tissues of genetically identical clone pairs of tall fescue with endophyte (E+) and without endophyte (E-) in response to direct water deficit stress. The E- clones were generated by treating E+ plants with fun...

  3. Tall fescue endophyte effects on tolerance to water-deficit stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The endophytic fungus, Neotyphodium coenophialum, can enhance drought tolerance of its host grass, tall fescue. To investigate endophyte effects on plant responses to acute water deficit stress, we did comprehensive profiling of plant metabolite levels in both shoot and root tissues of genetically identical clone pairs of tall fescue with endophyte (E+) and without endophyte (E-) in response to direct water deficit stress. The E- clones were generated by treating E+ plants with fungicide and selectively propagating single tillers. In time course studies on the E+ and E- clones, water was withheld from 0 to 5 days, during which levels of free sugars, sugar alcohols, and amino acids were determined, as were levels of some major fungal metabolites. Results After 2–3 days of withholding water, survival and tillering of re-watered plants was significantly greater for E+ than E- clones. Within two to three days of withholding water, significant endophyte effects on metabolites manifested as higher levels of free glucose, fructose, trehalose, sugar alcohols, proline and glutamic acid in shoots and roots. The fungal metabolites, mannitol and loline alkaloids, also significantly increased with water deficit. Conclusions Our results suggest that symbiotic N. coenophialum aids in survival and recovery of tall fescue plants from water deficit, and acts in part by inducing rapid accumulation of these compatible solutes soon after imposition of stress. PMID:24015904

  4. Tall fescue endophyte effects on tolerance to water-deficit stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand more about the enhanced drought tolerance conferred by the endophyte Neotyphodium coenophialum in tall fescue, we analyzed the effect of the endophyte on genetically identical tall fescue clones with (E+) and without the endophyte (E-), by generating E- plants through fungicide trea...

  5. Cytokine production associated with smallpox vaccine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Whitney L; Salk, Hannah M; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Smallpox was eradicated 34 years ago due to the success of the smallpox vaccine; yet, the vaccine continues to be studied because of its importance in responding to potential biological warfare and the adverse events associated with current smallpox vaccines. Interindividual variations in vaccine response are observed and are, in part, due to genetic variation. In some cases, these varying responses lead to adverse events, which occur at a relatively high rate for the smallpox vaccine compared with other vaccines. Here, we aim to summarize the cytokine responses associated with smallpox vaccine response to date. Along with a description of each of these cytokines, we describe the genetic and adverse event data associated with cytokine responses to smallpox vaccination.

  6. Cortical Thickness Changes Associated with Photoparoxysmal Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Groppa, Stanislav A; Deuschl, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is an EEG trait of spike and spike-wave discharges in response to photic stimulation that is closely linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). In our previous studies we showed that PPR is associated with functional alterations in the occipital and frontal co......) and compared these groups with a group of PPR-negative-healthy-controls (HC, n = 17; 15.3 ± 3.6 years; 6 males). Our results revealed an increase of cortical thickness in the occipital, frontal and parietal cortices bilaterally in PPR-positive-subjects in comparison to HC. Moreover PPR......-positive-subjects presented a significant decrease of cortical thickness in the temporal cortex in the same group contrast. IGE patients exhibited lower cortical thickness in the temporal lobe bilaterally and in the right paracentral region in comparison to PPR-positive-subjects. Our study demonstrates structural changes...... in the occipital lobe, frontoparietal regions and temporal lobe, which also show functional changes associated with PPR. Patients with epilepsy present changes in the temporal lobe and supplementary motor area....

  7. Emergency Response Communications and Associated Security Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Channa, Muhammad Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    The natural or man-made disaster demands an efficient communication and coordination among first responders to save life and other community resources. Normally, the traditional communication infrastructures such as land line or cellular networks are damaged and don't provide adequate communication services to first responders for exchanging emergency related information. Wireless ad hoc networks such as mobile ad hoc networks, wireless sensor networks and wireless mesh networks are the promising alternatives in such type of situations. The security requirements for emergency response communications include privacy, data integrity, authentication, key management, access control and availability. Various ad hoc communication frameworks have been proposed for emergency response situations. The majority of the proposed frameworks don't provide adequate security services for reliable and secure information exchange. This paper presents a survey of the proposed emergency response communication frameworks and the p...

  8. Immune response associated with nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, F M; Kripke, M L

    1997-10-01

    It is now clear that UV radiation causes nonmelanoma skin cancer in at least two ways: by causing permanent changes in the genetic code and by preventing immunologic recognition of mutant cells. These are interacting rather than separate mechanisms. Damage to DNA results in disregulation of cellular proliferation and initiates immune suppression by stimulating the production of suppressive cytokines. These cytokines contribute to the loss of immunosurveillance. Ultraviolet radiation has both local and systemic immunosuppressive effects. Locally, it depletes and alters antigen-presenting LC at the site of UV irradiation. Systemic suppression results when Ts cells are induced, by altered LC, by inflammatory macrophages that enter the skin following UV irradiation, or by the action of cytokines. Damage to DNA appears to be one of the triggering events in inducing systemic immunosuppression via the release of immunosuppressive cytokines and mediators. Immunologic approaches to treating skin cancers so far have concentrated on nonspecifically stimulating immune cells that infiltrate these tumors, but induction of specific immune responses against these tumors with antitumor vaccines has received little attention as yet. Preventive measures include sun avoidance and the use of sunscreens to prevent DNA damage by UV light. Future strategies may employ means to reverse UV-induced immunosuppression by using anti-inflammatory agents, biologicals that accelerate DNA repair or prevent the generation of immunosuppressive cytokines, and specific immunotherapy with tumor antigens. New approaches for studying the immunology of human skin cancers are needed to accelerate progress in this field.

  9. Clinical factors associated with lithium response in bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportiche, Sarah; Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Brichant-Petitjean, Clara; Gard, Sebastien; Khan, Jean-Pierre; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Henry, Chantal; Leboyer, Marion; Etain, Bruno; Scott, Jan; Bellivier, Frank

    2017-05-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common chronic illness characterized by high levels of morbidity and all-cause mortality. Lithium is one of the gold standard mood stabilizer treatments, but the identification of good, partial and non-responders in clinical settings is inconsistent. We used an established rating scale (the Alda scale) to classify the degree of lithium response (good response, partial response, non-response) in a large, multicentre clinically representative sample of well-characterized cases of bipolar disorders I and II. Next, we examined previously reported clinical predictors of response to determine which factors significantly differentiated between the three response groups. Of 754 cases, 300 received lithium, for at least 6 months, as a treatment for bipolar disorder (40%). Of these cases, 17% were classified as good response, 52% as partial response and 31% as non-response. Lifetime history of mixed episodes ( p = 0.017) and alcohol use disorders ( p = 0.015) both occurred in >20% of partial response and non-response groups but bipolar disorder I was of borderline statistical significance, being more frequent in the good response group (38%) compared with the non-response group (18%). There was a trend ( p = 0.06) for bipolar disorder II to be associated with non-response. Only three factors previously identified as predictors of lithium response significantly differentiated the response groups identified in our sample. Interestingly, these factors have all been found to co-occur more often than expected by chance, and it can be hypothesized that they may represent a shared underlying factor or dimension. Further prospective studies of predictors and the performance of the Alda scale are recommended.

  10. Gastric cancer progression associated with local humoral immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Yolanda, López-Vidal; Sergio, Ponce-de-León; Hugo, Esquivel-Solís; Isabel, Amieva-Fernández Rosa; Rafael, Barreto-Zúñiga; Aldo, Torre-Delgadillo; Gonzalo, Castillo-Rojas

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the association between H. pylori and gastric cancer has been well described, the alterations studies are scarce in the humoral immune response in specific anatomical areas of stomach and during the stages of gastric cancer. The aim in this study was to determine the influence of humoral immune responses against H. pylori infection on gastric carcinoma. Methods We selected 16 gastric cancer cases and approximately one matched control per case at the National Institute of M...

  11. Performance, forage utilization, and ergovaline consumption by beef cows grazing endophyte fungus-infected tall fescue, endophyte fungus-free tall fescue, or orchardgrass pastures.

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    Peters, C W; Grigsby, K N; Aldrich, C G; Paterson, J A; Lipsey, R J; Kerley, M S; Garner, G B

    1992-05-01

    Two 120-d trials (May to September, 1988 and 1989) determined the effects of grazing tall fescue (two varieties) or orchardgrass on forage intake and performance by beef cows. Each summer, 48 cow-calf pairs grazed endophyte-infected Kentucky-31 tall fescue (KY-31), endophyte-free Mozark tall fescue (MOZARK), or Hallmark orchardgrass (OG) pastures (16 pairs/treatment). Forage OM intakes and digestibilities were determined during June and August each year. Cow and calf BW and milk production were determined every 28 d. During June of both years, OM intakes did not differ (P greater than .10) among treatments. During August of 1988, intakes were 18% lower (P less than .05) by KY-31 cows (1.6% of BW) than by MOZARK or OG cows (average 1.95% of BW); however, no differences (P greater than .10) were measured in August of 1989. Estimates of ergovaline consumption during June from KY-31 were between 4.2 (1988) and 6.0 mg/d (1989), whereas August estimates were between 1.1 (1988) and 2.8 mg/d (1989). Ergovaline in MOZARK estrusa was below detection limits, except in August of 1989. Cows that grazed KY-31 lost three times (P less than .01) more BW than cows that grazed MOZARK or OG (42 vs 9 and 13 kg, respectively). Milk production by KY-31 cows was 25% lower (P less than .01) than that by cows that grazed MOZARK or OG (6.0 vs average of 8.0 kg/d). Similarly, slower (P less than .01) calf gains were noted for KY-31 than for MOZARK or OG (.72 vs .89 and .88 kg/d, respectively). Cows grazing KY-31 experienced accelerated BW loss and reduced milk production and weaned lighter calves than did cows grazing MOZARK or OG. Decreased performance was not explained by consistently reduced forage intakes; hence, altered nutrient utilization was suspected.

  12. Hemopexin activity is associated with angiotensin II responsiveness in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, Jan A.; Lely, Anna T.; Borghuis, Theo; Faas, Marijke M.; van Goor, Harry; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephanus; Bakker, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hemopexin, an acute phase protein, can downregulate the angiotensin (ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) in vitro. Whether hemopexin is involved in the responsiveness to ang II in vivo is unknown. Therefore, we tested whether variations in endogenous hemopexin activity are associated with th

  13. Stimulus-responsive hydrogels based on associative polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hietala, Sami; Hvilsted, Søren; Jankova Atanasova, Katja

    2008-01-01

    An important group of water soluble polymers are associative ones in which hydrophobic parts of the polymer molecules interact, self-assemble and enhance the viscosity of aqueous solutions even at low polymer concentrations. For many applications it would be beneficial to be able to combine...... the associative behaviour with stimuli-responsiveness. Suitable stimuli include for example temperature, pH, ionic strength or variation of polymer or additive concentration. Developments in the controlled radical polymerization methods has enabled versatile modification of polymer structures, which in tum...... enables design of novel associating polymers. Two different stimuli-responsive hydrogel systems will be discussed. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) has attracted attention due to its sharp and reversible transition behavior and well-defined demixing temperature in aqueous medium. This however only...

  14. Biofeedback therapy for pediatric headache: factors associated with response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Heidi K; Brockman, Libby N; Breuner, Cora C

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this study was to measure the effect of biofeedback therapy on pediatric headache and to identify factors associated with response to biofeedback therapy. In the United States, 17% of children have frequent or severe headaches. Biofeedback therapy (BFT) appears to be an effective treatment for headaches in adults and is often recommended for children with headaches, but there are few data in the pediatric population. It is also not clear which patients are most likely to benefit from biofeedback therapy. We examined the records of patients, aged 8 to 18 years old, who were referred to a pediatric BFT clinic for management of headache between 2004 and 2008. We extracted data regarding patient and headache characteristics, medication use, family history, and measures of depression, anxiety, and somatization. Chronic headache was defined as ≥4 headache days/week. Positive response to biofeedback was defined as a 50% reduction in number of headache days/week or hours/week, or ≥3-point decrease in severity (0-10 scale) between first and last visits. We analyzed the responder rate for those with episodic and chronic headaches and performed multivariable analysis to determine what factors were associated with headache response to biofeedback therapy. We analyzed records from 132 children who attended ≥2 biofeedback sessions. Median headache frequency dropped from 3.5 to 2 headache days/week between the first and last visits. The response rate was 58% overall; 48% for chronic headaches and 73% episodic headaches. In multivariate analysis, ability to raise hand temperature by >3°F at the last visit and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were associated with a positive response, and preventive medication use was associated with nonresponse. Anxiety, depression, and somatization were not significantly associated with response to biofeedback therapy. Biofeedback therapy appears to be an effective treatment for children and adolescents

  15. Association of response endpoints with survival outcomes in multiple myeloma

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    Lonial, S; Anderson, K C

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and the immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) thalidomide and lenalidomide, more patients with multiple myeloma are achieving deep, durable responses and disease control, and are living longer. These improvements have afforded more robust analyses of the relationship between response and survival. Generally, these studies have demonstrated that improvements in the quality of response across all stages of treatment are associated with better disease control and longer survival. Thus, achievement of maximal response should be strongly considered, particularly in the frontline setting, but must also be balanced with tolerability, quality of life and patient preferences. In select patients, achievement of a lesser response may be adequate to prolong survival, and attempts to treat these patients to a deeper response may place them at unnecessary risk without significant benefit. Maintenance therapy has been shown to improve the quality of response and disease control and, in some studies, survival. Studies support maintenance therapy for high-risk patients as a standard of care, and there are emerging data supporting maintenance therapy in standard-risk patients to improve progression-free and possibly overall survival. Multidrug regimens combining a proteasome inhibitor and an IMiD have shown exceptional response outcomes with acceptable increases in toxicity in both the frontline and salvage settings, and are becoming a standard treatment approach. Moving forward, the use of immunophenotypic and molecular response criteria will be essential in better understanding the impact of highly active and continuous treatment regimens across myeloma patient populations. Future translational studies will help to develop antimyeloma agents to their fullest potential. The introduction of novel targeted therapies, including the IMiD pomalidomide and the proteasome inhibitors carfilzomib and ixazomib (MLN9708), will provide

  16. Autophagy-associated immune responses and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongming; Chen, Liuxi; Xu, Yinghua; Han, Weidong; Lou, Fang; Fei, Weiqiang; Liu, Shuiping; Jing, Zhao; Sui, Xinbing

    2016-04-19

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process by which cellular components are sequestered into a double-membrane vesicle and delivered to the lysosome for terminal degradation and recycling. Accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy plays a critical role in cell survival, senescence and homeostasis, and its dysregulation is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration. Recent studies show that autophagy is also an important regulator of cell immune response. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates tumor immune responses remains elusive. In this review, we will describe the role of autophagy in immune regulation and summarize the possible molecular mechanisms that are currently well documented in the ability of autophagy to control cell immune response. In addition, the scientific and clinical hurdles regarding the potential role of autophagy in cancer immunotherapy will be discussed.

  17. An Association between Emotional Responsiveness and Smoking Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Keeley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Emotional responsiveness (ER has been theorized to play a protective role in pathways to tobacco initiation, regular use, and dependence, yet a possible association between ER and smoking behavior has not been studied. Our aim was to test whether measuring ER to a neutral stimulus was associated with decreased odds of current smoking. Methods. We measured ER and smoking status (current, former, and never in two datasets: a cross-sectional dataset of persons with diabetes (n=127 and a prospective dataset of depressed patients (n=107 from an urban primary care system. Because there were few former smokers in the datasets, smoking status was dichotomized (current versus former/never and measured at baseline (cross-sectional dataset or at 36 weeks after-baseline (prospective dataset. ER was ascertained with response to a neutral facial expression (any ER versus none. Results. Compared to their nonresponsive counterparts, adjusted odds of current smoking were lower among participants endorsing emotional responsiveness in both the cross-sectional and prospective datasets (ORs = .29 and .32, P’s <.02, resp.. Discussion. ER may be protective against current smoking behavior. Further research investigating the association between ER and decreased smoking may hold potential to inform treatment approaches to improve smoking prevalence.

  18. Lower corticosteroid skin blanching response is associated with severe COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J M Hoonhorst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic airflow limitation caused by ongoing inflammatory and remodeling processes of the airways and lung tissue. Inflammation can be targeted by corticosteroids. However, airway inflammation is generally less responsive to steroids in COPD than in asthma. The underlying mechanisms are yet unclear. This study aimed to assess whether skin corticosteroid insensitivity is associated with COPD and COPD severity using the corticosteroid skin blanching test. METHODS: COPD patients GOLD stage I-IV (n = 27, 24, 22, and 16 respectively and healthy never-smokers and smokers (n = 28 and 56 respectively were included. Corticosteroid sensitivity was assessed by the corticosteroid skin blanching test. Budesonide was applied in 8 logarithmically increasing concentrations (0-100 μg/ml on subject's forearm. Assessment of blanching was performed after 7 hours using a 7-point scale (normal skin to intense blanching. All subjects performed spirometry and body plethysmography. RESULTS: Both GOLD III and GOLD IV COPD patients showed significantly lower skin blanching responses than healthy never-smokers and smokers, GOLD I, and GOLD II patients. Their area under the dose-response curve values of the skin blanching response were 586 and 243 vs. 1560, 1154, 1380, and 1309 respectively, p<0.05. Lower FEV1 levels and higher RV/TLC ratios were significantly associated with lower skin blanching responses (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004 respectively. GOLD stage I, II, III and IV patients had similar age and packyears. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, severe and very severe COPD patients had lower skin corticosteroid sensitivity than mild and moderate COPD patients and non-COPD controls with comparable age and packyears. Our findings together suggest that the reduced skin blanching response fits with a subgroup of COPD patients that has an early-onset COPD phenotype.

  19. Neural correlates of stimulus-response and response-outcome associations in dorsolateral versus dorsomedial striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Stalnaker

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence suggests that there is functional heterogeneity in the control of behavior by the dorsal striatum. Dorsomedial striatum may support goal-directed behavior by representing associations between responses and outcomes (R-O associations. The dorsolateral striatum, in contrast, may support motor habits by encoding associations between stimuli and responses (S-R associations. To test whether neural correlates in striatum in fact conform to this pattern, we recorded single-units in dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum of rats performing a task in which R-O contingencies were manipulated independently of S-R contingencies. Among response-selective neurons in both regions, activity was significantly modulated by the initial stimulus, providing evidence of S-R encoding. Similarly, response selectivity was significantly modulated by the associated outcome in both regions, providing evidence of R-O encoding. In both regions, this outcome-modulation did not seem to reflect the relative value of the expected outcome, but rather its specific identity. Finally, in both regions we found correlates of the available action-outcome contingencies reflected in the baseline activity of many neurons. These results suggest that differences in information content in these two regions may not determine the differential roles they play in controlling behavior, demonstrated in previous studies.

  20. Association between neuroticism and amygdala responsivity emerges under stressful conditions.

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    Everaerd, Daphne; Klumpers, Floris; van Wingen, Guido; Tendolkar, Indira; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-05-15

    Increased amygdala reactivity in response to salient stimuli is seen in patients with affective disorders, in healthy subjects at risk for these disorders, and in stressed individuals, making it a prime target for mechanistic studies into the pathophysiology of affective disorders. However, whereas individual differences in neuroticism are thought to modulate the effect of stress on mental health, the mechanistic link between stress, neuroticism and amygdala responsivity is unknown. Thus, we studied the relationship between experimentally induced stress, individual differences in neuroticism, and amygdala responsivity. To this end, fearful and happy faces were presented to a large cohort of young, healthy males (n=120) in two separate functional MRI sessions (stress versus control) in a randomized, controlled cross-over design. We revealed that amygdala reactivity was modulated by an interaction between the factors of stress, neuroticism, and the emotional valence of the facial stimuli. Follow-up analysis showed that neuroticism selectively enhanced amygdala responses to fearful faces in the stress condition. Thus, we show that stress unmasks an association between neuroticism and amygdala responsivity to potentially threatening stimuli. This effect constitutes a possible mechanistic link within the complex pathophysiology of affective disorders, and our novel approach appears suitable for further studies targeting the underlying mechanisms.

  1. Predictive factors associated with hepatitis C antiviraltherapy response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may lead to significantliver injury, and viral, environmental, host, immunologicand genetic factors may contribute to the differencesin the disease expression and treatment response.In the early 2000s, dual therapy using a combination of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PR) becamethe standard of care for HCV treatment. In this PRera, predictive factors of therapy response related tovirus and host have been identified. In 2010/2011,therapeutic regimens for HCV genotype 1 patients weremodified, and the addition of NS3/4a protease inhibitors(boceprevir or telaprevir) to dual therapy increasedthe effectiveness and chances of sustained virologicresponse (SVR). Nevertheless, the first-generation tripletherapy is associated with many adverse events, some ofwhich are serious and associated with death, particularlyin cirrhotic patients. This led to the need to identifyviral and host predictive factors that might influencethe SVR rate to triple therapy and avoid unnecessaryexposure to these drugs. Over the past four years,hepatitis C treatment has been rapidly changing with thedevelopment of new therapies and other developments.Currently, with the more recent generations of pangenotipicantiviral therapies, there have been highersustained virologic rates, and prognostic factors maynot have the same importance and strength as before.Nonetheless, some variables may still be consistent withthe low rates of non-response with regimens that includesofosbuvir, daclatasvir and ledipasvir. In this manuscript,we review the predictive factors of therapy responseacross the different treatment regimens over the lastdecade including the new antiviral drugs.

  2. Imbalanced adaptive responses associated with microsatellite instability in cholangiocarcinoma

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    Loilome, Watcharin; Kadsanit, Sasithorn; Muisook, Kanha; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Namwat, Nisana; Techasen, Anchalee; Puapairoj, Anucha; Khuntikeo, Narong; Phonjit, Pichai

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive response of the genome protection mechanism occurs in cells when exposed to genotoxic stress due to the overproduction of free radicals via inflammation and infection. In such circumstances, cells attempt to maintain health via several genome protection mechanisms. However, evidence is increasing that this adaptive response may have deleterious effect; a reduction of antioxidant enzymes and/or imbalance in the DNA repair system generates microsatellite instability (MSI), which has procarcinogenic implications. Therefore, the present study hypothesized that MSI caused by imbalanced responses of antioxidant enzymes and/or DNA repair enzymes as a result of oxidative/nitrative stress arising from the inflammatory response is involved in liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinogenesis. The present study investigated this hypothesis by identifying the expression patterns of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase (CAT), and DNA repair enzymes, including alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG), apurinic endonuclease (APE) and DNA polymerase β (DNA pol β). In addition, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes, SOD2 and CAT, were examined in human cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) tissues using immunohistochemical staining. MSI was also analyzed in human CCA tissues. The resulting data demonstrated that the expression levels of the SOD2 and CAT enzymes decreased. The activities of SOD2 and CAT decreased significantly in the CCA tissues, compared with the hepatic tissue of cadaveric donors. In the DNA repairing enzymes, it was found that the expression levels of AAG and DNA pol β enzymes increased, whereas the expression of APE decreased. In addition, it was found that MSI-high was present in 69% of patients, whereas MSI-low was present in 31% of patients, with no patients classified as having microsatellite stability. In the patients, a MSI-high was correlated with poor prognosis, indicated by a shorter survival rate. These results

  3. An immune response network associated with blood lipid levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Inouye

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available While recent scans for genetic variation associated with human disease have been immensely successful in uncovering large numbers of loci, far fewer studies have focused on the underlying pathways of disease pathogenesis. Many loci which are associated with disease and complex phenotypes map to non-coding, regulatory regions of the genome, indicating that modulation of gene transcription plays a key role. Thus, this study generated genome-wide profiles of both genetic and transcriptional variation from the total blood extracts of over 500 randomly-selected, unrelated individuals. Using measurements of blood lipids, key players in the progression of atherosclerosis, three levels of biological information are integrated in order to investigate the interactions between circulating leukocytes and proximal lipid compounds. Pair-wise correlations between gene expression and lipid concentration indicate a prominent role for basophil granulocytes and mast cells, cell types central to powerful allergic and inflammatory responses. Network analysis of gene co-expression showed that the top associations function as part of a single, previously unknown gene module, the Lipid Leukocyte (LL module. This module replicated in T cells from an independent cohort while also displaying potential tissue specificity. Further, genetic variation driving LL module expression included the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP most strongly associated with serum immunoglobulin E (IgE levels, a key antibody in allergy. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM indicated that LL module is at least partially reactive to blood lipid levels. Taken together, this study uncovers a gene network linking blood lipids and circulating cell types and offers insight into the hypothesis that the inflammatory response plays a prominent role in metabolism and the potential control of atherogenesis.

  4. Metabolomics reveals insect metabolic responses associated with fungal infection.

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    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Luo, Feifei; Gao, Qiang; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between insects and pathogenic fungi are complex. We employed metabolomic techniques to profile insect metabolic dynamics upon infection by the pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Silkworm larvae were infected with fungal spores and microscopic observations demonstrated that the exhaustion of insect hemocytes was coupled with fungal propagation in the insect body cavity. Metabolomic analyses revealed that fungal infection could significantly alter insect energy and nutrient metabolisms as well as the immune defense responses, including the upregulation of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, and lipids, but the downregulation of eicosanoids and amines. The insect antifeedant effect of the fungal infection was evident with the reduced level of maclurin (a component of mulberry leaves) in infected insects but elevated accumulations in control insects. Insecticidal and cytotoxic mycotoxins like oosporein and beauveriolides were also detected in insects at the later stages of infection. Taken together, the metabolomics data suggest that insect immune responses are energy-cost reactions and the strategies of nutrient deprivation, inhibition of host immune responses, and toxin production would be jointly employed by the fungus to kill insects. The data obtained in this study will facilitate future functional studies of genes and pathways associated with insect-fungus interactions.

  5. Chemokines Associated with Pathologic Responses to Orthopedic Implant Debris

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    Hallab, Nadim J.; Jacobs, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success in returning people to health saving mobility and high quality of life, the over 1 million total joint replacements implanted in the US each year are expected to eventually fail after approximately 15–25 years of use, due to slow progressive subtle inflammation to implant debris compromising the bone implant interface. This local inflammatory pseudo disease state is primarily caused by implant debris interaction with innate immune cells, i.e., macrophages. This implant debris can also activate an adaptive immune reaction giving rise to the concept of implant-related metal sensitivity. However, a consensus of studies agree the dominant form of this response is due to innate reactivity by macrophages to implant debris danger signaling (danger-associated molecular pattern) eliciting cytokine-based and chemokine inflammatory responses. This review covers implant debris-induced release of the cytokines and chemokines due to activation of the innate (and the adaptive) immune system and how this leads to subsequent implant failure through loosening and osteolysis, i.e., what is known of central chemokines (e.g., IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, MIP-1, CCL9, CCL10, CCL17, and CCL22) associated with implant debris reactivity as related to the innate immune system activation/cytokine expression, e.g., danger signaling (e.g., IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, etc.), toll-like receptor activation (e.g., IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, etc.), bone catabolism (e.g., TRAP5b), and hypoxia responses (HIF-1α). More study is needed, however, to fully understand these interactions to effectively counter cytokine- and chemokine-based orthopedic implant-related inflammation.

  6. Adolescent responses toward a new technology: first associations, information seeking and affective responses to ecogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Mark J W; Koolstra, Cees M; Willems, Jaap T J M

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study among adolescents (N = 752) who were introduced to the emerging technology of ecogenomics for the first time. An online survey focused on their associations with the term ecogenomics, their planned information seeking behaviors if they were to acquire information about the new technology, and their first affective responses toward ecogenomics after having read some introductory information about it. Adolescents were found to associate ecogenomics most frequently with economy. Although the Internet was the most popular medium to be used in their planned information seeking behaviors, books and science communication professionals were judged as the most trustworthy information sources. After having read the introductory information about ecogenomics most adolescents reported positive affective responses toward the new technology.

  7. Association of periodontitis with persistent, pro-atherogenic antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhlin, Kåre; Holmer, Jacob; Gustafsson, Anders; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Pockley, Alan Graham; Johansson, Anders; Paju, Susanna; Klinge, Björn; Pussinen, Pirkko J

    2015-11-01

    To study antibody responses associated with molecular mimicry in periodontitis. Fifty-four periodontitis cases (mean age 54.0 years) and 44 controls (53.6 years) were examined, after which cases received periodontal treatment. Established immunoassays were used to analyse levels of antibodies against two pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), heat shock proteins (Hsp), Hsp60, Hsp65, and Hsp70, and epitopes of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) (CuOx-LDL and MDA-LDL) in plasma samples that were collected at baseline and after 3 (n = 48) and 6 (n = 30) months. When age, sex, smoking habit, and the number of teeth were considered in multivariate logistic regressions, Aa and Pg IgG, Hsp65-IgA, CuOx-LDL-IgG and -IgM, and MDA-LDL-IgG antibody levels were associated with periodontitis, whereas Hsp60-IgG2 antibody levels were inversely associated. The Aa antibody levels significantly correlated with the levels of IgA antibodies to Hsp65 and Hsp70, and both OxLDL IgA antibody levels. The levels of antibodies to Pg correlated with IgG antibodies to Hsp60, Hsp70, and both oxLDL antibody epitopes. None of the antibody levels changed significantly after treatment. Periodontitis is associated with persistently high levels of circulating antibodies that are reactive with pathogen- and host-derived antigens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Match mismatch processes underlie human hippocampal responses to associative novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2007-08-08

    The hippocampus has long been proposed to play a critical role in novelty detection through its ability to act as a comparator between past and present experience. A recent study provided evidence for this hypothesis by characterizing hippocampal responses to sequence novelty, a type of associative novelty where familiar items appear in a new temporal order. Here, we ask whether a hippocampal match-mismatch (i.e., comparator) mechanism operates selectively to identify the violation of predictions within the temporal domain or instead also underlies the processing of associative novelty in other domains (e.g., spatial). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a repetition paradigm in which subjects viewed sequences of objects presented in distinct locations on the screen and performed an incidental target detection task. The left hippocampus exhibited a pattern of activity consistent with that of an associative match-mismatch detector, with novelty signals generated only in conditions where one contextual component was novel and the other repeated. In contrast, right hippocampal activation signaled the presence of objects in familiar locations. Our results suggest that hippocampal match-mismatch computations constitute a general mechanism underpinning the processing of associative novelty. These findings support a model in which hippocampal mismatch signals rely critically on the recall of previous experience, a process that only occurs when novel sensory inputs overlap significantly with stored representations. More generally, the current study also offers insights into how the hippocampus automatically represents the spatiotemporal context of our experiences, a function that may relate to its role in episodic memory.

  9. Atomoxetine pharmacogenetics: associations with pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacob T; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Atomoxetine is indicated for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and is predominantly metabolized by the CYP2D6 enzyme. Differences in pharmacokinetic parameters as well as clinical treatment outcomes across CYP2D6 genotype groups have resulted in dosing recommendations within the product label, but clinical studies supporting the use of genotype guided dosing are currently lacking. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic and clinical studies have primarily focused on extensive as compared with poor metabolizers, with little information known about other metabolizer categories as well as genes involved in the pharmacodynamics of atomoxetine. This review describes the pharmacogenetic associations with atomoxetine pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability with considerations for the clinical utility of this information.

  10. Response inhibition is associated with white matter microstructure in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Baaré, William; Vestergaard, Martin

    2010-01-01

    inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), presupplementary motor cortex (preSMA), and subthalamic nucleus. Though the brain's fibre tracts are known to develop during childhood, little is known about how fibre tract development within this network relates to developing behavioural control. Here we examined...... right IFG and preSMA after controlling for age. Mean FA and diffusivity values were extracted from right and left IFG and preSMA. As hypothesized, faster response inhibition was significantly associated with higher FA and lower perpendicular diffusivity in both the right IFG and the right preSMA......, possibly reflecting faster speed of neural conduction within more densely packed or better myelinated fibre tracts. Moreover, both of these effects remained significant after controlling for age and whole brain estimates of these DTI parameters. Interestingly, right IFG and preSMA FA contributed additively...

  11. Factors associated with survey response in hand surgery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Arjan G J; Anderson, Jade A; Neuhaus, Valentin; Ring, David

    2013-10-01

    A low response rate is believed to decrease the validity of survey studies. Factors associated with nonresponse to surveys are poorly characterized in orthopaedic research. This study addressed whether (1) psychologic factors; (2) demographics; (3) illness-related factors; and (4) pain are predictors of a lower likelihood of a patient returning a mailed survey. One hundred four adult, new or return patients completed questionnaires including the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 depression scale, Short Health Anxiety Index, demographics, and a pain scale (0-10) during a routine visit to a hand and upper extremity surgeon. Of these patients, 38% had undergone surgery and the remainder was seen for various other conditions. Six months after their visit, patients were mailed the DASH questionnaire and a scale to rate their satisfaction with the visit (0-10). Bivariate analysis and logistic regression were used to determine risk factors for being a nonresponder to the followup of this study. The cohort consisted of 57 women and 47 men with a mean age of 51 years with various diagnoses. Thirty-five patients (34%) returned the questionnaire. Responders were satisfied with their visit (mean satisfaction, 8.7) and had a DASH score of 9.6. Compared with patients who returned the questionnaires, nonresponders had higher pain catastrophizing scores, were younger, more frequently male, and had more pain at enrollment. In logistic regression, male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.6), pain (OR, 1.3), and younger age (OR, 1.03) were associated with not returning the questionnaire. Survey studies should be interpreted in light of the fact that patients who do not return questionnaires in a hand surgery practice differ from patients who do return them. Hand surgery studies that rely on questionnaire evaluation remote from study enrollment should include tactics to improve the response of younger, male patients with more pain. Level II, prognostic study. See

  12. Cardiovascular Responses Associated with Daily Walking in Subacute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K. Prajapati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of regaining independent ambulation after stroke, the amount of daily walking completed during in-patient rehabilitation is low. The purpose of this study is to determine if (1 walking-related heart rate responses reached the minimum intensity necessary for therapeutic aerobic exercise (40%–60% heart rate reserve or (2 heart rate responses during bouts of walking revealed excessive workload that may limit walking (>80% heart rate reserve. Eight individuals with subacute stroke attending in-patient rehabilitation were recruited. Participants wore heart rate monitors and accelerometers during a typical rehabilitation day. Walking-related changes in heart rate and walking bout duration were determined. Patients did not meet the minimum cumulative requirements of walking intensity (>40% heart rate reserve and duration (>10 minutes continuously necessary for cardiorespiratory benefit. Only one patient exceeded 80% heart rate reserve. The absence of significant increases in heart rate associated with walking reveals that patients chose to walk at speeds well below a level that has meaningful cardiorespiratory health benefits. Additionally, cardiorespiratory workload is unlikely to limit participation in walking. Measurement of heart rate and walking during in-patient rehabilitation may be a useful approach to encourage patients to increase the overall physical activity and to help facilitate recovery.

  13. Host responses associated with chronic staphylococcal mastitis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Irene; Ferrian, Selena; Penadés, Mariola; García-Quirós, Ana; Pascual, Juan J; Selva, Laura; Viana, David; Corpa, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcal infection causes substantial economic losses in commercial rabbit production systems, and is associated with a wide variety of lesions, including chronic suppurative mastitis, which mainly affects breeding females. Most chronic staphylococcal infections in rabbits are caused by the ST121 lineage of Staphylococcus aureus, although other less common lineages, such as ST96 can also be involved. The aims of the present study were to characterise the host immune response in natural cases of mastitis in rabbits caused by S. aureus, to evaluate any relationship between peripheral and local immunity and to investigate the effect of different S. aureus genotypes on these immune responses. Adult multiparous female rabbits that were affected with chronic staphylococcal mastitis (n = 204) were enrolled into the study. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluations of mammary glands were undertaken, as well as flow cytometric analyses of blood. S. aureus isolates from the mammary glands were identified by multilocus sequence typing. Differences in the number of infiltrating cells were detected, depending on the type of pathology, with more immature lesions demonstrating greater cellularity, characterised by greater numbers of T lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells. A relationship was seen between the cells in blood and mammary tissues, the most notable being the positive correlation between monocytes and tissue macrophages. When glands were infected with ST96 strains, fewer granulocytes (P < 0.01) and greater numbers of B cells (P < 0.01), T cells (P < 0.001), CD4(+) T cells (P < 0.001) and CD8(+) T cells (P < 0.01) were detected, compared with mammary glands that were infected by ST121 strains of S. aureus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Behavioral responses associated with a human-mediated predator shelter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Shannon

    Full Text Available Human activities in protected areas can affect wildlife populations in a similar manner to predation risk, causing increases in movement and vigilance, shifts in habitat use and changes in group size. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates that in certain situations ungulate species may actually utilize areas associated with higher levels of human presence as a potential refuge from disturbance-sensitive predators. We now use four-years of behavioral activity budget data collected from pronghorn (Antilocapra americana and elk (Cervus elephus in Grand Teton National Park, USA to test whether predictable patterns of human presence can provide a shelter from predatory risk. Daily behavioral scans were conducted along two parallel sections of road that differed in traffic volume--with the main Teton Park Road experiencing vehicle use that was approximately thirty-fold greater than the River Road. At the busier Teton Park Road, both species of ungulate engaged in higher levels of feeding (27% increase in the proportion of pronghorn feeding and 21% increase for elk, lower levels of alert behavior (18% decrease for pronghorn and 9% decrease for elk and formed smaller groups. These responses are commonly associated with reduced predatory threat. Pronghorn also exhibited a 30% increase in the proportion of individuals moving at the River Road as would be expected under greater exposure to predation risk. Our findings concur with the 'predator shelter hypothesis', suggesting that ungulates in GTNP use human presence as a potential refuge from predation risk, adjusting their behavior accordingly. Human activity has the potential to alter predator-prey interactions and drive trophic-mediated effects that could ultimately impact ecosystem function and biodiversity.

  15. Lower Corticosteroid Skin Blanching Response Is Associated with Severe COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhorst, Susan J. M.; ten Hacken, Nicolaas; Loi, Adele T. Lo Tam; Koenderman, Leo; Lammers, Jan Willem J.; Telenga, Eef D.; Boezen, Hendrika; van den Berge, Maarten; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airflow limitation caused by ongoing inflammatory and remodeling processes of the airways and lung tissue. Inflammation can be targeted by corticosteroids. However, airway inflammation is generally less responsive t

  16. Clicker response timings and their association with grades.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Classroom response systems, including single-function hardware devices known as “clickers” and systems that utilise multifunction mobile devices such as mobile phones, are widely used for education and training. In higher education there is a growing evidence-base showing how they can be used effectively to promote active learning in the classroom and the ubiquity of mobile device ownership amongst students is increasing the access that instructors have to these kinds of response systems. Rec...

  17. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with cortisol response to crowding in Rainbow Trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding stress responses is essential for improving animal welfare and increasing agriculture production efficiency. Previously, we reported microsatellite markers associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting plasma cortisol response to crowding in rainbow trout. Our main objectives...

  18. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin: Its Response to Hypoxia and Association with Acute Mountain Sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Mellor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS is a common clinical challenge at high altitude (HA. A point-of-care biochemical marker for AMS could have widespread utility. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL rises in response to renal injury, inflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether NGAL rises with HA and if this rise was related to AMS, hypoxia or exercise. NGAL was assayed in a cohort (n=22 undertaking 6 hours exercise at near sea-level (SL; a cohort (n=14 during 3 hours of normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 11.6% and on two trekking expeditions (n=52 to over 5000 m. NGAL did not change with exercise at SL or following normobaric hypoxia. During the trekking expeditions NGAL levels (ng/ml, mean ± sd, range rose significantly (P<0.001 from 68 ± 14 (60–102 at 1300 m to 183 ± 107 (65–519; 143 ± 66 (60–315 and 150 ± 71 (60–357 at 3400 m, 4270 m and 5150 m respectively. At 5150 m there was a significant difference in NGAL between those with severe AMS (n=7, mild AMS (n=16 or no AMS (n=23: 201 ± 34 versus 171 ± 19 versus 124 ± 12 respectively (P=0.009 for severe versus no AMS; P=0.026 for mild versus no AMS. In summary, NGAL rises in response to prolonged hypobaric hypoxia and demonstrates a relationship to the presence and severity of AMS.

  19. A Survivin-Associated Adaptive Response in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grdina, David J.; Murley, Jeffrey S.; Miller, Richard C.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Sutton, Harold G.; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive responses can be induced in cells by very low doses of ionizing radiation resulting in an enhanced resistance to much larger exposures. The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) protein, survivin, has been implicated in many adaptive responses to cellular stress. Computerized axial tomography (CAT) used in image guided radiotherapy to position and monitor tumor response utilizes very low radiation doses ranging from 0.5 to 100 mGy. We investigated the ability of these very low radiation doses administered along with two 2 Gy doses separated by 24 h, a standard conventional radiotherapy dosing schedule, to initiate adaptive responses resulting in the elevation of radiation resistance in exposed cells. Human colon carcinoma (RKO36), mouse sarcoma (SA-NH), along with transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), wild type (WT) or cells lacking functional tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1−R2−) were used to assess their relative ability to express an adaptive response when grown either to confluence in vitro or as tumors in the flank of C57BL/6 mice. The survival of each of these cells was elevated from 5 to 20% (P ≤ 0.05) as compared to cells not receiving a 100 mGy or lesser dose. Additionally, the cells exposed to 100 mGy exhibited elevations in survivin levels, reductions in apoptosis frequencies, and loss of an adaptive response if transfected with survivin siRNA. This survivin-mediated adaptive response has the potential for affecting outcomes if regularly induced throughout a course of image guided radiation therapy. PMID:23651635

  20. A survivin-associated adaptive response in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grdina, David J; Murley, Jeffrey S; Miller, Richard C; Mauceri, Helena J; Sutton, Harold G; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle E; Weichselbaum, Ralph R

    2013-07-15

    Adaptive responses can be induced in cells by very low doses of ionizing radiation resulting in an enhanced resistance to much larger exposures. The inhibitor of apoptosis protein, survivin, has been implicated in many adaptive responses to cellular stress. Computerized axial tomography used in image-guided radiotherapy to position and monitor tumor response uses very low radiation doses ranging from 0.5 to 100 mGy. We investigated the ability of these very low radiation doses administered along with two 2 Gy doses separated by 24 hours, a standard conventional radiotherapy dosing schedule, to initiate adaptive responses resulting in the elevation of radiation resistance in exposed cells. Human colon carcinoma (RKO36), mouse sarcoma (SA-NH), along with transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts, wild type or cells lacking functional tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 were used to assess their relative ability to express an adaptive response when grown either to confluence in vitro or as tumors in the flank of C57BL/6 mice. The survival of each of these cells was elevated from 5% to 20% (P ≤ 0.05) as compared to cells not receiving a 100 mGy or lesser dose. In addition, the cells exposed to 100 mGy exhibited elevations in survivin levels, reductions in apoptosis frequencies, and loss of an adaptive response if transfected with survivin siRNA. This survivin-mediated adaptive response has the potential for affecting outcomes if regularly induced throughout a course of image guided radiation therapy. ©2013 AACR.

  1. ITGB5 and AGFG1 variants are associated with severity of airway responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Himes, Blanca E.; Qiu, Weiliang; Klanderman, Barbara; Ziniti, John; Senter-Sylvia, Jody; Szefler, Stanley J.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Zeiger, Robert S.; Strunk, Robert C.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Boushey, Homer; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Israel, Elliot; Mauger, David; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Nieuwenhuis, Maartje A. E.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Vonk, Judith M.; Rafaels, Nicholas; Hansel, Nadia N.; Barnes, Kathleen; Raby, Benjamin; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Weiss, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Background: Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), a primary characteristic of asthma, involves increased airway smooth muscle contractility in response to certain exposures. We sought to determine whether common genetic variants were associated with AHR severity. Methods: A genome-wide association study

  2. Nonconscious Influence of Masked Stimuli on Response Selection Is Limited to Concrete Stimulus-Response Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, Stuart T.; Haas, Brian W.

    2005-01-01

    A pattern-masked arrow negatively biased the "free choice" between 2 manual responses or between 2 vocal responses. This apparently nonconscious influence occurred only when the free-choice trials were intermixed randomly with other trials that terminated in fully visible arrows, which directed a response of the same modality (manual vs. vocal) as…

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study Identification of Novel Loci Associated with Airway Responsiveness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansel, Nadia N.; Pare, Peter D.; Rafaels, Nicholas; Sin, Don D.; Sandford, Andrew; Daley, Denise; Vergara, Candelaria; Huang, Lili; Elliott, W. Mark; Pascoe, Chris D.; Arsenault, Bryna A.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boezen, Marieke H.; Bosse, Yohan; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cho, Michael H.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Ober, Carole; Wise, Robert A.; Connett, John; Neptune, Enid R.; Beaty, Terri H.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased airway responsiveness is linked to lung function decline and mortality in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the genetic contribution to airway responsiveness remains largely unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using the Illumina

  4. Associations between circadian and stress response cortisol in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, S.S.H.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Weerth, C. de

    2017-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning is characterized by the baseline production of cortisol following a circadian rhythm, as well as by the superimposed production of cortisol in response to a stressor. However, it is relatively unknown whether the basal cortisol circadian rhythm i

  5. Response Inhibition Is Associated with White Matter Microstructure in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Baare, William F. C.; Vestergaard, Martin; Skimminge, Arnold; Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Ramsoy, Thomas Z.; Gerlach, Christian; Akeson, Per; Paulson, Olaf B.; Jernigan, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive control of thoughts, actions and emotions is important for normal behaviour and the development of such control continues throughout childhood and adolescence. Several lines of evidence suggest that response inhibition is primarily mediated by a right-lateralized network involving inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), presupplementary motor…

  6. Associations between Temperament and Social Responsiveness in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salley, Brenda; Miller, Angela; Bell, Martha Ann

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that social responsiveness (comprised of social awareness, social information processing, reciprocal social communication, social motivation, and repetitive/restricted interests) is continuously distributed within the general population. In the present study, we consider temperament as a co-occurring source of…

  7. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  8. Associations between Temperament and Social Responsiveness in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salley, Brenda; Miller, Angela; Bell, Martha Ann

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that social responsiveness (comprised of social awareness, social information processing, reciprocal social communication, social motivation, and repetitive/restricted interests) is continuously distributed within the general population. In the present study, we consider temperament as a co-occurring source of…

  9. Defensive Hostility: Psychosocial Correlates and Associations with Cardiovascular Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-21

    caffeinated drinks ( coffee , tea, most sodas) for two hours before your scheduled appointment. The completion of the questionnaires should take...high HR reactors were not different from low HR reactors on resting HR, blood pressu re, or serum lipid concentration . A second study replicated...individuals who endorsed suppression of anger items exhibited the greatest cardiovascular responses during Stroop and a math task. Furthermore, Mills

  10. 41 CFR 102-37.580 - Who is responsible for costs associated with the donation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... costs associated with the donation? 102-37.580 Section 102-37.580 Public Contracts and Property.../Destruction § 102-37.580 Who is responsible for costs associated with the donation? The recipient public body is responsible for paying the disposal costs incident to the donation, such as packing, preparation...

  11. MHC-associated immunopotentiation affects the embryo response to teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchinsky, A; Fein, A; Carp, H J; Toder, V

    1994-12-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate whether the effect of environmental teratogens can be modified by maternal immunostimulation. Two chemicals, cyclophosphamide (CP) and 2,3-quinoxalinedimetanol,1,4-dioxide (QD) were used as the reference teratogens (RT). The response to these RT was investigated in two animal models: (i) primigravid C57Bl/6 mice who underwent intrauterine immunization with allogeneic paternal (CBA/J), third-party (BALB/c) or syngeneic male splenocytes 21 days before mating; (ii) C57Bl/6 and CBA/J mice who were treated with RT during the second pregnancy only, after a different mating combination (syngeneic or allogeneic) in the first and the second pregnancy. Different doses of CP and QD were injected on days 12 and 9 of pregnancy, respectively. On day 19 of pregnancy implantation sites, resorptions, live and dead fetuses were recorded and live fetuses were examined for external and internal malformations with methods routinely used in teratological study. It was shown that intrauterine immunopotentiation with allogeneic paternal splenocytes clearly enhances the tolerance of F1 embryos to RT. Thus, in CP-treated females the resorption rate and the proportion of malformed fetuses were significantly reduced. It was followed by an almost two-fold increase in fetal weight. The protective effect of such immunization in QD-treated females was manifested as a dramatic decrease of the proportion of malformed fetuses and the resorption rate. Syngeneic splenocytes could not significantly influence an embryo's sensitivity to RT. The response to RT was also significantly weaker in the second pregnancy of female mice mated twice allogeneically than that observed in allogeneically mated primigravid mice. These results show that the embryo's response to environmental teratogens may be influenced by fetomaternal immune interactions.

  12. Testing hypotheses associated with bird responses to wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, David B; Wood, Jeff T; Cunningham, Ross B; MacGregor, Christopher; Crane, Mason; Michael, Damian; Montague-Drake, Rebecca; Brown, Darren; Muntz, Rachel; Gill, A Malcolm

    2008-12-01

    Disturbance is a key ecological process influencing the distribution and abundance of many elements of the earth's biota. Predicting the response of biota to disturbance is therefore important, but it nevertheless remains difficult to make accurate forecasts of response. We tested predictions from disturbance-related theories and concepts in 10 vegetation types at Booderee National Park (southeastern Australia) using a retrospective study of bird responses to fire history (over 35 years) on 110 sites and a prospective study following a single wildfire event in 2003 at 59 of these sites. Our data did not support predictions from the intermediate-disturbance hypothesis; observed bird species richness at a site was significantly (F(1,99) = 6.30, P = 0.014) negatively related to the number of fires since 1972 and was 8.7% lower (95% CI, 1.8-15.1%) for each additional fire. In contrast to fire history effects, we found that after the 2003 fire, the vast majority of individual species and the bird assemblage per se in most vegetation types recovered within two years. Thus, recovery after a single fire did not reflect long-term effects of multiple fires on overall bird species richness at a site. We postulated that the recovery of bird species richness and bird assemblage composition after the 2003 fire would be fastest in structurally simple vegetation types and slowest in structurally complex vegetation, but observed the opposite. Although observed bird species richness in vertically heterogeneous forest and woodland had returned to prefire levels by 2006, bird species richness in structurally simple vegetation types (e.g., sedgeland) had not. Postfire vegetation regeneration, together with a paucity of early-successional specialists, would explain the speed of recovery of the bird assemblage and why it changed relatively little during our investigation.

  13. Yeast responses to stresses associated with industrial brewery handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Brian R; Lawrence, Stephen J; Leclaire, Jessica P R; Powell, Chris D; Smart, Katherine A

    2007-09-01

    During brewery handling, production strains of yeast must respond to fluctuations in dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, osmolarity, ethanol concentration, nutrient supply and temperature. Fermentation performance of brewing yeast strains is dependent on their ability to adapt to these changes, particularly during batch brewery fermentation which involves the recycling (repitching) of a single yeast culture (slurry) over a number of fermentations (generations). Modern practices, such as the use of high-gravity worts and preparation of dried yeast for use as an inoculum, have increased the magnitude of the stresses to which the cell is subjected. The ability of yeast to respond effectively to these conditions is essential not only for beer production but also for maintaining the fermentation fitness of yeast for use in subsequent fermentations. During brewery handling, cells inhabit a complex environment and our understanding of stress responses under such conditions is limited. The advent of techniques capable of determining genomic and proteomic changes within the cell is likely vastly to improve our knowledge of yeast stress responses during industrial brewery handling.

  14. Heavy drinking is associated with deficient response inhibition in women but not in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Nederkoorn; M. Baltus; R. Guerrieri; R.W. Wiers

    2009-01-01

    Poor response inhibition has been associated with a wide range of problem behaviours, including addictive behaviours, and could represent a general vulnerability factor. Standard tests of response inhibition have used neutral stimuli. Here we tested whether a deficit in response inhibition in heavy

  15. The response of South African professional psychology associations to apartheid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, L J

    1990-01-01

    Professional psychology associations in South Africa have overtly and covertly furthered the aims of apartheid. Guidance about the ethical obligations of psychologists in the South African context has been singularly lacking, and as a result blacks have not been attracted to the profession of psychology in sufficient numbers to administer to psychological needs of the client population. The political dimension of psychological practice in South Africa needs to be addressed directly so that healing strategies relevant to the burgeoning racial conflict in South Africa can be implemented.

  16. Hormonal response during a fenfluramine-associated panic attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H.G. Vieira

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Secretion curves for prolactin, cortisol, TSH, and GH from a 37-year old woman with dysthymia and panic disorder with agoraphobia were determined one day prior to (day I, and during a panic attack (day II associated with an oral dose of 60 mg dl-fenfluramine, a drug known to increase anticipatory anxiety. The increased cortisol secretion observed is discussed in relation to the hormonal correlates of anxiety and the possible role of depression, dl-fenfluramine, and serotonergic receptor sensitivity

  17. Genomic association analysis identifies multiple loci influencing antihypertensive response to an angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen T; Bailey, Kent R; Schwartz, Gary L; Chapman, Arlene B; Chai, High Seng; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2012-06-01

    To identify genes influencing blood pressure response to an angiotensin II receptor blocker, single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by genome-wide association analysis of the response to candesartan were validated by opposite direction associations with the response to a thiazide diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide. We sampled 198 white and 193 blacks with primary hypertension from opposite tertiles of the race-sex-specific distributions of age-adjusted diastolic blood pressure response to candesartan. There were 285 polymorphisms associated with the response to candesartan at P<10(-4) in whites. A total of 273 of the 285 polymorphisms, which were available for analysis in a separate sample of 196 whites, validated for opposite direction associations with the response to hydrochlorothiazide (Fisher χ(2) 1-sided P=0.02). Among the 273 polymorphisms, those in the chromosome 11q21 region were the most significantly associated with response to candesartan in whites (eg, rs11020821 near FUT4, P=8.98 × 10(-7)), had the strongest opposite direction associations with response to hydrochlorothiazide (eg, rs3758785 in GPR83, P=7.10 × 10(-3)), and had the same direction associations with response to candesartan in the 193 blacks (eg, rs16924603 near FUT4, P=1.52 × 10(-2)). Also notable among the 273 polymorphisms was rs11649420 on chromosome 16 in the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel subunit SCNN1G involved in mediating renal sodium reabsorption and maintaining blood pressure when the renin-angiotensin system is inhibited by candesartan. These results support the use of genomewide association analyses to identify novel genes predictive of opposite direction associations with blood pressure responses to inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin and renal sodium transport systems.

  18. Robust hippocampal responsivity during retrieval of consolidated associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shoai; Chen, Lillian; Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F

    2015-05-01

    A contentious point in memory research is whether or not the hippocampus plays a time-limited role in the consolidation of declarative memories. A widely held view is that declarative memories are initially encoded in the hippocampus, then transferred to the neocortex for long-term storage. Alternate views argue instead that the hippocampus continues to play a role in remote memory recall. These competing theories are largely based on human amnesic and animal lesion/inactivation studies. However, in vivo electrophysiological evidence supporting these views is scarce. Given that other studies examining the role of the hippocampus in remote memory retrieval using lesion and imaging techniques in human and animal models have provided mixed results, it would be particularly useful to gain insight at the in vivo electrophysiological level. Here we report hippocampal single-neuron and theta activity recorded longitudinally during acquisition and remote retrieval of trace eyeblink conditioning. Results from conditioned rabbits were compared to those obtained from yoked pseudo-conditioned control rabbits. Results reveal continued learning-specific hippocampal activity one month after initial acquisition of the task. Our findings yield insight into the normal physiological responses of the hippocampus during memory processes and provide compelling in vivo electrophysiological evidence that the hippocampus is involved in both acquisition and retrieval of consolidated memories. © 2014 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Heat shock response and insulin-associated neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael J; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Blagg, Brian S J

    2012-03-01

    Dysfunctional insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) signaling contributes to the pathological progression of diabetes, diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD) and Huntington's diseases (HD). Despite their prevalence, there are limited therapeutic options available for the treatment of these neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, establishing a link between insulin/IGF-I and the pathoetiology of these diseases may provide alternative approaches toward their management. Many of the heat shock proteins (Hsps) are well-known molecular chaperones that solubilize and clear damaged proteins and protein aggregates. Recent studies suggest that modulating Hsps may represent a promising therapeutic avenue for improving insulin and IGF-I signaling. Pharmacological induction of the heat shock response (HSR) may intersect with insulin/IGF-I signaling to improve aspects of neurodegenerative phenotypes. Herein, we review the intersection between Hsps and the insulin/IGF systems under normal and pathological conditions. The discussion will emphasize the potential of non-toxic HSR inducers as viable therapeutic agents.

  20. An interferon response gene signature is associated with the therapeutic response of hepatitis C patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence M Pfeffer

    Full Text Available Infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major cause of chronic liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide, and thus represents a significant public health problem. The type I interferon (IFN, IFNα, has been successful in treating HCV-infected patients, but current IFN-based treatment regimens for HCV have suboptimal efficacy, and relatively little is known about why IFN therapy eliminates the virus in some patients but not in others. Therefore, it is critical to understand the basic mechanisms that underlie the therapeutic resistance to IFN action in HCV-infected individuals, and there is an urgent need to identify those patients most likely to respond to IFN therapy for HCV. To characterize the response of HCV-infected patients to treatment with IFNα, the expression of an IFN-response gene signature comprised of IFN-stimulated genes and genes that play an important role in the innate immune response was examined in liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients enrolled in a clinical trial. In the present study we found that the expression of a subset of IFN-response genes was dysregulated in liver biopsy samples from nonresponsive hepatitis C patients as compared with virologic responders. Based on these findings, a statistical model was developed to help predict the response of patients to IFN therapy, and compared to results obtained to the IL28 mutation model, which is highly predictive of the response to IFN-based therapy in HCV-infected patients. We found that a model incorporating gene expression data can improve predictions of IFN responsiveness compared to IL28 mutation status alone.

  1. Genetic Risk Scores Associated with Baseline Lipoprotein Subfraction Concentrations Do Not Associate with Their Responses to Fenofibrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis C. Frazier-Wood

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein subclass concentrations are modifiable markers of cardiovascular disease risk. Fenofibrate is known to show beneficial effects on lipoprotein subclasses, but little is known about the role of genetics in mediating the responses of lipoprotein subclasses to fenofibrate. A recent genomewide association study (GWAS associated several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with lipoprotein measures, and validated these associations in two independent populations. We used this information to construct genetic risk scores (GRSs for fasting lipoprotein measures at baseline (pre-fenofibrate, and aimed to examine whether these GRSs also associated with the responses of lipoproteins to fenofibrate. Fourteen lipoprotein subclass measures were assayed in 817 men and women before and after a three week fenofibrate trial. We set significance at a Bonferroni corrected alpha <0.05 (p < 0.004. Twelve subclass measures changed with fenofibrate administration (each p = 0.003 to <0.0001. Mixed linear models which controlled for age, sex, body mass index (BMI, smoking status, pedigree and study-center, revealed that GRSs were associated with eight baseline lipoprotein measures (p < 0.004, however no GRS was associated with fenofibrate response. These results suggest that the mechanisms for changes in lipoprotein subclass concentrations with fenofibrate treatment are not mediated by the genetic risk for fasting levels.

  2. Genetic variants associated with response to lithium treatment in bipolar disorder: a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liping; Heilbronner, Urs; Degenhardt, Franziska; Adli, Mazda; Akiyama, Kazufumi; Akula, Nirmala; Ardau, Raffaella; Arias, Bárbara; Backlund, Lena; Banzato, Claudio E M; Benabarre, Antoni; Bengesser, Susanne; Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Biernacka, Joanna M; Birner, Armin; Brichant-Petitjean, Clara; Bui, Elise T; Cervantes, Pablo; Chen, Guo-Bo; Chen, Hsi-Chung; Chillotti, Caterina; Cichon, Sven; Clark, Scott R; Colom, Francesc; Cousins, David A; Cruceanu, Cristiana; Czerski, Piotr M; Dantas, Clarissa R; Dayer, Alexandre; Étain, Bruno; Falkai, Peter; Forstner, Andreas J; Frisén, Louise; Fullerton, Janice M; Gard, Sébastien; Garnham, Julie S; Goes, Fernando S; Grof, Paul; Gruber, Oliver; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hauser, Joanna; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Hofmann, Andrea; Jamain, Stephane; Jiménez, Esther; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Kassem, Layla; Kittel-Schneider, Sarah; Kliwicki, Sebastian; König, Barbara; Kusumi, Ichiro; Lackner, Nina; Laje, Gonzalo; Landén, Mikael; Lavebratt, Catharina; Leboyer, Marion; Leckband, Susan G; Jaramillo, Carlos A López; MacQueen, Glenda; Manchia, Mirko; Martinsson, Lina; Mattheisen, Manuel; McCarthy, Michael J; McElroy, Susan L; Mitjans, Marina; Mondimore, Francis M; Monteleone, Palmiero; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Nöthen, Markus M; Ösby, Urban; Ozaki, Norio; Perlis, Roy H; Pfennig, Andrea; Reich-Erkelenz, Daniela; Rouleau, Guy A; Schofield, Peter R; Schubert, K Oliver; Schweizer, Barbara W; Seemüller, Florian; Severino, Giovanni; Shekhtman, Tatyana; Shilling, Paul D; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Simhandl, Christian; Slaney, Claire M; Smoller, Jordan W; Squassina, Alessio; Stamm, Thomas; Stopkova, Pavla; Tighe, Sarah K; Tortorella, Alfonso; Turecki, Gustavo; Volkert, Julia; Witt, Stephanie; Wright, Adam; Young, L Trevor; Zandi, Peter P; Potash, James B; DePaulo, J Raymond; Bauer, Michael; Reininghaus, Eva Z; Novák, Tomas; Aubry, Jean-Michel; Maj, Mario; Baune, Bernhard T; Mitchell, Philip B; Vieta, Eduard; Frye, Mark A; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Kato, Tadafumi; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, Maria; Reif, Andreas; Del Zompo, Maria; Bellivier, Frank; Schalling, Martin; Wray, Naomi R; Kelsoe, John R; Alda, Martin; Rietschel, Marcella; McMahon, Francis J; Schulze, Thomas G

    2016-03-12

    Lithium is a first-line treatment in bipolar disorder, but individual response is variable. Previous studies have suggested that lithium response is a heritable trait. However, no genetic markers of treatment response have been reproducibly identified. Here, we report the results of a genome-wide association study of lithium response in 2563 patients collected by 22 participating sites from the International Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen). Data from common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association with categorical and continuous ratings of lithium response. Lithium response was measured using a well established scale (Alda scale). Genotyped SNPs were used to generate data at more than 6 million sites, using standard genomic imputation methods. Traits were regressed against genotype dosage. Results were combined across two batches by meta-analysis. A single locus of four linked SNPs on chromosome 21 met genome-wide significance criteria for association with lithium response (rs79663003, p=1·37 × 10(-8); rs78015114, p=1·31 × 10(-8); rs74795342, p=3·31 × 10(-9); and rs75222709, p=3·50 × 10(-9)). In an independent, prospective study of 73 patients treated with lithium monotherapy for a period of up to 2 years, carriers of the response-associated alleles had a significantly lower rate of relapse than carriers of the alternate alleles (p=0·03268, hazard ratio 3·8, 95% CI 1·1-13·0). The response-associated region contains two genes for long, non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), AL157359.3 and AL157359.4. LncRNAs are increasingly appreciated as important regulators of gene expression, particularly in the CNS. Confirmed biomarkers of lithium response would constitute an important step forward in the clinical management of bipolar disorder. Further studies are needed to establish the biological context and potential clinical utility of these findings. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, National Institute of Mental Health

  3. Systematic review genetic biomarkers associated with anti-TNF treatment response in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Signe Bek; Nielsen, J V; Bo Bojesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    : To identify polymorphisms and candidate genes from the literature that are associated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment response in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. METHODS: We performed a PubMed literature search and retrieved...... studies reporting original data on association between polymorphisms and anti-TNF treatment response and conducted a meta-analysis. RESULTS: A functional polymorphism in FCGR3A was significantly associated with anti-TNF treatment response among CD patients using biological response criterion (decrease...... in an explorative analysis. CONCLUSIONS: There are no genetic markers currently available which are adequately predictive of anti-TNF response for use in the clinic. Genetic markers bear the advantage that they do not change over time. Therefore, hypothesis-free approaches, testing a large number of polymorphisms...

