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Sample records for ferritic-martensitic alloy ht-9

  1. Role of grain boundary engineering in the SCC behavior of ferritic-martensitic alloy HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.; Ampornrat, P.; Ren, X.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of grain boundary engineering (GBE) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloy HT-9 in supercritical water (SCW) at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were conducted on HT-9 in as-received (AR) and coincident site lattice enhanced (CSLE) condition. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens (irradiated with 2 MeV protons at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C to a dose of 7 dpa) were tested. Ferritic-martensitic steel HT-9 exhibited intergranular stress corrosion cracking when subjected to CERT tests in an environment of supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and also in an inert environment of argon at 500 deg. C. CSL-enhancement reduces grain boundary carbide coarsening and cracking susceptibility in both the unirradiated and irradiated condition. Irradiation enhanced coarsening of grain boundary carbides and cracking susceptibility of HT-9 for both the AR and CSLE conditions. Intergranular (IG) cracking of HT-9 results likely from fracture of IG carbides and seems consistent with the mechanism that coarser carbides worsen cracking susceptibility. Oxidation in combination with wedging stresses is the likely cause of the observed environmental enhancement of high temperature IG cracking in HT-9

  2. Gap Analysis of Material Properties Data for Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Neil R.; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena; Rodriguez, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), is supporting the development of an ASME Code Case for adoption of 12Cr-1Mo-VW ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel, commonly known as HT-9, primarily for use in elevated temperature design of liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFR) and components. In 2011, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) nuclear engineering staff began assisting in the development of a small modular reactor (SMR) design concept, previously known as the Hyperion Module, now called the Gen4 Module. LANL staff immediately proposed HT-9 for the reactor vessel and components, as well as fuel clad and ducting, due to its superior thermal qualities. Although the ASME material Code Case, for adoption of HT-9 as an approved elevated temperature material for LMFR service, is the ultimate goal of this project, there are several key deliverables that must first be successfully accomplished. The most important key deliverable is the research, accumulation, and documentation of specific material parameters; physical, mechanical, and environmental, which becomes the basis for an ASME Code Case. Time-independent tensile and ductility data and time-dependent creep and creep-rupture behavior are some of the material properties required for a successful ASME Code case. Although this report provides a cursory review of the available data, a much more comprehensive study of open-source data would be necessary. This report serves three purposes: (a) provides a list of already existing material data information that could ultimately be made available to the ASME Code, (b) determines the HT-9 material properties data missing from available sources that would be required and (c) estimates the necessary material testing required to close the gap. Ultimately, the gap analysis demonstrates that certain material properties testing will be required to fulfill the necessary information package for an ASME Code Case.

  3. Friction Stir Welding of HT9 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel: An Assessment of Microstructure and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    report of FSW on a ferritic- martensitic stainless steel is the work of Chung, which applied this approach to a dissimilar weld between F82H (ferritic... martensitic ) and SUS304 (austenitic stainless ) [43]. 7 D. CORROSION OF FERRITIC/ MARTENSITIC STEELS IN HIGH TEMPERATURE MOLTEN SALT COOLANTS In...Philadelphia, PA, 1992, pp. 1267–1286, March 1990. [15] S. Rosenwasser, ―The application of martensitic stainless steels in a lifelong fusion first wall

  4. Development of New Heats of Advanced Ferritic/Martensitic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pestovich, Kimberly Shay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aydogan, Eda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of transmuting minor actinides in various fuel cycle options. To achieve this goal, new fuels and cladding materials must be developed and tested to high burnup levels (e.g. >20%) requiring cladding to withstand very high doses (greater than 200 dpa) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Recent results from testing numerous ferritic/martensitic steels at low temperatures suggest that improvements in low temperature radiation tolerance can be achieved through carefully controlling the nitrogen content in these alloys. Thus, four new heats of HT-9 were produced with controlled nitrogen content: two by Metalwerks and two by Sophisticated Alloys. Initial results on these new alloys are presented including microstructural analysis and hardness testing. Future testing will include irradiation testing with ions and in reactor.

  5. Nanocluster irradiation evolution in Fe-9%Cr ODS and ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of dose rate and cascade morphology on nanocluster evolution in a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel and the commercial ferritic/martensitic (F/M) alloys HCM12A and HT9. We present a large, systematic data set spanning the three alloys, three irradiating particle types, four orders of magnitude in dose rate, and doses ranging 1-100 displacements per atom over 400-500 °C. Nanoclusters are characterized using atom probe tomography. ODS oxide nanoclusters experience partial dissolution after irradiation due to inverse Ostwald ripening, while F/M nanoclusters undergo Ostwald ripening. Damage cascade morphology is indicative of nanocluster number density evolution. Finally, the effects of dose rate on nanocluster morphology provide evidence for a temperature dilation theory, which purports that a negative temperature shift is necessary for higher dose rate irradiations to emulate nanocluster evolution in lower dose rate irradiations.

  6. TEM characterization of irradiated microstructure of Fe-9%Cr ODS and ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of irradiation dose and dose rate on defect cluster (i.e. dislocation loops and voids) evolution in a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel and commercial ferritic-martensitic steels HCM12A and HT9. Complimentary irradiations using Fe2+ ions, protons, or neutrons to doses ranging from 1 to 100 displacements per atom (dpa) at 500 °C are conducted on each alloy. The irradiated microstructures are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Dislocation loops exhibit limited growth after 1 dpa upon Fe2+ and proton irradiation, while any voids observed are small and sparse. The average size and number density of loops are statistically invariant between Fe2+, proton, and neutron irradiated specimens at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions of ∼3 dpa, 500 °C. Therefore, we conclude that higher dose rate charged particle irradiations can reproduce the neutron irradiated loop microstructure with temperature shift governed by the invariance theory; this temperature shift is ∼0 °C for the high sink strength alloys studied herein.

  7. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    stainless steel and ferritic/ martensitic steel can vary from structural and support components in the reactor core to reactor fuel...of ferritic/ martensitic steels compared to type 316 stainless steel after irradiation in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at 420 ºC to ~80dpa (From...ferritic martensitic steel at Sandia National Laboratories. The 316 stainless steel had a certified composition of:

  8. Radiation-induced segregation and phase stability in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharry, Janelle P.; Jiao Zhijie; Shankar, Vani [University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Busby, Jeremy T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Was, Gary S., E-mail: gsw@umich.edu [University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Radiation-induced segregation in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91 was studied to understand the behavior of solutes as a function of dose and temperature. Irradiations were conducted using 2 MeV protons to doses of 1, 3, 7 and 10 dpa at 400 deg. C. Radiation-induced segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries was measured, and various features of the irradiated microstructure were characterized, including grain boundary carbide coverage, the dislocation microstructure, radiation-induced precipitation and irradiation hardening. Results showed that Cr, Ni and Si segregate to prior austenite grain boundaries at low dose, but segregation ceases and redistribution occurs above 3 dpa. Grain boundary carbide coverage mirrors radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation induces formation of Ni-Si-Mn and Cu-rich precipitates that account for the majority of irradiation hardening. Radiation-induced segregation behavior is likely linked to the evolution of the precipitate and dislocation microstructures.

  9. Interdiffusion behavior of Al-rich oxidation resistant coatings on ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Y.; Hawkins, E.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505-0001 (United States); Pint, B.A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6156 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic-martensitic alloys was investigated in the temperature range of 650-700 C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H{sub 2}O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. The model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650-700 C based on a minimum Al content (C{sub b}) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a C{sub b} value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700 C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Effect of alloying element partitioning on ferrite hardening in a low alloy ferrite-martensite dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimian, A., E-mail: ebrahimiana@yahoo.com; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.

    2016-11-20

    In this paper, the effect of carbon and other alloying elements partitioning on ferrite hardening behavior were studied in details using a low alloy AISI4340 ferrite-martensite dual phase (DP) steel. To do so, various re-austenitised samples at 860 °C for 60 min were isothermally heated at 650 °C from 3 to 60 min and then water–quenched to obtain the final ferrite-martensite DP microstructures containing different ferrite and martensite volume fractions. Light and electron microscopic observations were supplemented with electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and nanoindentation tests to explore the localized compositional and hardening variations within ferrite grains in DP samples. The experimental results showed that the ferrite hardness was varied with progress of austenite to ferrite phase transformation in DP samples. In the case of a particular ferrite grain in a particular DP sample, despite a homogeneous distribution of carbon concentration, the ferrite hardness was significantly increased by increasing distance from the central location toward the interfacial α/γ areas. Beside a considerable influence of martensitic phase transformation on adjacent ferrite hardness, these results were rationalized in part to the significant level of Cr and Mo pile-up at α/γ interfaces leading to higher solid solution hardening effect of these regions. The reduction of potential energy developed by attractive interaction between C-Cr and C-Mo couples toward the carbon enriched prior austenite areas were the dominating driving force for pile-up segregation.

  11. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyevodin, V.N.; Karpov, S.A.; Kopanets, I.E.; Ruzhytskyi, V.V. [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Tolstolutskaya, G.D., E-mail: g.d.t@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ∼1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  12. Radiation damage simulation studies of selected austenitic and ferritic/martensitic alloys for fusion reactor structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazey, D.J.; Walters, G.P.; Buckley, S.N.; Bullough, R.; Hanks, W.; Bolster, D.E.J.; Sowden, B.C.; Lurcook, D.; Murphy, S.M.

    1985-03-01

    Results are given of an investigation of the radiation damage stability of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys following ion bombardment in the Harwell VEC to simulate fusion-reactor exposures up to 110 dpa at temperatures from 425 deg to 625 deg C. Gas production rates appropriate to CTR conditions were simulated using a mixed beam of (4 MeV He + 2 MeV H 2 ) in the ratio 1:4 He:H. A beam of 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions was used in sequence with the mixed gas beam to provide a gas/damage ratio of 13 appm He/dpa at a damage rate of approx. 1 dpa/hr. The materials were investigated using TEM and comprised three austenitic alloys: European reference 316L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb; four high-nickel alloys: Fe/25 Ni/8Cr, Inconel 625, Inconel 706 and Nimonic PE16, and four ferritic/martensitic alloys: FV 448, FV 607, CRM 12 and FI. Some data were obtained for a non-magnetic structural alloy Nonmagne-30. The swelling behaviour is reported. The overall results of the study indicate that on a comparative basis the ferritic alloys are the most swelling-resistant, whilst the high-nickel alloys have an acceptable low swelling response up to 110 dpa. The 316 alloys tested have shown an unfavourable swelling response. (author)

  13. Elemental volatility of HT-9 fusion reactor alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henslee, S.P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The volatility of elemental constituents from HT-9, a ferritic steel, proposed for fusion reactor structures, was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 800 to 1200 0 C for durations of 1 to 20 h. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy; molybdenum, manganese, and nickel were the primary constituents volatilized. Comparisons with elemental volatilities observed for another candidate fusion reactor materials. Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA), an austenitic stainless steel, indicate significant differences between the volatilities of these steels that may impact fusion reactor safety analysis and alloy selection. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry were used to investigate the oxide layers formed on HT-9 and to measure elemental contents within these layers

  14. High burnup performance of an advanced oxide fuel assembly in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] with ferritic/martensitic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, A.E.; Saito, G.H.; Lovell, A.J.; Makenas, B.J.

    1986-05-01

    An advanced oxide fuel assembly with ferritic/martensitic materials has successfully completed its sixth cycle of irradiation in the FFTF, reaching a peak pellet burnup greater than 100 MWd/KgM and a peak fast fluence greater than 15 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . The cladding, wire-wrap, and duct material for the ACO-1 test assembly is the ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT9, which was chosen for use in long-lifetime fuel assemblies because of its good nominal temperature creep strength and low swelling rate. Valuable experience on the performance of HT9 materials has been gained from this test, advancing our quest for long-lifetime fuel. Pertinent data, obtained from the ACO-1 test assembly, will support the irradiation of the Core Demonstration Experiment in FFTF

  15. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang, E-mail: thaksang.byun@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hoelzer, David T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kim, Jeoung Han [Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Maloy, Stuart A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The K{sub JQ} versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  16. Performance of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Hayes, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    Steady-state testing of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperatures was initiated in EBR-II in November of 1987. At that time U-10 wt. % Zr fuel clad with the low-swelling ferritic/martensitic alloy HT9 was being considered as driver fuel options for both EBR-II and FFTF. The objective of the X447 test described here was to determine the lifetime of HT9 cladding when operated with metallic fuel at beginning of life inside wall temperatures approaching ∼660 degree C. Though stress-temperature design limits for HT9 preclude its use for high burnup applications under these conditions due to excessive thermal creep, the X447 test was carried out to obtain data on high temperature breach phenomena involving metallic fuel since little data existed in that area

  17. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, J. de, E-mail: javier.deprado@urjc.es; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-15

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface. - Highlights: •W-Eurofer brazed joints, manufactured using Cu-based mechanically alloyed powders as filler is proposed. •The benefits derivate from the alloyed composition could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system. •Tested pre-alloyed fillers have a more homogeneous melting stage which enhances its spreading and flowing capabilities. •This behaviour could lead to work with higher heating rates and lower brazing temperatures.

  18. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-01

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface.

  19. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily.

  20. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily

  1. Study of the effects of austenitizing and tempering heat treatments on the alloy HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmon, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential use of the ferritic alloy Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr - 1 Mo) as an alternative to stainless steels used in high-neutron-fluence environments. The neutron radiation influences embrittlement where the impact-energy versus test-temperature curve is seen displaced to the right. As a result, commercially effective solutioning and tempering processes are needed to suppress this effect in the pre-irradiated condition. The effects of austenitizing treatments on the impact energy of HT-9 were identified. 18 figures, 6 tables

  2. Radiation induced microstructural evolution in ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Asakura, K.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    R and D of ferritic/martensitic steels as structural materials for fusion reactor is one of the most important issues of fusion technology. The efforts to characterize microstructural evolution under irradiation in the conventional Fe-Cr-Mo steels as well as newly developed Fe-Cr-Mn or Fe-Cr-W low activation ferritic/ martensitic steels have been continued. This paper provides some of the recent results of heavy irradiation effects on the microstructural evolution of ferritic/martensitic steels neutron irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA (Fast Flux Test Facility/Materials Open Test Assembly). Materials examined are Fe-10Cr-2Mo dual phase steel (JFMS: Japanese Ferritic/Martensitic Steel), Fe-12Cr-XMn-1Mo manganese stabilized martensitic steels and Fe-8Cr-2W Tungsten stabilized low activation martensitic steel (F82H). JFMS showed excellent void swelling resistance similar to 12Cr martensitic steel such as HT-9, while the manganese stabilized steels and F82H showed less void swelling resistance with small amount of void swelling at 640-700 K (F82H: 0.14% at 678 K). As for irradiation response of precipitate behavior, significant formation of intermetallic χ phase was observed in the manganese stabilized steels along grain boundaries which is though to cause mechanical property degradation. On the other hand, precipitates identified were the same type as those in unirradiated condition in F82H with no recognition of irradiation induced precipitates, which suggested satisfactory mechanical properties of F82H after the irradiation. (author)

  3. Chemical durability and degradation mechanisms of HT9 based alloy waste forms with variable Zr content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, L. N. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-30

    In Corrosion studies were undertaken on alloy waste forms that can result from advanced electrometallurgical processing techniques to better classify their durability and degradation mechanisms. The waste forms were based on the RAW3-(URe) composition, consisting primarily of HT9 steel and other elemental additions to simulate nuclear fuel reprocessing byproducts. The solution conditions of the corrosion studies were taken from an electrochemical testing protocol, and meant to simulate conditions in a repository. The alloys durability was examined in alkaline and acidic brines.

  4. Low-cycle fatigue behavior of HT-9 alloy in a flowing-lithium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-06-01

    Low-cycle fatigue data have been obtained on normalized/tempered or lithium-preexposed HT-9 alloy at 755 K in flowing lithium of controlled purity. The results show that the fatigue life of this material decreases with an increase in nitrogen content in lithium. A reduction in strain rate also decreases the fatigue life in high-nitrogen lithium. However, in the range from approx. 4 x 10 - 4 to 4 x 10 - 2 s - 1 , the strain rate has no effect on fatigue life in lithium containing <200 wppM nitrogen. The fatigue life of the HT-9 alloy in low-nitrogen lithium is significantly greater than the fatigue life of Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel or Type 403 martensitic steel in air. Furthermore, a 4.0-Ms preexposure to low-nitrogen lithium has no influence on fatigue life. The reduction in fatigue life in high-nitrogen lithium is attributed to internal corrosive attack of the material. The specimens tested in high-nitrogen lithium show internal corrosion along grain and martensitic lathe boundaries and intergranular fracture. This behavior is not observed in specimens tested in low-nitrogen lithium. Results for a constant-load corrosion test in flowing lithium are also presented

  5. Postirradiation notch ductility tests of ESR alloy HT-9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo alloy from UBR reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    During this period, irradiation exposures at 300 0 C and 150 0 C to approx. 8 x 10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 0.1 MeV, were completed for the Alloy HT-9 plate and the modified Alloy 9Cr-1Mo plates, respectively. Postirradiation tests of Charpy-V (C/sub v/) specimens were completed for both alloys; other specimen types included in the reactor assemblies were fatigue precracked Charpy-V (PCC/sub v/), half-size Charpy-V, and in the case of the modified 9Cr-1Mo, 2.54 mm thick compact tension specimens

  6. Activation product transport in a FLiBe-vanadium alloy-HT9 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.; Sze, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment is made of the gamma radiation hazards likely to be found around a fusion reactor heat transfer and tritium breeding loop which employs a vanadium alloy for the blanket and first wall structure and the ferritic-steel HT9 for the remainder of the loop. The coolant/tritium breeding fluid is the molten metallic salt FliBe. Since the radiation levels near the primary loop components are found to be less than 100 mR/hr 3-5 days after shutdown after three years of continuous full power operation, limited hands-on maintenance could be allowed. The very short half-lives of the predominant corrosion products make this result possible and make such a system very attractive

  7. Ferritic/martensitic steels: Promises and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Ehrlich, K.; Abe, F.

    1992-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for fusion reactors because of their higher swelling resistance, higher thermal conductivity, lower thermal expansion, and better liquid-metal compatibility than austenitic steels. Irradiation effects will ultimately determine the applicability of these steels, and the effects of irradiation on microstructure and swelling, and on the tensile, fatigue, and impact properties of the ferritic/martensitic steels are discussed. Most irradiation studies have been carried out in fast reactors, where little transmutation helium forms. Helium has been shown to enhance swelling and affect tensile and fracture behavior, making helium a critical issue, since high helium concentrations will be generated in conjunction with displacement damage in a fusion reactor. These issues are reviewed to evaluate the status of ferritic/martensitic steels and to assess the research required to insure that such steels are viable candidates for fusion applications

  8. Postirradiation fracture toughness tests of ESR alloy HT-9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo alloy from UBR reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Reed, J.R.; Sprague, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Alloy HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo are being evaluated for potential applications as first wall materials in magnetic fusion reactors. Objectives of the current research task were to test fatigue-precracked Charpy-V (PCC/sub v/) specimens from representative plates irradiated in the UBR reactor at 149 0 C or 300 0 C, and, to compare the results against postirradiation notch ductility data developed previously for the materials. Both plates represent electroslag refined (ESR) melt processing. PCC/sub v/ specimens of Alloy HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo alloy were irradiated at 300 0 C and 149 0 C, respectively, to approx.0.8 X 10 20 n/cm 2 , E > 0.1 MeV. During this period, postirradiation tests for fracture toughness were completed and results compared to notch ductility determinations from standard Charpy-V (C/sub v/) specimens irradiated in the same reactor experiments. Fracture surface examinations by SEM are also reported

  9. Corrosion of Ferritic-Martensitic steels in high temperature water: A literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2001-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel in high temperature water as reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) including stress corrosion cracking (SCC), corrosion fatigue and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS). Are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. (Author)

  10. Effects of alloying and processing modifications on precipitation and strength in 9%Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fast reactor cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippey, Kristin E.

    P92 was modified with respect to alloying and processing in the attempt to enhance high-temperature microstructural stability and mechanical properties. Alloying effects were modeled in ThermoCalcRTM and analyzed with reference to literature. ThermoCalcRTM modeling was conducted to design two low-carbon P92-like low-carbon alloys with austenite stabilized by alternative alloying; full conversion to austenite allows for a fully martensitic structure. Goals included avoidance of Z-phase, decrease of M23C6 phase fraction and maintained or increased MX phase fraction. Fine carbonitride precipitation was optimized by selecting alloying compositions such that all V and Nb could be solutionized at temperatures outside the delta-ferrite phase field. A low-carbon alloy (LC) and a low-carbon-zero-niobium alloy (0Nb) were identified and fabricated. This low-carbon approach stems from the increased creep resistance reported in several low-carbon alloys, presumably from reduced M23C6 precipitation and maintained MX precipitation [1], although these low-carbon alloys also contained additional tungsten (W) and cobalt (Co) compared to the base P92 alloy. The synergistic effect of Co and W on the microstructure and mechanical properties are difficult to deconvolute. Higher solutionizing temperatures allow more V and Nb into solution and increase prior austenite grain size; however, at sufficiently high temperatures delta-ferrite forms. Optimal solutionizing temperatures to maximize V and Nb in solution, while avoiding the onset of the delta ferrite phase field, were analyzed in ThermoCalcRTM. Optical microscopy showed ThermoCalc RTM predicted higher delta-ferrite onset temperatures of 20 °C in P92 alloys to nearly 50 °C in the designed alloys of the critical temperature. Identifying the balance where maximum fine precipitation is achieved and delta-ferrite avoided is a key factor in the design of an acceptable P92-like alloy for Generation IV reactor cladding. Processing was

  11. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steel clad tube for fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, K.; Saroja, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.; Vijay, R.; Venugopal Reddy, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Kapoor, Komal; Jha, S.K.; Tonpe, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues in the economical operation of FBR is to achieve high burn-up of fuel (200-250 GWd/t) which considerably reduces the fuel cycle cost. This imposes stringent requirements of void swelling resistance upto 200 dpa for the core structural materials. Presently used alloy 09 (a modified austenitic stainless steel, 15Cr-15Ni-Ti) for PFBR has void swelling limit less than 150 dpa. Because of the inherent void swelling resistance, 9-12Cr steels ferritic/martensitic steels are qualified for irradiation upto 200 dpa but their low creep strength at temperatures above 600 deg C restricts their application as a clad material. Oxide dispersion strengthening is found to be promising means of extending the creep resistance of ferritic/martensitic steels beyond 650 deg C without sacrificing the inherent advantages of high thermal conductivity and low swelling of ferritic steels

  12. Microstructural investigations of fast reactor irradiated austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueev, V.S.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Mitrofanova, N.M.; Romanueev, V.V.; Tselishev, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructural changes induced in advanced fast reactor fuel claddings fabricated from Cr16Ni15Mo3NbB and Cr16Ni15Mo2Mn2TiVB austenitic stainless steels in the cold worked condition and Cr13Mo2NbVB ferritic -martensitic steel following irradiation in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors. The data are compared with the results obtained from a typical austenitic commercial cladding material, Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, in the cold worked condition. The results reveal a beneficial effect of boron and other alloying elements in reducing void swelling in 16Cr-15Ni type austenitic steels. The high resistance of ferritic-martensitic steels to void swelling has been confirmed in the Cr13Mo2NbVB steel. (author)

  13. Durability and degradation of HT9 based alloy waste forms with variable Ni and Cr content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-31

    Short-term electrochemical and long-term hybrid electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on alloy waste forms in reference aqueous solutions that bound postulated repository conditions. The alloy waste forms investigated represent candidate formulations that can be produced with advanced electrochemical treatment of used nuclear fuel. The studies helped to better understand the alloy waste form durability with differing concentrations of nickel and chromium, species that can be added to alloy waste forms to potentially increase their durability and decrease radionuclide release into the environment.

  14. Evaluation of temper embrittlement of martensitic and ferritic-martensitic steels by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yusho; Takahashi, Hideaki; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1987-01-01

    Martensitic (HT-9) and ferritic-martensitic steels (9Cr-2Mo) are considered as fusion first wall materials. In this investigation in order to understand the sensitivity of temper embrittlement in these steels under actual service condition, fracture toughness testing was made by use of acoustic emission technique. The temper embrittlement was characterized in terms of fracture toughness. The fracture toughness of these steels under 500 deg C, 100 hrs, and 1000 hrs heat treatment was decreased and their changes in micro-fracture process have been observed. The fracture toughness changes by temper embrittlement was discussed by the characteristic of AE, AE spectrum analysis and fractographic investigation. The relation between micro-fracture processes and AE has been clarified. (author)

  15. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry

  16. Future directions for ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    High-chromium (7-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels are being considered for nuclear applications for both fission and fusion reactors. Conventional 9-12Cr Cr-Mo steels were the first candidates for these applications. For fusion reactors, reduced-activation steels were developed that were patterned on the conventional steels but with molybdenum replaced by tungsten and niobium replaced by tantalum. Both the conventional and reduced-activation steels are considered to have an upper operating temperature limit of about 550degC. For improved reactor efficiency, higher operating temperatures are required. For ferritic/martensitic steels that could meet such requirements, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are being considered. In this paper, the ferritic/martensitic steels that are candidate steels for nuclear applications will be reviewed, the prospect for ODS steel development and the development of steels produced by conventional processes will be discussed. (author)

  17. Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, L.; Anderson, M.; Taylor, D.; Allen, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oxidation is the primary corrosion phenomenon for the steels exposed to S-CO 2 . → The austenitic steels showed significantly better corrosion resistance than the ferritic-martensitic steels. → Alloying elements (e.g., Mo and Al) showed distinct effects on oxidation behavior. - Abstract: Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO 2 at 650 deg. C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

  18. Corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450circC and 550circC

    OpenAIRE

    倉田 有司; 二川 正敏; 斎藤 滋

    2005-01-01

    Static corrosion tests of various austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi at 450circC and 550circC for 3000h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior. Oxidation, grain boundary corrosion, dissolution and penetration were observed. The corrosion depth decreases at 450circC with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr doe...

  19. Influence of tempering on mechanical properties of ferritic martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Han, C. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, T. K.; Jeong, Y. H.; Cho, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1980s research programs for development of low activation materials began. This is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guidelines (10CFR part 61) that were developed to reduce long-lived radioactive isotopes, which allows nuclear reactor waste to be disposed of by shallow land burial when removed from service. Development of low activation materials is also key issue in nuclear fusion systems, as the structural components can became radioactive due to nuclear transmutation caused by exposure to high dose neutron irradiation. Reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed in the leading countries in nuclear fusion technology, and are now being considered as primary candidate material for the test blanket module (TBM) in the international thermonuclear experiment reactor (ITER). RAFM steels developed so far (e.g., EUROFER 97 and F82H) meet the requirement for structural application in the ITER. However, if such alloys are used in the DEMO or commercial fusion reactor is still unclear, as the reactors are designed to operate under much severe conditions (i.e., higher outlet coolant temperature and neutron fluences). Such harsh operating conditions lead to development of RAFM steels with better creep and irradiation resistances. Mechanical properties of RAFM steels are strongly affected by microstructural features including the distribution, size and type of precipitates, dislocation density and grain size. For a given composition, such microstructural characteristics are determined mainly by thermo-mechanical process employed to fabricate the final product, and accordingly a final heat treatment, i.e., tempering is the key step to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. In the present work, we investigated mechanical properties of the RAFM steels with a particular attention being paid to effects of tempering on impact and creep properties

  20. The co-evolution of microstructure features in self-ion irradiated HT9 at very high damage levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getto, E., E-mail: getto@usna.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, 21402 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Vancoevering, G.; Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Understanding the void swelling and phase evolution of reactor structural materials at very high damage levels is essential to maintaining safety and longevity of components in Gen IV fast reactors. A combination of ion irradiation and modeling was utilized to understand the microstructure evolution of ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 at high dpa. Self-ion irradiation experiments were performed on alloy HT9 to determine the co-evolution of voids, dislocations and precipitates up to 650 dpa at 460 °C. Modeling of microstructure evolution was conducted using the modified Radiation Induced Microstructure Evolution (RIME) model, which utilizes a mean field rate theory approach with grouped cluster dynamics. Irradiations were performed with 5 MeV raster-scanned Fe{sup 2+} ions on samples pre-implanted with 10 atom parts per million He. The swelling, dislocation and precipitate evolution at very high dpa was determined using Analytical Electron Microscopy in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) mode. Experimental results were then interpreted using the RIME model. A microstructure consisting only of dislocations and voids is insufficient to account for the swelling evolution observed experimentally at high damage levels in a complicated microstructure such as irradiated alloy HT9. G phase was found to have a minimal effect on either void or dislocation evolution. M{sub 2}X played two roles; a variable biased sink for defects, and as a vehicle for removal of carbon from solution, thus promoting void growth. When accounting for all microstructure interactions, swelling at high damage levels is a dynamic process that continues to respond to other changes in the microstructure as long as they occur.

  1. Water corrosion resistance of ODS ferritic-martensitic steel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasuji

    2008-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels have superior radiation resistance; it is possible to achieve a service temperature of up to around 973 K because of their superior creep strength. These advantages of ODS steels facilities their application to long-life cladding tubes in advanced fast reactor fuel elements. In addition to neutron radiation resistance, sufficient general corrosion resistance to maintain the strength of the cladding, and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance for spent-fuel-pool cooling systems and high-temperature oxidation for the fuel-clad chemical interaction (FCCI) of ODS ferritic steel are required. Although the addition of Cr to ODS is effective in preventing water corrosion and high-temperature oxidation, an excessively high amount of Cr leads to embrittlement due to the formation of a Cr-rich α' precipitate. The Cr content in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite, the ODS steels developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), is controlled. In a previous paper, it has been demonstrated that the resistances of 9Cr- and 12Cr-ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature oxidation are superior to those of conventional 12Cr ferritic steel. However, the water corrosion data of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels are very limited. In this study, a water corrosion test was conducted on ODS steels in consideration of the spent-fuel-pool cooling condition, and the results were compared with those of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. (author)

  2. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  3. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  4. Development of new ferritic / martensitic steels for fuel cladding in fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratti, M.

    2009-11-01

    Many studies are directed toward the development of ferritic / martensitic ODS materials for applications in Gen IV programs. In this study, the mechanisms of formation of nano-phases (Y, Ti, O) and the influence of titanium on the precipitation refinement have been analyzed by small angle neutron scattering, X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The obtained results allow developing new materials reinforced by nitrides (NDS which stands for Nitride Dispersion Strengthened). A first CEA patent is now being registered on these NDS materials processed by mechanical alloying. However, microstructural and mechanical characterizations are necessary to improve these new alloys. At last, a tensile and creep database has been acquired on an ODS Fe-18Cr material between room temperature and 650 C. These tests allow a qualitative description of the ODS mechanical behaviour. (author)

  5. Thermal Effects on Thin Laser-Peened Ferritic-Martensitic Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, M; Zalesky, T; Hosemann, P; El-dasher, B S; Halsey, W G; Stuart, B

    2007-01-01

    Laser peening is emerging as a promising technique to improve the corrosion resistance of cladding material candidates for lead-cooled fast reactors (LFRs). The challenge is in the performance capability of ∼1 mm-thick fuel-pin cladding. Ferritic-martensitic (F/M) steels are foreseen as possible candidates that stand severe conditions of high dose (150 dpa), and high temperature (∼500-600 C) under the corrosive environments of molten lead or lead-bismuth. In this paper, we present the results of experiments carried on laser peened (LP) samples of F/M steels HT9, T91, EP823, as well as the austenitic material 316 L. The samples underwent a thermal treatment in an oven at 520 C, and XRD compressive stress results indicate that the F/M samples do not retain the residual stress after 2 weeks of heat treatment. The corrosion behavior in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 535 C has been investigated as well. Also, irradiation experiments of LP samples to a maximum dose of ∼10 dpa are foreseen

  6. Design limits for HT9 cladding using stress-induced aging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, G.L.

    1986-04-01

    Stress-temperature design guidelines are developed for the ferritic/martensitic cladding material HT9. High temperature operation for HT9 may cause microstructural changes/aging which softens the structure and causes increased creep rates. Higher creep strains means cladding breech becomes more probable before the end of the expected pin lifetime. Tertiary creep is considered an indication of microstructural changes and is to be avoided in fuel pin operation. The creep rate correlation, which includes tertiary creep, is examined for information on stress-temperature relationships which promote aging. This approach leads to design limits for HT9 which are compared with expected hot channel conditions for fuel pins in the Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) planned for FFTF. The results show aging should not be significant for CDE

  7. Creep deformation of high Cr-Mo ferritic/martensitic steels by material softening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Song, B. J.; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2005-01-01

    High Cr (9-12%Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels represent a valuable alternative to austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications up to 600 .deg. C both in power and petrochemical plant, as well as good resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Material softening is the main physical phenomenon observed in the crept material. Thermally-induced change (such as particle coarsening or matrix solute depletion) and strain-induced change (such as dynamic subgrain growth) of microstructure degraded the alloy strength. These microstructural changes during a creep test cause the material softening, so the strength of the materials decreased. Many researches have been performed for the microstructural changes during a creep test, but the strength of crept materials has not been measured. In the present work, we measured the yield and tensile strength of crept materials using Indentationtyped Tensile Test System (AIS 2000). Material softening was quantitatively evaluated with a creep test condition, such as temperature and applied stress

  8. Summary Report of Summer Work: High Purity Single Crystal Growth & Microstructure of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestovich, Kimberly Shay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Harnessing the power of the nuclear sciences for national security and to benefit others is one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s missions. MST-8 focuses on manipulating and studying how the structure, processing, properties, and performance of materials interact at the atomic level under nuclear conditions. Within this group, single crystal scintillators contribute to the safety and reliability of weapons, provide global security safeguards, and build on scientific principles that carry over to medical fields for cancer detection. Improved cladding materials made of ferritic-martensitic alloys support the mission of DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program to close the nuclear fuel cycle, aiming to solve nuclear waste management challenges and thereby increase the performance and safety of current and future reactors.

  9. Deformation mechanisms in ferritic/martensitic steels and the impact on mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Po, Giacomo; Sharafat, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Structural steels for nuclear applications have undergone rapid development during the past few decades, thanks to a combination of trial-and-error, mechanism-based optimization, and multiscale modeling approaches. Deformation mechanisms are shown to be intimately related to mechanical design via dominant plastic deformation modes. Because mechanical design rules are mostly based on failure modes associated with plastic strain damage accumulation, we present here the fundamental deformation mechanisms for Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels, and delineate their operational range of temperature and stress. The connection between deformation mechanisms, failure modes, and mechanical design is shown through application of design rules. A specific example is given for the alloy F82H utilized in the design of a Test Blanket Module (TBM) in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), where several constitutive equations are developed for design-related mechanical properties

  10. Deformation mechanisms in ferritic/martensitic steels and the impact on mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@seas.ucla.edu; Po, Giacomo; Sharafat, Shahram

    2013-10-15

    Structural steels for nuclear applications have undergone rapid development during the past few decades, thanks to a combination of trial-and-error, mechanism-based optimization, and multiscale modeling approaches. Deformation mechanisms are shown to be intimately related to mechanical design via dominant plastic deformation modes. Because mechanical design rules are mostly based on failure modes associated with plastic strain damage accumulation, we present here the fundamental deformation mechanisms for Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels, and delineate their operational range of temperature and stress. The connection between deformation mechanisms, failure modes, and mechanical design is shown through application of design rules. A specific example is given for the alloy F82H utilized in the design of a Test Blanket Module (TBM) in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), where several constitutive equations are developed for design-related mechanical properties.

  11. Material science and manufacturing of heat-resistant reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A.G.; Blokhin, A.I.; Budylkin, N.I.; Chernov, V.M.; Leont'eva-Smirnova, M.V.; Mironova, E.G.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Solonin, M.I.; Porollo, S.I.; Zavyalsky, L.P.

    2000-01-01

    A number of issues regarding the development and use of 10-12% Cr reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels (RAFMS) for fusion are considered. These include: (1) problems of manufacturing and modifying their composition and metallurgical condition; (2) the influence on properties of their composition, purity, δ-ferrite concentration and cooling rates in the final stages of manufacturing; and (3) the effects of neutron irradiation at 320-650 deg. C up to 108 dpa on their mechanical properties. In addition, neutron activation and nuclear accumulation of elements in RAFMS with different initial concentrations of alloying and impurity elements for typical fusion reactor (DEMO) irradiation regimes have been calculated

  12. Heat-to-heat variability of irradiation creep and swelling of HT9 irradiated to high neutron fluence at 400-600{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation creep data on ferritic/martensitic steels are difficult and expensive to obtain, and are not available for fusion-relevant neutron spectra and displacement rates. Therefore, an extensive creep data rescue and analysis effort is in progress to characterize irradiation creep of ferritic/martensitic alloys in other reactors and to develop a methodology for applying it to fusion applications. In the current study, four tube sets constructed from three nominally similar heats of HT9 subjected to one of two heat treatments were constructed as helium-pressurized creep tubes and irradiated in FFTF-MOTA at four temperatures between 400 and 600{degrees}C. Each of the four heats exhibited a different stress-free swelling behavior at 400{degrees}C, with the creep rate following the swelling according to the familiar B{sub o} + DS creep law. No stress-free swelling was observed at the other three irradiation temperatures. Using a stress exponent of n = 1.0 as the defining criterion, {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} irradiation creep was found at all temperatures, but, only over limited stress ranges that decreased with increasing temperature. The creep coefficient B{sub o} is a little lower ({approx}50%) than that observed for austenitic steel, but the swelling-creep coupling coefficient D is comparable to that of austenitic steels. Primary transient creep behavior was also observed at all temperatures except 400{degrees}C, and thermal creep behavior was found to dominate the deformation at high stress levels at 550 and 600{degrees}C.

  13. Postirradiation thermocyclic loading of ferritic-martensitic structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, L.; Orychtchenko, A.; Petersen, C.; Rybin, V.

    Thermonuclear fusion reactors of the Tokamak-type will be unique power engineering plants to operate in thermocyclic mode only. Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are prime candidate structural materials for test blankets of the ITER fusion reactor. Beyond the radiation damage, thermomechanical cyclic loading is considered as the most detrimental lifetime limiting phenomenon for the above structure. With a Russian and a German facility for thermal fatigue testing of neutron irradiated materials a cooperation has been undertaken. Ampule devices to irradiate specimens for postirradiation thermal fatigue tests have been developed by the Russian partner. The irradiation of these ampule devices loaded with specimens of ferritic-martensitic steels, like the European MANET-II, the Russian 05K12N2M and the Japanese Low Activation Material F82H-mod, in a WWR-M-type reactor just started. A description of the irradiation facility, the qualification of the ampule device and the modification of the German thermal fatigue facility will be presented.

  14. Transient failure behavior of HT9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1994-07-01

    Alloy HT9 has-been chosen as candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications because the.material exhibits excellent resistance to void swelling. However, ferritic alloys are known to undergo a ductile-brittle transition as the test temperature is decreased. This inherent problem has limited their applications to reactor component materials subjected to low neutron exposures. Despite the ductile-brittle transition problem, results show that the materials exhibit superior resistance to fracture under very high neutron fluences at irradiation temperatures above 380C. Results also show that the transient behavior for HT9 cladding specimens taken from the fuel column region and cladding taken from outside the fuel column or unirradiated cladding are the same. HT9 cladding maintained its transient strength with irradiation to a fluence of 9 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV)

  15. Irradiation creep and void swelling of two LMR heats of HT9 at ∝400 C and 165 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    Two nominally identical heats of HT9 ferritic-martensitic steel were produced, fabricated into pressurized tubes, and then irradiated in FFTF, using identical procedures. After reaching 165 dpa at ∝400 C, small differences in strains associated with both phase-related changes in lattice parameter and void swelling were observed in comparing the two heats. The creep strains, while different, exhibited the same functional dependence on swelling behavior. The derived creep coefficients, the one associated with creep in the absence of swelling and the one directly responsive to swelling, were essentially identical for the two heats. Even more significantly, the creep coefficients for this bcc ferritic-martensitic steel appear to be very similar and possibly identical to those routinely derived from creep experiments on fcc austenitic steels. (orig.)

  16. Irradiation creep and void swelling of two LMR heat of HT9 at ∼400 degrees C and 165 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    Two nominally identical heats of HT9 ferritic-martensitic steel were produced, fabricated into pressurized tubes, and then irradiated in FFTF, using identical procedures. After reaching 165 dpa at ∼400C, small differences in strains associated with both phase-related change in lattice parameter and void swelling were observed in comparing the two heats. The creep strains, while different, exhibited the same functional relationship to the swelling behavior. The derived creep coefficients, the one associated with creep in the absence of swelling and the one directly responsive to swelling, were essentially identical for the two heats. Even more significantly, the creep coefficients for this bcc ferritic-martensitic steel appear to be very similar and possibly identical to those routinely derived from creep experiments on fcc austenitic steels

  17. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambard, V.

    2000-01-01

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  18. A reassessment of the effects of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Hankin, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    To test the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of tests performed on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400 C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile to brittle transition temperature shift of over 500 C. However, the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations also support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in HFIR. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation

  19. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  20. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  1. Comparison of the corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels exposed to static liquid Pb Bi at 450 and 550 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Y.; Futakawa, M.; Saito, S.

    2005-08-01

    Static corrosion tests of various steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450 °C and 550 °C for 3000 h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior in liquid Pb-Bi. Corrosion depth decreases at 450 °C with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic steels or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr does not occur in the three austenitic steels at 450 °C. Corrosion depth of ferritic/martensitic steels also decreases at 550 °C with increasing Cr content in steels whereas corrosion depth of austenitic steels, JPCA and 316SS becomes larger due to ferritization caused by dissolution of Ni at 550 °C than that of ferritic/martensitic steels. An austenitic stainless steel containing about 5%Si exhibits fine corrosion resistance at 550 °C because the protective Si oxide film is formed and prevents dissolution of Ni and Cr.

  2. Comparison of the corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels exposed to static liquid Pb-Bi at 450 and 550 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Y.; Futakawa, M.; Saito, S.

    2005-01-01

    Static corrosion tests of various steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450 deg. C and 550 deg. C for 3000 h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior in liquid Pb-Bi. Corrosion depth decreases at 450 deg. C with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic steels or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr does not occur in the three austenitic steels at 450 deg. C. Corrosion depth of ferritic/martensitic steels also decreases at 550 deg. C with increasing Cr content in steels whereas corrosion depth of austenitic steels, JPCA and 316SS becomes larger due to ferritization caused by dissolution of Ni at 550 deg. C than that of ferritic/martensitic steels. An austenitic stainless steel containing about 5%Si exhibits fine corrosion resistance at 550 deg. C because the protective Si oxide film is formed and prevents dissolution of Ni and Cr

  3. European development of ferritic-martensitic steels for fast reactor wrapper applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, K.; Little, E.A.; Levy, V.; Alamo, A.

    1987-01-01

    9-12%Cr ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are under development in Europe for fast reactor sub-assembly wrapper applications. Within this class of alloys, attention is focussed on three key specifications, viz. FV448 and DIN 1.4914 (both 10-12%CrMoVNb steels) and EM10 (an 8-10%Cr-0.15%C steel), which can be optimized to give acceptably low ductile-brittle transition characteristics. The results of studies on these steels, and earlier choices, covering heat treatment and compositional optimization, evolution of wrapper fabrication routes, pre and post-irradiation mechanical property and fracture toughness behaviour, microstructural stability, void swelling and in-reactor creep characteristics are reviewed. The retention of high void swelling to displacement doses in excess of 100 dpa in reactor irradiations reaffirms the selection of 9-12%Cr steels for on-going wrapper development. Moreover, irradiation-induced changes in mechanical properties (e.g. in-reactor creep and impact behaviour), measured to intermediate doses, do not give cause for concern; however, additional data to higher doses and at the lower irradiation temperatures of 370 0 -400 0 C are needed in order to fully endorse these alloys for high burnup applications in advanced reactor systems

  4. Proceedings of the second milestone meeting of European laboratories on the development of ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, E.; Ehrlich, K.; Schirra, M.

    1997-05-01

    In the frame of the European Fusion Technology Program a series of ferritic/martensitic developmental alloys, the composition of which had been optimized towards low long-term activation, was investigated and compared with conventional 9-12%CrMoVNb steels. It could be shown that by these chemical modifications neither the physical metallurgy nor the transformation behavior was changed markedly. Tensile-, creep-rupture- and fatigue properties are somewhat reduced, whereas the fracture toughness and impact data are far superior to conventional materials. This is an important advantage, especially if the expected detrimental effect of neutron irradiation on the latter properties is taken into account. First results of low-fluence irradiations indicate that the new alloys are less prone to irradiation-induced DBTT shifts. (orig./HM) [de

  5. Deformation twinning in irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2018-04-01

    Two different ferritic/martensitic steels were tensile tested to gain insight into the mechanisms of embrittlement induced by the combined effects of displacement damage and helium after proton/neutron irradiation in SINQ, the Swiss spallation neutron source. The irradiation conditions were in the range: 15.8-19.8 dpa (displacement per atom) with 1370-1750 appm He at 245-300 °C. All the samples fractured in brittle mode with intergranular or cleavage fracture surfaces when tested at room temperature (RT) or 300 °C. After tensile test, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was employed to investigate the deformation microstructures. TEM-lamella samples were extracted directly below the intergranular fracture surfaces or cleavage surfaces by using the focused ion beam technique. Deformation twinning was observed in irradiated specimens at high irradiation dose. Only twins with {112} plane were observed in all of the samples. The average thickness of twins is about 40 nm. Twins initiated at the fracture surface, became gradually thinner with distance away from the fracture surface and finally stopped in the matrix. Novel features such as twin-precipitate interactions, twin-grain boundary and/or twin-lath boundary interactions were observed. Twinning bands were seen to be arrested by grain boundaries or large precipitates, but could penetrate martensitic lath boundaries. Unlike the case of defect free channels, small defect-clusters, dislocation loops and dense small helium bubbles were observed inside twins.

  6. Impact fracture behavior of HT9 duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1994-07-01

    Ferritic alloys are known to undergo a ductile-brittle transition as the test temperature is decreased. This inherent problem has limited their applications to reactor component materials subjected to low neutron exposures. However, the excellent resistance to void swelling exhibited by these alloys has led to choosing the materials as candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. Despite the ductile-brittle transition problem, results show that the materials exhibit superior resistance to fracture under very high neutron fluences at irradiation temperatures above 380 degrees C. Impact testing on FFTF duct sections of HT9 indicates that HT9 ducts have adequate fracture toughness at much higher temperatures for handling operations at room temperature and refueling operations

  7. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  8. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  9. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.-A.F., E-mail: farhad.tavassoli@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/DEN/DANS/DMN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Diegele, E., E-mail: eberhard.diegele@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Lindau, R., E-mail: rainer.lindau@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Luzginova, N., E-mail: Natalia.Luzginova@gmail.com [NRG-Petten, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Tanigawa, H., E-mail: tanigawa.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Authority (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe–Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7–9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe–8%Cr–2%W–TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe–9%Cr–1%W–TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  10. Numerical simulation of transformation-induced microscopic residual stress in ferrite-martensite lamellar steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Y; Inao, A; Mochizuki, M; Toyoda, M

    2009-01-01

    The effect of transformation-induced microscopic residual stress on fatigue crack propagation behavior of ferrite-martensite lamellar steel was discussed. Fatigue tests of prestrained and non-prestrained specimens were performed. Inflections and branches at ferrite-martensite boundaries were observed in the non-prestrained specimens. On the other hand, less inflections and branches were found in the prestrained specimens. The experimental results showed that the transformation induced microscopic residual stress has influence on the fatigue crack propagation behavior. To estimate the microscopic residual, a numerical simulation method for the calculation of microscopic residual stress stress induced by martensitic transformation was performed. The simulation showed that compressive residual stress was generated in martensite layer, and the result agree with the experimental result that inflections and branches were observed at ferrite-martensite boundaries.

  11. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations

  12. Development of ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened) ferritic-martensitic steels for fast reactor fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Shigeharu

    2000-01-01

    In order to attain higher burnup and higher coolant outlet temperature in fast reactor, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels were developed as a long life fuel cladding. The improvement in formability and ductility, which are indispensable in the cold-rolling method for manufacturing cladding tube, were achieved by controlling the microstructure using techniques such as recrystallization heat-treatment and α to γ phase transformation. The ODS ferritic-martensitic cladding tubes manufactured using these techniques have the highest internal creep rupture strength in the world as ferritic stainless steels. Strength level approaches adequate value at 700degC, which meets the requirement for commercial fast reactors. (author)

  13. Effects of Mn addition on microstructures and mechanical properties of 10Cr ODS ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hyun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels are very attractive for the structural materials of fast fission reactors such as a sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) owing to their excellent irradiation resistance to a void swelling, but are known to reveal an abrupt loss of their creep and tensile strengths at temperatures above 600 .deg. C. Accordingly, high temperature strength should be considerably improved for an application of the FM steel to the structural materials of SFR. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FM steels are considered to be promising candidate materials for high- temperature components operating in severe environments such as nuclear fusion and fission systems due to their excellent high temperature strength and radiation resistance stemming from the addition of extremely thermally stable oxide particles dispersed in the ferritic/martensitic matrix.. To develop an advanced ODS steel for core structural materials for next generation nuclear reactor system applications, it is important to optimize its compositions to improve the high temperature strength and radiation resistance. This study investigates effects of Mn addition on microstructures and mechanical properties of 10Cr ODS FM steel. For this, two 10 Cr ODS FM steels were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and hot rolling process. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature and 700 .deg. C to evaluate the influences of the Mn element on the mechanical properties. The microstructures were observed using SEM, electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In the present study, the effects of Mn addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ODS FM steels were investigated. The ODS FM steels were manufactured by the MA, HIP and hot-rolling processes

  14. Effect of microstructure on the fracture toughness of ferrite-martensite-bainite steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, In Sup

    1988-01-01

    The effect of microstructure on the fracture toughness of ferrite-martensite -bainite steels was investigated with Fe-0.11C-1.64Mn-0.78Si composition. One inch compact tension specimens (1T-CTSs) were machined from hot rolled plates. The microstructure of ferrite-martensite-bainite was introduced to the specimens by the heat treatment of intercritical annealing at 800deg C and isothermal holding at 350deg C. Holding at 350deg C increased volume fraction of bainite, while decreased that of martensite, and refined martensite particles. Single specimen unloading compliance method was used in fracture test to obtain J-resistance (J-R) curve and to determine the fracture toughness(J IC ). Introduction of bainite to the ferrite-martensite steel improved the fracture toughness due to the deformation of bainite which relaxed the stress concentration on the interface of ferrite and martensite. Observation of fracto-graphs through the scanning electron microscope(SEM) identified the fracture mechanism of ferrite-martensite-bainite steels as dimple nucleation and crack growth by decohesion of ferrite matrix and second phase particles and by microvoid coales cence. (Author)

  15. Corrosion-resistant coating technique for oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ando, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are attractive materials for application as fuel cladding in fast reactors and first-wall material of fusion blanket. Recent studies have focused more on high-chromium ferritic (12-18 wt% Cr) ODS steels with attractive corrosion resistance properties. However, they have poor material workability, require complicated heat treatments for recrystallization, and possess anisotropic microstructures and mechanical properties. On the other hand, low-chromium ferritic/martensitic (8-9 wt% Cr) ODS steels have no such limitations; nonetheless, they have poor corrosion resistance properties. In our work, we developed a corrosion-resistant coating technique for a low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. The ODS steel was coated with the 304 or 430 stainless steel, which has better corrosion resistances than the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steels. The 304 or 430 stainless steel was coated by changing the canning material from mild steel to stainless steel in the conventional material processing procedure for ODS steels. Microstructural observations and micro-hardness tests proved that the stainless steels were successfully coated without causing a deterioration in the mechanical property of the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. (author)

  16. Some initial considerations on the suitability of Ferritic/ martensitic stainless steels as first wall and blanket materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    The constitution of stainless iron alloys and the characteristic properties of alloys in the main ferritic, martensitic and austenitic groups are discussed. A comparison of published data on the mechanical, thermal and irradiation properties of typical austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels shows that alloys in the latter groups have certain advantages for fusion applications. The ferromagnetism exhibited by martensitic and ferritic alloys has, however, been identified as a potentially serious obstacle to their utilisation in magnetic confinement devices. The paper describes measurements performed in other laboratories on the magnetic properties of two representative martensitic alloys 12Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-2Mo. These observations show that a modest bias magnetic field of magnitude 1 - 2 tesla induces a state of magnetic saturation in these materials. They would thus behave as essentially paramagnetic materials having a relative permeability close to unity when saturated by the toroidal field of a tokamak reactor. The results of computations by the General Atomic research group to assess the implications of such magnetic behaviour on reactor design and operation are presented. The results so far indicate that the ferromagnetism of martensitic/ferritic steels would not represent a major obstacle to their utilisation as first wall or blanket materials. (author)

  17. Microstructure and tensile properties of high strength duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborti, P.C.; Mitra, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    Duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels containing 38-80% martensite of varying morphologies were developed by batch intercritical annealing of a commercial variety vanadium bearing 0.2% C-Mn steel at different temperatures. Microstructures before intercritical annealing were found to control the morphological distribution of the phase constituents of the developed DFM steels. Tensile test results revealed best strength-ductility combination for finely distributed lamellar ferrite-martensite phase aggregate containing ∼60% martensite developed from a prior martensitic structure. Taking consideration of the modified law of mechanical mixture the experimental tensile strength data of the developed DFM steels has been formulated with some success and very good estimation for tensile strengths of pure ferrite and low carbon martensite has been made from tensile strength data of DFM steels

  18. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997.

  19. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997

  20. Irradiation damage of ferritic/martensitic steels: Fusion program data applied to a spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels were chosen as candidates for future fusion power plants because of their superior swelling resistance and better thermal properties than austenitic stainless steels. For the same reasons, these steels are being considered for the target structure of a spallation neutron source, where the structural materials will experience even more extreme irradiation conditions than expected in a fusion power plant first wall (i.e., high-energy neutrons that produce large amounts of displacement damage and transmutation helium). Extensive studies on the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of ferritic/martensitic steels indicate that the major problem involves the effect of irradiation on fracture, as determined by a Charpy impact test. There are indications that helium can affect the impact behavior. Even more helium will be produced in a spallation neutron target material than in the first wall of a fusion power plant, making helium effects a prime concern for both applications. 39 refs., 10 figs

  1. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, L., E-mail: tanl@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Tavassoli, A.-A.F.; Henry, J. [DMN/Dir, DEN, CEA Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, 76021 (Germany); Sakasegawa, H. [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Rokkasho, Aomori, 039-3212 (Japan); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Tanigawa, H. [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Rokkasho, Aomori, 039-3212 (Japan); Huang, Q. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. In addition to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. Limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic are presented and compared with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ∼70 displacements per atom at ∼300–325 °C.

  2. Effect of tungsten and tantalum on the low cycle fatigue behavior of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Vani, E-mail: vani@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Mariappan, K.; Nagesha, A.; Prasad Reddy, G.V.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of tungsten and tantalum on low cycle fatigue behavior of RAFM steels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both alloying elements W and Ta improved fatigue life. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase in Ta content improved fatigue life more than W. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimization of W content at 1.4 wt.%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Softening behavior closely related to W and Ta content. - Abstract: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are candidate materials for the test blanket modules of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Several degradation mechanisms such as thermal fatigue, low cycle fatigue, creep fatigue interaction, creep, irradiation hardening, swelling and phase instability associated irradiation embrittlement must be understood in order to estimate the component lifetime and issues concerning the structural integrity of components. The current work focuses on the effect of tungsten and tantalum on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of RAFM steels. Both alloying elements tungsten and tantalum improved the fatigue life. Influence of Ta on increasing fatigue life was an order of magnitude higher than the influence of W on improving the fatigue life. Based on the present study, the W content was optimized at 1.4 wt.%. Softening behavior of RAFM steels showed a strong dependence on W and Ta content in RAFM steels.

  3. Chemical compatibility study of lithium titanate with Indian reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Jain, Uttam; Haldar, Rumu; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical compatibility between Li_2TiO_3 and Indian RAFM steel has been studied at ITER operating temperature. • The lithium titanate chemically reacted with ferritic martensitic steel to form a brittle and non-adherent oxide layer. • The layer grew in a parabolic manner as a function of heating time. • Diffusion of oxygen (from Li_2TiO_3) appears to be controlling the oxide layer. - Abstract: Chemical compatibility between lithium titanate and Indian reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel (In-RAFMS) was studied for the first time under ITER operating temperature. Lithium titanate required for the study was synthesized in-house. Coupons of In-RAFMS were packed inside lithium titanate powder and heated at 550 °C up to 900 h under inert argon atmosphere. The lithium titanate chemically reacted with ferritic martensitic steel to form a brittle and non-adherent oxide layer. The layer grew in a parabolic manner as a function of heating time. Microstructural and phase evolution of this oxide layer was studied using XRD, SEM and EPMA. Iron and chromium enriched zones were found within the oxide layer. Diffusion of oxygen (from Li_2TiO_3) appears to be controlling the oxide layer.

  4. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V2C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V2C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  5. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong, E-mail: yongyang@ufl.edu

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V{sub 2}C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V{sub 2}C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  6. Quantitative analysis of tensile deformation behavior by in-situ neutron diffraction for ferrite-martensite type dual-phase steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Satoshi; Umezawa, Osamu; Harjo, Stefanus; Hasegawa, Kohei; Toji, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    The yielding and work-hardening behavior of ferrite-martensite type dual-phase (DP) alloys were clearly analyzed using the in-situ neutron diffraction technique. We successfully established a new method to estimate the stress and strain partitioning between ferrite and martensite phase during loading. Although these phases exhibit the same lattice structure with similar lattice parameters, their lattice strains on (110), (200) and (211) are obviously different from each other under an applied stress. The misfit strains between those phases were clearly accompanied with the phase-scaled internal stream (phase stress). Thus, the martensite phase yielded by higher applied stress than macro-yield stress, which resulted in high work-hardening rate of the DP steel. We also demonstrated that ferrite phase fraction influenced work-hardening behavior. (author)

  7. New stainless steels of ferrite-martensite grade and perspectives of their application in thermonuclear facilities and fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajtkhozhin, Eh.S.; Maksimkin, O.P.

    2007-01-01

    Review of scientific literature for last 5 years in which results on study of radiation effect on ferrite-martensite steels - construction materials of fast reactors and most probable candidates for first wall and blanket of the thermonuclear facilities ITER and Demo - are presented. Alongside with this a prior experimental data on study of microstructure changing and physical- mechanical properties of ferrite-martensite steel EhP-450 - the material of hexahedral case of spent assembly of BN-350 fast reactor- are cited. Principal attention was paid to considering of radiation effects of structural components content changing and ferrite-martensite steel swelling irradiated at comparatively low values of radiation damage climb rate

  8. Microstructure and properties of pipeline steel with a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rutao; Zuo Xiurong; Hu Yueyue; Wang Zhenwei; Hu, Dingxu

    2011-01-01

    In order to satisfy the transportation of the crude oil and gas in severe environmental conditions, a ferrite/martensite dual-phase pipeline steel has been developed. After a forming process and double submerged arc welding, the microstructure of the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The pipe showed good deformability and an excellent combination of high strength and toughness, which is suitable for a pipeline subjected to the progressive and abrupt ground movement. The base metal having a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure exhibited excellent mechanical properties in terms of uniform elongation of 7.5%, yield ratio of 0.78, strain hardening exponent of 0.145, an impact energy of 286 J at - 10 deg. C and a shear area of 98% at 0 deg. C in the drop weight tear test. The tensile strength and impact energy of the weld metal didn't significantly reduce, because of the intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites microstructure, leading to high strength and toughness in weld metal. The heat affected zone contained complete quenching zone and incomplete quenching zone, which exhibited excellent low temperature toughness of 239 J at - 10 deg. C. - Research Highlights: →The pipe with ferrite/martensite microstructure shows high deformability. →The base metal of the pipe consists of ferrite and martensite. →Heat affected zone shows excellent low temperature toughness. →Weld metal mainly consists of intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites. →Weld metal shows excellent low temperature toughness and high strength.