  4. Hostility is associated with a heightened prolactin response to meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in abstinent cocaine addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, L; Kahn, R S; Sturiano, C; Rinaldi, P J; Gabriel, S; Schmeidler, J P; Bernstein, D P; Siever, L; Cooper, T B

    1998-07-27

    The prolactin (PRL) response to the administration of serotonin (5HT) agonists is an index of central nervous system 5HT activity. This index is blunted in association with hostile aggression in personality and depressive disorder patients without substance abuse. We tested whether the PRL response to the oral administration of the partial 5HT agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP), 0.35 mg/kg, was associated with a measure of trait hostility, the Buss Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), in cocaine addicts who were completing a 3-week detoxification and rehabilitation program. We also tested whether the cocaine addicts differed from healthy volunteers on their PRL, cortisol (CORT) or temperature responses to MCPP. The PRL response to MCPP was positively associated with the total score on the BDHI. There were, however, no differences in the neuroendocrine or temperature responses to MCPP between the cocaine-dependent group and the healthy volunteers once age effects were controlled for.

  5. Hostility is associated with a low prolactin response to meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in abstinent alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, L; Holloway, K; Kahn, R S; Sturiano, C; Rinaldi, P J; Bernstein, D P; Siever, L; Gabriel, S; Cooper, T B

    1996-08-01

    The prolactin response to the administration of serotonin agonists is an index of central nervous system serotonin (5HT) activity. This index is blunted in association with hostile aggression in personality-disordered individuals without substance abuse. We tested whether prolactin response to the partial 5HT agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP) (0.35 mg/kg po) was associated with measures of trait hostility in alcoholics who were completing a 3-week rehabilitation program after medical detoxification. We also tested whether the same 5HT index differed in the group of alcoholics compared with the healthy volunteers. The prolactin response to MCPP was inversely associated with the main index of trait hostility and was similarly inversely associated with an index of depression. There was, however, no difference in neuroendocrine or temperature responses to MCPP between the alcohol-dependent group and the healthy volunteers.

  6. Consumer Specialty Products Association Letter and EPA Response re: Minimum Risk Pesticide Exemption Petition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Consumer Specialty Products Association petitioned EPA to exclude from the minimum risk pesticide exemption pesticides claiming to control “pests of significant public health importance” and require registration. View the petition and EPA's response.

  7. Differential Associations Between Psychopathy Dimensions, Types of Aggression, and Response Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feilhauer, J.; Cima, M.; Korebrits, A.M.; Kunert, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Findings on executive functioning in psychopathy are inconsistent. Different associations between psychopathy dimensions and executive functioning might explain contradicting findings. This study examined the role of psychopathy dimensions and types of aggression in response inhibition among 117 mal

  8. Association between tobacco smoking and response to tumour necrosis factor α inhibitor treatment in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Glintborg, Bente; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between tobacco smoking and disease activity, treatment adherence and treatment responses among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) initiating the first tumour necrosis factor α inhibitor therapy (TNFi) in routine care. METHODS: Observational cohort...

  9. Differential Associations Between Psychopathy Dimensions, Types of Aggression, and Response Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feilhauer, J.; Cima, M.; Korebrits, A.M.; Kunert, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Findings on executive functioning in psychopathy are inconsistent. Different associations between psychopathy dimensions and executive functioning might explain contradicting findings. This study examined the role of psychopathy dimensions and types of aggression in response inhibition among 117 mal

  10. Genetic Variation in the Histamine Production, Response, and Degradation Pathway Is Associated with Histamine Pharmacodynamic Response in Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bridgette L.; Sherwin, Catherine M. T.; Liu, Xiaoxi; Dai, Hongying; Vyhlidal, Carrie A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: There is growing knowledge of the wide ranging effects of histamine throughout the body therefore it is important to better understand the effects of this amine in patients with asthma. We aimed to explore the association between histamine pharmacodynamic (PD) response and genetic variation in the histamine pathway in children with asthma. Methods: Histamine Iontophoresis with Laser Doppler Monitoring (HILD) was performed in children with asthma and estimates for area under the effect curve (AUEC), maximal response over baseline (Emax), and time of Emax (Tmax) were calculated using non-compartmental analysis and non-linear mixed-effects model with a linked effect PK/PD model. DNA isolation and genotyping were performed among participants to detect known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (n = 10) among genes (HDC, HNMT, ABP1, HRH1, HRH4) within the histamine pathway. General linear model was used to identify associations between histamine related genetic variants and measured histamine PD response parameters. Results: Genotyping and HILD response profiles were completed for 163 children. ABP1 47 C/T, ABP1 4107, and HNMT-1639 C/Twere associated with Emax (ABP1 47 CC genotype mean Emax 167.21 vs. CT/TT genotype mean Emax 139.20, p = 0.04; ABP1 4107 CC genotype mean Emax 141.72 vs. CG/GG genotype mean Emax 156.09, p = 0.005; HNMT-1639 CC genotype mean Emax 132.62 vs. CT/TT genotype mean Emax 155.3, p = 0.02). In a stratified analysis among African American children only, ABP1 and HNMT SNPs were also associated with PD response; HRH4 413 CC genotype was associated with lower Emax, p = 0.009. Conclusions: We show for the first time that histamine pathway genetic variation is associated with measureable changes in histamine response in children with asthma. The variability in histamine response and impact of histamine pathway genotype is important to further explore in patients with asthma so as to improve disease phenotyping leading to more

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study for Response to Eimeria maxima Challenge in Broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamzic, Edin; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Hérault, Frédéric

    Use of genetic tools for improvement of host’s response is considered as a promising complementary approach for coccidiosis control. Therefore, we performed genome wide association study (GWAS) for response to Eimeria maxima challenge in broilers. The challenge was done on 2024 Cobb500 broilers. ...

  12. An increase in bronchial responsiveness is associated with continuing or restarting smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinn, S; Jarvis, D; Luczynska, CM; Ackermann-Liebrich, U; Anto, JM; Cerveri, [No Value; de Marco, R; Gislason, T; Heinrich, J; Janson, C; Kunzli, N; Leynaert, N; Neukirch, FO; Schouten, JP; Sunyer, J; Svanes, C; Wjst, M; Burney, PG

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Bronchial responsiveness (BHR) has been found to be associated with smoking, atopy, and lower lung function in cross-sectional studies, but there is little information on determinants of change in adults. Objectives: To analyze change in bronchial responsiveness in an international

  13. Tactile Responsiveness Patterns and Their Association with Core Features in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Feig, Jennifer H.; Heacock, Jessica L.; Cascio, Carissa J.

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often associated with aberrant responses to sensory stimuli, which are thought to contribute to the social, communication, and repetitive behavior deficits that define ASD. However, there are few studies that separate aberrant sensory responses by individual sensory modality to assess modality-specific…

  14. Thrombocytopenia is associated with a dysregulated host response in critically ill sepsis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claushuis, Theodora A M; van Vught, Lonneke A; Scicluna, Brendon P; Wiewel, Maryse A; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Ong, David S Y; Cremer, Olaf L; Horn, Janneke; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Bonten, Marc J M; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that platelets influence the host response during sepsis. We sought to assess the association of admission thrombocytopenia with the presentation, outcome, and host response in patients with sepsis. Nine hundred thirty-one consecutive sepsis patients were stratifie

  15. Single-nucleotide polymorphism associations in common with immune responses to measles and rubella vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Salk, Hannah M; Larrabee, Beth R; Pankratz, V Shane; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-11-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate immune response genes were evaluated for associations with measles- and rubella-specific neutralizing antibodies, interferon (IFN)-γ, and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion in two separate association analyses in a cohort of healthy immunized subjects. We identified six SNP associations shared between the measles-specific and rubella-specific immune responses, specifically neutralizing antibody titers (DDX58), secreted IL-6 (IL10RB, IL12B), and secreted IFN-γ (IFNAR2, TLR4). An intronic SNP (rs669260) in the antiviral innate immune receptor gene, DDX58, was significantly associated with increased neutralizing antibody titers for both measles and rubella viral antigens post-MMR vaccination (p values 0.02 and 0.0002, respectively). Significant associations were also found between IL10RB (rs2284552; measles study p value 0.006, rubella study p value 0.00008) and IL12B (rs2546893; measles study p value 0.005, rubella study p value 0.03) gene polymorphisms and variations in both measles- and rubella virus-specific IL-6 responses. We also identified associations between individual SNPs in the IFNAR2 and TLR4 genes that were associated with IFN-γ secretion for both measles and rubella vaccine-specific immune responses. These results are the first to indicate that there are SNP associations in common across measles and rubella vaccine immune responses and that SNPs from multiple genes involved in innate and adaptive immune response regulation may contribute to the overall human antiviral response.

  16. Temporary Activation of Perceptual-Motor Associations: A Stimulus-Response Interpretation of Automaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, Stuart T.; Greenberg, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Some types of automaticity can be attributed to simple stimulus-response associations (G. D. Logan, 1988). This can be studied with paradigms in which associations to an irrelevant stimulus automatically influence responding to a relevant stimulus. In 1 example, the irrelevant and relevant stimuli were presented successively with the 1st,…

  17. 30 CFR 201.100 - Responsibilities of the Associate Director for Minerals Revenue Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Minerals Revenue Management. 201.100 Section 201.100 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT GENERAL Oil and Gas, Onshore § 201.100 Responsibilities of the Associate Director for Minerals Revenue Management. The Associate Director is...

  18. Clinical response to antipsychotic drug treatment : Association study of polymorphisms in six candidate genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Burger, Huibert; Wilffert, Bob; Al Hadithy, Asmar; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Snieder, Harold

    Pharmacogenetic studies have demonstrated significant associations between several candidate genes (DRD2, DRD3, 5HTR2A and 5HTR2C, COMT and MTHFR) and antipsychotic drug response. The present study investigates the effect of nine polymorphisms in these genes for an association with antipsychotic

  19. Associations between Breastfeeding and Maternal Responsiveness: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Alison K

    2017-05-01

    Recent recommendations and prevention programs have focused on the promotion of responsive feeding during infancy, but more research is needed to understand best practices for fostering responsive feeding during early life. The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the accumulating bodies of evidence aimed at understanding associations between mothers' feeding experiences and responsive feeding in an attempt to clarify the nature of associations between feeding mode and responsive feeding. A literature search was conducted between January and October 2016; articles were collected from PsychINFO, Medline, and CINAHL, as well as from references in published research and reviews. Article inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) empirical research, 2) included a measure of infant feeding, 3) included a measure of maternal responsiveness, 4) study conducted in human participants, 5) available in English, and 6) study conducted in a developed and/or high-income country. Forty-three studies were identified. Cross-sectional observational studies consistently reported greater responsiveness among breastfeeding mothers than among formula-/bottle-feeding mothers. In addition, longitudinal studies showed that longer breastfeeding durations predicted lower use of nonresponsive feeding practices during later childhood, and some, but not all, found that breastfeeding mothers showed greater increases in responsiveness across infancy than did formula-/bottle-feeding mothers. However, a limited number of longitudinal studies also reported that greater responsiveness during early infancy predicted longer breastfeeding durations. A common limitation among these studies is the correlational nature of their designs and lack of prenatal measures of maternal responsiveness, which hinders our understanding of causal mechanisms. Although 2 randomized clinical trials aimed at promoting maternal responsiveness did not find effects of the intervention on breastfeeding outcomes

  20. Association of response to hepatitis B vaccination and survival in dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shih-Yi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The status of immunocompromised patients is well recognized in end stage renal disease (ESRD. As described recently, this acquired immune dysfunction in the uremic milieu may be one of the main pathogenic factors for mortality in ESRD. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the immune response following a hepatitis B vaccination (HBV vaccination and the survival of maintenance dialysis patients. Methods A total of 156 patients (103 on hemodialysis and 53 on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis were recruited. After receiving a full dose of the HBV vaccination, all patients were followed up for to 5 years to evaluate the association of patient survival, cause of mortality, and immune response. Results The response rate to the hepatitis B vaccination was 70.5%. There was no significant association between the immune response and the 5-year survival rate (p =0.600 or between the post-vaccination anti-HBs titers and the 5-year survival rate (p = 0.201. The logistic prediction model with the coefficient as non-response following HBV vaccination, diabetes mellitus, old age, and low albumin level could significantly predict infection-cause mortality (sensitivity = 0.842, specificity = 0.937. Conclusion There was no significant association between the immune response to HBV vaccination and the 5-year survival rate. However, non-response following HBV vaccination might be associated with infection-cause mortality in dialysis patients.

  1. Erythrophore cell response to food-associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Janine R; Dukovcic, Stephanie R; Dierksen, Karen P; Carlyle, Calvin A; Caldwell, Bruce A; Trempy, Janine E

    2008-09-01

    Cell-based biosensors have been proposed for use as function-based detectors of toxic agents. We report the use of Betta splendens chromatophore cells, specifically erythrophore cells, for detection of food-associated pathogenic bacteria. Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non-pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non-pathogenic Bacillus subtilis. Erythrophore cells were exposed to Salmonella enteritidis, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum. Each bacterial pathogen elicited a response from erythrophore cells that was distinguished from the corresponding bacterial growth medium, and this observed response was unique for each bacterial pathogen. These findings suggest that erythrophore cell response has potential for use as a biosensor in the detection and toxicity assessment for food-associated pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Erythrophore cell response to food‐associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Janine R.; Dukovcic, Stephanie R.; Dierksen, Karen P.; Carlyle, Calvin A.; Caldwell, Bruce A.; Trempy, Janine E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Cell‐based biosensors have been proposed for use as function‐based detectors of toxic agents. We report the use of Betta splendens chromatophore cells, specifically erythrophore cells, for detection of food‐associated pathogenic bacteria. Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non‐pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non‐pathogenic Bacillus subtilis. Erythrophore cells were exposed to Salmonella enteritidis, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum. Each bacterial pathogen elicited a response from erythrophore cells that was distinguished from the corresponding bacterial growth medium, and this observed response was unique for each bacterial pathogen. These findings suggest that erythrophore cell response has potential for use as a biosensor in the detection and toxicity assessment for food‐associated pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21261862

  3. Children's Emotionality Moderates the Association Between Maternal Responsiveness and Allostatic Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Nadya; Doan, Stacey N; Evans, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    high and low maternal responsiveness on allostatic load, a physiological indicator of chronic stress. Participants were 226 mother and child dyads. Mothers reported on children's emotionality at child age 9. Maternal responsiveness was measured at age 13 using self-reports and behavioral observation....... Allostatic load was measured at age 13 and 17 using neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, and metabolic biomarkers. Emotionality was associated with higher allostatic load if self-reported responsiveness was low, but with lower allostatic load, when self-reported responsiveness was high....

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study Identification of Novel Loci Associated with Airway Responsiveness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Peter D.; Rafaels, Nicholas; Sin, Don D.; Sandford, Andrew; Daley, Denise; Vergara, Candelaria; Huang, Lili; Elliott, W. Mark; Pascoe, Chris D.; Arsenault, Bryna A.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boezen, H. Marike; Bossé, Yohan; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cho, Michael H.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Ober, Carole; Wise, Robert A.; Connett, John; Neptune, Enid R.; Beaty, Terri H.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased airway responsiveness is linked to lung function decline and mortality in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the genetic contribution to airway responsiveness remains largely unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using the Illumina (San Diego, CA) Human660W-Quad BeadChip on European Americans with COPD from the Lung Health Study. Linear regression models with correlated meta-analyses, including data from baseline (n = 2,814) and Year 5 (n = 2,657), were used to test for common genetic variants associated with airway responsiveness. Genotypic imputation was performed using reference 1000 Genomes Project data. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses in lung tissues were assessed for the top 10 markers identified, and immunohistochemistry assays assessed protein staining for SGCD and MYH15. Four genes were identified within the top 10 associations with airway responsiveness. Markers on chromosome 9p21.2 flanked by LINGO2 met a predetermined threshold of genome-wide significance (P < 9.57 × 10−8). Markers on chromosomes 3q13.1 (flanked by MYH15), 5q33 (SGCD), and 6q21 (PDSS2) yielded suggestive evidence of association (9.57 × 10−8 < P ≤ 4.6 × 10−6). Gene expression studies in lung tissue showed single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosomes 5 and 3 to act as eQTL for SGCD (P = 2.57 × 10−9) and MYH15 (P = 1.62 × 10−6), respectively. Immunohistochemistry confirmed localization of SGCD protein to airway smooth muscle and vessels and MYH15 to airway epithelium, vascular endothelium, and inflammatory cells. We identified novel loci associated with airway responsiveness in a GWAS among smokers with COPD. Risk alleles on chromosomes 5 and 3 acted as eQTLs for SGCD and MYH15 messenger RNA, and these proteins were expressed in lung cells relevant to the development of airway responsiveness. PMID:25514360

  5. Testing for Association Using Multiple Response Survey Data: Approximate Procedures Based on the Rao-Scott Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. Roland; Decady, Yves J.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses approximate tests of marginal association in 2-way tables in which one or both response variables admit multiple responses. Although multiple-response questions appear in all fields of research, including sociology, education, and marketing, the development of association tests that can be used with multiple-response data is…

  6. Anorexia nervosa and obesity are associated with opposite brain reward response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Guido K W; Reynolds, Jeremy R; Shott, Megan E; Jappe, Leah; Yang, Tony T; Tregellas, Jason R; O'Reilly, Randall C

    2012-08-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disorder associated with food avoidance and malnutrition. In this study, we wanted to test whether we would find brain reward alterations in AN, compared with individuals with normal or increased body weight. We studied 21 underweight, restricting-type AN (age M 22.5, SD 5.8 years), 19 obese (age M 27.1, SD 6.7 years), and 23 healthy control women (age M 24.8, SD 5.6 years), using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance brain imaging together with a reward-conditioning task. This paradigm involves learning the association between conditioned visual stimuli and unconditioned taste stimuli, as well as the unexpected violation of those learned associations. The task has been associated with activation of brain dopamine reward circuits, and it allows the comparison of actual brain response with expected brain activation based on established neuronal models. A group-by-task condition analysis (family-wise-error-corrected Pbrain responses that were greater in the AN group, but lesser in the obese group, compared with controls. These results suggest that brain reward circuits are more responsive to food stimuli in AN, but less responsive in obese women. The mechanism for this association is uncertain, but these brain reward response patterns could be biomarkers for the respective weight state.

  7. P300 during response inhibition is associated with ad-lib alcohol consumption in social drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew; Field, Matt; Christiansen, Paul; Stancak, Andrej

    2013-06-01

    Reduced amplitude of the cortical P300 event-related potential (ERP) component during response inhibition is associated with vulnerability to alcohol use disorders. In the current study, we investigated the effect of an experimental manipulation of response conflict on the amplitude of the P300 component during response inhibition, and examined whether individual differences in the amplitude of this P300 component would predict voluntary ad-lib alcohol consumption, in social drinkers. Using a repeated measures design, 16 participants performed a stop-signal task after receiving instructions that either emphasised or de-emphasised response conflict while their electroencephalogram (EEG) was concurrently recorded, before their ad-lib drinking was assessed. Results revealed that task instructions had the predicted effects on behavioural indices of response inhibition and the associated P300 components. Most importantly, individual differences in the amplitude of P300 subcomponents during response inhibition were negatively correlated with ad-lib alcohol consumption. Results provide the first experimental support for theoretical models that posit that reduced amplitude of the P300 during response inhibition is associated with alcohol-seeking behaviour in humans.

  8. Repeated exposure to media violence is associated with diminished response in an inhibitory frontolimbic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher R; Grinband, Jack; Hirsch, Joy

    2007-12-05

    Media depictions of violence, although often claimed to induce viewer aggression, have not been shown to affect the cortical networks that regulate behavior. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we found that repeated exposure to violent media, but not to other equally arousing media, led to both diminished response in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (right ltOFC) and a decrease in right ltOFC-amygdala interaction. Reduced function in this network has been previously associated with decreased control over a variety of behaviors, including reactive aggression. Indeed, we found reduced right ltOFC responses to be characteristic of those subjects that reported greater tendencies toward reactive aggression. Furthermore, the violence-induced reduction in right ltOFC response coincided with increased throughput to behavior planning regions. These novel findings establish that even short-term exposure to violent media can result in diminished responsiveness of a network associated with behaviors such as reactive aggression.

  9. Parental responsibility beliefs: associations with parental anxiety and behaviours in the context of childhood anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetroaia, Adela; Hill, Claire; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-12-01

    High levels of parental anxiety are associated with poor treatment outcomes for children with anxiety disorders. Associated parental cognitions and behaviours have been implicated as impediments to successful treatment. We examined the association between parental responsibility beliefs, maternal anxiety and parenting behaviours in the context of childhood anxiety disorders. Anxious and non-anxious mothers of 7-12 year old children with a current anxiety disorder reported their parental responsibility beliefs using a questionnaire measure. Parental behaviours towards their child during a stressor task were measured. Parents with a current anxiety disorder reported a greater sense of responsibility for their child's actions and wellbeing than parents who scored within the normal range for anxiety. Furthermore, higher parental responsibility was associated with more intrusive and less warm behaviours in parent-child interactions and there was an indirect effect between maternal anxiety and maternal intrusive behaviours via parental responsibility beliefs. The sample was limited to a treatment-seeking, relatively high socio-economic population and only mothers were included so replication with more diverse groups is needed. The use of a range of stressor tasks may have allowed for a more comprehensive assessment of parental behaviours. The findings suggest that parental anxiety disorder is associated with an elevated sense of parental responsibility and may promote parental behaviours likely to inhibit optimum child treatment outcomes. Parental responsibility beliefs may therefore be important to target in child anxiety treatments in the context of parental anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Maternal BCG scar is associated with increased infant proinflammatory immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawa, Patrice Akusa; Webb, Emily L.; Filali-Mouhim, Abdelali; Nkurunungi, Gyaviira; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lule, Swaib Abubaker; Prentice, Sarah; Nash, Stephen; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Elliott, Alison M.; Cose, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Prenatal exposures such as infections and immunisation may influence infant responses. We had an opportunity to undertake an analysis of innate responses in infants within the context of a study investigating the effects of maternal mycobacterial exposures and infection on BCG vaccine-induced responses in Ugandan infants. Material and methods Maternal and cord blood samples from 29 mother-infant pairs were stimulated with innate stimuli for 24 h and cytokines and chemokines in supernatants were measured using the Luminex® assay. The associations between maternal latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), maternal BCG scar (adjusted for each other’s effect) and infant responses were examined using linear regression. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to assess patterns of cytokine and chemokine responses. Gene expression profiles for pathways associated with maternal LTBI and with maternal BCG scar were examined using samples collected at one (n = 42) and six (n = 51) weeks after BCG immunisation using microarray. Results Maternal LTBI was positively associated with infant IP-10 responses with an adjusted geometric mean ratio (aGMR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] of 5.10 [1.21, 21.48]. Maternal BCG scar showed strong and consistent associations with IFN-γ (aGMR 2.69 [1.15, 6.17]), IL-12p70 (1.95 [1.10, 3.55]), IL-10 (1.82 [1.07, 3.09]), VEGF (3.55 [1.07, 11.48]) and IP-10 (6.76 [1.17, 38.02]). Further assessment of the associations using PCA showed no differences for maternal LTBI, but maternal BCG scar was associated with higher scores for principal component (PC) 1 (median level of scores: 1.44 in scar-positive versus −0.94 in scar-negative, p = 0.020) in the infants. PC1 represented a controlled proinflammatory response. Interferon and inflammation response pathways were up-regulated in infants of mothers with LTBI at six weeks, and in infants of mothers with a BCG scar at one and six weeks after BCG immunisation. Conclusions

  11. Polyfunctional HIV-Specific Antibody Responses Are Associated with Spontaneous HIV Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Ackerman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elite controllers (ECs represent a unique model of a functional cure for HIV-1 infection as these individuals develop HIV-specific immunity able to persistently suppress viremia. Because accumulating evidence suggests that HIV controllers generate antibodies with enhanced capacity to drive antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC that may contribute to viral containment, we profiled an array of extra-neutralizing antibody effector functions across HIV-infected populations with varying degrees of viral control to define the characteristics of antibodies associated with spontaneous control. While neither the overall magnitude of antibody titer nor individual effector functions were increased in ECs, a more functionally coordinated innate immune-recruiting response was observed. Specifically, ECs demonstrated polyfunctional humoral immune responses able to coordinately recruit ADCC, other NK functions, monocyte and neutrophil phagocytosis, and complement. This functionally coordinated response was associated with qualitatively superior IgG3/IgG1 responses, whereas HIV-specific IgG2/IgG4 responses, prevalent among viremic subjects, were associated with poorer overall antibody activity. Rather than linking viral control to any single activity, this study highlights the critical nature of functionally coordinated antibodies in HIV control and associates this polyfunctionality with preferential induction of potent antibody subclasses, supporting coordinated antibody activity as a goal in strategies directed at an HIV-1 functional cure.

  12. Genomic association analysis of common variants influencing antihypertensive response to hydrochlorothiazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen T; Boerwinkle, Eric; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Bailey, Kent R; Gong, Yan; Chapman, Arlene B; McDonough, Caitrin W; Beitelshees, Amber L; Schwartz, Gary L; Gums, John G; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Hiltunen, Timo P; Citterio, Lorena; Donner, Kati M; Hedner, Thomas; Lanzani, Chiara; Melander, Olle; Saarela, Janna; Ripatti, Samuli; Wahlstrand, Björn; Manunta, Paolo; Kontula, Kimmo; Dominiczak, Anna F; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Johnson, Julie A

    2013-08-01

    To identify novel genes influencing blood pressure response to thiazide diuretic therapy for hypertension, we conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of ≈1.1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a combined sample of 424 European Americans with primary hypertension treated with hydrochlorothiazide from the Pharmacogenomic Evaluation of Antihypertensive Responses study (n=228) and the Genetic Epidemiology of Responses to Antihypertensive study (n=196). Polymorphisms associated with blood pressure response at P4/4 mm Hg) across study samples. The rs2273359 polymorphism in the GNAS-EDN3 region also replicated for same-direction association with systolic blood pressure response in the Nordic Diltiazem study, and the combined 3-study meta-analysis P value approached genome-wide significance (P=5.5 × 10(-8)). The findings document clinically important effects of genetic variation at novel loci on blood pressure response to a thiazide diuretic, which may be a basis for individualization of antihypertensive drug therapy and identification of new drug targets.

  13. Differences in stability of seed-associated microbial assemblages in response to invasion by phytopathogenic microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Rezki; Claire Campion; Beatrice Iacomi-Vasilescu; Anne Preveaux; Youness Toualbia; Sophie Bonneau; Martial Briand; Emmanuelle Laurent; Gilles Hunault; Philippe Simoneau; Marie-Agnès Jacques; Matthieu Barret

    2016-01-01

    Seeds are involved in the vertical transmission of microorganisms from one plant generation to another and consequently act as reservoirs for the plant microbiota. However, little is known about the structure of seed-associated microbial assemblages and the regulators of assemblage structure. In this work, we have assessed the response of seed associated microbial assemblages of Raphanus sativus to invading phytopathogenic agents, the bacterial strain Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xc...

  14. Transcriptome responses in alfalfa associated with tolerance to intensive animal grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yan; Ray, Ian; Song, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Tolerance of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) to animal grazing varies widely within the species. However, the molecular mechanisms influencing the grazing tolerant phenotype remain uncharacterized. The objective of this study was to identify genes and pathways that control grazing response in alfalfa. We analyzed whole-plant de novo transcriptomes from grazing tolerant and intolerant populations of M. sativa ssp. falcata subjected to grazing by sheep. Among the Gene Ontology terms which were identified as grazing responsive in the tolerant plants and differentially enriched between the tolerant and intolerant populations (both grazed), most were associated with the ribosome and translation-related activities, cell wall processes, and response to oxygen levels. Twenty-one grazing responsive pathways were identified that also exhibited differential expression between the tolerant and intolerant populations. These pathways were associated with secondary metabolite production, primary carbohydrate metabolic pathways, shikimate derivative dependent pathways, ribosomal subunit composition, hormone signaling, wound response, cell wall formation, and anti-oxidant defense. Sequence polymorphisms were detected among several differentially expressed homologous transcripts between the tolerant and intolerant populations. These differentially responsive genes and pathways constitute potential response mechanisms for grazing tolerance in alfalfa. They also provide potential targets for molecular breeding efforts to develop grazing-tolerant cultivars of alfalfa. PMID:26763747

  15. Bidirectional Associations Between Parental Responsiveness and Executive Function During Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Emily C; Landry, Susan H; Montroy, Janelle J; Williams, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we examined bidirectional associations between parental responsiveness and executive function (EF) processes in socioeconomically disadvantaged preschoolers. Participants were 534 3- to 5-year-old children (71% Hispanic/Latino; 28% African American; 1% European American) attending Head Start programs. At Time 1 (T1) and 6.5 months later at Time 2 (T2), parents and children participated in a videotaped free play session and children completed delay inhibition (gift delay-wrap, gift delay-bow) and conflict EF (bear/dragon, dimensional change card sort) tasks. Parental warm acceptance, contingent responsiveness, and verbal scaffolding were coded from the free play videos and aggregated to create a parental responsiveness latent variable. A cross-lagged panel structural equation model indicated that higher T1 parental responsiveness significantly predicted more positive gain in delay inhibition and conflict EF from T1 to T2. Higher T1 delay inhibition, but not T1 conflict EF, significantly predicted more positive change in parental responsiveness from T1 to T2. These associations were not explained by several possible confounding variables, including children's age, gender, race/ethnicity, and verbal ability. Findings suggest that parental responsiveness may support EF development in disadvantaged children, with reciprocal effects of delay inhibition on parental responsiveness.

  16. The association between anger-related personality trait and cardiac autonomic response abnormalities in elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Kosuke; Murata, Tetsuhito; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hamada, Toshihiko; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Wada, Yuji

    2007-09-01

    Cardiac autonomic response abnormality associated with trait anger has been recognized to elevate blood pressure in daily life, leading to atherosclerotic progression and cardiovascular disease. To clarify the relationship between anger-related personality traits and cardiac autonomic response in healthy elderly subjects, 54 volunteers consisting of 30 male (mean age 62.2+/-5.4) and 24 female (mean age 58.4+/-4.6) subjects underwent testing of heart rate variability (HRV) with head-up tilt. For the evaluation of trait anger, we used a questionnaire corresponding to the trait anger score taken from the State and Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Furthermore, we measured carotid intima-medial thickness (IMT) to evaluate atherosclerotic progression in subjects with anger trait. In female subjects, higher trait anger was positively associated with elevated carotid IMT and the suppression of HRV vagal attenuation from the supine to head-up position, and negatively associated with the HRV sympathetic activity in the head-up position and also with the HRV sympathetic response from the supine to head-up position. In male subjects, trait anger was not significantly associated with carotid IMT or any HRV component with or without head-up tilt testing. We conclude that a simple noninvasive measure, short-term HRV with head-up tilt testing, could be a useful method to investigate the association between cardiac autonomic imbalance and increased risk of atherosclerosis associated with trait anger in healthy elderly subjects.

  17. When speech enhances Spatial Musical Association of Response Codes: Joint spatial associations of pitch and timbre in nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Tina; Estner, Barbara; Lachmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the effect of the Spatial Musical Association of Response Codes (SMARC) depends on various features, such as task conditions (whether pitch height is implicit or explicit), response dimension (horizontal vs. vertical), presence or absence of a reference tone, and former musical training of the participants. In the present study, we investigated the effects of pitch range and timbre: in particular, how timbre (piano vs. vocal) contributes to the horizontal and vertical SMARC effect in nonmusicians under varied pitch range conditions. Nonmusicians performed a timbre judgement task in which the pitch range was either small (6 or 8 semitone steps) or large (9 or 12 semitone steps) in a horizontal and a vertical response setting. For piano sounds, SMARC effects were observed in all conditions. For the vocal sounds, in contrast, SMARC effects depended on pitch range. We concluded that the occurrence of the SMARC effect, especially in horizontal response settings, depends on the interaction of the timbre (vocal and piano) and pitch range if vocal and instrumental sounds are combined in one experiment: the human voice enhances the attention, both to the vocal and the instrumental sounds.

  18. Genomic association analysis suggests chromosome 12 locus influencing antihypertensive response to thiazide diuretic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen T; Bailey, Kent R; Fridley, Brooke L; Chapman, Arlene B; Schwartz, Gary L; Chai, High Seng; Sicotte, Hugues; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Rodin, Andréi S; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2008-08-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify novel genes influencing diastolic blood pressure (BP) response to hydrochlorothiazide, a commonly prescribed thiazide diuretic preferred for the treatment of high BP. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100K Arrays were used to measure single nucleotide polymorphisms across the 22 autosomes in 194 non-Hispanic black subjects and 195 non-Hispanic white subjects with essential hypertension selected from opposite tertiles of the race- and sex-specific distributions of age-adjusted diastolic BP response to hydrochlorothiazide (25 mg daily, PO, for 4 weeks). The black sample consisted of 97 "good" responders (diastolic BP response [mean+/-SD]=-18.3+/-4.2 mm Hg; age=47.1+/-6.1 years; 51.5% women) and 97 "poor" responders (diastolic BP response=-0.18+/-4.3; age=47.4+/-6.5 years; 51.5% women). Haplotype trend regression identified a region of chromosome 12q15 in which haplotypes constructed from 3 successive single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs317689, rs315135, and rs7297610) in proximity to lysozyme (LYZ), YEATS domain containing 4 (YEATS4), and fibroblast growth receptor substrate 2 (FRS2) were significantly associated with diastolic BP response (nominal P=2.39 x 10(-7); Bonferroni corrected P=0.024; simulated experiment-wise P=0.040). Genotyping of 35 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms selected to "tag" linkage disequilibrium blocks in these genes provided corroboration that variation in LYZ and YEATS4 was associated with diastolic BP response in a statistically independent data set of 291 black subjects and in the sample of 294 white subjects. These results support the use of genome-wide association analyses to identify novel genes influencing antihypertensive drug responses.

  19. Interleukin-6 promoter haplotypes are associated with etanercept response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotte, Heiko; Schmidt, Hartmut; Gaubitz, Markus; Drynda, Susanne; Kekow, Jörn; Willeke, Peter; Schlüter, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    Indices prognosticating anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are a matter of interest. Differential outcome under anti-TNF and anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6) therapy raises the question whether genetic polymorphisms that have previously been linked to IL-6 production are associated with response to anti-TNF therapy. Fifty (50) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were treated with etanercept (median 36 weeks, range 4-52). In terms of the EULAR response criteria, 25 patients responded well, 17 patients moderately and 8 patients not. By direct sequencing, the patients and 91 matched healthy controls were genotyped for the IL-6 promoter SNPs -597G > A (rs1800797), -572G > C (rs1800796) and -174G > C (rs1800795) and for an AnTn microsatellite tract at -373. Alleles and haplotypes were tested for association with disease susceptibility and therapy response. No significant difference was seen in the genotype distribution between patients and healthy controls. Confirming the results of previous studies, we observed a trend of -174G being more frequent in patients with a good or moderate therapy response. Beyond that, carriage of the A9T11 microsatellite allele within the -174G haplotype was associated most closely with a favourable response (relative risk 1.31; 95 % confidence interval 1.02-1.68). A subtle analysis of the IL-6 promoter giving respect to its complex haplotypic structure results in more precise information as to the association of genotypes with the long-term etanercept response. Despite a conclusive hypothesis that a genetically determined IL-6-dominated RA responds less well to anti-TNF, more work has to be done to provide us with reliable information regarding the functional aspects of these genetic polymorphisms.

  20. Central serotonin transporter levels are associated with stress hormone response and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimold, Matthias; Knobel, Astrid; Rapp, Michael A.; Batra, Anil; Wiedemann, Klaus; Ströhle, Andreas; Zimmer, Anke; Schönknecht, Peter; Smolka, Michael N.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Goldman, David; Machulla, Hans-Jürgen; Bares, Roland; Heinz, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Negative mood states are characterized by both stress hormone dysregulation and serotonergic dysfunction, reflected by altered thalamic serotonin transporter (5-HTT) levels. However, so far, no study examined the individual association between cortisol response and cerebral in vivo 5-HTT levels in patients suffering from negative mood states. Objective The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the interrelation of cortisol response, thalamic 5-HTT levels, and anxiety in healthy subjects and two previously published samples of patients with unipolar major depression (UMD) and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), controlling for age, gender, 5-HTT genotype, smoking, and seasonality. Methods Regional 5-HTT levels and cortisol response to dexamethasone-corticotropin (Dex-CRH) challenge were assessed in consecutive samples of medication-free patients suffering from UMD (N=10) and OCD (N=10), and 20 healthy volunteers. The intervention used was combined Dex-CRH test and [11C]DASB positron emission tomography. The main outcome measures were: 5-HTT binding potential (BPND) in a predefined thalamic ROI, cortisol response defined as the maximum cortisol increase in the combined Dex-CRH-test, and state of anxiety from the state-trait-anxiety inventory. Results Reduced thalamic 5-HTT BPND was associated with increased cortisol response (r=−0.35, p<0.05; in patients: r=−0.53, p<0.01) and with increased state anxiety (r=−0.46, p<0.01), surviving correction for age, gender, 5-HTT genotype, smoking, and seasonality (p<0.05). The 5-HTT genotype, on the contrary, was not significantly associated with cortisol response (p=0.19) or negative mood (p=0.23). Conclusion The association between stress hormone response, thalamic 5-HTT levels, and anxiety in patients suffering from negative mood states suggests an interaction between two major mechanisms implicated in negative mood states in humans. PMID:20585760

  1. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with physiological responses during rat liver regeneration: Innate immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Wen Chen; Ming-Zhen Zhang; Li-Feng Zhao; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between innate immune response and liver regeneration (LR) at transcriptional level.METHODS: Genes associated with innate immunity response were obtained by collecting the data from databases and retrieving articles. Gene expression changes in rat regenerating liver were detected by rat genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: A total of 85 genes were found to be associated with LR. The initially and totally expressed number of genes at the phases of initiation [0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH)], transition from Go to G1 (4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH),cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) was 36, 9, 47, 4 and 36, 26, 78,50, respectively, illustrating that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initial phase of LR and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity, these genes were classified into 5 types: 41 up-regulated, 4 predominantly up-regulated, 26 downregulated, 6 predominantly down-regulated, and 8 approximately up/down-regulated genes, respectively.The expression of these genes was up-regulated 350 times and down-regulated 129 times respectively,demonstrating that the expression of most genes was enhanced while the expression of a small number of genes was decreased during LR. Their time relevance was classified into 14 groups, showing that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities during LR were staggered. According to the gene expression patterns,they were classified into 28 types, indicating that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities were diverse and complicated during LR.CONCLUSION: Congenital cellular immunity is enhanced mainly in the forepart, prophase and anaphase of LR while congenital molecular immunity is increased dominantly in the forepart and anaphase of LR. A total of 85 genes associated with LR play an important role in innate immunity.

  2. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with physiological responses during rat liver regeneration: Cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Xing Zhang; Li-Feng Zhao; An-Shi Zhang; Xiao-Guang Chen; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the cellular immune response during rat liver regeneration (LR) at a transcriptional level.METHODS: Genes associated with the cellular immune response were obtained by collecting the data from databases and retrieving articles. Gene expression changes during LR were detected by rat genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: A total of 127 genes were found to be associated with LR. The number of initially and totally expressing genes in the initial phase of LR [0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH)], transition from G0-G1(4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH),cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) was 54, 11, 34, 3 and 54, 49, 70, 49 respectively, illustrating that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initiation of LR, and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity,these genes were classified into 41 up-regulated, 21 predominantly up-regulated, 41 down-regulated, 14 predominantly down-regulated, 10 similarly up-regulated and down-regulated genes, respectively. The total upand down-regulated expression times were 419 and 274,respectively, demonstrating that the expression of most genes was increased while the expression of a small number of genes was decreased. Their time relevance was classified into 14 groups, showing that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities were staggered during LR. According to the gene expression patterns,they were classified into 21 types, showing the activities were diverse and complicated during LR.CONCLUSION: Antigen processing and presentation are enhanced mainly in the forepart, prophase and anaphase of LR. T-cell activation and antigen elimination are enhanced mainly in the forepart and prophase of LR. A total of 127 genes associated with LR play an important role in cellular immunity.

  3. QTL Identification of the Insensitive Response to Photoperiod and Temperature in Soybean by Association Mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Qiao-mei; WEN Zi-xiang; ZHANG Shu-yun; HOU Jin-feng; GAI Jun-yi; YU De-yue; XING Han

    2013-01-01

    The insensitive response to photoperiod and temperature is an important quantitative trait for soybean in wide adaptation breeding. The natural variation in response to photoperiod and temperature was detected using 275 accessions of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] from China. Genome-wide association mapping, based on population structure analysis, was carried out using 118 SSR markers by the TASSEL GLM (general linear model) program. Nine SSR markers (P<0.01) were associated with the value of the response to photoperiod and temperature (VRPT) caused by days to flowering (DF), among which, Satt308 (LG M), Satt150 (LG M) and Satt440 (LG I), were identified in both 2006 and 2007. Twelve SSR markers (P<0.01) were associated with VRPT caused by days to maturity (DM), among which three markers, Satt387 (LG N), Satt307 (LG C2) and AW310961 (LG J), were detected in both 2006 and 2007. In addition, a total of 20 elite alleles were screened out over 2006 and 2007 for being associated with an insensitive response to photoperiod and temperature (IRPT) caused by DF and a total of seven different elite alleles were screened out for being associated with IRPT caused by DM. Among these elite alleles, five alleles, Satt150-244, Satt308-164, Satt308-206, Satt440-176, and Satt440-206, were associated with IRPT caused by DF and were identified in both years, but only one allele, Satt307-170, was identified as being associated with an IRPT caused by DM. Based on these elite alleles, a set of typical accessions were screened out. The result about the genetic basis of IRPT is meaningful for soybean wide adaption breeding.

  4. Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with insulin resistance and response to vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Reema; von Hurst, Pamela R; Stonehouse, Welma; Love, Donald R; Higgins, Colleen M; Coad, Jane

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and insulin resistance and the effects of these SNPs on changes in insulin sensitivity in response to vitamin D supplementation. The research described here was an extension of the Surya study. Genotyping of the Cdx-2, FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI SNPs was carried out on 239 South Asian women in New Zealand using polymerase chain reaction-based techniques. Associations of these genotypes and 3' end haplotypes with insulin resistance were determined using multiple regression analysis. Associations between SNP genotypes and responses in insulin sensitivity to vitamin D supplementation (4000 IU vitamin D(3) per day) were also determined for a subset (81) of these women. BsmI BB, ApaI AA, and TaqI tt genotypes were significantly associated with lower insulin resistance compared with BsmI bb, ApaI aa, and TaqI TT, respectively, in the cohort of 239 women. Furthermore, homozygosity of the haplotypes baT and BAt was associated with higher and lower insulin resistance, respectively, compared with no copies of their respective alleles. Of the 81 subjects who were supplemented with vitamin D, women with the FokI Ff genotype showed a significantly greater improvement in insulin sensitivity (increase of 29.4 [2.9, 38.1]) compared with women with the FokI FF genotype (increase of 2.3 [-11.5, 10.1]). This study has highlighted the association of vitamin D responsiveness and insulin resistance with VDR gene polymorphisms. This is the first study to determine associations between all three. Genotyping of the VDR gene may provide a predictive measure for insulin resistance in response to vitamin D intervention.

  5. Ageing is associated with a prolonged fever response in human endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Karen S.; Kemp, Helle Bruunsgaard; Hansen, Christian Muff

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether an age-associated impaired acute-phase response exists. Nine healthy elderly volunteers (median, 66 years; range, 61 to 69 years) and eight young controls (median, 24 years; range, 20 to 27 years) were given an intravenous bolus of endotoxin (2...... levels than did the young group. In conclusion, ageing is associated with an altered acute-phase response including initial hyperreactivity, prolonged inflammatory activity, and prolonged fever response.......The purpose of this study was to investigate whether an age-associated impaired acute-phase response exists. Nine healthy elderly volunteers (median, 66 years; range, 61 to 69 years) and eight young controls (median, 24 years; range, 20 to 27 years) were given an intravenous bolus of endotoxin (2...... ng/kg). The rectal temperature was monitored continuously, and blood samples for cytokine measurements were obtained before endotoxin administration as well as 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after the injection. The elderly subjects showed a more prolonged fever response compared to the young...

  6. Association between subjective and cortisol stress response depends on the menstrual cycle phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Annie; Pruessner, Jens C

    2013-12-01

    The relation between the physiologic and subjective stress responses is inconsistently reported across studies. Menstrual cycle phases variations have been found to influence the psychophysiological stress response; however little is known about possible cycle phase differences in the relationship between physiological and subjective stress responses. This study examined the effect of menstrual cycle phase in the association between subjective stress and physiological response. Forty-five women in either the follicular (n=21) or the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle were exposed to a psychosocial stress task. Salivary cortisol, cardiovascular, and subjective stress were assessed throughout the experiment. Results revealed a significant group difference in the association between peak levels of cortisol and post task subjective stress. In women in the follicular phase a negative association was observed (r(2)=0.199, p=0.04), while this relation was positive in the group of women in the luteal phase (r(2)=0.227, p=0.02). These findings suggest a possible role of sex hormones in modulating the cortisol stress response function in emotion regulation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of microRNAs with antibody response to mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected in t...

  8. Survey non-response in the Netherlands : Effects on prevalence estimates and associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loon, AJM; Tijhuis, M; Picavet, HSJ; Surtees, PG; Ormel, J

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Differences in respondent characteristics may lead to bias in prevalence estimates and bias in associations. Both forms of non-response bias are investigated in a study on psychosocial factors and cancer risk, which is a sub-study of a large-scale monitoring survey in the Netherlands. METHO

  9. RESPONSE ASSOCIATED WITH THE STORM OF APRIL 12-14, 1981

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-05-04

    May 4, 2006 ... that generate intense magnetic storms, as well as explain the F2 region response associated with ... geomagnetic storm, absence of positive ionospheric storm eflects at high and mid latitudes on the dayside ... In this work, we present the results of an ..... before rotating northward at 15:00 UT rea.chin.g an.

  10. A latent class distance association model for cross-classified data with a categorical response variable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera, J.F.; Rooij, M. de; Heiser, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a latent class distance association model for clustering in the predictor space of large contingency tables with a categorical response variable. The rows of such a table are characterized as profiles of a set of explanatory variables, while the columns represent a single ou

  11. Associations between Responsible Beverage Service Laws and Binge Drinking and Alcohol-Impaired Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Ann C.; Toomey, Traci L.; Wolfson, Julian; Lenk, Kathleen M.; Jones-Webb, Rhonda; Erickson, Darin J.

    2016-01-01

    We explored potential associations between the strength of state Responsible Beverage Service (RBS) laws and self-reported binge drinking and alcohol-impaired driving in the U.S. A multi-level logistic mixed-effects model was used, adjusting for potential confounders. Analyses were conducted on the overall BRFSS sample and drinkers only. Seven…

  12. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH BRONCHIAL RESPONSIVENESS TO HISTAMINE IN A POPULATION-SAMPLE OF ADULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RIJCKEN, B; SCHOUTEN, JP; MENSINGA, TT; WEISS, ST; DEVRIES, K; VANDERLENDE, R

    The association of age, gender, number of eosinophils, area of residence, cigarette smoking, respiratory symptom prevalence, and FEV1 with the level of bronchial responsiveness was studied in a random sample of 2,216 subjects aged 15 to 72 yr. Subjects participated in the Dutch longitudinal study on

  13. Statistical methods for genetic association studies with response-selective sampling designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balliu, Brunilda

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation describes new statistical methods designed to improve the power of genetic association studies. Of particular interest are studies with a response-selective sampling design, i.e. case-control studies of unrelated individuals and case-control studies of family members. The

  14. Suboptimal response to GnRHa long protocol is associated with a common LH polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alviggi, C; Clarizia, R; Pettersson, K;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this observational preliminary trial was to estimate the association between the most common polymorphism of LH (LH-β variant: v-βLH), with different profiles of ovarian response to recombinant human FSH (rhFSH). A total of 60 normogonadotrophic patients undergoing a gonadotrophin-rele...

  15. Factors associated with experts' opinions regarding criminal responsibility in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendregt, Marko; Muller, Eline; Nijman, Henk; de Beurs, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    In many jurisdictions, offenders need to have freely chosen to commit their crimes in order to be punishable. A mental defect or disorder may be a reason for diminished or total absence of criminal responsibility and may remove culpability. This study aims to provide an empirically based understanding of the factors on which experts base their judgements concerning criminal responsibility. Clinical, demographic and crime related variables, as well as MMPI-2 profiles, were collected from final reports concerning defendants of serious crime submitted to the observation clinic of the Dutch Ministry of Justice for a criminal responsibility assessment. Criminal responsibility was expressed along a five-point scale corresponding to the Dutch legal practice. Results showed that several variables contributed independently to experts' opinions regarding criminal responsibility: diagnosis (Axis I and II), cultural background, type of weapon used in committing the crime, and whether the defendant committed the crime alone or with others. In contract to jurisdictions involving a sane/insane dichotomy, the Dutch five-point scale of criminal responsibility revealed that Axis II personality disorders turned out to be mostly associated with a diminished responsibility. MMPI-2 scores also turned out to have a small contribution to experts' opinions on criminal responsibility, independently of mere diagnostic variables. These results suggest that experts base their judgements not only on the presence or absence of mental disorders, but also on cultural and crime related characteristics, as well as dimensional information about the defendant's personality and symptomatology.

  16. Prevalence of responsible hospitality policies in licensed premises that are associated with alcohol-related harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Justine B; Campbell, Elizabeth M; Wiggers, John H; Considine, Robyn J

    2002-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of responsible hospitality policies in a group of licensed premises associated with alcohol-related harm. During March 1999, 108 licensed premises with one or more police-identified alcohol-related incidents in the previous 3 months received a visit from a police officer. A 30-item audit checklist was used to determine the responsible hospitality policies being undertaken by each premises within eight policy domains: display required signage (three items); responsible host practices to prevent intoxication and under-age drinking (five items); written policies and guidelines for responsible service (three items); discouraging inappropriate promotions (three items); safe transport (two items); responsible management issues (seven items); physical environment (three items) and entry conditions (four items). No premises were undertaking all 30 items. Eighty per cent of the premises were undertaking 20 of the 30 items. All premises were undertaking at least 17 of the items. The proportion of premises undertaking individual items ranged from 16% to 100%. Premises were less likely to report having and providing written responsible hospitality documentation to staff, using door charges and having entry/re-entry rules. Significant differences between rural and urban premises were evident for four policies. Clubs were significantly more likely than hotels to have a written responsible service of alcohol policy and to clearly display codes of dress and conditions of entry. This study provides an indication of the extent and nature of responsible hospitality policies in a sample of licensed premises that are associated with a broad range of alcohol related harms. The finding that a large majority of such premises appear to adopt responsible hospitality policies suggests a need to assess the validity and reliability of tools used in the routine assessment of such policies, and of the potential for harm from licensed premises.

  17. Social alienation in schizophrenia patients: association with insula responsiveness to facial expressions of disgust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lindner

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Among the functional neuroimaging studies on emotional face processing in schizophrenia, few have used paradigms with facial expressions of disgust. In this study, we investigated whether schizophrenia patients show less insula activation to macro-expressions (overt, clearly visible expressions and micro-expressions (covert, very brief expressions of disgust than healthy controls. Furthermore, departing from the assumption that disgust faces signal social rejection, we examined whether perceptual sensitivity to disgust is related to social alienation in patients and controls. We hypothesized that high insula responsiveness to facial disgust predicts social alienation. METHODS: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure insula activation in 36 schizophrenia patients and 40 healthy controls. During scanning, subjects passively viewed covert and overt presentations of disgust and neutral faces. To measure social alienation, a social loneliness scale and an agreeableness scale were administered. RESULTS: Schizophrenia patients exhibited reduced insula activation in response to covert facial expressions of disgust. With respect to macro-expressions of disgust, no between-group differences emerged. In patients, insula responsiveness to covert faces of disgust was positively correlated with social loneliness. Furthermore, patients' insula responsiveness to covert and overt faces of disgust was negatively correlated with agreeableness. In controls, insula responsiveness to covert expressions of disgust correlated negatively with agreeableness. DISCUSSION: Schizophrenia patients show reduced insula responsiveness to micro-expressions but not macro-expressions of disgust compared to healthy controls. In patients, low agreeableness was associated with stronger insula response to micro- and macro-expressions of disgust. Patients with a strong tendency to feel uncomfortable with social interactions appear to be characterized by a

  18. HLA alleles associated with the adaptive immune response to smallpox vaccine: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Pankratz, V Shane; Salk, Hannah M; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported HLA allelic associations with vaccinia virus (VACV)-induced adaptive immune responses in a cohort of healthy individuals (n = 1,071 subjects) after a single dose of the licensed smallpox (Dryvax) vaccine. This study demonstrated that specific HLA alleles were significantly associated with VACV-induced neutralizing antibody (NA) titers (HLA-B*13:02, *38:02, *44:03, *48:01, and HLA-DQB1*03:02, *06:04) and cytokine (HLA-DRB1*01:03, *03:01, *10:01, *13:01, *15:01) immune responses. We undertook an independent study of 1,053 healthy individuals and examined associations between HLA alleles and measures of adaptive immunity after a single dose of Dryvax-derived ACAM2000 vaccine to evaluate previously discovered HLA allelic associations from the Dryvax study and determine if these associations are replicated with ACAM2000. Females had significantly higher NA titers than male subjects in both study cohorts [median ID50 discovery cohort 159 (93, 256) vs. 125 (75, 186), p smallpox vaccine-induced adaptive immune responses are significantly influenced by HLA gene polymorphisms. These data provide information for functional studies and design of novel candidate smallpox vaccines.

  19. Quality of life in cardiac resynchronization recipients: association with response and impact on outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarczyk, Radosław; Jędrzejczyk-Patej, Ewa; Mazurek, Michał; Szulik, Mariola; Kowalski, Oskar; Pruszkowska, Patrycja; Sokal, Adam; Średniawa, Beata; Boidol, Joanna; Kowalczyk, Jacek; Podolecki, Tomasz; Mencel, Grzegorz; Kalarus, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    The prognostic impact of improvement in health-related quality of life (QoL) and its relation to response in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) recipients remains unknown. To assess the correspondence between response to CRT and improvements in QoL and to verify if a change in QoL after pacing influences outcome in CRT patients. Ninety-seven participants of the Triple-Site Versus Standard Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Trial (TRUST CRT) randomized trial, in New York Heart Association class III-IV, QRS width ≥ 120 ms, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 35%, and significant mechanical dyssynchrony were included. Subjects filled out the Minnesota-QoL questionnaire prior to and 6 months after CRT with defibrillator (CRT-D) implantation. Data on major adverse cardiac events (MACEs: death, heart failure hospitalization, heart transplant) collected within the next 2.5 years and adjudicated blindly constituted the censoring variables. Within the first 6 months of resynchronization QoL improved in 81%, while worsening in 19% of patients. Clinical response, but not the echocardiographic one, was associated with improved QoL. During subsequent 2.5 years MACEs occurred in 37% of patients (23% died). Subjects without QoL improvement were significantly (both P QoL increased the probability of future MACE by 2.7 times (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.26-5.83; P = 0.01) and death by 3.2 times (95% CI: 1.23-8.32; P = 0.02) independently from clinical and echocardiographic response. Clinical response, but not the echocardiographic one, was associated with improved QoL in CRT recipients. These preliminary data suggest that lack of improvement in QoL after CRT was associated with a strongly unfavorable prognosis, regardless of functional or echocardiographic response. Our results merit further studies with a larger number of patients. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Prefrontal serotonin transporter availability is positively associated with the cortisol awakening response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe Gedsoe; Erritzoe, David; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2013-01-01

    higher cortisol responses when exposed to psychosocial stressors relative to high expressing 5-HTTLPR variants. However, it is not clear how the relation between SERT and cortisol output is reflected in the adult brain. We investigated the relation between cortisol response to awakening (CAR) and SERT...... binding in brain regions considered relevant to modify the cortisol awakening response. Methods: thirty-two healthy volunteers underwent in vivo SERT imaging with [11C]DASB-Positron Emission Tomography (PET), genotyping, and performed home-sampling of saliva to assess CAR. Results: CAR, defined...... between CAR and prefrontal SERT binding as tested by an interaction analysis (genotype×CAR). Conclusion: prefrontal SERT binding is positively associated with cortisol response to awakening. We speculate that in mentally healthy individuals prefrontal serotonergic neurotransmission may exert an inhibitory...

  1. The association between parenting behavior and somatization in adolescents explained by physiological responses in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Sofie; Grietens, Hans; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Hoppenbrouwers, Karel; Wiersema, Jan R; Baetens, Imke; Vos, Pieter; Van Leeuwen, Karla

    2014-08-01

    This study adds to the knowledge on somatization in adolescents by exploring its relation with parenting behavior and the mediating/moderating role of physiological responses in adolescents to parenting behavior. Eighteen adolescents with high and 18 adolescents with low somatization scores and their mothers completed a discussion task, from which observed parenting behavior scores were derived. Skin conductance in adolescents was measured before and during the discussion. For adolescents with high levels of physiological responses, unadaptive parenting was related to a higher chance of high somatization scores. For low physiologically responsive adolescents, the relation between parenting behavior and somatization was not significant. Parenting behavior is not univocally related to somatization in adolescents, but the association depends on physiological responses in adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms and biological pathways associated with response to TNFα inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Sophine B; Palermo, Giuseppe; Johansen, Julia S;

    2012-01-01

    Recently, two genome-wide association studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with the treatment response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We aimed to replicate these results and identify SNPs...... and the possible biological pathways associated with the treatment response to TNFα inhibitors....

  3. Antagonism of host antiviral responses by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus tegument protein ORF45.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xiu Zhu

    Full Text Available Virus infection of a cell generally evokes an immune response by the host to defeat the intruder in its effort. Many viruses have developed an array of strategies to evade or antagonize host antiviral responses. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is demonstrated in this report to be able to prevent activation of host antiviral defense mechanisms upon infection. Cells infected with wild-type KSHV were permissive for superinfection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, suggesting that KSHV virions fail to induce host antiviral responses. We previously showed that ORF45, a KSHV immediate-early protein as well as a tegument protein of virions, interacts with IRF-7 and inhibits virus-mediated type I interferon induction by blocking IRF-7 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (Zhu et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 99:5573-5578, 2002. Here, using an ORF45-null recombinant virus, we demonstrate a profound role of ORF45 in inhibiting host antiviral responses. Infection of cells with an ORF45-null mutant recombinant KSHV (BAC-stop45 triggered an immune response that resisted VSV super-infection, concomitantly associated with appreciable increases in transcription of type I IFN and downstream anti-viral effector genes. Gain-of-function analysis showed that ectopic expression of ORF45 in human fibroblast cells by a lentivirus vector decreased the antiviral responses of the cells. shRNA-mediated silencing of IRF-7, that predominantly regulates both the early and late phase induction of type I IFNs, clearly indicated its critical contribution to the innate antiviral responses generated against incoming KSHV particles. Thus ORF45 through its targeting of the crucial IRF-7 regulated type I IFN antiviral responses significantly contributes to the KSHV survival immediately following a primary infection allowing for progression onto subsequent stages in its life-cycle.

  4. Association of Elevated Reward Prediction Error Response With Weight Gain in Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGuzman, Marisa; Shott, Megan E; Yang, Tony T; Riederer, Justin; Frank, Guido K W

    2017-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder of unknown etiology. Understanding associations between behavior and neurobiology is important in treatment development. Using a novel monetary reward task during functional magnetic resonance brain imaging, the authors tested how brain reward learning in adolescent anorexia nervosa changes with weight restoration. Female adolescents with anorexia nervosa (N=21; mean age, 16.4 years [SD=1.9]) underwent functional MRI (fMRI) before and after treatment; similarly, healthy female control adolescents (N=21; mean age, 15.2 years [SD=2.4]) underwent fMRI on two occasions. Brain function was tested using the reward prediction error construct, a computational model for reward receipt and omission related to motivation and neural dopamine responsiveness. Compared with the control group, the anorexia nervosa group exhibited greater brain response 1) for prediction error regression within the caudate, ventral caudate/nucleus accumbens, and anterior and posterior insula, 2) to unexpected reward receipt in the anterior and posterior insula, and 3) to unexpected reward omission in the caudate body. Prediction error and unexpected reward omission response tended to normalize with treatment, while unexpected reward receipt response remained significantly elevated. Greater caudate prediction error response when underweight was associated with lower weight gain during treatment. Punishment sensitivity correlated positively with ventral caudate prediction error response. Reward system responsiveness is elevated in adolescent anorexia nervosa when underweight and after weight restoration. Heightened prediction error activity in brain reward regions may represent a phenotype of adolescent anorexia nervosa that does not respond well to treatment. Prediction error response could be a neurobiological marker of illness severity that can indicate individual treatment needs.

  5. Individual Variations in Nucleus Accumbens Responses Associated with Major Depressive Disorder Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaki, Masaya; Suzuki, Hideo; Savitz, Jonathan; Drevets, Wayne C; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2016-02-16

    Abnormal reward-related responses in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) have been reported for major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. However, variability exists in the reported results, which could be due to heterogeneity in neuropathology of depression. To parse the heterogeneity of MDD we investigated variation of NAcc responses to gain and loss anticipations using fMRI. We found NAcc responses to monetary gain and loss were significantly variable across subjects in both MDD and healthy control (HC) groups. The variations were seen as a hyperactive response subtype that showed elevated activation to the anticipation of both gain and loss, an intermediate response with greater activation to gain than loss, and a suppressed-activity with reduced activation to both gain and loss compared to a non-monetary condition. While these response variability were seen in both MDD and HC subjects, specific symptoms were significantly associated with the right NAcc variation in MDD. Both the hyper- and suppressed-activity subtypes of MDD patients had severe suicidal ideation and anhedonia symptoms. The intermediate subjects had less severity in these symptoms. These results suggest that differing propensities in reward responsiveness in the NAcc may affect the development of specific symptoms in MDD.

  6. Associations between maternal negative affect and adolescent's neural response to peer evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Z. Tan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Parenting is often implicated as a potential source of individual differences in youths’ emotional information processing. The present study examined whether parental affect is related to an important aspect of adolescent emotional development, response to peer evaluation. Specifically, we examined relations between maternal negative affect, observed during parent–adolescent discussion of an adolescent-nominated concern with which s/he wants parental support, and adolescent neural responses to peer evaluation in 40 emotionally healthy and depressed adolescents. We focused on a network of ventral brain regions involved in affective processing of social information: the amygdala, anterior insula, nucleus accumbens, and subgenual anterior cingulate, as well as the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Maternal negative affect was not associated with adolescent neural response to peer rejection. However, longer durations of maternal negative affect were associated with decreased responsivity to peer acceptance in the amygdala, left anterior insula, subgenual anterior cingulate, and left nucleus accumbens. These findings provide some of the first evidence that maternal negative affect is associated with adolescents’ neural processing of social rewards. Findings also suggest that maternal negative affect could contribute to alterations in affective processing, specifically, dampening the saliency and/or reward of peer interactions during adolescence.

  7. Emotional intelligence is associated with reduced insula responses to masked angry faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozei, Anna; Killgore, William D S

    2015-07-08

    High levels of emotional intelligence (EI) have been associated with increased success in the workplace, greater quality of personal relationships, and enhanced wellbeing. Evidence suggests that EI is mediated extensively by the interplay of key emotion regions including the amygdala, insula, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, among others. The insula, in particular, is important for processing interoceptive and somatic cues that are interpreted as emotional responses. We investigated the association between EI and functional brain responses within the aforementioned neurocircuitry in response to subliminal presentations of social threat. Fifty-four healthy adults completed the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and underwent functional magnetic brain imaging while viewing subliminal presentations of faces displaying anger, using a backward masked facial affect paradigm to minimize conscious awareness of the expressed emotion. In response to masked angry faces, the total MSCEIT scores correlated negatively with a cluster of activation located within the left insula, but not with activation in any other region of interest. Considering the insula's role in the processing of interoceptive emotional cues, the results suggest that greater EI is associated with reduced emotional visceral reactivity and/or more accurate interoceptive prediction when confronted with stimuli indicative of social threat.

  8. BAS-drive trait modulates dorsomedial striatum activity during reward response-outcome associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costumero, Víctor; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Fuentes, Paola; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Ávila, César

    2016-09-01

    According to the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory, behavioral studies have found that individuals with stronger reward sensitivity easily detect cues of reward and establish faster associations between instrumental responses and reward. Neuroimaging studies have shown that processing anticipatory cues of reward is accompanied by stronger ventral striatum activity in individuals with stronger reward sensitivity. Even though establishing response-outcome contingencies has been consistently associated with dorsal striatum, individual differences in this process are poorly understood. Here, we aimed to study the relation between reward sensitivity and brain activity while processing response-reward contingencies. Forty-five participants completed the BIS/BAS questionnaire and performed a gambling task paradigm in which they received monetary rewards or punishments. Overall, our task replicated previous results that have related processing high reward outcomes with activation of striatum and medial frontal areas, whereas processing high punishment outcomes was associated with stronger activity in insula and middle cingulate. As expected, the individual differences in the activity of dorsomedial striatum correlated positively with BAS-Drive. Our results agree with previous studies that have related the dorsomedial striatum with instrumental performance, and suggest that the individual differences in this area may form part of the neural substrate responsible for modulating instrumental conditioning by reward sensitivity.

  9. Associations between maternal negative affect and adolescent's neural response to peer evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Patricia Z; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Dahl, Ronald E; Nelson, Eric E; Stroud, Laura J; Siegle, Greg J; Morgan, Judith K; Silk, Jennifer S

    2014-04-01

    Parenting is often implicated as a potential source of individual differences in youths' emotional information processing. The present study examined whether parental affect is related to an important aspect of adolescent emotional development, response to peer evaluation. Specifically, we examined relations between maternal negative affect, observed during parent-adolescent discussion of an adolescent-nominated concern with which s/he wants parental support, and adolescent neural responses to peer evaluation in 40 emotionally healthy and depressed adolescents. We focused on a network of ventral brain regions involved in affective processing of social information: the amygdala, anterior insula, nucleus accumbens, and subgenual anterior cingulate, as well as the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Maternal negative affect was not associated with adolescent neural response to peer rejection. However, longer durations of maternal negative affect were associated with decreased responsivity to peer acceptance in the amygdala, left anterior insula, subgenual anterior cingulate, and left nucleus accumbens. These findings provide some of the first evidence that maternal negative affect is associated with adolescents' neural processing of social rewards. Findings also suggest that maternal negative affect could contribute to alterations in affective processing, specifically, dampening the saliency and/or reward of peer interactions during adolescence.

  10. ACE genetic variability and response to fluoxetine: lack of association in depressed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Firouzabadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidences suggest that besides the neurotransmitters contributing to the development of depression, renin-angiotensin system (RAS may also have a substantial role. Certain polymorphisms of RAS are associated with over activity of RAS & depression. Considering that antidepressants reduce the actions of angiotensin II, the main product of RAS, this may come into mind that genetic polymorphisms of the mentioned system may affect the outcome of therapy in depressed patients. In the present study, 100 newly diagnosed depressed patients, according to DSM-IV criteria, were treated with 20 mg of fluoxetine or 8-12 weeks. Patients were categorized into responsive and non-responsive groups according to 50% reduction in symptoms. Genotype frequencies of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene [ACE (I/D, A-240T and A2350G] were then determined in DNAs extracted from venous blood of the patients using polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR– RFLP and PCR. Results indicate that polymorphisms studied and their haplotypes were not associated with better response to fluoxetine. However, a strong association between age and treatment in depressed Iranian patients was observed (P=0.001. In conclusion, unlike previous reports, this study does not support the hypothesis of special genotypes of RAS contributing to a better response to antidepressants in depressed patients.

  11. Association between social functioning and prefrontal hemodynamic responses in elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Katsutoshi; Matsumura, Hiroshi; Mitani, Hideaki; Adachi, Akiko; Kaneko, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Social functioning has received widespread attention as one of the most important outcomes in psychiatric disorders and has been related to cognitive functioning and the underlying brain activity. Cognitive decline, however, appears not only in the psychiatric population but also in aged individuals. In our previous study, we demonstrated a significant relationship between social functioning and prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity in patients with depression. However, it has not been shown whether the above relationship could be extended to healthy populations. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a possible association between social functioning and prefrontal hemodynamic responses in healthy elderly adults by using a non-invasive and low-constraint functional neuroimaging technique, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Study subjects included 55 healthy, elderly volunteers. We measured hemodynamic responses over prefrontal cortical (PFC) areas during the verbal fluency task by using multi-channel NIRS and analyzed the relationship between task-associated hemodynamic responses and social functioning as measured by the social adaptation self-evaluation scale (SASS). A significant positive relationship was observed between the SASS total score and PFC activation. Our findings suggest that PFC activation is associated with social functioning in healthy elderly adults. Furthermore, hemodynamic responses assessed using non-invasive NIRS could be a useful biological marker of these characteristics.

  12. Transactional Associations between Youths' Responses to Peer Stress and Depression: The Moderating Roles of Sex and Stress Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoston, Anna M.; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined transactional associations between responses to peer stress and depression in youth. Specifically, it tested the hypotheses that (a) depression would predict fewer effortful responses and more involuntary, dysregulated responses to peer stress over time; and (b) fewer adaptive and more maladaptive responses would predict…

  13. Family-based association study of early growth response gene 3 with child bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallitano, Amelia L; Tillman, Rebecca; Dinu, Valentin; Geller, Barbara

    2012-05-01

    The risk for relapse of child bipolar I disorder (BP-I) is highly correlated with environmental factors. Immediate early genes of the early growth response (EGR) gene family are activated at high levels in the brain in response to environmental events, including stress, and mediate numerous neurobiological processes that have been associated with mental illness risk. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in EGR genes are associated with the risk to develop child bipolar I disorder. To investigate whether EGR genes may influence susceptibility to child bipolar I disorder (BP-I), we used Family Based Association Tests to examine whether SNPs in each of the EGR genes were associated with illness in 49 families. Two SNPs in EGR3 displayed nominally significant associations with child BP-I (p=0.027 and p=0.028); though neither was statistically significant following correction for multiple comparisons. Haplotype association analysis indicated that these SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium (LD). None of the SNPs tested in EGR1, EGR2, or EGR4 was associated with child BP-I. This study was limited by small sample size, which resulted in it being underpowered to detect a significant association after correction for multiple comparisons. Our study revealed a preliminary finding suggesting that EGR3, a gene that translates environmental stimuli into long-term changes in the brain, warrants further investigation for association with risk for child BP-I disorder in a larger sample. Such studies may help reveal mechanisms by which environment can interact with genetic predisposition to influence this severe mental illness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment Responsiveness in CIDP Patients with Diabetes Is Associated with Higher Degrees of Demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Abraham

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP is one of several chronic treatable acquired demyelinating neuropathies.To explore the association between the degree of demyelination in CIDP, and treatment responsiveness.A retrospective chart review of CIDP subjects assessed between 1997 and 2013 was performed to compare treatment responsiveness using different sets of criteria.99 CIDP patients were included, 34 with diabetes mellitus (DM. Treatment responsiveness was higher in CIDP-DM fulfilling 1 or more EFNS/PNS criteria, (63% vs. 31%, p = 0.03, and in CIDP+DM fulfilling 2 or more criteria (89% vs. 36%, p = 0.01. Nonetheless, treatment responsiveness in CIDP+DM had the highest odds ratio (3.73, p = 0.01. Similar results were also shown in simplified uniform study criteria, with 10% cut off values for CIDP-DM, compared to 30% for CIDP+DM.In CIDP+DM, higher degrees of demyelination are associated with treatment responsiveness, implying the need to adjust current criteria in these patients.

  15. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sjöberg

    Full Text Available A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD, an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 and CD4(+ T cells (Th17, with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  16. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Veronika; Sandström, Olof; Hedberg, Maria; Hammarström, Sten; Hernell, Olle; Hammarström, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD), an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+) T cells (Tc17) and CD4(+) T cells (Th17), with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  17. Child-care chaos and teachers' responsiveness: The indirect associations through teachers' emotion regulation and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Lieny; Hur, Eunhye; Buettner, Cynthia K

    2016-12-01

    Teachers in early child-care settings are key contributors to children's development. However, the role of teachers' emotional abilities (i.e., emotion regulation and coping skills) and the role of teacher-perceived environmental chaos in relation to their responsiveness to children are understudied. The current study explored the direct and indirect associations between teachers' perceptions of child-care chaos and their self-reported contingent reactions towards children's negative emotions and challenging social interactions via teachers' emotional regulation and coping strategies. The sample consisted of 1129 preschool-aged classroom teachers in day care and public pre-K programs across the US. We first found that child-care chaos was directly associated with teachers' non-supportive reactions after controlling for multiple program and teacher characteristics. In addition, teachers in more chaotic child-care settings had less reappraisal and coping skills, which in turn, was associated with lower levels of positive responsiveness to children. Teachers reporting a higher degree of chaos used more suppression strategies, which in turn, was associated with teachers' non-supportive reactions and fewer expressive encouragement reactions to children's emotions. Results of this exploratory study suggest that it is important to prepare teachers to handle chaotic environments with clear guidelines and rules. In order to encourage teachers' supportive responses to children, intervention programs are needed to address teachers' coping and emotion regulation strategies in early childhood education.

  18. Recommendations for responsible monitoring and regulation of clinical software systems. American Medical Informatics Association, Computer-based Patient Record Institute, Medical Library Association, Association of Academic Health Science Libraries, American Health Information Management Association, American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R A; Gardner, R M

    1997-01-01

    In mid-1996, the FDA called for discussions on regulation of clinical software programs as medical devices. In response, a consortium of organizations dedicated to improving health care through information technology has developed recommendations for the responsible regulation and monitoring of clinical software systems by users, vendors, and regulatory agencies. Organizations assisting in development of recommendations, or endorsing the consortium position include the American Medical Informatics Association, the Computer-based Patient Record Institute, the Medical Library Association, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, the American Health Information Management Association, the American Nurses Association, the Center for Healthcare Information Management, and the American College of Physicians. The consortium proposes four categories of clinical system risks and four classes of measured monitoring and regulatory actions that can be applied strategically based on the level of risk in a given setting. The consortium recommends local oversight of clinical software systems, and adoption by healthcare information system developers of a code of good business practices. Budgetary and other constraints limit the type and number of systems that the FDA can regulate effectively. FDA regulation should exempt most clinical software systems and focus on those systems posing highest clinical risk, with limited opportunities for competent human intervention.

  19. Causal versus spurious spatial exposure-response associations in health risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony; Popken, Douglas A; Berman, D Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Many recent health risk assessments have noted that adverse health outcomes are significantly statistically associated with proximity to suspected sources of health hazard, such as manufacturing plants or point sources of air pollution. Using geographic proximity to sources as surrogates for exposure to (possibly unknown) releases, spatial ecological studies have identified potential adverse health effects based on significant regression coefficients between risk rates and distances from sources in multivariate statistical risk models. Although this procedure has been fruitful in identifying exposure-response associations, it is not always clear whether the resulting regression coefficients have valid causal interpretations. Spurious spatial regression and other threats to valid causal inference may undermine practical efforts to causally link health effects to geographic sources, even when there are clear statistical associations between them. This paper demonstrates the methodological problems by examining statistical associations and regression coefficients between spatially distributed exposure and response variables in a realistic data set for California. We find that distance from "nonsense" sources (such as arbitrary points or lines) are highly statistically significant predictors of cause-specific risks, such as traffic fatalities and incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma. However, the signs of such associations typically depend on the distance scale chosen. This is consistent with theoretical analyses showing that random spatial trends (which tend to fluctuate in sign), rather than true causal relations, can create statistically significant regression coefficients: spatial location itself becomes a confounder for spatially distributed exposure and response variables. Hence, extreme caution and careful application of spatial statistical methods are warranted before interpreting proximity-based exposure-response relations as evidence of a possible or probable causal

  20. Adiposity is associated with blunted cardiovascular, neuroendocrine and cognitive responses to acute mental stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jones

    Full Text Available Obesity and mental stress are potent risk factors for cardiovascular disease but their relationship with each other is unclear. Resilience to stress may differ according to adiposity. Early studies that addressed this are difficult to interpret due to conflicting findings and limited methods. Recent advances in assessment of cardiovascular stress responses and of fat distribution allow accurate assessment of associations between adiposity and stress responsiveness. We measured responses to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task in healthy men (N = 43 and women (N = 45 with a wide range of BMIs. Heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP measures were used with novel magnetic resonance measures of stroke volume (SV, cardiac output (CO, total peripheral resistance (TPR and arterial compliance to assess cardiovascular responses. Salivary cortisol and the number and speed of answers to mathematics problems in the task were used to assess neuroendocrine and cognitive responses, respectively. Visceral and subcutaneous fat was measured using T(2 (*-IDEAL. Greater BMI was associated with generalised blunting of cardiovascular (HR:β = -0.50 bpm x unit(-1, P = 0.009; SV:β = -0.33 mL x unit(-1, P = 0.01; CO:β = -61 mL x min(-1 x unit(-1, P = 0.002; systolic BP:β = -0.41 mmHg x unit(-1, P = 0.01; TPR:β = 0.11 WU x unit(-1, P = 0.02, cognitive (correct answers: r = -0.28, P = 0.01; time to answer: r = 0.26, P = 0.02 and endocrine responses (cortisol: r = -0.25, P = 0.04 to stress. These associations were largely determined by visceral adiposity except for those related to cognitive performance, which were determined by both visceral and subcutaneous adiposity. Our findings suggest that adiposity is associated with centrally reduced stress responsiveness. Although this may mitigate some long-term health risks of stress responsiveness, reduced performance under stress may be a more immediate

  1. Anterior cingulate serotonin 1B receptor binding is associated with emotional response inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Hjordt, Liv Vadskjær; Dam, Vibeke Høyrup

    2017-01-01

    -HT1BR would be positively associated with false alarms (failures to inhibit nogo responses) in the context of aversive (angry and fearful) facial expressions. Across groups, we found that frontal cortex 5-HT1BR binding was positively correlated with false alarms when angry faces were go stimuli......-offender controls, completed an emotional Go/NoGo task requiring inhibition of prepotent motor responses to emotional facial expressions. We also measured cerebral serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) binding with [(11)C]AZ10419369 positron emission tomography within regions of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that 5...

  2. Genome-wide association study and biological pathway analysis for response to Eimeria maxima in broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamzic, Edin; Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Hérault, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Background Coccidiosis is the most common and costly disease in the poultry industry and which caused by protozoans from the genus of Eimeria. The current control of coccidiosis, based on the use of anticoccidial drugs and vaccination, faces serious obstacles such as drug resistance and the high...... regions associated to traits measured in the response to Eimeria maxima in broilers. Furthermore, the post-GWAS functional analysis indicates that biological pathways and networks involved in tissue proliferation and repair as well as primary innate immune response might play the most important role...

  3. Sleep Moderates the Association Between Response Inhibition and Self-Regulation in Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Allyson M; Miller, Alison L; Watamura, Sarah E; Kurth, Salome; Lassonde, Jonathan M; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2017-01-01

    Early childhood is a time of rapid developmental changes in sleep, cognitive control processes, and the regulation of emotion and behavior. This experimental study examined sleep-dependent effects on response inhibition and self-regulation, as well as whether acute sleep restriction moderated the association between these processes. Preschool children (N = 19; 45.6 ± 2.2 months; 11 female) followed a strict sleep schedule for at least 3 days before each of 2 morning behavior assessments: baseline (habitual nap/night sleep) and sleep restriction (missed nap/delayed bedtime). Response inhibition was evaluated via a go/no-go task. Twelve self-regulation strategies were coded from videotapes of children while attempting an unsolvable puzzle. We then created composite variables representing adaptive and maladaptive self-regulation strategies. Although we found no sleep-dependent effects on response inhibition or self-regulation measures, linear mixed-effects regression showed that acute sleep restriction moderated the relationship between these processes. At baseline, children with better response inhibition were more likely to use adaptive self-regulation strategies (e.g., self-talk, alternate strategies), and those with poorer response inhibition showed increased use of maladaptive self-regulation strategies (e.g., perseveration, fidgeting); however, response inhibition was not related to self-regulation strategies following sleep restriction. Our results showing a sleep-dependent effect on the associations between response inhibition and self-regulation strategies indicate that adequate sleep facilitates synergy between processes supporting optimal social-emotional functioning in early childhood. Although replication studies are needed, findings suggest that sleep may alter connections between maturing emotional and cognitive systems, which have important implications for understanding risk for or resilience to developmental psychopathology.

  4. Enhanced synaptic responses in the piriform cortex associated with sexual stimulation in the male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaus, J G; Tse, T L M; Werk, C M; Chanda, M L; Leblonde, A; Harbour, V L; Chapman, C A

    2009-12-29

    Male rats that copulate to ejaculation with female rats bearing an odor show a learned preference to ejaculate selectively with females that bear the odor. This conditioned ejaculatory preference reflects an association between the odor and the reward state induced by ejaculation. Although little is known about the neuronal mechanisms that mediate this form of learning, convergence of genitosensory and olfactory inputs occurs in both hypothalamic and cortical regions, notably within primary olfactory (piriform) cortex, which may be involved in the encoding or storage of the association. The present study contrasted the ability of genital investigations, mounts, intromissions, ejaculations, and a sexually conditioned olfactory stimulus, to enhance evoked synaptic field potentials in the piriform cortex. Rats in the Paired group underwent conditioning trials in which they copulated with sexually receptive females bearing an almond odor. Rats in the Unpaired control group copulated with receptive females bearing no odor. Responses in the piriform cortex evoked by electrical stimulation of the olfactory bulb were recorded in male rats as they engaged in different aspects of sexual behavior, and were also recorded after conditioning, during exposure to cotton swabs bearing the almond odor. The monosynaptic component of responses was increased during intromission and ejaculation, and the late component of responses was increased during anogenital sniffing and mounting (with or without intromission). However, no differences in the amplitudes of evoked responses were found between the Paired and Unpaired groups, and no differences in synaptic responses were found during presentation of the odor after conditioning. These data indicate that short-term alterations in synaptic responsiveness occur in piriform cortex as a function of sexual stimulation in the male rat, but that responses are not significantly altered by a conditioned odor.

  5. Host-selective toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis induce common responses associated with host susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovanna Pandelova

    Full Text Available Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr, a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA and Ptr ToxB (ToxB, are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death.

  6. Statin therapy is associated with improved pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Adam G; Gantt, Gerald A; Skacel, Marek; Pai, Rish; Hammel, Jeff P; Kalady, Matthew F

    2013-11-01

    Achieving a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves prognosis in rectal cancer. Statin therapy has been shown to enhance the impact of treatment in several malignancies, but little is known regarding the impact on rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves pathologic response in rectal cancer. This was a retrospective cohort study based on data from a prospectively maintained colorectal cancer database. The 2 cohorts were defined by statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This study was performed at a single tertiary referral center. Four hundred seven patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant therapy then proctectomy between 2000 and 2012 were included. Ninety-nine patients (24.3%) took a statin throughout the entire course of neoadjuvant therapy. The primary outcome measure was pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy as defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor regression grading system, grades 0 to 3. Patients in the statin cohort had a lower median regression grade (1 vs 2, p = 0.01) and were more likely to have a better response (grades 0-1 vs 2-3) than those not taking a statin (65.7% vs 48.7%, p = 0.004). Statin use remained a significant predictor of an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.33-3.82) in multivariate analyses. Although statin use itself did not significantly improve oncologic outcomes, an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 response was associated with statistically significant improvements in overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific mortality, and local recurrence. This was a retrospective study and subject to nonrandomization of patients and incorporated patients on variable statin agents and doses. Statin therapy is associated with an improved response of rectal cancer to

  7. Hemodynamic responses in human multisensory and auditory association cortex to purely visual stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumann Simon

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings of a tight coupling between visual and auditory association cortices during multisensory perception in monkeys and humans raise the question whether consistent paired presentation of simple visual and auditory stimuli prompts conditioned responses in unimodal auditory regions or multimodal association cortex once visual stimuli are presented in isolation in a post-conditioning run. To address this issue fifteen healthy participants partook in a "silent" sparse temporal event-related fMRI study. In the first (visual control habituation phase they were presented with briefly red flashing visual stimuli. In the second (auditory control habituation phase they heard brief telephone ringing. In the third (conditioning phase we coincidently presented the visual stimulus (CS paired with the auditory stimulus (UCS. In the fourth phase participants either viewed flashes paired with the auditory stimulus (maintenance, CS- or viewed the visual stimulus in isolation (extinction, CS+ according to a 5:10 partial reinforcement schedule. The participants had no other task than attending to the stimuli and indicating the end of each trial by pressing a button. Results During unpaired visual presentations (preceding and following the paired presentation we observed significant brain responses beyond primary visual cortex in the bilateral posterior auditory association cortex (planum temporale, planum parietale and in the right superior temporal sulcus whereas the primary auditory regions were not involved. By contrast, the activity in auditory core regions was markedly larger when participants were presented with auditory stimuli. Conclusion These results demonstrate involvement of multisensory and auditory association areas in perception of unimodal visual stimulation which may reflect the instantaneous forming of multisensory associations and cannot be attributed to sensation of an auditory event. More importantly, we are able

  8. The association between corporate social responsibility disclosure of cigarette company and company’s financial performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desy Ratna Yuwita Amelia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the association between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR disclosure and financial performances-Return on Assets (ROA, Return on Equity (ROE, and Stock Return-within the cigarette companies listed on Indonesian Stock Exchange. This research used 3 cigarettes companies; PT Gudang Garam Tbk., PT Hanjaya Mandala Sampoerna Tbk., and PT Bentoel Internasional Investama. Simple linear regression is used to examine the association between CSR disclosure and the cigarettes companies’ financial performance. The study reveals that the disclosure of CSR only has positive influences toward Return on Assets; yet, it does not correlate with the Return on Equity and Stock Return.

  9. Association between attributions of responsibility for motor vehicle crashes, depressive symptoms, and return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason; O'Donnell, Meaghan; Stafford, Lesley; Nordfjaern, Trond; Berk, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Perceptions surrounding the underlying causes of accidents and injuries may be a key mechanism influencing postaccident health and functional outcomes among people injured in road crashes. In particular, attributions of responsibility may influence rates of postcrash depressive symptomatology and return-to-work. We studied a large sample of people injured in motor vehicle crashes who were working at their time of accident and needed to take time off as a result of their injuries. Interviews took place at 2 time points, 12 months apart (T1: n = 1,024, T2: n = 303). Comparisons were made between participants' levels of depressive symptoms and rates of return to work based on their assessment of responsibility for their accident. People who did not attribute responsibility to themselves for their accident were 3 times more likely to exhibit symptoms of depression at follow-up than those who attributed responsibility to themselves. People with depressive symptoms were 3.5 times less likely to have returned to work. The effect of attributions of responsibility for accidents on return to work was mediated by the presence of depressive symptoms. Functional and psychological recovery from road trauma is closely associated with the assessment of responsibility for accidents. Findings are discussed in light of established posttrauma cognitive theories, the potential explanatory power of broader, more socially oriented models, and the changing nature of road trauma populations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Video Analysis of Factors Associated With Response Time to Physiologic Monitor Alarms in a Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafide, Christopher P; Localio, A Russell; Holmes, John H; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Stemler, Shannon; MacMurchy, Matthew; Zander, Miriam; Roberts, Kathryn E; Lin, Richard; Keren, Ron

    2017-06-01

    Bedside monitor alarms alert nurses to life-threatening physiologic changes among patients, but the response times of nurses are slow. To identify factors associated with physiologic monitor alarm response time. This prospective cohort study used 551 hours of video-recorded care administered by 38 nurses to 100 children in a children's hospital medical unit between July 22, 2014, and November 11, 2015. Patient, nurse, and alarm-level factors hypothesized to predict response time. We used multivariable accelerated failure-time models stratified by each nurse and adjusted for clustering within patients to evaluate associations between exposures and response time to alarms that occurred while the nurse was outside the room. The study participants included 38 nurses, 100% (n = 38) of whom were white and 92% (n = 35) of whom were female, and 100 children, 51% (n = 51) of whom were male. The race/ethnicity of the child participants was 45% (n = 45) black or African American, 33% (n = 33) white, 4% (n = 4) Asian, and 18% (n = 18) other. Of 11 745 alarms among 100 children, 50 (0.5%) were actionable. The adjusted median response time among nurses was 10.4 minutes (95% CI, 5.0-15.8) and varied based on the following variables: if the patient was on complex care service (5.3 minutes [95% CI, 1.4-9.3] vs 11.1 minutes [95% CI, 5.6-16.6] among general pediatrics patients), whether family members were absent from the patient's bedside (6.3 minutes [95% CI, 2.2-10.4] vs 11.7 minutes [95% CI, 5.9-17.4] when family present), whether a nurse had less than 1 year of experience (4.4 minutes [95% CI, 3.4-5.5] vs 8.8 minutes [95% CI, 7.2-10.5] for nurses with 1 or more years of experience), if there was a 1 to 1 nursing assignment (3.5 minutes [95% CI, 1.3-5.7] vs 10.6 minutes [95% CI, 5.3-16.0] for nurses caring for 2 or more patients), if there were prior alarms requiring intervention (5.5 minutes [95% CI, 1.5-9.5] vs 10.7 minutes [5.2-16.2] for patients

  11. A latent class distance association model for cross-classified data with a categorical response variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, José Fernando; de Rooij, Mark; Heiser, Willem J

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we propose a latent class distance association model for clustering in the predictor space of large contingency tables with a categorical response variable. The rows of such a table are characterized as profiles of a set of explanatory variables, while the columns represent a single outcome variable. In many cases such tables are sparse, with many zero entries, which makes traditional models problematic. By clustering the row profiles into a few specific classes and representing these together with the categories of the response variable in a low-dimensional Euclidean space using a distance association model, a parsimonious prediction model can be obtained. A generalized EM algorithm is proposed to estimate the model parameters and the adjusted Bayesian information criterion statistic is employed to test the number of mixture components and the dimensionality of the representation. An empirical example highlighting the advantages of the new approach and comparing it with traditional approaches is presented.

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of HDL cholesterol response to statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postmus, Iris; Warren, Helen R; Trompet, Stella

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In addition to lowering low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), statin therapy also raises high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Inter-individual variation in HDL-C response to statins may be partially explained by genetic variation. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed...... a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify variants with an effect on statin-induced high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) changes. The 123 most promising signals with p... in an independent group of 10 951 statin-treated individuals, providing a total sample size of 27 720 individuals. The only associations of genome-wide significance (pHDL-C response to statin treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Based on results from this study...

  13. Homer-1 polymorphisms are associated with psychopathology and response to treatment in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellmann, Ilja; Rujescu, Dan; Musil, Richard; Mayr, Andreas; Giegling, Ina; Genius, Just; Zill, Peter; Dehning, Sandra; Opgen-Rhein, Markus; Cerovecki, Anja; Hartmann, Annette M; Schäfer, Martin; Bondy, Brigitta; Müller, Norbert; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The HOMER 1 protein plays a crucial role in mediating glutamatergic neurotransmission. It has previously shown to be a candidate gene for etiology and pathophysiology of different psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia. To identify genes involved in response to antipsychotics, subgroups of animals were treated with haloperidol (1 mg/kg, n = 11) or saline (n = 12) for one week. By analyzing microarray data, we replicated the observed increase of Homer 1 gene expression. Furthermore, we genotyped 267 schizophrenic patients, who were treated monotherapeutically with different antipsychotics within randomized-controlled trials. Psychopathology was measured weekly using the PANSS for a minimum of four and a maximum of twelve weeks. Correlations between PANSS subscale scores at baseline and PANSS improvement scores after four weeks of treatment and genotypes were calculated by using a linear model for all investigated SNP's. We found an association between two HOMER 1 polymorphisms (rs2290639 and rs4704560) and different PANSS subscales at baseline. Furthermore all seven investigated polymorphisms were found to be associated with therapy response in terms of a significant correlation with different PANSS improvement subscores after four weeks of antipsychotic treatment. Most significant associations have been shown between the rs2290639 HOMER 1 polymorphism and PANSS subscales both at baseline conditions and after four weeks of antipsychotic treatment. This is the first study which shows an association between HOMER 1 polymorphisms and psychopathology data at baseline and therapy response in a clinical sample of schizophrenic patients. Thus, these data might further help in detecting differential therapy response in individuals with schizophrenia.

  14. Cortisol awakening response and cortisol/DHEA ratio associations with hippocampal volume in MDD

    OpenAIRE

    Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Jin Rowen; Sara Mason; Mellon, Synthia H.; Reus, Victor I.; Epel, Elissa S.; Heather M. Burke; Rebecca Rosser; John Coetzee; Laura Mahan; Michelle Coy; J Craig Nelson; Hamilton, Steven P; Sally Mendoza; Weiner, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies of Hypothalamic-Pituatary-Adrenal (HPA) associations with hippocampal (HC) volume have yielded inconsistent results. This might be due to the use of basal cortisol rather than cortisol reactivity measures and to the use of cortisol in isolation from related steroids. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the relationship of HC volume to cortisol awakening responses (CARs) and to the ratio of cortisol/DHEA in depressed (MDD) subjects and healthy controls. We additionally assessed...

  15. Attenuated Heart Rate Response is Associated with Hypocretin Deficiency in Patients with Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Petersen, Eva Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Our results show that autonomic dysfunction is part of the narcoleptic phenotype, and that hypocretin-1 deficiency is the primary predictor of this dysfunction. This finding suggests that the hypocretin system participates in the modulation of cardiovascular function at rest. CITATION: Sorensen G......; Knudsen S; Petersen ER; Kempfner J; Gammeltoft S; Sorensen HBD; Jennum P. Attenuated heart rate response is associated with hypocretin deficiency in patients with narcolepsy. SLEEP 2013;36(1):91-98....

  16. The Abscopal Effect Associated With a Systemic Anti-melanoma Immune Response

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    Stamell, Emily F. [Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Wolchok, Jedd D. [Melanoma and Sarcoma Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Gnjatic, Sacha [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Brownell, Isaac, E-mail: Isaac.brownell@nih.gov [Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Dermatology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The clearance of nonirradiated tumors after localized radiation therapy is known as the abscopal effect. Activation of an antitumor immune response has been proposed as a mechanism for the abscopal effect. Here we report a patient with metastatic melanoma who received palliative radiation to his primary tumor with subsequent clearance of all his nonirradiated in-transit metastases. Anti-MAGEA3 antibodies were found upon serological testing, demonstrating an association between the abscopal effect and a systemic antitumor immune response. A brain recurrence was then treated with a combination of stereotactic radiosurgery and immunotherapy with ipilimumab. The patient experienced a complete remission that included resolution of nodal metastases, with a concomitant increase in MAGEA3 titers and a new response to the cancer antigen PASD1. This case supports the immune hypothesis for the abscopal effect, and illustrates the potential of combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma.

  17. NPTX2 is associated with neoadjuvant therapy response in rectal cancer.

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    Karagkounis, Georgios; Thai, Leo; DeVecchio, Jennifer; Gantt, Gerald A; Duraes, Leonardo; Pai, Rish K; Kalady, Matthew F

    2016-05-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) is recommended for locally advanced rectal cancer. Tumor response varies from pathologic complete response (pCR) to no tumor regression. The mechanisms behind CRT resistance remain undefined. In our previously generated complementary DNA microarrays of pretreatment biopsies from rectal cancer patients, neuronal pentraxin 2 (NPTX2) expression discriminated patients with pCR from those with residual tumor. As tumor response is prognostic for survival, we sought to evaluate the clinical relevance of NPTX2 in rectal cancer. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate NPTX2 messenger RNA expression in individual rectal cancers before CRT. Tumors with NPTX2 expression 50% were defined as NPTX2-high. NPTX2 levels were compared to response to therapy and oncologic outcomes using Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square, and Mantel-Cox (log-rank) tests, as appropriate. Rectal cancers from 40 patients were included. The mean patient age was 56.8 years, and 30% were female. pCR was achieved in eight of 40 patients (20%). In these patients, messenger RNA NPTX2 levels were significantly decreased compared to those with residual cancer (fold change 30.4, P = 0.017). Patients with NPTX2-low tumors (n = 13) achieved improved response to treatment (P = 0.012 versus NPXT2-high tumors), with 38.5% and 46.1% of patients achieving complete or moderate response, respectively. Of patients with NPTX2-high tumors (n = 27), 11.1% and 18.5% achieved complete or moderate response, respectively. No recurrence or death was recorded in patients with NPTX2-low tumors, reflecting more favorable disease-free survival (P = 0.045). Decreased NPTX2 expression in rectal adenocarcinomas is associated with improved response to CRT and improved prognosis. Further studies to validate these results and elucidate the biological role of NPTX2 in rectal cancer are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Direct association between orbitofrontal atrophy and the response of psychotic symptoms to olanzapine in schizophrenia.

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    Molina, Vicente; Sanz, Javier; Benito, Carlos; Palomo, Tomás

    2004-07-01

    The study of cerebral variables associated with response to neuroleptics holds interest from both theoretical and clinical points of view. To date, no studies have aimed to identify predictors of response to olanzapine based on cerebral measurements. Here, we used magnetic resonance to assess the relationship between volumes of the prefrontal (dorsolateral and orbitofrontal) and temporal (temporal lobe and hippocampus) cortical regions and ventricles and, on the other hand, the response to olanzapine in 16 schizophrenic patients. Data from 42 healthy controls were used to calculate volume residuals in the patients, defined as deviations from the expected values, given individual age and intracranial volume. Residuals thus represent the effect of illness on regional measurements. The association between clinical change and those residuals was calculated separately for the positive, negative and total scores from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). There was a significant direct association between the degree of orbitofrontal atrophy and the improvement of positive symptoms with olanzapine. No predictors were found for change in the negative dimension. A trend was found for patients with larger ventricles to show a greater global decrease in total PANSS scores. Neither age nor duration of illness explained a significant proportion of the symptom improvement. This result, together with others from the literature, supports the idea that atypical antipsychotics may offer some benefit to patients with significant regional atrophy, and this may have implications for the choice of antipsychotic in clinical practice.

  19. Obesity Is Not Associated with Impaired Immune Response to Influenza Vaccination in HIV-Infected Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Charitha; McKittrick, Noah; Kim, Deborah; Kappes, Rosemarie A; Lo Re, Vincent; Tebas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. HIV-infected individuals demonstrate lower immunogenicity to the influenza vaccine, despite immunologic and virologic control of HIV infection. Obesity has been previously shown to be associated with diminished antibody responses to other vaccines in HIV-uninfected persons. However, no studies have examined if obesity is associated with diminished protective immune response to influenza vaccination among HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of immunogenicity data from a clinical trial of inactivated, trivalent influenza vaccine. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with seroconversion, defined as >4-fold increase in anti-hemagglutinin antibody titers after vaccination. Secondary endpoints were the proportion of participants with seroprotection (defined as antibody titers of ≥1 : 40) and geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers. Results. Overall, 48 (27%) participants were obese (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Seroconversion rates were comparable between obese and nonobese subjects for all three vaccine strains. Further, postvaccination geometric mean titers did not differ by body mass index category. Conclusion. Obesity was not associated with diminished antibody response to influenza vaccination in a sample of healthy HIV-infected persons.

  20. Obesity Is Not Associated with Impaired Immune Response to Influenza Vaccination in HIV-Infected Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charitha Gowda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. HIV-infected individuals demonstrate lower immunogenicity to the influenza vaccine, despite immunologic and virologic control of HIV infection. Obesity has been previously shown to be associated with diminished antibody responses to other vaccines in HIV-uninfected persons. However, no studies have examined if obesity is associated with diminished protective immune response to influenza vaccination among HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of immunogenicity data from a clinical trial of inactivated, trivalent influenza vaccine. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with seroconversion, defined as >4-fold increase in anti-hemagglutinin antibody titers after vaccination. Secondary endpoints were the proportion of participants with seroprotection (defined as antibody titers of ≥1 : 40 and geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers. Results. Overall, 48 (27% participants were obese (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2. Seroconversion rates were comparable between obese and nonobese subjects for all three vaccine strains. Further, postvaccination geometric mean titers did not differ by body mass index category. Conclusion. Obesity was not associated with diminished antibody response to influenza vaccination in a sample of healthy HIV-infected persons.

  1. Clinical Response to Vedolizumab in Ulcerative Colitis Patients Is Associated with Changes in Integrin Expression Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Friederike; Schillinger, Daniela; Atreya, Raja; Hirschmann, Simon; Fischer, Sarah; Neufert, Clemens; Atreya, Imke; Neurath, Markus F; Zundler, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Despite large clinical success, deeper insights into the immunological effects of vedolizumab therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases are scarce. In particular, the reasons for differential clinical response in individual patients, the precise impact on the equilibrium of integrin-expressing T cell subsets, and possible associations between these issues are not clear. Blood samples from patients receiving clinical vedolizumab therapy were sequentially collected and analyzed for expression of integrins and chemokine receptors on T cells. Moreover, clinical and laboratory data from the patients were collected, and changes between homing marker expression and clinical parameters were analyzed for possible correlations. While no significant correlation of changes in integrin expression and changes in outcome parameters were identified in Crohn's disease (CD), increasing α4β7 levels in ulcerative colitis (UC) seemed to be associated with favorable clinical development, whereas increasing α4β1 and αEβ7 correlated with negative changes in outcome parameters. Changes in α4β1 integrin expression after 6 weeks were significantly different in responders and non-responders to vedolizumab therapy as assessed after 16 weeks with a cutoff of +4.2% yielding 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity in receiver-operator-characteristic analysis. Our data show that clinical response to vedolizumab therapy in UC but not in CD is associated with specific changes in integrin expression profiles opening novel avenues for mechanistic research and possibly prediction of response to therapy.

  2. Clinical Response to Vedolizumab in Ulcerative Colitis Patients Is Associated with Changes in Integrin Expression Profiles

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    Friederike Fuchs

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite large clinical success, deeper insights into the immunological effects of vedolizumab therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases are scarce. In particular, the reasons for differential clinical response in individual patients, the precise impact on the equilibrium of integrin-expressing T cell subsets, and possible associations between these issues are not clear.MethodsBlood samples from patients receiving clinical vedolizumab therapy were sequentially collected and analyzed for expression of integrins and chemokine receptors on T cells. Moreover, clinical and laboratory data from the patients were collected, and changes between homing marker expression and clinical parameters were analyzed for possible correlations.ResultsWhile no significant correlation of changes in integrin expression and changes in outcome parameters were identified in Crohn’s disease (CD, increasing α4β7 levels in ulcerative colitis (UC seemed to be associated with favorable clinical development, whereas increasing α4β1 and αEβ7 correlated with negative changes in outcome parameters. Changes in α4β1 integrin expression after 6 weeks were significantly different in responders and non-responders to vedolizumab therapy as assessed after 16 weeks with a cutoff of +4.2% yielding 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity in receiver-operator-characteristic analysis.DiscussionOur data show that clinical response to vedolizumab therapy in UC but not in CD is associated with specific changes in integrin expression profiles opening novel avenues for mechanistic research and possibly prediction of response to therapy.

  3. Mast cells and influenza A virus: Association with allergic responses and beyond

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    Amy C. Graham

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a widespread infectious agent commonly found in mammalian and avian species. In humans, IAV is a respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal infections associated with significant morbidity in young and elderly populations and has a large economic impact. Moreover, IAV has the potential to cause both zoonotic spillover infection and global pandemics, which have significantly greater morbidity and mortality across all ages. The pathology associated with these pandemic and spillover infections appear to be the result of an excessive inflammatory response leading to severe lung damage, which likely predisposes the lungs for secondary bacterial infections. The lung is protected from pathogens by alveolar epithelial cells, endothelial cells, tissue resident alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, and mast cells. The importance of mast cells during bacterial and parasitic infections has been extensively studied, yet the role of these hematopoietic cells during viral infections is only beginning to emerge. Recently, it has been shown that mast cells can be directly activated in response to IAV, releasing mediators such histamine, proteases, leukotrienes, inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral chemokines, which participate in the excessive inflammatory and pathological response observed during IAV infections. In this review, we will examine the relationship between mast cells and IAV, and discuss the role of mast cells as a potential drug target during highly pathological IAV infections. Finally, we proposed an emerging role for mast cells in other viral infections associated with significant host pathology.

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of HDL cholesterol response to statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postmus, Iris; Warren, Helen R; Trompet, Stella; Arsenault, Benoit J; Avery, Christy L; Bis, Joshua C; Chasman, Daniel I; de Keyser, Catherine E; Deshmukh, Harshal A; Evans, Daniel S; Feng, QiPing; Li, Xiaohui; Smit, Roelof A J; Smith, Albert V; Sun, Fangui; Taylor, Kent D; Arnold, Alice M; Barnes, Michael R; Barratt, Bryan J; Betteridge, John; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buckley, Brendan M; Chen, Y-D Ida; de Craen, Anton J M; Cummings, Steven R; Denny, Joshua C; Dubé, Marie Pierre; Durrington, Paul N; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Ford, Ian; Guo, Xiuqing; Harris, Tamara B; Heckbert, Susan R; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Kastelein, John J P; Launer, Leonore J; Liu, Ching-Ti; Liu, Yongmei; Lumley, Thomas; McKeigue, Paul M; Munroe, Patricia B; Neil, Andrew; Nickerson, Deborah A; Nyberg, Fredrik; O'Brien, Eoin; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Post, Wendy; Poulter, Neil; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Rice, Kenneth; Rich, Stephen S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sattar, Naveed; Sever, Peter; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Shields, Denis C; Slagboom, P Eline; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Joshua D; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Stanton, Alice; Stott, David J; Stricker, Bruno H; Stürmer, Til; Uitterlinden, André G; Wei, Wei-Qi; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Whitsel, Eric A; Wiggins, Kerri L; Wilke, Russell A; Ballantyne, Christie M; Colhoun, Helen M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Franco, Oscar H; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hitman, Graham; Palmer, Colin N A; Psaty, Bruce M; Ridker, Paul M; Stafford, Jeanette M; Stein, Charles M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Caulfield, Mark J; Jukema, J Wouter; Rotter, Jerome I; Krauss, Ronald M

    2016-12-01

    In addition to lowering low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), statin therapy also raises high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Inter-individual variation in HDL-C response to statins may be partially explained by genetic variation. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify variants with an effect on statin-induced high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) changes. The 123 most promising signals with pHDL-C response to statin treatment. Based on results from this study that included a relatively large sample size, we suggest that CETP may be the only detectable locus with common genetic variants that influence HDL-C response to statins substantially in individuals of European descent. Although CETP is known to be associated with HDL-C, we provide evidence that this pharmacogenetic effect is independent of its association with baseline HDL-C levels. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Brain responses to audiovisual speech mismatch in infants are associated with individual differences in looking behaviour.

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    Kushnerenko, Elena; Tomalski, Przemyslaw; Ballieux, Haiko; Ribeiro, Helena; Potton, Anita; Axelsson, Emma L; Murphy, Elizabeth; Moore, Derek G

    2013-11-01

    Research on audiovisual speech integration has reported high levels of individual variability, especially among young infants. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that this variability results from individual differences in the maturation of audiovisual speech processing during infancy. A developmental shift in selective attention to audiovisual speech has been demonstrated between 6 and 9 months with an increase in the time spent looking to articulating mouths as compared to eyes (Lewkowicz & Hansen-Tift. (2012) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 109, 1431-1436; Tomalski et al. (2012) Eur. J. Dev. Psychol., 1-14). In the present study we tested whether these changes in behavioural maturational level are associated with differences in brain responses to audiovisual speech across this age range. We measured high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to videos of audiovisually matching and mismatched syllables /ba/ and /ga/, and subsequently examined visual scanning of the same stimuli with eye-tracking. There were no clear age-specific changes in ERPs, but the amplitude of audiovisual mismatch response (AVMMR) to the combination of visual /ba/ and auditory /ga/ was strongly negatively associated with looking time to the mouth in the same condition. These results have significant implications for our understanding of individual differences in neural signatures of audiovisual speech processing in infants, suggesting that they are not strictly related to chronological age but instead associated with the maturation of looking behaviour, and develop at individual rates in the second half of the first year of life.

  6. No association of endocannabinoid genes with bipolar disorder or lithium response in a Sardinian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanu, Claudia; Congiu, Donatella; Costa, Marta; Sestu, Massimiliano; Chillotti, Caterina; Ardau, Raffaella; Deiana, Valeria; Manchia, Mirko; Squassina, Alessio; Del Zompo, Maria

    2013-12-30

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and severe psychiatric condition with an underlying component of genetic susceptibility. Mounting evidence suggests a potential role of the endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system in the pathogenesis of BD. Here we investigated the role of genes encoding for key eCB elements on the risk of developing BD in a sample of 357BD patients and 422 healthy controls of Sardinian ancestry. Using the HapMap CEU population SNP database, we selected 25 tag Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (tSNPs) in N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD), cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) genes. No significant association was reported for FAAH or CNR1. SNPs rs11487077 and rs6465903 in NAPE-PLD showed nominal association (p=0.033 and p=0.026, respectively) with BD, not significant after permutation testing. These SNPs were also tested for association with lithium response in 204 BD patients characterized for response to long-term lithium treatment, reporting no significant findings. As a whole, our results do not support a clear role of FAAH, CNR1 and NAPE-PLD in BD and lithium response. Additional studies on independent, larger samples are warranted to further explore the involvement of the eCB system in BD. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. RAGE genetic polymorphisms are associated with risk, chemotherapy response and prognosis in patients with advanced NSCLC.

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    Xiang Wang

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the association between genetic polymorphisms of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE and susceptibility, chemotherapy response rate and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. METHOD: This is a prospective study in which 562 patients with NSCLC and 764 healthy controls were enrolled. Three RAGE genetic polymorphisms, namely, -429T/C, -374T/A and 82G/S were genotyped. Platinum-based chemotherapy was given to 432 subjects with advanced inoperable NSCLC and their responses to chemotherapy were evaluated. RESULTS: All the polymorphic genotypes of RAGE polymorphisms were associated with susceptibility for NSCLC. Only the 82G/S polymorphisms denoted a significant difference between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy. The 82SS genotype and 82S allele distribution not only increased the NSCLC risk, but also was associated with a lower chemotherapy response rate and poor prognosis, indicated by overall survival and progression free survival. CONCLUSION: The 82G/S genetic polymorphism of RAGE gene might be used as a genetic marker to screen for patients sensitive to thermotherapy and to predict the prognosis of NSCLC.

  8. IL28B polymorphisms associated with therapy response? ein inin Chilean chronic hepatitis C patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mauricio Venegas; Rodrigo A Villanueva; Katherine González; Javier Brahm

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association of three IL28B single nucleotide polymorphisms with response to therapy in Chilean patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV).((HHCV))).. METHODS: We studied two groups of patients with chronic HHCV infection ((genotype 1)), under standard combined treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin. One group consisted of 50 patients with sustained virological response, whereas the second group consisted of 49 null responders. In order to analyze the IL28B single nucleotide polymorphisms rs12979860, rs12980275 and rs8099917, samples were used for polymerase chain reaction amplification, and the genotyping was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS: The IL28B rs12979860 CC, rs12980275 AA and rs8099917 TT genotypes were much more frequently found in patients with sustained virological response compared to null responders ((38%, 44% and 50% vs 2%, 8.2% and 8.2%, respectively)). These differences were highly significant in all three cases (P < 0.0001)). CONCLUSION: The three IL28B polymorphisms studied are strongly associated with sustained virological response to therapy in Chilean patients with chronic HHCV ((genotype 1)).

  9. Gambling pathology is associated with dampened cortisol response among men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, J J; Franco, C; Sodano, R; Frye, C A; Wulfert, E

    2010-02-09

    Pathological gambling has many similarities to pharmacological addiction. Notably, both pathological gambling and drug addiction are characterized by aberrations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responding. As well, there are indications that gender differences may play a role in these processes. Whether gender and/or HPA response are associated with pathological gambling was of interest. Recreational and pathological gamblers (15 men and 6 women per group) had the HPA factor, cortisol, assessed in saliva before and after watching a video of their preferred mode of gambling (slot machines, horse race betting, scratch-off tickets, blackjack, video poker, craps, sports betting, online casino games, or lottery tickets), and a video of neutral stimuli (a rollercoaster ride). Basal levels of salivary cortisol did not significantly differ among recreational and pathological gamblers. However, recreational gamblers demonstrated significantly increased salivary cortisol levels after the gambling and rollercoaster videos, whereas pathological gamblers demonstrated no salivary cortisol increase in response to either video stimulus. There was also a non-significant trend for women to have a greater cortisol response to video stimuli compared to men. These data suggest that pathological gambling is associated with hypoactive HPA response to gambling stimuli, similar to chronic drug exposure, and gender may contribute to this effect.

  10. CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 regulates ROS homeostasis and oxidative stress responses.

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    Lai, Alvina Grace; Doherty, Colleen J; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Kay, Steve A; Schippers, Jos H M; Dijkwel, Paul P

    2012-10-16

    Organisms have evolved endogenous biological clocks as internal timekeepers to coordinate metabolic processes with the external environment. Here, we seek to understand the mechanism of synchrony between the oscillator and products of metabolism known as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in Arabidopsis thaliana. ROS-responsive genes exhibit a time-of-day-specific phase of expression under diurnal and circadian conditions, implying a role of the circadian clock in transcriptional regulation of these genes. Hydrogen peroxide production and scavenging also display time-of-day phases. Mutations in the core-clock regulator, CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1), affect the transcriptional regulation of ROS-responsive genes, ROS homeostasis, and tolerance to oxidative stress. Mis-expression of EARLY FLOWERING 3, LUX ARRHYTHMO, and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 affect ROS production and transcription, indicating a global effect of the clock on the ROS network. We propose CCA1 as a master regulator of ROS homeostasis through association with the Evening Element in promoters of ROS genes in vivo to coordinate time-dependent responses to oxidative stress. We also find that ROS functions as an input signal that affects the transcriptional output of the clock, revealing an important link between ROS signaling and circadian output. Temporal coordination of ROS signaling by CCA1 and the reciprocal control of circadian output by ROS reveal a mechanistic link that allows plants to master oxidative stress responses.

  11. Repeated exposure to media violence is associated with diminished response in an inhibitory frontolimbic network.

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    Christopher R Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Media depictions of violence, although often claimed to induce viewer aggression, have not been shown to affect the cortical networks that regulate behavior. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we found that repeated exposure to violent media, but not to other equally arousing media, led to both diminished response in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (right ltOFC and a decrease in right ltOFC-amygdala interaction. Reduced function in this network has been previously associated with decreased control over a variety of behaviors, including reactive aggression. Indeed, we found reduced right ltOFC responses to be characteristic of those subjects that reported greater tendencies toward reactive aggression. Furthermore, the violence-induced reduction in right ltOFC response coincided with increased throughput to behavior planning regions. CONCLUSIONS: These novel findings establish that even short-term exposure to violent media can result in diminished responsiveness of a network associated with behaviors such as reactive aggression.

  12. Association of genetic variants with response to iron supplements in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athiyarath, Rekha; Shaktivel, Kalaiselvi; Abraham, Vinod; Singh, Daisy; Bondu, Joseph Dian; Chapla, Aaron; George, Biju; Srivastava, Alok; Edison, Eunice Sindhuvi

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy is high in India where iron supplementation is a regular practice. The response to oral iron is influenced by several factors such as age, body mass index, gravida, socioeconomic status, food, vitamin deficiency and compliance to supplements. The major challenge is to understand the various modulators of iron status in this high-risk group so that we can improve the diagnosis and the management of these patients. The current study was designed to evaluate the iron status during pregnancy and to identify factors which might be influencing their response to oral iron. We investigated a total of 181 pregnant women with anemia (Hb < 11 g/dl) and evaluated the impact of probable factors on anemia and their iron status. Assessment of the response was based on hemoglobin and serum ferritin or transferrin saturation level after 8 and 20 weeks of iron supplementation. Socioeconomic, clinical, hematological, biochemical and genetic factors were all evaluated. Molecular analysis revealed that HFE variant allele (G) (rs1799945) was significantly associated with an adequate response to iron supplementation. We identified five subjects with a sustained poor response, and targeted re-sequencing of eleven iron-related genes was performed in them. We have identified seven novel variants in them, and in silico analysis suggested that these variants may have an iron regulatory effect. Taken together, our findings underscore the association of genetic variants with response to supplements in pregnancy, and they can be extended to other diseases where anemia and iron deficiency coexist.

  13. Tumor response to radiotherapy is dependent on genotype-associated mechanisms in vitro and in vivo

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    Williams Jerry R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that in vitro radiosensitivity of human tumor cells segregate non-randomly into a limited number of groups. Each group associates with a specific genotype. However we have also shown that abrogation of a single gene (p21 in a human tumor cell unexpectedly sensitized xenograft tumors comprised of these cells to radiotherapy while not affecting in vitro cellular radiosensitivity. Therefore in vitro assays alone cannot predict tumor response to radiotherapy. In the current work, we measure in vitro radiosensitivity and in vivo response of their xenograft tumors in a series of human tumor lines that represent the range of radiosensitivity observed in human tumor cells. We also measure response of their xenograft tumors to different radiotherapy protocols. We reduce these data into a simple analytical structure that defines the relationship between tumor response and total dose based on two coefficients that are specific to tumor cell genotype, fraction size and total dose. Methods We assayed in vitro survival patterns in eight tumor cell lines that vary in cellular radiosensitivity and genotype. We also measured response of their xenograft tumors to four radiotherapy protocols: 8 × 2 Gy; 2 × 5Gy, 1 × 7.5 Gy and 1 × 15 Gy. We analyze these data to derive coefficients that describe both in vitro and in vivo responses. Results Response of xenografts comprised of human tumor cells to different radiotherapy protocols can be reduced to only two coefficients that represent 1 total cells killed as measured in vitro 2 additional response in vivo not predicted by cell killing. These coefficients segregate with specific genotypes including those most frequently observed in human tumors in the clinic. Coefficients that describe in vitro and in vivo mechanisms can predict tumor response to any radiation protocol based on tumor cell genotype, fraction-size and total dose. Conclusions We establish an analytical

  14. Emotion processing fails to modulate putative mirror neuron response to trained visuomotor associations.

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    Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M; Kirkovski, Melissa; Fornito, Alex; Paton, Bryan; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Enticott, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that activation of the putative human mirror neuron system (MNS) can be elicited via visuomotor training. This is generally interpreted as supporting an associative learning account of the mirror neuron system (MNS) that argues against the ontogeny of the MNS to be an evolutionary adaptation for social cognition. The current study assessed whether a central component of social cognition, emotion processing, would influence the MNS activity to trained visuomotor associations, which could support a broader role of the MNS in social cognition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we assessed repetition suppression to the presentation of stimulus pairs involving a simple hand action and a geometric shape that was either congruent or incongruent with earlier association training. Each pair was preceded by an image of positive, negative, or neutral emotionality. In support of an associative learning account of the MNS, repetition suppression was greater for trained pairs compared with untrained pairs in several regions, primarily supplementary motor area (SMA) and right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG). This response, however, was not modulated by the valence of the emotional images. These findings argue against a fundamental role of emotion processing in the mirror neuron response, and are inconsistent with theoretical accounts linking mirror neurons to social cognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adolescent personality: associations with Basal, awakening, and stress-induced cortisol responses.

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    Laceulle, Odilia M; Nederhof, Esther; van Aken, Marcel A G; Ormel, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the associations between personality facets and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning. Previous studies have mainly focussed on stress-induced HPA-axis activation. We hypothesized that other characteristics of HPA-axis functioning would have a stronger association with personality based on the neuroendocrine literature. Data (n = 343) were used from the TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS), a large prospective cohort study of Dutch adolescents. We studied the association between facets of Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Conscientiousness and basal cortisol, the cortisol awakening response (CAR), and four measures of stress-induced HPA-axis activity. Basal cortisol levels were related to facets of all three personality traits. The CAR and stress-induced cortisol were not related to personality. Possibly due to its more trait-like nature, basal cortisol seems more informative than stress-induced cortisol when investigating trait-like characteristics such as personality facets.

  16. Genetic Variations in Inflammatory Response Genes and Their Association with the Risk of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men. Genetic variations in inflammatory response genes can potentially influence the risk of prostate cancer. We aimed to examine the association between PPARG Pro12Ala, NFKB1 -94 ins/del, NFKBIA -826C/T, COX-1 (50C>T, and COX-2 (-1195G>A polymorphisms on prostate cancer risk. The genotypes of the polymorphisms were ascertained in 543 prostate cancer patients and 753 controls through PCR-RFLP and the risk association was evaluated statistically using logistic regression analysis. The NFKB1 -94 polymorphism was shown to decrease prostate cancer risk in both heterozygous and homozygous comparison models (odds ratios of 0.74 (95% CI = 0.58–0.96 (P=0.02 and 0.57 (95% CI = 0.42–0.78 (PA polymorphisms may be, respectively, associated with decreased and increased prostate cancer risk in the Chinese population.

  17. Association between exposure to nonactionable physiologic monitor alarms and response time in a children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafide, Christopher P; Lin, Richard; Zander, Miriam; Graham, Christian Sarkis; Paine, Christine W; Rock, Whitney; Rich, Andrew; Roberts, Kathryn E; Fortino, Margaret; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Localio, A Russell; Keren, Ron

    2015-06-01

    Alarm fatigue is reported to be a major threat to patient safety, yet little empirical data support its existence in the hospital. To determine if nurses exposed to high rates of nonactionable physiologic monitor alarms respond more slowly to subsequent alarms that could represent life-threatening conditions. Observational study using video. Freestanding children's hospital. Pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients requiring inotropic support and/or mechanical ventilation, and medical ward patients. None. Actionable alarms were defined as correctly identifying physiologic status and warranting clinical intervention or consultation. We measured response time to alarms occurring while there were no clinicians in the patient's room. We evaluated the association between the number of nonactionable alarms the patient had in the preceding 120 minutes (categorized as 0-29, 30-79, or 80+ alarms) and response time to subsequent alarms in the same patient using a log-rank test that accounts for within-nurse clustering. We observed 36 nurses for 210 hours with 5070 alarms; 87.1% of PICU and 99.0% of ward clinical alarms were nonactionable. Kaplan-Meier plots showed incremental increases in response time as the number of nonactionable alarms in the preceding 120 minutes increased (log-rank test stratified by nurse P alarms were nonactionable, and response time increased as nonactionable alarm exposure increased. Alarm fatigue could explain these findings. Future studies should evaluate the simultaneous influence of workload and other factors that can impact response time. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  18. Susceptibility and resistance to Echinococcus granulosus infection: Associations between mouse strains and early peritoneal immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Merlino, Alicia; Capurro, Rafael; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    In helminth infections, there are no easy associations between host susceptibility and immune responses. Interestingly, immunity to cestodes - unlike most helminths - seems to require Th1-type effectors. In this sense, we reported recently that Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice are high and low susceptible strains, respectively, to experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus. However, the role of the early cellular peritoneal response in such differential susceptibility is unknown. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of cytokines expression and cellular phenotypes in peritoneal cells from infected Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Additionally, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted to highlight the most relevant differences between strains. Finally, the anti-parasite activities of peritoneal cells were assessed through in vitro systems. PCAs clustered C57Bl/6 mice by their early mixed IL-5/TNF-α responses and less intense expression of Th2-type cytokines. Moreover, they exhibited lower counts of eosinophils and higher numbers of macrophages and B cells. Functional studies showed that peritoneal cells from infected C57Bl/6 mice displayed greater anti-parasite activities, in accordance with higher rates of NO production and more efficient ADCC responses. In conclusion, mild Th2-responses and active cellular mechanisms are key determinants in murine resistance to E. granulosus infection, supporting the cestode immune exception among helminth parasites.

  19. T-Cell Responses Are Associated with Survival in Acute Melioidosis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemajittra Jenjaroen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is an increasingly recognised cause of sepsis and death across South East Asia and Northern Australia, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Risk factors include diabetes, alcoholism and renal disease, and a vaccine targeting at-risk populations is urgently required. A better understanding of the protective immune response in naturally infected patients is essential for vaccine design.We conducted a longitudinal clinical and immunological study of 200 patients with melioidosis on admission, 12 weeks (n = 113 and 52 weeks (n = 65 later. Responses to whole killed B. pseudomallei were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ ELIspot assay and flow cytometry and compared to those of control subjects in the region with diabetes (n = 45 and without diabetes (n = 43.We demonstrated strong CD4+ and CD8+ responses to B. pseudomallei during acute disease, 12 weeks and 52 weeks later. 28-day mortality was 26% for melioidosis patients, and B. pseudomallei-specific cellular responses in fatal cases (mean 98 IFN-γ cells per million PBMC were significantly lower than those in the survivors (mean 142 IFN-γ cells per million PBMC in a multivariable logistic regression model (P = 0.01. A J-shaped curve association between circulating neutrophil count and mortality was seen with an optimal count of 4000 to 8000 neutrophils/μl. Melioidosis patients with known diabetes had poor diabetic control (median glycated haemoglobin HbA1c 10.2%, interquartile range 9.2-13.1 and showed a stunted B. pseudomallei-specific cellular response during acute illness compared to those without diabetes.The results demonstrate the role of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in protection against melioidosis, and an interaction between diabetes and cellular responses. This supports development of vaccine strategies that induce strong T-cell responses for the control of intracellular pathogens such as B. pseudomallei.

  20. Association of TCF7L2 gene polymorphisms with reduced acute insulin response in Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Nicholette D; Lehtinen, Allison B; Langefeld, Carl D; Campbell, Joel K; Haffner, Steven M; Norris, Jill M; Bergman, Richard N; Goodarzi, Mark O; Rotter, Jerome I; Bowden, Donald W

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variation at the transcription factor 7-like 2 locus has been linked to type 2 diabetes in predominantly European-derived populations. The biological basis of these associations remains to be determined. The objective of this study was to evaluate previously associated variants for association with measures of glucose homeostasis in Hispanic-Americans and African-Americans and determine the biological mechanism(s) through which these variants exert their effect. This study was the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRAS-FS). The IRAS-FS is a community-based study of Hispanic-Americans (San Antonio, TX, and San Luis Valley, CO) and African-Americans (Los Angeles, CA). A total of 1040 Hispanic-American and 500 African-American individuals from the IRAS-FS formed the basis of this study. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES(S): The primary glucose homeostasis phenotypes of interest in this study were derived from the frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test and include insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response, and disposition index. In Hispanic-Americans, significant evidence of association was observed between single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs7903146 and rs112255372 with reduced insulin secretion as measured by acute insulin response and adjusted for the degree of insulin sensitivity (P = 0.032 and 0.036, respectively). Other quantitative measures, e.g. insulin sensitivity or disposition index, were not associated with the single nucleotide polymorphisms examined. In African-Americans there was no evidence of association observed. These results suggest that transcription factor 7-like 2 variants could play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in the Hispanic-American population through a mechanism involving insulin secretion.

  1. Decreased sleep duration is associated with increased fMRI responses to emotional faces in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Brooke L; Hamann, Stephan; Inman, Cory; Johnson, Katrina C; Brennan, Patricia A

    2016-04-01

    In adults and children, sleep loss is associated with affective dysregulation and increased responsivity to negative stimuli. Adult functional neuroimaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated associations between restricted sleep and neural alterations in the amygdala and reward circuitry when viewing emotional picture and face stimuli. Despite this, few studies have examined the associations between short sleep duration and emotional responsivity in typically developing children, and no studies have investigated this relationship using fMRI. The current study examined the relationship between sleep duration and fMRI activation to emotional facial expressions in 15 male children (ages 7-11 years). During fMRI scanning, subjects viewed and made perceptual judgments regarding negative, neutral, and positive emotional faces. Maternal reported child sleep duration was negatively associated with (a) activation in the bilateral amygdala, left insula, and left temporal pole activation when viewing negative (i.e., fearful, disgust) vs. neutral faces, (b) right orbitofrontal and bilateral prefrontal activation when viewing disgust vs. neutral faces, and (c) bilateral orbitofrontal, right anterior cingulate, and left amygdala activation when viewing happy vs. neutral faces. Consistent with our prediction, we also noted that emotion-dependent functional connectivity between the bilateral amygdala and prefrontal cortex, cingulate, fusiform, and occipital cortex was positively associated with sleep duration. Paralleling similar studies in adults, these findings collectively suggest that decreased sleep duration in school-aged children may contribute to enhanced reactivity of brain regions involved in emotion and reward processing, as well as decreased emotion-dependent functional connectivity between the amygdala and brain regions associated with emotion regulation.