  9. Material physical properties of 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) wrapper tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Yasuhide; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Tanno, Takashi; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Koyama, Shinichi

    2012-09-01

    It is necessary to develop core materials for fast reactors in order to achieve high-burnup. Ferritic steels are expected to be good candidate core materials to achieve this objective because of their excellent void swelling resistance. Therefore, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel and 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) have been respectively developed for cladding and wrapper tube materials in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this study, various physical properties of PNC-FMS wrapper materials were measured and equations and future standard measurement technique of physical properties for the design and evaluation were conducted. (author)

  10. Behavior of implanted hydrogen in ferritic/martensitic steels under irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, F.; Takahashi, H.; Ohnuki, S.; Nagasaki, R.

    1988-07-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the behavior of hydrogen under irradiation in ferritic/martensitic stainless steel Fe-10Cr-2Mo-1Ni. Hydrogen was implanted into the specimens by ion accelerator or chemical cathodic charging method, followed by electron irradiation in a HVEM at temperatures from room temperature to 773 K. Streaks in the electron diffraction patterns were observed only during electron irradiation at 623-723 K. From these results it is suggested that the occurrence of the streak pattern is due to the formation of radiation-induced complexes of Ni or Cr with hydrogen along directions.

  11. Compression behavior of a ferritic-martensitic Cr-Mo steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Mishin, Oleg; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The compression behavior of a ferritic-martensitic Cr-Mo steel is characterized for strain rates ranging from 10-4 s-1 to 10-1 s-1 and engineering strains up to 40%. Adiabatic heating causes a reduction in flow stress during continuous compression at a strain rate of 10-1 s-1. No reduction...... in the flow stress is observed if interrupted compression tests are performed with loading and holding steps. Two work-hardening stages with work-hardening rates decreasing linearly with the flow stress are identified and interpreted in terms of the KocksMecking model. The microstructural evolution...

  12. Report of IEA workshop on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    IEA Workshop on Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels under implementing agreement for program of research and development on fusion materials was held at Tokyo Yayoi Kaikan and JAERI headquarter on November 2-3, 2000. The objective of this workshop was a review of the fusion material development programs, the progress of the collaboration and the irradiation effects studies on RAF/M steels in the collaborating parties (Europe, Russia the United States, and Japan). Moreover, the development of plans for future collaboration was discussed. The present report contains viewgraphs presented at the workshop. (author)

  13. Recent progress of R and D activities on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Q., E-mail: qunying.huang@fds.org.cn [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1135, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Baluc, N. [CRPP-EPFL, ODGA C110 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dai, Y. [LNM, PSI, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Jitsukawa, S. [JAEA, 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-Mura, Ibaraki-Ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kimura, A. [IAE, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Konys, J. [KIT, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kurtz, R.J. [PNNL, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Lindau, R. [KIT, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Muroga, T. [NIFS, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Odette, G.R. [UCSB, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Raj, B. [IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Stoller, R.E.; Tan, L. [ORNL, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Tanigawa, H. [JAEA, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tavassoli, A.-A.F. [DMN/Dir, DEN, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Yamamoto, T. [UCSB, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Wan, F. [DMPC, USTB, Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Y. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1135, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Several types of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been developed over the past 30 years in China, Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA for application in ITER test blanket modules (TBMs) and future fusion DEMO and power reactors. The progress has been particularly important during the past few years with evaluation of mechanical properties of these steels before and after irradiation and in contact with different cooling media. This paper presents recent RAFM steel results obtained in ITER partner countries in relation to different TBM and DEMO options.

  14. Diffusion bonding of 9Cr ODS ferritic/martensitic steel with a phase transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon, E-mail: shnoh@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kim, Tae Kyu [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Diffusion bonding was employed to join 9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel under uniaxial hydrostatic pressure, and the microstructure and tensile properties of the joints were investigated. • ODS steel was successfully diffusion bonded at an austenization temperature to migrate a residual diffusion bonding interface. • The tensile properties of the joint region were comparable with that of the base metal with a ductile fracture occurred far from the bonding interface. • It is considered that diffusion bonding with a phase transformation can be a very useful joining method for fabricating components in next-generation nuclear systems using 9Cr ODS ferritic/martensitic steel. - Abstract: Diffusion bonding was employed to join oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel under uniaxial hydrostatic pressure using a high vacuum hot press, and the microstructure and tensile properties of the joints were investigated. 9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel was successfully diffusion bonded at 1150 °C for 1 h to migrate a residual bonding interface. Following heat treatment, including normalising at 1050 °C and tempering at 800 °C for 1 h, comparable results without inclusions or micro-voids at the bonding interface, or degradation in the base metal were achieved. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation revealed that the nano-oxide particles in the bonding region were uniformly distributed in the matrix. At room temperature, the joint had nearly the same tensile properties with that of the base metal. The tensile strength of the joint region at elevated temperatures was comparable with that of the base metal. The total elongation of the joint region decreased slightly, but reached 80% of the base metal at 700 °C, and a ductile fracture occurred far from the bonding interface. Therefore, it is considered that diffusion bonding with a phase transformation can be a very useful joining method for

  15. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.; Sato, Y.S.; Sekio, Y.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.; Ogawa, R.; Kokawa, H.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding was applied to the wrapper tube materials, 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel, designed for fast reactors and defect-free welds were successfully produced. The mechanical and microstructural properties of the friction stir welded steel were subsequently investigated. The hardness values of the stir zone were approximately 550 Hv (5.4 GPa) with minimal dependence on the rotational speed, even though they were much higher than those of the base material. However, tensile strengths and elongations of the stir zones were high at 298 K, compared to those of the base material. The excellent tensile properties are attributable to the fine grain formation during friction stir welding

  16. Liquid metal reactor core material HT9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kuk, I. H.; Ryu, W. S. and others

    1998-03-01

    A state-of-the art is surveyed on the liquid metal reactor core materials HT9. The purpose of this report is to give an insight for choosing and developing the materials to be applied to the KAERI prototype liquid metal reactor which is planned for the year of 2010. In-core stability of cladding materials is important to the extension of fuel burnup. Austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316) has been used as core material in the early LMR due to the good mechanical properties at high temperatures, but it has been found to show a poor swelling resistance. So many efforts have been made to solve this problem that HT9 have been developed. HT9 is 12Cr-1MoVW steel. The microstructure of HT9 consisted of tempered martensite with dispersed carbide. HT9 has superior irradiation swelling resistance as other BCC metals, and good sodium compatibility. HT9 has also a good irradiation creep properties below 500 dg C, but irradiation creep properties are degraded above 500 dg C. Researches are currently in progress to modify the HT9 in order to improve the irradiation creep properties above 500 dg C. New design studies for decreasing the core temperature below 500 dg C are needed to use HT9 as a core material. On the contrary, decrease of the thermal efficiency may occur due to lower-down of the operation temperature. (author). 51 refs., 6 tabs., 19 figs

  17. Behavior of ferritic/martensitic steels after n-irradiation at 200 and 300 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijasevic, M.; Lucon, E.; Almazouzi, A.

    2008-01-01

    High chromium ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered as the most promising structural materials for accelerator driven systems (ADS). One drawback that needs to be quantified is the significant hardening and embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation at low temperatures with production of spallation elements. In this paper irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of F/M steels have been studied and comparisons are provided between two ferritic/martensitic steels, namely T91 and EUROFER97. Both materials have been irradiated in the BR2 reactor of SCK-CEN/Mol at 300 deg. C up to doses ranging from 0.06 to 1.5 dpa. Tensile tests results obtained between -160 deg. C and 300 deg. C clearly show irradiation hardening (increase of yield and ultimate tensile strengths), as well as reduction of uniform and total elongation. Irradiation effects for EUROFER97 starting from 0.6 dpa are more pronounced compared to T91, showing a significant decrease in work hardening. The results are compared to our latest data that were obtained within a previous program (SPIRE), where T91 had also been irradiated in BR2 at 200 deg. C (up to 2.6 dpa), and tested between -170 deg. C and 300 deg. C. Irradiation effects at lower irradiation temperatures are more significant

  18. Microstructural control and high temperature mechanical property of ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adetunji, G.J.

    1991-04-01

    The materials under study are 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels, alternative candidate materials for application in core components of nuclear power reactors. This work involves (1) Investigation of high temperature fracture mechanism during slow tensile and limited creep testing at 600 o C (2) Extensive study of solute element segregation both theoretically and experimentally (3) Investigation of effects by thermal ageing and irradiation on microstructural developments in relation to high temperature mechanical behaviour. From (1) the results obtained indicate that the important microstructural characteristics controlling the fracture of 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels at high temperature are (a) solute segregation to inclusion-matrix interfaces (b) hardness of the martensitic matrix and (c) carbide particle size distribution. From (2) the results indicate a strong concentration gradient of silicon and molybdenum near lath packet boundaries for certain quenching rates from the austenitizing temperature. From (3) high temperature tensile data were obtained for irradiated samples with thermally aged ones as control. (author)

  19. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R. G.; Morgan, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 400 °C and 28 dpa (1.7 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 465 °C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided (˜15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  20. Sigma phases in an 11%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel with the normalized and tempered condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yinzhong, E-mail: shenyz@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhou, Xiaoling; Shi, Tiantian; Huang, Xi [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shang, Zhongxia [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Wenwen; Ji, Bo; Xu, Zhiqiang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-12-15

    At the present time 9–12% Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels with target operating temperatures up to 650 °C and higher are being developed in order to further increase thermal efficiency so as to reduce coal consumption and air pollution. An 11% Cr F/M steel was prepared by reference to the nominal chemical composition of SAVE12 steel with an expected maximum use temperature of 650 °C. The precipitate phases of the 11% Cr F/M steel normalized at 1050 °C for 0.5 h and tempered at 780 °C for 1.5 h were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Except for Cr-/Cr-Fe-Co-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, Nb-/V-/Ta-Nb-/Nd-rich MX, Fe-rich M{sub 5}C{sub 2}, Co-rich M{sub 3}C and Fe-Co-rich M{sub 6}C phases previously identified in the steel, two types of sigma phases consisting of σ-FeCr and σ-FeCrW were found to be also present in the normalized and tempered steel. Identified σ-FeCr and σ-FeCrW phases have a simple tetragonal crystal structure with estimated lattice parameters a/c = 0.8713/0.4986 and 0.9119/0.5053 nm, respectively. The compositions in atomic pct of the observed sigma phases were determined to be approximately 50Fe-50Cr for the σ-FeCr, and 30Fe-55Cr-10W in addition to a small amount of Ta, Co and Mn for the σ-FeCrW. The sigma phases in the steel exhibit various blocky morphologies, and appear to have a smaller amount compared with the dominant phases Cr-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Nb-/V-/Ta-Nb-rich MX of the steel. The σ-FeCr phase in the steel was found to precipitate at δ-ferrite/martensite boundaries, suggesting that δ-ferrite may rapidly induce the formation of sigma phase at δ-ferrite/martensite boundaries in high Cr F/M steels containing δ-ferrite. The formation mechanism of sigma phases in the steel is also discussed in terms of the presence of δ-ferrite, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation, precipitation/dissolution of M{sub 2}X, and steel composition. - Highlights: •Precipitate phases in normalized and tempered 11%Cr F/M steel are

  1. Degradation of HT9 under simultaneous ion beam irradiation and liquid metal corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, D., E-mail: davefrazer@berkeley.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA United States (United States); Qvist, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA United States (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University (Sweden); Parker, S.; Krumwiede, D.L. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA United States (United States); Caro, M.; Tesmer, J.; Maloy, S.A.; Wang, Y.Q. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM United States (United States); Hosemann, P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA United States (United States)

    2016-10-15

    A potentially promising coolant/structural material pair for a liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors is lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant with the ferritic/martensitic steel HT9. The challenge of deploying LBE, however, is the corrosive environment it creates for structural materials. This corrosion can be mitigated with precise oxygen content control in the LBE to allow for the growth of passive protective oxide layers on the surface of the steel. In this paper, results are reported from the Irradiation Corrosion Experiment II (ICE-II), which allowed the simultaneous irradiation of a sample while in contact with LBE. It was found that a characteristic multilayer structure with an outer Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide and inner FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel was grown and the oxidation was significantly larger in the irradiated region when compared to the region that was only exposed to LBE corrosion. Possible mechanisms are discussed to help understand this irradiation enhanced corrosion behavior.

  2. Microstructural probing of ferritic/martensitic steels using internal transmutation-based positron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsjak, Vladimir; Dai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the use of an internal 44Ti/44Sc radioisotope source for a direct microstructural characterization of ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steels after irradiation in targets of spallation neutron sources. Gamma spectroscopy measurements show a production of ∼1MBq of 44Ti per 1 g of f/m steels irradiated at 1 dpa (displaced per atom) in the mixed proton-neutron spectrum at the Swiss spallation neutron source (SINQ). In the decay chain 44Ti → 44Sc → 44Ca, positrons are produced together with prompt gamma rays which enable the application of different positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) analyses, including lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Due to the high production yield, long half-life and relatively high energy of positrons of 44Ti, this methodology opens up new potential for simple, effective and inexpensive characterization of radiation induced defects in f/m steels irradiated in a spallation target.

  3. Resistance spot weldability of 11Cr–ferritic/martensitic steel sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Yano, Yasuhide; Ito, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Resistance spot welding of 11Cr–0.4Mo–2W, V, Nb ferritic/martensitic steel sheets with different thicknesses was examined to develop a manufacturing technology for a fast reactor fuel subassembly with an inner duct structure. In the spot welding, welding current, electrode force, welding time and holding time were varied as welding parameters to investigate the appropriate welding conditions. Welding conditions under which spot weld joints did not have either crack or void defects in the nugget could be found when the electrode force was increased to 9.8 kN. It was also found that the electrode cap with a longer tip end length was effective for preventing weld defect formations. Strength of the spot welded joint was characterized from micro hardness and shear tension tests. In addition, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the spot welded joint was measured by Charpy impact tests with specimens that had notches in the welded zone.

  4. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  5. Development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and fabrication technologies for Indian test blanket module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T., E-mail: tjk@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2011-10-01

    For the development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel (RAFMS), for the Indian Test Blanket Module for ITER, a 3-phase programme has been adopted. The first phase consists of melting and detailed characterization of a laboratory scale heat conforming to Eurofer 97 composition, to demonstrate the capability of the Indian industry for producing fusion grade steel. In the second phase which is currently in progress, the chemical composition will be optimized with respect to tungsten and tantalum for better combination of mechanical properties. Characterization of the optimized commercial scale India-specific RAFM steel will be carried out in the third phase. The first phase of the programme has been successfully completed and the tensile, impact and creep properties are comparable with Eurofer 97. Laser and electron beam welding parameters have been optimized and welding consumables were developed for Narrow Gap - Gas Tungsten Arc welding and for laser-hybrid welding.

  6. TIG of Reduced Activation Ferrite/Martensitic Steel for the Korean ITER-TBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, Duck Young; Ahn, Mu Young; Yu, In Keun; Cho, Seun Gyon; Oh, Seung Jin

    2010-01-01

    Test Blanket Modules (TBM) will be tested in ITER to verify the capability of tritium breeding and recovery and the extraction of thermal energy suitable for the production of electricity. A Helium Cooled Solid Breeder (HCSB) TBM has been developed in Korea to accomplish these goals. Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel has been chosen as the primary candidate structural material for Korean TBM. Due to the complexity of the First wall (FW) and Side wall (SW), it is necessary to develop various joining technologies, such as Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding, for the successful fabrication of TBM. In this study, the mechanical properties of TIG welded RAFM steel were investigated. Various mechanical tests of TIG-welded RAFM steel were performed to obtain the optimized TIG welding process for RAFM steel

  7. TIG of Reduced Activation Ferrite/Martensitic Steel for the Korean ITER-TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, Duck Young; Ahn, Mu Young; Yu, In Keun; Cho, Seun Gyon [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Jin [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Test Blanket Modules (TBM) will be tested in ITER to verify the capability of tritium breeding and recovery and the extraction of thermal energy suitable for the production of electricity. A Helium Cooled Solid Breeder (HCSB) TBM has been developed in Korea to accomplish these goals. Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel has been chosen as the primary candidate structural material for Korean TBM. Due to the complexity of the First wall (FW) and Side wall (SW), it is necessary to develop various joining technologies, such as Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding, for the successful fabrication of TBM. In this study, the mechanical properties of TIG welded RAFM steel were investigated. Various mechanical tests of TIG-welded RAFM steel were performed to obtain the optimized TIG welding process for RAFM steel

  8. Technical issues of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fabrication of ITER test blanket modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Hirose, T.; Shiba, K.; Kasada, R.; Wakai, E.; Serizawa, H.; Kawahito, Y.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Katayama, S.; Mori, H.; Nishimoto, K.; Klueh, R.L.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E.; Zinkle, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems. The RAFM F82H was developed in Japan with emphasis on high-temperature properties and weldability. Extensive irradiation studies have conducted on F82H, and it has the most extensive available database of irradiated and unirradiated properties of all RAFMs. The objective of this paper is to review the R and D status of F82H and to identify the key technical issues for the fabrication of an ITER test blanket module (TBM) suggested from the recent research achievements in Japan. This work clarified that the primary issues with F82H involve welding techniques and the mechanical properties of weld joints. This is the result of the distinctive nature of the joint caused by the phase transformation that occurs in the weld joint during cooling, and its impact on the design of a TBM will be discussed

  9. Thermo-mechanical fatigue behavior of reduced activation ferrite/martensite stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, C.; Rodrian, D.

    2002-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical cycling fatigue (TMCF) behavior of reduced activation ferrite/martensite stainless steels is examined. The test rig consists of a stiff load frame, which is directly heated by the digitally controlled ohmic heating device. Cylindrical specimens are used with a wall thickness of 0.4 mm. Variable strain rates are applied at TMCF test mode, due to the constant heating rate of 5.8 K/s and variable temperature changes. TMCF results of as received EUROFER 97 in the temperature range between 100 and 500-600 deg. C show a reduction in life time (a factor of 2) compared to F82H mod. and OPTIFER IV. TMCF-experiments with hold times of 100 and 1000 s show dramatic reduction in life time for all three materials

  10. Radiation effects on low cycle fatigue properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, T.; Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M.; Kohyama, A.; Katoh, Y.; Narui, M.

    2002-01-01

    The reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, RAFs F82H IEA heat has been fatigue-tested at ambient temperature under diametral strain controlled conditions. In order to evaluate the effects of radiation damage and transmutation damage on fatigue characteristics, post-neutron irradiation and post-helium ion implantation fatigue tests were carried out. Fracture surfaces and fatigue crack initiation on the specimen surface were observed by SEM. Low-temperature irradiation caused an increase in stress amplitude and a reduction in fatigue lifetime corresponding to radiation hardening and loss of ductility. Neutron irradiated samples showed brittle fracture surface, and it was significant for large strain tests. On the other hand, helium implantation caused delay of cyclic softening. However, brittle crack initiation and propagation did not depend on the helium concentration profiles

  11. Investigation on the Enhanced Oxidation of Ferritic/Martensitic Steel P92 in Pure Steam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntao Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of ferritic/martensitic steel P92 was investigated in pure oxygen and in pure steam at 600–800 °C by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results showed that the oxidation of P92 was significantly enhanced and multilayer scale with an outer iron oxides layer formed in pure steam. At 700 °C, the gas switch markedly influenced the scaling kinetics and scale microstructure. It was supposed that the higher affinity of iron to steam would be attributed to the enhanced oxidation of P92 in pure steam, and the much easier transport of hydroxyl would account for the significant difference induced by gas switch.

  12. Mechanical characterization of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel of spanish production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, D.; Serrano, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows the first results concerning the characterization of two heats of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFM) made in Spain, called AF1B and AF2A. The results of this characterization are compared with their European counterparts, EUROFER97-2, which was chosen as reference material. All activities described were performed in the Structural Materials Unit of CIEMAT, within the national project TECNO-FUS CONSOLIDER INGENIO.The two Spanish heats have the same production process and heat treatment. Both heats have a similar tensile behaviour similar to EUROFER97-2, but on the other hand impact properties are lower. The microstructure of AF1B reveals large biphasic inclusions that affecting its mechanical properties, especially the impact properties. AF2A casting was free of these inclusions. (Author) 24 refs.

  13. Development of an extensive database of mechanical properties for Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Ando, M.; Wakai, E.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hirose, T.; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Klueh, R.L.; Sokolov, M.; Stoller, R.; Zinklek, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G.; Kurtz, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems, as they have been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. F82H (8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.04Ta-0.1C) and JLF-1 (9Cr-2W-0.2V-0.08Ta-0.1C) are RAFMs, which have been developed and studied in Japan and the various effects of irradiation were reported. F82H is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the IEA fusion materials development collaboration. The Japan/US collaboration program also has been conducted with the emphasis on heavy irradiation effects of F82H, JLF-1 and ORNL9Cr2WVTa over the past two decades using Fast Flux Testing Facility (FFTF) of PNNL and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL, and the irradiation condition of the irradiation capsules of those reactors were precisely controlled by the well matured capsule designing and instrumentation. Now, among the existing database for RAFMs the most extensive one is that for F82H. The objective of this paper is to review the database status of RAFMs, mainly on F82H, to identify the key issues for the future development of database. Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies before and after irradiation are summarized. (authors)

  14. Interfacial properties of HIP joint between beryllium and reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, T.; Ogiwara, H.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: ITER test blanket module is the most important components to validate energy production and fuel breeding process for future demonstration reactor. Reduced activation ferritic / martensitic steel is recognized as a promising structural material for breeding blanket systems. And Beryllium must be used as plasma facing materials for ITER in vessel components. In this work, interfacial properties of beryllium/reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAF/Ms) joint were investigated for a first wall of ITER test blanket module (TBM). The starting materials were ITER grade Beryllium, S65C and a Japanese RAF/M, F82H. The joint was produced by solid state hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method. Chromium layer with the thickness of 1 μm and 10 μm were formed by plasma vapor deposition on the beryllium surface as a diffusion barrier. The HIP was carried out at 1023 K and 1233 K which are determined by standard normalizing and tempering temperature of F82H. The joint made at 1233 K was followed by tempering at 1033 K. The bonding interface was characterized by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The bonding strength was also investigated by isometric four point bending tests at ambient temperature. EPMA showed chromium layer effectively worked as a diffusion barrier at 1023 K. However, the beryllium rich layer was formed in F82H after HIP at 1233 K followed by tempering. Bending tests revealed that thin chromium layer and low temperature HIP is preferable. The high temperature HIP introduce brittle BeFe inter metallic compounds along bonding interface. On the other hand, joint with thick chromium layer suffer from brittleness of chromium itself. (authors)

  15. Interfacial properties of HIP joint between beryllium and reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Ogiwara, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Enoeda, M. [Naka Fusion Research Establishment, J.A.E.R.I., Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: ITER test blanket module is the most important components to validate energy production and fuel breeding process for future demonstration reactor. Reduced activation ferritic / martensitic steel is recognized as a promising structural material for breeding blanket systems. And Beryllium must be used as plasma facing materials for ITER in vessel components. In this work, interfacial properties of beryllium/reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAF/Ms) joint were investigated for a first wall of ITER test blanket module (TBM). The starting materials were ITER grade Beryllium, S65C and a Japanese RAF/M, F82H. The joint was produced by solid state hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method. Chromium layer with the thickness of 1 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m were formed by plasma vapor deposition on the beryllium surface as a diffusion barrier. The HIP was carried out at 1023 K and 1233 K which are determined by standard normalizing and tempering temperature of F82H. The joint made at 1233 K was followed by tempering at 1033 K. The bonding interface was characterized by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The bonding strength was also investigated by isometric four point bending tests at ambient temperature. EPMA showed chromium layer effectively worked as a diffusion barrier at 1023 K. However, the beryllium rich layer was formed in F82H after HIP at 1233 K followed by tempering. Bending tests revealed that thin chromium layer and low temperature HIP is preferable. The high temperature HIP introduce brittle BeFe inter metallic compounds along bonding interface. On the other hand, joint with thick chromium layer suffer from brittleness of chromium itself. (authors)

  16. Development of an extensive database of mechanical properties for Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Ando, M.; Wakai, E.; Jitsukawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy (Japan); Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Klueh, R.L. [0ak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States); Sokolov, M.; Stoller, R.; Zinklek, S. [0ak Ridge Noational Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States); Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G. [UCSB, Dept. of Chemical Engineering UCSB, Santa-Barbara (United States); Kurtz, R.J. [Pacifie Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems, as they have been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. F82H (8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.04Ta-0.1C) and JLF-1 (9Cr-2W-0.2V-0.08Ta-0.1C) are RAFMs, which have been developed and studied in Japan and the various effects of irradiation were reported. F82H is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the IEA fusion materials development collaboration. The Japan/US collaboration program also has been conducted with the emphasis on heavy irradiation effects of F82H, JLF-1 and ORNL9Cr2WVTa over the past two decades using Fast Flux Testing Facility (FFTF) of PNNL and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL, and the irradiation condition of the irradiation capsules of those reactors were precisely controlled by the well matured capsule designing and instrumentation. Now, among the existing database for RAFMs the most extensive one is that for F82H. The objective of this paper is to review the database status of RAFMs, mainly on F82H, to identify the key issues for the future development of database. Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies before and after irradiation are summarized. (authors)

  17. Evaluation of Microstructural and Mechanical Property of Medium-sized HT9 Cladding Forged Material for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Lee, Kang Soo; Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Chan Bock

    2012-01-01

    Microstructural and mechanical property were evaluated at the medium-sized HT9 (12Cr-1MoWV) forged steel which was considered as primary candidate for the fuel cladding in sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). Material was forged at 1170 degrees C after the induction melting to make round bar as 160 mm diameter, 7000 mm length then the radial distribution of microstructure as well as microhardness was evaluated. The results showed that overall microstructure exhibited as ferrite-martensite structure, where small amount (2-3%) of delta ferrite was formed throughout the specimen and maximum 15% of transformed ferrite was formed at the center, where it gradually decreased toward the radial direction. Sensitivity analysis of the cooling curve and Time-Temperature-Transformation (TTT) diagram revealed that formation of transformed ferrite could be avoided when the diameter was decreased down to 120 mm.

  18. Energy-filtered TEM imaging and EELS study of ODS particles and argon-filled cavities in ferritic-martensitic steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimiankou, M; Lindau, R; Möslang, A

    2005-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels with yttrium oxide (Y(2)O(3)) have been produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing for use as advanced material in fusion power reactors. Argon gas, usually widely used as inert gas during mechanical alloying, was surprisingly detected in the nanodispersion-strengthened materials. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) led to the following results: (i) chemical composition of ODS particles, (ii) voids with typical diameters of 1-6 nm are formed in the matrix, (iii) these voids are filled with Ar gas, and (iv) the high-density nanosized ODS particles serve as trapping centers for the Ar bubbles. The Ar L(3,2) energy loss edge at 245 eV as well as the absorption features of the ODS particle elements were identified in the EELS spectrum. The energy resolution in the EEL spectrum of about 1.0 eV allows to identify the electronic structure of the ODS particles.

  19. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S.Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  20. Irradiation experience with HT9-clad metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The safe and reliable performance of metallic fuel is currently under study and demonstration in the Integral Fast Reactor program. In-reactor tests of HT9-clad metallic fuel have now reached maturity and have all shown good performance characteristics to burnups exceeding 17.5 at. % in the lead assembly. Because this low-swelling tempered martensitic alloy is the cladding of choice for high fluence applications, the experimental observations and performance modelling efforts reported in this paper play an important role in demonstrating reliability

  1. High Temperature Elastic Properties of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) Steel Using Impulse Excitation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Raju, Subramanian; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Saibaba, Saroja

    2018-03-01

    The polycrystalline elastic constants of an indigenous variant of 9Cr-1W-based reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel have been determined as a function of temperature from 298 K to 1323 K (25 °C to 1000 °C), using impulse excitation technique (IET). The three elastic constants namely, Young's modulus E, shear modulus G, and bulk modulus B, exhibited significant softening with increasing temperature, in a pronounced non-linear fashion. In addition, clearly marked discontinuities in their temperature variations are noticed in the region, where ferrite + carbides → austenite phase transformation occurred upon heating. Further, the incidence of austenite → martensite transformation upon cooling has also been marked by a step-like jump in both elastic E and shear moduli G. The martensite start M s and M f finish temperatures estimated from this study are, M s = 652 K (379 °C) and M f =580 K (307 °C). Similarly, the measured ferrite + carbide → austenite transformation onset ( Ac 1) and completion ( Ac 3) temperatures are found to be 1126 K and 1143 K (853 °C and 870 °C), respectively. The Poisson ratio μ exhibited distinct discontinuities at phase transformation temperatures; but however, is found to vary in the range 0.27 to 0.29. The room temperature estimates of E, G, and μ for normalized and tempered microstructure are found to be 219 GPa, 86.65 GPa, and 0.27, respectively. For the metastable austenite phase, the corresponding values are: 197 GPa, 76.5 GPa, and 0.29, respectively. The measured elastic properties as well as their temperature dependencies are found to be in good accord with reported estimates for other 9Cr-based ferritic-martensitic steel grades. Estimates of θ D el , the elastic Debye temperature and γ G, the thermal Grüneisen parameter obtained from measured bulk elastic properties are found to be θ D el = 465 K (192 °C) and γ G = 1.57.

  2. Microstructural probing of ferritic/martensitic steels using internal transmutation-based positron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krsjak, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.krsjak@psi.ch; Dai, Yong

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents the use of an internal {sup 44}Ti/{sup 44}Sc radioisotope source for a direct microstructural characterization of ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steels after irradiation in targets of spallation neutron sources. Gamma spectroscopy measurements show a production of ∼1MBq of {sup 44}Ti per 1 g of f/m steels irradiated at 1 dpa (displaced per atom) in the mixed proton–neutron spectrum at the Swiss spallation neutron source (SINQ). In the decay chain {sup 44}Ti → {sup 44}Sc → {sup 44}Ca, positrons are produced together with prompt gamma rays which enable the application of different positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) analyses, including lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Due to the high production yield, long half-life and relatively high energy of positrons of {sup 44}Ti, this methodology opens up new potential for simple, effective and inexpensive characterization of radiation induced defects in f/m steels irradiated in a spallation target.