  2. Computational Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Altered Drug Responsiveness in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Costa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is one of the most frequent mortality causes in western countries, with rapidly increasing prevalence. Anti-diabetic drugs are the first therapeutic approach, although many patients develop drug resistance. Most drug responsiveness variability can be explained by genetic causes. Inter-individual variability is principally due to single nucleotide polymorphisms, and differential drug responsiveness has been correlated to alteration in genes involved in drug metabolism (CYP2C9 or insulin signaling (IRS1, ABCC8, KCNJ11 and PPARG. However, most genome-wide association studies did not provide clues about the contribution of DNA variations to impaired drug responsiveness. Thus, characterizing T2D drug responsiveness variants is needed to guide clinicians toward tailored therapeutic approaches. Here, we extensively investigated polymorphisms associated with altered drug response in T2D, predicting their effects in silico. Combining different computational approaches, we focused on the expression pattern of genes correlated to drug resistance and inferred evolutionary conservation of polymorphic residues, computationally predicting the biochemical properties of polymorphic proteins. Using RNA-Sequencing followed by targeted validation, we identified and experimentally confirmed that two nucleotide variations in the CAPN10 gene—currently annotated as intronic—fall within two new transcripts in this locus. Additionally, we found that a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP, currently reported as intergenic, maps to the intron of a new transcript, harboring CAPN10 and GPR35 genes, which undergoes non-sense mediated decay. Finally, we analyzed variants that fall into non-coding regulatory regions of yet underestimated functional significance, predicting that some of them can potentially affect gene expression and/or post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs affecting the splicing.

  3. Molecular subtypes of metastatic colorectal cancer are associated with patient response to irinotecan-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, M; Mollevi, C; Bibeau, F; Vie, N; Selves, J; Emile, J-F; Roger, P; Gongora, C; Robert, J; Tubiana-Mathieu, N; Ychou, M; Martineau, P

    2017-05-01

    Currently, metastatic colorectal cancer is treated as a homogeneous disease and only RAS mutational status has been approved as a negative predictive factor in patients treated with cetuximab. The aim of this study was to evaluate if recently identified molecular subtypes of colon cancer are associated with response of metastatic patients to first-line therapy. We collected and analysed 143 samples of human colorectal tumours with complete clinical annotations, including the response to treatment. Gene expression profiling was used to classify patients in three to six classes using four different molecular classifications. Correlations between molecular subtypes, response to treatment, progression-free and overall survival were analysed. We first demonstrated that the four previously described molecular classifications of colorectal cancer defined in non-metastatic patients also correctly classify stage IV patients. One of the classifications is strongly associated with response to FOLFIRI (P=0.003), but not to FOLFOX (P=0.911) and FOLFIRI + Bevacizumab (P=0.190). In particular, we identify a molecular subtype representing 28% of the patients that shows an exceptionally high response rate to FOLFIRI (87.5%). These patients have a two-fold longer overall survival (40.1 months) when treated with FOLFIRI, as first-line regimen, instead of FOLFOX (18.6 months). Our results demonstrate the interest of molecular classifications to develop tailored therapies for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and a strong impact of the first-line regimen on the overall survival of some patients. This however remains to be confirmed in a large prospective clinical trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of pathogen-associated molecular patterns in inflammatory responses against alginate based microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A; de Haan, Bart J; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2013-12-28

    Alginate-based microcapsules are used for immunoisolation of cells to release therapeutics on a minute-to-minute basis. Unfortunately, alginate-based microcapsules are suffering from varying degrees of success, which is usually attributed to differences in tissue responses. This results in failure of the therapeutic cells. In the present study we show that commercial, crude alginates may contain pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which are recognized by the sensors of the innate immune system. Known sensors are Toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD receptors, and C-type lectins. By using cell-lines with a non-functional adaptor molecule essential in Toll-like receptor signaling, i.e. MyD88, we were able to show that alginates signal mainly via MyD88. This was found for low-G, intermediate-G, and high-G alginates applied in calcium-beads, barium-beads as well as in alginate-PLL-alginate capsules. These alginates did stimulate TLRs 2, 5, 8, and 9 but not TLR4 (LPS receptor). Upon implantation in rats these alginates provoked a strong inflammatory response resulting in fibrosis of the capsules. Analysis demonstrated that commercial alginates contain the PAMPs peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, and flagellin. By applying purification procedures, these PAMPs were largely removed. This was associated with deletion of the inflammatory tissue responses as confirmed by an implantation experiment in rats. Our data also show that alginate itself does not provoke TLR mediated responses. We were able to unravel the sensor mechanism by which contaminants in alginates may provoke inflammatory responses.

  5. Phenotypic responses to social defeat are associated with differences in cued and contextual fear discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulka, Brooke N; Lynch, Joseph F; Latsko, Maeson S; Mulvany, Jessica L; Jasnow, Aaron M

    2015-09-01

    Conflict among individuals is one of the most common forms of stressors experienced across a variety of species, including humans. Social defeat models in mice produce two phenotypic behavioral responses characterized by prolonged social avoidance (susceptibility) or continued social interaction (resistance). The resistant phenotype has been proposed as a model of resilience to chronic stress-induced depression in humans. Previously, we have found that mice that are resistant to social defeat stress display significant impairments in extinction learning and retention, suggesting that continued social interaction following the experience of social defeat may be associated with maladaptive fear responses. Here, we examined how individual differences in response to social defeat may be related to differences in cued and context fear discrimination. Following defeat, resistant mice showed increased fear to a neutral cued stimulus (CS-) compared to control and susceptible mice, but were still able to significantly discriminate between the CS+ and CS-. Likewise, both phenotypes were generally able to discriminate between the training context and neutral context at all retention intervals tested (1, 5, 14 days). However, susceptible mice displayed significantly better discrimination compared to resistant and non-defeated control mice when assessing the discrimination ratio. Thus, at a time when most animals begin exhibiting generalization to contextual cues, susceptible mice retain the ability to discriminate between fearful and neutral contexts. These data suggest that the differences observed in context and cued discrimination between susceptible and resistant mice may be related to differences in their coping strategies in response to social defeat. In particular, resistance or resilience to social defeat as traditionally characterized may be associated with altered inhibitory learning. Understanding why individual differences arise in response to stress, including

  6. Endotoxemia is associated with altered innate and adaptive immune responses in untreated HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Roslev Bukh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial translocation may contribute to the immunopathogenesis in HIV infection. We investigated if microbial translocation and inflammation were associated with innate and adaptive immune responses in adults with HIV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was an observational cohort study. Sera from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals were analyzed for microbial translocation (soluble CD14, lipopolysaccharides [LPS], endotoxin core antibody, and anti-α-galactosyl antibodies and inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, IL-6, IL-1 receptor antagonist, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II, and IL-10 with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from HIV-infected persons and healthy controls (primed with single-stranded HIV-1-derived RNA were stimulated with LPS, and cytokine production was measured. Finally, HIV-infected patients were immunized with Prevnar 7vPnC±CpG 7909 followed by Pneumo Novum PPV-23. Effects of microbial translocation and inflammation on immunization were analyzed in a predictive regression model. We included 96 HIV-infected individuals, 76 on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, 20 HAART-naive, and 50 healthy controls. Microbial translocation and inflammatory markers were higher among HIV-infected persons than controls. Cytokine levels following LPS stimulation were increased in PBMCs from HAART-naive compared to HAART-treated HIV-infected persons. Further, RNA-priming of PBMCs from controls acted synergistically with LPS to augment cytokine responses. Finally, high serum LPS levels predicted poor vaccine responses among HAART-naive, but not among HAART-treated HIV-infected individuals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LPS acts synergistically with HIV RNA to stimulate innate immune responses in vitro and increasing serum LPS levels seem to predict poor antibody responses after vaccination among HAART-naive HIV-infected persons. Thus, our

  7. Computational Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Altered Drug Responsiveness in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Valerio; Federico, Antonio; Pollastro, Carla; Ziviello, Carmela; Cataldi, Simona; Formisano, Pietro; Ciccodicola, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is one of the most frequent mortality causes in western countries, with rapidly increasing prevalence. Anti-diabetic drugs are the first therapeutic approach, although many patients develop drug resistance. Most drug responsiveness variability can be explained by genetic causes. Inter-individual variability is principally due to single nucleotide polymorphisms, and differential drug responsiveness has been correlated to alteration in genes involved in drug metabolism (CYP2C9) or insulin signaling (IRS1, ABCC8, KCNJ11 and PPARG). However, most genome-wide association studies did not provide clues about the contribution of DNA variations to impaired drug responsiveness. Thus, characterizing T2D drug responsiveness variants is needed to guide clinicians toward tailored therapeutic approaches. Here, we extensively investigated polymorphisms associated with altered drug response in T2D, predicting their effects in silico. Combining different computational approaches, we focused on the expression pattern of genes correlated to drug resistance and inferred evolutionary conservation of polymorphic residues, computationally predicting the biochemical properties of polymorphic proteins. Using RNA-Sequencing followed by targeted validation, we identified and experimentally confirmed that two nucleotide variations in the CAPN10 gene—currently annotated as intronic—fall within two new transcripts in this locus. Additionally, we found that a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP), currently reported as intergenic, maps to the intron of a new transcript, harboring CAPN10 and GPR35 genes, which undergoes non-sense mediated decay. Finally, we analyzed variants that fall into non-coding regulatory regions of yet underestimated functional significance, predicting that some of them can potentially affect gene expression and/or post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs affecting the splicing. PMID:27347941

  8. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with inflammatory responses during rat liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-Yi Shao; Li-Feng Zhao; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between inflammatory response and liver regeneration (LR) at transcriptional level.METHODS: After partial hepatectomy (PH) of rats,the genes associated with inflammatory response were obtained according to the databases, and the gene expression changes during LR were checked by the Rat Genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty-nine genes were associated with liver regeneration. The initial and total expressing gene numbers found in initiation phase (0.5-4 h after PH), G0/G1 transition (4-6 h after PH),cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH), cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) of liver regeneration were 107, 34, 126, 6 and 107,92, 233, 145 respectively, showing that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the beginning of liver regeneration, and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity, these genes were classified into 5 groups: only up-regulated, predominantly up-,only down-, predominantly down-, up- and down-,involving 92, 25, 77, 14 and 31 genes, respectively. The total times of their up- and down-regulated expression were 975 and 494, respectively, demonstrating that the expressions of the majority of genes were increased,and that of a few genes were decreased. Their time relevance was classified into 13 groups, showing that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities were staggered during liver regeneration. According to gene expression patterns, they were classified into 33 types,suggesting that the activities were diverse and complex during liver regeneration.CONCLUSION: Inflammatory response is closely associated with liver regeneration, in which 239 LRassociated genes play an important role.

  9. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with blood coagulation responses during rat liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Feng Zhao; Wei-Min Zhang; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To study the blood coagulation response after partial hepatectomy (PH) at transcriptional level.METHODS:After PH of rats, the associated genes with blood coagulation were obtained through reference to the databases, and the gene expression changes in rat regenerating liver were analyzed by the Rat Genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: It was found that 107 genes were associated with liver regeneration. The initially and totally expressing gene numbers occurring in initiation phase of liver regeneration (0.5-4 h after PH), G0/G1 transition (4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH), cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) were 44, 11, 58, 7 and 44, 33,100, 71 respectively, showing that the associated genes were mainly triggered in the forepart and prophase, and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity, these genes were classified into 5 groups:only up-, predominantly up-, only down-, predominantly down-, up- and down-regulation, involving 44, 8, 36,13 and 6 genes, respectively, and the total times of their up- and down-regulation expression were 342 and 253, respectively, demonstrating that the number of the up-regulated genes was more than that of the downregulated genes. Their time relevance was classified into 15 groups, showing that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities were staggered during liver regeneration. According to gene expression patterns,they were classified into 29 types, suggesting that their protein activities were diverse and complex during liver regeneration.CONCLUSION: The blood coagulation response is enhanced mainly in the forepart, prophase and anaphase of liver regeneration, in which the response in the forepart, prophase of liver regeneration can prevent the bleeding caused by partial hepatectomy, whereas that in the anaphase contributes to the structure-function reorganization of regenerating liver. In the process,107 genes associated with liver

  10. 31 CFR 358.9 - Who is responsible for the cost and risks associated with the shipment of securities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 358.9 Who is responsible for the cost and risks associated with the shipment of securities? The... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is responsible for the cost and risks associated with the shipment of securities? 358.9 Section 358.9 Money and Finance: Treasury...

  11. One version of direct response priming requires automatization of the relevant associations but not awareness of the prime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, Stuart T

    2015-07-01

    Priming is the influence of one event on performance during a second event. One type of priming is known as semantic priming because it biases interpretation of the subsequent stimulus. Another type, direct response priming, biases responding directly without semantic mediation. Research reviewed in this article indicates that two versions of the second type, direct response priming, can be distinguished. One version, explicit priming, requires awareness of the prime. The other version, associative response priming, occurs even if the prime is masked and not phenomenally visible. This version, which is attributed to associations relating specific sensory events to movements of particular muscles, is enabled only if the association has previously been automatized by brief practice in which the to-be-primed response is made to the stimulus that subsequently appears as the prime. Associative response priming can be explained by a simple stimulus-response interpretation; other varieties of priming are more theoretically challenging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Maternal responses to adolescent positive affect are associated with adolescents' reward neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Sarah; Yap, Marie B H; Yücel, Murat; Sheeber, Lisa; Simmons, Julian G; Pantelis, Christos; Allen, Nicholas B

    2009-09-01

    The development of reward-based learning and decision-making, and the neural circuitry underlying these processes, appears to be influenced negatively by adverse child-rearing environments characterized by abuse and other forms of maltreatment. No research to-date has investigated whether normative variations in the child-rearing environment have effects on adolescent brain structure. We examined whether normative variations in maternal responses to adolescents' positive affective behavior were associated with morphometric measures of the adolescents' affective neural circuitry, namely the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Healthy adolescents (N = 113) participated in laboratory-based interaction tasks with their mothers, and underwent high-resolution (3T) structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The mother-adolescent interactions included a pleasant event-planning interaction (EPI) and a conflictual problem-solving interaction (PSI). Adolescents, whose mothers displayed more punishing responses to their positive affective behavior during both tasks, and only during the PSI, had larger left dorsal ACC and bilateral OFC volumes, respectively. In addition, boys whose mothers evidenced this pattern of behavior during the EPI had larger right amygdala volumes. These results suggest that normative variations in maternal responses to affective behavior are associated with the structural characteristics of adolescents' affective neural circuitry, which may have implications for the development of their social, cognitive and affective functioning.

  13. Intracellular sAPP retention in response to Abeta is mapped to cytoskeleton-associated structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Vieira, Sandra Isabel; Crespo-López, Maria Elena; Guiomar de Oliveira, Márcio A; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A B

    2009-05-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) contributes to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease and provides a close association between molecular events and pathology, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. In the work described here, Abeta did not induce amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression, but APP processing/trafficking was markedly affected. In COS-7 cells, Abeta provokes retention of intracellular sAPPalpha (isAPPalpha). Intracellular holo-APP levels remain unchanged, and extracellular total sAPP increases, although extracellular sAPPalpha alone was not altered significantly. In primary neuronal cultures and PC12 cells, isAPP also increased, but this was mirrored by a decrease in extracellular total sAPP. The isAPP retention was particularly associated with the cytoskeletal fraction. The retention "per se" occurred in vesicular-like densities, negative for a C-terminal antibody and strongly positive for the 6E10 antibody, clearly showing abnormal intracellular accumulation of sAPPalpha in response to Abeta. Our data support a dynamic model for intracellular retention of sAPPalpha as an early response to Abeta exposure. Particularly noteworthy was the observation that removal of Abeta reversed the isAPP accumulation. Mechanistically, these findings disclose an attractive physiological response, revealing the capacity of cells to deal with adverse effects induced by Abeta.

  14. Factors associated with the response to interferon-based antiviral therapies for chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hirayuki; Enomoto; Shuhei; Nishiguchi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection is a major health concern worldwide. Interferon-α(IFN-α) therapy has been the main antiviral treatment for more than 20 years. Because of its established antitumor effects, IFNbased treatments for chronic HCV infection still have a clinical impact, particularly for patients with high risk conditions of developing hepatocellular carcinoma, such as older age and advanced liver fibrosis. As a result of exhaustive research, several viral factors, including NS5 A amino acid mutations such as the IFN sensitivitydetermining region and the IFN/ribavirin resistancedetermining region, and mutations of amino acids in the core protein region(core 70 and 91) were shown to be associated with the response to IFN-α treatment. In addition, among the host factors related to the response to IFN-α treatment, polymorphisms of the interleukin-28 B gene were identified to be the most important factor. In this article, we review the factors associated with the efficacy of IFN-α treatment for chronic HCV infection. In addition, our recent findings regarding the possible involvement of anti-IFN-α neutralizing antibodies in a non-response to pegylated-IFN-α treatment are also described.

  15. Hypertrophic response of the Association of Thyroid Hormone and Exercise in the Heart of Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Fernanda Rodrigues de, E-mail: nandaeduca@yahoo.com.br; Resende, Elmiro Santos; Lopes, Leandro; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Chagas, Rafaella; Fidale, Thiago; Rodrigues, Poliana [UFU - Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a component of cardiac remodeling occurring in response to an increase of the activity or functional overload of the heart. Assess hypertrophic response of the association of thyroid hormone and exercise in the rat heart. We used 37 Wistar rats, male, adults were randomly divided into four groups: control, hormone (TH), exercise (E), thyroid hormone and exercise (H + E); the group received daily hormone levothyroxine sodium by gavage at a dose of 20 μg thyroid hormone/100g body weight, the exercise group took swimming five times a week, with additional weight corresponding to 20% of body weight for six weeks; in group H + E were applied simultaneously TH treatment groups and E. The statistics used was analysis of variance, where appropriate, by Tukey test and Pearson correlation test. The T4 was greater in groups TH and H + E. The total weight of the heart was greater in patients who received thyroid hormone and left ventricular weight was greater in the TH group. The transverse diameter of cardiomyocytes increased in groups TH, E and H + E. The percentage of collagen was greater in groups E and H + E Correlation analysis between variables showed distinct responses. The association of thyroid hormone with high-intensity exercise produced cardiac hypertrophy, and generated a standard hypertrophy not directly correlated to the degree of fibrosis.

  16. Quantitative trait loci associated with androgenic responsiveness in triticale (×Triticosecale Wittm.) anther culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzewska, M; Czyczyło-Mysza, I; Dubas, E; Gołębiowska-Pikania, G; Golemiec, E; Stojałowski, S; Chrupek, M; Zur, I

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with androgenic responsiveness in triticale were analyzed using a population of 90 DH lines derived from the F1 cross between inbred line 'Saka 3006' and cv. 'Modus', which was used in a number of earlier studies on molecular mapping in this crop. Using Windows QTL Cartographer and MapQTL 5.0, composite interval mapping (CIM) and association studies (Kruskal-Wallis test; K-W) for five androgenesis parameters (androgenic embryo induction, total regeneration and green plant regeneration ability, and two characteristics describing final androgenesis efficiency) were conducted. For the studied components of androgenic response, CIM detected in total 28 QTLs which were localized on 5 chromosomes from A and R genomes. Effects of all QTLs that were identified at 2.0 or above of the LOD score explained 5.1-21.7 % of the phenotypic variation. Androgenesis induction was associated with seven QTLs (LOD between 2.0 and 5.8) detected on chromosomes 5A, 4R, 5R and 7R, all of them confirmed by K-W test as regions containing the markers significantly linked to the studied trait. What is more, K-W test revealed additional markers on chromosomes: 5A, 2BL, 7B and 5R. Both total and green regeneration ability were controlled by genes localized on chromosome 4A. Some of the QTLs that affected final androgenesis efficiency were identical with those associated with androgenic embryo induction efficiency, suggesting that the observed correlation may be either due to tight linkage or to pleiotropy. Key message Five regions of the triticale genome were indicated as revealing significant marker/trait association. Markers located in these regions are potentially useful for triticale breeding through marker-assisted selection.

  17. Associative conditioning with leg cycling and inspiratory resistance enhances the early exercise ventilatory response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Duncan; Stewart, Jamie D

    2004-12-01

    Repeated trials of hypercapnic exercise [deltaPET CO2 = 7 (1) mmHg] augment the increase in inspired minute ventilation and tidal volume (V(T)) in the early phase of subsequent trials of unencumbered exercise alone. The increase in V(T) in the first 20 s of exercise was correlated to the increase in V(T) evoked during hypercapnic exercise trials, suggesting that the evoked increase in V(T) during conditioning may be a factor in mediating associative conditioning. To test this hypothesis, inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) was employed to evoke an increase in V(T) [deltaV(T) = 0.4 (0.1) I(BTPS)] during conditioning exercise trials [IRL + EX; deltaP(ET)CO2 = 2 (l) mmHg]. IRL + EX associative conditioning elicited a significant augmentation of the early minute ventilation (+46%) and V(T) (+100%) responses to subsequent unencumbered exercise. The latter was correlated to the evoked increase in V(T) during associative conditioning with IRL + EX. The results support the hypothesis that an evoked increase in V(T) during associative conditioning could be a factor in eliciting long-term modulation of minute ventilation in subsequent unencumbered exercise. The results further indicated that the modulation of ventilation early in exercise is not due to sensitisation to repeated trials of either IRL or exercise alone. Associative conditioning may shape the ventilatory response to exercise through a process of motor learning. Data are presented as mean (SEM) unless otherwise stated.

  18. Genetic evidence for the association between the early growth response 3 (EGR3 gene and schizophrenia.

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    Rui Zhang

    Full Text Available Recently, two genome scan meta-analysis studies have found strong evidence for the association of loci on chromosome 8p with schizophrenia. The early growth response 3 (EGR3 gene located in chromosome 8p21.3 was also found to be involved in the etiology of schizophrenia. However, subsequent studies failed to replicate this finding. To investigate the genetic role of EGR3 in Chinese patients, we genotyped four SNPs (average interval ∼2.3 kb in the chromosome region of EGR3 in 470 Chinese schizophrenia patients and 480 healthy control subjects. The SNP rs35201266 (located in intron 1 of EGR3 showed significant differences between cases and controls in both genotype frequency distribution (P = 0.016 and allele frequency distribution (P = 0.009. Analysis of the haplotype rs35201266-rs3750192 provided significant evidence for association with schizophrenia (P = 0.0012; a significant difference was found for the common haplotype AG (P = 0.0005. Furthermore, significant associations were also found in several other two-, and three-SNP tests of haplotype analyses. The meta-analysis revealed a statistically significant association between rs35201266 and schizophrenia (P = 0.0001. In summary, our study supports the association of EGR3 with schizophrenia in our Han Chinese sample, and further functional exploration of the EGR3 gene will contribute to the molecular basis for the complex network underlying schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  19. The speed of learning instructed stimulus-response association rules in human: experimental data and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugmann, Guido; Goslin, Jeremy; Duchamp-Viret, Patricia

    2013-11-01

    Humans can learn associations between visual stimuli and motor responses from just a single instruction. This is known to be a fast process, but how fast is it? To answer this question, we asked participants to learn a briefly presented (200ms) stimulus-response rule, which they then had to rapidly apply after a variable delay of between 50 and 1300ms. Participants showed a longer response time with increased variability for short delays. The error rate was low and did not vary with the delay, showing that participants were able to encode the rule correctly in less than 250ms. This time is close to the fastest synaptic learning speed deemed possible by diffusive influx of AMPA receptors. Learning continued at a slower pace in the delay period and was fully completed in average 900ms after rule presentation onset, when response latencies dropped to levels consistent with basic reaction times. A neural model was proposed that explains the reduction of response times and of their variability with the delay by (i) a random synaptic learning process that generates weights of average values increasing with the learning time, followed by (ii) random crossing of the firing threshold by a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron model, and (iii) assuming that the behavioural response is initiated when all neurons in a pool of m neurons have fired their first spike after input onset. Values of m=2 or 3 were consistent with the experimental data. The proposed model is the simplest solution consistent with neurophysiological knowledge. Additional experiments are suggested to test the hypothesis underlying the model and also to explore forgetting effects for which there were indications for the longer delay conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012.

  20. Differences in stability of seed-associated microbial assemblages in response to invasion by phytopathogenic microorganisms

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    Samir Rezki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Seeds are involved in the vertical transmission of microorganisms from one plant generation to another and consequently act as reservoirs for the plant microbiota. However, little is known about the structure of seed-associated microbial assemblages and the regulators of assemblage structure. In this work, we have assessed the response of seed-associated microbial assemblages of Raphanus sativus to invading phytopathogenic agents, the bacterial strain Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc 8004 and the fungal strain Alternaria brassicicola Abra43. According to the indicators of bacterial (16S rRNA gene and gyrB sequences and fungal (ITS1 diversity employed in this study, seed transmission of the bacterial strain Xcc 8004 did not change the overall composition of resident microbial assemblages. In contrast seed transmission of Abra43 strongly modified the richness and structure of fungal assemblages without affecting bacterial assemblages. The sensitivity of seed-associated fungal assemblage to Abra43 is mostly related to changes in relative abundance of closely related fungal species that belong to the Alternaria genus. Variation in stability of the seed microbiota in response to Xcc and Abra43 invasions could be explained by differences in seed transmission pathways employed by these micro-organisms, which ultimately results in divergence in spatio-temporal colonization of the seed habitat.

  1. Differences in stability of seed-associated microbial assemblages in response to invasion by phytopathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezki, Samir; Campion, Claire; Iacomi-Vasilescu, Beatrice; Preveaux, Anne; Toualbia, Youness; Bonneau, Sophie; Briand, Martial; Laurent, Emmanuelle; Hunault, Gilles; Simoneau, Philippe; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Barret, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Seeds are involved in the vertical transmission of microorganisms from one plant generation to another and consequently act as reservoirs for the plant microbiota. However, little is known about the structure of seed-associated microbial assemblages and the regulators of assemblage structure. In this work, we have assessed the response of seed-associated microbial assemblages of Raphanus sativus to invading phytopathogenic agents, the bacterial strain Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) 8004 and the fungal strain Alternaria brassicicola Abra43. According to the indicators of bacterial (16S rRNA gene and gyrB sequences) and fungal (ITS1) diversity employed in this study, seed transmission of the bacterial strain Xcc 8004 did not change the overall composition of resident microbial assemblages. In contrast seed transmission of Abra43 strongly modified the richness and structure of fungal assemblages without affecting bacterial assemblages. The sensitivity of seed-associated fungal assemblage to Abra43 is mostly related to changes in relative abundance of closely related fungal species that belong to the Alternaria genus. Variation in stability of the seed microbiota in response to Xcc and Abra43 invasions could be explained by differences in seed transmission pathways employed by these micro-organisms, which ultimately results in divergence in spatio-temporal colonization of the seed habitat.

  2. IgG Responses to Tissue-Associated Antigens as Biomarkers of Immunological Treatment Efficacy

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    Heath A. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that IgG responses to a panel of 126 prostate tissue-associated antigens are common in patients with prostate cancer. In the current report we questioned whether changes in IgG responses to this panel might be used as a measure of immune response, and potentially antigen spread, following prostate cancer-directed immune-active therapies. Sera were obtained from prostate cancer patients prior to and three months following treatment with androgen deprivation therapy (=34, a poxviral vaccine (=31, and a DNA vaccine (=21. Changes in IgG responses to individual antigens were identified by phage immunoblot. Patterns of IgG recognition following three months of treatment were evaluated using a machine-learned Bayesian Belief Network (ML-BBN. We found that different antigens were recognized following androgen deprivation compared with vaccine therapies. While the number of clinical responders was low in the vaccine-treated populations, we demonstrate that ML-BBN can be used to develop potentially predictive models.

  3. Phloem-associated auxin response maxima determine radial positioning of lateral roots in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Leentje; Roberts, Ianto; De Rycke, Riet; Beeckman, Tom

    2012-06-05

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, lateral-root-forming competence of pericycle cells is associated with their position at the xylem poles and depends on the establishment of protoxylem-localized auxin response maxima. In maize, our histological analyses revealed an interruption of the pericycle at the xylem poles, and confirmed the earlier reported proto-phloem-specific lateral root initiation. Phloem-pole pericycle cells were larger and had thinner cell walls compared with the other pericycle cells, highlighting the heterogeneous character of the maize root pericycle. A maize DR5::RFP marker line demonstrated the presence of auxin response maxima in differentiating xylem cells at the root tip and in cells surrounding the proto-phloem vessels. Chemical inhibition of auxin transport indicated that the establishment of the phloem-localized auxin response maxima is crucial for lateral root formation in maize, because in their absence, random divisions of pericycle and endodermis cells occurred, not resulting in organogenesis. These data hint at an evolutionarily conserved mechanism, in which the establishment of vascular auxin response maxima is required to trigger cells in the flanking outer tissue layer for lateral root initiation. It further indicates that lateral root initiation is not dependent on cellular specification or differentiation of the type of vascular tissue.

  4. T-cell response to p53 tumor-associated antigen in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueter, Marco; Gasser, Martin; Schramm, Nicolai; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Tocco, Georges; Gerstlauer, Christiane; Grimm, Martin; Nichiporuk, Ekaterina; Thalheimer, Andreas; Thiede, Arnulf; Meyer, Detlef; Benichou, Gilles; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2006-02-01

    Despite the radical surgical resection performed in patients with colorectal carcinoma, there is a high rate of tumor recurrence. Over an observation period of 3 years, 18% of the patients in our collective suffered a tumor relapse with local or distinct metastases after initial R0-resection. Some evidence suggests that this may be due to suppression of anti-tumor responses, a phenomenon that might be attributed to regulatory T cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the tumor-specific immune response depending on the UICC stage of patients with colorectal cancer. The cellular immune responses against defined antigens that are overexpressed in most of the patients with colorectal cancer were characterized. For this purpose, the tumor suppressor gene, p53, was chosen as the tumor-associated antigen that exhibits mutations and overexpression in up to 60% of colorectal carcinoma. We observed that p53 induced both IFN-gamma and IL-10 secretion. The predominance of IL-10 production indicated that regulatory T cells directly participate in modulating the anti-tumor immune response. IL-10 levels in the blood as well as the expression of regulatory T-cell specific genes at the tumor site correlate with the UICC stage of the disease. These results may provide an explanation for the poor prognosis and increased recurrence rate in patients with advanced carcinoma.

  5. IBD5 polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease: Association with response to infliximab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elena Urcelay; Juan Luis Mendoza; Alfonso Martínez; Laura Fernández; Carlos Taxonera; Manuel Díaz-Rubio; Emilio G.de la Concha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are multifactorial pathologies of unknown etiology. One susceptibility locus,IBD5, has been mapped to chromosome 5q31. We analyzed our Spanish cohorts of Crohn's disease (CD)and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients to determine whether this locus is associated with IBD, and to ascertain the main clinical phenotype influenced by this risk factor. The kind of interaction, either genetic heterogeneity or epistasis, between this IBD5 susceptibility region and the NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations was studied as well.Finally, ve assessed whether this locus can predict response to infliximab therapy.METHODS: A case control study was performed with 274CD and 211 UC patients recruited from a single center and 511 healthy ethnically matched controls. Two polymorphisms were genotyped in the IBD5 locus and three in the CARD15/NOD2 gene.RESULTS: Our results evidence association only with CD especially with the fistulizing phenotype and in the absence of NOD2/CARD15 variants (mutant allele frequency in patients vscontrols: OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.35-3.06,P<0.01). The frequency of the IBD5 homozygous mutant genotype significantly increased in CD patients lacking response to infliximab (RR = 3.88, 95% CI = 1.18-12.0,P<0.05). UC patients overall do not show association with 5q31 polymorphisms, although a similar trend to the one observed in CD is found within the worse prognosis group.CONCLUSION: The IBD5 variants may enhance an individual carrier's risk for CD, mainly in the absence of the NOD2/CARD15 mutations and in fistulizing patients.The data presented suggest the potential role of the 5q31polymorphisms as markers of response to infiiximab.

  6. Mapping genetic variants associated with beta-adrenergic responses in inbred mice.

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    Micha Hersch

    Full Text Available β-blockers and β-agonists are primarily used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Inter-individual variability in response to both drug classes is well recognized, yet the identity and relative contribution of the genetic players involved are poorly understood. This work is the first genome-wide association study (GWAS addressing the values and susceptibility of cardiovascular-related traits to a selective β(1-blocker, Atenolol (ate, and a β-agonist, Isoproterenol (iso. The phenotypic dataset consisted of 27 highly heritable traits, each measured across 22 inbred mouse strains and four pharmacological conditions. The genotypic panel comprised 79922 informative SNPs of the mouse HapMap resource. Associations were mapped by Efficient Mixed Model Association (EMMA, a method that corrects for the population structure and genetic relatedness of the various strains. A total of 205 separate genome-wide scans were analyzed. The most significant hits include three candidate loci related to cardiac and body weight, three loci for electrocardiographic (ECG values, two loci for the susceptibility of atrial weight index to iso, four loci for the susceptibility of systolic blood pressure (SBP to perturbations of the β-adrenergic system, and one locus for the responsiveness of QTc (p<10(-8. An additional 60 loci were suggestive for one or the other of the 27 traits, while 46 others were suggestive for one or the other drug effects (p<10(-6. Most hits tagged unexpected regions, yet at least two loci for the susceptibility of SBP to β-adrenergic drugs pointed at members of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Loci for cardiac-related traits were preferentially enriched in genes expressed in the heart, while 23% of the testable loci were replicated with datasets of the Mouse Phenome Database (MPD. Altogether these data and validation tests indicate that the mapped loci are relevant to the traits and responses studied.

  7. Genetic associations of the response to inhaled corticosteroids in children during an asthma exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Ozlem; Uluca, Ünal; Birben, Esra; Coşkun, Yavuz; Ozkars, Mehmet Yasar; Keskin, Mehmet; Kucukosmanoglu, Ercan; Kalayci, Omer

    2016-08-01

    Genetic associations of the response to inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) during an asthma exacerbation are unknown. To evaluate the role of genetic variants in the therapeutic response to high-dose ICS in children with moderate-to-severe asthma exacerbations. Eighty-two children (56 boys/26 girls, mean age 9.6 ± 3.2 years) with moderate-severe asthma exacerbation were genotyped for eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms that were a priori associated with ICS response in chronic asthma treatment: glucocorticosteroid receptor (NR3C1) rs41423247; corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptor1 (CRHR1) rs242939, rs242941, and rs1876828; T-box 21 (TBX21) rs2240017; glucocorticoid-induced transcript 1 (GLCCl1); and T gene rs3099266 and rs2305089. Children were treated with a single high-dose (4000 μg) fluticasone propionate given by a nebulizer followed by 1000 μg/day of inhaled fluticasone propionate for 6 days. Primary outcome measure was the improvement in FEV1 at 4 h. Mean FEV1 was 71.7 ± 14.2% at presentation. Overall, fluticasone treatment resulted in a significant improvement in asthma score and FEV1 (p Children with the GG genotype at NR3C1 rs41423247 (n = 26) had a higher improvement in FEV1 [24.2% (interquartile range 11.5-36.3)] compared to those with CG+CC (n = 19), [7.9% (interquartile range 6.1-24.6) (p = 0.006)]. Homozygosity for the G allele at rs41423247 of the glucocorticosteroid receptor (NR3C1) gene is associated with a higher improvement in FEV1 at 4 h in children with moderate-to-severe asthma exacerbation treated with high-dose ICS. This observation may have important clinical implications especially for children who use systemic steroids frequently for recurrent asthma exacerbations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. SIRT1 expression is associated with the chemotherapy response and prognosis of patients with advanced NSCLC.

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    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available AIM: The role of Sirtuin 1 (SIRT 1 in carcinogenesis is controversial. This study was to explore the association between the SIRT1 expression and the clinical characteristics, the responsiveness to chemotherapy and prognosis in Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. METHODS: We enrolled 295 patients with inoperable advanced stage of NSCLC, namely, stage III (A+B and IV NSCLC. All patients had received platinum-based chemotherapy after diagnosis and the chemotherapy response were evaluated. All patients were followed up for overall survival (OS and progression free survival (PFS. In vitro, H292 cells were tranfected with SIRT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA. The cell biological behaviors and chemosensitivity to cisplatin treatment were studied. The in vivo tumorgenesis and metastasis assays were performed in nude mice. RESULTS: We found that the SIRT1 expressions were significantly associated with the tumor stage, tumor size and differentiation status. Patients with high SIRT 1 expressions had a significantly higher chance to be resistant to chemotherapy than those with low SIRT 1 expression. Patients with high expression of SIRT1 had significantly shorter OS and DFS than those with low expression. Cox analyses confirmed that the SIRT 1 expression was a strong predictor for a poor OS and PFS in NSCLC patients underwent Platinum-based chemotherapy. In vitro studies revealed that the reduced expression SIRT 1 by siRNA technique significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion. More importantly, SIRT1 si-RNA significantly enhanced the chemosensitivity of H292 cells to cisplatin treatment. The in vivo tumorgenesis and metastasis assays showed that SIRT1 knockdown dramatically reduced the tumor volume and the metastatic ability in nude mice. CONCLUSION: Collectively, our data suggest that the SIRT1 expression may be a molecular marker associated with the NSLCLC clinical features, treatment responsiveness and prognosis of advanced NSCLC.

  9. Responsive parenting is associated with improved type 1 diabetes-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Harbaum, M; Nansel, T; Haynie, D L; Iannotti, R J; Simons-Morton, B

    2008-09-01

    Improved quality of life is an important treatment goal for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. While previous research supports a relationship between family environment and quality of life, little research has addressed the relationship of parenting style constructs to quality of life in children with chronic disease. The present investigation assesses the relationship of parent responsiveness and demandingness with diabetes-related quality of life among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Baseline and 12-month follow-up self-report assessments were collected on a sample of 81 children with type 1 diabetes participating in an efficacy trial of a behavioural intervention to enhance adherence. The sample had a mean age of 13.3 years (SD=1.7) and duration of diabetes of 7.7 years (SD=3.7). Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship of parent responsiveness and demandingness to diabetes-related quality of life at each time point. After adjusting for demographic and diabetes characteristics, as well as diabetes-specific parent-child behaviours, parent responsiveness was significantly associated with baseline diabetes-related quality of life (beta=0.23; P=0.04). This relationship was sustained at 12-month follow-up (beta=0.22; P=0.04) after adjusting for baseline quality of life and treatment group assignment, suggesting that parent responsiveness is associated with improved quality of life. Findings indicate the importance of a supportive and emotionally warm parenting style in promoting improved quality of life for children with type 1 diabetes. Appropriate parenting skills should be an element of diabetes family management health care.

  10. Misclassification in binary responses and effect on genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekaya, Romdhane; Smith, Shannon; Hay, El Hamidi; Aggrey, Samuel E

    2013-09-01

    Misclassification of dependent variables is a major issue in many areas of science that can arise when indirect markers are used to classify subjects or continuous traits are treated as categorical. In human medicine, this can have significant impacts on diagnostic accuracy. In animal science applications, misclassification can negatively affect both the accuracy of selection and the ability to ascertain the biological mechanisms for traits of interest. When dealing with traits influenced by genetic factors, genomic markers, such as SNP, can provide direct measurements of the underlying mechanisms controlling phenotypic responses. Unfortunately, in the presence of misclassification in the discrete dependent variables, the robustness of the analysis and the validity of the results could be severely compromised. To quantify the impact of misclassification on genome-wide association studies for binary responses, a real databased simulation was carried out. The simulated data consisted of 2,400 animals genotyped for 50K SNP. A binary trait with heritability equal to 0.10 and prevalence of 20% was generated. A rate of 1, 5, and 10% misclassification was artificially introduced to the true binary responses. Using a latent-threshold model, 3 analyses were carried out for each misclassification rate using 1) the true data (M1), 2) the contaminated data and ignoring misclassification (M2), and 3) the contaminated data and accounting for misclassification (M3). The results indicate that ignoring misclassification, when it exists in the data such as in M2, will lead to major deterioration in the performance of the model. When misclassification was contemplated in the model (M2), the results indicated a strong capacity of the procedure in dealing with potential misclassification in the training set. In fact, a large portion of miscoded samples in the training set was identified and corrected. The results of this study suggest that the proposed method is adequate and effective

  11. Resilience is decreased in irritable bowel syndrome and associated with symptoms and cortisol response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S H; Naliboff, B D; Shih, W; Presson, A P; Videlock, E J; Ju, T; Kilpatrick, L; Gupta, A; Mayer, E A; Chang, L

    2017-07-18

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a stress-sensitive disorder associated with early adverse life events (EALs) and a dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Resilience is the ability to recover and adapt positively to stress but has not been well studied in IBS. The aims of this study are to compare resilience in IBS and healthy controls (HCs) and to assess its relationships with IBS symptom severity, quality of life (QOL), EALs, and HPA axis response. Two hundred fifty-six subjects (154 IBS, 102 HCs) completed questionnaires for resilience (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale [CD-RISC] and Brief Resilience Scale [BRS]), IBS symptoms, IBS-QOL, and EALs. Ninety-six of these subjects had serial serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels to exogenous corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and ACTH measured. The relationship between IBS status, resilience, and other variables of interest was assessed by regression analysis after adjusting for demographics and neuroticism, a predictor of resilience. Resilience was significantly lower in IBS compared to HCs (CD-RISC: 72.16±14.97 vs 77.32±12.73, P=.003; BRS: 3.29±0.87 vs 3.93±0.69, Presilience and IBS status for ACTH-stimulated cortisol response (P=.031); more resilient IBS subjects had lower cortisol response, and more resilient HCs had higher cortisol response. Lower resilience is associated with IBS status, worse IBS symptom severity, lower IBS-QOL, greater EALs, and stress hyperresponsiveness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Changes in Cervical Cancer FDG Uptake During Chemoradiation and Association With Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidd, Elizabeth A., E-mail: ekidd@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Thomas, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh [Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research showed that pretreatment uptake of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), as assessed by the maximal standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and the variability of uptake (FDG{sub hetero}), predicted for posttreatment response in cervical cancer. In this pilot study, we evaluated the changes in SUV{sub max} and FDG{sub hetero} during concurrent chemoradiation for cervical cancer and their association with post-treatment response. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with stage Ib1-IVa cervical cancer were enrolled. SUV{sub max}, FDG{sub hetero}, and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) were recorded from FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans performed pretreatment and during weeks 2 and 4 of treatment and were evaluated for changes and association with response assessed on 3-month post-treatment FDG-PET/CT. Results: For all patients, the average pretreatment SUV{sub max} was 17.8, MTV was 55.4 cm{sup 3}, and FDG{sub hetero} was -1.33. A similar decline in SUV{sub max} was seen at week 2 compared with baseline and week 4 compared with week 2 (34%). The areas of highest FDG uptake in the tumor remained relatively consistent on serial scans. Mean FDG{sub hetero} decreased during treatment. For all patients, MTV decreased more from week 2 to week 4 than from pretreatment to week 2. By week 4, the average SUV{sub max} had decreased by 57% and the MTV had decreased by 30%. Five patients showed persistent or new disease on 3-month post-treatment PET. These poor responders showed a higher average SUV{sub max}, larger MTV, and greater heterogeneity at all 3 times. Week 4 SUV{sub max} (P=.037), week 4 FDG{sub hetero} (P=.005), pretreatment MTV (P=.008), and pretreatment FDG{sub hetero} (P=.008) were all significantly associated with post-treatment PET response. Conclusions: SUV{sub max} shows a consistent rate of decline during treatment and declines at a faster rate than MTV regresses. Based on this pilot study

  13. Role of gut microbiota in the modulation of atherosclerosis-associated immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry A Chistiakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and metabolic abnormalities are linked to each other. At present, pathogenic inflammatory response was recognized as a major player in metabolic diseases. In humans, intestinal microflora could significantly influence the development of metabolic diseases including atherosclerosis. Commensal bacteria were shown to activate inflammatory pathways through altering lipid metabolism in adipocytes, macrophages, and vascular cells, inducing insulin resistance, and producing trimethylamine-N-oxide. However, gut microbiota could also play the atheroprotective role associated with anthocyanin metabolism and administration of probiotics and their components. Here, we review the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota may influence atherogenesis.

  14. Role of autophagy in disease resistance and hypersensitive response-associated cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Munch, David; Bressendorff, Simon

    2011-01-01

    documented, but how autophagy contributes to plant innate immunity and cell death is not that clear. A few research reports have appeared recently to shed light on the roles of autophagy in plant-pathogen interactions and in disease-associated host cell death. We present a first attempt to reconcile......Ancient autophagy pathways are emerging as key defense modules in host eukaryotic cells against microbial pathogens. Apart from actively eliminating intracellular intruders, autophagy is also responsible for cell survival, for example by reducing the deleterious effects of endoplasmic reticulum...

  15. Cancer associated aberrant protein o-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Petersen, Cecilie; Lavrsen, Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of mucins and other extracellular proteins is an important event in carcinogenesis and the resulting cancer associated glycans have been suggested as targets in cancer immunotherapy. We assessed the role of O-linked GalNAc glycosylation on antigen uptake, processing...... response to a cancer related tumor antigen, Balb/c or B6.Cg(CB)-Tg(HLA-A/H2-D)2Enge/J (HLA-A2 transgenic) mice were immunized with a non-glycosylated or GalNAc-glycosylated MUC1 derived peptide followed by comparison of T cell proliferation, IFN-¿ release, and antibody induction. Gal...

  16. Metabolic and co-expression network-based analyses associated with nitrate response in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coneva, Viktoriya; Simopoulos, Caitlin; Casaretto, José A; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Guevara, David R; Cohn, Jonathan; Zhu, Tong; Guo, Lining; Alexander, Danny C; Bi, Yong-Mei; McNicholas, Paul D; Rothstein, Steven J

    2014-12-03

    Understanding gene expression and metabolic re-programming that occur in response to limiting nitrogen (N) conditions in crop plants is crucial for the ongoing progress towards the development of varieties with improved nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). To unravel new details on the molecular and metabolic responses to N availability in a major food crop, we conducted analyses on a weighted gene co-expression network and metabolic profile data obtained from leaves and roots of rice plants adapted to sufficient and limiting N as well as after shifting them to limiting (reduction) and sufficient (induction) N conditions. A gene co-expression network representing clusters of rice genes with similar expression patterns across four nitrogen conditions and two tissue types was generated. The resulting 18 clusters were analyzed for enrichment of significant gene ontology (GO) terms. Four clusters exhibited significant correlation with limiting and reducing nitrate treatments. Among the identified enriched GO terms, those related to nucleoside/nucleotide, purine and ATP binding, defense response, sugar/carbohydrate binding, protein kinase activities, cell-death and cell wall enzymatic activity are enriched. Although a subset of functional categories are more broadly associated with the response of rice organs to limiting N and N reduction, our analyses suggest that N reduction elicits a response distinguishable from that to adaptation to limiting N, particularly in leaves. This observation is further supported by metabolic profiling which shows that several compounds in leaves change proportionally to the nitrate level (i.e. higher in sufficient N vs. limiting N) and respond with even higher levels when the nitrate level is reduced. Notably, these compounds are directly involved in N assimilation, transport, and storage (glutamine, asparagine, glutamate and allantoin) and extend to most amino acids. Based on these data, we hypothesize that plants respond by rapidly mobilizing

  17. Brain serotonin 4 receptor binding is associated with the cortisol awakening response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Gustav R; Fisher, Patrick M; Dyssegaard, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin signalling is considered critical for an appropriate and dynamic adaptation to stress. Previously, we have shown that prefrontal serotonin transporter (SERT) binding is positively associated with the cortisol awakening response (CAR) (Frokjaer et al., 2013), which is an index...... and serotonin signaling in vivo in humans. We suggest that higher synaptic serotonin concentration, here indexed by lower 5-HT4r binding, supports HPA-axis dynamics, which in healthy volunteers is reflected by a robust CAR....... of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis output dynamics. Here, we investigated in healthy individuals if cerebral serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT4r) binding, reported to be a proxy for serotonin levels, is associated with CAR. Thirty healthy volunteers (25 males, age range 20-56 years) underwent 5-HT4r PET...

  18. Dose-time-response association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourt, Aude; Lévêque, Emilie; Guichard, Elie; Gilg Soit Ilg, Anabelle; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Leffondré, Karen

    2017-09-01

    Early occupational exposure to asbestos has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of pleural mesothelioma (PM), which suggests that the timing of exposure might play a role in the dose-response relationship. However, none studies has evaluated the relative impact of increasing the annual intensity of occupational exposure to asbestos at each time of the whole exposure history. Yet such evaluation would allow the comparison of the risks of PM associated with different longitudinal profiles of occupational exposure to asbestos. Our objective was to estimate the time-dependent relative impact of asbestos exposure intensity over the whole occupational history and to compare the resulting estimated risks of PM associated with different profiles of exposure, using data from a large French case-control study. This study included 1196 male cases recruited in 1987-2006 and 2369 matched controls on birth year. Occupational exposure to asbestos was assessed using a job exposure matrix and represented in logistic regression models using a flexible weighted cumulative index of exposure. Due to much stronger weights of early doses of asbestos exposure, subjects who accumulated 20 fibres/mL over their entire job history with high doses during the first years and low doses thereafter were at higher risk of PM than those who accumulated most of the doses later (OR=2.37 (95% CI 2.01 to 2.87)). This study provides new insights on the dose-time-response relationship between occupational asbestos and PM and illustrates the importance of considering timing of exposure in its association with cancer risk. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. 41 CFR 102-79.95 - Who is responsible for the costs associated with providing access to antenna sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the costs associated with providing access to antenna sites? 102-79.95 Section 102-79.95 Public... Space Siting Antennas on Federal Property § 102-79.95 Who is responsible for the costs associated with... costs to Federal agencies associated with providing access to antenna sites, including obtaining...

  20. Short copy number variations potentially associated with tonic immobility responses in newly hatched chicks.

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    Hideaki Abe

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tonic immobility (TI is fear-induced freezing that animals may undergo when confronted by a threat. It is principally observed in prey species as defence mechanisms. In our preliminary research, we detected large inter-individual variations in the frequency and duration of freezing behavior among newly hatched domestic chicks (Gallus gallus. In this study we aim to identify the copy number variations (CNVs in the genome of chicks as genetic candidates that underlie the behavioral plasticity to fearful stimuli. METHODS: A total of 110 domestic chicks were used for an association study between TI responses and copy number polymorphisms. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH was conducted between chicks with high and low TI scores using an Agilent 4 × 180 custom microarray. We specifically focused on 3 genomic regions (>60 Mb of chromosome 1 where previous quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis showed significant F-values for fearful responses. RESULTS: ACGH successfully detected short CNVs within the regions overlapping 3 QTL peaks. Eleven of these identified loci were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR as copy number polymorphisms. Although there wkas no significant p value in the correlation analysis between TI scores and the relative copy number within each breed, several CNV loci showed significant differences in the relative copy number between 2 breeds of chicken (White Leghorn and Nagoya which had different quantitative characteristics of fear-induced responses. CONCLUSION: Our data shows the potential CNVs that may be responsible for innate fear response in domestic chicks.

  1. Age-associated Epstein–Barr virus-specific T cell responses in seropositive healthy adults

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    Cárdenas Sierra, D; Vélez Colmenares, G; Orfao de Matos, A; Fiorentino Gómez, S; Quijano Gómez, S M

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is present in 95% of the world's adult population. The immune response participates in immune vigilance and persistent infection control, and this condition is maintained by both a good quality (functionality) and quantity of specific T cells throughout life. In the present study, we evaluated EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte responses in seropositive healthy individuals younger and older than 50 years of age. The assessment comprised the frequency, phenotype, functionality and clonotypic distribution of T lymphocytes. We found that in both age groups a similar EBV-specific T cell response was found, with overlapping numbers of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+) within the memory and effector cell compartments, in addition to monofunctional and multi-functional T cells producing interleukin (IL)-2 and/or interferon (IFN)-γ. However, individuals aged more than 50 years showed significantly higher frequencies of IL-2-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes in association with greater production of soluble IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 than subjects younger than 50 years. A polyclonal T cell receptor (TCR)-variable beta region (Vβ) repertoire exists in both age groups under basal conditions and in response to EBV; the major TCR families found in TNF-α+/CD4+ T lymphocytes were Vβ1, Vβ2, Vβ17 and Vβ22 in both age groups, and the major TCR family in TNF-α+/CD8+ T cells was Vβ13·1 for individuals younger than 50 years and Vβ9 for individuals aged more than 50 years. Our findings suggest that the EBV-specific T cell response (using a polyclonal stimulation model) is distributed throughout several T cell differentiation compartments in an age-independent manner and includes both monofunctional and multi-functional T lymphocytes. PMID:24666437

  2. Spatiotemporal phosphoprotein distribution and associated cytokine response of a traumatic injury.

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    Han, Alice A; Currie, Holly N; Loos, Matthew S; Vrana, Julie A; Fabyanic, Emily B; Prediger, Maren S; Boyd, Jonathan W

    2016-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of wound healing have been extensively characterized, providing a better understanding of the processes involved in wound repair and offering advances in treatment methods. Both spatial and temporal investigations of injury biomarkers have helped to pinpoint significant time points and locations during the recovery process, which may be vital in managing the injury and making the appropriate diagnosis. This study addresses spatial and temporal differences of phosphoproteins found in skeletal muscle tissue following a traumatic femur fracture, which were further compared to co-localized cytokine responses. In particular, several proteins (Akt, ERK, c-Jun, CREB, JNK, MEK1, and p38) and post-translational phosphorylations (p-Akt, p-c-Jun, p-CREB, p-ERK1/2, p-MEK1, p-p38, p-GSK3α/β, p-HSP27, p-p70S6K, and p-STAT3) associated with inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling were found to exhibit significant spatial and temporal differences in response to the traumatic injury. Quadratic discriminant analysis of all measured responses, including cytokine concentrations from previously published findings, was used to classify temporal and spatial observations at high predictive rates, further confirming that distinct spatiotemporal distributions for total protein, phosphorylation signaling, and cytokine (IL-1α, IL-1ß, IL2, IL6, TNF-α, and MIP-1α) responses exist. Finally, phosphoprotein measurements were found to be significantly correlated to cytokine concentrations, suggesting coordinated intracellular and extracellular activity during crucial periods of repair. This study represents a first attempt to monitor and assess integrated changes in extracellular and intracellular signaling in response to a traumatic injury in muscle tissues, which may provide a framework for future research to improve both our understanding of wounds and their treatment options.

  3. T cell responses against tumor associated antigens and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients

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    Rivoltini Licia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spontaneous T cell responses against specific tumor-associated antigens (TAA are frequently detected in peripheral blood of tumor patients of various histiotypes. However, little is known about whether these circulating, spontaneously occurring, TAA-reactive T cells influence the clinical course of disease. Methods Fifty-four HLA-A2 positive colorectal cancer patients had been analyzed for the presence of T cell responses against epitopes derived from the TAA Ep-CAM, her-2/neu, and CEA either by ELISPOT assay or by intracellular cytokine staining. Then, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed comparing T-cell-responders and T-cell-non-responders. For comparison, a group of T-cell-non-responders was compiled stringently matched to T-cell-responders based on clinical criteria and also analyzed for survival. Results Sixteen out of 54 patients had a detectable T cell response against at least one of the three tested TAA. Two out of 21 patients (9.5% with limited stage of disease (UICC I and II and 14 out of 33 patients (42.4% with advanced disease (UICC III and IV were T cell response positive. Comparing all T-cell-responders (n = 16 and all T-cell-non-responders (n = 38, no survival difference was found. In an attempt to reduce the influence of confounding clinical factors, we then compared 16 responders and 16 non-responders in a matched group survival analysis; and again no survival difference was found (p = 0.7. Conclusion In summary, we found no evidence that spontaneous peripheral T cell responses against HLA-A2-binding epitopes of CEA, her-2/neu and Ep-CAM are a strong prognostic factor for survival.

  4. Chronic Critical Illness from Sepsis Is Associated with an Enhanced TCR Response.

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    Borken, Farina; Markwart, Robby; Requardt, Robert P; Schubert, Katja; Spacek, Michal; Verner, Miroslav; Rückriem, Stefan; Scherag, André; Oehmichen, Frank; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Rubio, Ignacio

    2017-06-15

    Sepsis is characterized by a disproportionate host response to infection that often culminates in multiple organ failure. Current concepts invoke a deregulated immune reaction involving features of hyperinflammation, as well as protracted immune suppression. However, owing to the scarcity of human data, the precise origin of a long-term suppression of adaptive immunity remains doubtful. We report on an explorative clinical study of chronic critical illness (CCI) patients aimed at assessing the long-term consequences of sepsis on T cell function. Blood was drawn from 12 male CCI patients (median age 67 y, range 48-79 y) receiving continuous mechanical ventilation and renal replacement therapy in a long-term care hospital who had been treated in an external acute care hospital for severe sepsis. T cells were purified and subjected to flow cytometric immune-phenotyping and functional assays. We found that T cells from CCI patients featured higher basal levels of activation and stronger expression of the inhibitory surface receptor programmed cell death 1 compared with controls. However, T cells from CCI patients exhibited no suppressed TCR response at the level of proximal TCR signaling (activation/phosphorylation of PLCγ, Erk, Akt, LAT), activation marker upregulation (CD69, CD25, CD154, NUR77), IL-2 production, or clonal expansion. Rather, our data illustrate an augmented response in T cells from CCI patients in response to TCR/coreceptor (CD3/CD28) challenge. Thus, the present findings reveal that CCI sepsis patients feature signs of immune suppression but that their T cells exhibit a primed, rather than a suppressed, phenotype in their TCR response, arguing against a generalized T cell paralysis as a major cause of protracted immune suppression from sepsis. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Association between age at diagnosis of Graves' disease and variants in genes involved in immune response.

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    Beata Jurecka-Lubieniecka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graves' disease (GD is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. The aim of the study was to examine the association between genetic variants in genes encoding proteins involved in immune response and the age at diagnosis of GD. METHODS: 735 GD patients and 1216 healthy controls from Poland were included into the study. Eight genetic variants in the HLA-DRB1, TNF, CTLA4, CD40, NFKb, PTPN22, IL4 and IL10 genes were genotyped. Patients were stratified by the age at diagnosis of GD and the association with genotype was analysed. RESULTS: Polymorphism in the HLA-DRB1, TNF and CTLA4 genes were associated with GD. The carriers of the HLA DRB1*03 allele were more frequent in patients with age at GD diagnosis ≤30 years than in patients with older age at GD diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: HLADRB1*03 allele is associated with young age at diagnosis of Graves' disease in Polish population.

  6. Oppositionality and sympathetic skin response in adolescents: specific associations with the headstrong/hurtful dimension.

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    Silva, Nanucha Teixeira da; Schestatsky, Pedro; Winckler, Pablo Brea; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Petroceli, Alana Wypyszynski; Heldt, Elizeth Paz da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Oppositionality encompasses distinct dimensions, and few studies have investigated the validity of such distinctions from a pathophysiological perspective. Our aim was to investigate the association between sympathetic skin responses (SSR) and distinct oppositional dimensions in a community sample of adolescents. Forty adolescents aged 13.84±1.46 years participated in this study. Oppositionality was measured by externalizing behavior and bullying scores (dependent variables), while SSR was recorded by electrical changes at the skin level (independent variables). Results showed that increased SSRs were associated with oppositionality; however, these associations were specific to the headstrong/hurtful dimension. Further exploratory analyses demonstrated that increased SSRs were associated with several types of headstrong/hurtful behaviors and underscore the importance of the first aversive stimuli to differentiate groups with low and high headstrong/hurtful behaviors. There were no differences between groups regarding time until habituation. This study provides insights about how dysfunctions in autonomic balance may contribute to the emergence of oppositional behavior among adolescents.

  7. Genome-wide association of lipid-lowering response to statins in combined study populations.

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    Mathew J Barber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statins effectively lower total and plasma LDL-cholesterol, but the magnitude of decrease varies among individuals. To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs contributing to this variation, we performed a combined analysis of genome-wide association (GWA results from three trials of statin efficacy. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bayesian and standard frequentist association analyses were performed on untreated and statin-mediated changes in LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride on a total of 3932 subjects using data from three studies: Cholesterol and Pharmacogenetics (40 mg/day simvastatin, 6 weeks, Pravastatin/Inflammation CRP Evaluation (40 mg/day pravastatin, 24 weeks, and Treating to New Targets (10 mg/day atorvastatin, 8 weeks. Genotype imputation was used to maximize genomic coverage and to combine information across studies. Phenotypes were normalized within each study to account for systematic differences among studies, and fixed-effects combined analysis of the combined sample were performed to detect consistent effects across studies. Two SNP associations were assessed as having posterior probability greater than 50%, indicating that they were more likely than not to be genuinely associated with statin-mediated lipid response. SNP rs8014194, located within the CLMN gene on chromosome 14, was strongly associated with statin-mediated change in total cholesterol with an 84% probability by Bayesian analysis, and a p-value exceeding conventional levels of genome-wide significance by frequentist analysis (P = 1.8 x 10(-8. This SNP was less significantly associated with change in LDL-cholesterol (posterior probability = 0.16, P = 4.0 x 10(-6. Bayesian analysis also assigned a 51% probability that rs4420638, located in APOC1 and near APOE, was associated with change in LDL-cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Using combined GWA analysis from three clinical trials involving nearly 4

  8. Relationship satisfaction moderates the associations between male partner responses and depression in women with vulvodynia: a dyadic daily experience study.

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    Rosen, Natalie O; Bergeron, Sophie; Sadikaj, Gentiana; Glowacka, Maria; Baxter, Mary-Lou; Delisle, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Vulvodynia is a prevalent vulvovaginal pain condition that interferes with women's psychological health. Given the central role of sexuality and relationships in vulvodynia, relationship satisfaction may be an important moderator of daily partner responses to this pain and associated negative sequelae, such as depression. Sixty-nine women (M age=28.12 years, SD=6.68) with vulvodynia and their cohabiting partners (M age=29.67 years, SD=8.10) reported their daily relationship satisfaction, and male partner responses on sexual intercourse days (M=3.74, SD=2.47) over 8 weeks. Women also reported their depressive symptoms. Relationship satisfaction on the preceding day moderated the associations between partner responses and women's depressive symptoms in several significant ways: (1) On days after women reported higher relationship satisfaction than usual, their perception of greater facilitative male partner responses was associated with their decreased depression; (2) on days after women reported lower relationship satisfaction than usual, their perception of greater negative male partner responses was associated with their increased depression; (3) on days after men reported higher relationship satisfaction than usual, their self-reported higher negative responses were associated with decreased women's depression, and higher solicitous responses were associated with increased women's depression, whereas (4) on days after men reported lower relationship satisfaction than usual, their self-reported higher negative responses were related to increased women's depression, and higher solicitous responses were associated with decreased women's depression. Targeting partner responses and relationship satisfaction may enhance the quality of interventions aimed at reducing depression in women with vulvodynia. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between DNA damage response and repair genes and risk of invasive serous ovarian cancer.

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    Joellen M Schildkraut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We analyzed the association between 53 genes related to DNA repair and p53-mediated damage response and serous ovarian cancer risk using case-control data from the North Carolina Ovarian Cancer Study (NCOCS, a population-based, case-control study. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis was restricted to 364 invasive serous ovarian cancer cases and 761 controls of white, non-Hispanic race. Statistical analysis was two staged: a screen using marginal Bayes factors (BFs for 484 SNPs and a modeling stage in which we calculated multivariate adjusted posterior probabilities of association for 77 SNPs that passed the screen. These probabilities were conditional on subject age at diagnosis/interview, batch, a DNA quality metric and genotypes of other SNPs and allowed for uncertainty in the genetic parameterizations of the SNPs and number of associated SNPs. Six SNPs had Bayes factors greater than 10 in favor of an association with invasive serous ovarian cancer. These included rs5762746 (median OR(odds ratio(per allele = 0.66; 95% credible interval (CI = 0.44-1.00 and rs6005835 (median OR(per allele = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.53-0.91 in CHEK2, rs2078486 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.21-2.25 and rs12951053 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.20-2.26 in TP53, rs411697 (median OR (rare homozygote = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.35 - 0.79 in BACH1 and rs10131 (median OR( rare homozygote = not estimable in LIG4. The six most highly associated SNPs are either predicted to be functionally significant or are in LD with such a variant. The variants in TP53 were confirmed to be associated in a large follow-up study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings, further follow-up of the DNA repair and response pathways in a larger dataset is warranted to confirm these results.

  10. Humoral Responses to Diverse Autoimmune Disease-Associated Antigens in Multiple Sclerosis.

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    Kishore Malyavantham

    Full Text Available To compare frequencies of autoreactive antibody responses to endogenous disease-associated antigens in healthy controls (HC, relapsing and progressive MS and to assess their associations with clinical and MRI measures of MS disease progression.The study analyzed 969 serum samples from 315 HC, 411 relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS, 128 secondary progressive MS (SP-MS, 33 primary progressive MS (PP-MS and 82 patients with other neurological diseases for autoantibodies against two putative MS antigens CSF114(Glc and KIR4.1a and KIR4.1b and against 24 key endogenous antigens linked to diseases such as vasculitis, systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis, scleroderma, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease and primary biliary cirrhosis. Associations with disability and MRI measures of lesional injury and neurodegeneration were assessed.The frequencies of anti-KIR4.1a and anti-KIR4.1b peptide IgG positivity were 9.8% and 11.4% in HC compared to 4.9% and 7.5% in RR-MS, 8.6% for both peptides in SP-MS and 6.1% for both peptides in PP-MS (p = 0.13 for KIR4.1a and p = 0.34 for KIR4.1b, respectively. Antibodies against CSF114(Glc, KIR4.1a and KIR4.1b peptides were not associated with MS compared to HC, or with MS disease progression. HLA DRB1*15:01 positivity and anti-Epstein Barr virus antibodies, which are MS risk factors, were not associated with these putative MS antibodies.Antibody responses to KIR4.1a and KIR4.1b peptides are not increased in MS compared to HC nor associated with MS disease progression. The frequencies of the diverse autoreactive antibodies investigated are similar in MS and HC.

  11. A colorectal cancer classification system that associates cellular phenotype and responses to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Homicsko, Krisztian; Collisson, Eric A; Gibb, William J; Wullschleger, Stephan; Ostos, Liliane C Gonzalez; Lannon, William A; Grotzinger, Carsten; Del Rio, Maguy; Lhermitte, Benoit; Olshen, Adam B; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Cantley, Lewis C; Gray, Joe W; Hanahan, Douglas

    2013-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer mortality. Whereas some patients respond well to therapy, others do not, and thus more precise, individualized treatment strategies are needed. To that end, we analyzed gene expression profiles from 1,290 CRC tumors using consensus-based unsupervised clustering. The resultant clusters were then associated with therapeutic response data to the epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted drug cetuximab in 80 patients. The results of these studies define six clinically relevant CRC subtypes. Each subtype shares similarities to distinct cell types within the normal colon crypt and shows differing degrees of 'stemness' and Wnt signaling. Subtype-specific gene signatures are proposed to identify these subtypes. Three subtypes have markedly better disease-free survival (DFS) after surgical resection, suggesting these patients might be spared from the adverse effects of chemotherapy when they have localized disease. One of these three subtypes, identified by filamin A expression, does not respond to cetuximab but may respond to cMET receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the metastatic setting. Two other subtypes, with poor and intermediate DFS, associate with improved response to the chemotherapy regimen FOLFIRI in adjuvant or metastatic settings. Development of clinically deployable assays for these subtypes and of subtype-specific therapies may contribute to more effective management of this challenging disease.

  12. The MTHFR C677T variant is associated with responsiveness to disulfiram treatment for cocaine dependency

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    Catherine eSpellicy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Disulfiram is a one of the few pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction that shows promise. Since disulfiram and cocaine both affect levels of global methylation we hypothesized the MTHFR gene, whose product is involved in supplying methyl groups for DNA and protein methylation, may be associated with responsiveness to disulfiram in cocaine-dependent individuals. Methods: Sixty-seven cocaine dependent patients were stabilized on methadone for two weeks and then randomized into disulfiram (250 mg/day, N = 32 and placebo groups (N =35 for 10 weeks. Patients were genotyped for the MTHFR (rs1801133, also known as C677T polymorphism and the data was evaluated for association with cocaine-free urines in the disulfiram or placebo groups. Data from patients that completed all ten weeks of the study (N = 56 were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA, corrected for population structure. Results: The CT or TT MTHFR genotype group (N = 32 dropped from 73% to 52% on disulfiram (p = 0.0001, while the placebo group showed no treatment effect. The CC MTHFR genotype group (N = 24 showed a reduced, but still significant, reduction in cocaine-positive urines on disulfiram compared to placebo; 81-69% (p = 0.007. Conclusion: This study indicates that a patient’s MTHFR genotype may be used to identify individuals who might show improved response to disulfiram treatment for cocaine dependence.

  13. Personality predictors of antiaggressive response to fluoxetine: inverse association with neuroticism and harm avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, K Luan; Lee, Royce; Coccaro, Emil F

    2011-09-01

    Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are generally effective in reducing impulsive aggression in individuals with intermittent explosive disorder, a large proportion of intermittent explosive disorder patients fail to achieve full remission despite adequate dosage and duration of treatment. Temperament, specifically those associated with negative emotionality (neuroticism, harm avoidance) may predict response to SSRI treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether baseline neuroticism and harm avoidance scores would be associated with reduced aggression (as measured by the Overt Aggression Scale-Modified [OAS-M] aggression scores) after SSRI treatment. Participants participating in a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of fluoxetine completed the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (n=57) and the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (n=38) before entering the treatment trial. Multiple regression analyses (accounting for baseline OAS-M aggression scores) revealed that pretreatment eysenck personality questionnaire neuroticism and tridimensional personality questionnaire harm avoidance independently and uniquely predicted OAS-M aggression scores at endpoint in the fluoxetine, but not placebo, treated group. These preliminary findings are the first from a placebo-controlled clinical trial to suggest that temperamental factors such as neuroticism and harm avoidance can partly explain the observed variability in treatment response in SSRI treated individuals with impulsive aggression and prompt future prospective studies examining personality dimensions as predictors of outcomes in clinical trials.

  14. Innate immune memory: Implications for host responses to damage-associated molecular patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crișan, Tania O; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the innate immune system build immunological memory via epigenetic reprogramming after stimulations with microbial ligands. This functional readjustment allows for enhanced nonspecific inflammatory responses upon secondary challenges, a process termed "trained immunity." The epigenomic blueprint of trained monocytes has been recently reported, which revealed several important immunologic and metabolic mechanisms that underlie these changes. Interestingly, similar long-term reprogramming of cytokine production has also been described to be induced by endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Here, we present an overview of the novel data showing that endogenous alarm signals associated with tissue damage and sterile inflammation can induce trained immunity through epigenetic regulation of transcriptional programs. We describe new and old evidence of persistent effects of DAMPs in driving inflammation and enforce the concept that the influence of tissue-derived signals is critical in adjusting the magnitude and type of immune response built by the host. The better characterization of trained immunity for the persistence of inflammation induced by DAMPs would provide new possibilities for intervention in aging and autoinflammatory disorders. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. INSIGHT responsive parenting intervention is associated with healthier patterns of dietary exposures in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, Emily E; Paul, Ian M; Birch, Leann L; Savage, Jennifer S

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether a responsive parenting (RP) intervention affects infant dietary patterns. Primiparous mother-newborn dyads (n = 291) were randomized to the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) RP intervention or control. Curricula were delivered at nurse home visits at ages 3, 16, 28, and 40 weeks. RP group feeding guidance advised responsive feeding, delayed introduction of solids, repeated exposure to novel foods, and age-appropriate portion sizes. Latent class analysis identified patterns of dietary exposure at 9 months. Class membership at 9 months was used to predict BMI percentile at 2 years. Five dietary patterns were identified: "Breastfed, Fruits and Vegetables," "Breastfed, Low Variety," "Formula, Fruits and Vegetables," "Formula, Low Variety," and "Formula, High Energy Density." Over 60% of infants had patterns low in fruits and vegetables or high in energy-dense foods. RP group infants were less likely than control to be in the "Formula, Low Variety" class (OR = 0.40, 95% CI 0.23-0.71) or "Formula, High Energy Density" class (OR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.12-0.61) relative to the "Formula, Fruits and Vegetables" class. Dietary pattern at 9 months was significantly associated with BMI percentile at 2 years. While a majority of infants consumed diets low in fruits and vegetables, the INSIGHT RP intervention was associated with healthier dietary patterns. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  16. Genes associated with hypersensitive response (HR in the citrus EST database (CitEST

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    Simone Guidetti-Gonzalez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are continuously exposed to pathogen attack, but successful infection is rare because they protect themselves against pathogens using a wide range of response mechanisms. One of them is the hypersensitive response (HR, which is a form of cell death often associated with plant resistance to pathogen infection to prevent the spreadsebpg@cnpq.br sebpg@cnpq.br of the potential pathogen from infected to uninfected tissues. Cell death is activated by recognition of pathogen-derived molecules by the resistance (R gene products, and is associated with the massive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, salicylic acid (SA, and other pro-death signals such as nitric oxide (NO. The analysis of the citrus EST (CitEST database revealed the presence of putative genes likely to be involved in HR through their products, like metacaspases, lipoxygenases, phospholipases, pathogenesis-related proteins, glutathione transferases/peroxidases, enzymes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway and in the formation and detoxification of ROS, as well as those involved in the formation and regulation of ion channels, SA and NO. By analysis of the EST database of Citrus, it was possible to identify several putative genes that code for key enzymes involved in HR triggering and also in plant defense against biotic and abiotic stress.

  17. Association between filial responsibility when caring for parents and the caregivers overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Marinês; Mocellin, Duane; Fengler, Fernanda Laís; Rosset, Idiane; Santos, Naiana Oliveira Dos; Machado, Diani de Oliveira; Day, Carolina Baltar; Paskulin, Lisiane Manganelli Girardi

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the association between filial responsibility and the overload of the children when caring for their older parents. Cross-sectional study with 100 caregiver children of older adults. Filial liability was assessed by the attitudes of the responsible child (scale of expectation and filial duty) and by care behaviors (assistance in activities of daily living, emotional and financial support, and keeping company). The overload was assessed by the Caregiver Burden Inventory. To assess the associations, the correlation coefficients of Pearson and Spearman, Kruskal-Wallis Test, and Mann-Whitney were employed. Variables that presented p-valuePearson e Spearman, Teste de Kruskal-Wallis e Mann-whitney. Variáveis que apresentaram valor de pmodelo multivariado de regressão linear. Os fatores associados com a sobrecarga foram: emprego formal (p=0,002), sentimentos na vida familiar (p<0,001), apoio financeiro (p=0,027) e ajuda nas Atividades da Vida Diária (AVDs) (p<0,001). Os filhos que mais auxiliavam nas AVDs e prestavam apoio financeiro apresentaram maiores níveis de sobrecarga.

  18. Dose Response Association between Physical Activity and Biological, Demographic, and Perceptions of Health Variables

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    Paul D. Loprinzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few population-based studies have examined the association between physical activity (PA and cardiovascular disease risk factors, demographic variables, and perceptions of health status, and we do not have a clear understanding of the dose-response relationship among these variables. Methods: Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to examine the dose-response relationship between objectively measured PA and metabolic syndrome (and its individual cardiovascular disease risk factors, demographic variables, and perceptions of health. After exclusions, 5,538 participants 18 years or older were included in the present study, with 2,538 participants providing fasting glucose and 2,527 providing fasting triglyceride data. PA was categorized into deciles. Results: Overall, the health benefits showed a general pattern of increase with each increasing levels of PA. Of the ten PA classifications examined, participants in the highest moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA category (at least 71 min/day had the lowest odds of developing metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: At a minimum, sedentary adults should strive to meet current PA guidelines (i.e., 150 min/week of MVPA, with additional positive benefits associated with engaging in three times this level of PA.

  19. Enhanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiencies in monocot cells is associated with attenuated defense responses.

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    Zhang, Wan-Jun; Dewey, Ralph E; Boss, Wendy; Phillippy, Brian Q; Qu, Rongda

    2013-02-01

    Plant defense responses can lead to altered metabolism and even cell death at the sites of Agrobacterium infection, and thus lower transformation frequencies. In this report, we demonstrate that the utilization of culture conditions associated with an attenuation of defense responses in monocot plant cells led to highly improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiencies in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). The removal of myo-inositol from the callus culture media in combination with a cold shock pretreatment and the addition of L-Gln prior to and during Agrobacterium-infection resulted in about 84 % of the treated calluses being stably transformed. The omission of myo-inositol from the callus culture media was associated with the failure of certain pathogenesis related genes to be induced after Agrobacterium infection. The addition of a cold shock and supplemental Gln appeared to have synergistic effects on infection and transformation efficiencies. Nearly 60 % of the stably transformed calluses regenerated into green plantlets. Calluses cultured on media lacking myo-inositol also displayed profound physiological and biochemical changes compared to ones cultured on standard growth media, such as reduced lignin within the cell walls, increased starch and inositol hexaphosphate accumulation, enhanced Agrobacterium binding to the cell surface, and less H(2)O(2) production after Agrobacterium infection. Furthermore, the cold treatment greatly reduced callus browning after infection. The simple modifications described in this report may have broad application for improving genetic transformation of recalcitrant monocot species.

  20. l-Dopa responsiveness is associated with distinctive connectivity patterns in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Harith; Wu, Chengyuan; Hyam, Jonathan; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; De Vita, Enrico; Yousry, Tarek; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Hariz, Marwan; Behrens, Timothy; Ashburner, John; Zrinzo, Ludvic

    2017-06-01

    Neuronal loss and dopamine depletion alter motor signal processing between cortical motor areas, basal ganglia, and the thalamus, resulting in the motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Dopamine replacement therapy can reverse these manifestations with varying degrees of improvement. To evaluate functional connectivity in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and changes in functional connectivity in relation to the degree of response to l-dopa, 19 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in the on-medication state. Scans were obtained on a 3-Tesla scanner in 3 × 3 × 2.5 mm(3) voxels. Seed-based bivariate regression analyses were carried out with atlas-defined basal ganglia regions as seeds, to explore relationships between functional connectivity and improvement in the motor section of the UPDRS-III following an l-dopa challenge. False discovery rate-corrected P was set at motor area, mesial primary motor, and primary sensory areas). Our findings show characteristic basal ganglia resting-state functional connectivity patterns associated with different degrees of l-dopa responsiveness in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. l-Dopa exerts a graduated influence on remapping connectivity in distinct motor control networks, potentially explaining some of the variance in treatment response. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Whipple’s Disease-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension with Positive Vasodilator Response Despite Severe Hemodynamic Derangements

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    Salah Najm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH associated with Whipple’s disease (WD-PH is extremely rare, and the underlying pathophysiological processes are incompletely understood. Alterations in hemodynamics can be severe, with right ventricular (RV dysfunction being common. A case involving a 23-year-old man with WD-PH who exhibited a dramatic vasodilator response during right heart catheterization despite severely altered pulmonary hemodynamics and concomitant RV dysfunction is reported. While the patient’s symptoms responded poorly to treatment with nifedipine and sildenafil, significant improvement in dyspnea, RV dysfunction and pulmonary pressures were noted following antibiotic therapy. The present report highlights that despite severely elevated pulmonary artery pressures and RV dysfunction in WD-PH patients, a highly significant vasodilator response and dramatic improvement with antibiotic therapy may be observed. Furthermore, the case highlights the phenomenon of PH in the setting of inflammation, suggesting that adequate control of the inflammatory response can be accompanied by a marked improvement in hemodynamics in certain types of PH.

  2. Itch-associated response and antinociception induced by intracisternal endomorphins in mice.

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    Yamaguchi, T; Kitagawa, K; Kuraishi, Y

    1998-11-01

    Endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 are newly identified endogenous peptides and have high affinity and selectivity for mu-opioid receptors. The present experiments were conducted to determine whether intracisternal injection of these peptides would produce an itch-associated response and antinociception and to compare their effects to that of morphine. Endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 (0.3-3 nmol/mouse) elicited facial scratching characterized by bell-shaped dose-response curves with a peak effect at endomorphin-1 at 0.3 nmol/mouse and endomorphin-2 at 1 nmol/mouse. Their peak effects were inhibited by subcutaneous pretreatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg). Morphine (0.3-30 nmol/mouse) produced facial scratching, and its dose-response curve was also bell-shaped. Scratching of the body trunk, head and ears were not elicited by these doses of endomorphins and morphine. Endomorphin-1 and -2 at doses of 0.3-3 nmol/mouse produced dose-dependent antinociception, as measured with the tail-pressure test. The potency and duration of actions of these peptides were comparable to those of morphine. The results suggest that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 are involved in itch-signaling and pain-inhibiting functions of the brain.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Rice Plasma Membrane-associated Proteins in Response to Chitooligosaccharide Elicitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Chen; Qun Li; Zuhua He

    2007-01-01

    Chitooligomers or chitooligosaccharides (COS) are elicitors that bind to the plasma membrane (PM) and elicit various defense responses. However, the PM-bound proteins involved in elicitor-mediated plant defense responses still remain widely unknown. In order to get more information about PM proteins involved in rice defense responses, we conducted PM proteomic analysis of the rice suspension cells elicited by COS. A total of 14 up- or down-regulated protein spots were observed on 2-D gels of PM fractions at 12 h and 24 h after COS incubation. Of them, eight protein spots were successfully identified by MS (mass spectrography) and predicted to be associated to the PM and function in plant defense, including a putative PKN/PRK1 protein kinase, a putative pyruvate kinase isozyme G, a putative zinc finger protein, a putative MAR-binding protein MFP1, and a putative calcium-dependent protein kinase. Interestingly, a COS-induced pM5-like protein was identified for the first time in plants, which is a trans-membrane nodal modulator in transforming growth factor-β(TGFβ) signaling in vertebrates. We also identified two members of a rice polyprotein family, which were up-regulated by COS. Our study would provide a starting point for functionality of PM proteins in the rice basal defense.

  4. Association study between clinical response to rizatriptan and some candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuni, Carlo; Cherchi, Allesandra; Congiu, Donatella; Piccardi, Maria P; Del Zompo, Maria; Stochino, Maria E

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test genetic differences in the clinical response to rizatriptan in patients affected by migraine without aura. These genetic differences could be explained by various genes, the HTR1B, encoding the 5-HT(1) receptor subtype, MAOA gene that encodes the monoamino-oxidase, the main metabolic enzyme of this triptan, SLC6A4 (gene encoding the serotonin transporter) and DRD(2) (gene encoding the D(2) receptor), both involved in the pathogenesis of migraine. Fifty unrelated patients affected by migraine without aura (IHS) were included. Patients were divided into two groups (responders and non-responders) according to clinical response. Thirty-one out of fifty patients responded to rizatriptan. A significant difference among the two groups was observed in both allele (p=0.02) and genotype distribution (p=0.03) of DRD2/NcoI. The significant association with the DRD2/NcoI polymorphism in responders suggested that the DRD2/NcoI C allele may be considered a susceptibility factor heralding a good response to rizatriptan.

  5. Insights into molecular and metabolic events associated with fruit response to postharvest fungal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam eAlkan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to postharvest losses more than 30% of harvested fruits will not reach the consumers’ plate. Fungal pathogens play a key role in those losses, as they cause most of the fruit rots and the customer complaints. Many of the fungal pathogens are already present in the unripe fruit but remain quiescent during fruit growth until a particular phase of fruit ripening and senescence. The pathogens sense the developmental change and switch into the devastating necrotrophic life style that causes fruit rotting. Colonization of unripe fruit by the fungus initiates defensive responses that limit fungal growth and development. However, during fruit ripening several physiological processes occur that correlate with increased fruit susceptibility. In contrast to plant defenses in unripe fruit, the defense posture of ripe fruit entails a different subset of defense responses that will end with fruit rotting and losses. This review will focus on several aspects of molecular and metabolic events associated with fleshy fruit responses induced by postharvest fungal pathogens during fruit ripening.

  6. Insights into molecular and metabolic events associated with fruit response to post-harvest fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Noam; Fortes, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Due to post-harvest losses more than 30% of harvested fruits will not reach the consumers' plate. Fungal pathogens play a key role in those losses, as they cause most of the fruit rots and the customer complaints. Many of the fungal pathogens are already present in the unripe fruit but remain quiescent during fruit growth until a particular phase of fruit ripening and senescence. The pathogens sense the developmental change and switch into the devastating necrotrophic life style that causes fruit rotting. Colonization of unripe fruit by the fungus initiates defensive responses that limit fungal growth and development. However, during fruit ripening several physiological processes occur that correlate with increased fruit susceptibility. In contrast to plant defenses in unripe fruit, the defense posture of ripe fruit entails a different subset of defense responses that will end with fruit rotting and losses. This review will focus on several aspects of molecular and metabolic events associated with fleshy fruit responses induced by post-harvest fungal pathogens during fruit ripening.

  7. Melatonin responsive hemicrania continua in which indomethacin was associated with contralateral headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Milo; Young, Tim M

    2014-05-01

    Headache is a well-documented side effect of indomethacin in the older medical literature; however, it has rarely been commented on in indomethacin-responsive hemicrania continua. We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman with left-sided hemicrania continua whose indomethacin treatment was associated with a continuous right-sided migraine. Her indomethacin therapy was discontinued heralding a return of her left-sided hemicrania continua and a resolution of her right-sided migraine. Her hemicrania continua then responded well to melatonin, with recurrence on stopping and improvement on restarting. This is the most detailed description of headache as a side effect of indomethacin in a headache patient we are aware of, and one of only a few reported cases of melatonin-responsive hemicrania continua. We review the evidence of headache as a side effect of indomethacin in order to highlight its importance in the treatment of headache disorders. We emphasize that indomethacin headache response may be more than simply a beneficial or neutral one and might be relevant to some cases of apparently indomethacin-resistant hemicrania continua. We hope this case may encourage clinicians to inquire about headache as a potential side effect of indomethacin.

  8. Long term use of lithium and factors associated with treatment response among patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Gan Wei; Makmor-Bakry, Mohd; Omar, Marhanis Salihah

    2016-06-01

    Lithium has been the gold standard in treating bipolar disorder. In recent years, the use of lithium seems to be diminished although it is well tolerated among the bipolar disorder patients. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of lithium as well as to determine factors associated with lithium response among patient with bipolar disorder. A retrospective study was done in a tertiary care hospital in Malaysia which included 47 bipolar disorder patients that were prescribed with lithium maintenance therapy in the time frame of January 2009 until December 2013. Of all the baseline characteristics tested, only psychotic feature differentiated lithium monotherapy group and combination therapy group significantly (χ(2)=4.732, p=0.03). When compared to period before lithium maintenance, all outcome measures (i.e. annual relapse rate, proportion time spent ill and duration of mood episode) showed significant improvement after lithium maintenance in both treatment groups. Lithium discontinuation only occurred in five cases of adverse effects. Predominant depressive mood episode before lithium maintenance (OR=0.159, p=0.033) and first euthymic interval after lithium maintenance (OR=1.109, p=0.047) significantly predicted lithium response. Lithium significantly reduced the frequency and time spent in relapse in patients with bipolar disorder. Predominant depressive mood polarity before lithium maintenance and longer first euthymic interval after lithium maintenance had been identified to predict lithium response significantly.

  9. Lack of association between mannose binding lectin and antibody responses after acellular pertussis vaccinations.

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    Kirsi Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is one of the key molecules in innate immunity and its role in human vaccine responses is poorly known. This study aimed to investigate the possible association of MBL polymorphisms with antibody production after primary and booster vaccinations with acellular pertussis vaccines in infants and adolescents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five hundred and sixty eight subjects were included in this study. In the adolescent cohort 355 subjects received a dose of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (dTpa vaccine ten years previously. Follow-up was performed at 3, 5 and 10 years. Infant cohort consisted of 213 subjects, who had received three primary doses of DTaP vaccine at 3, 5, and 12 months of age according to Finnish immunization program. Blood samples were collected before the vaccinations at 2,5 months of age and after the vaccinations at 13 months and 2 years of age. Concentrations of IgG antibodies to pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin and antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids were measured by standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of MBL2 gene exon1 (codons 52, 54, 57 were examined. MBL serum concentration was also measured from the adolescent cohort. No association was found with MBL2 exon 1 polymorphisms and antibody responses against vaccine antigens, after primary and booster dTpa vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that MBL polymorphisms do not affect the production and persistence of antibodies after acellular pertussis vaccination. Our finding also suggests that MBL might not be involved in modulating antibody responses to the vaccines made of purified bacterial proteins.

  10. The cortisol awakening response is associated with performance of a serial sequence reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyl, Nicolette A; Schneider, Luke; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Clow, Angela; Ridding, Michael C; Pitcher, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    There is emerging evidence of a relationship between the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and the neural mechanisms underlying learning and memory. The aim of this study was to determine whether the CAR is associated with acquisition, retention and overnight consolidation or improvement of a serial sequence reaction time task. Salivary samples were collected at 0, 15, 30 and 45 min after awakening in 39 healthy adults on 2 consecutive days. The serial sequence reaction time task was repeated each afternoon. Participants completed the perceived stress scale and provided salivary samples prior to testing for cortisol assessment. While the magnitude of the CAR (Z score) was not associated with either baseline performance or the timed improvement during task acquisition of the serial sequence task, a positive correlation was observed with reaction times during the stable performance phase on day 1 (r=0.373, p=0.019). Residuals derived from the relationship between baseline and stable phase reaction times on day 1 were used as a surrogate for the degree of learning: these residuals were also correlated with the CAR mean increase on day 1 (r=0.357, p=0.048). Task performance on day 2 was not associated with the CAR obtained on this same day. No association was observed between the perceived stress score, cortisol at testing or task performance. These data indicate that a smaller CAR in healthy adults is associated with a greater degree of learning and faster performance of a serial sequence reaction time task. These results support recognition of the CAR as an important factor contributing to cognitive performance throughout the day.

  11. PKA-chromatin association at stress responsive target genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccarini, Leticia; Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Rossi, Silvia; Proft, Markus; Portela, Paula

    2015-11-01

    Gene expression regulation by intracellular stimulus-activated protein kinases is essential for cell adaptation to environmental changes. There are three PKA catalytic subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Tpk1, Tpk2, and Tpk3 and one regulatory subunit: Bcy1. Previously, it has been demonstrated that Tpk1 and Tpk2 are associated with coding regions and promoters of target genes in a carbon source and oxidative stress dependent manner. Here we studied five genes, ALD6, SED1, HSP42, RPS29B, and RPL1B whose expression is regulated by saline stress. We found that PKA catalytic and regulatory subunits are associated with both coding regions and promoters of the analyzed genes in a stress dependent manner. Tpk1 and Tpk2 recruitment was completely abolished in catalytic inactive mutants. BCY1 deletion changed the binding kinetic to chromatin of each Tpk isoform and this strain displayed a deregulated gene expression in response to osmotic stress. In addition, yeast mutants with high PKA activity exhibit sustained association to target genes of chromatin-remodeling complexes such as Snf2-catalytic subunit of the SWI/SNF complex and Arp8-component of INO80 complex, leading to upregulation of gene expression during osmotic stress. Tpk1 accumulation in the nucleus was stimulated upon osmotic stress, while the nuclear localization of Tpk2 and Bcy1 showed no change. We found that each PKA subunit is transported into the nucleus by a different β-karyopherin pathway. Moreover, β-karyopherin mutant strains abolished the chromatin association of Tpk1 or Tpk2, suggesting that nuclear localization of PKA catalytic subunits is required for its association to target genes and properly gene expression.

  12. Belowground fungal associations and water interact to influence the compensatory response of Ipomopsis aggregata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsup, Cassandra M; Paige, Ken N

    2016-02-01

    Although the concept that some plants benefit from being eaten is counterintuitive, there is now considerable evidence demonstrating enhanced fitness following herbivory. It has been assumed that plants growing in high resource conditions are the ones best able to compensate for herbivory. However, just the opposite has been found for dicotyledonous plants exhibiting patterns of overcompensation, with most occurring in resource-poor conditions. Long-term studies of the monocarpic biennial, scarlet gilia, Ipomopsis aggregata growing in resource-poor conditions have shown that ungulate herbivory by mule deer and elk can result in a threefold increase in plant fitness over uneaten controls. These observations led us to hypothesize that fungal associations would facilitate the compensatory response most commonly observed in this Arizona population of scarlet gilia; perhaps mutualistic associations with fungi, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, would explain the phenomenon of overcompensation altogether. Fungal removal experiments, using Captan®, a commercially available fungicide, showed that a reduction in fungal abundance altered the compensatory response following ungulate herbivory, particularly in years in which water was limited, increasing fitness compensation from equal compensation to overcompensation. A multifactorial experiment revealed that the interactive effects of water and fungicide maximized fruit production following herbivory. Our results are counter to the “modification of tolerance hypothesis” in which plants associating with mycorrhizal fungi will have higher tolerance to herbivory. It is likely that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and dark septate endophytes compete with plants for photosynthates following herbivory, thereby limiting the magnitude of compensation. Thus, fungi appear to be parasitic on scarlet gilia following ungulate herbivory.

  13. ABO blood group is associated with response to inhaled nitric oxide in neonates with respiratory failure.

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    George T El-Ferzli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO reduces death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO in infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN. However, the response to iNO is variable and only 50-60% of infants demonstrate a response to iNO. It is not known why only some infants respond to iNO. Adults and children with blood groups B or AB do not respond as well to iNO as those with blood groups O/A. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine if blood group was associated with iNO response in newborn infants, a retrospective medical record review was done of infants admitted to a regional NICU from 2002-9 with a diagnosis of PPHN. Data were collected during the first twelve hours post-initiation of treatment. Of 86 infants diagnosed with PPHN, 23 infants had blood group A [18 received iNO], 21 had group B [18 with iNO], 40 had group O [36 with iNO], and 2 had group AB [both received iNO]. Change in PaO(2/FiO(2 was less in infants with blood group A, of whom less than half were responders (ΔPaO(2/FiO(2>20% at 12 h versus 90% of infants with either O or B. Race, sex, birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, and baseline PaO(2/FiO(2 were similar among groups. Outcomes including need for ECMO, death, length of ventilatory support, length of iNO use, and hospital stay were statistically not different by blood groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that blood group influences iNO response in neonates. We hypothesize that either there is genetic linkage of the ABO gene locus with vasoregulatory genes, or that blood group antigens directly affect vascular reactivity.

  14. Methanol and ethanol modulate responses to danger- and microbe-associated molecular patterns

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    Claire T Hann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is a byproduct of cell wall modification, released through the action of pectin methylesterases (PMEs, which demethylesterify cell wall pectins. Plant PMEs play not only a role in developmental processes but also in responses to herbivory and infection by fungal or bacterial pathogens. Molecular mechanisms that explain how methanol affects plant defenses are poorly understood. Here we show that exogenously supplied methanol alone has weak effects on defense signaling in three dicot species, however it profoundly alters signaling responses to danger- and microbe-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, MAMPs such as the alarm hormone systemin, the bacterial flagellum-derived flg22 peptide, and the fungal cell wall-derived oligosaccharide chitosan. In the presence of methanol the kinetics and amplitudes of DAMP/MAMP-induced MAP kinase (MAPK activity and oxidative burst are altered in tobacco and tomato suspension-cultured cells, in Arabidopsis seedlings and tomato leaf tissue. As a possible consequence of altered DAMP/MAMP signaling, methanol suppressed the expression of the defense genes PR-1 and PI-1 in tomato. In cell cultures of the grass tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea, Poaceae, Monocots, methanol alone activates MAPKs and increases chitosan-induced MAPK activity, and in the darnel grass Lolium temulentum (Poaceae, it alters wound-induced MAPK signaling. We propose that methanol can be recognized by plants as a sign of the damaged self. In dicots, methanol functions as a DAMP-like alarm signal with little elicitor activity on its own, whereas it appears to function as an elicitor-active DAMP in monocot grasses. Ethanol had been implicated in plant stress responses, although the source of ethanol in plants is not well established. We found that it has a similar effect as methanol on responses to MAMPs and DAMPs.

  15. Early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2016-10-01

    75.7%.Conclusion: We demonstrated the novel finding that early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation are associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness and established a simple method for detecting lung hyperinflation. Keywords: GOLD I, GOLD II, RV/TLC, bronchodilation test

  16. High cortisol awakening response is associated with impaired error monitoring and decreased post-error adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Duan, Hongxia; Qin, Shaozheng; Yuan, Yiran; Buchanan, Tony W; Zhang, Kan; Wu, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    The cortisol awakening response (CAR), a rapid increase in cortisol levels following morning awakening, is an important aspect of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity. Alterations in the CAR have been linked to a variety of mental disorders and cognitive function. However, little is known regarding the relationship between the CAR and error processing, a phenomenon that is vital for cognitive control and behavioral adaptation. Using high-temporal resolution measures of event-related potentials (ERPs) combined with behavioral assessment of error processing, we investigated whether and how the CAR is associated with two key components of error processing: error detection and subsequent behavioral adjustment. Sixty university students performed a Go/No-go task while their ERPs were recorded. Saliva samples were collected at 0, 15, 30 and 60 min after awakening on the two consecutive days following ERP data collection. The results showed that a higher CAR was associated with slowed latency of the error-related negativity (ERN) and a higher post-error miss rate. The CAR was not associated with other behavioral measures such as the false alarm rate and the post-correct miss rate. These findings suggest that high CAR is a biological factor linked to impairments of multiple steps of error processing in healthy populations, specifically, the automatic detection of error and post-error behavioral adjustment. A common underlying neural mechanism of physiological and cognitive control may be crucial for engaging in both CAR and error processing.

  17. Are you gonna leave me? Separation anxiety is associated with increased amygdala responsiveness and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Ronny; Grotegerd, Dominik; Opel, Nils; Kaufmann, Carolin; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Kugel, Harald; Heindel, Walter; Donges, Uta-Susan; Suslow, Thomas; Arolt, Volker; Dannlowski, Udo

    2015-02-01

    The core feature of separation anxiety is excessive distress when faced with actual or perceived separation from people to whom the individual has a strong emotional attachment. So far little is known about the neurobiological underpinnings of separation anxiety. Therefore, we investigated functional (amygdala responsiveness and functional connectivity during threat-related emotion processing) and structural (grey matter volume) imaging markers associated with separation anxiety as measured with the Relationship Scale Questionnaire in a large sample of healthy adults from the Münster Neuroimaging Cohort (N = 320). We used a robust emotional face-matching task and acquired high-resolution structural images for morphometric analyses using voxel-based morphometry. The main results were positive associations of separation anxiety scores with amygdala reactivity to emotional faces as well as increased amygdala grey matter volumes. A functional connectivity analysis revealed positive associations between separation anxiety and functional coupling of the amygdala with areas involved in visual processes and attention, including several occipital and somatosensory areas. Taken together, the results suggest a higher emotional involvement in subjects with separation anxiety while watching negative facial expressions, and potentially secondary neuro-structural adaptive processes. These results could help to understand and treat (adult) separation anxiety.

  18. Radiation Promotes Colorectal Cancer Initiation and Progression by Inducing Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Bum; Bozeman, Ronald; Kaisani, Aadil; Kim, Wanil; Zhang, Lu; Richardson, James A.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common since protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared to conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIR) which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence associated gene (P19Arf) are markedly increased. Following these changes loss of Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared to x-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, CDDO-EA, reduces proton irradiation associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus, exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  19. Shared Responsibility for Type 1 Diabetes Care Is Associated With Glycemic Variability and Risk of Glycemic Excursions in Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Arwen M; Noser, Amy E; Clements, Mark A; Patton, Susana R

    2017-05-25

    We examined how parent and youth responsibility for type 1 diabetes (T1D) care is related to adherence and glycemic outcomes, namely, glycemic variability and risk of glycemic excursions. One hundred thirty-five parent-youth dyads (10-16 years old; diagnosed with T1D for at least 6 months) participated in this study. Percent responsibility of T1D care attributed to the youth, parent, or shared was measured using the Diabetes Family Responsibility Questionnaire. We collected youth's hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and glucometer downloads to examine relationships between responsibility and HbA1c, frequency of blood glucose monitoring (self-monitoring blood glucose, SMBG), risk of glycemic excursions, and actual glycemic variability using bivariate correlations and path analysis. Participants reported shared responsibility for almost half of T1D self-care tasks. Bivariate correlations showed shared responsibility was associated with less variability, whereas parent responsibility was associated with greater glycemic variability and risk for glycemic excursions. Youth responsibility was associated with lower frequency of SMBG. The path analyses confirmed our correlational findings ( p sresponsibility. Our results support the hypothesis that shared T1D responsibility is associated with better diabetes outcomes in youth.

  20. Sexual Assertiveness Mediates the Associations Between Partner Facilitative Responses and Sexual Outcomes in Women With Provoked Vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicoll, Gabrielle; Corsini-Munt, Serena; O Rosen, Natalie; McDuff, Pierre; Bergeron, Sophie

    2017-10-03

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a recurrent idiopathic vulvo-vaginal pain associated with negative sexual and psychological consequences. Facilitative partner responses to pain are currently receiving empirical attention because they are positively associated with women's sexual outcomes. However, the mechanisms through which facilitative responses to pain are associated with these outcomes have not been examined. One potential mechanism is sexual assertiveness, which has been found to be associated with better sexual function and satisfaction in women with PVD. The present study examined whether women's sexual assertiveness mediated the association between women's perception of facilitative partner responses and women's sexual function and satisfaction. Women (N = 140) with PVD symptomatology completed self-reported questionnaires evaluating their perception of their partners' facilitative responses, and their own sexual assertiveness, sexual function, and sexual satisfaction. Dependent measures were sexual function measured by the Female Sexual Function Index and sexual satisfaction assessed by the Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction Scale. Results indicated that women's higher sexual assertiveness mediated the association between their greater perceived facilitative partner responses and their improved sexual function and satisfaction. Findings suggest a potential mechanism through which partner responses may be associated with women's sexual outcomes.

  1. RNA disruption is associated with response to multiple classes of chemotherapy drugs in tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendrula, Rashmi; Mispel-Beyer, Kyle; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo M; Pritzker, Laura B; Pritzker, Ken; Masilamani, Twinkle; Wang, Xiaohui; Lannér, Carita

    2016-02-24

    Cellular stressors and apoptosis-inducing agents have been shown to induce ribosomal RNA (rRNA) degradation in eukaryotic cells. Recently, RNA degradation in vivo was observed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, where mid-treatment tumor RNA degradation was associated with complete tumor destruction and enhanced patient survival. However, it is not clear how widespread chemotherapy induced "RNA disruption" is, the extent to which it is associated with drug response or what the underlying mechanisms are. Ovarian (A2780, CaOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, BT474, SKBR3) cancer cell lines were treated with several cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and total RNA was isolated. RNA was also prepared from docetaxel resistant A2780DXL and carboplatin resistant A2780CBN cells following drug exposure. Disruption of RNA was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Northern blotting was performed using probes complementary to the 28S and 18S rRNA to determine the origins of degradation bands. Apoptosis activation was assessed by flow cytometric monitoring of annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) binding to cells and by measuring caspase-3 activation. The link between apoptosis and RNA degradation (disruption) was investigated using a caspase-3 inhibitor. All chemotherapy drugs tested were capable of inducing similar RNA disruption patterns. Docetaxel treatment of the resistant A2780DXL cells and carboplatin treatment of the A2780CBN cells did not result in RNA disruption. Northern blotting indicated that two RNA disruption bands were derived from the 3'-end of the 28S rRNA. Annexin-V and PI staining of docetaxel treated cells, along with assessment of caspase-3 activation, showed concurrent initiation of apoptosis and RNA disruption, while inhibition of caspase-3 activity significantly reduced RNA disruption. Supporting the in vivo evidence, our results demonstrate that RNA disruption is induced by multiple chemotherapy agents in cell lines from different tissues and is

  2. Positive association of phencyclidine-responsive genes, PDE4A and PLAT, with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiangdong; Takaki, Hiromi; Wang, Lixiang; Kuroki, Tosihide; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Kijiro; Ninomiya, Hideaki; Arinami, Tadao; Inada, Toshiya; Ujike, Hiroshi; Itokawa, Masanari; Tochigi, Mamoru; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Someya, Toshiyuki; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki

    2011-12-01

    As schizophrenia-like symptoms are produced by administration of phencyclidine (PCP), a noncompetitive antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, PCP-responsive genes could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We injected PCP to Wistar rats and isolated five different parts of the brain in 1 and 4 hr after the injection. We analyzed the gene expression induced by the PCP treatment of these tissues using the AGILENT rat cDNA microarray system. We observed changes in expression level in 90 genes and 21 ESTs after the treatment. Out of the 10 genes showing >2-fold expressional change evaluated by qRT-PCR, we selected 7 genes as subjects for the locus-wide association study to identify susceptibility genes for schizophrenia in the Japanese population. In haplotype analysis, significant associations were detected in combinations of two SNPs of BTG2 (P = 1.4 × 10(-6) ), PDE4A (P = 1.4 × 10(-6) ), and PLAT (P = 1 × 10(-3) ), after false discovery rate (FDR) correction. Additionally, we not only successfully replicated the haplotype associations in PDE4A (P = 6.8 × 10(-12) ) and PLAT (P = 0.015), but also detected single-point associations of one SNP in PDE4A (P = 0.0068) and two SNPs in PLAT (P = 0.0260 and 0.0104) in another larger sample set consisting of 2,224 cases and 2,250 controls. These results indicate that PDE4A and PLAT may be susceptibility genes for schizophrenia in the Japanese population.

  3. Insulin Resistance Is Associated With a Poor Response to Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Ana I.; García-Bermejo, Pablo; Cortijo, Elisa; Bustamante, Rosa; Rojo Martínez, Esther; González Sarmiento, Enrique; Fernández-Herranz, Rosa; Arenillas, Juan F.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance (IR) may not only increase stroke risk, but could also contribute to aggravate stroke prognosis. Mainly through a derangement in endogenous fibrinolysis, IR could affect the response to intravenous thrombolysis, currently the only therapy proved to be efficacious for acute ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that high IR is associated with more persistent arterial occlusions and poorer long-term outcome after stroke thrombolysis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a prospective, observational, longitudinal study in consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients presenting with middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion who received intravenous thrombolysis. Patients with acute hyperglycemia (≥155 mg/dL) receiving insulin were excluded. IR was determined during admission by the homeostatic model assessment index (HOMA-IR). Poor long-term outcome, as defined by a day 90 modified Rankin scale score ≥3, was considered the primary outcome variable. Transcranial Duplex-assessed resistance to MCA recanalization and symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation were considered secondary end points. RESULTS A total of 109 thrombolysed MCA ischemic stroke patients were included (43.1% women, mean age 71 years). The HOMA-IR was higher in the group of patients with poor outcome (P = 0.02). The probability of good outcome decreased gradually with increasing HOMA-IR tertiles (80.6%, 1st tertile; 71.4%, 2nd tertile; and 55.3%, upper tertile). A HOMA-IR in the upper tertile was independently associated with poor outcome when compared with the lower tertile (odds ratio [OR] 8.54 [95% CI 1.67–43.55]; P = 0.01) and was associated with more persistent MCA occlusions (OR 8.2 [1.23–54.44]; P = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS High IR may be associated with more persistent arterial occlusions and worse long-term outcome after acute ischemic stroke thrombolysis. PMID:21911778

  4. Specific and combined subjective responses to noise and their association with cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Vandasova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noise is one of the most extensive environmental factors affecting the general population. The present study is focused on the association between discomfort caused by noise and the incidence of certain diseases (ischaemic heart disease, stroke and hypertension. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional questionnaire study, conducted in 10 cities in the Czech Republic, comprises two stages with 3592 obtained questionnaires in the first phase and 762 in the second phase. Twelve variables describe subjective responses to noise from different sources at different times of day. The intensity of the associations between variables was measured by correlation coefficient. Logistic regression was used for fitting models of morbidity, and confounders such as age and socio-economic status were included. The hypotheses from the first phase were independently validated using data from the second phase. Results: The general rates of noise annoyance/sleep disturbance had greater correlation with traffic noise variables than with neighbourhood noise variables. Factors significantly associated with diseases are: for hypertension − annoyance by traffic noise (the elderly, odds ratio (OR 1.4 and sleep disturbance by traffic and neighbourhood noise (the elderly, OR 1.6; for ischaemic heart disease − the general rate of noise annoyance (all respondents, OR 1.5 and the adults 30–60 years, OR 1.8 and the general rate of annoyance and sleep disturbance (all respondents, OR 1.3; for stroke − annoyance and sleep disturbance by traffic and neighbourhood noise (all respondents, OR 1.8. Conclusion: Factors that include multiple sources of noise or non-specific noise are associated with the studied diseases more frequently than the source-specific factors.

  5. Fault zone damage, nonlinear site response, and dynamic triggering associated with seismic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunquan

    My dissertation focuses primarily on the following three aspects associated with passing seismic waves in the field of earthquake seismology: temporal changes of fault zone properties, nonlinear site response, and dynamic triggering. I systematically analyze temporal changes of fault zone (FZ) site response along the Karadere-Duzce branch of the North Anatolian fault that ruptured during the 1999 Izmit and Duzce earthquake sequences. These results provide a bridge between the large-amplitude near-instantaneous changes and the lower-amplitude longer-duration variations observed in previous studies. The temporal changes measured from this high-resolution spectral ratio analysis also provide a refinement for the beginning of the longer more gradual process typically observed by analyzing repeating earthquakes. I use the same sliding-window spectral ratio technique to analyze temporal changes in site response associated with the strong ground motion of the Mw6.6 2004 Mid-Niigata earthquake sequence recorded by the borehole stations in Japanese Digital Strong-Motion Seismograph Network (KiK-Net). The results suggest that at a given site the input ground motion plays an important role in controlling both the coseismic change and postseismic recovery in site response. In a follow-up study, I apply the same sliding-window spectral ratio technique to surface and borehole strong motion records at 6 KiK-Net sites, and stack results associated with different earthquakes that produce similar PGAs. In some cases I observe a weak coseismic drop in the peak frequency when the PGA is as small as ˜20--30 Gal, and near instantaneous recovery after the passage of the direct S waves. The percentage of drop in the peak frequency starts to increase with increasing PGA values. A coseismic drop in the peak spectral ratio is also observed at 2 sites. When the PGA is larger than ˜60 Gal to more than 100 Gal, considerably stronger coseismic drops of the peak frequencies are observed

  6. Association of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) genetic variants with acute bronchodilator response in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Audrey H.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Lazarus, Ross; Xu, Jingsong; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Lima, John J.; Irvin, Charles G.; Hanrahan, John P.; Lange, Christoph; Weiss, Scott T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Corticotropin - releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) participates in smooth muscle relaxation response and may influence acute airway bronchodilator response to short – acting β2 agonist treatment of asthma. We aim to assess associations between genetic variants of CRHR2 and acute bronchodilator response in asthma. Methods We investigated 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms in CRHR2 for associations with acute bronchodilator response to albuterol in 607 Caucasian asthmatic subjects recruited as part of the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Replication was conducted in two Caucasian adult asthma cohorts – a cohort of 427 subjects enrolled in a completed clinical trial conducted by Sepracor Inc. (MA, USA) and a cohort of 152 subjects enrolled in the Clinical Trial of Low-Dose Theopylline and Montelukast (LODO) conducted by the American Lung Association Asthma Clinical Research Centers. Results Five variants were significantly associated with acute bronchodilator response in at least one cohort (p-value ≤ 0.05). Variant rs7793837 was associated in CAMP and LODO (p-value = 0.05 and 0.03, respectively) and haplotype blocks residing at the 5’ end of CRHR2 were associated with response in all three cohorts. Conclusion We report for the first time, at the gene level, replicated associations between CRHR2 and acute bronchodilator response. While no single variant was significantly associated in all three cohorts, the findings that variants at the 5’ end of CRHR2 are associated in each of three cohorts strongly suggest that the causative variants reside in this region and its genetic effect, although present, is likely to be weak. PMID:18408560

  7. Association of hormonal responses and performance of student pilots during acceleration training on the human centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, D.; Rohleder, N.; Welsch, H.

    2005-08-01

    Prediction of student pilots' +Gz tolerance by stress hormone levels would be a useful tool in aviation medicine. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between neuroendocrine parameters with performance during acceleration training on the human centrifuge (HC).We investigated 21 student pilots during self-controlled acceleration training on the HC. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were measured after individual training sessions and at rest. Performance was defined by several characteristics including maximum tolerated acceleration. ACTH and cortisol, were significantly higher 20 minutes after acceleration training compared to the resting condition. Subjects tolerated a maximal acceleration of +6.69 Gz. HPA hormone levels and responses were associated with maximum tolerated acceleration +Gz. These findings support the expectation that acceleration- induced increases in stress hormones may enable the organism to tolerate a higher acceleration and could therefore be used as predictors for acceleration tolerance.

  8. High cortisol awakening response is associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus Per Juul; Lunde, Marianne Anita; Undén, M;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the predictive validity of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in patients with non-seasonal major depression. METHOD: Patients were treated with sertraline in combination with bright or dim light therapy for a 5-week period. Saliva cortisol levels were measured in 63...... patients, as an awakening profile, before medication and light therapy started. The CAR was calculated by using three time-points: awakening and 20 and 60 min after awakening. RESULTS: Patients with low CAR had a very substantial effect of bright light therapy compared with dim light therapy, whereas...... patients with a high CAR had no effect of bright light therapy compared with dim light therapy. CONCLUSION: High CAR was associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy. This result raises the question of whether bright light acts through a mechanism different from...

  9. World marrow donor association crisis response, business continuity, and disaster recovery guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, Julia; Case, Cullen; Amer, Beth; Hornung, Raymond A; Schmidt, Alexander H

    2012-12-01

    Multiple institutions, such as donor registries, donor centers, transplantation centers, collection centers, and courier companies, are involved in the international exchange of hematopoietic stem cells. The ability to safely and efficiently ensure continued operation of a donor registry relies on an organization's resiliency in the face of an incident that could impede donor search, donor selection, stem cell collection, or transportation. The Quality Assurance Working Group of the World Marrow Donor Association has developed guidelines on how to establish an organizational resiliency program intended for donor registries initiating an emergency preparedness process. These guidelines cover the minimal requirements of preparedness in prevention and mitigation, crisis response, business continuity, and disaster recovery, and the need for continued maintenance and revision. Issues of international cooperation are addressed as well.

  10. Dramatic and sustained responsiveness of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis-associated pulmonary hypertension to vasodilator therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Adam; Kane, Garvan; Yi, Eunhee; Frantz, Robert; Vassallo, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is an uncommon diffuse lung disease characterized by the abnormal accumulation of Langerhans' cells around small airways and other distal lung compartments. Although pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a frequent complication of PLCH, the role of advanced PH therapies for PLCH-related PH is not well-established. We describe a PLCH patient with severe, disease-related PH that responded unexpectedly well to advanced PH therapy with sustained improvement over a 10 year follow-up period. This case indicates that PLCH-associated PH may, in certain instances, be highly responsive to advanced PH therapies and emphasizes the importance of trialing these therapies among patients with PLCH-related PH. PMID:26029568

  11. An Investigation of Response Bias Associated with Electronically Delivered Risk-Tolerance Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Grable

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    A randomized experimental study was designed to compare risk-tolerance scores for those who completed a paper-and-pen risk-tolerance assessment instrument (i.e., the control group to those who answered the same questions using an electronic method. It was hypothesized that the possibility of an electronic bias might be present. Controlling for financial knowledge, which was positively associated with risk tolerance, men were found to report much higher risk-tolerance scores than women when responding to electronically delivered questions. Results suggest that financial therapists ought to consider this possibility as a factor that influences responses to risk assessments, especially as they incorporate additional technological evaluation tools into their practice.

  12. Responsive Hydrogels from Associative Block Copolymers: Physical Gelling through Polyion Complexation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M. Papadakis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review article highlights a specific class of responsive polymer-based hydrogels which are formed through association of oppositely charged polyion segments. The underpinning temporary three-dimensional network is constituted of hydrophilic chains (either ionic or neutral physically crosslinked by ion pair formation arising from intermolecular polyionic complexation of oppositely charged repeating units (polyacid/polybase ionic interactions. Two types of hydrogels are presented: (i hydrogels formed by triblock copolymers bearing oppositely charged blocks (block copolyampholytes, forming self-assembled networks; and (ii hydrogels formed by co-assembly of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte segments belonging to different macromolecules (either block copolymers or homopolyelectrolytes. Due to the weak nature of the involved polyions, these hydrogels respond to pH and are sensitive to the presence of salts. Discussing and evaluating their solution, rheological and structural properties in dependence on pH and ionic strength, it comes out that the hydrogel properties are tunable towards potential applications.

  13. A Multivariate Genome-Wide Association Analysis of 10 LDL Subfractions, and Their Response to Statin Treatment, in 1868 Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Heejung; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Joshua D.; Mora, Samia; Ridker, Paul M.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 7 subfractions of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) and 3 subfractions of intermediate density lipoproteins (IDLs) measured by gradient gel electrophoresis, and their response to statin treatment, in 1868 individuals of European ancestry from the Pharmacogenomics and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease study. Our analyses identified four previously-implicated loci (SORT1, APOE, LPA, and CETP) as containing variants that are very strongly associated with lipoprotein subfractions (log10Bayes Factor > 15). Subsequent conditional analyses suggest that three of these (APOE, LPA and CETP) likely harbor multiple independently associated SNPs. Further, while different variants typically showed different characteristic patterns of association with combinations of subfractions, the two SNPs in CETP show strikingly similar patterns - both in our original data and in a replication cohort - consistent with a common underlying molecular mechanism. Notably, the CETP variants are very strongly associated with LDL subfractions, despite showing no association with total LDLs in our study, illustrating the potential value of the more detailed phenotypic measurements. In contrast with these strong subfraction associations, genetic association analysis of subfraction response to statins showed much weaker signals (none exceeding log10Bayes Factor of 6). However, two SNPs (in APOE and LPA) previously-reported to be associated with LDL statin response do show some modest evidence for association in our data, and the subfraction response proles at the LPA SNP are consistent with the LPA association, with response likely being due primarily to resistance of Lp(a) particles to statin therapy. An additional important feature of our analysis is that, unlike most previous analyses of multiple related phenotypes, we analyzed the subfractions jointly, rather than one at a time. Comparisons of our multivariate analyses with standard univariate analyses

  14. Children's food and satiety responsiveness in association with post-prandial glucose following a standardized liquid meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowey, M A; Chandler-Laney, P C

    2017-08-23

    Children's responsiveness to food cues and satiety may put them at greater risk for obesity; however, little is known about the physiological mechanisms underlying children's responsiveness to food and satiety. The objective of this study was to examine the association between children's post-prandial glucose responses and maternal report of their eating behaviours. A secondary data analysis was conducted using partial correlation analyses adjusted for gender in a sample of children aged 5-10 years and their mothers (N = 28 dyads). Standardized liquid meal tests were administered to children and blood samples were obtained over the following 4 h. Mothers completed the Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire. An earlier post-prandial peak glucose concentration was associated with greater food responsiveness (r = -0.39, P = 0.04) but not satiety responsiveness. The percent increase in glucose from fasting to peak also tended to be inversely associated with greater food responsiveness (r = -0.38, P = 0.05). Results suggest that earlier and smaller post-prandial glucose excursions may be related to children's response to food cues. Future research should use objective methods to examine whether the association of post-prandial glucose with food responsiveness prospectively contributes to weight gain. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  15. The MTHFR C677T Variant is Associated with Responsiveness to Disulfiram Treatment for Cocaine Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellicy, Catherine J.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Hamon, Sara C.; Harding, Mark J.; Nielsen, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Disulfiram is a one of the few pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction that shows promise. Since disulfiram and cocaine both affect levels of global methylation we hypothesized the MTHFR gene, whose product is involved in supplying methyl groups for DNA and protein methylation, may be associated with responsiveness to disulfiram in cocaine-dependent individuals. Methods: Sixty-seven cocaine-dependent patients were stabilized on methadone for 2 weeks and then randomized into disulfiram (250 mg/day, N = 32) and placebo groups (N = 35) for 10 weeks. Patients were genotyped for the MTHFR (rs1801133, also known as C677T) polymorphism and the data was evaluated for association with cocaine-free urines in the disulfiram or placebo groups. Data from patients that completed all 10 weeks of the study (N = 56) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), corrected for population structure. Results: The CT or TT MTHFR genotype group (N = 32) dropped from 73 to 52% cocaine-positive urines on disulfiram (p = 0.0001), while the placebo group showed no treatment effect. The CC MTHFR genotype group (N = 24) showed a smaller, but still significant, reduction in cocaine-positive urines on disulfiram compared to placebo; 81–69% (p = 0.007). Conclusion: This study indicates that a patient’s MTHFR genotype may be used to identify individuals who might show improved response to disulfiram treatment for cocaine dependence. Clinical Trial: Pharmacogenetics of Disulfiram for Cocaine, clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00149630, NIDA-18197-2, NCT00149630. PMID:23335901

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase B is associated with the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyi Sun

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC comprises a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC with poor therapeutic outcomes and high glycolytic dependency. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF are currently accepted as standard regimens for HNSCC patients with a high risk of distant metastatic spread. However, the antitumor outcomes of TPF neoadjuvant chemotherapy in HNSCC remain controversial. This study investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB, a key glycolytic enzyme catalyzing the inter-conversion between pyruvate and lactate, in determining chemotherapy response and prognosis in OSCC patients. We discovered that a high protein level of LDHB in OSCC patients was associated with a poor response to TPF regimen chemotherapy as well as poor overall survival and disease-free survival. Our in-depth study revealed that high LDHB expression conferred resistance to taxol but not 5-fluorouracil or cisplatin. LDHB deletion sensitized OSCC cell lines to taxol, whereas the introduction of LDHB decreased sensitivity to taxol treatment. Taxol induced a pronounced impact on LDHB-down-regulated OSCC cells in terms of apoptosis, G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and energy metabolism. In conclusion, our study highlighted the critical role of LDHB in OSCC and proposed that LDHB could be used as a biomarker for the stratification of patients for TPF neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the determination of prognosis in OSCC patients.

  17. Medulloblastoma-associated DDX3 variant selectively alters the translational response to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sekyung; Flynn, Ryan A; Floor, Stephen N; Purzner, James; Martin, Lance; Do, Brian T; Schubert, Simone; Vaka, Dedeepya; Morrissy, Sorana; Li, Yisu; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Northcott, Paul A; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Adams, Christopher M; Leib, Ryan D; Breese, Marcus; Marra, Marco A; Malkin, David; Lichter, Peter; Doudna, Jennifer A; Pfister, Stefan M; Taylor, Michael D; Chang, Howard Y; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2016-05-10

    DDX3X encodes a DEAD-box family RNA helicase (DDX3) commonly mutated in medulloblastoma, a highly aggressive cerebellar tumor affecting both children and adults. Despite being implicated in several facets of RNA metabolism, the nature and scope of DDX3's interactions with RNA remain unclear. Here, we show DDX3 collaborates extensively with the translation initiation machinery through direct binding to 5'UTRs of nearly all coding RNAs, specific sites on the 18S rRNA, and multiple components of the translation initiation complex. Impairment of translation initiation is also evident in primary medulloblastomas harboring mutations in DDX3X, further highlighting DDX3's role in this process. Arsenite-induced stress shifts DDX3 binding from the 5'UTR into the coding region of mRNAs concomitant with a general reduction of translation, and both the shift of DDX3 on mRNA and decreased translation are blunted by expression of a catalytically-impaired, medulloblastoma-associated DDX3R534H variant. Furthermore, despite the global repression of translation induced by arsenite, translation is preserved on select genes involved in chromatin organization in DDX3R534H-expressing cells. Thus, DDX3 interacts extensively with RNA and ribosomal machinery to help remodel the translation landscape in response to stress, while cancer-related DDX3 variants adapt this response to selectively preserve translation.

  18. Enhancer Turnover Is Associated with a Divergent Transcriptional Response to Glucocorticoid in Mouse and Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Alasdair W; Young, Robert S; Hume, David A; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2016-01-15

    Phenotypic differences between individuals and species are controlled in part through differences in expression of a relatively conserved set of genes. Genes expressed in the immune system are subject to especially powerful selection. We have investigated the evolution of both gene expression and candidate enhancers in human and mouse macrophages exposed to glucocorticoid (GC), a regulator of innate immunity and an important therapeutic agent. Our analyses revealed a very limited overlap in the repertoire of genes responsive to GC in human and mouse macrophages. Peaks of inducible binding of the GC receptor (GR) detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation-Seq correlated with induction, but not repression, of target genes in both species, occurred at distal regulatory sites not promoters, and were strongly enriched for the consensus GR-binding motif. Turnover of GR binding between mice and humans was associated with gain and loss of the motif. There was no detectable signal of positive selection at species-specific GR binding sites, but clear evidence of purifying selection at the small number of conserved sites. We conclude that enhancer divergence underlies the difference in transcriptional activation after GC treatment between mouse and human macrophages. Only the shared inducible loci show evidence of selection, and therefore these loci may be important for the subset of responses to GC that is shared between species.

  19. Association between Serum Cortisol and DHEA-S Levels and Response to Antipsychotic Treatment in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoja Babinkostova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggested that alterations in serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. AIM: To compare serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls and to evaluate their association with the response to antipsychotic treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this clinical prospective study were included 60 patients with schizophrenia and 40 healthy age and sex matched control subjects. Clinical evaluation of patients was performed using the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. A questionnaire for socio-demographic and clinical data collection was used. For the purposes of the study, the examined group was divided in two subgroups: responders and nonresponders. Serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels were measured at baseline in all participants and after 3 and 6 weeks of the antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia. RESULTS: Patients with schizophrenia had significantly higher serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels in comparison to the control group. Responders had significantly higher serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels compared with nonresponders. CONCLUSION: Elevated serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and they may be related to positive response to antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia.

  20. An Examination of Personality Traits Associated with Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredborg, Beverley; Clark, Jim; Smith, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a perceptual condition in which the presentation of particular audio-visual stimuli triggers intense, pleasurable tingling sensations in the head and neck regions, which may spread to the periphery of the body. These triggering stimuli are often socially intimate in nature, and usually involve repetition of movements and/or sounds (e.g., hearing whispering, watching someone brush her hair). Reports of ASMR experiences first appeared in online communities in 2010; since this time, these communities have expanded, with some groups consisting of over 100,000 members. However, despite the apparent prevalence of ASMR, there is currently no research on the personality characteristics that co-occur with this condition. In the current study, 290 individuals with ASMR and 290 matched controls completed the Big Five Personality Inventory (BFI; John et al., 1991); participants with ASMR also completed a questionnaire related to their ASMR phenomenology. Individuals with ASMR demonstrated significantly higher scores on Openness-to-Experience and Neuroticism, and significantly lower levels of Conscientiousness, Extraversion, and Agreeableness compared to matched controls. Further, ratings of subjective ASMR intensity in response to 14 common ASMR stimuli were positively correlated with the Openness-to-Experience and Neuroticism dimensions of the BFI. These results provide preliminary evidence that ASMR is associated with specific personality traits and suggest avenues for further investigation. PMID:28280478

  1. The antibody response against MART-1 differs in patients with melanoma-associated leucoderma and vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulings, Hansje-Eva; Willemsen, Karin J; Glykofridis, Iris; Krebbers, Gabrielle; Komen, Lisa; Kroon, Marije W; Kemp, E Helen; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; van der Veen, J P Wietze; Luiten, Rosalie M; Tjin, Esther P M

    2014-11-01

    Patients with melanoma may develop skin depigmentation spontaneously or following therapy, referred to as melanoma-associated leucoderma (MAL). As clinical presentation of MAL may precede primary/metastatic melanoma detection, recognition of MAL is important to prevent its misdiagnosis as vitiligo and the subsequent application of immunosuppressive treatment. To reveal the immunity involved in MAL development, we investigated the presence of antibody and T-cell immune responses directed against the melanocyte-differentiation-antigens MART-1 (Melan-A), tyrosinase and gp100 in patients with MAL, as compared to patients with vitiligo. Autoantibodies to gp100 and tyrosinase were commonly found in both diseases. Interestingly, MART-1 antibodies were only present in patients with MAL. Melanocyte antigen-specific T cells were found in all patients, with relatively more specific T cells in patients with active vitiligo. Although MAL and vitiligo may appear clinically similar, our results indicate that the humoral immune responses against MART-1 differ between these diseases, which can help to differentiate MAL from vitiligo.