  3. Progress of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A.; Ukai, S.; Sawai, T.; Wakai, E.; Shiba, K.; Miwa, Y.; Furuya, K.; Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent accomplishment by the Japanese activity for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAF/M) development has been reviewed. Some of the results obtained in EU and US by international collaborative activities are also introduced. Effect of irradiation on the shift of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been evaluated to a dose of 20dpa. Results suggest that RAF/M appears to satisfy the requirement on DBTT-shift for the blanket application in the dose range up to several tens of dpa. Also, enhancement effect of DBTT-shift by transmutation produced helium (He) atoms was revealed to be smaller than has been suggested previously. Preliminary studies about the effect of irradiation on fatigue mechanism, the susceptibility to environmentally assisted cracking in water and flow stress-strain relation have been conducted for the specimens irradiated to several dpa, including the post irradiation tensile property examination of the joints by Hot-isostatic press (HIP) bonding method. The results also indicate that RAF/Ms exhibit suitable properties for ITER test blanket module. (author)

  4. Development of ferritic-martensitic P9 steel for wrapper application in future SFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, B.K.; Mathew, M.D.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Moitra, A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the outcome of the research and development efforts directed towards the development of ferritic-martensitic P9 steel for wrapper application in future sodium cooled fast reactors with an objective to achieve high fuel burnup and more economical nuclear energy. The important and critical issues involved for the development of P9 wrappers such as optimisation of chemical composition in terms of trace elements like sulphur and phosphorous and appropriate thermo-mechanical treatments along with thermal ageing and irradiation effects on fracture properties have been discussed. Tensile properties evaluated at temperatures ranging from 300 to 873 K on the experimental three heats of P9 steel with different silicon contents and made using primary vacuum induction melting followed by secondary electro slag refining route, have been presented. Fracture behaviour examined mainly in terms of ductile to brittle transition temperature and upper shelf energy provided encouraging results. Based on these investigations, a roadmap has been drawn to make experimental P9 steel wrappers for tests in fast breeder test reactor and prototype fast breeder reactor. (author)

  5. Formation of alumina-aluminide coatings on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, alumina-aluminide coatings were formed on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel substrate. First, coatings of aluminum were deposited electrochemically on T91 steel in a room temperature AlCl3-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquid, then the obtained coating was subjected to a two stage heat treatment procedure consisting of prolonged heat treatment of the sample in vacuum at 300 ○C followed by oxidative heat treatment in air at 650 ○C for 16 hours. X-ray diffraction measurement of the oxidatively heat treated samples indicated formation of Fe-Al and Cr-Al intermetallics and presence of amorphous alumina. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurement confirmed 50 wt- % O in the oxidized coating. Microscratch adhesion test conducted on alumina-aluminide coating formed on T91 steel substrate showed no major adhesive detachment up to 20 N loads. However, adhesive failure was observed at a few discrete points on the coating along the scratch track.

  6. Thermal and mechanical behaviour of the reduced-activation-ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindau, R.; Moeslang, A.; Schirra, M.

    2002-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are being considered for structural application in potential fusion energy systems. Based on the substantial experience with RAFM developmental steels of OPTIFER type, an industrial 3.5 tons batch of a 9CrWVTa-RAFM steel, called EUROFER 97 had been specified and ordered. A characterisation programme has been launched to determine the relevant mechanical and physical-metallurgical properties in order to qualify the steel for fusion application. The hardening, tempering and transformation behaviour of EUROFER is in good agreement with that of other RAFM-steels like OPTIFER and the Japanese industrial scale heat F82H mod. Tensile tests, performed between RT and 750 deg. C, show comparable strength and ductility values that are not strongly affected by different heat treatments and ageing at 580 and 600 deg. C up to 3300 h. Impact bending tests indicate a superior ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of EUROFER in the as-received condition compared with that of F82H mod. Creep tests between 450 and 650 deg. C up to test times of 15000 h reveal a creep strength similar to other RAFM steels like OPTIFER and F82H mod. EUROFER shows a good low-cycle fatigue behaviour with longer lifetimes than F82H mod. The deformation and softening behaviour is similar

  7. Bootstrap calculation of ultimate strength temperature maxima for neutron irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obraztsov, S. M.; Konobeev, Yu. V.; Birzhevoy, G. A.; Rachkov, V. I.

    2006-12-01

    The dependence of mechanical properties of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels on irradiation temperature is of interest because these steels are used as structural materials for fast, fusion reactors and accelerator driven systems. Experimental data demonstrating temperature peaks in physical and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated pure iron, nickel, vanadium, and austenitic stainless steels are available in the literature. A lack of such an information for F/M steels forces one to apply a computational mathematical-statistical modeling methods. The bootstrap procedure is one of such methods that allows us to obtain the necessary statistical characteristics using only a sample of limited size. In the present work this procedure is used for modeling the frequency distribution histograms of ultimate strength temperature peaks in pure iron and Russian F/M steels EP-450 and EP-823. Results of fitting the sums of Lorentz or Gauss functions to the calculated distributions are presented. It is concluded that there are two temperature (at 360 and 390 °C) peaks of the ultimate strength in EP-450 steel and single peak at 390 °C in EP-823.

  8. Compatibility Behavior of the Ferritic-Martensitic Steel Cladding under the Liquid Sodium Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Chan Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Fuel cladding is a component which confines uranium fuel to transport energy into the coolant as well as protect radioactive species from releasing outside. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) has been considered as one of the most probable next generation reactors in Korea because it can maximize uranium resource as well as reduce the amount of PWR spent fuel in conjunction with pyroprocessing. Sodium has been selected as the coolant of the SFR because of its superior fast neutron efficiency as well as thermal conductivity, which enables high power core design. However, it is reported that the fuel cladding materials like austenitic and ferritic stainless steel react sodium coolant so that the loss of the thickness, intergranular attack, and carburization or decarburization process may happen to induce the change of the mechanical property of the cladding. This study aimed to evaluate material property of the cladding material under the liquid sodium environment. Ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) coupon and cladding tube were exposed at the flowing sodium then the microstructural and mechanical property were evaluated. mechanical property of the cladding was evaluated using the ring tension test

  9. Evaluation of creep rupture property of high strength ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehira, Akihiro; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Ukai, Shigeharu; Yoshida, Eiichi

    1999-04-01

    High Strength Ferritic/Martensitic Steel (PNC-FMS : 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W,Nb,V), developed by JNC, is one of the candidate materials for the long-life core of large-scale fast breeder reactor. The material design base standard (tentative) of PNC-FMS was established and the creep rupture strength reduction factor in the standard was determined in 1992. This factor was based on only evaluation of decarburization effect on tensile strength after sodium exposure. In this study, creep rupture properties of PNC-FMS under out of pile sodium exposure and in pile were evaluated, using recent test results as well as previous ones. The evaluation results are summarized as follows : a. Decarburization rate constant of pressurized tubes under sodium exposure is identical with stress free specimens. b. In case of the same decarburization content under out of pile sodium exposure, creep strength tends to decrease more significantly than tensile strength. c. Creep strength under out of pile sodium exposure showed significant decrease in high temperature and long exposure time, but in pile (MOTA) creep strength showed little decrease. A new creep rupture strength reduction factor, which is the ratio of creep rupture strength under sodium exposure or in pile to in air, was made by correlating the creep rupture strength. This new method directly using the ratio of creep rupture strength was evaluated and discussed from the viewpoint of design applicability, compared with the conventional method based on decarburization effect on tensile strength. (author)

  10. Compatibility of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels with liquid breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Nagasaka, T.; Kondo, M.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Suzuki, A.; Terai, T.

    2008-10-01

    The compatibility of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel (RAFM) with liquid Li and molten-salt Flibe have been characterized and accessed. Static compatibility tests were carried out in which the specimens were immersed into liquid Li or Flibe in isothermal autoclaves. Also carried out were compatibility tests in flowing liquid Li by thermal convection loops. In the case of liquid Li, the corrosion rate increased with temperature significantly. The corrosion was almost one order larger for the loop tests than for the static tests. Chemical analysis showed that the corrosion was enhanced when the level of N in Li is increased. Transformation from martensitic to ferritic phase and the resulting softening were observed in near-surface area of Li-exposed specimens, which were shown to be induced by decarburization. In the case of Flibe, the corrosion loss was much larger in a Ni crucible than in a RAFM crucible. Both fluorides and oxides were observed on the surfaces. Thus, the key corrosion process of Flibe is the competing process of fluoridation and oxidation. Possible mechanism of the enhanced corrosion in Ni crucible is electrochemical circuit effect. It was suggested that the corrosion loss rate of RAFM by liquid Li and Flibe can be reduced by reducing the level of impurity N in Li and avoiding the use of dissimilar materials in Flibe, respectively. (author)

  11. Fatigue life assessment based on crack growth behavior in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Shuhei; Sato, Yuki; Hasegawa, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Crack growth behavior under low cycle fatigue in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H IEA-heat (Fe-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.02Ta), was investigated to improve the fatigue life assessment method of fusion reactor structural material. Low cycle fatigue test was carried out at room temperature in air at a total strain range of 0.4-1.5% using an hourglass-type miniature fatigue specimen. The relationship between the surface crack length and life fraction was described using one equation independent of the total strain range. Therefore, the fatigue life and residual life could be estimated using the surface crack length. Moreover, the microcrack initiation life could be estimated using the total strain range if there was a one-to-one correspondence between the total strain range and number of cycles to failure. The crack growth rate could be estimated using the total strain range and surface crack length by introducing the concept of the normalized crack growth rate. (author)

  12. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  13. Microstructural stability of fast reactor irradiated 10 to 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Stoter, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    The strength and microstructural stability of three 10 to 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic stainless steels have been characterized following fast reactor irradiation to damage levels of 30 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures in the range 380 to 615 0 C. Irradiation results in either increases or decreases in room temperature hardness depending on the irradiation temperature. These strength changes can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of the combined effects of irradiation-induced interstitial dislocation loop formation and recovery of the dislocation networks comprising the initial tempered martensite structures. Precipitate evolution in the irradiated steels is associated with the nonequilibrium segregation of the elements nickel, silicon, molybdenum, chromium and phosphorus, brought about by solute-point defect interactions. The principal irradiation-induced precipitates identified are M 6 X, intermetallic chi and sigma phases and also α' (Cr-rich ferrite). The implications of the observed microstructural changes on the selection of martensitic stainless steels for fast reactor wrapper applications are briefly considered

  14. Ion-irradiation-induced microstructural modifications in ferritic/martensitic steel T91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang; Miao, Yinbin; Li, Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, in situ transmission electron microscopy investigations were carried out to study the microstructural evolution of ferritic/martensitic steel T91 under 1 MeV Krypton ion irradiation up to 4.2 x 10(15) ions/cm(2) at 573 K, 673 K, and 773 K. At 573 K, grown-in defects are strongly modified by black dot loops, and dislocation networks together with black-dot loops were observed after irradiation. At 673 K and 773 K, grown-in defects are only partially modified by dislocation loops; isolated loops and dislocation segments were commonly found after irradiation. Post irradiation examination indicates that at 4.2 x 1015 ions/cm(2), about 51% of the loops were a(0)/2 < 111 > type for the 673 K irradiation, and the dominant loop type was a(0)< 100 > for the 773 K irradiation. Finally, a dispersed barrier hardening model was employed to estimate the change in yield strength, and the calculated ion data were found to follow the similar trend as the existing neutron data with an offset of 100-150 MPa. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of Prior Fatigue Cycling on Creep Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Aritra; Vijayanand, V. D.; Parameswaran, P.; Shankar, Vani; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-06-01

    Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) and 210 MPa on Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel which was subjected to different extents of prior fatigue exposure at 823 K at a strain amplitude of ±0.6 pct to assess the effect of prior fatigue exposure on creep behavior. Extensive cyclic softening that characterized the fatigue damage was found to be immensely deleterious for creep strength of the tempered martensitic steel. Creep rupture life was reduced to 60 pct of that of the virgin steel when the steel was exposed to as low as 1 pct of fatigue life. However, creep life saturated after fatigue exposure of 40 pct. Increase in minimum creep rate and decrease in creep rupture ductility with a saturating trend were observed with prior fatigue exposures. To substantiate these findings, detailed transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out on the steel. With fatigue exposures, extensive recovery of martensitic-lath structure was distinctly observed which supported the cyclic softening behavior that was introduced due to prior fatigue. Consequently, prior fatigue exposures were considered responsible for decrease in creep ductility and associated reduction in the creep rupture strength.

  16. Multiscale simulation of yield strength in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chen Chong; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Zhigang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Zhao, Ji Jun [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology and College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2017-04-15

    One of the important requirements for the application of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel is to retain proper mechanical properties under irradiation and high-temperature conditions. To simulate the yield strength and stress-strain curve of steels during high-temperature and irradiation conditions, a multiscale simulation method consisting of both microstructure and strengthening simulations was established. The simulation results of microstructure parameters were added to a superposition strengthening model, which consisted of constitutive models of different strengthening methods. Based on the simulation results, the strength contribution for different strengthening methods at both room temperature and high-temperature conditions was analyzed. The simulation results of the yield strength in irradiation and high-temperature conditions were mainly consistent with the experimental results. The optimal application field of this multiscale model was 9Cr series (7–9 wt.%Cr) RAFM steels in a condition characterized by 0.1–5 dpa (or 0 dpa) and a temperature range of 25–500°C.

  17. Development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Choi, B. K.; Han, C. H.; Lee, D. W.; Cho, S.; Kim, T. K.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1980s research programs for development of low activation materials began. This is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guidelines (10CFR part 61) that were developed to reduce longlived radioactive isotopes, which allows nuclear reactor waste to be disposed of by shallow land burial when removed from service. Development of low activation materials is also key issue in nuclear fusion systems, as the structural components can became radioactive due to nuclear transmutation caused by exposure to high dose neutron irradiation. Reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed in the leading countries in nuclear fusion technology, and are now being considered as candidate structural material for the test blanket module (TBM) in the international thermonuclear experiment reactor (ITER). South Korea joined the ITER program in 2003 and since then extensive effort has been made for developing the helium-cooled solid-breeder (HCSB) TBM which is scheduled to be tested in the ITER program. However, there has been no research activity to develop RAFM steels in South Korea, while all the participants in the ITER program have developed their own RAFM steels. It is recently that the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started the Korean RAFM steel research program, aiming at an application for the HCSB-type TBM structure in ITER. In what follows, the current status of RAFM steels and the R and D program led by KAERI to develop Korean RAFM steels are summarized

  18. Evaluation of mechanical properties of weldments for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, T. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineeering, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Komazaki, S.; Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are the first candidate material for fusion reactor, and will be used as the structural materials of ITER test blanket modules (TBM). TBM will be assembled by welding various parts, it is important to be clearly mechanical properties of weldments to qualify TBM structure. In this paper, unirradiated mechanical properties of weldments, which is consisted of weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal region, obtained from TIG and EB welded F82H IEA-heat were evaluated by tensile, Charpy impact and creep test. Charpy impact test revealed that impact properties of weld metal does not deteriorate compared with that of base metal. The creep tests were carried out at temperatures of 773-873 K and at stress levels of 130-280 MPa, with the specimens which include weld metal and HAZ region in the gage section. In these conditions, rupture time of weldments yield to about 100-1000 hours. In the high-stress range, creep lives of welded joint decreased about 40% of base metal. However, in the low-stress range, creep lives of welded joint decrease about 60 to 70% of base metal. The failure at fine grain HAZ region (Type IV failure) does not occur in these conditions. The mechanism of these properties deterioration will be discussed based on the detailed analyses on microstructure changes. (authors)

  19. Effect of helium on fatigue crack growth and life of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Shuhei; Takahashi, Manabu; Hasegawa, Akira; Yamazaki, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    The effects of helium on the fatigue life, micro-crack growth behavior up to final fatigue failure, and fracture mode under fatigue in the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H IEA-heat, were investigated by low cycle fatigue tests at room temperature in air at a total strain range of 0.6–1.5%. Significant reduction of the fatigue life due to helium implantation was observed for a total strain range of 1.0–1.5%, which might be attributable to an increase in the micro-crack propagation rate. However, the reduction of fatigue life due to helium implantation was not significant for a total strain range of 0.6–0.8%. A brittle fracture surface (an original point of micro-crack initiation) and a cleavage fracture surface were observed in the helium-implanted region of fracture surface. A striation pattern was observed in the non-implanted region. These fracture modes of the helium-implanted specimen were independent of the strain range

  20. Technical issues of fabrication technologies of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Hirose, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The key technical issues of RAFM steel fabrication are the control of Ta, and deoxidation of the steel with a limited amount of Al addition. • Addition of Ta with poor deoxidation might results in the agglomeration of inclusions at 1/2t position. • ESR was proved to be effective removing Ta oxide inclusions and avoiding agglomeration of inclusions at 1/2t position, and achieving low oxygen concentration. -- Abstract: The key issue for DEMO application is that Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels fabrication technologies has to be highly assured, especially with respect to high availability, reliability and reduced activation capability on the DEMO level fabrication, which requires not a few tons but thousand tons RAFM fabrication. One of the key technical issues of RAFM fabrication is the control of Ta, and deoxidation of the steel with a limited amount of Al addition. The series of F82H (Fe–8Cr–2W–V, Ta) melting revealed that Ta have tendency to form oxide on melting process, and this will have large impact on reliability of the steels. Al is also the key elements, as it is commonly used for deoxidation of steels, and achieving lower oxygen level is essential to obtain good mechanical properties, but the maximum concentration of Al is limited in view of reduced activation capability. These tendency and limitation resulted in the Ta oxide agglomeration in the middle of plate, but the remelting process, ESR (electro slag remelting), was found to be successful on removing those Ta oxides

  1. Current status of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels R and D for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akihiko

    2005-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF/M) steels have been considered to be the prime candidate for the fusion blanket structural material. The irradiation data obtained up to now indicates rather high feasibility of the steels for application to fusion reactors because of their high resistance to degradation of material performance caused by both the irradiation-induced displacement damage and transmutation helium atoms. The martensitic structure of RAF/M steels consists of a large number of lattice defects before the irradiation, which strongly retards the formation of displacement damage through absorption and annihilation of the point defects generated by irradiation. Transmutation helium can be also trapped at those defects in the martensitic structure so that the growth of helium bubbles at grain boundaries is suppressed. The major properties of the steels are well within our knowledge, and processing technologies are mostly developed for fusion application. RAF/M steels are now certainly ready to proceed to the next stage, that is, the construction of International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor Test Blanket Modules (ITER-TBM). Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels have been developed for higher thermal efficiency of fusion power plants. Recent irradiation experiments indicated that the steels were quite highly resistant to neutron irradiation embrittlement, showing hardening accompanied by no loss of ductility. High-Cr ODS steels whose chromium concentration was in the range from 14 to 19 mass% showed high resistance to corrosion in supercritical pressurized water. It is shown that the 14Cr-ODS steel is susceptible to neither hydrogen nor helium embrittlement. A combined utilization of ODS steels with RAF/M steels will be effective to realize fusion power early at a reasonable thermal efficiency. (author)

  2. Hardening and embrittlement mechanisms of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated at 573 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States); Hashimoto, N. [Hokkaido Univ., Materials Science and Engineering Div., Graduate School of Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Sokolov, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been reported that reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs), such as F82H, ORNL9Cr-2WVTa, and JLF-1, showed a variety of changes in ductile-brittle transition temperature and yield stress after irradiation at 573 K up to 5 dpa, and those differences could not be interpreted solely by the difference of dislocation microstructure induced by irradiation. To investigate the impact of other microstructural feature, i.e. precipitates, the precipitation behavior of F82H, ORNL 9Cr-2WVTa, and JLF-1 was examined. It was revealed that irradiation-induced precipitation and amorphization of precipitates partly occurred and caused the different precipitation on block, packet and prior austenitic grain boundaries. In addition to these phenomena, irradiation-induced nano-size precipitates were also observed in the matrix. It was also revealed that the chemical compositions of precipitates approached the calculated thermal equilibrium state of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} at an irradiation temperature of 573 K. The calculation also suggests the presence of Laves phase at 573 K, which is usually not observed at this temperature, but the ion irradiation on aged F82H with Laves phase suggests that Laves phase becomes amorphous and could not be stable under irradiation at 573 K. This observation indicates the possibility that the irradiation-induced nano-size precipitation could be the consequence of the conflict between precipitation and amorphization of Laves phase. Over all, these observations suggests that the variety of embrittlement and hardening of RAFMs observed at 573 K irradiation up to 5 dpa might be the consequence of the transition phenomena that occur as the microstructure approaches thermal equilibrium during irradiation at 573 K. (authors)

  3. It was the demonstration of industrial steel production capacity ferritic-martensitic Spanish ASTURFER scale demand ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coto, R.; Serrano, M.; Moran, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Artimez, J. A.; Belzunce, J.; Sedano, L.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) structural steels are considered as candidate materials with notable possibilities to be incorporated to fusion reactor ITER, nowadays under construction, and future fusion reactor DEMO, involving a notable forecasting of supply materials, with a considerable limitation due to the few number of furnishes currently on the market. The manufacture at an industrial scale of the ASTURFER steel, developed at laboratory scale by ITMA Materials Technology and the Structural Materials Division of the Technology Division of CIEMAT would be a significant business opportunity for steelwork companies.

  4. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements of austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the SINQ target irradiation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Dai, Y.; Kikuchi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Titanium-doped austenitic stainless steel (JPCA) and reduced activated ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) irradiated with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons were investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. Subnanometer-sized (steel, the positron annihilation lifetime of the bubbles decreased with increasing irradiation dose and annealing temperature because the bubbles absorb additional He atoms. In the case of JPCA steel, the positron annihilation lifetime increased with increasing annealing temperature above 773 K, in which case the dissociation of complexes of vacancy clusters with He atoms and the growth of He bubbles was detected. He bubble size and density were also discussed.

  5. Fractographic examination of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel charpy specimens irradiated to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schubert, L.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Fractographic examinations are reported for a series of reduced activation ferritic/Martensitic steel Charpy impact specimens tested following irradiation to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C in FFTF. One-third size specimens of six low activation steels developed for potential application as structural materials in fusion reactors were examined. A shift in brittle fracture appearance from cleavage to grain boundary failure was noted with increasing manganese content. The results are interpreted in light of transmutation induced composition changes in a fusion environment.

  6. Irradiation effects on tensile ductility and dynamic toughness of ferritic-martensitic 7-12 Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preininger, D.

    2006-01-01

    The superimposed effect of irradiation-induced hardening by small defects (clusters, dislocation loops) and chromium-rich - precipitate formations on tensile ductility and Charpy-impact behaviour of various ferritic-martensitic (7-13)CrWVTa(Ti)-RAFM steels have been examined by micro-mechanical deformation and ductile/dynamic fracture models. Analytical relations have been deduced describing irradiation-induced changes of uniform ductility and fracture strain as well as ductile-to-brittle transition temperature DBTT and ductile upper shelf energy USE observed from impact tests. The models apply work-hardening with competitive action of relevant dislocation multiplication and annihilation reactions. The impact model takes into account stress intensity with local plasticity and fracture within the damage zone of main crack. Especially, the influences of radiation-induced changes in ductile and dynamic fracture stresses have been considered together with effects from strain rate sensitivity of strength, precipitate morphology as mean size dp and volume fraction fv as well as deformation temperature and strain rate. For these, particularly the correlation between tensile ductility and impact properties have been examined. Strengthening by clusters and loops generally reduces uniform ductility, and more stronger fracture strain as well as ductile upper shelf energy USE and additionally increases DBTT for constant fracture stresses. A superimposed precipitation hardening by formation of 3-6 nm, f v 6 nm, which clear above the sharable limit of coherent precipitates increases with increasing fraction fv and but strongly reduces with increasing matrix strength due to full martensitic structure, higher C, N alloying contents and pronounced hardening by irradiation-induced cluster and loop formations. A combined increase of fracture stresses due to irradiation-induced changes of the grain boundary structure diminishes the strength-induced increase in DBTT and more stronger

  7. Estimation of Oxidation Kinetics and Oxide Scale Void Position of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exfoliation of oxide scales from high-temperature heating surfaces of power boilers threatened the safety of supercritical power generating units. According to available space model, the oxidation kinetics of two ferritic-martensitic steels are developed to predict in supercritical water at 400°C, 500°C, and 600°C. The iron diffusion coefficients in magnetite and Fe-Cr spinel are extrapolated from studies of Backhaus and Töpfer. According to Fe-Cr-O ternary phase diagram, oxygen partial pressure at the steel/Fe-Cr spinel oxide interface is determined. The oxygen partial pressure at the magnetite/supercritical water interface meets the equivalent oxygen partial pressure when system equilibrium has been attained. The relative error between calculated values and experimental values is analyzed and the reasons of error are suggested. The research results show that the results of simulation at 600°C are approximately close to experimental results. The iron diffusion coefficient is discontinuous in the duplex scale of two ferritic-martensitic steels. The simulation results of thicknesses of the oxide scale on tubes (T91 of final superheater of a 600 MW supercritical boiler are compared with field measurement data and calculation results by Adrian’s method. The calculated void positions of oxide scales are in good agreement with a cross-sectional SEM image of the oxide layers.

  8. Behavior of ferritic/martensitic steels after n-irradiation at 200 and 300 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matijasevic, M.; Lucon, E.; Almazouzi, A.

    2008-06-01

    High chromium ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered as the most promising structural materials for accelerator driven systems (ADS). One drawback that needs to be quantified is the significant hardening and embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation at low temperatures with production of spallation elements. In this paper irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of F/M steels have been studied and comparisons are provided between two ferritic/martensitic steels, namely T91 and EUROFER97. Both materials have been irradiated in the BR2 reactor of SCK-CEN/Mol at 300 °C up to doses ranging from 0.06 to 1.5 dpa. Tensile tests results obtained between -160 °C and 300 °C clearly show irradiation hardening (increase of yield and ultimate tensile strengths), as well as reduction of uniform and total elongation. Irradiation effects for EUROFER97 starting from 0.6 dpa are more pronounced compared to T91, showing a significant decrease in work hardening. The results are compared to our latest data that were obtained within a previous program (SPIRE), where T91 had also been irradiated in BR2 at 200 °C (up to 2.6 dpa), and tested between -170 °C and 300 °C. Irradiation effects at lower irradiation temperatures are more significant.

  9. Development of next generation tempered and ODS reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Boutard, J. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Kimura, A.; Lindau, R.; Odette, G. R.; Rieth, M.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, H.

    2017-09-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are currently the most technologically mature option for the structural material of proposed fusion energy reactors. Advanced next-generation higher performance steels offer the opportunity for improvements in fusion reactor operational lifetime and reliability, superior neutron radiation damage resistance, higher thermodynamic efficiency, and reduced construction costs. The two main strategies for developing improved steels for fusion energy applications are based on (1) an evolutionary pathway using computational thermodynamics modelling and modified thermomechanical treatments (TMT) to produce higher performance reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels and (2) a higher risk, potentially higher payoff approach based on powder metallurgy techniques to produce very high strength oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels capable of operation to very high temperatures and with potentially very high resistance to fusion neutron-induced property degradation. The current development status of these next-generation high performance steels is summarized, and research and development challenges for the successful development of these materials are outlined. Material properties including temperature-dependent uniaxial yield strengths, tensile elongations, high-temperature thermal creep, Charpy impact ductile to brittle transient temperature (DBTT) and fracture toughness behaviour, and neutron irradiation-induced low-temperature hardening and embrittlement and intermediate-temperature volumetric void swelling (including effects associated with fusion-relevant helium and hydrogen generation) are described for research heats of the new steels.

  10. Effects of irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.W.; Tanigawa, H.; Hirose, T.; Kohyama, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In materials life decision for a commercial blanket, thermal fatigue property of materials is a particularly important. The loading of structural materials in fusion reactor is, besides the plasma surface interactions, a combined effect of high heat fluxes and neutron irradiation. Depending on the pulse lengths, the operating conditions, and the thermal conductivity, these oscillating temperature gradients will cause elastic and elastic-plastic cyclic deformation giving rise to (creep-) fatigue in structural first wall and blanket components. Especially, investigation of the fatigue property in Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAF/M) steel and establishment of the evaluation technology are demanded in particular immediately for design/manufacturing of ITER-TBM. And also, fatigue testing after irradiation will be carried out in hot cells with remote control system. Considering limited ability of specimen manipulation in the cells, the specimen and the test method need to be simple for operation. The existing data bases of RAF/M steel provide baseline data set including post-irradiation fatigue data. However, to perform the accurate fatigue lifetime assessment for ITER-TBM and beyond utilizing the existing data base, the mechanical understanding of fatigue fracture is mandatory. It has been previously reported by co-authors that dislocation cell structure was developed on low cycle fatigued RAF/M steel, and led the fatigue crack to develop along prior austenitic grain boundary. In this work, the effects of nuclear irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for RAF/M steels and its fracture mechanisms were examined based on the flow stress analysis and detailed microstructure analysis. Fracture surfaces and crack initiation site were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also applied to clarify the microstructural features of fatigue behavior. It is also important to

  11. Effects of irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.W. [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Energy Science (Japan); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In materials life decision for a commercial blanket, thermal fatigue property of materials is a particularly important. The loading of structural materials in fusion reactor is, besides the plasma surface interactions, a combined effect of high heat fluxes and neutron irradiation. Depending on the pulse lengths, the operating conditions, and the thermal conductivity, these oscillating temperature gradients will cause elastic and elastic-plastic cyclic deformation giving rise to (creep-) fatigue in structural first wall and blanket components. Especially, investigation of the fatigue property in Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAF/M) steel and establishment of the evaluation technology are demanded in particular immediately for design/manufacturing of ITER-TBM. And also, fatigue testing after irradiation will be carried out in hot cells with remote control system. Considering limited ability of specimen manipulation in the cells, the specimen and the test method need to be simple for operation. The existing data bases of RAF/M steel provide baseline data set including post-irradiation fatigue data. However, to perform the accurate fatigue lifetime assessment for ITER-TBM and beyond utilizing the existing data base, the mechanical understanding of fatigue fracture is mandatory. It has been previously reported by co-authors that dislocation cell structure was developed on low cycle fatigued RAF/M steel, and led the fatigue crack to develop along prior austenitic grain boundary. In this work, the effects of nuclear irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for RAF/M steels and its fracture mechanisms were examined based on the flow stress analysis and detailed microstructure analysis. Fracture surfaces and crack initiation site were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also applied to clarify the microstructural features of fatigue behavior. It is also important to

  12. Embrittlement of irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels in the absence of irradiation hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States); Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Sokolov, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Neutron irradiation of 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels below 425-450 deg. C produces microstructural defects that cause an increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. This irradiation hardening causes embrittlement, which is observed in Charpy impact and toughness tests as an increase in ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Based on observations that show little change in strength in these steels irradiated above 425-450 deg. C, the general conclusion has been that no embrittlement occurs above this irradiation-hardening temperature regime. In a recent study of F82H steel irradiated at 300, 380, and 500 deg. C, irradiation hardening-an increase in yield stress-was observed in tensile specimens irradiated at the two lower temperatures, but no change was observed for the specimens irradiated at 500 deg. C. As expected, an increase in DBTT occurred for the Charpy specimens irradiated at 300 and 380 deg. C. However, there was an unexpected increase in the DBTT of the specimens irradiated at 500 deg. C. The observed embrittlement was attributed to the irradiation-accelerated precipitation of Laves phase. This conclusion was based on results from a detailed thermal aging study of F82H, in which tensile and Charpy specimens were aged at 500, 550, 600, and 650 deg. C to 30,000 h. These studies indicated that there was a decrease in yield stress at the two highest temperatures and essentially no change at the two lowest temperatures. Despite the strength decrease or no change, the DBTT increased for Charpy specimens irradiated at all four temperatures. Precipitates were extracted from thermally aged specimens, and the amount of precipitate was correlated with the increase in transition temperature. Laves phase was identified in the extracted precipitates by X-ray diffraction. Earlier studies on conventional elevated-temperature steels also showed embrittlement effects above the irradiation-hardening temperature

  13. Fracture behavior of unirradiated HT-9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1983-05-01

    Fracture toughness tests on HT-9 weld and HAZ samples and modified 9Cr-1Mo weld samples were performed at 93, 205, 427 and 538 0 C. Specimens were of circular compact tension type fabricated from welded material with the notch orientation parallel to the fusion line. The test results were analyzed using the J-integral approach. The results demonstrated that the toughness of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo was not significantly reduced due to welding. However, the tearing modulus of the welded material was lower than that of base metal, indicating that the alloys become less resistant to crack propagation as a result of welding

  14. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of stainless steels D9 and HT9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibowitz, L.; Blomquist, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Renewed interest in the use of metallic fuels in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors has prompted study of the thermodynamic and transport properties of its materials. Two stainless steels are of particular interest because of their good performance under irradiation. These are D9, an austenitic steel, and HT9, a ferritic steel. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion data for these alloys are of particular interest in assessing in-reactor behavior. Because literature data were inadequate, measurements of these two properties for the two steels were performed and are reported to 1200 K. Of particular interest is the influence on these properties of a phase transition in HT9

  15. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment; Developpement d'une nouvelle nuance martensitique ODS pour utilisation sous rayonnement a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambard, V

    2000-07-01

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  16. A roadmap for tailoring the strength and ductility of ferritic/martensitic T91 steel via thermo-mechanical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, M.; Sun, C.; Fan, Z.; Chen, Y.; Zhu, R.; Yu, K.Y.; Hartwig, K.T.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels with high strength and excellent ductility are important candidate materials for the life extension of the current nuclear reactors and the design of next generation nuclear reactors. Recent studies show that equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) was able to improve mechanical strength of ferritic T91 steels moderately. Here, we examine several strategies to further enhance the mechanical strength of T91 while maintaining its ductility. Certain thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) processes enabled by combinations of ECAE, water quench, and tempering may lead to “ductile martensite” with exceptionally high strength in T91 steel. The evolution of microstructures and mechanical properties of T91 steel were investigated in detail, and transition carbides were identified in water quenched T91 steel. This study provides guidelines for tailoring the microstructure and mechanical properties of T91 steel via ECAE enabled TMT for an improved combination of strength and ductility.

  17. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements of austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the SINQ target irradiation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K., E-mail: ksato@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Dai, Y. [Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kikuchi, K. [Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Titanium-doped austenitic stainless steel (JPCA) and reduced activated ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) irradiated with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons were investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. Subnanometer-sized (<{approx}0.8 nm) helium bubbles, which cannot be observed by transmission electron microscopy, were detected by positron annihilation lifetime measurements for the first time. For the F82H steel, the positron annihilation lifetime of the bubbles decreased with increasing irradiation dose and annealing temperature because the bubbles absorb additional He atoms. In the case of JPCA steel, the positron annihilation lifetime increased with increasing annealing temperature above 773 K, in which case the dissociation of complexes of vacancy clusters with He atoms and the growth of He bubbles was detected. He bubble size and density were also discussed.

  18. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements of austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the SINQ target irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Dai, Y.; Kikuchi, K.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-doped austenitic stainless steel (JPCA) and reduced activated ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) irradiated with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons were investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. Subnanometer-sized (<∼0.8 nm) helium bubbles, which cannot be observed by transmission electron microscopy, were detected by positron annihilation lifetime measurements for the first time. For the F82H steel, the positron annihilation lifetime of the bubbles decreased with increasing irradiation dose and annealing temperature because the bubbles absorb additional He atoms. In the case of JPCA steel, the positron annihilation lifetime increased with increasing annealing temperature above 773 K, in which case the dissociation of complexes of vacancy clusters with He atoms and the growth of He bubbles was detected. He bubble size and density were also discussed.

  19. Stress effects in cylindrical tubes of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels with oxide scales. Materials selection for a HPLWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, H.

    2002-11-01

    In the frame of the studies for a high performance concept of a light water reactor (LWR) different materials for the cladding are investigated, among them are austenitic and ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steels of different Cr content. Due to the envisaged very extended life times of the fuel elements in the reactor, corrosion problems may arise. Thus, cracking and/or spalling effects in oxide scales on metallic components may play an important role in the corrosion process as they lead, in general, to a drastic enhancement in the oxidation rates. Analytical models for different fundamental stress problems in the compound oxide scale/metallic substrate have been developed and implemented in the computer code OXSPA. These models concern the growth stresses in the cylindrical tubes, the stresses due to temperature changes and radial temperature gradients and the stresses due to inside and outside pressures. (orig.)

  20. Patent Analysis of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for the Fuel Cladding in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Woo Gon; Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Dae Whan; Han, Chang Hee; Lee, Chan Bock

    2007-09-01

    The Korean, Japanese, U.S. and European patents related to the ferritic/martensitic steels were systematically surveyed to evaluate their patent status, which would be applicable to the fuel cladding materials for the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). From the surveys, totally 38 patents were finally selected for the quantitative and qualitative analysis. Among them, 28 patents (74%) were processed by Japanese companies and Sumitomo Metal industries Ltd. was top-ranked in the number (9) of priority patents. On the basis of these surveys, most patents could be applicable to the fuel cladding materials for SFR and, especially, some useful patents as the cladding were registered by the Russian and the Korean

  1. Patent Analysis of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for the Fuel Cladding in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Woo Gon; Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Dae Whan; Han, Chang Hee; Lee, Chan Bock

    2007-09-15

    The Korean, Japanese, U.S. and European patents related to the ferritic/martensitic steels were systematically surveyed to evaluate their patent status, which would be applicable to the fuel cladding materials for the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). From the surveys, totally 38 patents were finally selected for the quantitative and qualitative analysis. Among them, 28 patents (74%) were processed by Japanese companies and Sumitomo Metal industries Ltd. was top-ranked in the number (9) of priority patents. On the basis of these surveys, most patents could be applicable to the fuel cladding materials for SFR and, especially, some useful patents as the cladding were registered by the Russian and the Korean.

  2. Effect of pre-strain on susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel to hydrogen embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Tiwari, Abhishek; Jain, Uttam; Keskar, Nachiket; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Ram N.; Dey, Gautam K.

    2015-01-01

    The role of pre-strain on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel was investigated using constant nominal strain-rate tension test. The samples were pre-strained to different levels of plastic strain and their mechanical behavior and mode of fracture under the influence of hydrogen was studied. The effect of plastic pre-strain in the range of 0.5–2% on the ductility of the samples was prominent. Compared to samples without any pre-straining, effect of hydrogen was more pronounced on pre-strained samples. Prior deformation reduced the material ductility under the influence of hydrogen. Up to 35% reduction in the total strain was observed under the influence of hydrogen in pre-strained samples. Hydrogen charging resulted in increased occurrence of brittle zones on the fracture surface. Hydrogen Enhanced Decohesion (HEDE) was found to be the dominant mechanism of fracture.

  3. Carbon Contamination During Ion Irradiation - Accurate Detection and Characterization of its Effect on Microstructure of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Kruska, Karen; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Edwards, Danny J.; Zhu, Zihua; Zhang, Jiandong

    2017-11-17

    Accelerator-based ion beam techniques have been used to study radiation effects in materials for decades. Although carbon contamination induced by ion beam in target materials is a well-known issue, it has not been fully characterized nor quantified for studies in ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels that are candidate materials for applications such as core structural components in advanced nuclear reactors. It is an especially important issue for this class of material because of the effect of carbon level on precipitate formation. In this paper, the ability to quantify carbon contamination using three common techniques, namely time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS), atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is compared. Their effectiveness and short-comings in determining carbon contamination will be presented and discussed. The corresponding microstructural changes related to carbon contamination in ion irradiated F/M steels are also presented and briefly discussed.

  4. Analysis of Low Dose Irradiation Damages in Structural Ferritic/Martensitic Steels by Proton Irradiation and Nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, Owais A.; Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Byong Guk; Jeong, Jong Ryul; Maeng, Cheol Soo; Lee, Myoung Goo

    2016-01-01

    As a result, ferritic-martensitic steels find applications in the in-core and out-of-core components which include ducts, piping, pressure vessel and cladding, etc. Due to ferromagnetism of F/M steel, it has been successfully employed in solenoid type fuel injector. Although the irradiation induced degradation in ferritic martensitic steels is lower as compare to (i) reduced activation steels, (ii) austenitic steels and (iii) martensitic steels, F/M steels are still prone to irradiation induced hardening and void swelling. The irradiation behavior may become more sophisticated due to transmutation and production of helium and hydrogen. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of F/M steels is also expected to increase due to irradiation. These irradiation induced degradations may deteriorate the integrity of F/M components. As a result of these investigations, it has found that the F/M steels experience no irradiation hardening above 400 .deg. C, but below this temperature, up to 350 .deg. C, weak hardening is observed. The irradiation hardening becomes more pronounced below 300 .deg. C. Moreover, the irradiation hardening has also found dependent upon radiation damage. The hardening was found increasing with increasing dose. Due to pronounced irradiation hardening below 300 .deg. C and increasing radiation damage with increasing dose (even at low dpa), it is required to investigate the post irradiation mechanical properties of F/M steel, in order to confirm its usefulness in structural and magnetic components which experience lifetime doses as low as 1x10"-"5 dpa.

  5. Analysis of Low Dose Irradiation Damages in Structural Ferritic/Martensitic Steels by Proton Irradiation and Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waseem, Owais A.; Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Byong Guk [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jong Ryul [Chungnam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Maeng, Cheol Soo; Lee, Myoung Goo [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As a result, ferritic-martensitic steels find applications in the in-core and out-of-core components which include ducts, piping, pressure vessel and cladding, etc. Due to ferromagnetism of F/M steel, it has been successfully employed in solenoid type fuel injector. Although the irradiation induced degradation in ferritic martensitic steels is lower as compare to (i) reduced activation steels, (ii) austenitic steels and (iii) martensitic steels, F/M steels are still prone to irradiation induced hardening and void swelling. The irradiation behavior may become more sophisticated due to transmutation and production of helium and hydrogen. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of F/M steels is also expected to increase due to irradiation. These irradiation induced degradations may deteriorate the integrity of F/M components. As a result of these investigations, it has found that the F/M steels experience no irradiation hardening above 400 .deg. C, but below this temperature, up to 350 .deg. C, weak hardening is observed. The irradiation hardening becomes more pronounced below 300 .deg. C. Moreover, the irradiation hardening has also found dependent upon radiation damage. The hardening was found increasing with increasing dose. Due to pronounced irradiation hardening below 300 .deg. C and increasing radiation damage with increasing dose (even at low dpa), it is required to investigate the post irradiation mechanical properties of F/M steel, in order to confirm its usefulness in structural and magnetic components which experience lifetime doses as low as 1x10{sup -5} dpa.

  6. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  7. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (United States); Hirth, J.P. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  8. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  9. Corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and austenitic stainless steel from secondary circuit of CANDU NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, L.; Fulger, M.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.; Lazar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion damages of welds occur in spite of the fact that the proper base metal and filler metal have been correctly selected, industry codes and standards have been followed and welds have been realized with full weld penetration and have proper shape and contour. In secondary circuit of a Nuclear Power Station there are some components which have dissimilar welds. The principal criteria for selecting a stainless steel usually is resistance to corrosion, and white most consideration is given to the corrosion resistance of the base metal, additional consideration should be given to the weld metal and to the base metal immediately adjacent to the weld zone. Our experiments were performed in chloride environmental on two types of samples: non-welded (410 or W 1.4006 ferritic-martensitic steel and 304L or W 1.4307 austenitic stainless steel) and dissimilar welds (dissimilar metal welds: joints between 410 ferritic-martensitic and 304L austenitic stainless steel). To evaluate corrosion susceptibility of dissimilar welds was used electrochemical method (potentiodynamic method) and optic microscopy (microstructural analysis). The present paper follows the localized corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic steel in solutions containing chloride ions. It was evaluated the corrosion rates of samples (welded and non-welded) by electrochemical methods. (authors)

  10. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  11. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  12. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8–12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriiyanova, Y.E., E-mail: fomenkoj@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Bryk, V.V.; Borodin, O.V.; Kalchenko, A.S.; Voyevodin, V.N.; Tolstolutskaya, G.D. [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe–Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr{sup +3}, 40 keV He{sup +}, and 20 keV H{sup +}. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  13. Fabrication and integrity test preparation of HIP-joined W and ferritic-martensitic steel mockups for fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Won; Shin, Kyu In; Kim, Suk Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Choi, Bo Guen; Moon, Se Youn; Hong, Bong Guen

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten (W) and ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as armor and structural materials, respectively, are the major candidates for plasma-facing components (PFCs) such as the blanket first wall (BFW) and the divertor, in a fusion reactor. In the present study, three W/FMS mockups were successfully fabricated using a hot isostatic pressing (HIP, 900 .deg. C, 100 MPa, 1.5 hrs) with a following post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT, tempering, 750 .deg. C, 70 MPa, 2 hrs), and the W/FMS joining method was developed based on the ITER BFW and the test blanket module (TBM) development project from 2004 to the present. Using a 10-MHz-frequency flat-type probe to ultrasonically test of the joint, we found no defects in the fabricated mockups. For confirmation of the joint integrity, a high heat flux test will be performed up to the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions. These conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis with conventional codes such as ANSYS-CFX for thermal-hydraulic conditions considering the test facility, the Korea heat load test facility with an electron beam (KoHLT-EB), and its water coolant system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI)

  14. Fabrication and integrity test preparation of HIP-joined W and ferritic-martensitic steel mockups for fusion reactor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Won; Shin, Kyu In; Kim, Suk Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Choi, Bo Guen; Moon, Se Youn; Hong, Bong Guen

    2014-10-01

    Tungsten (W) and ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as armor and structural materials, respectively, are the major candidates for plasma-facing components (PFCs) such as the blanket first wall (BFW) and the divertor, in a fusion reactor. In the present study, three W/FMS mockups were successfully fabricated using a hot isostatic pressing (HIP, 900 °C, 100 MPa, 1.5 hrs) with a following post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT, tempering, 750 °C, 70 MPa, 2 hrs), and the W/FMS joining method was developed based on the ITER BFW and the test blanket module (TBM) development project from 2004 to the present. Using a 10-MHz-frequency flat-type probe to ultrasonically test of the joint, we found no defects in the fabricated mockups. For confirmation of the joint integrity, a high heat flux test will be performed up to the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions. These conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis with conventional codes such as ANSYS-CFX for thermal-hydraulic conditions considering the test facility, the Korea heat load test facility with an electron beam (KoHLT-EB), and its water coolant system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI).

  15. Fabrication and integrity test preparation of HIP-joined W and ferritic-martensitic steel mockups for fusion reactor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Won; Shin, Kyu In; Kim, Suk Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Choi, Bo Guen [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Youn; Hong, Bong Guen [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Tungsten (W) and ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as armor and structural materials, respectively, are the major candidates for plasma-facing components (PFCs) such as the blanket first wall (BFW) and the divertor, in a fusion reactor. In the present study, three W/FMS mockups were successfully fabricated using a hot isostatic pressing (HIP, 900 .deg. C, 100 MPa, 1.5 hrs) with a following post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT, tempering, 750 .deg. C, 70 MPa, 2 hrs), and the W/FMS joining method was developed based on the ITER BFW and the test blanket module (TBM) development project from 2004 to the present. Using a 10-MHz-frequency flat-type probe to ultrasonically test of the joint, we found no defects in the fabricated mockups. For confirmation of the joint integrity, a high heat flux test will be performed up to the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions. These conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis with conventional codes such as ANSYS-CFX for thermal-hydraulic conditions considering the test facility, the Korea heat load test facility with an electron beam (KoHLT-EB), and its water coolant system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI)

  16. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanaja, J., E-mail: jvanaja4@gmail.com [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Laha, K. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2012-05-15

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr-1W-0.06Ta-0.22V-0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300-873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  17. Mechanical properties of 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weldment prepared by electron beam welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, C.R., E-mail: chitta@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Albert, S.K. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Mastanaiah, P. [Defense Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Chaitanya, G.M.S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Murthy, C.V.S. [Defense Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Kumar, E. Rajendra [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Width of HAZ is smaller in the 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process compared to that reported for TIG weldments in literature. • Weld joint is stronger than that of the base metal. • Toughness of weld metal prepared by EB welding process is comparable to that (in PWHT condition) prepared by TIG process. • DBTT of as-welded 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process is comparable to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition. - Abstract: Microstructure and mechanical properties of the weldments prepared from 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel using electron beam welding (EBW) process were studied. Microstructure consists of tempered lath martensite where precipitates decorating the boundaries in post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Lath and precipitate sizes were found to be finer in the weld metal than in base metal. Accordingly, hardness of the weld metal was found to be higher than the base metal. Tensile strength of the cross weldment specimen was 684 MPa, which was comparable with the base metal tensile strength of 670 MPa. On the other hand, DBTT of 9Cr–1W weld metal in as-welded condition is similar to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition.

  18. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E., E-mail: vtp@igcar.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  19. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Sam, Shiju; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2012-05-01

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr-1W-0.06Ta-0.22V-0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300-873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  20. Extraction residue analysis on F82H-BA07 heat and other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaka, Takuya; Hishinuma, Yoshimitsu; Muroga, Takeo; Li, Yanfen; Watanabe, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Ando, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Extraction residue analysis was conducted on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, such as F82H-BA07 heat, F82H-IEA heat, JLF-1 JOYO heat and CLAM steel. M 23 C 6 type precipitates, TaC precipitates and Fe 2 W Laves phase were identified in the present analyses. M 23 C 6 precipitates were coarsened in F82H-BA07 compared with the other steels at as-normalized and tempered (NT) condition. TaC precipitate formation was enhanced in JLF-1 and CLAM compared with F82H-BA07 and F82H-IEA at as-NT condition. Laves phase were detected in F82H-IEA after aging above 550 o C, where solid solution W was significantly decreased. F82H-IEA exhibited hardening after aging at 400 and 500 o C for 100 khr, whereas softening at 600 and 650 o C. This behavior is similar to JLF-1 and CLAM, and can be understood by precipitation of TaC and Laves phase.

  1. Mechanical properties of 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weldment prepared by electron beam welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Sam, Shiju; Mastanaiah, P.; Chaitanya, G.M.S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Murthy, C.V.S.; Kumar, E. Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Width of HAZ is smaller in the 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process compared to that reported for TIG weldments in literature. • Weld joint is stronger than that of the base metal. • Toughness of weld metal prepared by EB welding process is comparable to that (in PWHT condition) prepared by TIG process. • DBTT of as-welded 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process is comparable to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition. - Abstract: Microstructure and mechanical properties of the weldments prepared from 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel using electron beam welding (EBW) process were studied. Microstructure consists of tempered lath martensite where precipitates decorating the boundaries in post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Lath and precipitate sizes were found to be finer in the weld metal than in base metal. Accordingly, hardness of the weld metal was found to be higher than the base metal. Tensile strength of the cross weldment specimen was 684 MPa, which was comparable with the base metal tensile strength of 670 MPa. On the other hand, DBTT of 9Cr–1W weld metal in as-welded condition is similar to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition

  2. Study of the first stages of oxidation of a ferritic-martensitic steel Fe-12Cr in CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhieda, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the development of Sodium Fast Reactors in France, supercritical carbon dioxide integrated in the Brayton cycle is proposed as new cycle energy conversion system to replace current steam generators. Ferritic-Martensitic steels with 9-12 wt% Cr are good candidates for heat exchanger application because they have good mechanical properties up to a temperature of 600 C, a high thermal conductivity, a low coefficient of thermal expansion and a lower cost than that of austenitic steels. However, it has been found that these steels present a high parabolic oxide growth rate and a strong carburization in the temperature and pressure conditions of the SC-CO 2 cycle (550 C, 250 bar). This study aims to investigate the influence of different parameters (impurities present in CO 2 , thermal ramp rate and surface state) on the oxidation mechanism of a Fe-12 Cr steel in CO 2 at 550 C. It has been shown that depending on these parameters, a thin protective oxide scale without any strong carburization can be obtained. A model is proposed to explain the experimental results. (author) [fr

  3. IRRADIATION CREEP AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TWO FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEELS IRRADIATED IN THE BN-350 FAST REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoriashin, A. M.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.; Loltukhovsky, A. G.; Bochvar, A. A.; Garner, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    Russian ferritic/martensitic steels EP-450 and EP-823 were irradiated to 20-60 dpa in the BN-350 fast reactor in the form of pressurized creep tubes and small rings used for mechanical property tests. Data derived from these steels serves to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. It appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures less then 420 degrees C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation-related densification. The irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F/M steels is about one-half that of austenitic steels, and that the loss of strength at test temperatures above 500 degrees C is a problem generic to all F/M steels. This conclusion is supported by post-irradiation measurement of short-term mechanical properties. At temperatures below 500 degrees C both steels retain their high strength (yield stress 0.2=550-600 MPa), but at higher test temperatures a sharp decrease of strength properties occurs. However, the irradiated steels still retain high post-irradiation ductility at test temperatures in the range of 20-700 degrees C.

  4. Microstructure anisotropy and its effect on mechanical properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel fabricated by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Zhai, Yutao; Liu, Shaojun; Mao, Xiaodong

    2018-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a promising way for the fabrication of complex reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel components. The microstructure of the SLM built China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel plates was observed and analyzed. The hardness, Charpy impact and tensile testing of the specimens in different orientations were performed at room temperature. The results showed that the difference in the mechanical properties was related to the anisotropy in microstructure. The planer unmelted porosity in the interface of the adjacent layers induced opening/tensile mode when the tensile samples parallel to the build direction were tested whereas the samples vertical to the build direction fractured in the shear mode with the grains being sheared in a slant angle. Moreover, the impact absorbed energy (IAE) of all impact specimens was significantly lower than that of the wrought CLAM steel, and the IAE of the samples vertical to the build direction was higher than that of the samples parallel to the build direction. The impact fracture surfaces revealed that the load parallel to the build layers caused laminated tearing among the layers, and the load vertical to the layers induced intergranular fracture across the layers.

  5. Triple ion-beam studies of radiation damage in 9Cr2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Hunn, J.D.; Rao, G.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Mansur, L.K.

    1997-01-01

    To simulate radiation damage under a future Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) environment, irradiation experiments were conducted on a candidate 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel using the Triple Ion Facility (TIF) at ORNL. Irradiation was conducted in single, dual, and triple ion beam modes using 3.5 MeV Fe ++ , 360 keV He + , and 180 keV H + at 80, 200, and 350 degrees C. These irradiations produced various defects comprising black dots, dislocation loops, line dislocations, and gas bubbles, which led to hardening. The largest increase in hardness, over 63 %, was observed after 50 dpa for triple beam irradiation conditions, revealing that both He and H are augmenting the hardening. Hardness increased less than 30 % after 30 dpa at 200 degrees C by triple beams, compatible with neutron irradiation data from previous work which showed about a 30 % increase in yield strength after 27.2 dpa at 365 degrees C. However, the very large concentrations of gas bubbles in the matrix and on lath and grain boundaries after these simulated SNS irradiations make predictions of fracture behavior from fission reactor irradiations to spallation target conditions inadvisable

  6. In situ neutron diffraction and Elastic–Plastic Self-Consistent polycrystal modeling of HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, B.; Brown, D.W.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Saleh, T.A.; Maloy, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Qualifying materials for use in reactors with fluences greater than 200 dpa (displacements per atom) requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Research into the mechanical behavior of these materials under reactor conditions is ongoing. In order to probe changes in deformation mechanisms due to radiation in these materials, samples of HT-9 were tested in tension in situ on the SMARTS instrument at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Experimental results, confirmed with modeling, show significant load sharing between the carbides and parent phase of the steel beyond yield, displaying the critical role of carbides during deformation, along with basic texture development.

  7. In situ neutron diffraction and Elastic-Plastic Self-Consistent polycrystal modeling of HT-9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, B., E-mail: clausen@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Brown, D.W.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Saleh, T.A.; Maloy, S.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Qualifying materials for use in reactors with fluences greater than 200 dpa (displacements per atom) requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Research into the mechanical behavior of these materials under reactor conditions is ongoing. In order to probe changes in deformation mechanisms due to radiation in these materials, samples of HT-9 were tested in tension in situ on the SMARTS instrument at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Experimental results, confirmed with modeling, show significant load sharing between the carbides and parent phase of the steel beyond yield, displaying the critical role of carbides during deformation, along with basic texture development.

  8. Helium-induced weld degradation of HT-9 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chin-An; Chin, B.A.; Lin, Hua T.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Helium-bearing Sandvik HT-9 ferritic steel was tested for weldability to simulate the welding of structural components of a fusion reactor after irradiation. Helium was introduced into HT-9 steel to 0.3 and 1 atomic parts per million (appm) by tritium doping and decay. Autogenous single pass full penetration welds were produced using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under laterally constrained conditions. Macroscopic examination showed no sign of any weld defect in HT-9 steel containing 0.3 appm helium. However, intergranular micro cracks were observed in the HAZ of HT-9 steel containing 1 appm helium. The microcracking was attributed to helium bubble growth at grain boundaries under the influence of high stresses and temperatures that were present during welding. Mechanical test results showed that both yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature, while the total elongation increased with increasing temperature for all control and helium-bearing HT-9 steels

  9. Analysis of Current HT9 Creep Correlations and Modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Min; Sohn, Dongseong; Cheon, Jin Sik

    2014-01-01

    It has high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and low irradiation induced swelling. However high temperature creep of HT9 has always been a life limiting factor. Above 600 .deg. C, the dislocation density in HT9 is decreased and the M 23 C 6 precipitates coarsen, these processes are accelerated if there is irradiation. Finally microstructural changes at high temperature lead to lower creep strength and large creep strain. For HT9 to be used as a future cladding, creep behavior of the HT9 should be predicted accurately based on the physical understanding of the creep phenomenon. Most of the creep correlations are composed of irradiation creep and thermal creep terms. However, it is certain that in-pile thermal creep and out-of-pile thermal creep are different because of the microstructure changes induced from neutron irradiation. To explain creep behavior more accurately, thermal creep contributions other than neutron irradiation should be discriminated in a creep correlation. To perform this work, existing HT9 creep correlations are analyzed, and the results are used to develop more accurate thermal creep correlation. Then, the differences between in-pile thermal creep and out-of-pile thermal creep are examined

  10. Contributions from research on irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels to materials science and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1990-05-01

    Ferritic and martensitic steels are finding increased application for structural components in several reactor systems. Low-alloy steels have long been used for pressure vessels in light water fission reactors. Martensitic stainless steels are finding increasing usage in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and are being considered for fusion reactor applications when such systems become commercially viable. Recent efforts have evaluated the applicability of oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels. Experiments on the effect of irradiation on these steels provide several examples where contributions are being made to materials science and engineering. Examples are given demonstrating improvements in basic understanding, small specimen test procedure development, and alloy development.

  11. Low cycle fatigue design data for India-specific reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (IN-RAFM) steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan, K.; Shankar, Vani, E-mail: vani@igcar.gov.in; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Generation of first set of experimental data related to LCF performance of the commercial heat of IN-RAFM steel. • Analysis of cyclic behavior from the perspective of both design and material characteristics. • Various correction factors to account for various plastic strain accumulations, change in Poisson’s ratio and asymmetry of loadings. • Low cycle fatigue design parameters and correction factor values were comparable with P91 steel as reported in RCC-MR design code. - Abstract: The objective of the present paper is to provide first hand experimental data and analysis on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) performance of a commercial heat of Indian reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (IN-RAFM) steel. Since this material is not yet codified in RCC-MR, cyclic properties were generated for the design of the structural material of the Test Blanket Modules (TBM) made of RAFM steel. Hence, as a part of the material development program, LCF experiments were conducted on IN-RAFM steel obtained in the normalized and tempered condition. Total axial strain controlled experiments were performed in air by employing strain amplitudes ranging from ±0.25 to ±1.0% and at temperatures of 300, 673, 723, 823, and 873 K and a nominal strain rate, 3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}. In the present work, various cyclic parameters that are useful for the design oriented fatigue analysis are derived as per the systematic procedure given in the RCC-MR design code. The physical significance of each design parameter such as elasto-plastic corrections based on Neuber analysis has been explained and correlated with the material behavior such as the cyclic softening nature of the RAFM steel.