  2. Chronic Childhood Peer Rejection is Associated with Heightened Neural Responses to Social Exclusion During Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Geert-Jan; van Lier, Pol A C; Crone, Eveline A; Güroğlu, Berna

    2016-01-01

    This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study examined subjective and neural responses to social exclusion in adolescents (age 12-15) who either had a stable accepted (n = 27; 14 males) or a chronic rejected (n = 19; 12 males) status among peers from age 6 to 12. Both groups of adolescents reported similar increases in distress after being excluded in a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball), but adolescents with a history of chronic peer rejection showed higher activity in brain regions previously linked to the detection of, and the distress caused by, social exclusion. Specifically, compared with stably accepted adolescents, chronically rejected adolescents displayed: 1) higher activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) during social exclusion and 2) higher activity in the dACC and anterior prefrontal cortex when they were incidentally excluded in a social interaction in which they were overall included. These findings demonstrate that chronic childhood peer rejection is associated with heightened neural responses to social exclusion during adolescence, which has implications for understanding the processes through which peer rejection may lead to adverse effects on mental health over time.

  3. No association between the PREP gene and lithium responsive bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grof Paul

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar disorder (BD is a major psychiatric condition that commonly requires prophylactic and episodic treatment. Lithium (Li has been used for over 40 years now as an effective prophylactic agent. Response to Li treatment seems to be, at least in part, genetically determined. Although we ignore how Li specifically prevents mood episodes, it has previously been suggested that Li exerts an effect on the phosphoinositide pathway, and more recently, it has been proposed that Li may modulate prolyl endopeptidase (PREP. Methods In this study we carried out an association study looking at the PREP gene, located on ch 6q22. Five intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, three coding SNPs and one SNP in the 5' UTR were investigated for their frequency in a BD sample of 180 excellent Li responders, 69 Li nonresponders and 126 controls. Genotyping was carried out using the SNaPshot reaction from Applied Biosystems, which is a modified fluorescent single base pair extension procedure. Results Following correction for multiple testing, no significant genotypic, allelic or estimated haplotypic differences were found between responders and nonresponders or between BD patients and controls. Conclusion PREP is an interesting candidate gene to investigate in genetic studies of BD, but our findings do not support the hypothesis that genetic variation in this gene plays a major role in the etiology of BD or Li response.

  4. Cancer associated aberrant protein O-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Madsen

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation of mucins and other extracellular proteins is an important event in carcinogenesis and the resulting cancer associated glycans have been suggested as targets in cancer immunotherapy. We assessed the role of O-linked GalNAc glycosylation on antigen uptake, processing, and presentation on MHC class I and II molecules. The effect of GalNAc O-glycosylation was monitored with a model system based on ovalbumin (OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides (+/- glycosylation loaded onto dendritic cells co-cultured with IL-2 secreting OVA peptide-specific T cell hybridomas. To evaluate the in vivo response to a cancer related tumor antigen, Balb/c or B6.Cg(CB-Tg(HLA-A/H2-D2Enge/J (HLA-A2 transgenic mice were immunized with a non-glycosylated or GalNAc-glycosylated MUC1 derived peptide followed by comparison of T cell proliferation, IFN-γ release, and antibody induction. GalNAc-glycosylation promoted presentation of OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides by MHC class II molecules and the MUC1 antigen elicited specific Ab production and T cell proliferation in both Balb/c and HLA-A2 transgenic mice. In contrast, GalNAc-glycosylation inhibited the presentation of OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides by MHC class I and abolished MUC1 specific CD8+ T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. GalNAc glycosylation of MUC1 antigen therefore facilitates uptake, MHC class II presentation, and antibody response but might block the antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells.

  5. Tissue contaminants and associated transcriptional response in trout liver from high elevation lakes of Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.W.; Aluru, N.; Black, R.W.; Vijayan, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The consistent cold temperatures and large amount of precipitation in the Olympic and Cascade ranges of Washington State are thought to enhance atmospheric deposition of contaminants. However, little is known about contaminant levels in organisms residing in these remote high elevation lakes. We measured total mercury and 28 organochlorine compounds in trout collected from 14 remote lakes in the Olympic, Mt. Rainer, and North Cascades National Parks. Mercury was detected in trout from all lakes sampled (15 to 262 ??g/kg ww), while two organochlorines, total polychlorinated biphenyls (tPCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), were also detected in these fish tissues (<25 ??g/kg ww). In sediments, organochlorine levels were below detection, while median total and methyl mercury were 30.4 and 0.34 ??g/ kg dry weight (ww), respectively. Using fish from two lakes, representing different contaminant loading levels (Wilcox lake: high; Skymo lake: low), we examined transcriptional response in the liver using a custom-made low-density targeted rainbow trout cDNA microarray. We detected significant differences in liver transcriptional response, including significant changes in metabolic, endocrine, and immune-related genes, in fish collected from Wilcox Lake compared to Skymo Lake. Overall, our results suggest that local urban areas contribute to the observed contaminant patterns in these high elevation lakes, while the transcriptional changes point to a biological response associated with exposure to these contaminants in fish. Specifically, the gene expression pattern leads us to hypothesize a role for mercury in disrupting the metabolic and reproductive pathways in fish from high elevation lakes in western Washington. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  6. Regional brain responses associated with drinking water during thirst and after its satiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Pascal; Farrell, Michael J; Adib, Faiz R M; Egan, Gary F; McKinley, Michael J; Denton, Derek A

    2014-04-08

    The instinct of thirst was a cardinal element in the successful colonization by vertebrates of the dry land of the planet, which began in the Ordovician period about 400 million y ago. It is a commonplace experience in humans that drinking water in response to thirst following fluid loss is a pleasant experience. However, continuing to drink water once thirst has been satiated becomes unpleasant and, eventually, quite aversive. Functional MRI experiments reported here show pleasantness of drinking is associated with activation in the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann area 32) and the orbitofrontal cortex. The unpleasantness and aversion of overdrinking is associated with activation in the midcingulate cortex, insula, amygdala, and periaqueductal gray. Drinking activations in the putamen and cerebellum also correlated with the unpleasantness of water, and the motor cortex showed increased activation during overdrinking compared with drinking during thirst. These activations in motor regions may possibly reflect volitional effort to conduct compliant drinking in the face of regulatory mechanisms inhibiting intake. The results suggestive of a specific inhibitory system in the control of drinking are unique.

  7. Blunted heart rate recovery is associated with exaggerated blood pressure response during exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Umuttan; Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Gok, Hasan

    2013-11-01

    Increased sympathetic activity and endothelial dysfunction are the proposed mechanisms underlying exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise (EBPR). However, data regarding heart rate behavior in patients with EBPR are lacking. We hypothesized that heart rate recovery (HRR) could be impaired in patients with EBPR. A total of 75 normotensive subjects who were referred for exercise treadmill test examination and experienced EBPR were included to this cross-sectional case-control study. The control group consisted of 75 age- and gender-matched normotensive subjects without EBPR. EBPR was defined as a peak exercise systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥210 mmHg in men and ≥190 mmHg in women. HRR was defined as the difference in HR from peak exercise to 1 min in recovery; abnormal HRR was defined as ≤12 beats/min. These parameters were compared with respect to occurrence of EBPR. Mean values of systolic and diastolic BP at baseline, peak exercise, and the first minute of the recovery were significantly higher in the subjects with EBPR. Mean HRR values were significantly lower (P exercise, a linear correlation existed between the degree of HRR and decrease in systolic BP during the recovery period. However, such a correlation was not found in subjects with EBPR. Our data suggest that mechanisms underlying the blunting of the HRR might be associated with the genesis of EBPR. The association between the extent of HRR and adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with EBPR needs to be investigated in detail in future research.

  8. Associations of airway inflammation and responsiveness markers in non asthmatic subjects at start of apprenticeship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tossa Paul

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness (BHR is considered a hallmark of asthma. Other methods are helpful in epidemiological respiratory health studies including Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FENO and Eosinophils Percentage (EP in nasal lavage fluid measuring markers for airway inflammation along with the Forced Oscillatory Technique measuring Airway resistance (AR. Can their outcomes discriminate profiles of respiratory health in healthy subjects starting apprenticeship in occupations with a risk of asthma? Methods Rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma-like symptoms, FEV1 and AR post-Methacholine Bronchial Challenge (MBC test results, FENO measurements and EP were all investigated in apprentice bakers, pastry-makers and hairdressers not suffering from asthma. Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA was simultaneously conducted in relation to these groups and this generated a synthetic partition (EI. Associations between groups of subjects based on BHR and EI respectively, as well as risk factors, symptoms and investigations were also assessed. Results Among the 441 apprentice subjects, 45 (10% declared rhinoconjunctivitis-like symptoms, 18 (4% declared asthma-like symptoms and 26 (6% suffered from BHR. The mean increase in AR post-MBC test was 21% (sd = 20.8%. The median of FENO values was 12.6 ppb (2.6-132 range. Twenty-six subjects (6.7% had EP exceeding 14%. BHR was associated with atopy (p Conclusions Are any of the identified markers predictive of increased inflammatory responsiveness or of development of symptoms caused by occupational exposures? Analysis of population follow-up will attempt to answer this question.

  9. Proteins of Leishmania (Viannia shawi confer protection associated with Th1 immune response and memory generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passero Luiz Felipe D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania (Viannia shawi parasite was first characterized in 1989. Recently the protective effects of soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA from L. (V. shawi promastigotes were demonstrated using BALB/c mice, the susceptibility model for this parasite. In order to identify protective fractions, SLA was fractionated by reverse phase HPLC and five antigenic fractions were obtained. Methods F1 fraction was purified from L. (V. shawi parasite extract by reverse phase HPLC. BALB/c mice were immunized once a week for two consecutive weeks by subcutaneous routes in the rump, using 25 μg of F1. After 1 and 16 weeks of last immunization, groups were challenged in the footpad with L. (V. shawi promastigotes. After 2 months, those same mice were sacrificed and parasite burden, cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated. Results The F1 fraction induced a high degree of protection associated with an increase in IFN-γ, a decrease in IL-4, increased cell proliferation and activation of CD8+T lymphocytes. Long-term protection was acquired in F1-immunized mice, associated with increased CD4+ central memory T lymphocytes and activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, F1-immunized groups showed an increase in IgG2a levels. Conclusions The inductor capability of antigens to generate memory lymphocytes that can proliferate and secrete beneficial cytokines upon infection could be an important factor in the development of vaccine candidates against American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis.

  10. Growth and yield of corn hybrids in response to association with Azospirillum brasilense and nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniele Marini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in optimizing the positive effects of the association between Azospirillum bacteria and corn crop in order to reduce the use of nitrogen fertilizers. This study aimed to evaluate the inoculation efficiency of an A. brasilense-based commercial product in association with different rates of nitrogen fertilization in two corn genotypes. The experiment was arranged in a 2 x 2 x 5 factorial randomized block design, with four replications. The treatments consisted of two corn hybrids (30F53 and CD386; with and without inoculation with a commercial product based on A. brasilense and five nitrogen rates (0, 40, 80, 120 and 160 kg ha-1. The variables plant height, basal stem diameter, leaf area, shoot dry matter, leaf nitrogen content, length and diameter of the cob, weight of 100 grains and grain yield were evaluated. Inoculation with A. brasilense provided increases of 11 and 12% in leaf area and shoot dry matter, respectively. There were differences in the response of the corn hybrids for most variables and the increase in nitrogen supply provided increments in the growth and yield of corn.

  11. Duration of exclusive breastfeeding is associated with differences in infants' brain responses to emotional body expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Kathleen M; Rajhans, Purva; Missana, Manuela; Grossmann, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Much research has recognized the general importance of maternal behavior in the early development and programing of the mammalian offspring's brain. Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) duration, the amount of time in which breastfed meals are the only source of sustenance, plays a prominent role in promoting healthy brain and cognitive development in human children. However, surprisingly little is known about the influence of breastfeeding on social and emotional development in infancy. In the current study, we examined whether and how the duration of EBF impacts the neural processing of emotional signals by measuring electro-cortical responses to body expressions in 8-month-old infants. Our analyses revealed that infants with high EBF experience show a significantly greater neural sensitivity to happy body expressions than those with low EBF experience. Moreover, regression analyses revealed that the neural bias toward happiness or fearfulness differs as a function of the duration of EBF. Specifically, longer breastfeeding duration is associated with a happy bias, whereas shorter breastfeeding duration is associated with a fear bias. These findings suggest that breastfeeding experience can shape the way in which infants respond to emotional signals.

  12. Acetazolamide-responsive exercise-induced episodic ataxia associated with a novel homozygous DARS2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Schicks, Julia; Lindig, Tobias; Biskup, Saskia; Schmidt, Thorsten; Hansel, Jochen; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Schöls, Ludger

    2011-10-01

    Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and brain lactate elevation (LBSL) was recently shown to be caused by mutations in the DARS2 gene, encoding a mitochondrial aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. So far, affected individuals were invariably compound heterozygous for two mutations in DARS2, and drug treatments have remained elusive. Prospective 2-year follow-up of the natural history of the main presenting symptoms in a homozygous DARS2 mutation carrier, followed by a 60 day treatment with acetazolamide in two different doses and with two random treatment interruptions. The patient presented with exercise-induced paroxysmal gait ataxia and areflexia as an atypical phenotype associated with a novel homozygous DARS2 mutation. These features showed an excellent dose-dependent, sustained treatment response to a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Pathogenic mutations in episodic ataxia genes were excluded, thus making it highly unlikely that this phenotype was because of episodic ataxia as a second disorder besides LBSL. This case demonstrates that DARS2 mutation homozygosity is not lethal, as suggested earlier, but compatible with a rather benign disease course. More importantly, it extends the phenotypic spectrum of LBSL and reveals that at least some DARS2-associated phenotypic features might be readily treatable. However, future observations of paroxsymal ataxia and, possibly, areflexia in other DARS2-mutated patients are warranted to further corroborate our finding that DARS2 mutations can lead to a paroxsymal ataxia phenotype.

  13. MATE2 Expression Is Associated with Cancer Cell Response to Metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintilie, Melania; Muaddi, Hala; Chaib, Selim; Yeung, ManTek; Fusciello, Manlio; Sykes, Jenna; Pitcher, Bethany; Hagenkort, Anna; McKee, Trevor; Vellanki, Ravi; Chen, Eric; Bristow, Robert G.; Wouters, Bradly G.; Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Background There is great interest in repurposing the commonly prescribed anti-diabetic drug metformin for cancer therapy. Intracellular uptake and retention of metformin is affected by the expression of organic cation transporters (OCT) 1–3 and by multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) 1–2. Inside cells, metformin inhibits mitochondrial function, which leads to reduced oxygen consumption and inhibition of proliferation. Reduced oxygen consumption can lead to improved tumor oxygenation and radiation response. Purpose Here we sought to determine if there is an association between the effects of metformin on inhibiting oxygen consumption, proliferation and expression of OCTs and MATEs in a panel of 19 cancer cell lines. Results There was relatively large variability in the anti-proliferative response of different cell lines to metformin, with a subset of cell lines being very resistant. In contrast, all cell lines demonstrated sensitivity to the inhibition of oxygen consumption by metformin, with relatively small variation. The expression of OCT1 correlated with expression of both OCT2 and OCT3. OCT1 and OCT2 were relatively uniformly expressed, whereas expression of OCT3, MATE1 and MATE2 showed substantial variation across lines. There were statistically significant associations between resistance to inhibition of proliferation and MATE2 expression, as well as between sensitivity to inhibition of oxygen consumption and OCT3 expression. One cell line (LNCaP) with high OCT3 and low MATE2 expression in concert, had substantially higher intracellular metformin concentration than other cell lines, and was exquisitely sensitive to both anti-proliferative and anti-respiratory effects. In all other cell lines, the concentration of metformin required to inhibit oxygen consumption acutely in vitro was substantially higher than that achieved in the plasma of diabetic patients. However, administering anti-diabetic doses of metformin to tumor-bearing mice resulted in

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies SESTD1 as a novel risk gene for lithium-responsive bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J; Bergen, S E; Di Florio, A; Karlsson, R; Charney, A; Ruderfer, D M; Stahl, E A; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; Gordon-Smith, K; Forty, L; Green, E K; Jones, I; Jones, L; Scolnick, E M; Sklar, P; Smoller, J W; Lichtenstein, P; Hultman, C; Craddock, N; Landén, M; Smoller, Jordan W; Perlis, Roy H; Lee, Phil Hyoun; Castro, Victor M; Hoffnagle, Alison G; Sklar, Pamela; Stahl, Eli A; Purcell, Shaun M; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Charney, Alexander W; Roussos, Panos; Michele Pato, Carlos Pato; Medeiros, Helen; Sobel, Janet; Craddock, Nick; Jones, Ian; Forty, Liz; Florio, Arianna Di; Green, Elaine; Jones, Lisa; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Landen, Mikael; Hultman, Christina; Jureus, Anders; Bergen, Sarah; McCarroll, Steven; Moran, Jennifer; Smoller, Jordan W; Chambert, Kimberly; Belliveau, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    Lithium is the mainstay prophylactic treatment for bipolar disorder (BD), but treatment response varies considerably across individuals. Patients who respond well to lithium treatment might represent a relatively homogeneous subtype of this genetically and phenotypically diverse disorder. Here, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify (i) specific genetic variations influencing lithium response and (ii) genetic variants associated with risk for lithium-responsive BD. Patients with BD and controls were recruited from Sweden and the United Kingdom. GWAS were performed on 2698 patients with subjectively defined (self-reported) lithium response and 1176 patients with objectively defined (clinically documented) lithium response. We next conducted GWAS comparing lithium responders with healthy controls (1639 subjective responders and 8899 controls; 323 objective responders and 6684 controls). Meta-analyses of Swedish and UK results revealed no significant associations with lithium response within the bipolar subjects. However, when comparing lithium-responsive patients with controls, two imputed markers attained genome-wide significant associations, among which one was validated in confirmatory genotyping (rs116323614, P=2.74 × 10(-8)). It is an intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on chromosome 2q31.2 in the gene SEC14 and spectrin domains 1 (SESTD1), which encodes a protein involved in regulation of phospholipids. Phospholipids have been strongly implicated as lithium treatment targets. Furthermore, we estimated the proportion of variance for lithium-responsive BD explained by common variants ('SNP heritability') as 0.25 and 0.29 using two definitions of lithium response. Our results revealed a genetic variant in SESTD1 associated with risk for lithium-responsive BD, suggesting that the understanding of BD etiology could be furthered by focusing on this subtype of BD.

  15. Specific predictive power of automatic spider-related affective associations for controllable and uncontrollable fear responses toward spiders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Huijding (Jorg); P.J. de Jong (Peter)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis study examined the predictive power of automatically activated spider-related affective associations for automatic and controllable fear responses. The Extrinsic Affective Simon Task (EAST; De Houwer, 2003) was used to indirectly assess automatic spider fear-related associations. Th

  16. Dairy consumption is inversely associated with type 2 diabetes: dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Observational studies suggest an inverse association between dairy intake and incident type 2 diabetes, but the quantity of dairy is not known. Previous meta-analyses did not take into account the type of dairy product. Therefore, we examined dose-response associations between the intake of total

  17. Specific predictive power of automatic spider-related affective associations for controllable and uncontrollable fear responses toward spiders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijdlng, J; de Jong, PJ; Huijding, J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the predictive power of automatically activated spider-related affective associations for automatic and controllable fear responses. The Extrinsic Affective Simon Task (EAST; De Houwer, 2003) was used to indirectly assess automatic spider fear-related associations. The EAST and t

  18. A non-linear association between self-reported negative emotional response to stress and subsequent allostatic load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Nadya; Doan, Stacey N; Kivimäki, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Previous research suggests that high levels of negative emotions may affect health. However, it is likely that the absence of an emotional response following stressful events may also be problematic. Accordingly, we investigated whether a non-linear association exists between negative emotional...... cardiovascular, metabolic and immune function biomarkers at three clinical follow-up examinations. A non-linear association between negative emotional response and allostatic load was observed: being at either extreme end of the distribution of negative emotional response increased the risk of physiological...

  19. Weight loss, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia associated with sustained virologic response to Hepatitis C treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuntra Suwantarat, Alan D. Tice, Thana Khawcharoenporn, Dominic C. Chow

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify apparent adverse effects of treatment of chronic hepatitis C and their relationship to sustained virologic response (SVR. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted of all Hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in an academic ambulatory infectious disease practice. Clinical and laboratory characteristics were compared between patients with SVR and without SVR. RESULTS: Fifty-four patients completed therapy with the overall SVR rate of 76%. SVR was associated with genotype non-1 (P=0.01, weight loss more than 5 kilograms (P=0.04, end of treatment leukopenia (P=0.02 and thrombocytopenia (P=0.05. In multivariate analysis, SVR was significant associated with HCV genotype non-1 (Adjusted Odd Ratio [AOR] 15.22; CI 1.55 to 149.72; P=0.02, weight loss more than 5 kilograms, (AOR 5.74; CI 1.24 to 26.32; P=0.04, and end of treatment white blood cell count level less than 3 X 103 cells/µl (AOR 9.09; CI 1.59 to 52.63; P=0.02. Thrombocytopenia was not significant after adjustment. Other factors including age, gender, ethnicity, injection drug use, viral load, anemia, alanine transaminase level, and liver histology did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Besides non-1 genotype, SVR was found to be independently associated with weight loss during therapy, and leukopenia at the end of HCV treatment. These correlations suggest continuation of therapy despite adverse effects, may be of benefit.

  20. Network-based association of hypoxia-responsive genes with cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Oldham, William M.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Molecular oxygen is indispensable for cellular viability and function. Hypoxia is a stress condition in which oxygen demand exceeds supply. Low cellular oxygen content induces a number of molecular changes to activate regulatory pathways responsible for increasing the oxygen supply and optimizing cellular metabolism under limited oxygen conditions. Hypoxia plays critical roles in the pathobiology of many diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, stroke, and chronic lung diseases. Although the complicated associations between hypoxia and cardiovascular (and cerebrovascular) diseases (CVD) have been recognized for some time, there are few studies that investigate their biological link from a systems biology perspective. In this study, we integrate hypoxia genes, CVD genes, and the human protein interactome in order to explore the relationship between hypoxia and cardiovascular diseases at a systems level. We show that hypoxia genes are much closer to CVD genes in the human protein interactome than that expected by chance. We also find that hypoxia genes play significant bridging roles in connecting different cardiovascular diseases. We construct a hypoxia-CVD bipartite network and find several interesting hypoxia-CVD modules with significant gene ontology similarity. Finally, we show that hypoxia genes tend to have more CVD interactors in the human interactome than in random networks of matching topology. Based on these observations, we can predict novel genes that may be associated with CVD. This network-based association study gives us a broad view of the relationships between hypoxia and cardiovascular diseases and provides new insights into the role of hypoxia in cardiovascular biology.

  1. Proinflammatory responses driven by non-gluten factors are masked when they appear associated to gliadins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliszewska, A; Martinez, V; Laparra, J M

    2016-09-01

    Cereal proteins are of clinical interest because of their cytotoxic and immunogenic features being associated to allergic processes and intestinal disorders. In addition to gliadins, there has been suggested an important role for non-gluten modulating factors (nGMF) on the onset of intestinal inflammatory processes. In this study, the amino acid sequences generated after a simulated human gastrointestinal (sGI) digestion of a commercial extract of gliadins (GEF) and the nGMF-enriched fraction (nGEF) obtained from them were characterized (nanoESI-qQTOF). These fractions were fed (20 days) to Wistar rats, sensitized with interferon (IFN)-γ (1000 IU/rat) and further treated with indomethacin (2 mg/kg). The production of inflammatory mediators (ELISAs) and the expression (rt-qPCR) of innate biomarkers was monitored in duodenal tissue sections. There were also evaluated changes in defined leukocyte (flow cytometry) populations quantified in peripheral blood samples. Expected nGMF components, CM3 and 0.19, as well as toxic gliadin-derived peptides were generated after sGI digestion. Rats fed with the nGEF showed higher concentrations of IFNγ, as well as expression levels of TLR-4 and the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α in duodenal samples than those animals fed with GEF. Rats fed with GEF showed higher expression levels of the endocannabinoid receptor-1 and an increased CD4(+)CD3(+)Foxp3(+) cell population. The data points out significant different cytotoxic and immunogenic potential of the nGEF when administered independently of the GEF to which are commonly associated. However, proinflammatory responses to nGMF are masked when present associated to gliadins.

  2. Situational vs. dispositional measurement of catastrophizing: Associations with pain responses in multiple samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Claudia M.; Kronfli, Tarek; Buenaver, Luis F.; Smith, Michael T.; Berna, Chantal; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    Catastrophizing is widely recognized as an important risk factor for adverse pain-related outcomes. However, questions remain surrounding the details of its assessment. In particular, recent laboratory studies suggest that evaluation of “situational” catastrophizing (i.e., catastrophizing measured during or directly after the administration of noxious stimulation) may provide information distinct from that obtained by standard, or “dispositional” measures which assess individuals’ recall of catastrophizing in daily life. However, comparatively little research has systematically investigated the inter-relationships and properties of these two different forms of pain-related catastrophizing. The current study evaluated both situational and dispositional catastrophizing measures within multiple samples: healthy individuals (N=84), patients with painful temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD; N=48), and patients with painful arthritis (N=43). All participants first completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS)49, and then underwent psychophysical pain testing, which included heat, cold, and pressure pain. Participants then completed a situational catastrophizing measure with reference to the laboratory pain he/she had just undergone. Situational catastrophizing scores were not significantly correlated with dispositional PCS scores in the healthy participants and arthritis patients, though they were associated in TMD patients. Situational catastrophizing was more strongly associated with experimental pain responses than dispositional PCS scores for the healthy subjects and arthritis patients. In general, higher levels of situational catastrophizing were associated with lower pain thresholds and higher pain ratings across all 3 samples. The findings highlight the importance of multi-dimensional assessment of pain-related catastrophizing, and suggests a role for measuring catastrophizing related to specific, definable events. PMID:20439057

  3. Association of coral algal symbionts with a diverse viral community responsive to heat shock

    KAUST Repository

    Brüwer, Jan D.

    2017-08-17

    Stony corals provide the structural foundation of coral reef ecosystems and are termed holobionts given they engage in symbioses, in particular with photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. Besides Symbiodinium, corals also engage with bacteria affecting metabolism, immunity, and resilience of the coral holobiont, but the role of associated viruses is largely unknown. In this regard, the increase of studies using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to assess gene expression provides an opportunity to elucidate viral signatures encompassed within the data via careful delineation of sequence reads and their source of origin.Here, we re-analyzed an RNA-Seq dataset from a cultured coral symbiont (Symbiodinium microadriaticum, Clade A1) across four experimental treatments (control, cold shock, heat shock, dark shock) to characterize associated viral diversity, abundance, and gene expression. Our approach comprised the filtering and removal of host sequence reads, subsequent phylogenetic assignment of sequence reads of putative viral origin, and the assembly and analysis of differentially expressed viral genes. About 15.46% (123 million) of all sequence reads were non-host-related, of which <1% could be classified as archaea, bacteria, or virus. Of these, 18.78% were annotated as virus and comprised a diverse community consistent across experimental treatments. Further, non-host related sequence reads assembled into 56,064 contigs, including 4856 contigs of putative viral origin that featured 43 differentially expressed genes during heat shock. The differentially expressed genes included viral kinases, ubiquitin, and ankyrin repeat proteins (amongst others), which are suggested to help the virus proliferate and inhibit the algal host\\'s antiviral response.Our results suggest that a diverse viral community is associated with coral algal endosymbionts of the genus Symbiodinium, which prompts further research on their ecological role in coral health and resilience.

  4. Isoprene Responses and Functions in Plants Challenged by Environmental Pressures Associated to Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Fini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The functional reasons for isoprene emission are still a matter of hot debate. It was hypothesized that isoprene biosynthesis evolved as an ancestral mechanism in plants adapted to high water availability, to cope with transient and recurrent oxidative stresses during their water-to-land transition. There is a tight association between isoprene emission and species hygrophily, suggesting that isoprene emission may be a favorable trait to cope with occasional exposure to stresses in mesic environments. The suite of morpho-anatomical traits does not allow a conservative water use in hygrophilic mesophytes challenged by the environmental pressures imposed or exacerbated by drought and heat stress. There is evidence that in stressed plants the biosynthesis of isoprene is uncoupled from photosynthesis. Because the biosynthesis of isoprene is costly, the great investment of carbon and energy into isoprene must have relevant functional reasons. Isoprene is effective in preserving the integrity of thylakoid membranes, not only through direct interaction with their lipid acyl chains, but also by up-regulating proteins associated with photosynthetic complexes and enhancing the biosynthesis of relevant membrane components, such as mono- and di-galactosyl-diacyl glycerols and unsaturated fatty acids. Isoprene may additionally protect photosynthetic membranes by scavenging reactive oxygen species. Here we explore the mode of actions and the potential significance of isoprene in the response of hygrophilic plants when challenged by severe stress conditions associated to rapid climate change in temperate climates, with special emphasis to the concomitant effect of drought and heat. We suggest that isoprene emission may be not a good estimate for its biosynthesis and concentration in severely droughted leaves, being the internal concentration of isoprene the important trait for stress protection.

  5. Suppression of adipogenesis by pathogenic seipin mutant is associated with inflammatory response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While pathogenic mutations in BSCL2/Seipin cause congenital generalized lipodystrophy, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether and how the pathogenic missense A212P mutation of Seipin (Seipin-A212P inhibits adipogenesis. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: We analyzed gene expression and lipid accumulation in stable 3T3-L1 cell lines expressing wild type (3T3-WT, non-lipodystrophic mutants N88S (3T3-N88S and S90L (3T3-S90L, or lipodystrophic mutant A212P Seipin (3T3-A212P. When treated with adipogenic cocktail, 3T3-WT, 3T3-N88S and 3T3-S90L cells exhibited proper differentiation into mature adipocytes, indistinguishable from control 3T3-L1 cells. In contrast, adipogenesis was significantly impaired in 3T3-A212P cells. The defective adipogenesis in 3T3-A212P cells could be partially rescued by either PPARγ agonist or PPARγ overexpression. Gene expression profiling by microarray revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis was associated with activation of inflammatory genes including IL-6 and iNOS. We further demonstrated that Seipin-A212P expression at pre-differentiation stages significantly activated inflammatory responses by using an inducible expression system. The inflammation-associated inhibition of adipogenesis could be rescued by treatment with anti-inflammatory agents. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that pathogenic Seipin-A212P inhibits adipogenesis and the inhibition is associated with activation of inflammatory pathways at pre-differentiation stages. Use of anti-inflammatory drugs may be a potential strategy for the treatment of lipodystrophy.

  6. Glycyrrhizin inhibits the manifestations of anti-inflammatory responses that appear in association with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)-like reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Miwa; Kobayashi, Makiko; Herndon, David N; Pollard, Richard B; Suzuki, Fujio

    2006-09-01

    In association with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), anti-inflammatory response syndrome is commonly manifested in patients with trauma, burn injury, and after major surgery. These patients are increasingly susceptible to infection with various pathogens due to the excessive release of anti-inflammatory cytokines from anti-inflammatory effector cells. Recently, CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) found in the sera of mice with pancreatitis was identified as an active molecule for SIRS-associated anti-inflammatory response manifestation. Also, the inhibitory activity of glycyrrhizin (GL) on CCL2 production was reported. Therefore, the effect of GL on SIRS-associated anti-inflammatory response manifestation was investigated in a murine SIRS model. Without any stimulation, splenic T cells from mice 5 days after SIRS induction produced cytokines associated with anti-inflammatory response manifestation. However, these cytokines were not produced by splenic T cells from SIRS mice previously treated with GL. In dual-chamber transwells, IL-4-producing cells were generated from normal T cells cultured with peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from SIRS mice. However, IL-4-producing cells were not generated from normal T cells in transwell cultures performed with PMN from GL-treated SIRS mice. CCL2 was produced by PMN from SIRS mice, while this chemokine was not demonstrated in cultures of PMN from SIRS mice treated with GL. These results indicate that GL has the capacity to suppress SIRS-associated anti-inflammatory response manifestation through the inhibition of CCL2 production by PMN.

  7. Genetic Variation in the TLR5 Locus Is Associated with Anti-TNF Response Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    linkage data exists) previously found to be associated with RA anti-TNF response in a Dutch cohort (1) and it has been associated with higher PBMC IFN-γ secretion and altered CCL20 production. TLR1 rs4833095 has been associated with high PBMC TLR1 expression. Subgroup associations were found......Background/Purpose: In a recent study (paper in press) of Danish rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients we found single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NLRP3 and interferon-γ genes to be associated with response to tumor necrosis factor a inhibitors (anti-TNF). The aim of this study...... was to extend and corroborate these associations by analyzing a new set of functional polymorphisms in the NLRP3-inflammasome and interferon-γ pathways in RA patients treated with anti-TNF. Methods: Twenty-three functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 14 genes involved in the inflammasome...

  8. In vitro cytokine responses to periodontal pathogens: generalized aggressive periodontitis is associated with increased IL-6 response to Porphyromonas gingivalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, T S; Holmstrup, Palle; Bendtzen, K

    2010-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) is an inflammatory condition resulting in destruction of tooth-supporting tissues. We examined the production of IL-1beta, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-12 and IL-10 in cultures of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) from 10 patients...... from two donors free of disease were stimulated with this bacterium in the presence of the various patient and control sera. An elevated IL-6 and TNF-alpha response was observed in the presence of patient sera (P ... occurs in GAgP, and that pro-inflammatory serum factors play an essential role in the response....

  9. Anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis patients is associated with genetic variation in the NLRP3-inflammasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from tumor necrosis factor-α blocking treatment (anti-TNF), but about one third do not respond. The objective of this study was to replicate and extend previously found associations between anti-TNF treatment response and genetic...... logistic regression analyses were performed to test associations between genotypes and treatment response at 3-6 months using the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criterion. American College of Rheumatology treatment response (ACR50) and relative change in 28-joint disease activity score...... (relDAS28) were used as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses were stratified according to smoking status, type of anti-TNF drug and IgM-Rheumatoid Factor (IgM-RF) status. False discovery rate (FDR) controlling was used to adjust for multiple testing. RESULTS: Statistically significant associations...

  10. Association between tumor tissue TIMP-1 levels and objective response to first-line chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klintman, Marie; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study from our laboratory, high tumor levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) have been associated with an adverse response to chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer suggesting that TIMP-1, which is known to inhibit apoptosis, may be a new predictive marker...... in this disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between TIMP-1 and objective response to chemotherapy in an independent patient population consisting of patients with metastatic breast cancer from Sweden and Denmark. TIMP-1 was measured using ELISA in 162 primary tumor extracts from...... patients who later developed metastatic breast cancer and these levels were related to the objective response to first-line chemotherapy. Increasing levels of TIMP-1 were associated with a decreasing probability of response to treatment, reaching borderline significance (OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 0.97-2.62, P = 0...

  11. Genetic variants in the apelin system and blood pressure responses to dietary sodium interventions: a family-based association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Hixson, James E; Rao, Dabeeru C; Gu, Dongfeng; Jaquish, Cashell E; Rice, Treva; Shimmin, Lawrence C; Chen, Jichun; Cao, Jie; Kelly, Tanika N; Hamm, Lotuce Lee; He, Jiang

    2010-04-01

    We examined the association between genetic variants in the apelin system and blood pressure (BP) responses to low-sodium and high-sodium interventions in the GenSalt Study. A 7-day low-sodium intervention (51.3 mmol sodium per day) followed by a 7-day high-sodium intervention (307.8 mmol sodium per day) was conducted among 1906 participants from 637 Han Chinese families. BP measurements were obtained at baseline and following each intervention using a random-zero sphygmomanometer. Twenty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including both tag and functional SNPs, were selected from three candidate genes (APLN, APLNR, and ACE2). Single marker and haplotype analyses were conducted using the Family Based Association Test program. The false discovery rate method was used to correct for multiple testing. SNPs rs2282623 and rs746886 of the APLNR gene were significantly associated with DBP (both P = 0.002) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) (P = 0.001 and 0.005, respectively) responses to low-sodium intervention. Six SNPs of the ACE2 gene were significantly associated with SBP, DBP, or MAP responses to low-sodium intervention. Three of them, rs1514283, rs1514282, and rs4646176, were also significantly associated with MAP response to high-sodium intervention (all P family-based study indicates that genetic variants in the APLNR and ACE2 genes are significantly associated with BP responses to dietary sodium intervention.

  12. There is more than "more is up": Hand and foot responses reverse the vertical association of number magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Matthias; Gashaj, Venera; Stahnke, Antje; Mast, Fred W

    2014-08-01

    Recent research in cognitive sciences shows a growing interest in spatial-numerical associations. The horizontal SNARC (spatial-numerical association of response codes) effect is defined by faster left-sided responses to small numbers and faster right-sided responses to large numbers in a parity judgment task. In this study we investigated whether there is also a SNARC effect for upper and lower responses. The grounded cognition approach suggests that the universal experience of "more is up" serves as a robust frame of reference for vertical number representation. In line with this view, lower hand responses to small numbers were faster than to large numbers (Experiment 1). Interestingly, the vertical SNARC effect reversed when the lower responses were given by foot instead of the hand (Experiments 2, 3, and 4). We found faster upper (hand) responses to small numbers and faster lower (foot) responses to large numbers. Additional experiments showed that spatial factors cannot account for the reversal of the vertical SNARC effect (Experiments 4 and 5). Our results question the view of "more is up" as a robust frame of reference for spatial-numerical associations. We discuss our results within a hierarchical framework of numerical cognition and point to a possible link between effectors and number representation.

  13. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy are Positively Associated with Immune Responses to an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladeshi Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ikhtear Uddin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental enteropathy (EE is a poorly understood condition that refers to chronic alterations in intestinal permeability, absorption, and inflammation, which mainly affects young children in resource-limited settings. Recently, EE has been linked to suboptimal oral vaccine responses in children, although immunological mechanisms are poorly defined. The objective of this study was to determine host factors associated with immune responses to an oral cholera vaccine (OCV. We measured antibody and memory T cell immune responses to cholera antigens, micronutrient markers in blood, and EE markers in blood and stool from 40 Bangladeshi children aged 3-14 years who received two doses of OCV given 14 days apart. EE markers included stool myeloperoxidase (MPO and alpha anti-trypsin (AAT, and plasma endotoxin core antibody (EndoCab, intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP, and soluble CD14 (sCD14. We used multiple linear regression analysis with LASSO regularization to identify host factors, including EE markers, micronutrient (nutritional status, age, and HAZ score, predictive for each response of interest. We found stool MPO to be positively associated with IgG antibody responses to the B subunit of cholera toxin (P = 0.03 and IgA responses to LPS (P = 0.02; plasma sCD14 to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.07; plasma i-FABP to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.01 and with memory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.01; stool AAT to be negatively associated with IL-10 (regulatory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.02, and plasma EndoCab to be negatively associated with cholera toxin-specific memory T cell responses (P = 0.02. In summary, in a cohort of children 3-14 years old, we demonstrated that the majority of biomarkers of environmental enteropathy were positively associated with immune responses after vaccination with an OCV.

  14. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy are Positively Associated with Immune Responses to an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladeshi Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Islam, Shahidul; Nishat, Naoshin S.; Hossain, Motaher; Rafique, Tanzeem Ahmed; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Zhang, Yue; Saha, Amit; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Ryan, Edward T.; Leung, Daniel T.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a poorly understood condition that refers to chronic alterations in intestinal permeability, absorption, and inflammation, which mainly affects young children in resource-limited settings. Recently, EE has been linked to suboptimal oral vaccine responses in children, although immunological mechanisms are poorly defined. The objective of this study was to determine host factors associated with immune responses to an oral cholera vaccine (OCV). We measured antibody and memory T cell immune responses to cholera antigens, micronutrient markers in blood, and EE markers in blood and stool from 40 Bangladeshi children aged 3–14 years who received two doses of OCV given 14 days apart. EE markers included stool myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alpha anti-trypsin (AAT), and plasma endotoxin core antibody (EndoCab), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP), and soluble CD14 (sCD14). We used multiple linear regression analysis with LASSO regularization to identify host factors, including EE markers, micronutrient (nutritional) status, age, and HAZ score, predictive for each response of interest. We found stool MPO to be positively associated with IgG antibody responses to the B subunit of cholera toxin (P = 0.03) and IgA responses to LPS (P = 0.02); plasma sCD14 to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.07); plasma i-FABP to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.01) and with memory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.01); stool AAT to be negatively associated with IL-10 (regulatory) T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.02), and plasma EndoCab to be negatively associated with cholera toxin-specific memory T cell responses (P = 0.02). In summary, in a cohort of children 3–14 years old, we demonstrated that the majority of biomarkers of environmental enteropathy were positively associated with immune responses after vaccination with an OCV. PMID:27824883

  15. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy are Positively Associated with Immune Responses to an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladeshi Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Islam, Shahidul; Nishat, Naoshin S; Hossain, Motaher; Rafique, Tanzeem Ahmed; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Zhang, Yue; Saha, Amit; Harris, Jason B; Calderwood, Stephen B; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Ryan, Edward T; Leung, Daniel T; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-11-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a poorly understood condition that refers to chronic alterations in intestinal permeability, absorption, and inflammation, which mainly affects young children in resource-limited settings. Recently, EE has been linked to suboptimal oral vaccine responses in children, although immunological mechanisms are poorly defined. The objective of this study was to determine host factors associated with immune responses to an oral cholera vaccine (OCV). We measured antibody and memory T cell immune responses to cholera antigens, micronutrient markers in blood, and EE markers in blood and stool from 40 Bangladeshi children aged 3-14 years who received two doses of OCV given 14 days apart. EE markers included stool myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alpha anti-trypsin (AAT), and plasma endotoxin core antibody (EndoCab), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP), and soluble CD14 (sCD14). We used multiple linear regression analysis with LASSO regularization to identify host factors, including EE markers, micronutrient (nutritional) status, age, and HAZ score, predictive for each response of interest. We found stool MPO to be positively associated with IgG antibody responses to the B subunit of cholera toxin (P = 0.03) and IgA responses to LPS (P = 0.02); plasma sCD14 to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.07); plasma i-FABP to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.01) and with memory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.01); stool AAT to be negatively associated with IL-10 (regulatory) T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.02), and plasma EndoCab to be negatively associated with cholera toxin-specific memory T cell responses (P = 0.02). In summary, in a cohort of children 3-14 years old, we demonstrated that the majority of biomarkers of environmental enteropathy were positively associated with immune responses after vaccination with an OCV.

  16. Intraspecies variability in the dose-response relationship for Salmonella Enteritidis associated with genetic differences in cellular immune response.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havelaar, A.H.; Garssen, J.; Takumi, K.; Koedam, M.I.; Ritmeester, W.; Fonteyne, L. de la; Bousema, T.; Vos, J.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of differences in host cellular immunity, we studied the dose-response relationship for infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) in two different rat strains, skewed towards T helper 1 (Th1, Lewis rats) or T helper 2 (Th2, Brown Norway rats) immunoregulatio

  17. Association of basal serum testosterone levels with ovarian response and in vitro fertilization outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate basal testosterone (T levels during follicular phase of the menstrual cycle as a predictor for ovarian response and in vitro fertilization (IVF outcome. Method We analyzed data retrospectively from hospital-based IVF center including one thousand two hundred and sixty Chinese Han women under their first IVF cycle reached the ovum pick-up stage, without polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS or endometriosis undergoing long IVF protocol. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1: patients with diminished ovarian reserve (basal FSH >10 IU/L (n = 187; Group 2: patients with normal ovarian reserve (basal FSH Results Basal T levels were markly different between pregnant and non-pregnant women in Group 1; whereas not in Group 2. A testosterone level of 47.85 ng/dl was shown to predict pregnancy outcome with a sensitivity of 52.8% and specificity of 65.3%; and the basal T was correlated with the numbers of large follicles (> 14 mm on HCG day in Group 1. Significantly negative correlations were observed between basal T, days of stimulation and total dose of gonadotropins after adjusting for confounding factors in both groups. Conclusion In women with diminished ovarian reserve, basal T level was a predictor for the number of large follicles on HCG day and pregnancy outcome; but could not in those with normal serum FSH. Basal T levels were associated with both days of stimulation and total dose of gonadotropins, indicating that lower level of T might relate with potential ovarian poor response.

  18. The Effects of Laterite and Associated Terrain Components on PBMR Response in HAPEX-Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, William L.; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Wang, James R.

    1997-01-01

    Terrain characteristics such as roughness and vegetation have been shown to significantly affect the interpretation of microwave brightness temperatures (T(B)s) for mapping soil moisture. This study, a part of the 1992 HAPEX-Sahel experiment (Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in the Sahel), aimed to determine the effects of laterite and associated terrain components (i.e. vegetation, soil, and exposed water bodies) on the T(B) response of the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR, L-band, 21 cm wavelength), using the NS001 Thematic Mapper Simulator data as a surrogate for ground data. Coincident PBMR and NS001 data acquired from the high altitude (about 1500 m) long transect flights were processed to obtain TBs and radiances, respectively. The transects covered a range of moisture conditions. For this preliminary evaluation, no atmospheric corrections were applied, and the data sets were aligned by matching the acquisition times of the data records. NS001 pixels (about 4 m) were averaged to approximate the resolution of the PBMR (about 450 m), before their flight line data were compared. The laterite plateaux were found to have a surprisingly strong effect on the PBMR T(B) response. T(B) variations along the flight line could largely be explained by a combination of density and dielectric properties of laterite. The effect of surface moisture was distinguishable from the laterite effect, with the distinction apparently related to the occurrence of ephemeral pools of water after rainfall. Model simulated T(B)s agreed reasonably well with the observed T(B)s.

  19. Prostate cancer characteristics associated with response to pre-receptor targeting of the androgen axis.

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    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Factors influencing differential responses of prostate tumors to androgen receptor (AR axis-directed therapeutics are poorly understood, and predictors of treatment efficacy are needed. We hypothesized that the efficacy of inhibiting DHT ligand synthesis would associate with intra-tumoral androgen ratios indicative of relative dependence on DHT-mediated growth.We characterized two androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenograft models after androgen suppression by castration in combination with the SRD5A inhibitor, dutasteride, as well as a panel of castration resistant metastases obtained via rapid autopsy.In LuCaP35 tumors (intra-tumoral T:DHT ratio 2:1 dutasteride suppressed DHT to 0.02 ng/gm and prolonged survival vs. castration alone (337 vs.152 days, HR 2.8, p = 0.0015. In LuCaP96 tumors (T:DHT 10:1, survival was not improved despite similar DHT reduction (0.02 ng/gm. LuCaP35 demonstrated higher expression of steroid biosynthetic enzymes maintaining DHT levels (5-fold higher SRD5A1, 41 fold higher, 99-fold higher RL-HSD, p<0.0001 for both, reconstitution of intra-tumoral DHT (to ∼30% of untreated tumors, and ∼2 fold increased expression of full length AR. In contrast, LuCaP96 demonstrated higher levels of steroid catabolizing enzymes (6.9-fold higher AKR1C2, 3000-fold higher UGT2B15, p = 0.002 and p<0.0001 respectively, persistent suppression of intra-tumoral DHT, and 6-8 fold induction of full length AR and the ligand independent V7 AR splice variant. Human metastases demonstrated bio-active androgen levels and AR full length and AR splice-variant expression consistent with the range observed in xenografts.Intrinsic differences in basal steroidogenesis, as well as variable expression of full length and splice-variant AR, associate with response and resistance to pre-receptor AR ligand suppression. Expression of steroidogenic enzymes and AR isoforms may serve as potential biomarkers of sensitivity to potent AR-axis inhibition and

  20. Human colon carcinogenesis is associated with increased interleukin-17-driven inflammatory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhaohui Xie,1 Yine Qu,2 Yanli Leng,2 Wenxiu Sun,2 Siqi Ma,2 Jingbo Wei,2 Jiangong Hu,3 Xiaolan Zhang1 1Department of Gastroenterology, Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei United University School of Basic Medicine, Tangshan, Hebei, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pathology, the Second Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Inflammation is known to contribute to carcinogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-17 (IL-17 or IL-17A has been shown to play a critical role in colon carcinogenesis in mouse models. However, few studies have investigated IL-17A in human colon tissues. In the present study, we assessed IL-17-driven inflammatory responses in 17 cases of human colon adenocarcinomas, 16 cases of human normal colon tissues adjacent to the resected colon adenocarcinomas, ten cases of human ulcerative colitis tissues from biopsies, and eight cases of human colon polyps diagnosed as benign adenomas. We found that human colon adenocarcinomas contained the highest levels of IL-17A cytokine, which was significantly higher than the IL-17A levels in the adenomas, ulcerative colitis, and normal colon tissues (P<0.01. The levels of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA were also the highest in human colon adenocarcinomas, followed by adenomas and ulcerative colitis. The increased levels of IL-17A and IL-17RA were accompanied with increased IL-17-driven inflammatory responses, including activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathways, increase in expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP9, MMP7, MMP2, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2, and cyclin D1, decrease in Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX expression, and increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and VEGF receptor (VEGFR expression that

  1. Genetic risk scores associated with baseline lipoprotein subfraction concentrations do not associate with their responses to fenofibrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoprotein subclass concentrations are modifiable markers of cardiovascular disease risk. Fenofibrate is known to show beneficial effects on lipoprotein subclasses, but little is known about the role of genetics in mediating the responses of lipoprotein subclasses to fenofibrate. A recent genomewid...

  2. Polyfunctional Specific Response to Echinococcus Granulosus Associates to the Biological Activity of the Cysts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Petrone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a complex disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus (E.granulosus, and its immunophatogenesis is still not clearly defined. A peculiar feature of chronic CE is the coexistence of Th1 and Th2 responses. It has been suggested that Th1 cytokines are related to disease resistance, whereas Th2 cytokines are related to disease susceptibility and chronicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by multi-parametric flow cytometry (FACS, the presence of CE specific immune signatures.We enrolled 54 subjects with suspected CE; 42 of them had a confirmed diagnosis, whereas 12 were classified as NO-CE. Based on the ultrasonography images, CE patients were further categorized as being in "active stages" (25 and "inactive stages" (17. The ability of CD4+ T-cells to produce IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, Th2 cytokines or IL-10 was assessed by FACS on antigen-specific T-cells after overnight stimulation with Antigen B (AgB of E.granulosus. Cytokine profiles were evaluated in all the enrolled subjects. The results show that none of the NO-CE subjects had a detectable AgB-specific response. Among the CE patients, the frequency and proportions of AgB-specific CD4+ T-cells producing IL-2+TNF-α+Th2+ or TNF-α+Th2+ were significantly increased in the "active stages" group compared to the "inactive stages" group. Moreover, an increased proportion of the total polyfunctional subsets, as triple-and double-functional CD4 T-cells, was found in CE patients with active disease. The response to the mitogen, used as a control stimulus to evaluate the immune competence status, was characterized by the same cytokine subsets in all the subjects enrolled, independent of CE.We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that polyfunctional T-cell subsets as IL-2+TNF-α+Th2+ triple-positive and TNF-α+Th2+ double-positive specific T-cells associate with cyst biological activity. These results contribute to increase knowledge of CE immunophatogenesis and

  3. CCL2 responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis are associated with disease severity in tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leucocyte activating chemokines such as CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL8 together with proinflammatory IFNgamma, TNFalpha and downmodulatory IL10 play a central role in the restriction of M. tuberculosis infections, but is unclear whether these markers are indicative of tuberculosis disease severity. METHODOLOGY: We investigated live M. tuberculosis- and M. bovis BCG-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses in patients with tuberculosis (TB and healthy endemic controls (ECs, n = 36. TB patients comprised pulmonary (PTB, n = 34 and extrapulmonary groups, subdivided into those with less severe localized extrapulmonary TB (L-ETB, n = 16 or severe disseminated ETB (D-ETB, n = 16. Secretion of CCL2, IFNgamma, IL10 and CCL3, and mRNA expression of CCL2, TNFalpha, CCL3 and CXCL8 were determined. RESULTS: M. tuberculosis- and BCG-induced CCL2 secretion was significantly increased in both PTB and D-ETB (p<0.05, p<0.01 as compared with L-ETB patients. CCL2 secretion in response to M. tuberculosis was significantly greater than to BCG in the PTB and D-ETB groups. M. tuberculosis-induced CCL2 mRNA transcription was greater in PTB than L-ETB (p = 0.023, while CCL2 was reduced in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB (p = 0.005 patients. M. tuberculosis-induced IFNgamma was greater in L-ETB than PTB (p = 0.04, while BCG-induced IFNgamma was greater in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB patients (p = 0.036. TNFalpha mRNA expression was raised in PTB as compared with L-ETB group in response to M. tuberculosis (p = 0.02 and BCG (p = 0.03. Mycobacterium-induced CCL3 and CXCL8 was comparable between TB groups. CONCLUSIONS: The increased CCL2 and TNFalpha in PTB patients may support effective leucocyte recruitment and M. tuberculosis localization. CCL2 alone is associated with severity of TB, possibly due to increased systemic inflammation found in severe disseminated TB or due to increased monocyte infiltration to lung parenchyma in pulmonary disease.

  4. Analysis of binary responses with outcome-specific misclassification probability in genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekaya R

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Romdhane Rekaya,1–3 Shannon Smith,4 El Hamidi Hay,5 Nourhene Farhat,6 Samuel E Aggrey3,7 1Department of Animal and Dairy Science, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, 2Department of Statistics, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, 3Institute of Bioinformatics, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 4Zoetis, Kalamazoo, MI, 5United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, 6Carolinas HealthCare System Blue Ridge, Morganton, NC, 7Department of Poultry Science, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA Abstract: Errors in the binary status of some response traits are frequent in human, animal, and plant applications. These error rates tend to differ between cases and controls because diagnostic and screening tests have different sensitivity and specificity. This increases the inaccuracies of classifying individuals into correct groups, giving rise to both false-positive and false-negative cases. The analysis of these noisy binary responses due to misclassification will undoubtedly reduce the statistical power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS. A threshold model that accommodates varying diagnostic errors between cases and controls was investigated. A simulation study was carried out where several binary data sets (case–control were generated with varying effects for the most influential single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and different diagnostic error rate for cases and controls. Each simulated data set consisted of 2000 individuals. Ignoring misclassification resulted in biased estimates of true influential SNP effects and inflated estimates for true noninfluential markers. A substantial reduction in bias and increase in accuracy ranging from 12% to 32% was observed when the misclassification procedure was invoked. In fact, the majority of influential SNPs that were not identified using the noisy data were captured using the

  5. Perceived stress at work is associated with attenuated DHEA-S response during acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, Anna-Karin; Theorell, Töres; Kushnir, Mark M; Bergquist, Jonas; Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H

    2013-09-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) have been suggested to play a protective role during acute psychosocial stress, because they act as antagonists to the effects of the stress hormone cortisol. This study aims to investigate whether prolonged psychosocial stress, measured as perceived stress at work during the past week, is related to the capacity to produce DHEA and DHEA-S during acute psychosocial stress. It also aims to investigate whether prolonged perceived stress affects the balance between production of cortisol and DHEA-S during acute psychosocial stress. Thirty-six healthy subjects (19 men and 17 women, mean age 37 years, SD 5 years), were included. Perceived stress at work during the past week was measured by using the Stress-Energy (SE) Questionnaire. The participants were divided into three groups based on their mean scores; Low stress, Medium stress and High stress. The participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and blood samples were collected before, directly after the stress test, and after 30 min of recovery. General Linear Models were used to investigate if the Medium stress group and the High stress group differ regarding stress response compared to the Low stress group. Higher perceived stress at work was associated with attenuated DHEA-S response during acute psychosocial stress. Furthermore, the ratio between the cortisol production and the DHEA-S production during the acute stress test were higher in individuals reporting higher perceived stress at work compared to individuals reporting low perceived stress at work. There was no statistical difference in DHEA response between the groups. This study shows that prolonged stress, measured as perceived stress at work during the past week, seems to negatively affect the capacity to produce DHEA-S during acute stress. Given the protective functions of DHEA-S, attenuated DHEA-S production during acute stress may lead to higher risk for adverse

  6. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons/Orthopaedic Trauma Associations/Pediatric Orthopaedic Association Disaster Response and Preparedness Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anthony E; Gerlinger, Tad L; Born, Christopher T

    2015-10-01

    A disaster is a catastrophic event that disrupts normal infrastructure to such a degree that normal response mechanisms and capabilities cannot manage what is required to respond appropriately to the event. Launched after the largest urban disaster in modern history--the 2010 Haiti Earthquake--the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons/Orthopaedic Trauma Association/Pediatric Orthopaedic Association of North America (AAOS/SOMOS/OTA/POSNA) Disaster Response Course (DRC) is designed to prepare orthopaedic surgeons for service in disaster response and humanitarian assistance efforts in both the acute phases as well as in the recovery and reconstructions phases. To date, 395 orthopaedic surgeons have completed the DRC and 286 (72.4%) have opted to become registered disaster responders.

  7. Self-reported and measured stress related responses associated with exposure to wind turbine noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, David S; Feder, Katya; Keith, Stephen E; Voicescu, Sonia A; Marro, Leonora; Than, John; Guay, Mireille; Denning, Allison; Bower, Tara; Villeneuve, Paul J; Russell, Evan; Koren, Gideon; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    The current study was the first to assess stress reactions associated with wind turbine noise (WTN) exposure using self-reported and objective measures. Randomly selected participants, aged 18-79 yr (606 males; 632 females), living between 0.25 and 11.22 km from wind turbines, were exposed to outdoor calculated WTN levels up to 46 dBA (response rate 78.9%). Multiple regression modeling left the great majority (77%-89%) of the variance in perceived stress scale (PSS) scores, hair cortisol concentrations, resting blood pressure, and heart rate unaccounted for, and WTN exposure had no apparent influence on any of these endpoints. PSS scores were positively, but weakly, related to cortisol concentrations and resting heart rate (Pearson r = 0.13 and r = 0.08, respectively). Across WTN categories, modeled mean PSS scores ranged from 13.15 to 13.84 (p = 0.8614). Modeled geometric means for hair cortisol concentrations, resting mean systolic, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were 150.54-191.12 ng/g (p = 0.5416), 113.38-116.82 mmHg (p = 0.4990), 67.98-70.34 mmHg (p = 0.5006), and 68.24-70.71 bpm (p = 0.5223), respectively. Irrespective of WTN levels, diastolic blood pressure appeared to be slightly (2.90 mmHg 95% CI: 0.75,5.05) higher among participants highly annoyed by blinking lights on turbines (p = 0.0081). Collectively, the findings do not support an association between exposure to WTN up to 46 dBA and elevated self-reported and objectively defined measures of stress.

  8. The clinical features of 17 patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis

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    CHEN Hai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the onset pattern, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and imaging features of 17 Chinese patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT. Methods The clinical data of 17 SREAT patients were collected. Retrospective analysis of their clinical features, as well as their serum levels of anti-thyroid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical indicators, MRI and therapy was performed. Results The initial symptoms of those patients were seizures (4 cases, psychiatric symptoms (4 cases, hypomnesis (4 cases, walking unsteadiness (2 cases, headache (2 cases and dysarthria (1 case. Three cases were acute onset, 5 cases subacute onset and 9 cases chronic onset. The anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO of 17 cases were significantly increased, average (928.63 ± 406.28 × 10 3 IU/L. The anti?thyroglobulin antibody (anti-TG of 15 cases was increased, average (601.27 ± 1014.12 × 10 3 IU/L. The protein in CSF was mildly increased, average (513.75 ± 283.15 mg/L. The EEG of 5 patients presented slow wave and the EEG of 2 patients showed epileptiform discharge. The brain MRI of 11 patients showed multifocal lesions in frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, basal ganglia, centrum ovale, corpus callosum, thalamus, cerebellum, and brain stem. The findings of clinical immunological index and tumor markers were normal. Besides, the prognosis of 11 patients treated with methylprednisolone and 3 patients treated with dexamethasone were good. Recurrence occurred in 2 patients. Conclusion Basically, the clinical features of Chinese SREAT patients present seizures, hypomnesis and psychiatric symptoms associated with increased anti-thyroid and multifocal lesions in gray and white matter of brain.

  9. Association between P-Glycoprotein expression and response to chemotherapy in patients with osteosarcoma: A systematic and meta-analysis

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    Zhi-Gang Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to investigate the association between p-glycoprotein (Pgp expression and response to chemotherapy in patients with osteosarcoma. Materials and Methods: We searched and included the openly published articles evaluated the correlation between Pgp expression and response to chemotherapy. The odds ratio (OR of response rate for Pgp positive group versus Pgp negative group was aggregated by random or fixed effect model. Results: Twelve studies were included in our meta-analysis. The mean Pgp positive rate was 0.39 ± 0.10 with its range of (0.14-0.53. The summary response rate was 0.46 ± 0.16 in Pgp positive and 0.57 ± 0.27 in the Pgp negative group, with no statistical difference between two groups (P > 0.05. The pooled OR of response rate for Pgp positive group versus Pgp negative group was 0.75 with its 95% confidence interval of 0.47-1.22, indicating there was no association between Pgp expression and response to chemotherapy in patients with osteosarcoma. Conclusion: The present evidence indicated that there was no association between p-glycoprotein expression and chemotherapy response in patients with osteosarcoma.

  10. Parent-adolescent dyads: association of parental autonomy support and parent-adolescent shared diabetes care responsibility.

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    Hanna, K M; Dashiff, C J; Stump, T E; Weaver, M T

    2013-09-01

    Parent-adolescent shared responsibility for diabetes care is advocated by experts to achieve beneficial diabetes and psychosocial outcomes for adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Parental autonomy support may be a way to facilitate this sharing. In this dyadic study, we examined parental diabetes-specific autonomy support experienced by adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents (n = 89 dyads), and its association with their experience of shared diabetes care responsibility. Path analysis was used to test an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model for parental autonomy support effects on shared responsibility. This was a secondary analysis of data from 89 parent-early/mid-adolescent dyads. Actor effects were identified. Parents' and adolescents' perceptions of parental autonomy support were associated with their respective reports of shared diabetes care responsibility. One partner effect was identified. Adolescents' reports of parental autonomy support were associated with parents' reports of shared responsibility. Parents and adolescents held similar views of autonomy support but discrepant views of shared responsibility. Older adolescents perceived less parental autonomy support. Increasing parental autonomy support may facilitate parent-adolescent sharing of diabetes care responsibility. Adolescent and parent perceptions influence each other and need to be considered when working with them to strengthen parental autonomy support. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Association between polymorphisms in selected inflammatory response genes and the risk of prostate cancer

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    Chen J

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jun Chen,1,* Xue-Ming Ying,2,* Xue-Ming Huang,3 Peng Huang,4 Shao-Cong Yan1 1Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 2Department of Oncology, Jingdezhen City People’s Hospital, Jingdezhen, 3Department of Urology, Research Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 4The Medical School of Nanchang University, School of Public Health, Nanchang, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Inflammation represents an important event which facilitates prostate carcinogenesis. Genetic variations in inflammatory response genes could affect the level and function of the protein products, resulting in the differential prostate cancer risk among carriers of different variants. This study attempted to investigate the association of IL-4 rs2243250, IL-6 rs10499563, IL-8 rs4073, as well as NFKBIA rs2233406 and rs3138053 polymorphisms with prostate cancer risk in the Chinese population. Genotyping of the polymorphisms was performed by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique on 439 prostate cancer patients and 524 controls, and the association of each polymorphic genotype with prostate cancer risk was evaluated by using logistic regression analysis based on allele, heterozygous, and homozygous comparison models, with adjustment to age and smoking status. We showed that the C allele of IL-4 rs2243250 polymorphism could increase prostate cancer risk (heterozygous comparison model: odds ratio [OR] =1.434, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.092–1.881, P=0.009; homozygous comparison model: OR =2.301, 95% CI =1.402–3.775, P=0.001; allele comparison model: OR =1.509, 95% CI =1.228–1.853, P<0.001. On the other hand, the C allele of rs10499563 polymorphism could decrease prostate cancer risk (heterozygous comparison model: OR =0.694, 95% CI =0.525–0.918, P=0.010; homozygous comparison model: OR =0.499, 95% CI =0

  12. Association study between genetic monoaminergic polymorphisms and OCD response to clomipramine treatment

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    K Miguita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we investigated the 5HTTLPR and STin2 polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4, the G861C polymorphism (rs6296 of the serotonin receptor 1D beta (HTR1B, the T102C (rs6113 and C516T (rs6305 polymorphisms of the serotonin receptor gene subtype 2A (HTR2A, the DAT UTR, DAT intron 8 and DAT intron 14 of the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3, the Val-158-Met (rs4680 polymorphism of the COMT and the silent mutation G1287A (rs5569 in the norepinephrine transporter gene (SLC6A2. We genotyped 41 obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD outpatients, classified as good-responders (n=27 and poor-responders (n=14 to treatment with clomipramine according to the Yale Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS. Patients who achieved a reduction in symptoms of 40% or more in YBOCS after 14 weeks of treatment were considered good-responders. Genotypes and alleles distribution of the investigated polymorphisms were compared between both groups. We did not find association between the studied polymorphisms and clomipramine response in our sample.