  12. Impact properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H jointed by hot isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiwara, H.; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Enoeda, M. [Naka Fusion Research Establishment, J.A.E.R.I., Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are the leading candidate structural material for the blanket system of fusion reactors. The important issue at the current stage is the finalization of a detailed manufacturing specification for ITER test blanket module. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process is one of the most important methods to fabricate the first wall with cooling channels. The objective of this paper is to optimize HIP condition to obtain the excellent joints mechanical properties. The materials used were F82H steels. The joint was produced by solid state HIP method. Before HIP treatments, specimens were heated in vacuum condition to out-gas. This treatment was conducted to decrease oxidation on the surfaces. HIP treatments were carried out for 2 h at 1100 deg. C - 140 MPa. The specimens were normalized at 960 deg. C for 0.5 h and tempered at 750 deg. C for 1.5 h. The bonding interface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Charpy impact tests and tensile tests were conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the HIP joint. Impact tests revealed that there were no significant differences in the ductile-brittle transition temperatures of HIP jointed specimens and base metal specimens, but the upper-shelf energy (USE) of the HIP joint specimens at room temperature was only about 10% of that of the base metal specimens. SEM observations of the fracture surface of HIP joint specimens revealed that a large number of oxides were formed on the HIP joint. This result indicates that oxides formed on the HIP joint are the dominant factor of the impact properties. Based on these results, the pre-HIP treatment conditions had been optimized to reduce the number of oxides, and USE of HIP joint specimens increased to about 50% of that of the base metal. The detailed analyses on the HIP joint microstructure will be reported. (authors)

  13. Effect of alloy content on microstructure and microchemistry of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the microstructural evolution in 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels during short term thermal exposures. Since the microstructure is strongly influenced by the alloying additions, mainly W, Ta and C contents, the effect of varying W and Ta contents on ...

  14. Boron-bearing Influences of 9Cr-0.5Mo-2W-V-Nb Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for a SFR Fuel Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Han, Chang-Hee; Kim, Woo-Gon; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2008-01-01

    Currently the principal materials in a SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor) of Gen-IV nuclear system are considering stainless steels (e.g. austenitic steels and ferritic/martensitic steels) for pressure boundary and structural applications in the primary circuit (cladding, duct, cold and hot leg piping, and pressure vessel). There are sound technical justifications for these material selections, and the adoption of these stainless steels for a wide range of nuclear and non-nuclear applications has generated much industrial technology and experience. However, there are strong incentives to develop advanced materials, especially cladding, for the Gen-IV SFR. The Gen-IV SFR is to have a considerable increase in safety and be economically competitive when compared with the conventional water reactors. To accomplish these objectives, the development of the fuel cladding material should be set forth as a premise because its integrity is directly related to those of the reactor system as well as the fuel in the Gen-IV SFR. Since last year, a R and D program was launched to develop the improved ferritic/martensitic steel for the Gen-IV SFR fuel cladding. Categories of materials considered in the program included 8 - 12% Cr ferritic/ martensitic steels. A strong recommendation was made for the development of a high strength steel equivalent to or superior to ASTM Gr.92 steel to offset the difficulties encountered with commercial available steels of the 8 - 12% Cr group. That is, since fuel cladding in the Gen-IV SFR would operate under higher temperatures than 600 .deg. C, contacting with liquid sodium, and be irradiated by neutrons to as high as 200dpa, the cladding should thus sustain both superior irradiation and temperature stabilities during an operational life. The newly developed advanced steel should overcome the severe drawback; mechanical properties, especially creep, are deteriorated at a higher temperature over 600 .deg. C. In this study, as one of the composition

  15. Effect of irradiation temperature on microstructure of ferritic-martensitic ODS steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Jäntsch, U.; Möslang, A.

    2017-09-01

    The EUROFER-ODS alloy with 0.5% Y2O3 was neutron irradiated with doses up to 16.2 dpa at 250 °C, 350 °C and 450 °C. The radiation induced changes in the microstructure (e.g. dislocation loops and voids) were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The number density of radiation induced defects was found to be significantly lower than in EUROFER 97 irradiated at the same conditions. It was found that the appearance and extent of radiation damage strongly depend not only on the irradiation temperature but also on the local number density and size distribution of ODS particles. The higher number density of dislocation loops and voids was found in the local areas with low number density of ODS particles. The interstitial loops with Burgers vector of both ½ and types were detected by imaging using different diffraction conditions.

  16. Microstructural Evolution of Advanced Radiation-Resistant ODS Steel with Different Lengths of Mechanical Alloying Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Ga Eon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/ martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, powder properties and microstructures of the ODS steel with different length of mechanical alloying time was investigated. The ODS steel milled 5h showed homogeneous grain structure with the highest hardness.

  17. Microstructural Evolution of Advanced Radiation-Resistant ODS Steel with Different Lengths of Mechanical Alloying Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Ga Eon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/ martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, powder properties and microstructures of the ODS steel with different length of mechanical alloying time was investigated. The ODS steel milled 5h showed homogeneous grain structure with the highest hardness

  18. Development of filler wires for welding of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel for India's test blanket module of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Arivazhagan, B.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Indigenous development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel has become necessary for India as a participant in the International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme. Optimisation of RAFM steel is in an advanced stage for the fabrication of test blanket module (TBM) components. Simultaneously, development of RAFM steel filler wires has been undertaken since there is no commercial filler wires are available for fabrication of components using RAFM steel. The purpose of this study is to develop filler wires that can be directly used for both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and for narrow-gap gas tungsten arc welding (NG-GTAW) that reduces the deposited weld metal volume and heat affected zone (HAZ) width. Further, the filler wires would also be used for hybrid laser-MIG welding for thick section joints. In view of meeting all the requirements, a detailed specification was prepared for the development of filler wires for welding of RAFM steel. Meanwhile, welding trials have been carried out on 2.5 mm thick plates of the RAFM steel using GTAW process at various heat inputs with a preheat temperature of 250 C followed by various post weld heat treatments (PWHT). The microstructure of the weld metal in most of the cases showed the presence of some amount of delta-ferrite. Filler wires as per specifications have also been developed with minor variations on the chemistry against the specified values. Welding parameters and PWHT parameters were optimized to qualify the filler wires without the presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal and with optimized mechanical properties. Results showed that the weld metals are free from delta-ferrite. Tensile properties at ambient temperature and at 500 C are well above the specified values, and are much higher than the base metal values. Ductile Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT) has been evaluated as -81 C based on the 68 J criteria. The present study highlights the basis and methodology

  19. Effect of precipitate on yield strength of ferritic/martensitic steel exposed to 650 .deg. C liquid sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Jeonghyeon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Hun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Ferritic/martensitic steels(FMS) which are used as one of cladding and structure materials in UCFR, have high creep strength at 600~650°C, low expansion coefficient, and dimensional stability with irradiation-induced void swelling in circumstance of fast neutrons compared to austenitic stainless steel. However, as exposed to high temperature liquid sodium during the design life time (30 to 60 years), the surface of FMS experienced Cr-depletion and decarburization by dissolution of components into sodium and formed oxidations by reacting with sodium. This changes chemical compositions of inter-surface and effects on behavior of precipitations. This change can cause a degradation of mechanical strength of structure material of UCFR. The research about FMS on effects of long term exposure in liquid sodium at 650 °C involve analysis of yield strength by change of microstructure, solid solution hardening and precipitation hardening. It shows how this three parts occupy total yield strength respectively and change over time. In a specific procedure, the microstructure and the surface phenomenon of FMS (Gr. 92) that are exposed to liquid sodium at 650°C, 20 ppm oxygen and are aged in high pure Argon gas environment to express bulk have been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). When specimens were exposed to 650 °C liquid sodium for 1583, 3095 hours and Ar-gas 1601, 2973 hours, mechanical properties of materials were analyzed quantitatively. After experiment, NaCrO{sub 2} oxidation was formed on the surface of Gr.92 at sodium environment. Also, change of microstructure, dissolution of elements, and nucleation and growth of precipitation was raised. During exposed to high temperature at sodium or Ar-gas, annealed lath structure as well as coarsening of tempered martensite structure affects reduction of mechanical properties. And dissolution of elements results in reduction of solid solution hardening. This

  20. Effects of impurity elements on mechanical properties and microstructures of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawahata, A. [Ibaraki Univ., Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Hitachi (Japan); Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Enomoto, M. [Ibaraki Univ., Dept. of Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Hitachi (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs), such as F82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-0.2V- 0.04Ta-0.1C, in wt%), are one of the leading candidates for structural materials of fusion reactors. Impact property of F82H can be improved by adjusting the amount of tantalum or titanium concentration. On the other hand, it was reported by microstructure analyses of IEA steel that tantalum has a tendency to form oxides and causes a large dispersion of fracture toughness. In this study, the correlation between titanium or tantalum concentration and the impact property were reported focusing on difference in microstructure. Charpy impact test and microstructure analyses were carried out against modified F82H series of which titanium, nitrogen and tantalum composition were controlled. Charpy impact test results showed that the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of T05A (0.05Ta- 0.0014N-

  1. The influence of inclusions on the low cycle fatigue properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.H.; Kima, S.W. [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Energy Science (Japan); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels, such as F82H, are the primary near-term candidate for the blanket structural material of nuclear fusion reactors. During operation, blanket structural materials will be subjected to cyclic loading caused by start-up and shut-down procedure or plasma disruption. Therefore, investigation of fatigue property is essential to reactor design. It is considered that fatigue properties depend on the material factor such as the inclusion distribution, surface morphology and so on. Especially, many experimental results show that inclusions become the fracture origin in a given volume of material subjected to cyclic stress, and fracture failure is most likely to initiate at the largest inclusion in the volume. Therefore, the prediction of the size of maximum inclusion and its impact on fatigue properties would be essential to the fusion reactor materials development and application. This paper examines the possible relation between fatigue life and inclusion parameters such as size, shape, distribution and composition. The low cycle fatigue behavior of F82H steel at room temperature in air condition under fully reversed push-pull triangular wave was studied using miniaturized hourglass-type specimens with 1.25 mm in diameter. Total strain range is selected from 0.8% to 2.4%, and the strain rate was 0.04%/s. To examine the size and composition of the inclusions, fracture surfaces and crack initiation region were investigated by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and EDS. The inclusions such as TaO{sub x}, TaO{sub x}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the size below 10 {mu}m are observed on specimen surface. The surface observation of the specimen which discontinued testing at 20 and 500 cycle tested at the strain range of 1.4% revealed that fatigue loading induced separation of inclusions from the matrix in initial stage, then micro-crack induced around the inclusions

  2. Production and qualification for fusion applications, a steel of low activity ferritic-martensitic ASTURFER; Produccion y cualificacion, para aplicaciones de fusion, de un acero de baja actividad ferritico-martensitico, ASTURFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, A.; Belzunce, J.; Artimez, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    This article details the work carried out in the design and development pilot plant scale of a steel ferritic-martensitic of reduced activity, Asturfer, with a chemical composition and metallurgical properties similar to steel Eurofer. We describe the different stages of steel production and the results of the characterizations made in the context of an extensive test program.

  3. Tensile and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr–1.8W–0.5Ti–0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian, E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Wang, Man; Li, Shaofu; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The tensile property and Charpy impact were tested. • Both strength and plasticity in LT direction are better than that of TL direction. • The LSE was more than 65% of the USE from absorbed energy curve. • The initiation and propagation energy at different temperatures were calculated. • High LSE and dimples on the fracture surface indicated good toughness at −60 °C. - Abstract: A 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic steel with a composition of 9Cr–1.8W–0.5Ti–0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} was fabricated by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing, followed by hot rolling. Tensile properties were measured at room temperature (23 °C) and 700 °C in the rolling direction (LT) and the transverse direction (TL). The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the as-rolled samples in both directions reached 990 MPa at 23 °C, and still maintained at 260 MPa at 700 °C. The tensile strength and elongation of the rolling direction was greater than that of the transverse direction. The Charpy impact was tested from −100 to 100 °C in the LT direction. The lower shelf energy (LSE) was more than 65% of the upper shelf energy (USE). The total absorbed energy was separated into the energies for crack initiation and propagation. The propagation energy was always higher than the initiation energy in the range of temperatures tested. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the rolled 9Cr ODS evaluated by an absorbed energy curve was about 0 °C. However, the high LSE and the fracture surface that still contained dimples at lower shelf indicated good toughness of the as-rolled 9Cr ODS steels at temperature of −60 °C.

  4. TEM observations of HT-9 as-welded weldment microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    TEM studies of different locations in an HT-9 weldment indicated delta-ferrite (delta) occurrence, M 23 C 6 precipitation at delta-martensite interfaces, fine carbide precipitation at prior austenite grain boundaries, and martensite lath and lath packet size to be the distinguishable microstructure features observed. Furthermore, retained austenite films were observed in the weld metal and the HAZ adjacent to the weld metal that reached the highest temperature during joining. The microstructures correlate well with the observed room temperature microhardness except for the fusion boundary in weld metal which exhibited a hardness drop and an unexpected minimum amount of delta-ferrite

  5. Effect of microstructural evolution by isothermal aging on the mechanical properties of 9Cr-1WVTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min-Gu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hoon, E-mail: lee1626@kims.re.kr [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Joonoh; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Namhyun [Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Chan Kim, Hyoung [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The influence of microstructural changes caused by aging condition on tensile and Charpy impact properties was investigated for reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) 9Cr-1WVTa steels having single martensite and a mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite. For the mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite, the Charpy impact properties deteriorated in both as-normalized and tempered conditions due to the ferrite and the accompanying M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries which act as path and initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. However, aging at 550 °C for 20–100 h recovered gradually the Charpy impact toughness without any distinct drop in strength, as a result of the spheroidization of the coarse M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries, which makes crack initiation more difficult.

  6. Effects of corrosion and precipitates on mechanical properties in the ferritic/martensitic steel cladding under ultra-long cycle fast reactor environment at 650 .deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Hun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This changes chemical compositions of inter-surface and effects on behavior of precipitations. NaCrO{sub 2} which is ternary sodium compound occurs intergranular corrosion resulting in thickness reduction. This change can cause a degradation of mechanical strength of structure material of UCFR. Therefore, we should consider longterm compatibility with sodium and study about life prediction. The research about ferritic/martensitic steel on effects of long term exposure in liquid sodium at 650 .deg. C, 20ppm oxygen includes weight loss of test material (Gr. 92) by corrosion and mechanism about nucleation and growth of precipitates like Laves-phase in bulk. There are many changes such as segregation of component to nucleate precipitates, affecting into microstructural evolution of the steel. Therefore, the thermochemical reaction research to predict behavior about precipitates should be performed. In a specific procedure, the micro-structure and the surface phenomenon of ferritic/martensitic steels (Gr. 92) that are exposed to liquid sodium at 650 .deg. C, 20 ppm oxygen and aged in high pure Argon gas environment to express bulk have been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). At 10 ppm oxygen designed oxygen value for UCFR, there is 107μm thickness reduction for 30 years. Thus, if there is no degradation of mechanical strength caused by aging effect, the tolerance of load of initial cladding should be higher than real load at least 23.6 %. Compared to specimens exposed to Ar-gas environment, Specimen which solutions are leaded into sodium has degradation of strength by reduction of solution hardening.

  7. Effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties of a commercial 12Cr-1Mo steel (HT-9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1981-08-01

    The microstructure of a commercial 12Cr-1Mo steel (HT-9) and its associated effect on strength and toughness properties is being studied in a continuing program aimed at qualifying the alloy for use in fusion energy machines. Interim results show this alloy is subject to a degree of tempered martensite embrittlement and temper embrittlement. For applications projected for fusion machines at lower temperatures, a new heat treatment (1000 0 C, 1 h, air-cooled followed by 650 0 C tempering) at lower temperatures and shorter times than the vendor-recommended heat treatment has been identified. Microstructural differences between the treatments are discussed, and mechanical properties are correlated. 6 figures

  8. Effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on HT-9 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emigh, R.A.

    1985-12-01

    The effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on the toughness of an Fe-12Cr-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.3V (HT-9) steel was studied. The resulting microstructures were characterized by their mechanical properties, precipitated carbide distribution, and fracture surface appearance. It was proposed that multiple transformations would refine the martensite structure and improve toughness. Optical and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that the martensite packet structure was somewhat refined by a second austenite transformation. Transmission electron microscopy studies of carbon extraction replicas showed that this multiple step treatment had eliminated grain boundary carbide films seen in single treated specimens on prior austenite grain boundaries. The 0.2% yield strength, tensile strength, and elongation were relatively unchanged, but the toughness measured by fatigue pre-cracked Charpy impact tests increased for the multiple step specimens

  9. Oxidation/volatilization rates in air for candidate fusion reactor blanket materials, PCA and HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Kraus, H.G.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Jones, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Large uncertainties exist in the quantity of neutron-induced activation products that can be mobilized in potential fusion accidents. The accidental combination of high temperatures and oxidizing conditions might lead to mobilization of a significant amount of activation products from structural materials. Here, the volatilization of constituents of PCA and HT-9 resulting from oxidation in air was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 600 to 1300 0 C for 1, 5, or 20 h. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy. Molybdenum and manganese were the radiologically significant primary constituents most volatilizized, suggesting that molybdenum and manganese should be minimized in fusion steel compositions. Higher chromium content appears beneficial in reducing hazards from mobile activation products. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the oxide layer on samples. (orig.)

  10. Oxidation/volatilization rates in air for candidate fusion reactor blanket materials, PCA and HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Kraus, H.G.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Jones, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Large uncertainties exist in the quantity of neutron-induced activation products that can be mobilized in potential fusion accidents. The accidental combination of high temperatures and oxidizing conditions might lead to mobilization of a significant amount of activation products from structural materials. Here, the volatilization of constituents of PCA and HT-9 resulting from oxidation in air was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 600 to 1300 0 C for 1, 5, or 20 hours. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy. Molybdenum and manganese were the radiologically significant primary constituents most volatilized, suggesting that molybdenum and manganese should be minimized in fusion steel compositions. Higher chromium content appears beneficial in reducing hazards from mobile activation products. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the oxide layer on samples

  11. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  12. Strength and rupture-life transitions caused by secondary carbide precipitation in HT-9 during high-temperature low-rate mechanical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Hughes, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    The martensitic-ferritic alloy HT-9 is slated for long-term use as a fuel-cladding material in the Integral Fast Reactor. Analysis of published high-temperature mechanical property data suggests that secondary carbide precipitation would occur during service life causing substantial strengthening of the as-heat-treated material. Aspects of the kinetics of this precipitation process are extracted from calculations of the back stress necessary to produce the observed strengthening effect under various creep loading conditions. The resulting Arrhenius factor is shown to agree quantitatively with shifts to higher strength of crept material in reference to the intrinsic strength of HT-9. The results of very low constant strain-rate high-temperature tensile tests on as-heat-treated HT-9 that focus on the transition in strength with precipitation will be presented and related to rupture-life

  13. Fractographic examination of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo Charpy specimens irradiated in the AD-2 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Fracture surface topologies have been examined using scanning electron microscopy for 20 selected half sized Charpy impact specimens of HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo in order to provide improved understanding of fracture toughness degradation as a result of irradiation for Path E alloys. The specimen matrix included unirradiated specimens and specimens irradiated in EBR-II in the AD-2 experiment. Also, hardness measurements have been made on selected irradiated Charpy specimens. The results of examinations indicate that irradiation hardening due to G-phase formation at 390 0 C is responsible for the large shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) found in HT-9. Toughness degradation in HT-9 observed following higher temperature irradiations is attributed to precipitation at delta ferrite stringers. Reductions in toughness as a consequence of irradiation in Modified 9Cr-1Mo are attributed to in-reactor precipitation of (V,Nb)C and M 23 C 6 . It is shown that crack propagation rates for ductile and brittle failure modes can be measured, that they differ by over an order of magnitude and that unexpected multiple shifts in fracture mode from ductile to brittle failure can be attributed to the effect of delta ferrite stringers on crack propagation rates

  14. Fundamental flow and fracture studies of HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Maiti, R.; Sheckherd, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Results of electron microscopy studies of cleavage crack formation and propagation in HT-9 are consistent with a model for stress-controlled cleavage in which the critical stress sigma/sub f//sup */ is related to the lath packet size. Moreover, sigma/sub f//sup */ appears to undergo a sharp transition at low temperatures and high strain rates; this is probably a result of a change in mechanism from slip- to twinning-nucleated cleavage. This change in sigma/sub f//sup */ effects corresponding changes in lower shelf fracture toughness. A simple two-parameter approach is shown to be a reasonable basis for predicting fracture loads for various size and crack-geometry bend specimens. These results indicated that cleavage fracture will occur near plastic collapse loads for thin wall structures containing shallow surface cracks. Results of an initial study of ductility in the cleavage regime indicate deflectional displacements on the order of 1-2 cm/m will be the limit for such shallow surface cracks in thin walls. The effects of dissolved hydrogen and stress state variations induced by side grooving were investigated. Hydrogen charges resulted in an average reduction in measured K/sub O/ values of about 17% and 5% in the ratio of maximum load fracture-to-collapse stress ratios. No significant effect of hydrogen on ductility was observed. Side grooving resulted in increases in both apparent K/sub O/ toughness levels and fracture-to-collapse stress ratios. Side grooving decreased ductility for shallow cracks and increased it for deep cracks. In general these effects are judged to be relatively modest compared to uncertainties in the measurements and the effects of significant variations in size and strength levels

  15. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sham, T.-L.; Tan, L.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Summary of creep, thermal aging and weldability aspects: • The creep resistance of advanced 9Cr FM steels was greatly enhanced by optimizing their compositions as well as by using TMT. – Up to about 700 times increase in creep life, compared to Gr91, was achieved under the accelerated test conditions at 600°C. • The increased density of ultrafine precipitates facilitated the increase in strength and thermal aging resistance, leading to the improved creep resistance. • Properties of four candidate austenitic alloys, HT-UPS, NF709, and two modified HT-UPS alloy (designated Alloys A and B), have been evaluated and compared with 316H. – Alloys A and B showed successful improvement in weldability. – Only a little difference in thermal stability of the alloys in solution annealed conditions. 10% cold work increased the yield strength of the alloys for more than 200% compared to the HT-UPS without cold work. – HT-UPS exhibited the best creep properties among the alloys with and without cold work, and NF709 followed

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Changhoon; Lee, Taeho; Jang, Minho; Park, Mingu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite.

  17. Microstructural evolution in modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated with mixed high-energy proton and neutron spectra at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sencer, B.H.; Garner, F.A.; Gelles, D.S.; Bond, G.M.; Maloy, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel was exposed at 32-57 deg. C to a mixed proton/neutron particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The microstructure of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo consists of laths, dislocations and carbides. Examination of electron diffraction patterns obtained from extraction replicas of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo revealed that the precipitate microstructure was primarily dominated by M 23 C 6 carbides. The post-irradiation microstructure contained black-spot damage in addition to precipitates and dislocations. Examination of electron diffraction patterns revealed diffuse rings from M 23 C 6 carbides, indicating amorphization and/or nanocrystallinity. Crystalline MC carbides were also found. No cavity formation was found although a significant amount of helium and hydrogen generation had been generated. TEM-EDS examination of extraction replicas for carbides from unirradiated and irradiated samples did not show any detectable changes in composition of either M 23 C 6 or MC carbides. There was also no evident change in carbide size. Lattice images of M 23 C 6 carbides revealed an amorphous microstructure following irradiation, but MC carbides were still crystalline

  18. Influence of liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic on tensile, fatigue and creep properties of ferritic/martensitic and austenitic steels for transmutation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorse, D., E-mail: dominique.gorse-pomonti@polytechnique.edu [CNRS-LSI, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, 91128, Palaiseau Cedex (France); Auger, T. [CNRS-MSSMAT, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290, Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Vogt, J.-B.; Serre, I. [CNRS-LMPGM, 59655, Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Weisenburger, A. [ForschungszentrumKarlsruheGmbH, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gessi, A.; Agostini, P. [ENEA, CR Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, Bologna (Italy); Fazio, C. [ForschungszentrumKarlsruheGmbH, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hojna, A.; Di Gabriele, F. [Ustav jaderneho vyzkumu Rez a.s., Husinec 130, Rez 25068 (Czech Republic); Van Den Bosch, J.; Coen, G.; Almazouzi, A. [SCK-CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Centre), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Serrano, M. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-31

    In this paper, the tensile, fatigue and creep properties of the Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steel T91 and of the Austenitic Stainless (AS) Steel 316L in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or lead, obtained in the different organizations participating to the EUROTRANS-DEMETRA project are reviewed. The results show a remarkable consistency, referring to the variety of metallurgical and surface state conditions studied. Liquid Metal Embrittlement (LME) effects are shown, remarkable on heat-treated hardened T91 and also on corroded T91 after long-term exposure to low oxygen containing Liquid Metal (LM), but hardly visible on passive or oxidized smooth T91 specimens. For T91, the ductility trough was estimated, starting just above the melting point of the embrittler (T{sub M,E} = 123.5 deg. C for LBE, 327 deg. C for lead) with the ductility recovery found at 425 deg. C. LME effects are weaker on 316L AS steel. Liquid Metal Assisted Creep (LMAC) effects are reported for the T91/LBE system at 550 deg. C, and for the T91/lead system at 525 deg. C. Today, if the study of the LME effects on T91 and 316L in LBE or lead can be considered well documented, in contrast, complementary investigations are necessary in order to quantify the LMAC effects in these systems, and determine rigorously the threshold creep conditions.

  19. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh, E-mail: mjo99@kims.re.kr [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Min-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-ku, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Min-Gu [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-Dong, Geumjeong-gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Heung Nam [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs.

  20. Effect of Microstructures and Tempering Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of 9Cr-2W Reduced-Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min-Gu; Kang, Nam Hyun; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of microstructures (martensite, ferrite, or mixed ferrite and martensite) on the mechanical properties. Of particular interest was the Charpy impact results for 9Cr-2W reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels. Under normalized conditions, steel with martensitic microstructure showed superior tensile strength and Charpy impact results. This may result from auto-tempering during the transformation of martensite. On the other hand, both ferrite, and ferrite mixed with martensite, showed unusually poor Charpy impact results. This is because the ferrite phases, and coarse M_23C_6 carbides at the ferrite-grain boundaries acted as cleavage crack propagation paths, and as preferential initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. After the tempering heat treatment, although tensile strength decreased, the energy absorbed during the Charpy impact test drastically increased for martensite, and ferrite mixed with martensite. This was due to the tempered martensite. On the other hand, there were no distinctive differences in tensile and Charpy impact properties of steel with ferrite microstructure, when comparing normalized and tempered conditions.

  1. Reduced Antivation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Eurofer 97 as Possible Structural Material for Fusion Devices. Metallurgical Characterization on As-Received Condition and after Simulated Services Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A. M.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2004-07-01

    Metallurgical Characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97, on as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatment in the temperature range from 400 degree centigree to 600 degree centigree for periods up to 10.000 h, was carried out. The microstructure of the steel remained stable (tempered martensite with M{sub 2}3 C{sub 6} and MX precipitates) after the thermal ageing treatments studied in this work. In general, this stability was also observed in the mechanical properties. The Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of hardness, ultimate tensile stress, 0,2% proof stress, USE and T{sub 0}3 regardless of the investigated material condition. However, ageing at 600 degree centigree for 10.000 ha caused a slight increase in the DBTT, of approximately 23. In terms of creep properties, the steel shows in general adequate creep rupture strength levels for short rupture times. However, the results obtained up to now for long time creep rupture tests at 500 degree centigree suggests a change in the deformation mechanisms. (Author) 62 refs.

  2. Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Eurofer 97 as Possible Structural Material for Fusion Devices. Metallurgical Characterization on As-Received Condition and after Simulated Services Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A. M.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2004-01-01

    Metallurgical Characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97, on as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatment in the temperature range from 400 degree centigree to 600 degree centigree for periods up to 10.000 h, was carried out. The microstructure of the steel remained stable (tempered martensite with M 2 3 C 6 and MX precipitates) after the thermal ageing treatments studied in this work. In general, this stability was also observed in the mechanical properties. The Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of hardness, ultimate tensile stress, 0,2% proof stress, USE and T 0 3 regardless of the investigated material condition. However, ageing at 600 degree centigree for 10.000 ha caused a slight increase in the DBTT, of approximately 23 . In terms of creep properties, the steel shows in general adequate creep rupture strength levels for short rupture times. However, the results obtained up to now for long time creep rupture tests at 500 degree centigree suggests a change in the deformation mechanisms. (Author) 62 refs

  3. A study on influence of heat input variation on microstructure of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weld metal produced by GTAW process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Srinivasan, G.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel is a major structural material for test blanket module (TBM) to be incorporated in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme to study the breeding of tritium in fusion reactors. This material has been mainly developed to achieve significant reduction in the induced radioactivity from the structural material used. Fabrication of TBM involves extensive welding, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process is one of the welding processes being considered for this purpose. In the present work, the effect of heat input on microstructure of indigenously developed RAFM steel weld metal produced by GTAW process has been studied. Autogenous bead-on-plate welding, autogenous butt-welding, butt-welding with filler wire addition, and pulsed welding on RAFMS have been carried out using GTAW process respectively. The weld metal is found to contain δ-ferrite and its volume fraction increased with increase in heat input. This fact suggests that δ-ferrite content in the weld metal is influenced by the cooling rate during welding. It was also observed that the hardness of the weld metal decreased with increase in δ-ferrite content. This paper highlights the effect of heat input and PWHT duration on microstructure and hardness of welds.

  4. Irradiation Creep and Swelling of Russian Ferritic-Martensitic Steels Irradiated to Very High Exposures in the BN-350 Fast Reactor at 305-335 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konobeev, Yury V.; Dvoriashin, Alexander M.; Porollo, S.I.; Shulepin, S.V.; Budylkin, N.I.; Mironova, Elena G.; Garner, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Russian ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels EP-450, EP-852 and EP-823 were irradiated in the BN-350 fast reactor in the form of gas-pressurized creep tubes. The first steel is used in Russia for hexagonal wrappers in fast reactors. The other steels were developed for compatibility with Pb-Bi coolants and serve to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. In an earlier paper we published data on irradiation creep of EP-450 and EP-823 at temperatures between 390 and 520C, with dpa levels ranging from 20 to 60 dpa. In the current paper new data on the irradiation creep and swelling of EP-450 and EP-852 at temperatures between 305 and 335C and doses ranging from 61 to 89 dpa are presented. Where comparisons are possible, it appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures <420C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation-related densification. These irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F/M steels is about one-half that of austenitic steels.

  5. Irradiation Creep of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels EP-450, EP-823 and EI-852 Irradiated in the BN-350 Reactor over Wide Ranges of Irradiation Temperature and Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porollo, S.I.; Konobeev, Y.V.; Ivanov, A.A.; Shulepin, S.V.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels appear to be the most promising materials for advanced nuclear systems, especially for fusion reactors. Their main advantages are higher resistance to swelling and lower irradiation creep rate as has been repeatedly demonstrated in examinations of these materials after irradiation. Nevertheless, available experimental data on irradiation resistance of F/M steels are insufficient, with the greatest deficiency of data for high doses and for both low and high irradiation temperatures. From the very beginning of operation the BN-350 fast reactor has been used for irradiation of specimens of structural materials, including F/M steels. The most unique feature of BN-350 was its low inlet sodium temperature, allowing irradiation at temperatures over a very wide range of temperatures compared with the range in other fast reactors. In this paper data are presented on swelling and irradiation creep of three Russian F/M steels EP-450, EP-823 and EI-852, irradiated in experimental assemblies of the BN-350 reactor at temperatures in the range of 305-700 deg. C to doses ranging from 20 to 89 dpa. The investigation was performed using gas-pressurized creep tubes with hoop stresses in the range of 0 - 294 MPa. (authors)

  6. Effects of Ti and Ta addition on microstructure stability and tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for nuclear fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Kyu; Lee, Ji Won; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang Hoon; Hong, Hyun Uk

    2018-03-01

    The effects of Ti and Ta addition on microstructure stability and tensile properties of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been investigated. Ti addition of 0.06 wt% to conventional RAFM reference base steel (Fe-9.3Cr-0.93W-0.22V-0.094Ta-0.1C) was intended to promote the precipitation of nano-sized (Ti,W) carbides with a high resistance to coarsening. In addition, the Ti addition was substituted for 0.094 wt% Ta. The Ti-added RAFM steel (Ti-RAFM) exhibited a higher yield strength (ΔYS = 32 MPa) at 600 °C than the reference base steel due to additional precipitation hardening by (Ti,W)-rich MX with an average size of 6.1 nm and the area fraction of 2.39%. However, after thermal exposure at 600 °C for 1000 h, this Ti-RAFM was more susceptible to degradation than the reference base steel; the block width increased by 77.6% in Ti-RAFM after thermal exposure while the reference base steel showed only 9.1% increase. In order to suppress diffusion rate during thermal exposure, the large-sized Ta element with low activation was added to Ti-RAFM. The Ta-added Ti-RAFM steel exhibited good properties with outstanding microstructure stability. Quantitative comparison in microstructures was discussed with a consideration of Ti and Ta addition.

  7. Comparative study of eddy current and Barkhausen noise nondestructive testing methods in microstructural examination of ferrite-martensite dual-phase steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanei, S.; Kashefi, M.; Mazinani, M.

    2014-04-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrite-martensite dual-phase steels were evaluated using eddy current and Barkhausen noise nondestructive testing methods and correlated with their microstructural changes. Several routes were used to produce different microstructures of dual-phase steels. The first route was different heat treatments in γ region to vary the ferrite grain size (from 9.47 to 11.12 in ASTM number), and the second one was variation in intercritical annealing temperatures (from 750 to 890 °C) in order to produce different percentages of martensite in dual-phase microstructure. The results concerning magnetic Barkhausen noise are discussed in terms of height, position and shape of Barkhausen noise profiles, taking into account two main aspects: ferrite grain size, and different percentages of martensite. Then, eddy current testing was used to study the mentioned microstructural changes by detection of impedance variations. The obtained results show that microstructural changes have a noticeable effect on the magnetic properties of dual-phase steels. The results reveal that both magnetic methods have a high potential to be used as a reliable nondestructive tool to detect and monitor microstructural changes occurring during manufacturing of dual-phase steels.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of reference 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS low activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muroga, T., E-mail: muroga@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nagasaka, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Li, Y.; Abe, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ukai, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Okuda, T. [Kobelco Research Institute, 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2271 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    For the purpose of arranging reference alloys available for various characterization efforts by Japanese fusion research groups, fabrication of reference 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS steels have been carried out with similar manufacturing processes followed by various characterizations. The fabrication proceeded with powder mixing, MA, encapsulation into mild steel cases, hot extrusion and hot forging, followed by final heat treatments. Each alloy was extruded into three bars. The characterization included chemical composition analysis, SEM and TEM microstructural observations, hardness tests, tensile tests at RT and 973 K, and relatively short-term thermal creep tests at 973 K. Room temperature hardness for 9Cr-ODS was larger than 12Cr-ODS, the former showing large increase when annealing temperature exceeded 1200 K and the latter showing no significant change with annealing temperature. Tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS was significantly larger than that of 12Cr-ODS at RT but comparable at 973 K. 9Cr-ODS showed longer and shorter creep rupture time than 12Cr-ODS at high and low stress levels, respectively. The mechanism of the difference in creep properties of the two alloys was discussed.

  9. Experimental specifications for eutectic reaction between metallic fuel and HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Nam, Cheol; Lee, Byoung Oon; Ryu, Woo Seog

    1998-10-01

    The chemical interaction between metallic fuel and cladding is important in designing the fuel pin of the KALIMER. When metal fuel and cladding are contacted, the elements in fuel and cladding are inter-diffuse each other, forming the reaction layers at interface. The reaction layers may cause two important factors in aspects of fuel pin integrity. Firstly, it degrades cladding strength by reducing effective cladding thickness. Secondly, these layers accelerate eutectic reaction at transient conditions. To evaluate these phenomena, the diffusion couple experiment is planned by using metal fuels with various zirconium contents and HT-9 steel. The U-Zr fuel alloys will be used for the experiment with the different zirconium contents, these are 8, 10 and 12 weight %. This experiment aims to evaluate the effects of zirconium content on the chemical reaction. Furthermore, the reaction rate and threshold temperature of the eutectic melting will be determined as a function of the zirconium content. This document describes the detail experimental specifications for the eutectic reaction such as test setup, test requirements and test procedure. (author). 10 refs

  10. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He{sup +} beam and sequential He{sup +} and H{sup +} beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C.

  11. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenhui; Guo, Liping; Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng; Ren, Yaoyao; Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He + beam and sequential He + and H + beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C

  12. Investigation on microstructure and properties of narrow-gap laser welding on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel CLF-1 with a thickness of 35 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shikai; Zhang, Jianchao; Yang, Jiaoxi; Lu, Junxia; Liao, Hongbin; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2018-05-01

    Reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel is chosen as a structural material for test blanket modules (TBMs) to be constructed in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). Chinese specific RAFM steel named with CLF-1 has been developed for CFETR. In this paper, a narrow-gap groove laser multi-pass welding of CLF-1 steel with thickness of 35 mm is conduced by YLS-15000 fiber laser. Further, the microstructures of different regions in the weld joint were characterized, and tensile impact and micro-hardness tests were carried out for evaluating the mecharical properties. The results show that the butt weld joint of CLF-1 steel with a thickness of 35 mm was well-formed using the optimal narrow-gap laser filler wire welding and no obvious defects was found such as incomplete fusion cracks and pores. The microstructures of backing layer is dominated by lath martensites and the Heat-Affected Zone (HAZ) was mainly filled with two-phase hybrid structures of secondary-tempering sorbites and martensites. The filler layer is similar to the backing layer in microstructures. In tensile tests, the tensile samples from different parts of the joint all fractured at base metal (BM). The micro-hardness of weld metal (WM) was found to be higher than that of BM and the Heat-Affected Zone (HAZ) exhibited no obvious softening. After post weld heat treatment (PWHT), it can be observed that the fusion zone of the autogenous welding bead and the upper filling beads mainly consist of lath martensites which caused the lower impact absorbing energy. The HAZ mainly included two-phase hybrid structures of secondary-tempering sorbites and martensites and exhibited favorable impact toughness.

  13. The effect of microstructural change on the Charpy impact properties of the high-strength ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) irradiated in JOYO/MARICO-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Yasuhide; Akasaka, Naoaki; Yoshitake, Tsunemitsu; Abe, Yasuhiro

    2004-03-01

    It is well known that the irradiation embrittlement is one of the most important issues to apply ferritic steels for FBR core materials, although ferritic steels have been considered to be candidate core materials of the commercialized FBR core material because of their superior swelling resistance. In order to evaluate the effects of microstructural changes during irradiation on the Charpy impact properties of the high-strength ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS), microstructural observations were performed with transmission electron microscopy on ruptured halves of the half-sized Charpy specimens of PNC-FMS irradiated in the JOYO/MARICO-1. The results obtained in this study are as follows: (1) There was remarkable disappearance of the lath of martensite in the samples irradiated at 650degC, although there was no significant change in microstructures, especially the lath of martensite between the samples irradiated at 500degC and unirradiated. The disappearance of martensitic lath in the samples irradiated at 650degC was larger than that of the samples thermally aged at 650degC. (2) The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of irradiated PNC-FMS is judged to increase with the disappearance of martensitic lath and to decrease with the recovery in dislocations. (3) The decrease in the upper shelf energy (USE) of irradiated PNC-FMS is significantly accompanied by the change of precipitation behavior. (4) The Charpy impact properties and microstructures of PNC-FMS irradiated at 500degC were superior under these irradiation conditions. In future, it is necessary to establish how to evaluate Charpy impact properties in a high fluence region, based on theoretical methods introduced from the data gained in low fluence experiments, in addition to expanding the data area widely. (author)

  14. It was the demonstration of industrial steel production capacity ferritic-martensitic Spanish ASTURFER scale demand ITER; Hacia la demostracion de capacidad de produccion industrial del acero ferritico-martensitico espanol ASTURFER a escala de demanda ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coto, R.; Serrano, M.; Moran, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Artimez, J. A.; Belzunce, J.; Sedano, L.

    2013-07-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) structural steels are considered as candidate materials with notable possibilities to be incorporated to fusion reactor ITER, nowadays under construction, and future fusion reactor DEMO, involving a notable forecasting of supply materials, with a considerable limitation due to the few number of furnishes currently on the market. The manufacture at an industrial scale of the ASTURFER steel, developed at laboratory scale by ITMA Materials Technology and the Structural Materials Division of the Technology Division of CIEMAT would be a significant business opportunity for steelwork companies.

  15. Optimization of the Fabrication Route of Ferritic/Martensitic ODS Cladding Tubes: Metallurgical Approach and Pilgering Numerical Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logé, R.E.; Vanegas-Marques, E.; Mocellin, K.; Toualbi, L.; Carlan, Y. de

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • Fabrication route of 9Cr-ODS (martensitic) alloys is well controlled. • Fabrication route of 14Cr-ODS (ferritic) should be further optimized. • The choice between a ferritic or a martensitic grade is not already done, it will depend also on the behaviour under irradiation, the corrosion resistance … • Part of the optimization can rely on numerical simulation of pilgering: • The constitutive behaviour is an essential ingredient for process optimization: appropriate cyclic laws must be used. • The numerical analysis can look at cracking risks, final yield stress, and even residual stress state or surface roughness. • HPTR laboratory approaches can be translated to the (industrial) VMR process provided some additional adjustments in the numerical code

  16. Metallurgical characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97 on as-received condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A.M.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2001-01-01

    A new European reduced activation ferrous alloy (denominated Eurofer'97) developed as possible first wall and breeder blanket structural material for fusion applications is being characterized. In this paper, activities specially focussed to investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties of this material on the as-received state (normalized at 980 degree sign C/27' plus tempered at 760 degree sign C/90'/air cooled) are presented. Chemical analyses, a detailed microstructural study, hardness, tensile and Charpy tests have been carried out and are compared to the reduced activation material F-82H modified previously studied. The results show that the Eurofer'97 is a fully martensitic steel free of δ-ferrite with similar tensile and better impact properties than the F-82H modified steel. Two types of carbides have been observed in the Eurofer'97, namely, Cr rich precipitates and Ta/V rich precipitates, tentatively identified as M 23 C 6 type and (Ta,V)C type, respectively

  17. Thermal-Fatigue Analysis of W-coated Ferritic-Martensitic Steel Mockup for Fusion Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Suk Kwon; Park, Seong Dae; Kim, Dong Jun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Yeon; Hong, Bong Guen [Chonbuk University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, commercial ANSYS-CFX for thermalhydraulic analysis and ANSYS-mechanical for the thermo-mechanical analysis are used to evaluate the thermal-lifetime of the mockup to determine the test conditions. Also, the Korea Heat Load Test facility with an Electron Beam (KoHLT-EB) will be used and its water cooling system is considered to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis especially for considering the two-phase analysis with a higher heat flux conditions. Through the ITER blanket first wall (BFW) development project in Korea, the joining methods were developed with a beryllium (Be) layer as a plasma-facing material, a copper alloy (CuCrZr) layer as a heat sink, and type 316L austenitic stainless steel (SS316L) as a structural material. And joining methods were developed such as Be as an armor and FMS as a structural material, or W as an armor and FMS as a structural material were developed through the test blanket module (TBM) program. As a candidate of PFC for DEMO, a new W/FMS joining methods, W coating with plasma torch, have been developed. The HHF test conditions are found by performing a thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analysis with the conventional codes such as ANSYSCFX and .mechanical especially for considering the two-phase condition in cooling tube.

  18. The Cold Gas-Dynamic Spray and Characterization of Microcrystalline and Nanocrystalline Copper Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    set—the vial itself is constructed of a polycarbonate shell with stainless steel end plugs with a stainless steel impactor contained within the vial...Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/ Martensitic Steels ,” M.S. Thesis, MAE Dept., Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, 2012...Process. From [2]. .....................................................5  Figure 3.  Individual Particle after Impact with a Steel Substrate. From [15

  19. Thermal-Fatigue Analysis of W-joined Ferritic-Martensitic Steel Mockup for Fusion Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Won; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Kim, Suk Kwon; Park, Seong Dae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyu In [Gentec Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Yeon; Hong, Bong Guen [Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Through the ITER blanket first wall (BFW) development project in Korea, the joining methods were developed with a beryllium (Be) layer as a plasma-facing material, a copper alloy (CuCrZr) layer as a heat sink, and type 316L austenitic stainless steel (SS316L) as a structural material. And joining methods were developed such as Be as an armor and FMS as a structural material, or W as an armor and FMS as a structural material were developed through the test blanket module (TBM) program. As a candidate of PFC for DEMO, W/FMS joining methods have been developed and a new Ti interlayer was applied differently from the previous work. In the present study, the W/FMS PFC development was introduced with the following procedure to apply to the PFCs for a fusion reactor: (1) Three W/FMS mockups were fabricated using the developed HIP followed by a post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT). (2) Because the High Heat Flux (HHF) test should be performed over the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions to confirm the joint's integrity, the test conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis. In this study, commercial ANSYS-CFX for thermalhydraulic analysis and ANSYS-mechanical for the thermo-mechanical analysis are used to evaluate the thermal-lifetime of the mockup to determine the test conditions. Also, the Korea Heat Load Test facility with an Electron Beam (KoHLT-EB) will be used and its water cooling system is considered to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis especially for considering the two-phase analysis with a higher heat flux conditions. From the analysis, the heating and the cooling conditions were determined for 0.5- and 1.0-MW/m{sup 2} heat fluxes, respectively. Elastic-plastic analysis is performed to determine the lifetime and finally, the 1.0 MW/m{sup 2} heat flux conditions are determined up to 4,306 cycles. The test will be done in the near future and the measured temperatures will be compared with the present simulation results.

  20. Development of filler wires for welding of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel for India's test blanket module of ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, G.; Arivazhagan, B.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2010-07-01

    Indigenous development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel has become necessary for India as a participant in the International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme. Optimisation of RAFM steel is in an advanced stage for the fabrication of test blanket module (TBM) components. Simultaneously, development of RAFM steel filler wires has been undertaken since there is no commercial filler wires are available for fabrication of components using RAFM steel. The purpose of this study is to develop filler wires that can be directly used for both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and for narrow-gap gas tungsten arc welding (NG-GTAW) that reduces the deposited weld metal volume and heat affected zone (HAZ) width. Further, the filler wires would also be used for hybrid laser-MIG welding for thick section joints. In view of meeting all the requirements, a detailed specification was prepared for the development of filler wires for welding of RAFM steel. Meanwhile, welding trials have been carried out on 2.5 mm thick plates of the RAFM steel using GTAW process at various heat inputs with a preheat temperature of 250 C followed by various post weld heat treatments (PWHT). The microstructure of the weld metal in most of the cases showed the presence of some amount of delta-ferrite. Filler wires as per specifications have also been developed with minor variations on the chemistry against the specified values. Welding parameters and PWHT parameters were optimized to qualify the filler wires without the presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal and with optimized mechanical properties. Results showed that the weld metals are free from delta-ferrite. Tensile properties at ambient temperature and at 500 C are well above the specified values, and are much higher than the base metal values. Ductile Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT) has been evaluated as -81 C based on the 68 J criteria. The present study highlights the basis and methodology

  1. Influence of Tool Rotational Speed and Post-Weld Heat Treatments on Friction Stir Welded Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manugula, Vijaya L.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Mythili, R.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of tool rotational speed (200 and 700 rpm) on evolving microstructure during friction stir welding (FSW) of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel (RAFMS) in the stir zone (SZ), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) have been explored in detail. The influence of post-weld direct tempering (PWDT: 1033 K (760 °C)/ 90 minutes + air cooling) and post-weld normalizing and tempering (PWNT: 1253 K (980 °C)/30 minutes + air cooling + tempering 1033 K (760 °C)/90 minutes + air cooling) treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties has also been assessed. The base metal (BM) microstructure was tempered martensite comprising Cr-rich M23C6 on prior austenite grain and lath boundaries with intra-lath precipitation of V- and Ta-rich MC precipitates. The tool rotational speed exerted profound influence on evolving microstructure in SZ, TMAZ, and HAZ in the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated states. Very high proportion of prior austenitic grains and martensite lath boundaries in SZ and TMAZ in the as-welded state showed lack of strengthening precipitates, though very high hardness was recorded in SZ irrespective of the tool speed. Very fine-needle-like Fe3C precipitates were found at both the rotational speeds in SZ. The Fe3C was dissolved and fresh precipitation of strengthening precipitates occurred on both prior austenite grain and sub-grain boundaries in SZ during PWNT and PWDT. The post-weld direct tempering caused coarsening and coalescence of strengthening precipitates, in both matrix and grain boundary regions of TMAZ and HAZ, which led to inhomogeneous distribution of hardness across the weld joint. The PWNT heat treatment has shown fresh precipitation of M23C6 on lath and grain boundaries and very fine V-rich MC precipitates in the intragranular regions, which is very much similar to that prevailed in BM prior to FSW. Both the PWDT and PWNT treatments caused considerable reduction in the hardness of SZ

  2. Review of creep resistant alloys for power plant applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagode

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A paper describes the most popular alloys for power plant application as well as the most promising alloys for future application in that technology. The components in power plants operate in severe conditions (high temperatures and pressures and they are expected reliable service for 30 years and more. The correct choice of the material is, thus, of a very importance. The paper describes the development as well as advantages and disadvantages of convenient ferritic/martensitic steels, ferritic/bainitic steels, austenitic stainless steels and the new alloys for the application at temperatures of 650°C and more.

  3. Development of Preliminary HT9 Cladding Tube for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Heo, Hyeong Min; Park, Sang Gyu; Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Chan Bock

    2013-01-01

    To achieve manufacturing technology of the fuel cladding tube in order to keep pace with the predetermined schedule in developing SFR fuel, KAERI has launched in developing fuel cladding tube in cooperation with a domestic steelmaking company. After fabricating medium-sized 1.1 ton HT9 ingot, followed by the multiple processes of hot and cold working, preliminary samples of HT9 seamless cladding tube having 7.4mm in outer diameter, 0.56mm in thickness, and 3m in length were fabricated. The objective of this study is to summarize the brief development status of the HT9 cladding tubes. Mechanical properties like axial tension, biaxial burst, pressurized creep and sodium compatibility of the cladding tubes were carried out to set up the performance evaluation technology to test the prototype FMS cladding tube which is going to be manufactured in next stage. As a part of developing fuel cladding for the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), preliminary HT9 cladding tube was fabricated in cooperation with a domestic steelmaking company. Microstructure as well as mechanical tests like axial tensile test, biaxial burst test, and pressurized creep test of the fuel cladding were carried out. Performance of the domestic HT9 tube was revealed to be similar in the previously fabricated foreign HT9 tube. Further prototype FMS cladding tube is going to be manufactured in next year based on this experience. Various test items like mechanical test, sodium compatibility test, microstructural analysis, basic property, cladding performance under transient situation, and performance under ion and neutron irradiation are going be performed in the future to set up the relevant technology for the licensing of the SFR cladding tube

  4. J/sub 1c/ fracture toughness transition behavior of HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1984-01-01

    Small compact tension specimens of two heats of HT-9 were tested at temperatures ranging from room temperature to -192 0 C. The ductile-brittle transition toughness of HT-9 was evaluated using the J-integral approach. There were two loading rates of 2.1 x 10 -5 m/s and 3.2 x 10 -2 m/s. The ductile-brittle transition temperatures of HT-9 (number 1 heat) tested at 2.1 x 10 -5 m/s and HT-9 (number 2 heat) tested at 3.2 x 10 -2 m/s were found to be -60 and -10 0 C, respectively. Results showed the fracture toughness of the former was not sensitive to loading rate and the lower shelf toughness decreased with temperature to a J/sub 1c/ value of 5 kJ/m 2 at -190 0 C. Furthermore, the values of J/sub 1c/ were valid since the thickness of the test specimens was well above the thickness criterion

  5. Mechanical characterization of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel of spanish production; Caracterizacion mecanica de un acero ferritico/martenitico de activacion reducida de produccion espanola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, D.; Serrano, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper shows the first results concerning the characterization of two heats of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFM) made in Spain, called AF1B and AF2A. The results of this characterization are compared with their European counterparts, EUROFER97-2, which was chosen as reference material. All activities described were performed in the Structural Materials Unit of CIEMAT, within the national project TECNO-FUS CONSOLIDER INGENIO.The two Spanish heats have the same production process and heat treatment. Both heats have a similar tensile behaviour similar to EUROFER97-2, but on the other hand impact properties are lower. The microstructure of AF1B reveals large biphasic inclusions that affecting its mechanical properties, especially the impact properties. AF2A casting was free of these inclusions. (Author) 24 refs.

  6. Synergies Between ' and Cavity Formation in HT-9 Following High Dose Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Saleh, Tarik A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eftink, Benjamin P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Candidate cladding materials for advanced nuclear power reactors including fast reactor designs require materials capable of withstanding high dose neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures. One candidate material, HT-9, through various research programs have demonstrated the ability to withstand significant swelling and other radiation-induced degradation mechanisms in the high dose regime (>50 displacements per atom, dpa) at elevated temperatures (>300 C). Here, high efficiency multi-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) acquisition with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and modeling technique is used to probe the microstructural features that contribute to the exceptional swelling resistance of HT-9. In particular, the synergies between ' and fine-scale and moderate-scale cavity formation is investigated.

  7. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure in experimental and commercial ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Thomas, L.E.

    1983-05-01

    A series of microstructural studies have been undertaken on fast-reactor-irradiated specimens of experimental ferritic alloys and ferritic/martensitic commercial alloys covering a broad range of compositions and starting microstructures. It is found that voids do indeed form in ferritic alloys and that dislocation loops and tangles are created during irradiation at temperatures below 500 0 C. Swelling rates as high as 0.25% per 10 22 n/cm 2 have been measured. However, the major effect of irradiation is precipitation and precipitation can suppress void swelling completely and/or be responsible for degradation of mechanical properties

  8. Time-temperature characteristics of the various heat-affected zones in HT-9 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Temperatures at different distances from the fusion boundary were measured during GTA weld depositing MTS-4 filler wire on 9.52-mm (3/8 in.) thick HT-9 plate. Peak temperature measurements indicate each of the heat-affected regions to be austenitized. An exponential expression has been used to describe the cooling curves as a function of peak temperature (or distance) from the fusion boundary

  9. Microstructural comparison of HT-9 irradiated in HFIR and EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    A series of specimens of HT-9 heat 91354 have been examined following irradiation in HFIR to 39 dpa at 300, 400, 500 and 600 0 C and following irradiation in EBR-II to 29 dpa at 390 and 500 0 C. HFIR irradiation was found to have promoted helium bubble formation at all temperatures and voids at 400 0 C. Cavitation had not been observed at lower fluence, nor was it found in EBR-II irradiated specimens. The onset of void swelling in HFIR is attributed to helium generation. The observations provide an explanation for saturation of ductile-brittle transition temperature shifts with increasing fluence

  10. Thermal expansion characteristics of Fe-9Cr-0.12C-0.56Mn-0.24V-1.38W-0.06Ta (wt.%) reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Raju; Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Rai, Arun Kumar; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Saibaba, Saroja; Jayakumar, Tammana; Rajendra Kumar, Ellappan

    2015-04-01

    The lattice and bulk thermal expansion behavior of an Indian version of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (INRAFM) steel has been quantified using high temperature X-ray diffraction and dilatometry. The lattice parameter of tempered α-ferrite phase exhibited a smooth quadratic increase with temperature, while that of γ-austenite remained fairly linear up to 1273 K. The results suggest that α-ferrite + Carbides → γ-austenite transformation occurs upon continuous heating in the temperature range, 1146 ⩽ T ⩽ 1173 K. Further, this transformation is found to be accompanied by a reduction in average atomic volume. The mean linear thermal expansion coefficients of tempered α-ferrite and γ-austenite phases are estimated to be about 1.48 × 10-5 and 2.4 × 10-5 K-1 respectively. The magnetic contribution to relative thermal dilatation (Δl/l298)mag is found to be small and negative, as compared to phonon contribution.

  11. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  12. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jung, Y. H.; Bang, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    The systematic study was performed to develop the advanced corrosion-resistant Zr alloys for high burnup and Gen IV application. The corrosion behavior was significantly changed with the alloy composition and the corrosion environment. In general, the model alloys with a higher alloying elements showed a higher corrosion resistance. Among the model alloys tested in this study, Zr-10Cr-0.2Fe showed the best corrosion resistance regardless of the corrosion condition. The oxide on the higher corrosion-resistant alloy such as Zr-1.0Cr-0.2Fe consisted of mainly columnar grains, and it have a higher tetragonal phase stability. In comparison with other alloys being considered for the SCWR, the Zr alloys showed a lower corrosion rate than ferritic-martensitic steels. The results of this study imply that, at least from a corrosion standpoint, Zr alloys deserve consideration as potential cladding or structural materials in supercritical water cooled reactors

  13. Magnetic forces on a ferromagnetic HT-9 first wall/blanket and coolant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechtenberg, T.A.; Dahms, C.; Attaya, H.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison)

    1984-01-01

    The GFUN 3D code was used to model the toroidal fields and determine the magnetic body forces on the STARFIRE design for coolant pipes exiting the first wall sector and first wall/blanket modules. The HT-9 coolant pipes were modeled on the basis of a square bar having the same length and material volume as the coolant pipes. The stress analysis was performed using these magnetic forces applied to a pipe of 4 meters length, 8.25 cm O.D., and 0.75 cm thickness by the MODSAP stress analysis code. For the first wall/blanket module, GFUN 3D does not allow full modeling of the complex thin-walled structure or numerous small tubes because of the element aspect ratio limitations. Therefore, to obtain three dimensional loads, a solid homogeneous equivalent structure was used

  14. Radiation response of alloy T91 at damage levels up to 1000 peak dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gigax, J.G., E-mail: gigaxj@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Chen, T.; Kim, Hyosim [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Wang, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Price, L.M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Aydogan, E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Maloy, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schreiber, D.K.; Toloczko, M.B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Shao, Lin [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Ferritic/martensitic alloys are required for advanced reactor components to survive 500–600 neutron-induced dpa. Ion-induced void swelling of ferritic/martensitic alloy T91 in the quenched and tempered condition has been studied using a defocused, non-rastered 3.5 MeV Fe-ion beam at 475 °C to produce damage levels up to 1000 peak displacements per atom (dpa). The high peak damage level of 1000 dpa is required to reach 500–600 dpa level due to injected interstitial suppression of void nucleation in the peak dpa region, requiring data extraction closer to the surface at lower dpa levels. At a relatively low peak damage level of 250 dpa, voids began to develop, appearing first in the near-surface region. With increasing ion fluence, swelling was observed deeper in the specimen, but remained completely suppressed in the back half of the ion range, even at 1000 peak dpa. The local differences in dpa rate in the front half of the ion range induce an “internal temperature shift” that strongly influences the onset of swelling, with shorter transient regimes resulting from lower dpa rates, in agreement not only with observations in neutron irradiation studies but also in various ion irradiations. Swelling was accompanied by radiation-induced precipitation of Cu-rich and Si, Ni, Mn-rich phases were observed by atom probe tomography, indicating concurrent microchemical evolution was in progress. In comparison to other ferritic/martensitic alloys during ion irradiation, T91 exhibits good swelling resistance with a swelling incubation period of about 400 local dpa.

  15. Radiation response of alloy T91 at damage levels up to 1000 peak dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gigax, J. G.; Chen, T.; Kim, Hyosim; Wang, J.; Price, L. M.; Aydogan, E.; Maloy, S. A.; Schreiber, D. K.; Toloczko, M. B.; Garner, F. A.; Shao, Lin

    2016-12-01

    Ferritic/martensitic alloys are required for advanced reactor components to survive 500e600 neutroninduced dpa. Ion-induced void swelling of ferritic/martensitic alloy T91 in the quenched and tempered condition has been studied using a defocused, non-rastered 3.5 MeV Fe-ion beam at 475 C to produce damage levels up to 1000 peak displacements per atom (dpa). The high peak damage level of 1000 dpa is required to reach 500e600 dpa level due to injected interstitial suppression of void nucleation in the peak dpa region, requiring data extraction closer to the surface at lower dpa levels. At a relatively low peak damage level of 250 dpa, voids began to develop, appearing first in the near-surface region. With increasing ion fluence, swelling was observed deeper in the specimen, but remained completely suppressed in the back half of the ion range, even at 1000 peak dpa. The local differences in dpa rate in the front half of the ion range induce an “internal temperature shift” that strongly influences the onset of swelling, with shorter transient regimes resulting from lower dpa rates, in agreement not only with observations in neutron irradiation studies but also in various ion irradiations. Swelling was accompanied by radiation-induced precipitation of Cu-rich and Si, Ni, Mn-rich phases were observed by atom probe tomography, indicating concurrent microchemical evolution was in progress. In comparison to other ferritic/martensitic alloys during ion irradiation, T91 exhibits good swelling resistance with a swelling incubation period of about 400 local dpa.