  13. Association of auditory steady state responses with perception of temporal modulations and speech in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manju, Venugopal; Gopika, Kizhakke Kodiyath; Arivudai Nambi, Pitchai Muthu

    2014-01-01

    Amplitude modulations in the speech convey important acoustic information for speech perception. Auditory steady state response (ASSR) is thought to be physiological correlate of amplitude modulation perception. Limited research is available exploring association between ASSR and modulation detection ability as well as speech perception. Correlation of modulation detection thresholds (MDT) and speech perception in noise with ASSR was investigated in twofold experiments. 30 normal hearing individuals and 11 normal hearing individuals within age range of 18-24 years participated in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. MDTs were measured using ASSR and behavioral method at 60 Hz, 80 Hz, and 120 Hz modulation frequencies in the first experiment. ASSR threshold was obtained by estimating the minimum modulation depth required to elicit ASSR (ASSR-MDT). There was a positive correlation between behavioral MDT and ASSR-MDT at all modulation frequencies. In the second experiment, ASSR for amplitude modulation (AM) sweeps at four different frequency ranges (30-40 Hz, 40-50 Hz, 50-60 Hz, and 60-70 Hz) was recorded. Speech recognition threshold in noise (SRTn) was estimated using staircase procedure. There was a positive correlation between amplitude of ASSR for AM sweep with frequency range of 30-40 Hz and SRTn. Results of the current study suggest that ASSR provides substantial information about temporal modulation and speech perception.

  14. Responses of Coral-Associated Bacterial Communities to Local and Global Stressors

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    Jamie M. McDevitt-Irwin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The microbial contribution to ecological resilience is still largely overlooked in coral reef ecology. Coral-associated bacteria serve a wide variety of functional roles with reference to the coral host, and thus, the composition of the overall microbiome community can strongly influence coral health and survival. Here, we synthesize the findings of recent studies (n = 45 that evaluated the impacts of the top three stressors facing coral reefs (climate change, water pollution and overfishing on coral microbiome community structure and diversity. Contrary to the species losses that are typical of many ecological communities under stress, here we show that microbial richness tends to be higher rather than lower for stressed corals (i.e., in ~60% of cases, regardless of the stressor. Microbial responses to stress were taxonomically consistent across stressors, with specific taxa typically increasing in abundance (e.g., Vibrionales, Flavobacteriales, Rhodobacterales, Alteromonadales, Rhizobiales, Rhodospirillales, and Desulfovibrionales and others declining (e.g., Oceanosprillales. Emerging evidence also suggests that stress may increase the microbial beta diversity amongst coral colonies, potentially reflecting a reduced ability of the coral host to regulate its microbiome. Moving forward, studies will need to discern the implications of stress-induced shifts in microbiome diversity for the coral hosts and may be able to use microbiome community structure to identify resilient corals. The evidence we present here supports the hypothesis that microbial communities play important roles in ecological resilience, and we encourage a focus on the microbial contributions to resilience for future research.

  15. Association Between Psychological Stress and Stimulation of Inflammatory Responses in Periodontal Disease

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    Mahvash MousaviJazi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Based on the evidence regarding the relationship between inflammatory processes and stress responses, the present study investigated the association between psychological stress and elevation of inflammatory mediators related to periodontal disease in adult patients.Materials and Methods: The study consisted of 50 patients including 25 patients with chronic periodontitis and 25 cases with aggressive periodontitis. Twenty-five healthy subjects without any evidence of periodontal disorder were also randomly selected as the control group. The clinical parameters including plaque index (PI, bleeding on probing (BOP, probing depth (PPD and clinical attachment loss (CAL were recorded and GCF samples were collected for analysis of GCF contents of IL-6 and IL-1β levels. The Kettle stress questionnaire was also used to determine stress severity.Results: IL-1β was significantly higher, but IL-6 was only slightly higher(marginal p-value=0.058The median score of stress was higher in aggressive periodontitis than the chronic disorder and also in the two periodontal disease groups than the healthy subjects. Among studied clinical parameters, CAL and PPD were positively correlated with the GCF IL-1β level. No significant correlations were found between clinical parameters and GCF IL-6 level. There were strong positive relationships between stress severity and in both aggressive and chronic periodontitis; however stress did not influence GCF contents of IL-6.Conclusion: Psychological stress has a pivotal role in the stimulation of inflammatory processes via IL-1β increase in aggressive and chronic periodontitis.

  16. Renal cell therapy is associated with dynamic and individualized responses in patients with acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, H David; Weitzel, William F; Bartlett, Robert H; Swaniker, Fresca C; Paganini, Emil P

    2003-01-01

    Renal cell therapy in conjunction with continuous hemofiltration techniques may provide important cellular metabolic activities to patients with acute renal failure (ARF) and may thereby change the natural history of this disorder. The development of a tissue-engineered bioartificial kidney consisting of a conventional hemofiltration cartridge in series with a renal tubule assist device (RAD) containing 10(9) human renal proximal tubule cells provides an opportunity to evaluate this form of therapy in patients with ARF in the intensive care unit. Nine patients with ARF and multi-organ systems failure (MOSF) have been treated so far with a tissue-engineered kidney in an FDA-approved Phase I/II clinical study currently underway. Acute physiologic parameters and serum cytokine levels were assessed before, during and after treatment with a bioartificial kidney. Use of the RAD in this clinical setting demonstrates maintenance of cell viability and functionality. Cardiovascular stability appears to be maintained during RAD treatment. Human tubule cells in the RAD demonstrated differentiated metabolic and endocrinologic activity. Acute physiologic and plasma cytokine data demonstrate that renal cell therapy is associated with rapid and variable responses in patients with ARF and MOSF. The initial clinical experience with the bioartificial kidney and the RAD suggests that renal tubule cell therapy may provide a dynamic and individualized treatment program as assessed by acute physiologic and biochemical indices. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Pathological and immunological responses associated with differential survival of Chinook salmon following Renibacterium salmoninarum challenge

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    Purcell, Maureen K.; Elliott, Diane G.; Metzger, C. David; Wargo, Andrew; Park, K. Linda

    2010-01-01

    Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha are highly susceptible to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Previously we demonstrated that introduced Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan, Wisconsin (WI), USA, have higher survival following R. salmoninarum challenge relative to the progenitor stock from Green River, Washington, USA. In the present study, we investigated the pathological and immunological responses that are associated with differential survival in the 2 Chinook salmon stocks following intra-peritoneal R. salmoninarum challenge of 2 different cohort years (2003 and 2005). Histological evaluation revealed delayed appearance of severe granulomatous lesions in the kidney and lower overall prevalence of membranous glomerulopathy in the higher surviving WI stock. The higher survival WI stock had a lower bacterial load at 28 d post-infection, as measured by reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). However, at all other time points, bacterial load levels were similar despite higher mortality in the more susceptible Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that the stocks may differ in their tolerance to infection by the bacterium. Interferon-y, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Mx-1, and transferrin gene expression were up-regulated in both stocks following challenge. A trend of higher iNOS gene expression at later time points (≥28 d post-infection) was observed in the lower surviving Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that higher iNOS expression may contribute to greater pathology in that stock.

  18. Escherichia coli response to uranyl exposure at low pH and associated protein regulations.

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    Arbia Khemiri

    Full Text Available Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia coli cells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro.

  19. Prognostic Factors Related to Clinical Response in Patients with Metastatic MelanomaTreated by CTL-Associated Antigen-4 Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Stephanie G.; Klapper, Jacob A.; Smith, Franz O.; C.Yang, James; Sherry, Richard M.; Royal, Richard E.; Kammula, Udai S.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Allen, Tamika E.; Levy, Catherine L.; Michael, Yellin; Nichol, Geoffrey; E.White, Donald; Steinberg, Seth M.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose CTL-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) can inhibit T-cell activation and helps maintain peripheral self-tolerance. Previously, we showed immune-related adverse events (IRAE) and objective, durable clinical responses in patients with metastatic melanoma treated with CTLA-4 blockade.We have now treated139 patients in two trials and have sufficient follow-up to examine factors associated with clinical response. Experimental Design A total of 139 patients with metastatic melanoma were treated: 54 patients received ipilimumab in conjunction with peptide vaccinations and 85 patients were treated with intrapatient dose escalation of ipilimumab and randomized to receive peptides in accordance with HLA-A*0201status. Results Three patients achieved complete responses (CR; ongoing at 29+, 52+, and 53+ months); an additional 20 patients achieved partial responses (PR) for an overall objective response rate of 17%. The majority of patients (62%, 86 of 139) developed some form of IRAE, which was associated with a greater probability of objective antitumor response (P = 0.0004); all patients with CR had more severe IRAEs. Prior therapy with IFNα-2b was a negative prognostic factor, whereas prior high-dose interleukin-2 did not significantly affect the probability of response. There were no significant differences in the rate of clinical response or development of IRAEs between the two trials. The duration of tumor response was not affected by the use of high-dose steroids for abrogation of treatment-related toxicities (P = 0.23). There were no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion In patients with metastatic melanoma, ipilimumab can induce durable objective clinical responses, which are related to the induction of IRAEs. PMID:17982122

  20. Genetic Variations in Pattern Recognition Receptor Loci Are Associated with Anti-TNF Response in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

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    Jacob Sode

    Full Text Available To determine whether genetic variation within genes related to the Toll-like receptor, inflammasome and interferon-γ pathways contributes to the differences in treatment response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (anti-TNF in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.In a retrospective case-case study, we assessed 23 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 15 genes. We included 538 anti-TNF naïve Danish RA patients from the nationwide DANBIO database. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to detect associations (p-value<0.05 between genotypes and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR treatment responses. False Discovery Rate corrections for multiple testing (q-value and stratified analyses were performed to investigate association with individual therapies and IgM-rheumatoid factor (RF status.Six of twenty successfully genotyped polymorphisms were nominally associated with EULAR treatment response. Three of these were in weak to moderate linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms previously reported associated with anti-TNF treatment response. TLR5(rs5744174 variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR = 1.7(1.1-2.5,p = 0.010,q = 0.46 and TLR1(rs4833095 homozygous variant carriers (OR = 2.8(1.1-7.4,p = 0.037,q = 0.46 had higher odds for a positive treatment response. NLRP3(rs10754558 variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR = 0.6(0.4-1.0,p = 0.045,q = 0.46 were more likely to have a negative treatment response. The association in TLR5(rs5744174 remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons among patients negative for RF (OR = 6.2(2.4-16.3,p = 0.0002,q = 0.024. No other association withstood correction for multiple testing. Post hoc analyses showed that change in Patient Global score on a visual analogue scale (VAS and change in pain VAS were the main factors responsible for the association.We reproduced previously reported associations between genetic variation in the TLR10/1/6 gene cluster, TLR5

  1. Association of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Survival According to Ambulance Response Times After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gerds, Thomas A; Kragholm, Kristian; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-12-20

    Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between time from 911 call to emergency medical service arrival (response time) and survival according to whether bystander CPR was provided (yes or no). Reported are 30-day survival chances with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals. With increasing response times, adjusted 30-day survival chances decreased for both patients with bystander CPR and those without. However, the contrast between the survival chances of patients with versus without bystander CPR increased over time: within 5 minutes, 30-day survival was 14.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8-16.4) versus 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6), corresponding to 2.3 times higher chances of survival associated with bystander CPR; within 10 minutes, 30-day survival chances were 6.7% (95% CI: 5.4-8.1) versus 2.2% (95% CI: 1.5-3.1), corresponding to 3.0 times higher chances of 30-day survival associated with bystander CPR. The contrast in 30-day survival became statistically insignificant when response time was >13 minutes (bystander CPR vs no bystander CPR: 3.7% [95% CI: 2.2-5.4] vs 1.5% [95% CI: 0.6-2.7]), but 30-day survival was still 2.5 times higher associated with bystander CPR. Based on the model and Danish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest statistics, an additional 233 patients could potentially be saved annually if response time was reduced from 10 to 5 minutes and 119 patients if response time was reduced from 7 (the median

  2. Computer-Mediated Communication in Intimate Relationships: Associations of Boundary Crossing, Intrusion, Relationship Satisfaction, and Partner Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Aaron M; Baptist, Joyce; Hogan, Bernie

    2017-06-15

    This study examined the impact of technology on couples in committed relationships through the lens of the couple and technology framework. Specifically, we used data from 6,756 European couples to examine associations between online boundary crossing, online intrusion, relationship satisfaction, and partner responsiveness. The results suggest that participants' reports of online boundary crossing were linked with lower relationship satisfaction and partner responsiveness. Also, lower relationship satisfaction and partner responsiveness were associated with increased online boundary crossing. The results suggest that men, but not women, who reported greater acceptability for online boundary crossing were more likely to have partners who reported lower relationship satisfaction in their relationships. Implications for clinicians, relationship educators, and researchers are discussed. Video abstract accessible by clicking here. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  3. An upside to adversity?: moderate cumulative lifetime adversity is associated with resilient responses in the face of controlled stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seery, Mark D; Leo, Raphael J; Lupien, Shannon P; Kondrak, Cheryl L; Almonte, Jessica L

    2013-07-01

    Despite common findings suggesting that lack of negative life events should be optimal, recent work has revealed a curvilinear pattern, such that some cumulative lifetime adversity is instead associated with optimal well-being. This work, however, is limited in that responses to specific stressors as they occurred were not assessed, thereby precluding investigation of resilience. The current research addressed this critical gap by directly testing the relationship between adversity history and resilience to stressors. Specifically, we used a multimethod approach across two studies to assess responses to controlled laboratory stressors (respectively requiring passive endurance and active instrumental performance). Results revealed hypothesized U-shaped relationships: Relative to a history of either no adversity or nonextreme high adversity, a moderate number of adverse life events was associated with less negative responses to pain and more positive psychophysiological responses while taking a test. These results provide novel evidence in support of adversity-derived propensity for resilience that generalizes across stressors.

  4. Loss of Response to Melatonin Treatment Is Associated with Slow Melatonin Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braam, W.; van Geijlswijk, I.; Keijzer, Henry; Smits, Marcel G.; Didden, Robert; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In some of our patients with intellectual disability (ID) and sleep problems, the initial good response to melatonin disappeared within a few weeks after starting treatment, while the good response returned only after considerable dose reduction. The cause for this loss of response to melatonin is yet unknown. We hypothesise that this…

  5. Loss of Response to Melatonin Treatment Is Associated with Slow Melatonin Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braam, W.; van Geijlswijk, I.; Keijzer, Henry; Smits, Marcel G.; Didden, Robert; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In some of our patients with intellectual disability (ID) and sleep problems, the initial good response to melatonin disappeared within a few weeks after starting treatment, while the good response returned only after considerable dose reduction. The cause for this loss of response to melatonin is yet unknown. We hypothesise that this…

  6. Loss of response to melatonin treatment is associated with slow melatonin metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, W.J.; Geijlswijk, I.M. van; Keijzer, H.; Smits, M.G.; Didden, H.C.M.; Curfs, L.M.G

    2010-01-01

    Background In some of our patients with intellectual disability (ID) and sleep problems, the initial good response to melatonin disappeared within a few weeks after starting treatment, while the good response returned only after considerable dose reduction. The cause for this loss of response to mel

  7. Associations between MDR1 gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia and therapeutic response to olanzapine in female schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozina, Nada; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Medved, Vesna; Jovanovic, Nikolina; Sertic, Jadranka; Hotujac, Ljubomir

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug resistant protein (MDR1) gene, which codes for P-glycoprotein and functions as an efflux transporter in different cells, is widely localized in normal tissues including the gastrointestinal tract, blood cells, biliary tract, kidney and brain and plays a major role in absorption, distribution and elimination of various xenobiotics. Therefore, MDR1 gene variants were proposed as potential susceptibility factors for diseases and as determinants of treatment response to various drugs. We investigated the relationships between exon 21 G2677T and exon 26 C3435T genetic variants of MDR1 gene with susceptibility and treatment response in female schizophrenic patients. The study was conducted in two steps. We first compared allele, genotype and haplotype distributions between 117 female schizophrenic patients and 123 control female subjects. Afterwards, we studied treatment response to olanzapine, in 87 out of 117 previously unmedicated female patients. Overall, we found lower representation of G2677/C3435 haplotype in schizophrenic female patients compared to controls. Test result for linkage disequilibrium between loci was found to be significant. Furthermore, we found significant associations between MDR1 exon 21 G2677T genotypes and treatment response measured with positive PANSS percentage changes, with T allele and TT genotype being associated with significantly better treatment response. A borderline, non-significant statistical association was found between MDR1 exon 26 C3435T genotypes and treatment response, with TT genotype being associated with better treatment response. Our data support functional importance of the MDR1 mutations for the susceptibility and treatment response in female schizophrenic patients.

  8. Genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor loci are associated with anti-TNF response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    .46) and TLR1(rs4833095) homozygous variant carriers (OR = 2.8(1.1-7.4),p = 0.037,q = 0.46) had higher odds for a positive treatment response. NLRP3(rs10754558) variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR) = 0.6(0.4-1.0),p = 0.045,q = 0.46) were more likely to have a negative treatment response. The association...

  9. Automatic and Controlled Response Inhibition: Associative Learning in the Go/No-Go and Stop-Signal Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Frederick; Logan, Gordon D.

    2008-01-01

    In five experiments, the authors examined the development of automatic response inhibition in the go/no-go paradigm and a modified version of the stop-signal paradigm. They hypothesized that automatic response inhibition may develop over practice when stimuli are consistently associated with stopping. All five experiments consisted of a training phase and a test phase in which the stimulus mapping was reversed for a subset of the stimuli. Consistent with the automatic-inhibition hypothesis, the authors found that responding in the test phase was slowed when the stimulus had been consistently associated with stopping in the training phase. In addition, they found that response inhibition benefited from consistent stimulus-stop associations. These findings suggest that response inhibition may rely on the retrieval of stimulus-stop associations after practice with consistent stimulus-stop mappings. Stimulus-stop mapping is typically consistent in the go/no-go paradigm, so automatic inhibition is likely to occur. However, stimulus-stop mapping is typically inconsistent in the stop-signal paradigm, so automatic inhibition is unlikely to occur. Thus, the results suggest that the two paradigms are not equivalent because they allow different kinds of response inhibition. PMID:18999358

  10. In vitro cytokine responses to periodontal pathogens: generalized aggressive periodontitis is associated with increased IL-6 response to Porphyromonas gingivalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, T S; Holmstrup, Palle; Bendtzen, K;

    2010-01-01

    the participants' inherent oral flora. The P. gingivalis -induced production of IL-6 was approximately 2.5-fold higher in patients with GAgP than in healthy controls (P TNF-alpha production was non-significantly elevated. IL-1beta production induced by P. gingivalis, as all cytokine......Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) is an inflammatory condition resulting in destruction of tooth-supporting tissues. We examined the production of IL-1beta, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-12 and IL-10 in cultures of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) from 10 patients...... from two donors free of disease were stimulated with this bacterium in the presence of the various patient and control sera. An elevated IL-6 and TNF-alpha response was observed in the presence of patient sera (P

  11. Transcriptional and biochemical responses of monoacylglycerol acyltransferase-mediated oil synthesis and associated senescence-like responses in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Kumar Divi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Triacylglycerol (TAG accumulates in plant seeds as a major renewable source of carbon for food, fuel and industrial feedstock. Approaches to enhance TAG content by altering lipid pathways and genes in vegetative parts have gained significant attention for biofuel and other applications. However, consequences of these modifications are not always studied in detail. In an attempt to increase TAG levels in leaves we previously demonstrated that a novel substrate, monoacylglycerol (MAG, can be used for the biosynthesis of diacylglycerol (DAG and TAG. Transient expression of the Mus musculus monoacylglycerol acyltransferase MGAT1 and 2 in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana increased TAG levels at 5 days post infiltration (dpi. Here we show that increased TAG and DAG levels can be achieved as early as 2 dpi. In addition, the MGAT1 infiltrated areas showed senescence-like symptoms from 3 dpi onwards. To unravel underlying molecular mechanisms, Illumina deep sequencing was carried out (a for de-novo assembling and annotation of N. benthamiana leaf transcripts and (b to characterize MGAT1-responsive transcriptome. We found that MGAT1-responsive genes are involved in several processes including TAG biosynthesis, photosynthesis, cell-wall, cutin, suberin, wax and mucilage biosynthesis, lipid and hormone metabolism. Comparative analysis with transcript profiles from other senescence studies identified characteristic gene expression changes involved in senescence induction. We confirmed that increased TAG and observed senescence-symptoms are due to the MAG depletion caused by MGAT1 activity and suggest a mechanism for MGAT1 induced TAG increase and senescence-like symptoms. The data generated will serve as a valuable resource for oil and senescence related studies and for future N. benthamiana transcriptome studies.

  12. Factors associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowicz, Bryan S; Hyman, Leslie; Hou, Wei; Oates, Thomas W; Reddy, Michael; Paquette, David W; Katancik, James A; Engebretson, Steven P

    2014-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing health problem worldwide. People with T2DM are at risk of experiencing periodontitis and likely require treatment. Using data from the national multicenter Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT), the authors assessed patient-based characteristics associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical therapy. The DPTT investigators randomly assigned adults with T2DM (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] ≥ 7 percent and periodontitis to receive immediate or delayed therapy (scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instruction, chlorhexidine rinse). The investigators assessed probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), and medical conditions at baseline, three months and six months. Six-month changes in mean PD, CAL and BOP defined the treatment response. Complete data were available for 473 of 514 DPTT participants. The authors used multiple regression models to evaluate participant-level factors associated with the response. More severe baseline PD, CAL and BOP were associated with greater improvements in these same measurements (P 30 kilograms per square meter) experienced greater reductions in PD and BOP than did participants who were not obese (P diabetes duration, and smoking were not associated with change in any outcome (P > .1). In patients with T2DM, baseline disease severity was associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Body mass index and Hispanic ethnicity-but not glycemic control, diabetes duration or smoking-also may be useful in predicting clinical changes in this population.

  13. Non-invasive measurements of exhaled NO and CO associated with methacholine responses in mice

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    Ameredes Bill T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO in exhaled breath are considered obtainable biomarkers of physiologic mechanisms. Therefore, obtaining their measures simply, non-invasively, and repeatedly, is of interest, and was the purpose of the current study. Methods Expired NO (ENO and CO (ECO were measured non-invasively using a gas micro-analyzer on several strains of mice (C57Bl6, IL-10-/-, A/J, MKK3-/-, JNK1-/-, NOS-2-/- and NOS-3-/- with and without allergic airway inflammation (AI induced by ovalbumin systemic sensitization and aerosol challenge, compared using independent-sample t-tests between groups, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA within groups over time of inflammation induction. ENO and ECO were also measured in C57Bl6 and IL-10-/- mice, ages 8–58 weeks old, the relationship of which was determined by regression analysis. S-methionyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC, and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP were used to inhibit neuronal/constitutive NOS-1 and heme-oxygenase, respectively, and alter NO and CO production, respectively, as assessed by paired t-tests. Methacholine-associated airway responses (AR were measured by the enhanced pause method, with comparisons by repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc testing. Results ENO was significantly elevated in naïve IL-10-/- (9–14 ppb and NOS-2-/- (16 ppb mice as compared to others (average: 5–8 ppb, whereas ECO was significantly higher in naïve A/J, NOS-3-/- (3–4 ppm, and MKK3-/- (4–5 ppm mice, as compared to others (average: 2.5 ppm. As compared to C57Bl6 mice, AR of IL-10-/-, JNK1-/-, NOS-2-/-, and NOS-3-/- mice were decreased, whereas they were greater for A/J and MKK3-/- mice. SMTC significantly decreased ENO by ~30%, but did not change AR in NOS-2-/- mice. SnPP reduced ECO in C57Bl6 and IL-10-/- mice, and increased AR in NOS-2-/- mice. ENO decreased as a function of age in IL-10-/- mice, remaining unchanged in C57Bl6 mice. Conclusion These results are

  14. A longitudinal genome-wide association study of anti-tumor necrosis factor response among Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honne, Kyoko; Hallgrímsdóttir, Ingileif; Wu, Chunsen;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of Caucasian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to identify genetic biomarkers of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) response have used response at a single time point as the phenotype with which single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations have been tested. The findings...... DAS28, treatment duration, type of anti-TNF agent and concomitant methotrexate. Cross-sectional analyses were performed using multivariate linear regression models, with response from a single time point (ΔDAS-3 or ΔDAS-6) as phenotype; all other variables were the same as in the GEE models. RESULTS...

  15. Association between brain natriuretic peptide, markers of inflammation and the objective and subjective response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Versteeg, Henneke; Meine, Mathias;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Studies suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can induce a decrease in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and systemic inflammation, which may be associated with CRT-response. However, the evidence is inconclusive. We examined levels of BNP and inflammatory markers from...... ventricular end systolic volume; subjective CRT-response was defined as an improvement of ⩾10 points in patient-reported health status assessed with the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire. Plasma BNP and markers of inflammation (CRP, IL-6, TNFα, sTNFr1 and sTNFr2) were measured at three time points......=27.31, pinflammation. This indicates that response to CRT...

  16. Spontaneous immune responses against glioma-associated antigens in a long term survivor with malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Mitsugu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with high grade glioma, little is known regarding existence of naturally occurring adaptive T cell reactivity against glioma-associated antigens (GAAs. In this report, we characterized GAA-specific CD8+ T cells and innate immune cells in a patient who has survived with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA for over 12 years without recurrence. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs derived from the long term survivor with AA were evaluated for the frequency, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity and differentiation status of CD8+ cells recognizing GAA-derived epitopes as well as relative numbers of other immune cell subsets. This patient's AA tissue was evaluated for expression of two GAAs EphA2 and interleukin-13 receptor α2 subunit (IL-13Rα2 by immunohistochemistry. Results The patient's tumor expressed both EphA2 and IL-13Rα2, and in vitro stimulated PBMC demonstrated superior EphA2883–891 and IL-13Rα2345–353-specific CTL reactivity compared to PBMC samples from two other patients with progressing malignant glioma. Unstimulated EphA2883–891-reactive CD8+ T cells contained high numbers of CD45RA-/CCR7- late effector and CD45RA-/CCR7+ central memory cells. Among other leukocyte subsets, elevated numbers of NK-T cells were found. Conclusion To our knowledge, the current study is one of the first demonstrating the presence of antigen-experienced, GAA-reactive CD8+ T cells in a patient who has survived with AA for over 12 years without recurrence. Further studies are warranted to determine whether the status of GAA-reactive CD8+ T cells dictates survival of patients and/or response to therapeutic vaccines.

  17. Genes associated with 2-methylisoborneol biosynthesis in cyanobacteria: isolation, characterization, and expression in response to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongjie; Xu, Yao; Shao, Jihai; Wang, Jie; Li, Renhui

    2011-04-07

    The volatile microbial metabolite 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) is a root cause of taste and odor issues in freshwater. Although current evidence suggests that 2-MIB is not toxic, this compound degrades water quality and presents problems for water treatment. To address these issues, cyanobacteria and actinomycetes, the major producers of 2-MIB, have been investigated extensively. In this study, two 2-MIB producing strains, coded as Pseudanabaena sp. and Planktothricoids raciborskii, were used in order to elucidate the genetic background, light regulation, and biochemical mechanisms of 2-MIB biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. Genome walking and PCR methods revealed that two adjacent genes, SAM-dependent methyltransferanse gene and monoterpene cyclase gene, are responsible for GPP methylation and subsequent cyclization to 2-MIB in cyanobacteria. These two genes are located in between two homologous cyclic nucleotide-binding protein genes that may be members of the Crp-Fnr regulator family. Together, this sequence of genes forms a putative operon. The synthesis of 2-MIB is similar in cyanobacteria and actinomycetes. Comparison of the gene arrangement and functional sites between cyanobacteria and other organisms revealed that gene recombination and gene transfer probably occurred during the evolution of 2-MIB-associated genes. All the microorganisms examined have a common origin of 2-MIB biosynthesis capacity, but cyanobacteria represent a unique evolutionary lineage. Gene expression analysis suggested that light is a crucial, but not the only, active regulatory factor for the transcription of 2-MIB synthesis genes. This light-regulated process is immediate and transient. This study is the first to identify the genetic background and evolution of 2-MIB biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, thus enhancing current knowledge on 2-MIB contamination of freshwater.

  18. Prebiotics modulate immune responses in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhana, Vijaya; Broadway, Mary M; Bruce, Matthew P; Lowenthal, John W; Geier, Mark S; Hughes, Robert J; Bean, Andrew G D

    2009-07-01

    The recent European Union ban on the prophylactic use of in-feed antibiotics has escalated the search for alternatives for use within the poultry industry. When evaluating the efficacy of potential antibiotic alternatives on bird health and productivity, it is important to analyze the competence of the immune cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), because it is routinely involved in the surveillance of colonizing microbes as well as in interacting with the ingested feed antigens. Therefore, we studied the effect of the prebiotics mannan-oligosaccharide (MOS) and fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) on the phenotypic and functional competence of immune cells in cecal tonsil (CT), which is a major GALT. Day-old Cobb 500 male broilers were randomized to 4 groups. Control chickens were fed the basal diet only. Chickens in experimental groups received 0.05 g/kg zinc bacitracin or 5 g/kg of either FOS or MOS in addition to basal diet. At the end of 25 d, our comparison of the experimental groups with controls revealed that the addition of prebiotics to diet resulted in a significant reduction in the proportion of B cells and in mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes in CT. Furthermore, FOS treatment significantly enhanced the IgM and IgG antibody titers in plasma. These findings emphasize the need for the analyses of the gut immune function following treatment with novel feed additives. The knowledge obtained from such analyses may aid in understanding the mechanisms underlying the immune competence of the birds, which needs consideration when selecting and optimizing new feed additives instead of antibiotics for poultry production.

  19. Association of Tuberculosis Status with Neurologic Disease and Immune Response in HTLV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Anselmo; Carvalho, Natália; Neves, Yuri; Braga Santos, Silvane; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Arruda, Sérgio; Netto, Eduardo Martins; Glesby, Marshall J; Carvalho, Edgar

    2017-06-26

    The human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1 infected individuals have increased susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection but the influence of tuberculosis (TB) on the course of HTLV-1 infection is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of TB on immunological, virologic, and neurologic features of HTLV-1 infection. This is a retrospective analysis of individuals enrolled in a cohort study from an HTLV-1 clinic who were evaluated for past or latent tuberculosis (LTB) and classified clinically as HTLV-1 carriers, probable HAM/TSP and definite HAM/TSP. Spontaneous cytokine production (interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor [TNF], and interleukin[IL]-10), serum chemokines (CXCL9 and CXCL10) and HTLV-1 proviral load were evaluated. Of 172 participants, 64 did not have histories of TB (TB- group), 81 had LTB and 27 had TB in the past (TB+ group). In the TB+ group, there was a higher frequency of HAM/TSP patients (35%) than in HTLV-1 carriers (10%) (OR = 3.8, p = .0001). HAM/TSP patients with histories of TB had higher IFN-γ/IL-10 and TNF/IL-10 ratios when compared with HAM/TSP patients without histories of TB. There were no differences in serum chemokine production and proviral load across TB groups stratified on HTLV-1 clinical status. In conclusion, TB may influence the development of HAM/TSP, and patients with these two diseases have an impairment in the modulation of immune response.

  20. [Treatment of diminished sexual response associated with the use of oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucs, G B; Coutinho, E M

    1975-01-01

    Loss of libido associated with the use of oral contraceptives has been studied in 113 women of reproductive age who had taken a combined pill for periods ranging from 1 to 3 years. The patients were divided in four groups. In the first group (I) of 24 women oral contraceptive treatment was discontinued and all women received in intra-uterine contraceptive device (IUCD). The second group (II) of 36 patients, the brand of oral contraceptive was changed. Women in group (III) had their oral contraceptive maintained receiving in addition a mixture of an androgen and an estrogen (methyltestosterone 4 mg and ethynilestradiol 0.002 mg) daily. To women of group (IV) the oral contraceptive was discontinued but the androgen-estrogen mixture was given. All women in this group received an IUCD. Evaluation of the psyco-sexual parameters included changes in libido, time to reach an orgasm, duration and intensity or orgasms. Frequency of intercourse and response to autostimulation was also investigated. Libido was restored in 94.2% of patients in group II, in 97.3% of group III and in 92.8% of group IV. In group I only 55.6% of patients had libido fully restored. In view of the prompt restoration of libido in all groups except in patients discontinuing oral contraceptive therapy, it is suggested that loss of libido in oral contraceptive users has an important physological component which can be overcome probably by psychotherapy. Short term treatment with a mixture of methyltestosterone and ethynilestradiol seems to be highly effective in restoring libido in all patients.

  1. Metabolic variations in different citrus rootstock cultivars associated with different responses to Huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Ute; Fiehn, Oliver; Bowman, Kim D

    2016-10-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive bacterial diseases of citrus. No resistant cultivars have been identified, although tolerance has been observed in the genus Poncirus and some of its hybrids with Citrus that are commonly used as rootstocks. In this study we exploited this tolerance by comparing five different tolerant hybrids with a cultivar that shows pronounced HLB sensitivity to discern potential contributing metabolic factors. Whole leaves of infected and non-infected greenhouse-grown seedlings were extracted and subjected to untargeted GC-TOF MS based metabolomics. After BinBase data filtering, 342 (experiment 1) and 650 (experiment 2) unique metabolites were quantified, of which 122 and 195, respectively, were assigned by chemical structures. The number of metabolites found to be differently regulated in the infected state compared with the non-infected state varied between the cultivars and was largest (166) in the susceptible cultivar Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reticulata) and lowest (3) in the tolerant cultivars US-897 (C. reticulata 'Cleopatra' × Poncirus trifoliata) and US-942 (C. reticulata 'Sunki' × P. trifoliata) from experiment 2. Tolerance to HLB did not appear to be associated with accumulation of higher amounts of protective metabolites in response to infection. Many metabolites were found in higher concentrations in the tolerant cultivars compared with susceptible Cleopatra mandarin and may play important roles in conferring tolerance to HLB. Lower availability of specific sugars necessary for survival of the pathogen may also be a contributing factor in the decreased disease severity observed for these cultivars.

  2. Immune responsiveness associated with experimental Encephalitozoon intestinalis infection in immunocompetent rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omalu ICJ

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Microsporidial infections have been recognized as an increasingly important infection in immuncompromised patients, particularly those infected with HIV/AIDS. This study was designed to study immune responses associated with experimental Encephalitozoon intestinalis infection in immunocompetent rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four Rats in 3 groups, A (Control, B (Intraperitoneal and C (Oral were given injections of 0.5 ml of 2 x 10 6 of purified spores of Encephalitotozoon intestinalis spores and were observed for serum specific IgG for 21 days using both direct and indirect ELISA. Results: In indirect ELISA, specific lgG were detected on days 7, 14 and 21 for the group B rats and on day 21 for group C and in direct ELISA method, specific lgG were detected in-group B rats on days 7 and 21, for group C rats on day 21 only, while in the control rats, specific lgG were not detected. There was no significant difference between the direct and indirect methods (df=1, X 2 , P>0.05. E. intestinalis was observed in stool samples of rats in 1/12 (08.33% on days 14 and 21 in group B, and in 4/10 (33.33%, 3/10 (25.00% and 2/10 (16.67% on days 7, 14 and 21 respectively in group C. In group A, which is the control rats, no microsporidia were observed on days 0, 7, 14 and 21. Conclusions: There were no changes in the T-lymphocyte counts of rats prior to and after inoculation with spores. Extensive lesions were observed along the intestinal walls especially on the middle and lower sections of group C rats only.

  3. Is bacterial luminescence response to low-dose radiation associated with mutagenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhko, T V; Guseynov, O A; Guseynova, V E; Bondar, A A; Devyatlovskaya, A N; Kudryasheva, N S

    2017-10-01

    Luminous marine bacteria are widely used in bioassays with luminescence intensity being a physiological parameter tested. The purpose of the study was to determine whether bacterial genetic alteration is responsible for bioluminescence kinetics change under low-dose radiation exposure. The alpha-emitting radionuclide (241)Am and beta-emitting radionuclide (3)H were used as the sources of low-dose ionizing radiation. Changes of bioluminescence kinetics of Photobacterium phosphoreum in solutions of (241)Am(NO3)3, 7 kBq/L, and tritiated water, 100 MBq/L, were studied; bioluminescence kinetics stages (absence of effect, activation, and inhibition) were determined. Bacterial suspension was sampled at different stages of the bioluminescent kinetics; the doses accumulated by the samples were close or a little higher than a tentative limit of a low-dose interval: 0.10 and 0.85 Gy for (241)Am, or 0.11 and 0.18 Gy for (3)H. Sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene did not reveal a mutagenic effect of low-dose alpha and beta radiation in the bacterial samples. Previous results on bacterial DNA exposed to low-dose gamma radiation (0.25 Gy) were analyzed and compared to those for alpha and beta irradiation. It is concluded that bioluminescence activation and/or inhibition under the applied conditions of low-dose alpha, beta and gamma radioactive exposure is not associated with DNA mutations in the gene sequences tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genes associated with 2-methylisoborneol biosynthesis in cyanobacteria: isolation, characterization, and expression in response to light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjie Wang

    Full Text Available The volatile microbial metabolite 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB is a root cause of taste and odor issues in freshwater. Although current evidence suggests that 2-MIB is not toxic, this compound degrades water quality and presents problems for water treatment. To address these issues, cyanobacteria and actinomycetes, the major producers of 2-MIB, have been investigated extensively. In this study, two 2-MIB producing strains, coded as Pseudanabaena sp. and Planktothricoids raciborskii, were used in order to elucidate the genetic background, light regulation, and biochemical mechanisms of 2-MIB biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. Genome walking and PCR methods revealed that two adjacent genes, SAM-dependent methyltransferanse gene and monoterpene cyclase gene, are responsible for GPP methylation and subsequent cyclization to 2-MIB in cyanobacteria. These two genes are located in between two homologous cyclic nucleotide-binding protein genes that may be members of the Crp-Fnr regulator family. Together, this sequence of genes forms a putative operon. The synthesis of 2-MIB is similar in cyanobacteria and actinomycetes. Comparison of the gene arrangement and functional sites between cyanobacteria and other organisms revealed that gene recombination and gene transfer probably occurred during the evolution of 2-MIB-associated genes. All the microorganisms examined have a common origin of 2-MIB biosynthesis capacity, but cyanobacteria represent a unique evolutionary lineage. Gene expression analysis suggested that light is a crucial, but not the only, active regulatory factor for the transcription of 2-MIB synthesis genes. This light-regulated process is immediate and transient. This study is the first to identify the genetic background and evolution of 2-MIB biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, thus enhancing current knowledge on 2-MIB contamination of freshwater.

  5. Predicting Response Trajectories during Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Panic Disorder: No Association with the BDNF Gene or Childhood Maltreatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Santacana

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and result in low quality of life and a high social and economic cost. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT for anxiety disorders is well established, but a substantial proportion of patients do not respond to this treatment. Understanding which genetic and environmental factors are responsible for this differential response to treatment is a key step towards "personalized medicine". Based on previous research, our objective was to test whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and/or childhood maltreatment are associated with response trajectories during exposure-based CBT for panic disorder (PD.We used Growth Mixture Modeling to identify latent classes of change (response trajectories in patients with PD (N = 97 who underwent group manualized exposure-based CBT. We conducted logistic regression to investigate the effect on these trajectories of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and two different types of childhood maltreatment, abuse and neglect.We identified two response trajectories ("high response" and "low response", and found that they were not significantly associated with either the genetic (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism or childhood trauma-related variables of interest, nor with an interaction between these variables.We found no evidence to support an effect of the BDNF gene or childhood trauma-related variables on CBT outcome in PD. Future studies in this field may benefit from looking at other genotypes or using different (e.g. whole-genome approaches.

  6. Responsiveness of genes to manipulation of transcription factors in ES cells is associated with histone modifications and tissue specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to determining static states of gene expression (high vs. low), it is important to characterize their dynamic status. For example, genes with H3K27me3 chromatin marks are not only suppressed but also poised for activation. However, the responsiveness of genes to perturbations has never been studied systematically. To distinguish gene responses to specific factors from responsiveness in general, it is necessary to analyze gene expression profiles of cells responding to a large variety of disturbances, and such databases did not exist before. Results We estimated the responsiveness of all genes in mouse ES cells using our recently published database on expression change after controlled induction of 53 transcription factors (TFs) and other genes. Responsive genes (N = 4746), which were readily upregulated or downregulated depending on the kind of perturbation, mostly have regulatory functions and a propensity to become tissue-specific upon differentiation. Tissue-specific expression was evaluated on the basis of published (GNF) and our new data for 15 organs and tissues. Non-responsive genes (N = 9562), which did not change their expression much following any perturbation, were enriched in housekeeping functions. We found that TF-responsiveness in ES cells is the best predictor known for tissue-specificity in gene expression. Among genes with CpG islands, high responsiveness is associated with H3K27me3 chromatin marks, and low responsiveness is associated with H3K36me3 chromatin, stronger tri-methylation of H3K4, binding of E2F1, and GABP binding motifs in promoters. Conclusions We thus propose the responsiveness of expression to perturbations as a new way to define the dynamic status of genes, which brings new insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and tissue specificity. PMID:21306619

  7. Responsiveness of genes to manipulation of transcription factors in ES cells is associated with histone modifications and tissue specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Marshall

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to determining static states of gene expression (high vs. low, it is important to characterize their dynamic status. For example, genes with H3K27me3 chromatin marks are not only suppressed but also poised for activation. However, the responsiveness of genes to perturbations has never been studied systematically. To distinguish gene responses to specific factors from responsiveness in general, it is necessary to analyze gene expression profiles of cells responding to a large variety of disturbances, and such databases did not exist before. Results We estimated the responsiveness of all genes in mouse ES cells using our recently published database on expression change after controlled induction of 53 transcription factors (TFs and other genes. Responsive genes (N = 4746, which were readily upregulated or downregulated depending on the kind of perturbation, mostly have regulatory functions and a propensity to become tissue-specific upon differentiation. Tissue-specific expression was evaluated on the basis of published (GNF and our new data for 15 organs and tissues. Non-responsive genes (N = 9562, which did not change their expression much following any perturbation, were enriched in housekeeping functions. We found that TF-responsiveness in ES cells is the best predictor known for tissue-specificity in gene expression. Among genes with CpG islands, high responsiveness is associated with H3K27me3 chromatin marks, and low responsiveness is associated with H3K36me3 chromatin, stronger tri-methylation of H3K4, binding of E2F1, and GABP binding motifs in promoters. Conclusions We thus propose the responsiveness of expression to perturbations as a new way to define the dynamic status of genes, which brings new insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and tissue specificity.

  8. Association between nicotine withdrawal and reward responsiveness in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergadia, Michele L; Der-Avakian, Andre; D'Souza, Manoranjan S; Madden, Pamela A F; Heath, Andrew C; Shiffman, Saul; Markou, Athina; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2014-11-01

    Reward-related disturbances after withdrawal from nicotine are hypothesized to contribute to relapse to tobacco smoking but mechanisms underlying and linking such processes remain largely unknown. To determine whether withdrawal from nicotine affects reward responsiveness (ie, the propensity to modulate behavior as a function of prior reinforcement experience) across species using translational behavioral assessments in humans and rats. Experimental studies used analogous reward responsiveness tasks in both humans and rats to examine whether reward responsiveness varied in (1) an ad libitum smoking condition compared with a 24-hour acute nicotine abstinence condition in 31 human smokers with (n = 17) or without (n = 14) a history of depression; (2) rats 24 hours after withdrawal from chronic nicotine (n = 19) or saline (n = 20); and (3) rats following acute nicotine exposure after withdrawal from either chronic nicotine or saline administration. Performance on a reward responsiveness task under nicotine and nonnicotine conditions. In both human smokers and nicotine-treated rats, reward responsiveness was significantly reduced after 24-hour withdrawal from nicotine (P responsiveness were greater in those with a history of depression. In rats previously exposed to chronic nicotine, acute nicotine reexposure long after withdrawal potentiated reward responsiveness (P responsiveness to natural rewards and to experience potentiated nicotine-induced reward responsiveness. Moreover, demonstration of behavioral homology across humans and rodents provides a strong translational framework for the investigation and development of clinical treatments targeting reward responsiveness deficits during early withdrawal of nicotine.

  9. A survey of genomic studies supports association of circadian clock genes with bipolar disorder spectrum illnesses and lithium response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J McCarthy

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythm abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD have led to a search for genetic abnormalities in circadian "clock genes" associated with BD. However, no significant clock gene findings have emerged from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. At least three factors could account for this discrepancy: complex traits are polygenic, the organization of the clock is more complex than previously recognized, and/or genetic risk for BD may be shared across multiple illnesses. To investigate these issues, we considered the clock gene network at three levels: essential "core" clock genes, upstream circadian clock modulators, and downstream clock controlled genes. Using relaxed thresholds for GWAS statistical significance, we determined the rates of clock vs. control genetic associations with BD, and four additional illnesses that share clinical features and/or genetic risk with BD (major depression, schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity. Then we compared the results to a set of lithium-responsive genes. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were both enriched among core clock genes but not among upstream clock modulators. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were also enriched among pervasively rhythmic clock-controlled genes but not among genes that were less pervasively rhythmic or non-rhythmic. Our analysis reveals previously unrecognized associations between clock genes and BD-spectrum illnesses, partly reconciling previously discordant results from past GWAS and candidate gene studies.

  10. Broad Anti-Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Antibody Responses Are Associated with Improved Clinical Disease Parameters in Chronic HCV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Rachael E.; Cowton, Vanessa M.; Robinson, Mark W.; Cole, Sarah J.; Barclay, Stephen T.; Mills, Peter R.; Thomson, Emma C.; McLauchlan, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) responses targeting E1E2 envelope glycoproteins are generated in many individuals. It is unclear if these antibodies play a protective or a pathogenic role during chronic infection. In this study, we investigated whether bNAb responses in individuals with chronic infection were associated with differences in clinical presentation. Patient-derived purified serum IgG was used to assess the breadth of HCV E1E2 binding and the neutralization activity of HCV pseudoparticles. The binding and neutralization activity results for two panels bearing viral envelope proteins representing either an intergenotype or an intragenotype 1 group were compared. We found that the HCV load was negatively associated with strong cross-genotypic E1E2 binding (P = 0.03). Overall, we observed only a modest correlation between total E1E2 binding and neutralization ability. The breadth of intergenotype neutralization did not correlate with any clinical parameters; however, analysis of individuals with genotype 1 (gt1) HCV infection (n = 20), using an intragenotype pseudoparticle panel, found a strong association between neutralization breadth and reduced liver fibrosis (P = 0.006). A broad bNAb response in our cohort with chronic infection was associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the HLA-DQB1 gene (P = 0.038), as previously reported in a cohort with acute disease. Furthermore, the bNAbs in these individuals targeted more than one region of E2-neutralizing epitopes, as assessed through cross-competition of patient bNAbs with well-characterized E2 antibodies. We conclude that the bNAb responses in patients with chronic gt1 infection are associated with lower rates of fibrosis and host genetics may play a role in the ability to raise such responses. IMPORTANCE Globally, there are 130 million to 150 million people with chronic HCV infection. Typically, the disease is progressive and is a

  11. A large population-based association study between HLA and KIR genotypes and measles vaccine antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Schaid, Daniel J; Larrabee, Beth R; Haralambieva, Iana H; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Human antibody response to measles vaccine is highly variable in the population. Host genes contribute to inter-individual antibody response variation. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are recognized to interact with HLA molecules and possibly influence humoral immune response to viral antigens. To expand on and improve our previous work with HLA genes, and to explore the genetic contribution of KIR genes to the inter-individual variability in measles vaccine-induced antibody responses, we performed a large population-based study in 2,506 healthy immunized subjects (ages 11 to 41 years) to identify HLA and KIR associations with measles vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. After correcting for the large number of statistical tests of allele effects on measles-specific neutralizing antibody titers, no statistically significant associations were found for either HLA or KIR loci. However, suggestive associations worthy of follow-up in other cohorts include B*57:01, DQB1*06:02, and DRB1*15:05 alleles. Specifically, the B*57:01 allele (1,040 mIU/mL; p = 0.0002) was suggestive of an association with lower measles antibody titer. In contrast, the DQB1*06:02 (1,349 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) and DRB1*15:05 (2,547 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) alleles were suggestive of an association with higher measles antibodies. Notably, the associations with KIR genotypes were strongly nonsignificant, suggesting that KIR loci in terms of copy number and haplotypes are not likely to play a major role in antibody response to measles vaccination. These findings refine our knowledge of the role of HLA and KIR alleles in measles vaccine-induced immunity.

  12. A large population-based association study between HLA and KIR genotypes and measles vaccine antibody responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Larrabee, Beth R.; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Human antibody response to measles vaccine is highly variable in the population. Host genes contribute to inter-individual antibody response variation. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are recognized to interact with HLA molecules and possibly influence humoral immune response to viral antigens. To expand on and improve our previous work with HLA genes, and to explore the genetic contribution of KIR genes to the inter-individual variability in measles vaccine-induced antibody responses, we performed a large population-based study in 2,506 healthy immunized subjects (ages 11 to 41 years) to identify HLA and KIR associations with measles vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. After correcting for the large number of statistical tests of allele effects on measles-specific neutralizing antibody titers, no statistically significant associations were found for either HLA or KIR loci. However, suggestive associations worthy of follow-up in other cohorts include B*57:01, DQB1*06:02, and DRB1*15:05 alleles. Specifically, the B*57:01 allele (1,040 mIU/mL; p = 0.0002) was suggestive of an association with lower measles antibody titer. In contrast, the DQB1*06:02 (1,349 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) and DRB1*15:05 (2,547 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) alleles were suggestive of an association with higher measles antibodies. Notably, the associations with KIR genotypes were strongly nonsignificant, suggesting that KIR loci in terms of copy number and haplotypes are not likely to play a major role in antibody response to measles vaccination. These findings refine our knowledge of the role of HLA and KIR alleles in measles vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:28158231

  13. Dose-Response Association Between Physical Activity and Incident Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejiao; Zhang, Dongdong; Liu, Yu; Sun, Xizhuo; Han, Chengyi; Wang, Bingyuan; Ren, Yongcheng; Zhou, Junmei; Zhao, Yang; Shi, Yuanyuan; Hu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Ming

    2017-05-01

    Despite the inverse association between physical activity (PA) and incident hypertension, a comprehensive assessment of the quantitative dose-response association between PA and hypertension has not been reported. We performed a meta-analysis, including dose-response analysis, to quantitatively evaluate this association. We searched PubMed and Embase databases for articles published up to November 1, 2016. Random effects generalized least squares regression models were used to assess the quantitative association between PA and hypertension risk across studies. Restricted cubic splines were used to model the dose-response association. We identified 22 articles (29 studies) investigating the risk of hypertension with leisure-time PA or total PA, including 330 222 individuals and 67 698 incident cases of hypertension. The risk of hypertension was reduced by 6% (relative risk, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.96) with each 10 metabolic equivalent of task h/wk increment of leisure-time PA. We found no evidence of a nonlinear dose-response association of PA and hypertension (Pnonlinearity=0.094 for leisure-time PA and 0.771 for total PA). With the linear cubic spline model, when compared with inactive individuals, for those who met the guidelines recommended minimum level of moderate PA (10 metabolic equivalent of task h/wk), the risk of hypertension was reduced by 6% (relative risk, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.97). This meta-analysis suggests that additional benefits for hypertension prevention occur as the amount of PA increases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Association study of olanzapine-induced weight gain and therapeutic response with SERT gene polymorphisms in female schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozina, Nada; Medved, Vesna; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Sain, Ivica; Sertic, Jadranka

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between L/S promoter (SERTPR) and l/s intron2 (SERTin2) genetic variants of serotonin transporter (SERT) polymorphisms with olanzapine-induced weight gain and treatment response in 94 female schizophrenic patients treated with olanzapine for up to 3 months. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each patient prior to olanzapine administration and 3 months afterwards. To assess and evaluate improvement of clinical psychotic symptoms and therapeutic response to the antipsychotic, all patients were rated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome ScaLe (PANSS). Overall, the presence of S SERTPR allelic variant and SS genotype was associated with significantly higher weight gain in subjects who were non-obese at the time of admission. The presence of L SERTPR variant was associated with significantly better treatment response measured with total PANSS and general PANSS subscale, while the presence of l SERTin2 variant determined better treatment response only in several items. No evidence of linkage disequilibrium between the two loci was found in the sample. These findings identify genetic factors associated with oLanzapine-induced weight gain and treatment response in femaLe schizophrenic patients.

  15. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive–behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jonathan R. I.; Lester, Kathryn J.; Keers, Robert; Roberts, Susanna; Curtis, Charles; Arendt, Kristian; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Dalgleish, Tim; Hartman, Catharina A.; Heiervang, Einar R.; Hötzel, Katrin; Hudson, Jennifer L.; In-Albon, Tina; Lavallee, Kristen; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Marin, Carla E.; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H.; Rapee, Ronald M.; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C.; Silverman, Wendy K.; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. Aims To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of psychological treatment response in children with anxiety disorders (n = 980). Method Presence and severity of anxiety was assessed using semi-structured interview at baseline, on completion of treatment (post-treatment), and 3 to 12 months after treatment completion (follow-up). DNA was genotyped using the Illumina Human Core Exome-12v1.0 array. Linear mixed models were used to test associations between genetic variants and response (change in symptom severity) immediately post-treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Results No variants passed a genome-wide significance threshold (P = 5 × 10−8) in either analysis. Four variants met criteria for suggestive significance (P<5 × 10−6) in association with response post-treatment, and three variants in the 6-month follow-up analysis. Conclusions This is the first genome-wide therapygenetic study. It suggests no common variants of very high effect underlie response to CBT. Future investigations should maximise power to detect single-variant and polygenic effects by using larger, more homogeneous cohorts. PMID:26989097

  16. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive-behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jonathan R I; Lester, Kathryn J; Keers, Robert; Roberts, Susanna; Curtis, Charles; Arendt, Kristian; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Dalgleish, Tim; Hartman, Catharina A; Heiervang, Einar R; Hötzel, Katrin; Hudson, Jennifer L; In-Albon, Tina; Lavallee, Kristen; Lyneham, Heidi J; Marin, Carla E; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H; Rapee, Ronald M; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C; Silverman, Wendy K; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of psychological treatment response in children with anxiety disorders (n = 980). Presence and severity of anxiety was assessed using semi-structured interview at baseline, on completion of treatment (post-treatment), and 3 to 12 months after treatment completion (follow-up). DNA was genotyped using the Illumina Human Core Exome-12v1.0 array. Linear mixed models were used to test associations between genetic variants and response (change in symptom severity) immediately post-treatment and at 6-month follow-up. No variants passed a genome-wide significance threshold (P = 5 × 10(-8)) in either analysis. Four variants met criteria for suggestive significance (P<5 × 10(-6)) in association with response post-treatment, and three variants in the 6-month follow-up analysis. This is the first genome-wide therapygenetic study. It suggests no common variants of very high effect underlie response to CBT. Future investigations should maximise power to detect single-variant and polygenic effects by using larger, more homogeneous cohorts. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  17. Therapygenetics: anterior cingulate cortex-amygdala coupling is associated with 5-HTTLPR and treatment response in panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Ulrike; Straube, Benjamin; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Konrad, Carsten; Ströhle, Andreas; Wittmann, André; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Arolt, Volker; Kircher, Tilo; Deckert, Jürgen; Reif, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the 5'-flanking promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4, the 5-HTT-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) has been inconclusively associated with response to cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). As genomic functions are stronger related to neural than to behavioural markers, we investigated the association of treatment response, 5-HTTLPR and functional brain connectivity in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG). Within the national research network PANIC-NET 231 PD/AG patients who provided genetic information underwent a manualized exposure-based CBT. A subset of 41 patients participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) add-on study prior to treatment applying a differential fear conditioning task. Neither the treatment nor the reduced fMRI sample showed a direct effect of 5-HTTLPR on treatment response as defined by a reduction in the Hamilton Anxiety Scale score ≥50 % from baseline to post assessment. On a neural level, inhibitory anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)-amygdala coupling during fear conditioning that had previously been shown to characterize treatment response in this sample was driven by responders with the L/L genotype. Building upon conclusive evidence from basic and preclinical findings on the association of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism with emotion regulation and related brain connectivity patterns, present findings translate these to a clinical sample of PD/AG patients and point towards a potential intermediate connectivity phenotype modulating response to exposure-based CBT.

  18. Reduced levels of cytosolic DNA sensor AIM2 are associated with impaired cytokine responses in healthy elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Qi; Westra, Johanna; van der Geest, Kornelis S. M.; Moser, Jill; Bijzet, Johan; Kuiper, Timara; Lorencetti, Pedro G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Netea, Mihai G.; Heeringa, Peter; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Human aging is associated with remodeling of the immune system. While most studies on immunosenescence have focused on adaptive immunity, the effects of aging on innate immunity are not well understood. Here, we investigated whether aging affects cytokine responses to a wide range of well

  19. HELLP syndrome is associated with an increased inflammatory response, which may be inhibited by administration of prednisolone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimel, PJ van Runnard; Kavelaars, A.; Heijnen, C.J.; Peters, W.H.M.; Huisjes, A.J.M.; Franx, A.; Bruinse, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of prednisolone on HELLP syndrome by assessing several markers of the inflammatory response and hepatic damage associated with HELLP syndrome. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Single-center, tertiary obstetric care facility at the University Medical Centre Utr

  20. HELLP syndrome is associated with an increased inflammatory response, which may be inhibited by administration of prednisolone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimel, Pieter J. van Runnard; Kavelaars, Annemiek; Heijnen, Cobie J.; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Huisjes, Anjoke J. M.; Franx, Arie; Bruinse, Hein W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of prednisolone on HELLP syndrome by assessing several markers of the inflammatory response and hepatic damage associated with HELLP syndrome. Design. Prospective study. Setting. Single-center, tertiary obstetric care facility at the University Medical Centre Utr

  1. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive–behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, J.R.I.; Lester, K.J.; Keers, R.; Roberts, S.; Curtis, C.; Arendt, K.; Bögels, S.; Cooper, P.; Creswell, C.; Dalgleish, T.; Hartman, C.A.; Heiervang, E.R.; Hötzel, K.; Hudson, J.L.; In-Albon, T.; Lavallee, K.; Lyneham, H.J.; Marin, C.E.; Meiser-Stedman, R.; Morris, T.; Nauta, M.H.; Rapee, R.M.; Schneider, S.; Schneider, S.C.; Silverman, W.K.; Thastum, M.; Thirlwall, K.; Waite, P.; Wergeland, G.J.; Breen, G.; Eley, T.C.

    Background Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. Aims To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of

  2. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive-behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, Jonathan R I; Lester, Kathryn J; Keers, Robert; Roberts, Susanna; Curtis, Charles; Arendt, Kristian; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Dalgleish, Tim; Hartman, Catharina A; Heiervang, Einar R; Hötzel, Katrin; Hudson, Jennifer L; In-Albon, Tina; Lavallee, Kristen; Lyneham, Heidi J; Marin, Carla E; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H; Rapee, Ronald M; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C; Silverman, Wendy K; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. AIMS: To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with impaired cytokine response and adhesion molecule expression in human endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis; Berg, Ronan M G;

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of acquiring infectious diseases and developing sepsis. This may partly be due to immune dysfunction. We investigated the in vivo innate immune response of type 2 diabetic persons to an intravenous injection of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)....

  4. Elevated antithyroid peroxidase antibodies indicating Hashimoto's thyroiditis are associated with the treatment response in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Johannes; Aust, Stefanie; Kurz, Christine; Nouri, Kazem; Wirth, Stefan; Huber, Johannes C; Mayerhofer, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    In infertile women suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies values exceeding the upper level of normal were found in significantly more clomiphene citrate resistant patients compared clomiphene citrate responders and metformin responders. Thus, elevated antiTPO levels are associated with poor treatment response in infertile women who suffer from PCOS.

  5. HELLP syndrome is associated with an increased inflammatory response, which may be inhibited by administration of prednisolone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimel, Pieter J. van Runnard; Kavelaars, Annemiek; Heijnen, Cobie J.; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Huisjes, Anjoke J. M.; Franx, Arie; Bruinse, Hein W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of prednisolone on HELLP syndrome by assessing several markers of the inflammatory response and hepatic damage associated with HELLP syndrome. Design. Prospective study. Setting. Single-center, tertiary obstetric care facility at the University Medical Centre Utr

  6. Early immune response patterns to pathogenic bacteria are associated to increased risk of lower respiratory infections in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, N. H.; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Rasmussen, Mette Annelie

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal colonisation of the airways with respiratory pathogens is associated with increased risk of lower respiratory infections (LRI) in early childhood (1). Therefore, we hypothesized that children developing LRI have an abnormal immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We aimed...

  7. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive-behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, Jonathan R I; Lester, Kathryn J; Keers, Robert; Roberts, Susanna; Curtis, Charles; Arendt, Kristian; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Dalgleish, Tim; Hartman, Catharina A; Heiervang, Einar R; Hötzel, Katrin; Hudson, Jennifer L; In-Albon, Tina; Lavallee, Kristen; Lyneham, Heidi J; Marin, Carla E; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H; Rapee, Ronald M; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C; Silverman, Wendy K; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. AIMS: To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of psychologi

  8. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive–behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, J.R.I.; Lester, K.J.; Keers, R.; Roberts, S.; Curtis, C.; Arendt, K.; Bögels, S.; Cooper, P.; Creswell, C.; Dalgleish, T.; Hartman, C.A.; Heiervang, E.R.; Hötzel, K.; Hudson, J.L.; In-Albon, T.; Lavallee, K.; Lyneham, H.J.; Marin, C.E.; Meiser-Stedman, R.; Morris, T.; Nauta, M.H.; Rapee, R.M.; Schneider, S.; Schneider, S.C.; Silverman, W.K.; Thastum, M.; Thirlwall, K.; Waite, P.; Wergeland, G.J.; Breen, G.; Eley, T.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. Aims To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of psychologica

  9. Antibody Response is More Likely to Pneumococcal Proteins Than to Polysaccharide After HIV-associated Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Green, Nicola; Goldblatt, David;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). In order to assess the immunogenicity of pneumococcal proteins and polysaccharide, we investigated protein and serotype-specific antibody responses after HIV-associate...

  10. Balancing Healthy Meals and Busy Lives: Associations between Work, School, and Family Responsibilities and Perceived Time Constraints among Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jennifer E.; Laska, Melissa N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize associations between perceived time constraints for healthy eating and work, school, and family responsibilities among young adults. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: A large, Midwestern metropolitan region. Participants: A diverse sample of community college (n = 598) and public university (n = 603) students.…

  11. Association of gene variants with lipid levels in response to fenofibrate is influenced by metabolic syndrome status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenofibrate therapy reduces serum triglycerides (TG) and increases high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and thus addresses the atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Our hypothesis is that genetic factors contribute to the variability of lipid response to fenofib...

  12. Anti-TNF Treatment Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Is Associated with Genetic Variation in the NLRP3-Inflammasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Hetland, Merete Lund; Locht, Henning; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Andersen, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from tumor necrosis factor-α blocking treatment (anti-TNF), but about one third do not respond. The objective of this study was to replicate and extend previously found associations between anti-TNF treatment response and genetic variation in the TNF-, NF-κB- and pattern recognition receptor signalling pathways. Methods Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including 34 functional, in 28 genes involved in inflammatory pathways were assessed in 538 anti-TNF naive Danish RA patients with clinical data. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to test associations between genotypes and treatment response at 3–6 months using the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criterion. American College of Rheumatology treatment response (ACR50) and relative change in 28-joint disease activity score (relDAS28) were used as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses were stratified according to smoking status, type of anti-TNF drug and IgM-Rheumatoid Factor (IgM-RF) status. False discovery rate (FDR) controlling was used to adjust for multiple testing. Results Statistically significant associations with EULAR response were found for two SNPs in NLRP3(rs4612666) (OR (odds ratio) for good/moderate response = 0.64 (95% confidence interval: 0.44–0.95), p = 0.025, q = 0.95) and INFG(rs2430561) (OR = 0.40 (0.21–0.76), p = 0.005, q = 0.18) and among IgM-RF positive patients for TNFRS1A(rs4149570) (0.59 (0.36–0.98), p = 0.040, q = 0.76). Current smokers who carried the NLRP3(rs4612666) variant allele were less likely to benefit from anti-TNF treatment (OR = 0.24 (0.10–0.56), p = 0.001, q = 0.04). Conclusions In a population of Danish RA patients, we confirm the NLRP3 gene as associated with EULAR anti-TNF response as previously reported. The NLRP3 variant (T) allele is associated with lower treatment response, in particular among

  13. Low Interferon Relative-Response to Cytomegalovirus Is Associated with Low Likelihood of Intrauterine Transmission of the Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifat Eldar-Yedidia

    Full Text Available Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a very common intrauterine infection which can cause severe mental and hearing impairments. Notably, only 40% of primarily infected women transmit CMV to the fetus. CMV-specific T-cell response has a role in CMV disease but individual immune heterogeneity precludes reliable correlation between measurable T-cells response and intrauterine transmission.To establish a correlation between maternal T-cells response and fetal CMV transmission using an individual normalized immune response.We analyzed IFN-γ secretion upon whole blood stimulation from primary CMV-infected pregnant women, with either CMV-peptides or PHA-mitogen.We established a new normalization method of individual IFN-γ response to CMV by defining the ratio between specific-CMV response and non-specific mitogen response (defined as IFN-γ relative response, RR, aiming to overcome high person-to-person immune variability. We found a unique subpopulation of women with low IFN-γ RR strongly correlated with absence of transmission. IFN-γ RR lower than 1.8% (threshold determined by ROC analysis reduces the pre-test probability of transmission from 40% to 8%, revealing an unexpected link between low IFN-γ RR and non-transmission.In pregnant women with primary CMV infection, low IFN-γ RR is associated with low risk of transmission.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus but not cytomegalovirus is associated with reduced vaccine antibody responses in Gambian infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Holder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV are persistent herpesviruses that have various immunomodulatory effects on their hosts. Both viruses are usually acquired in infancy in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region where childhood vaccines are less effective than in high income settings. To establish whether there is an association between these two observations, we tested the hypothesis that infection with one or both viruses modulate antibody responses to the T-cell independent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the T-cell dependent measles vaccines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Infection with EBV and CMV was diagnosed by the presence of virus-specific IgM in the peripheral blood or by the presence of IgG at higher levels than that found in umbilical cord blood. Anti-meningococcus IgG and IgM were quantified by ELISA. Anti-measles antibody responses were quantified by haemagglutinin antibody inhibition assay. Infants infected with EBV had reduced IgG and IgM antibody responses to meningococcal polysaccharides and to measles vaccine. Infection with CMV alone predicted no changes in the response to meningococcal polysaccharide. While CMV alone had no discernable effect on the antibody response to measles, the response of infants infected with both CMV and EBV was similar to that of infants infected with neither, suggesting that the effects of CMV infection countered the effects of EBV on measles antibody responses. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this exploratory study indicate that infection with EBV is associated with reduced antibody responses to polysaccharides and to measles vaccine, but suggest that the response to T-cell dependent antigens such as measles haemagglutinin may be restored by infection with CMV.

  15. Susceptibility to Lower Respiratory Infections in Childhood is Associated with Perturbation of the Cytokine Response to Pathogenic Airway Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal colonization of the airways with respiratory pathogens is associated with increased risk of lower respiratory infections (LRI) in early childhood. Therefore, we hypothesized that children developing LRI have an aberrant immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy....... OBJECTIVE: To characterize in vitro the early life systemic immune response to pathogenic bacteria and study the possible association with incidence of LRI during the first 3 years of life. METHODS: The Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood2000 (COPSAC2000) is a clinical birth cohort study......, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, and IL-17 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated at age 6 months from 291 infants. Data were analyzed by Poisson regression against incidence of LRI in infancy. RESULTS:: A multivariable model including all cytokine responses from the three different bacterial stimulations...

  16. Changes in JC virus-specific T cell responses during natalizumab treatment and in natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly R Perkins

    Full Text Available Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML induced by JC virus (JCV is a risk for natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Here we characterize the JCV-specific T cell responses in healthy donors and natalizumab-treated MS patients to reveal functional differences that may account for the development of natalizumab-associated PML. CD4 and CD8 T cell responses specific for all JCV proteins were readily identified in MS patients and healthy volunteers. The magnitude and quality of responses to JCV and cytomegalovirus (CMV did not change from baseline through several months of natalizumab therapy. However, the frequency of T cells producing IL-10 upon mitogenic stimulation transiently increased after the first dose. In addition, MS patients with natalizumab-associated PML were distinguished from all other subjects in that they either had no detectable JCV-specific T cell response or had JCV-specific CD4 T cell responses uniquely dominated by IL-10 production. Additionally, IL-10 levels were higher in the CSF of individuals with recently diagnosed PML. Thus, natalizumab-treated MS patients with PML have absent or aberrant JCV-specific T cell responses compared with non-PML patients, and changes in T cell-mediated control of JCV replication may be a risk factor for developing PML. Our data suggest further approaches to improved monitoring, treatment and prevention of PML in natalizumab-treated patients.

  17. A methodology for distinguishing between extinction and punishment effects associated with response blocking.

    OpenAIRE

    Lerman, D C; Iwata, B A

    1996-01-01

    We present one method for distinguishing between extinction and punishment effects. The proportion of responses that produced a consequence (blocking) was varied while hand mouthing was treated in a man diagnosed with profound mental retardation. Response patterns across the schedule changes suggested that the blocking procedure functioned as a punishing event.

  18. Association mapping analysis of the response to Macrophomina phaseolina in the Andean Diversity Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean Diversity Panel was evaluated for response to inoculation with charcoal rot in a field trial in Isabela, Puerto Rico in 2012. The trial was inoculated with backpack sprayers at flowering and a visual evaluation was conducted three weeks later. There was a broad range of response, with abo...

  19. Response sets in self-report data and their associations with personality traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, P; Slaets, JPJ

    2005-01-01

    Objective: With a strong reliance on the use of self-report questionnaires in psychiatric research, appropriate attention should he given to the existence and correlates of response sets. We studied the presence of response tendencies by using an old research paradigm from psychology. Methods: We ad

  20. A Methodology for Distinguishing between Extinction and Punishment Effects Associated with Response Blocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Iwata, Brian A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a method for distinguishing between extinction and punishment effects. In extinction and punishment, different schedules of reinforcement or punishment are in effect when a given proportion of responses is blocked. Response patterns in treatment of hand mouthing in an adult with profound mental retardation suggest that a…

  1. Immunohistochemical markers of advanced basal cell carcinoma: CD56 is associated with a lack of response to vismodegib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jean-Marie; Knol, Anne-Chantal; Nguyen, Jean-Michel; Khammari, Amir; Saint-Jean, Mélanie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    Vismodegib is an effective treatment for advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC), but primary resistance to vismodegib remains to be elucidated. Alternative approaches are warranted to help selecting patients most likely to be responsive to treatment. The identification of immunohistochemical markers may support this perspective, as well as better understanding of resistance mechanisms. To determine the level of expression of CD56, PDGF-R, CD117, MMP9, TIMP3, and CXCR4 in advanced BCC, and explore whether expression levels are associated with non-response to vismodegib. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Immunohistochemical markers were selected based on their roles in tumour proliferation and/or migration in skin tumours. Tissue samples included pretreatment advanced BCC samples from patients treated with vismodegib, with an available response after six months of treatment. Regression optimised models were used to build hypotheses regarding a possible association between expression levels and non-response to vismodegib, which was then tested by logistic regression. Twenty-three patients were included. The percentage of samples expressing markers ranged from 43.5% (CD117) to 91.3% (CXCR4). CD56 expression was significantly associated with an increased risk of non-response to vismodegib (OR = 5.5; CI 95%: 3.4-29.8; p = 0.0488); a similar association was suggested for CXCR4 (p = 0.066), but not identified for other markers. These results provide a better understanding of the expression of immunohistochemical markers in advanced BCC. Further detailed analysis of CD56 expression may provide insights into guiding further investigation of the correlation between this marker and non-response to vismodegib.

  2. Expression pattern and action analysis of genes associated with the responses to chemical stimuli during rat liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Wei Qin; Li-Feng Zhao; Xiao-Guang Chen; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the genes associated with the responses to chemokines, nutrients, inorganic substances, organic substances and xenobiotics after rat partial hepatectomy (PH) at transcriptional level.METHODS: The associated genes involved in the five kinds of responses were obtained from database and literature, and the gene expression changes during liver regeneration in rats were checked by the Rat Genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: It was found that 60, 10, 9, 6, 26 genes respectively participating in the above five kinds of responses were associated with liver regeneration. The numbers of initially and totally expressed genes occurring in the initial phase of liver regeneration (0.5-4 h after PH), G0/G1 transition (4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH), cell differentiation and structure-functional reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) were 51,19, 52, 6 and 51, 43, 98, 68 respectively, illustrating that the associated genes were mainly triggered in the initiation and transition stages, and functioned at different phases. According to their expression similarity,these genes were classified into 5 groups: only upregulated (47), predominantly up-regulated (18), only down-regulated (24), predominantly down-regulated (10), and up- and down-regulated (8). The total times of their up-regulated and down-regulated expression were 441 and 221, demonstrating that the number of up-regulated genes is more than that of the down-regulated genes. Their time relevance and gene expression patterns were classified into 14 and 26 groups, showing that the cell physiological and biochemical activities were staggered, diversified and complicated during liver regeneration in rats.CONCLUSION: The chemotaxis was enhanced mainly in the forepart and metaphase of LR. The response of regenerating liver to nutrients and chemical substances was increased, whereas that to xenobiotics was not strong. One hundred and seven genes associated with LR play important roles in the responses to

  3. Demographic and clinical factors associated with response to smallpox vaccine in preimmunized volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Bossi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: In March 2003, the French Ministry of Health implemented a program on preparedness and response to a biological attack using smallpox as weapon. This program included the establishment of a preoutbreak national team that could be revaccinated against smallpox. OBJECTIVE: To identify demographic and clinical factors associated with vaccination success defined as the presence of a pustule at the inoculation site at day 8 (days 7-9, with an undiluted vaccinia virus derived from a Lister strain among preimmunized volunteers. VOLUNTEERS AND METHODS: From March 2003 to November 2006, we have studied prospectively 226 eligible volunteers. Demographic data were recorded for each volunteer (age, sex, number of previously smallpox vaccinations and date of the last vaccination. Smallpox vaccine adverse reactions were diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination performed at days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after revaccination. RESULTS: A total of 226 volunteers (sex ratio H/F = 2.7 were revaccinated. Median age was 45 years (range: 27-63 yrs. All volunteers completed follow-up. Median number of vaccinations before revaccination was 2 (range: 1-8. The median delay between time of the study and the last vaccination was 29 years (range; 18-60 yrs. Sixty-one volunteers (27% experienced one (n = 40 or more (n = 21 minor side effects during the 2-14 days after revaccination. Successful vaccination was noted in 216/226 volunteers (95.6% at day 8 and the median of the pustule diameter was 5 mm (range: 1-20 mm. Size of the pustule at day 8 was correlated with age (p = 0.03 and with the presence of axillary adenopathy after revaccination (p = 0.007. Sex, number of prior vaccinations, delay between the last vaccination and revaccination, and local or systemic side effects with the exception of axillary adenopathy, were not correlated with the size of the pustule at day 8. CONCLUSIONS: Previously vaccinated volunteers can be successfully revaccinated with the

  4. FeNO and Bronchial Responsiveness are Associated and Continuous traits in Young Children Independent of Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Ann-Marie Malby; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Bønnelykke, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Elevated fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and bronchial hyperresponsiveness are used as surrogate markers of asthma. These traits may be continuous in the population. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether FeNO and bronchial responsiveness are associated both in children...... with and in children without a history of asthma symptoms. METHODS 196 six-year-old children comprising asymptomatic children, children with intermittent asthmatic symptoms and children with persistent asthma were randomly included from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2000) high...... adjustment for gender, allergic rhinitis, current asthma, inhaled corticosteroid treatment and upper respiratory tract infections prior to testing. Stratified analyses showed similar associations in children with and without asthma. CONCLUSION FeNO and bronchial responsiveness are associated traits...

  5. Association of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival according to ambulance response-times after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective...... was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. METHODS: We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used...... to examine the association between time from 911 call to emergency medical service arrival (response time) and survival according to whether bystander CPR was provided (yes or no). Reported are 30-day survival chances with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals. RESULTS: With increasing response times, adjusted...

  6. Patient Characteristics Associated with HCV Treatment Adherence, Treatment Completion, and Sustained Virologic Response in HIV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C (HCV treatment efficacy among HIV patients is limited by poor treatment adherence and tolerance, but few studies have examined the psychosocial determinants of treatment adherence and outcomes. Methods. Chart abstracted and survey data were collected on 72 HIV patients who had received pegylated interferon and ribavirin to assess correlates of treatment adherence, completion, and sustained virologic response (SVR. Results. Nearly half (46% the sample had active psychiatric problems and 13% had illicit drug use at treatment onset; 28% reported <100% treatment adherence, 38% did not complete treatment (mostly due to virologic nonresponse, and intent to treat SVR rate was 49%. Having a psychiatric diagnosis was associated with nonadherence, while better HCV adherence was associated with both treatment completion and SVR. Conclusions. Good mental health may be an indicator of HCV treatment adherence readiness, which is in turn associated with treatment completion and response, but further research is needed with new HCV treatments emerging.

  7. Lack of Responsiveness during the Onset and Offset of Sevoflurane Anesthesia Is Associated with Decreased Awake-Alpha Oscillation Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Kara J; Su, Lijuan; Gao, Lei; Eromo, Ersne; Vazquez, Rafael; Rhee, James; Hobbs, Lauren E; Ibala, Reine; Demircioglu, Gizem; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Akeju, Oluwaseun

    2017-01-01

    Anesthetic drugs are typically administered to induce altered states of arousal that range from sedation to general anesthesia (GA). Systems neuroscience studies are currently being used to investigate the neural circuit mechanisms of anesthesia-induced altered arousal states. These studies suggest that by disrupting the oscillatory dynamics that are associated with arousal states, anesthesia-induced oscillations are a putative mechanism through which anesthetic drugs produce altered states of arousal. However, an empirical clinical observation is that even at relatively stable anesthetic doses, patients are sometimes intermittently responsive to verbal commands during states of light sedation. During these periods, prominent anesthesia-induced neural oscillations such as slow-delta (0.1-4 Hz) oscillations are notably absent. Neural correlates of intermittent responsiveness during light sedation have been insufficiently investigated. A principled understanding of the neural correlates of intermittent responsiveness may fundamentally advance our understanding of neural dynamics that are essential for maintaining arousal states, and how they are disrupted by anesthetics. Therefore, we performed a high-density (128 channels) electroencephalogram (EEG) study (n = 8) of sevoflurane-induced altered arousal in healthy volunteers. We administered temporally precise behavioral stimuli every 5 s to assess responsiveness. Here, we show that decreased eyes-closed, awake-alpha (8-12 Hz) oscillation power is associated with lack of responsiveness during sevoflurane effect-onset and -offset. We also show that anteriorization-the transition from occipitally dominant awake-alpha oscillations to frontally dominant anesthesia induced-alpha oscillations-is not a binary phenomenon. Rather, we suggest that periods, which were defined by lack of responsiveness, represent an intermediate brain state. We conclude that awake-alpha oscillation, previously thought to be an idling rhythm, is

  8. External Criticism by Parents and Obsessive Beliefs in Adolescents: Mediating Role of Beliefs associated with Inflated Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvaiepour, Zohreh; Nosratabadi, Mehdi

    2015-09-18

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is considered as a rare disorder in children. According to cognitive theories, criticism triggers responsibility behavior and thus causes obsessive behaviors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mediating role of beliefs associated with responsibility in the relationship between external criticism of parents and obsessive beliefs in adolescents. In this study, 547 high school students aged from 15 to18 years were selected using multi-stage cluster random sampling from four regions of the education office in Shiraz. Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire-child version (OBQ-CV), Pathway to Inflated Responsibility beliefs Scale (PIRBS), and perceived criticism questionnaire were used to collect data. Pearson's correlation was used to investigate the relationship between the study variables. For analysis of mediation model, multiple mediators analysis using Macro Software was used. External criticism only indirectly and through beliefs associated with inflated responsibility accounts for 6% of the variance of responsibility, 14% of the variance of threat estimation and 10% of the variance of perfectionism of obsessive beliefs (Presponsibility accounts for 7% of the variance of the importance of obsessive beliefs. This study showed that the beliefs associated with inflated responsibility can mediate the relationship between external criticism and obsessive beliefs. According to the cognitive model of Salkovskis, criticism by parents, as a violation to and an influence on children, by affecting the subscales of inflated responsibility, can increase the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. In order to identify potential affecting mechanisms of criticism on obsessive-compulsive disorder, further experimental research is required.

  9. Pasture Management Strategies for Sequestering Soil Carbon - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzluebbers, Alan J.

    2006-03-15

    management indicated that soil organic carbon and nitrogen storage were greater with than without endophyte only under high soil fertility. This extra carbon and nitrogen in soil due to the presence of the endophyte was further found to be located in intermediately sized soil aggregates, which are important for reducing water runoff and improving water quality. These results suggest that well-fertilized tall fescue pastures with a high percentage of plants infected with the endophyte have the potential to help offset the rising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This research has also shown positive ecological implications of tall fescue-endophyte association.

  10. Association of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor polymorphisms with chronic hepatitis C and responses to therapy in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Mota de Vasconcelos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soroprevalence for Hepatitis C virus is reported as 2.12% in Northern Brazil, with about 50% of the patients exhibiting a sustained virological response (SVR. Aiming to associate polymorphisms in Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR with chronic hepatitis C and therapy responses we investigated 125 chronic patients and 345 controls. Additionally, 48 ancestry markers were genotyped to control for population stratification. The frequency of the KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL2+HLA-C Asp80 gene and ligand was higher in chronic infected patients than in controls (p < 0.0009, OR = 3.4; p = 0.001, OR = 3.45. In fact, KIR2DL3 is a weaker inhibitor of NK activity than KIR2DL2, which could explain the association of KIR2DL2 with chronic infection. Moreover, KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS2+HLA-C Asp80 (p < 0.0001, OR = 2.51; p = 0.0084, OR = 2.62 and KIR2DS3 (p < 0.0001; OR = 2.57 were associated with chronic infection, independently from KIR2DL2. No differences in ancestry composition were observed between control and patients, even with respect to therapy response groups. The allelic profile KIR2DL2/KIR2DS2/KIR2DS3 was associated with the chronic hepatitis C (p < 0.0001; OR = 3. Furthermore, the patients also showed a higher mean number of activating genes and a lower frequency of the homozygous AA profile, which is likely secondary to the association with non-AA and/or activating genes. In addition, the KIR2DS5 allele was associated with SVR (p = 0.0261; OR = 0.184.The ancestry analysis of samples ruled out any effects of population substructuring and did not evidence interethnic differences in therapy response, as suggested in previous studies.

  11. Association between neurovascular contact on MRI and response to gamma knife radiosurgery in trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbay, Sami H; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A; Riesenburger, Ron; Gupta, Punita; O'Callaghan, Mark; Yun, Eric; Oljeski, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) provides adequate short-term pain control in about 70% of the patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether the presence of neurovascular contact (NVC) at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve on pre-gamma knife MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS. We studied 40 consecutive patients who underwent GKRS for treatment of intractable TN. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the side of symptoms analyzed pre-treatment constructive interference in steady state (CISS) images to determine the presence of NVC by consensus. An adequate response was defined as freedom from pain with or without reduced need for medical therapy. Adequate short-term response to GKRS was seen in 29 (72.5%) of 40 patients. NVC was seen in 30 of the 40 patients. Twenty-five (83.3%) of 30 patients with NVC had adequate short-term response to GKRS. Only four (40%) of the 10 patients without NVC had adequate response to GKRS (X2=7.06; PNVC were seven times more likely to have an adequate response to GKRS than those without NVC (odds ratio =7.5).The presence of NVC on pre-treatment MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS.

  12. Association between neurovascular contact on MRI and response to gamma knife radiosurgery in trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbay, Sami H.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.; Gupta, Punita; O' Callaghan, Mark; Yun, Eric; Oljeski, Steven [Tufts-New England Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Riesenburger, Ron [Tufts-New England Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) provides adequate short-term pain control in about 70% of the patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether the presence of neurovascular contact (NVC) at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve on pre-gamma knife MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS.We studied 40 consecutive patients who underwent GKRS for treatment of intractable TN. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the side of symptoms analyzed pre-treatment constructive interference in steady state (CISS) images to determine the presence of NVC by consensus. An adequate response was defined as freedom from pain with or without reduced need for medical therapy. Adequate short-term response to GKRS was seen in 29 (72.5%) of 40 patients. NVC was seen in 30 of the 40 patients. Twenty-five (83.3%) of 30 patients with NVC had adequate short-term response to GKRS. Only four (40%) of the 10 patients without NVC had adequate response to GKRS (X{sup 2}=7.06; P<0.01). Patients with NVC were seven times more likely to have an adequate response to GKRS than those without NVC (odds ratio =7.5).The presence of NVC on pre-treatment MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS. (orig.)

  13. HI responses induced by seasonal influenza vaccination are associated with clinical protection and with seroprotection against non-homologous strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luytjes, Willem; Enouf, Vincent; Schipper, Maarten; Gijzen, Karlijn; Liu, Wai Ming; van der Lubben, Mariken; Meijer, Adam; van der Werf, Sylvie; Soethout, Ernst C

    2012-07-27

    Vaccination against influenza induces homologous as well as cross-specific hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) responses. Induction of cross-specific HI responses may be essential when the influenza strain does not match the vaccine strain, or even to confer a basic immune response against a pandemic influenza virus. We carried out a clinical study to evaluate the immunological responses after seasonal vaccination in healthy adults 18-60 years of age, receiving the yearly voluntary vaccination during the influenza season 2006/2007. Vaccinees of different age groups were followed for laboratory confirmed influenza (LCI) and homologous HI responses as well as cross-specific HI responses against the seasonal H1N1 strain of 2008 and pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009 (H1N1pdm09) were determined. Homologous HI titers that are generally associated with protection (i.e. seroprotective HI titers ≥40) were found in more than 70% of vaccinees. In contrast, low HI titers before and after vaccination were significantly associated with seasonal LCI. Cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against drifted seasonal H1N1 were found in 69% of vaccinees. Cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against H1N1pdm09 were also significantly induced, especially in the youngest age group. More specifically, cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against H1N1pdm09 were inversely correlated with age. We did not find a correlation between the subtype of influenza which was circulating at the age of birth of the vaccinees and cross-specific HI response against H1N1pdm09. These data indicate that the HI titers before and after vaccination determine the vaccination efficacy. In addition, in healthy adults between 18 and 60 years of age, young adults appear to be best able to mount a cross-protective HI response against H1N1pdm09 or drifted seasonal influenza after seasonal vaccination.

  14. Association between dynamic features of breast DCE-MR imaging and clinical response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lijuan; Fan, Ming; Li, Lihua; Zhang, Juan; Shao, Guoliang; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is being used increasingly in the management of patients with breast cancer for systemically reducing the size of primary tumor before surgery in order to improve survival. The clinical response of patients to NACT is correlated with reduced or abolished of their primary tumor, which is important for treatment in the next stage. Recently, the dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used for evaluation of the response of patients to NACT. To measure this correlation, we extracted the dynamic features from the DCE- MRI and performed association analysis between these features and the clinical response to NACT. In this study, 59 patients are screened before NATC, of which 47 are complete or partial response, and 12 are no response. We segmented the breast areas depicted on each MR image by a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme, registered images acquired from the sequential MR image scan series, and calculated eighteen features extracted from DCE-MRI. We performed SVM with the 18 features for classification between patients of response and no response. Furthermore, 6 of the 18 features are selected to refine the classification by using Genetic Algorithm. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are 87%, 95.74% and 50%, respectively. The calculated area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is 0.79+/-0.04. This study indicates that the features of DCE-MRI of breast cancer are associated with the response of NACT. Therefore, our method could be helpful for evaluation of NACT in treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Genome-wide association study to identify chromosomal regions associated with antibody response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk of Dutch Holstein-Friesians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulzen, K J E; Schopen, G C B; van Arendonk, J A M; Nielen, M; Koets, A P; Schrooten, C; Heuven, H C M

    2012-05-01

    Heritability of susceptibility to Johne's disease in cattle has been shown to vary from 0.041 to 0.159. Although the presence of genetic variation involved in susceptibility to Johne's disease has been demonstrated, the understanding of genes contributing to the genetic variance is far from complete. The objective of this study was to contribute to further understanding of genetic variation involved in susceptibility to Johne's disease by identifying associated chromosomal regions using a genome-wide association approach. Log-transformed ELISA test results of 265,290 individual Holstein-Friesian cows from 3,927 herds from the Netherlands were analyzed to obtain sire estimated breeding values for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP)-specific antibody response in milk using a sire-maternal grandsire model with fixed effects for parity, year of birth, lactation stage, and herd; a covariate for milk yield on test day; and random effects for sire, maternal grandsire, and error. For 192 sires with estimated breeding values with a minimum reliability of 70%, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing was conducted by a multiple SNP analysis with a random polygenic effect fitting 37,869 SNP simultaneously. Five SNP associated with MAP-specific antibody response in milk were identified distributed over 4 chromosomal regions (chromosome 4, 15, 18, and 28). Thirteen putative SNP associated with MAP-specific antibody response in milk were identified distributed over 10 chromosomes (chromosome 4, 14, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, and 29). This knowledge contributes to the current understanding of genetic variation involved in Johne's disease susceptibility and facilitates control of Johne's disease and improvement of health status by breeding.

  16. Different Adjuvants Induce Common Innate Pathways That Are Associated with Enhanced Adaptive Responses against a Model Antigen in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burny, Wivine; Callegaro, Andrea; Bechtold, Viviane; Clement, Frédéric; Delhaye, Sophie; Fissette, Laurence; Janssens, Michel; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Marchant, Arnaud; van den Berg, Robert A.; Garçon, Nathalie; van der Most, Robbert; Didierlaurent, Arnaud M.

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the role of innate responses in vaccine immunogenicity, we compared early responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) combined with different Adjuvant Systems (AS) in healthy HBV-naïve adults, and included these parameters in multi-parametric models of adaptive responses. A total of 291 participants aged 18–45 years were randomized 1:1:1:1:1 to receive HBsAg with AS01B, AS01E, AS03, AS04, or Alum/Al(OH)3 at days 0 and 30 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00805389). Blood protein, cellular, and mRNA innate responses were assessed at early time-points and up to 7 days after vaccination, and used with reactogenicity symptoms in linear regression analyses evaluating their correlation with HBs-specific CD4+ T-cell and antibody responses at day 44. All AS induced transient innate responses, including interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP), mostly peaking at 24 h post-vaccination and subsiding to baseline within 1–3 days. After the second but not the first injection, median interferon (IFN)-γ levels were increased in the AS01B group, and IFN-γ-inducible protein-10 levels and IFN-inducible genes upregulated in the AS01 and AS03 groups. No distinct marker or signature was specific to one particular AS. Innate profiles were comparable between AS01B, AS01E, and AS03 groups, and between AS04 and Alum groups. AS group rankings within adaptive and innate response levels and reactogenicity prevalence were similar (AS01B ≥ AS01E > AS03 > AS04 > Alum), suggesting an association between magnitudes of inflammatory and vaccine responses. Modeling revealed associations between adaptive responses and specific traits of the innate response post-dose 2 (activation of the IFN-signaling pathway, CRP and IL-6 responses). In conclusion, the ability of AS01 and AS03 to enhance adaptive responses to co-administered HBsAg is likely linked to their capacity to activate innate immunity, particularly the IFN-signaling pathway. PMID

  17. CTL responses of high functional avidity and broad variant cross-reactivity are associated with HIV control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Mothe

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses targeting specific HIV proteins, in particular Gag, have been associated with relative control of viral replication in vivo. However, Gag-specific CTL can also be detected in individuals who do not control the virus and it remains thus unclear how Gag-specific CTL may mediate the beneficial effects in some individuals but not in others. Here, we used a 10mer peptide set spanning HIV Gag-p24 to determine immunogen-specific T-cell responses and to assess functional properties including functional avidity and cross-reactivity in 25 HIV-1 controllers and 25 non-controllers without protective HLA class I alleles. Our data challenge the common belief that Gag-specific T cell responses dominate the virus-specific immunity exclusively in HIV-1 controllers as both groups mounted responses of comparable breadths and magnitudes against the p24 sequence. However, responses in controllers reacted to lower antigen concentrations and recognized more epitope variants than responses in non-controllers. These cross-sectional data, largely independent of particular HLA genetics and generated using direct ex-vivo samples thus identify T cell responses of high functional avidity and with broad variant reactivity as potential functional immune correlates of relative HIV control.

  18. Molecular responses in root-associative rhizospheric bacteria to variations in plant exudates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoun, Hamid; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2015-04-01

    Plant exudates are a major factor in the interface of plant-soil-microbe interactions and it is well documented that the microbial community structure in the rhizosphere is largely influenced by the particular exudates excreted by various plants. Azospirillum brasilense is a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium that is known to interact with a large number of plants, including important food crops. The regulatory gene flcA has an important role in this interaction as it controls morphological differentiation of the bacterium that is essential for attachment to root surfaces. Being a response regulatory gene, flcA mediates the response of the bacterial cell to signals from the surrounding rhizosphere. This makes this regulatory gene a good candidate for analysis of the response of bacteria to rhizospheric alterations, in this case, variations in root exudates. We will report on our studies on the response of Azospirillum, an ecologically, scientifically and agriculturally important bacterial genus, to variations in the rhizosphere.

  19. Association of Filial Responsibility, Ethnicity, and Acculturation Among Japanese American Family Caregivers of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2017-03-01

    Challenges of filial caregiving practices by 1st-generation immigrants due to differences in caregiving values between their home and host countries are well documented. This study explored the filial responsibility of later generation Japanese American caregivers of older adults. Acculturation and filial responsibility were measured using the Suinn-Lew Asian Self Identity Acculturation scale and Filial Values Index, respectively. A qualitative interview guide was developed using Gordon's assimilation theory, and 21 caregivers ( M age = 68 years, 86% female, seven in each generation) were interviewed. Despite the 3rd-generation caregivers' high acculturation level, their filial responsibility scores remained high. Qualitative interviews also revealed later generation caregivers' strong filial responsibility and continued caregiving involvement. Unexpectedly, caregivers' own future expectancy of care included placement in mainstream residential facilities rather than ethnic-specific settings. Findings point to the need to develop caregiver services that consider later generation caregivers' culture and level of assimilation.

  20. Precise Control over the Rheological Behavior of Associating Stimuli-Responsive Block Copolymer Gels

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    Jérémy Brassinne

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available “Smart” materials have considerably evolved over the last few years for specific applications. They rely on intelligent macromolecules or (supra-molecular motifs to adapt their structure and properties in response to external triggers. Here, a supramolecular stimuli-responsive polymer gel is constructed from heterotelechelic double hydrophilic block copolymers that incorporate thermo-responsive sequences. These macromolecular building units are synthesized via a three-step controlled radical copolymerization and then hierarchically assembled to yield coordination micellar hydrogels. The dynamic mechanical properties of this particular class of materials are studied in shear flow and finely tuned via temperature changes. Notably, rheological experiments show that structurally reinforcing the micellar network nodes leads to precise tuning of the viscoelastic response and yield behavior of the material. Hence, they constitute promising candidates for specific applications, such as mechano-sensors.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: response to HLH-04 treatment protocol

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    Elva Jiménez-Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Diagnosis of HLH is the critical first step to successful treatment. The earlier it is identified, the less the tissue damage and reduced risk of multiple organ failure, which favors treatment response.

  2. Association between Ghrelin gene (GHRL polymorphisms and clinical response to atypical antipsychotic drugs in Han Chinese schizophrenia patients

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    Yang Yongfeng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ghrelin (GHRL is a pivotal peptide regulator of food intake, energy balance, and body mass. Weight gain (WG is a common side effect of the atypical antipsychotics (AAPs used to treat schizophrenia (SZ. Ghrelin polymorphisms have been associated with pathogenic variations in plasma lipid concentrations, blood pressure, plasma glucose, and body mass index (BMI. However, it is unclear whether GHRL polymorphisms are associated with WG due to AAPs. Furthermore, there is no evidence of an association between GHRL polymorphisms and SZ or the therapeutic response to AAPs. We explored these potential associations by genotyping GHRL alleles in SZ patients and controls. We also examined the relation between these SNPs and changes in metabolic indices during AAP treatment in SZ subgroups distinguished by high or low therapeutic response. Methods Four SNPs (Leu72Met, -501A/C, -604 G/A, and -1062 G > C were genotyped in 634 schizophrenia patients and 606 control subjects. Results There were no significant differences in allele frequencies, genotype distributions, or the distributions of two SNP haplotypes between SZ patients and healthy controls (P > 0.05. There was also no significant difference in symptom reduction between genotypes after 8 weeks of AAP treatment as measured by positive and negative symptom scale scores (PANSS. However, the -604 G/A polymorphism was associated with a greater BMI increase in response to AAP administration in both APP responders and non-responders as distinguished by PANSS score reduction (P P Conclusions These four GHRL gene SNPs were not associated with SZ in this Chinese Han population. The -604 G/A polymorphism was associated with significant BW and BMI increases during AAP treatment. Patients exhibiting higher WG showed greater improvements in positive and negative symptoms than patients exhibiting lower weight gain or weight loss.

  3. Association of human TLR1 and TLR6 deficiency with altered immune responses to BCG vaccination in South African infants.

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    April Kaur Randhawa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of effective immunoprophylaxis against tuberculosis (TB remains a global priority, but is hampered by a partially protective Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine and an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although host genetic factors may be a primary reason for BCG's variable and inadequate efficacy, this possibility has not been intensively examined. We hypothesized that Toll-like receptor (TLR variation is associated with altered in vivo immune responses to BCG. We examined whether functionally defined TLR pathway polymorphisms were associated with T cell cytokine responses in whole blood stimulated ex vivo with BCG 10 weeks after newborn BCG vaccination of South African infants. In the primary analysis, polymorphism TLR6_C745T (P249S was associated with increased BCG-induced IFN-γ in both discovery (n = 240 and validation (n = 240 cohorts. In secondary analyses of the combined cohort, TLR1_T1805G (I602S and TLR6_G1083C (synonymous were associated with increased IFN-γ, TLR6_G1083C and TLR6_C745T were associated with increased IL-2, and TLR1_A1188T was associated with increased IFN-γ and IL-2. For each of these polymorphisms, the hypo-responsive allele, as defined by innate immunity signaling assays, was associated with increased production of TH1-type T cell cytokines (IFN-γ or IL-2. After stimulation with TLR1/6 lipopeptide ligands, PBMCs from TLR1/6-deficient individuals (stratified by TLR1_T1805G and TLR6_C745T hyporesponsive genotypes secreted lower amounts of IL-6 and IL-10 compared to those with responsive TLR1/6 genotypes. In contrast, no IL-12p70 was secreted by PBMCs or monocytes. These data support a mechanism where TLR1/6 polymorphisms modulate TH1 T-cell polarization through genetic regulation of monocyte IL-10 secretion in the absence of IL-12. These studies provide evidence that functionally defined innate immune gene variants are associated with the

  4. Moderating effects of salivary testosterone levels on associations between job demand and psychological stress response in Japanese medical workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Kumi; Miwa, Machiko; Taniguchi, Toshiyo; Tsuchiya, Masao; Kawakami, Norito

    2016-06-10

    Levels of job stress have been shown to be inversely associated with testosterone levels, but some inconsistent results have been documented. We investigated the moderating effects of testosterone levels on associations between job stress-factors and psychological stress responses in Japanese medical workers. The participants were 63 medical staff (20 males and 43 women; mean age: 30.6 years; SD=7.3) in Okayama, Japan. Their job-stress levels and psychological stress responses were evaluated using self-administered questionnaires, and their salivary testosterone collected. Multiple regression analyses showed that job demand was positively associated with stress responses in men and women. An interaction between testosterone and support from colleagues had a significant effect on depression and anxiety for women. In women with lower testosterone levels, a reducing effect of support from colleagues on depression and anxiety was intensified. In women with higher testosterone levels, depression and anxiety levels were identical regardless of support from colleagues. Testosterone may function as a moderator between perceived work environment and psychological stress responses for female medical workers.

  5. Cytotoxic and Inflammatory Responses Induced by Outer Membrane Vesicle-Associated Biologically Active Proteases from Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Ayan; Tapader, Rima; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Ghosh, Amit; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    Proteases in Vibrio cholerae have been shown to play a role in its pathogenesis. V. cholerae secretes Zn-dependent hemagglutinin protease (HAP) and calcium-dependent trypsin-like serine protease (VesC) by using the type II secretion system (TIISS). Our present studies demonstrated that these proteases are also secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) and transported to human intestinal epithelial cells in an active form. OMV-associated HAP induces dose-dependent apoptosis in Int407 cells and an enterotoxic response in the mouse ileal loop (MIL) assay, whereas OMV-associated VesC showed a hemorrhagic fluid response in the MIL assay, necrosis in Int407 cells, and an increased interleukin-8 (IL-8) response in T84 cells, which were significantly reduced in OMVs from VesC mutant strain. Our results also showed that serine protease VesC plays a role in intestinal colonization of V. cholerae strains in adult mice. In conclusion, our study shows that V. cholerae OMVs secrete biologically active proteases which may play a role in cytotoxic and inflammatory responses. PMID:26930702

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies ABCG2 (BCRP) as an allopurinol transporter and a determinant of drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, CC; Yee, SW; Liang, X; Hoffmann, TJ; Kvale, MN; Banda, Y; Jorgenson, E; Schaefer, C; Risch, N; Giacomini, KM

    2015-01-01

    The first-line treatment of hyperuricemia, which causes gout, is allopurinol. The allopurinol response is highly variable, with many users failing to achieve target serum uric acid (SUA) levels. No genome-wide association study (GWAS) has examined the genetic factors affecting allopurinol effectiveness. Using 2,027 subjects in Kaiser Permanente’s Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort, we conducted a GWAS of allopurinol-related SUA reduction, first in the largest ethnic group, non-Hispanic white (NHW) subjects, and then in a stratified transethnic meta-analysis. ABCG2, encoding the efflux pump BCRP, was associated with SUA reduction in NHW subjects (P = 2 × 10−8), and a missense allele (rs2231142) was associated with a reduced response (P = 3 × 10−7) in the meta-analysis. Isotopic uptake studies in cells demonstrated that BCRP transports allopurinol and genetic variants in ABCG2 affect this transport. Collectively, this first GWAS of allopurinol response demonstrates that ABCG2 is a key determinant of response to the drug. PMID:25676789

  7. Cytotoxic and Inflammatory Responses Induced by Outer Membrane Vesicle-Associated Biologically Active Proteases from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Ayan; Tapader, Rima; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Ghosh, Amit; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chakrabarti, Manoj K; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Pal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Proteases in Vibrio cholerae have been shown to play a role in its pathogenesis. V. cholerae secretes Zn-dependent hemagglutinin protease (HAP) and calcium-dependent trypsin-like serine protease (VesC) by using the type II secretion system (TIISS). Our present studies demonstrated that these proteases are also secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) and transported to human intestinal epithelial cells in an active form. OMV-associated HAP induces dose-dependent apoptosis in Int407 cells and an enterotoxic response in the mouse ileal loop (MIL) assay, whereas OMV-associated VesC showed a hemorrhagic fluid response in the MIL assay, necrosis in Int407 cells, and an increased interleukin-8 (IL-8) response in T84 cells, which were significantly reduced in OMVs from VesC mutant strain. Our results also showed that serine protease VesC plays a role in intestinal colonization of V. cholerae strains in adult mice. In conclusion, our study shows that V. cholerae OMVs secrete biologically active proteases which may play a role in cytotoxic and inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Tetrahydrobiopterin non-responsiveness in dihydropteridine reductase deficiency is associated with the presence of mutant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, R G; Jennings, I; Bracco, G; Ponzone, A; Guardamagna, O

    1986-01-01

    Correlation of the response to a load of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) in dihydropterin reductase (DHPR) deficient patients to the type of mutation in these patients has led to the conclusion that 4 patients without mutant DHPR molecules in their cells respond to the BH4 load, whereas 3 patients with mutant DHPR in their cells do not respond. Intravenous injection of BH4 in 1 of the cases not responding to BH4 again showed no response.

  9. Pregnancy and pregnancy-associated hormones alter immune responses and disease pathogenesis.

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    Robinson, Dionne P; Klein, Sabra L

    2012-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is evolutionarily advantageous for inflammatory immune responses that might lead to fetal rejection to be reduced and anti-inflammatory responses that promote transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus to be increased. Hormones modulate the immunological shift that occurs during pregnancy. Estrogens, including estradiol and estriol, progesterone, and glucocorticoids increase over the course of pregnancy and affect transcriptional signaling of inflammatory immune responses at the maternal-fetal interface and systemically. During pregnancy, the reduced activity of natural killer cells, inflammatory macrophages, and helper T cell type 1 (Th1) cells and production of inflammatory cytokines, combined with the higher activity of regulatory T cells and production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, affects disease pathogenesis. The severity of diseases caused by inflammatory responses (e.g., multiple sclerosis) is reduced and the severity of diseases that are mitigated by inflammatory responses (e.g., influenza and malaria) is increased during pregnancy. For some infectious diseases, elevated inflammatory responses that are necessary to control and clear a pathogen have a negative consequence on the outcome of pregnancy. The bidirectional interactions between hormones and the immune system contribute to both the outcome of pregnancy and female susceptibility to disease.

  10. Putative IL-10 Low Producer Genotypes Are Associated with a Favourable Etanercept Response in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

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    Heiko Schotte

    Full Text Available Outcome predictors of biologic therapeutic drugs like TNF inhibitors are of interest since side effects like serious infections or malignancy cannot be completely ruled out. Response rates are heterogeneous. The present study addressed the question whether in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA interleukin-10 (IL-10 promoter genotypes with potential relevance for IL-10 production capacity are associated with response to long-term treatment with etanercept. Caucasian RA patients that, according to the EULAR criteria, responded well (n = 25, moderately (n = 17 or not (n = 8 to etanercept therapy (median 36 months, range 4-52, and 160 matched controls were genotyped for the IL-10 promoter SNPs -2849 G>A (rs6703630, -1082 G>A (rs1800896, -819 C>T (rs1800871 and -592 C>A (rs1800872. Haplotypes were reconstructed via mathematic model and tested for associations with disease susceptibility and therapy response. We identified the four predominant haplotypes AGCC, GATA, GGCC, and GACC in almost equal distribution. Patients that responded well carried the putative IL-10 low producer allele -2849 A or the haplotypes AGCC and GATA (RR 2.1 and 4.0, respectively; 95% CI 1.1-4.0 and 1.1-14.8, whereas an unfavourable response was associated with carriage of the putative high producer haplotype GGCC (RR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.3. No significant associations of alleles or haplotypes with disease susceptibility were observed. In RA, a low IL-10 production which is genetically determined rather by haplotypes than by SNPs may favour the response to etanercept treatment. Iatrogenic blockade of TNF may reveal proinflammatory effects of its endogeneous antagonist IL-10. Further studies are needed to correlate these genetic findings to direct cytokine measurements.

  11. An exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise is associated with nitric oxide bioavailability and inflammatory markers in normotensive females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Ohta, Masanori; Ikeda, Masaharu; Jiang, Ying; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    This study was designed to examine the associations of an exaggerated systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to exercise with the indices of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, oxidative stress, inflammation and arterial stiffness in normotensive females. The subjects included 84 normotensive females without a history of cardiovascular disease or stroke who were not taking any medications. Each subject performed a multistage graded submaximal exercise stress test using an electric bicycle ergometer, and their blood pressure was measured at rest and during the last minute of each stage. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, plasma nitrate/nitrite (NOx), plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and fibrinogen levels and the white blood cell count were measured. An exaggerated SBP response to exercise was defined according to the criteria of the Framingham Study (peak SBP: ⩾190 mm Hg). An exaggerated SBP response to exercise was observed in 27 subjects. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the hs-CRP (odds ratio (OR): 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.07, P=0.015) and plasma NOx levels (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.87-0.98, P=0.014) were significantly associated with an exaggerated SBP response to exercise. Furthermore, the percent change in SBP was found to be significantly associated with an increase in the hs-CRP (P for trend=0.006) and a decrease in the plasma NOx levels (P for trend=0.001). These results suggest that an exaggerated SBP response to exercise was associated with the NO bioavailability and inflammatory status in normotensive females.

  12. Predicting Response Trajectories during Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Panic Disorder: No Association with the BDNF Gene or Childhood Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacana, Martí; Arias, Bárbara; Mitjans, Marina; Bonillo, Albert; Montoro, María; Rosado, Sílvia; Guillamat, Roser; Vallès, Vicenç; Pérez, Víctor; Forero, Carlos G.; Fullana, Miquel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and result in low quality of life and a high social and economic cost. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders is well established, but a substantial proportion of patients do not respond to this treatment. Understanding which genetic and environmental factors are responsible for this differential response to treatment is a key step towards “personalized medicine”. Based on previous research, our objective was to test whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and/or childhood maltreatment are associated with response trajectories during exposure-based CBT for panic disorder (PD). Method We used Growth Mixture Modeling to identify latent classes of change (response trajectories) in patients with PD (N = 97) who underwent group manualized exposure-based CBT. We conducted logistic regression to investigate the effect on these trajectories of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and two different types of childhood maltreatment, abuse and neglect. Results We identified two response trajectories (“high response” and “low response”), and found that they were not significantly associated with either the genetic (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism) or childhood trauma-related variables of interest, nor with an interaction between these variables. Conclusions We found no evidence to support an effect of the BDNF gene or childhood trauma-related variables on CBT outcome in PD. Future studies in this field may benefit from looking at other genotypes or using different (e.g. whole-genome) approaches. PMID:27355213

  13. Melanopsin gene polymorphism I394T is associated with pupillary light responses in a dose-dependent manner.

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    Shigekazu Higuchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs play an important role in non-image forming responses to light, such as circadian photoentrainment, light-induced melatonin suppression, and pupillary light response. Although it is known that there are some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the melanopsin (OPN4 gene in humans, the associations of the SNPs with non-image forming responses to light remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the associations of melanopsin gene polymorphisms with pupillary light response. METHODS: Japanese university students (mean age: 21.0 ± 1.7 years with the genotypes of TT (n = 38, TC (n = 28 and CC (n = 7 at rs1079610 (I394T located in the coding region participated in the present study. They were matched by age and sex ratio. Dark-adapted pupil size (<1 lx was first measured. Then steady-state pupil size was measured during exposure to five lighting conditions (10 lx, 100 lx, 1000 lx, 3000 lx, 6000 lx in the vertical direction at eye level. RESULTS: Significant interaction between the genotype of I394T (TT versus TC+CC and luminance levels was found in pupil size. Under high illuminance levels (1000 lx, 3000 lx and 6000 lx, pupil sizes in subjects with the C allele were significantly smaller than those in subjects with the TT genotype. On the other hand, pupil size in subjects with the C allele under low illuminance (<1 lx was significantly larger than that in subjects with the TT genotype. Percentages of pupil constriction under high illuminance levels were significantly greater in subjects with the C allele than in subjects with the TT genotype. CONCLUSIONS: Human melanopsin gene polymorphism I394T interacted with irradiance in association with pupil size. This is the first evidence suggesting a functional connection between melanopsin gene polymorphism and pupillary light response as an index of non-image forming response to light.

  14. Subcortical BOLD responses during visual sexual stimulation vary as a function of implicit porn associations in women.

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    Borg, Charmaine; de Jong, Peter J; Georgiadis, Janniko R

    2014-02-01

    Lifetime experiences shape people's attitudes toward sexual stimuli. Visual sexual stimulation (VSS), for instance, may be perceived as pleasurable by some, but as disgusting or ambiguous by others. VSS depicting explicit penile-vaginal penetration (PEN) is relevant in this respect, because the act of penetration is a core sexual activity. In this study, 20 women without sexual complaints participated. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a single-target implicit association task to investigate how brain responses to PEN were modulated by the initial associations in memory (PEN-'hot' vs PEN-disgust) with such hardcore pornographic stimuli. Many brain areas responded to PEN in the same way they responded to disgust stimuli, and PEN-induced brain activity was prone to modulation by subjective disgust ratings toward PEN stimuli. The relative implicit PEN-disgust (relative to PEN-'hot') associations exclusively modulated PEN-induced brain responses: comparatively negative (PEN-disgust) implicit associations with pornography predicted the strongest PEN-related responses in the basal forebrain (including nucleus accumbens and bed nucleus of stria terminalis), midbrain and amygdala. Since these areas are often implicated in visual sexual processing, the present findings should be taken as a warning: apparently their involvement may also indicate a negative or ambivalent attitude toward sexual stimuli.

  15. Palladium-based dental alloys are associated with oral disease and palladium-induced immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, J.; Scheper, R.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Rustemeyer, T.; van Hoogstraten, I.M.W.; von Blomberg, M.E.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Palladium (Pd) and gold (Au) based dental alloys have been associated with oral disease. Objectives This study was designed to explore possible associations between the presence of Au-based and Pd-based dental alloys, and oral lesions, systemic complaints, and specific in vivo and in vitr

  16. The influence of labels associated with anchor points of Likert-type response scales in survey questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Jean-Guy; Grondin, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Survey questionnaires are among the most used data gathering techniques in the social sciences researchers' toolbox and many factors can influence respondents' answers on items and affect data validity. Among these factors, research has accumulated which demonstrates that verbal and numeric labels associated with item's response categories in such questionnaire may influence substantially the way in which respondents operate their choices within the proposed response format. In line with these findings, the focus of this article is to use Andrich's Rating scale model to illustrate what kind of influence the quantifier adverb "totally," used to label or emphasize extreme categories, could have on respondents' answers.

  17. Resting vagal tone and vagal response to stress: associations with anxiety, aggression, and perceived anxiety control among youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brandon G; Weems, Carl F

    2014-08-01

    This study tested the associations of both resting vagal tone and vagal response to stress with anxiety control beliefs, anxiety, and aggression among 80 youths (aged 11-17 years). Measures included physiological assessments of emotion regulation along with youth self-report of anxiety control beliefs, anxiety, and aggression and caregiver reports of their child's anxiety and aggression. Resting vagal tone was positively related to anxiety control beliefs, but negatively associated with anxiety. Conversely, higher levels of anxiety and aggression were associated with increased vagal tone during a cognitive stress task. Findings suggest associations between physiological and self-report of emotion regulation (anxiety control beliefs) and that anxiety and aggression may have specific and nonspecific relations with physiological indices of emotion regulation.

  18. Frequent ice cream consumption is associated with reduced striatal response to receipt of an ice cream-based milkshake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kyle S; Stice, Eric

    2012-04-01

    Weight gain leads to reduced reward-region responsivity to energy-dense food receipt, and consumption of an energy-dense diet compared with an isocaloric, low-energy-density diet leads to reduced dopamine receptors. Furthermore, phasic dopamine signaling to palatable food receipt decreases after repeated intake of that food, which collectively suggests that frequent intake of an energy-dense food may reduce striatal response to receipt of that food. We tested the hypothesis that frequent ice cream consumption would be associated with reduced activation in reward-related brain regions (eg, striatum) in response to receipt of an ice cream-based milkshake and examined the influence of adipose tissue and the specificity of this relation. Healthy-weight adolescents (n = 151) underwent fMRI during receipt of a milkshake and during receipt of a tasteless solution. Percentage body fat, reported food intake, and food craving and liking were assessed. Milkshake receipt robustly activated the striatal regions, yet frequent ice cream consumption was associated with a reduced response to milkshake receipt in these reward-related brain regions. Percentage body fat, total energy intake, percentage of energy from fat and sugar, and intake of other energy-dense foods were not related to the neural response to milkshake receipt. Our results provide novel evidence that frequent consumption of ice cream, independent of body fat, is related to a reduction in reward-region responsivity in humans, paralleling the tolerance observed in drug addiction. Data also imply that intake of a particular energy-dense food results in attenuated reward-region responsivity specifically to that food, which suggests that sensory aspects of eating and reward learning may drive the specificity.

  19. Frequent ice cream consumption is associated with reduced striatal response to receipt of an ice cream–based milkshake123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Background: Weight gain leads to reduced reward-region responsivity to energy-dense food receipt, and consumption of an energy-dense diet compared with an isocaloric, low-energy-density diet leads to reduced dopamine receptors. Furthermore, phasic dopamine signaling to palatable food receipt decreases after repeated intake of that food, which collectively suggests that frequent intake of an energy-dense food may reduce striatal response to receipt of that food. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that frequent ice cream consumption would be associated with reduced activation in reward-related brain regions (eg, striatum) in response to receipt of an ice cream–based milkshake and examined the influence of adipose tissue and the specificity of this relation. Design: Healthy-weight adolescents (n = 151) underwent fMRI during receipt of a milkshake and during receipt of a tasteless solution. Percentage body fat, reported food intake, and food craving and liking were assessed. Results: Milkshake receipt robustly activated the striatal regions, yet frequent ice cream consumption was associated with a reduced response to milkshake receipt in these reward-related brain regions. Percentage body fat, total energy intake, percentage of energy from fat and sugar, and intake of other energy-dense foods were not related to the neural response to milkshake receipt. Conclusions: Our results provide novel evidence that frequent consumption of ice cream, independent of body fat, is related to a reduction in reward-region responsivity in humans, paralleling the tolerance observed in drug addiction. Data also imply that intake of a particular energy-dense food results in attenuated reward-region responsivity specifically to that food, which suggests that sensory aspects of eating and reward learning may drive the specificity. PMID:22338036

  20. Cortisol and vagal tone responses to competitive challenge in preschoolers: associations with temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzella, B; Gunnar, M R; Krueger, W K; Alwin, J

    2000-12-01

    Sixty-one 3- to 5-year-old nursery school children participated in a study of tempera ment and stress responses to competition. Each child individually participated in a competition against a familiar adult experimenter to determine who would win enough games to receive a prize. After initially winning three games (Win Period), the children lost the next three games (Lose Period), before winning the final games and receiving the prize. Salivary cortisol, vagal tone, affect and turn-taking behavior were measured in response to the competition and examined in relation to child temperament using a teacher-report version of the Child Behavior Questionnaire. Behavioral measures indicated that the procedures were emotionally engaging and the threat of losing was aversive. Surgency (extroversion) was positively correlated with positive affect during Win periods and tense/angry affect during the Lose period of the competition. Vagal tone decreased as the children began to play against the adult and children who were more tense/angry while losing showed additional suppression of vagal tone when they began to lose the competition. Most of the children did not show a cortisol response to the competition; however, the 15% who increased cortisol (responses >1 SD of classroom baselines) were described by teachers as more surgent and lower in effortful control. All but one of these children who increased in cortisol was male. Cortisol responsive children also displayed higher levels of tense/angry affect during the Lose period. Surgent, extroverted children appear to be vulnerable to competition stress.

  1. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C; Sellati, Timothy J; Harton, Jonathan A

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection.

  2. Response sets in self-report data and their associations with personality traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter de Jonge

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: With a strong reliance on the use of self-report questionnaires in psychiatric research, appropriate attention should be given to the existence and correlates of response sets. We studied the presence of response tendencies by using an old research paradigm from psychology. Methods: We administered response options without questions to a sample of 91 second-year medical students, together with two personality questionnaires. Results: The scores of the respondents demonstrated the willingness of respondents to fill in a content-free questionnaire and revealed the presence of a general tendency towards positive responses. In psychometric theory, this would be referred to as a 'constant error'. More importantly, positive answers were significantly related to low neuroticism, high extraversion and high well-being. In psychometric theory, this would imply 'response bias' in which the self-reports are confounded by personality features. Conclusions: In the development and evaluation of questionnaires, researchers should be aware of the potential for this bias, particularly when asking questions about subjective health status.

  3. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  4. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Periasamy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection.

  5. Association between diabetes treatment adherence and parent-child agreement regarding treatment responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Blake Mark; Gadaire, Dana M; Holman, Kathryn; LeBlanc, Linda A

    2015-06-01

    When primary responsibility for Type 1 diabetes (DM1) treatment adherence transfers from parents to adolescents, glycemic control often suffers. Low rates of treatment adherence during this transition are possibly attributable to decreased parental involvement, disagreements between parents and children regarding treatment responsibilities, and increased family conflict. The current investigation assessed the relationships between each of these variables and glycemic control among youth diagnosed with DM1. Parent and child report questionnaires were completed by 64 parent-child dyads (ages 8-18) with a child diagnosed with DM1. HbA1c readings served as measures of glycemic control. Parental involvement in their children's treatment was reported to decline with age, however absolute levels of parent involvement were not significantly correlated with youth HbA1c levels. Parent-child agreement regarding treatment responsibility and reports of diabetes-related conflict were significant predictors of glycemic control. Results support previous findings implicating parent-child agreement regarding treatment responsibilities and family conflict as predictors of treatment adherence among youth with DM1. The current study found this relationship to be significant for a larger population of children for which past research has failed to find such an effect. Taken together, these findings suggest further research is warranted to identify effective methods for transferring treatment responsibilities from parents to children.

  6. The localisation of inflammatory cells and expression of associated proteoglycans in response to implanted chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; Jung, MoonSun; McGrath, Barbara; O'Grady, Robert L; McCarthy, Simon J; Lord, Megan S

    2014-02-01

    Implantation of a foreign material almost certainly results in the formation of a fibrous capsule around the implant however, mechanistic events leading to its formation are largely unexplored. Mast cells are an inflammatory cell type known to play a role in the response to material implants, through the release of pro-inflammatory proteases and cytokines from their α-granules following activation. This study examined the in vivo and in vitro response of mast cells to chitosan, through detection of markers known to be produced by mast cells or involved with the inflammatory response. Mast cells, identified as Leder stained positive cells, were shown to be present in response to material implants. Additionally, the mast cell receptor, c-kit, along with collagen, serglycin, perlecan and chondroitin sulphate were detected within the fibrous capsules, where distribution varied between material implants. In conjunction, rat mast cells (RBL-2H3) were shown to be activated following exposure to chitosan as indicated by the release of β-hexosaminidase. Proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycans produced by the cells showed similar expression and localisation when in contact with chitosan to when chemically activated. These data support the role that mast cells play in the inflammatory host response to chitosan implants, where mediators released from their α-granules impact on the formation of a fibrous capsule by supporting the production and organisation of collagen fibres.

  7. Heterogeneity in glucose response curves during an oral glucose tolerance test and associated cardiometabolic risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulman, Adam; Simmons, Rebecca Kate; Vistisen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to examine heterogeneity in glucose response curves during an oral glucose tolerance test with multiple measurements and to compare cardiometabolic risk profiles between identified glucose response curve groups. We analyzed data from 1,267 individuals without diabetes from five studies...... in Denmark, the Netherlands and the USA. Each study included between 5 and 11 measurements at different time points during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test, resulting in 9,602 plasma glucose measurements. Latent class trajectories with a cubic specification for time were fitted to identify different...... patterns of plasma glucose change during the oral glucose tolerance test. Cardiometabolic risk factor profiles were compared between the identified groups. Using latent class trajectory analysis, five glucose response curves were identified. Despite similar fasting and 2-h values, glucose peaks and peak...

  8. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms and Response to Anti-TNFs in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Prieto-Pérez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha is a major proinflammatory cytokine involved in the immune response in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Anti-TNF drugs such as infliximab and adalimumab are used to treat IBD; however, approximately 30% of patients do not respond to treatment. Individual genetic differences could contribute to lack of efficacy. Genetic studies have tried to uncover the factors underlying differences in response, however, knowledge remains limited, and the results obtained should be validated, so that pharmacogenetic information can be applied in clinical practice. In this review, we gather current knowledge in the pharmacogenetics of anti-TNF drugs in patients with IBD. We observed a connection between the major genes described as possible predictors of response to anti-TNF drugs in IBD and the cytokines and molecules involved in the T helper (Th 17 pathway.

  9. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms and Response to Anti-TNFs in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Pérez, Rocío; Almoguera, Berta; Cabaleiro, Teresa; Hakonarson, Hakon; Abad-Santos, Francisco

    2016-02-06

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha is a major proinflammatory cytokine involved in the immune response in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Anti-TNF drugs such as infliximab and adalimumab are used to treat IBD; however, approximately 30% of patients do not respond to treatment. Individual genetic differences could contribute to lack of efficacy. Genetic studies have tried to uncover the factors underlying differences in response, however, knowledge remains limited, and the results obtained should be validated, so that pharmacogenetic information can be applied in clinical practice. In this review, we gather current knowledge in the pharmacogenetics of anti-TNF drugs in patients with IBD. We observed a connection between the major genes described as possible predictors of response to anti-TNF drugs in IBD and the cytokines and molecules involved in the T helper (Th) 17 pathway.

  10. Exposure-response analysis of risk of respiratory disease associated with occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayner, L; Smith, R; Bailer, J; Gilbert, S; Steenland, K; Dement, J; Brown, D; Lemen, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate alternative models and estimate risk of mortality from lung cancer and asbestosis after occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos. METHODS: Data were used from a recent update of a cohort mortality study of workers in a South Carolina textile factory. Alternative exposure-response models were evaluated with Poisson regression. A model designed to evaluate evidence of a threshold response was also fitted. Lifetime risks of lung cancer and asbestosis were estimated with an actuarial approach that accounts for competing causes of death. RESULTS: A highly significant exposure-response relation was found for both lung cancer and asbestosis. The exposure-response relation for lung cancer seemed to be linear on a multiplicative scale, which is consistent with previous analyses of lung cancer and exposure to asbestos. In contrast, the exposure-response relation for asbestosis seemed to be nonlinear on a multiplicative scale in this analysis. There was no significant evidence for a threshold in models of either the lung cancer or asbestosis. The excess lifetime risk for white men exposed for 45 years at the recently revised OSHA standard of 0.1 fibre/ml was predicted to be about 5/1000 for lung cancer, and 2/1000 for asbestosis. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the findings from previous investigations of a strong exposure-response relation between exposure to chrysotile asbestos and mortality from lung cancer, and asbestosis. The risk estimates for lung cancer derived from this analysis are higher than those derived from other populations exposed to chrysotile asbestos. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. PMID:9423577

  11. Anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis patients is associated with genetic variation in the NLRP3-inflammasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from tumor necrosis factor-α blocking treatment (anti-TNF), but about one third do not respond. The objective of this study was to replicate and extend previously found associations between anti-TNF treatment response and genetic...... (relDAS28) were used as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses were stratified according to smoking status, type of anti-TNF drug and IgM-Rheumatoid Factor (IgM-RF) status. False discovery rate (FDR) controlling was used to adjust for multiple testing. RESULTS: Statistically significant associations...