  16. Effects of HFIR irradiation at 550C on the microstructure and toughness of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.; Huang, F.H.; Johnson, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    Results are reported for base metal and weld metal specimens of HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo following irradiation in HFIR at 55 0 C to 5 dpa. The DBTT shifts in irradiated base metal specimens were 30 0 C for HT-9 and 90 0 C for 9Cr-1Mo with further shifts of 20 0 C for weld metal. Concurrently, strength as measured by hardness increased 15 percent for HT-9 and 25 percent for 9Cr-1Mo. The hardness increases can be attributed in part to defect clusters 1.5 to 3.0 nm in diameter at densities approaching 10 17 cm -3 and also to lower rates of cavity nucleation ahead of the propagating crack

  17. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ X-ray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 °C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 °C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 °C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 °C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments. - Highlights: • The tensile deformation of 9Cr ODS steel was studied by synchrotron irradiation. • The evolution of internal mean stress was calculated. • The evolution of dislocation character was determined by best-fit method. • Edge type dominates plasticity at RT and 300 °C, while screw type dominates at 600 °C.

  18. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guangming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Zhou, Zhangjian, E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Mo, Kun [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Almer, Jonathan [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stubbins, James F. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ X-ray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 °C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 °C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 °C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 °C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments. - Highlights: • The tensile deformation of 9Cr ODS steel was studied by synchrotron irradiation. • The evolution of internal mean stress was calculated. • The evolution of dislocation character was determined by best-fit method. • Edge type dominates plasticity at RT and 300 °C, while screw type dominates at 600 °C.

  19. Interdiffusion between U-Pu-Zr fuel and HT9 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Petri, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    As part of systematic interdiffusion studies of fuel-cladding compatibility in the integral Fast Reactor, a solid-solid diffusion couple was assembled with U-22Pu-23 1 Zr fuel and HT9 2 cladding and annealed at 650 degrees C for 100 hours. The couple was examined for diffusion structure development using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX). Point-by-point and linescan analysis was used to generate composition profiles and diffusion paths. From the composition profiles, average effective interdiffusion coefficients were calculated for individual components on both sides of the Matano plane. Results from this investigation indicate that the same types of phases as would be expected from binary U-Fe, Pu-Fe, and Zr-Fe phase diagrams develop in this couple; and U and Pu are the fastest diffusing fuel components and Fe is the fastest diffusing cladding component. Compared with diffusion couples with binary (U-Zr) fuel, the addition of Pu greatly enhanced the extent of diffusion and affected the types of phases observed

  20. Influence of dynamic sodium environment on the creep-fatigue behaviour of Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, R.; Ganesan, V.; Mariappan, K.; Sukumaran, G.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of dynamic sodium on the CFI behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel has investigated. → The cyclic stress response of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel under flowing sodium environment is similar to that of air environment. → The creep-fatigue endurance of the alloy is found to decrease with introduction of hold time and with increase in the duration of hold time and the factor of life increase in sodium compared to air environment is reduced with increase in hold time. → In contrast to air environment, tensile holds were found to be more damaging than compression hold in sodium environment. → Design rules based on air environment can be safely applied for the components operating in sodium environment. - Abstract: The use of liquid sodium as a heat transfer medium for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) necessitates a clear understanding of the effects of dynamic sodium on low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep and creep-fatigue interaction (CFI) behaviour of reactor structural materials. Mod. 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is the material of current interest for the steam generator components of sodium cooled fast reactors. The steam generator has a design life of 30-40 years. The effects of dynamic sodium on the LCF and CFI behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel have been investigated at 823 and 873 K. The CFI life of the steel showed marginal increase under flowing sodium environment when compared to air environment. Hence, the design rules for creep-fatigue interaction based on air tests can be safely applied for components operating in sodium environment. This paper attempts to explain the observed LCF and CFI results based on the detailed metallography and fractography conducted on the failed samples.

  1. Creep characterization of type 316LN and HT-9 stainless steels by the K-R creep damage model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2001-01-01

    The Kachanov and Rabotnov (K-R) creep damage model was interpreted and applied to type 316LN and HT-9 stainless steels. Seven creep constants of the model, A, B, k, m, λ, γ, and q were determined for type 316LN stainless steel. In order to quantify a damage parameter, the cavity was interruptedly traced during creep for measuring cavity area to be reflected into the damage equation. For type 316LN stainless steel, λ=ε R /ε * and λ f =ε/ε R were 3.1 and increased with creep strain. The creep curve with λ=3.1 depicted well the experimental data to the full lifetime and its damage curve showed a good agreement when γ=24. However for the HT-9 stainless steel, the values of λ and λ f were different as λ=6.2 and λ f =8.5, and their K-R creep curves did not agree with the experimental data. This mismatch in the HT-9 steel was due to the ductile fracture by softening of materials rather than the brittle fracture by cavity growth. The differences of the values in the above steels were attributed to creep ductilities at the secondary and the tertiary creep stages

  2. Low activation vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzenburg, W. van.

    1991-01-01

    The properties and general characteristics of vanadium-base alloys are reviewed in terms of the materials requirements for fusion reactor first wall and blanket structures. In this review attention is focussed on radiation response including induced radioactivity, mechanical properties, compatibility with potential coolants, physical and thermal properties, fabricability and resources. Where possible, properties are compared to those of other leading candidate structural materials, e.g. austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels. Vanadium alloys appear to offer advantages in the areas of long-term activation, mechanical properties at temperatures above 600 deg C, radiation resistance and thermo-hydraulic design, due to superior physical and thermal properties. They also have a potential for higher temperature operation in liquid lithium systems. Disadvantages are associated with their ability to retain high concentrations of hydrogen isotopes, higher cost, more difficult fabrication and welding. A particular concern regarding use of vanadium alloys relates their reactivity with non-metallic elements, such as oxygen and nitrogen. (author). 33 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Development of high performance ODS alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Garner, Frank [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2018-01-29

    This project aims to capitalize on insights developed from recent high-dose self-ion irradiation experiments in order to develop and test the next generation of optimized ODS alloys needed to meet the nuclear community's need for high strength, radiation-tolerant cladding and core components, especially with enhanced resistance to void swelling. Two of these insights are that ferrite grains swell earlier than tempered martensite grains, and oxide dispersions currently produced only in ferrite grains require a high level of uniformity and stability to be successful. An additional insight is that ODS particle stability is dependent on as-yet unidentified compositional combinations of dispersoid and alloy matrix, such as dispersoids are stable in MA957 to doses greater than 200 dpa but dissolve in MA956 at doses less than 200 dpa. These findings focus attention on candidate next-generation alloys which address these concerns. Collaboration with two Japanese groups provides this project with two sets of first-round candidate alloys that have already undergone extensive development and testing for unirradiated properties, but have not yet been evaluated for their irradiation performance. The first set of candidate alloys are dual phase (ferrite + martensite) ODS alloys with oxide particles uniformly distributed in both ferrite and martensite phases. The second set of candidate alloys are ODS alloys containing non-standard dispersoid compositions with controllable oxide particle sizes, phases and interfaces.

  4. Effects of irradiation on ferritic alloys and implications for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-07-01

    This paper reviews the ADIP irradiation effects data base on ferritic (martensitic) alloys to provide reactor teams with an understanding of how such alloys will behave for fusion reactor first wall applications. Irradiation affects dimensional stability, strength and toughness. Dimensional stability is altered by precipitation and void swelling. Swelling as high as 25% may occur in some ferritic alloys at 500 dpa. Irradiation alters strength both during and following irradiation. Irradiation at low temperatures leads to hardening whereas at higher temperatures and high exposures, precipitate coarsening can result in softening. Toughness can also be adversely affected by irradiation. Failure can occur in ferritic in a brittle manner and irradiation induced hardening causes brittle failure at higher temperatures. Even at high test temperatures, toughness is reduced due to reduced failure initiation stresses. 39 refs

  5. Mechanical properties of martensitic alloy AISI 422

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Hu, W.L.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1992-09-01

    HT9 is a martensitic stainless steel that has been considered for structural applications in liquid metal reactors (LMRs) as well as in fusion reactors. AISI 422 is a commercially available martensitic stainless steel that closely resembles HT9, and was studied briefly under the auspices of the US LMR program. Previously unpublished tensile, fracture toughness and charpy impact data on AISI 422 were reexamined for potential insights into the consequences of the compositional differences between the two alloys, particularly with respect to current questions concerning the origin of the radiation-induced embrittlement observed in HT9. 8 refs, 8 figs

  6. Alloy development for cladding and duct applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straalsund, J.L.; Johnson, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Three general classes of materials under development for cladding and ducts are listed. Solid solution strengthened, or austenitic, alloys are Type 316 stainless steel and D9. Precipitation hardened (also austenitic) alloys consist of D21, D66 and D68. These alloys are similar to such commercial alloys as M-813, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Nimonic PE-16. The third general class of alloys is composed of ferritic alloys, with current emphasis being placed on HT-9, a tempered martensitic alloy, and D67, a delta-ferritic steel. The program is comprised of three parallel paths. The current reference, or first generation alloy, is 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel. Second generation alloys for near-term applications include D9 and HT-9. Third generation materials consist of the precipitation strengthened steels and ferritic alloys, and are being considered for implementation at a later time than the first and second generation alloys. The development of second and third generation materials was initiated in 1974 with the selection of 35 alloys. This program has proceeded to today where there are six advanced alloys being evaluated. These alloys are the developmental alloys D9, D21, D57, D66 and D68, together with the commerical alloy, HT-9. The status of development of these alloys is summarized

  7. The co-evolution of microstructure features in self-ion irradiated HT9 at very high damage levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getto, Elizabeth Margaret

    The objective of this study was to understand the co-evolution of microstructure features in self-ion irradiated HT9 at very high damage levels. HT9 (heat 84425) was pre-implanted with 10 atom parts per million helium and then irradiated with 5 MeV Fe++ in the temperature range of 440-480°C to 188 dpa. A damage dependence study from 75 to 650 dpa was performed at the peak swelling temperature of 460°C. The swelling, dislocation and precipitate evolution was determined using Analytic Electron Microscopes in both Conventional Transmission electron microscopy (CTEM) and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) modes. Void swelling reached a nominally linear rate of 0.03%/dpa from 188 to 650 dpa at 460°C. G phase precipitates were observed by 75 dpa and grew linearly up to 650 dpa. M 2X was observed by 250 dpa and peaked in volume fraction at 450 dpa. Dislocation loop evolution was observed up to 650 dpa including a step change in diameter between 375 and 450 dpa; which correlated with nucleation and growth of M2X. The experimental results were interpreted using a rate theory model, the Radiation Induced Microstructure Evolution (RIME), in the damage range from 188 to 650 dpa. A simple system of voids and dislocations was modeled in which the dislocations measured from experiment were used as input, or the dislocations were allowed to evolve dynamically, resulting in swelling that was overestimated by 63% relative to that observed experimentally. G phase had limited effect on the void or dislocation behavior. The behavior of M2X within the microstructure was characterized as a direct effect as a coherent sink, and as an indirect effect in consuming carbon from the matrix, which had the largest impact on both void and dislocation behavior. A slowly monotonically increasing swelling rate was observed both experimentally and computationally, with swelling rates of ˜0.025%/dpa and ˜0.036%/dpa before and after 450 dpa. The agreement in void behavior between

  8. Capability demonstration of simultaneous proton beam irradiation during exposure to molten lead–bismuth eutectic for HT9 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qvist, Staffan; Bolind, Alan Michael; Hosemann, Peter; Wang, Yongqiang; Tesmer, Joseph; De Caro, Magdalena Serrano; Bourke, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We report the design and assembly of a corrosion station to enable simultaneous proton irradiation of a metallic surface that was also in contact with molten lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE). The capability has been established at the ion beam materials laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The engineering design focused on temperature and oxygen content control in the LBE, as well as the ability to achieve doses significantly in excess of 1 dpa in the contact region over the irradiation campaigns. In the preliminary demonstration of capability reported here, a sample made of HT9 steel was placed in contact with LBE at 450 °C and irradiated for 58 h at an average proton beam current of 0.3 μA/mm 2 . SRIM [1] calculations indicate that the nominal surface dose ranged from approximately 3–22 dpa. This paper outlines the experimental setup and design constraints. Characterization of the sample will be reported in a subsequent paper.

  9. Capability demonstration of simultaneous proton beam irradiation during exposure to molten lead–bismuth eutectic for HT9 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qvist, Staffan, E-mail: staffan@berkeley.edu [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Bolind, Alan Michael [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Hosemann, Peter [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Wang, Yongqiang; Tesmer, Joseph; De Caro, Magdalena Serrano; Bourke, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2013-01-11

    We report the design and assembly of a corrosion station to enable simultaneous proton irradiation of a metallic surface that was also in contact with molten lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE). The capability has been established at the ion beam materials laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The engineering design focused on temperature and oxygen content control in the LBE, as well as the ability to achieve doses significantly in excess of 1 dpa in the contact region over the irradiation campaigns. In the preliminary demonstration of capability reported here, a sample made of HT9 steel was placed in contact with LBE at 450 °C and irradiated for 58 h at an average proton beam current of 0.3 μA/mm{sup 2}. SRIM [1] calculations indicate that the nominal surface dose ranged from approximately 3–22 dpa. This paper outlines the experimental setup and design constraints. Characterization of the sample will be reported in a subsequent paper.

  10. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  11. Processing of Advanced Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, P. D. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Hawk, Jeffrey A. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Cowen, Christopher J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760 C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  12. Ion-induced swelling of ODS ferritic alloy MA957 tubing to 500 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B., E-mail: mychailo.toloczko@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Voyevodin, V.N.; Bryk, V.V.; Borodin, O.V.; Mel’nychenko, V.V.; Kalchenko, A.S. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-10-15

    In order to study the potential swelling behavior of the ODS ferritic alloy MA957 at very high dpa levels, specimens were prepared from pressurized tubes that were unirradiated archives of tubes previously irradiated in FFTF to doses as high as 110 dpa. These unirradiated specimens were irradiated with 1.8 MeV Cr{sup +} ions to doses ranging from 100 to 500 dpa and examined by transmission electron microscopy. No co-injection of helium or hydrogen was employed. It was shown that compared to several tempered ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the same facility, these tubes were rather resistant to void swelling, reaching a maximum value of only 4.5% at 500 dpa and 450 °C. In this fine-grained material, the distribution of swelling was strongly influenced by the presence of void denuded zones along the grain boundaries.

  13. Development of Computational Tools for Predicting Thermal- and Radiation-Induced Solute Segregation at Grain Boundaries in Fe-based Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) has been frequently reported in structural materials such as austenitic, ferritic, and ferritic-martensitic stainless steels (SS) that have been widely used in light water reactors (LWRs). RIS has been linked to secondary degradation effects in SS including irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Earlier studies on thermal segregation in Fe-based alloys found that metalloids elements such as P, S, Si, Ge, Sn, etc., embrittle the materials when enrichment was observed at grain boundaries (GBs). RIS of Fe-Cr-Ni-based austenitic steels has been modeled in the U.S. 2015 fiscal year (FY2015), which identified the pre-enrichment due to thermal segregation can have an important role on the subsequent RIS. The goal of this work is to develop thermal segregation models for alloying elements in steels for future integration with RIS modeling.

  14. Influence of irradiation with energy-rich particles on the hardness of the Fe-Cr alloy; Einfluss der Bestrahlung mit energiereichen Teilchen auf die Haerte von Fe-Cr-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintze, Cornelia

    2013-01-14

    Ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for components exposed to high neutron fluxes in future nuclear applications like fusion and generation IV fission reactors. The ductilebrittle transition and its shift to higher temperatures which is predominantly caused by irradiation hardening are main concerns for these materials. In the present work, the irradiation behaviour of binary Fe-Cr model alloys, which represent a simplified model for ferritic/martensitic steels, is studied. To this end irradiation with iron ions is used in order to simulate the neutron-induced damage. Due to the limited penetration depth characterization methods suitable for thin layers have to be applied. In the present case, nanohardness testing and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are employed. The results, including the irradiation-induced hardness change of the layer as a function of chromium content, fluence and irradiation temperature and, for selected cases, quantitative TEM analyses, were exploited to identify irradiation-induced dislocation loops as one source of irradiation hardening. Additional results of small-angle neutron scattering experiments on neutron-irradiated specimens of the same alloys show that nm-scaled α'-phase precipitates also significantly contribute to the irradiation-induced hardness increase. An Orowan model is used to estimate the obstacle strengths posed to dislocation glide by these lattice defects. The topic is stepwise extended to more complex situations with respect to the irradiation conditions and the materials. Considering simultaneous and sequential irradiations with iron- and helium-ions it is shown that the effect of helium on irradiation hardening depends on the chronological order of the irradiations and that the simultaneous introduction of helium in fusion-relevant concentrations amplifies irradiation hardening based on a synergistic effect. There is no

  15. Mechanical characteristics of heterogeneous structures obtained by high-temperature brazing of corrosion-resistant steels with rapidly quenched non-boron nickel-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, B.; Penyaz, M.; Ivannikov, A.; Sevryukov, O.; Bachurina, D.; Fedotov, I.; Voennov, A.; Abramov, E.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing nickel filler metals for high temperature brazing corrosion resistance steels different classes is perspective. The use of these alloys leads to the formation of a complex heterogeneous structure in the diffusion zone that contains separations of intermediate phases such as silicides and borides. This structure negatively affects the strength characteristics of the joint, especially under dynamic loads and in corrosive environment. The use of non-boron filler metals based on the Ni-Si-Be system is proposed to eliminate this structure in the brazed seam. Widely used austenitic 12Cr18Ni10Ti and ferrite-martensitic 16Cr12MoSiWNiVNb reactor steels were selected for research and brazing was carried out. The mechanical characteristics of brazed joints were determined using uniaxial tensile and impact toughness tests, and fractography was investigated by electron microscopy.

  16. Simulation of nanostructural evolution under irradiation in Fe-9%CrC alloys: An object kinetic Monte Carlo study of the effect of temperature and dose-rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chiapetto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the effects of both temperature and dose-rate on the nanostructural evolution under irradiation of the Fe-9%CrC alloy, model material for high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. Starting from an object kinetic Monte Carlo model validated at 563K, we investigate here the accumulation of radiation damage as a function of temperature and dose-rate, attempting to highlight its connection with low-temperature radiation-induced hardening. The results show that the defect cluster mobility becomes high enough to partially counteract the material hardening process only above ∼290°C, while high fluxes are responsible for higher densities of defects, so that an increase of the hardening process with increasing dose-rates may be expected.

  17. Study of neutron irradiation on F82H alloys by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, S.S., E-mail: h.shaosong@ht8.ecs.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kitao, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.; Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Seto, M.

    2015-01-15

    The effects of neutron irradiation on F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel and its model alloys were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The microstructural damage mechanisms of these alloys, during the void incubation period were interpreted using the short range order (SRO) parameters. Results show that within Fe–8Cr alloy, the atoms in the nearest neighbor (NN) of the Fe nuclei were inhomogeneous, prior to irradiation. A configuration trapping model of Cr supported the negative average SRO observed for the NN shells in our Fe–Cr alloys. We found that irradiation also accelerated the SRO in Fe–8Cr through a diffusion mechanism, where Cr atom repulsion was concentration dependent. Finally, comparative studies were conducted on F82H model alloys using the present Mössbauer measurements and our previously reported work on positron annihilation spectroscopy, which further established that irradiation of the alloys promoted the growth of a M{sub 23}C{sub 6} complex.

  18. On the use of tin-lithium alloys as breeder material for blankets of fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuetterer, M.A.; Aiello, G.; Barbier, F.; Giancarli, L.; Poitevin, Y.; Sardain, P.; Szczepanski, J.; Li Puma, A.; Ruvutuso, G.; Vella, G.

    2000-01-01

    Tin-lithium alloys have several attractive thermo-physical properties, in particular high thermal conductivity and heat capacity, that make them potentially interesting candidates for use in liquid metal blankets. This paper presents an evaluation of the advantages and drawbacks caused by the substitution of the currently employed alloy lead-lithium (Pb-17Li) by a suitable tin-lithium alloy: (i) for the European water-cooled Pb-17Li (WCLL) blanket concept with reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel as the structural material; (ii) for the European self-cooled TAURO blanket with SiC f /SiC as the structural material. It was found that in none of these blankets Sn-Li alloys would lead to significant advantages, in particular due to the low tritium breeding capability. Only in forced convection cooled divertors with W-alloy structure, Sn-Li alloys would be slightly more favorable. It is concluded that Sn-Li alloys are only advantageous in free surface cooled reactor internals, as this would make maximum use of the principal advantage of Sn-Li, i.e., the low vapor pressure

  19. Radiation damage simulation studies in the Harwell VEC of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazey, D J; Walters, G P; Buckley, S N; Hanks, W; Bolster, D E.J.; Murphy, S M

    1988-07-01

    Three austenitic (316 L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb); four high-nickel (IN 625, IN 706, PE 16, Fe-25Ni-8Cr) and four ferritic (CRM 12, FV 448, FV 607, FI) alloys have been irradiated with 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions in the Harwell VEC to simulated fusion-reactor doses up to 110 dpa (proportional to 10 MW-yr m/sup -2/) at temperatures from 425 to 625/sup 0/C. Gas production rates appropriate to fusion were obtained from a mixed beam of He+H/sub 2/ in the ratio 1:4 He:H with gas/dpa ratios of 13 appm He/dpa and 52 appm H/dpa. The 316 alloys showed irradiation-induced precipitation and swelling as high as 40% in ST 316-Ti after 110 dpa at 625/sup 0/C. Low swelling (e.g. <2% at 110 dpa) was observed in the high-nickel alloys. The ferritic/martensitic alloys showed negligible swelling (e.g. <0.2% in FV 607 after 100 dpa at 475/sup 0/C). The results demonstrate the high swelling behaviour of 316 alloys and the better swelling resistance of high-nickel and ferritic alloys under simulated fusion conditions.

  20. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

  1. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of 60 Ni which produces no helium, 59 Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ( Nat Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of 59 Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to ∼7 dpa at 300 and 400 degrees C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400 degrees C than at 300 degrees C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from 59 Ni and Nat Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400 degrees C. At 300 degrees C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400 degrees C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces

  2. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  3. Fundamental investigation of point defect interactions in FE-CR alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B.D.; Lee, H.J.; Wong, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Fe-Cr alloys are a leading candidate material for structural applications in Generation TV and fusion reactors, and there is a relatively large database on their irradiation performance. However, complete understanding of the response of Fe-Cr alloys to intermediate-to-high temperature irradiation, including the radiation induced segregation of Cr, requires knowledge of point defect and point defect cluster interactions with Cr solute atoms and impurities. We present results from a hierarchical multi-scale modelling approach of defect cluster behaviour in Fe-Cr alloys. The modelling includes ab initio electronic structure calculations performed using the VASP code with projector-augmented electron wave functions using PBE pseudo-potentials and a collinear treatment of magnetic spins, molecular dynamics using semi-empirical Finnic-Sinclair type potentials, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of coupled defect and Cr transport responsible for microstructural evolution. The modelling results are compared to experimental observations in both binary Fe-Cr and more complex ferritic-martensitic alloys, and provide a basis for understanding a dislocation loop evolution and the observations of Cr enrichment and depletion at grain boundaries in various irradiation experiments. (authors)

  4. Materials for innovative lead alloy cooled nuclear systems: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Georg; Weisenburger, Alfons; Fetzer, Renate; Heinzel, Annette; Jianu, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues for all future innovative nuclear systems including Gen IV reactors are materials. The selection of the structural materials determines the design which has to consider the properties and the availability of the materials. Beside general requirements for material properties that are common for all fast reactor types specific issues arise from coolant compatibility. The high solubility of steel alloying elements in liquid Pb-alloys at reactor relevant temperatures is clearly detrimental. Therefore, all steels that are considered as structural materials have to be protected by dissolution barriers. The most common barriers for steels under consideration are oxide scales that form in situ during operation. However, increasing the temperature above 500 deg. C will result either in dissolution attack or in enhanced oxidation. For higher temperatures additional barriers like alumina forming surface alloys are discussed and investigated. Mechanical loads like creep stress and fretting will act on the steels. These mechanical loads will interact with the coolant and can increase the negative effects. For a LFR (Lead Fast Reactor) Demonstrator and MYHRRA (ADS) austenitic steels (316L) are selected for most in core components. The 15-15Ti is the choice for the fuel cladding of MYHRRA and a Pb cooled demonstrator. For an industrial LFR (Lead Fast Reactor) the ferritic martensitic steel T91 was selected as fuel clad material due to its improved irradiation resistance. T91 is in both designs the material to be used for the heat exchanger. Surface alloying with alumina forming alloys is considered to assure material functionality at higher temperatures and is therefore selected for fuel cladding of the ELFR and the heat exchanger tubes. This presentation will give an overview on the selected materials for innovative Pb alloy cooled nuclear systems considering, beside pure compatibility, the influence of mechanical interaction like creep and

  5. Fracture toughness of ferritic alloys irradiated at FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1986-05-01

    Ferritic compact tension specimens loaded in the Material Open Test Assembly (MOTA) for irradiation during FFTF Cycle 4 were tested at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 428/degree/C. The electrical potential single specimen method was used to measure the fracture toughness of the specimens. Results showed that the fracture toughness of both HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo decreases with increasing test temperature and that the toughness of HT-9 was about 30% higher than that of 9Cr-1Mo. In addition, increasing irradiation temperature resulted in an increase in tearing modulus for both alloys. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of n-irradiated Fe-Cr Model Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijasevic, Milena; Al Mazouzi, Abderrahim

    2008-01-01

    High chromium ( 9-12 wt %) ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors and other advanced systems such as accelerator driven systems (ADS). Their use for these applications requires a careful assessment of their mechanical stability under high energy neutron irradiation and in aggressive environments. In particular, the Cr concentration has been shown to be a key parameter to be optimized in order to guarantee the best corrosion and swelling resistance, together with the least embrittlement. In this work, the characterization of the neutron irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys with different Cr % with respect to microstructure and mechanical tests will be presented. The behavior of Fe-Cr alloys have been studied using tensile tests at different temperature range ( from -160 deg. C to 300 deg. C). Irradiation-induced microstructure changes have been studied by TEM for two different irradiation doses at 300 deg. C. The density and the size distribution of the defects induced have been determined. The tensile test results indicate that Cr content affects the hardening behavior of Fe-Cr binary alloys. Hardening mechanisms are discussed in terms of Orowan type of approach by correlating TEM data to the measured irradiation hardening. (authors)

  7. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved

  8. Technology readiness level (TRL) assessment of cladding alloys for advanced nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reliable fuel claddings are essential for the safe, sustainable and economic operation of nuclear stations. This paper presents a worldwide TRL assessment of advanced claddings for Gen III and IV reactors following an extensive literature review. Claddings include austenitic, ferritic/martensitic (F/M), reduced activation (RA) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels as well as advanced iron-based alloys (Kanthal alloys). Also assessed are alloys of zirconium, nickel (including Hastelloy R ), titanium, chromium, vanadium and refractory metals (Nb, Mo, Ta and W). Comparison is made with Cf/C and SiCf/SiC composites, MAX phase ceramics, cermets and TRISO fuel particle coatings. The results show in general that the higher the maximum operating temperature of the cladding, the lower the TRL. Advanced claddings were found to have lower TRLs than the corresponding fuel materials, and therefore may be the limiting factor in the deployment of advanced fuels and even possibly the entire reactor in the case of Gen IV. (authors)

  9. Establishment of technological basis for fabrication of U-Pu-Zr ternary alloy fuel pins for irradiation tests in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Hironobu; Iwai, Takashi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Arai, Yasuo; Nakamura, Kinya; Ogata, Takanari

    2011-01-01

    A high-purity Ar gas atmosphere glove box accommodating injection casting and sodium-bonding apparatuses was newly installed in the Plutonium Fuel Research Facility of Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, in which several nitride and carbide fuel pins were fabricated for irradiation tests. The experiences led to the establishment of the technological basis of the fabrication of U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel pins for the first time in Japan. After the injection casting of the U-Pu-Zr alloy, the metallic fuel pins were fabricated by welding upper and lower end plugs with cladding tubes of ferritic-martensitic steel. Subsequent to the sodium bonding for filling the annular gap region between the U-Pu-Zr alloy and the cladding tube with the melted sodium, the fuel pins for irradiation tests are inspected. This paper shows the apparatuses and the technological basis for the fabrication of U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel pins for the irradiation test planned at the experimental fast test reactor Joyo. (author)

  10. On the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior of martensitic alloys neutron irradiated to 26 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on specimens made of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo in various heat treatment conditions which were irradiated in EBR-II to 26 dpa at 390 to 500 0 C. The results are compared with previous results on specimens irradiated to 13 dpa. HT-9 base metal irradiated at low temperatures showed a small additional increase in ductile brittle transition temperature and a decrease in upper shelf energy from 13 to 26 dpa. No fluence effect was observed in 9Cr-1Mo base metal. The 9Cr-1Mo weldment showed degraded DBTT but improved USE response compared to base metal, contrary to previous findings on HT-9. Significant differences were observed in HT-9 base metal between mill annealed material and normalized and tempered material. The highest DBTT for HT-9 alloys was 50 0 C higher than for the worst case in 9Cr-1Mo alloys. Fractography and hardness measurements were also obtained. Significant differences in fracture appearance were observed in different product forms, although no dependence on fluence was observed. Failure was controlled by the preirradiation microstructure

  11. Oxidation behavior of steels and Alloy 800 in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmedo, A.M.; Bordoni, R.; Dominguez, G.; Alvarez, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a ferritic-martensitic steel T91 and a martensitic steel AISI 403 up to 750 h, and of AISI 316L and Alloy 800 up to 336 h in deaerated supercritical water, 450ºC-25 MPa, was investigated in this paper. After exposure up to 750 h, the weight gain data, for steels T91 and AISI 403, was fitted by ∆W=k t n , were n are similar for both steels and k is a little higher for T91. The oxide films grown in the steels were characterized using gravimetry, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction. The films were adherent and exhibited a low porosity. For this low oxygen content supercritical water exposure, the oxide scale exhibited a typical duplex structure, in which the scale is composed of an outer iron oxide layer of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) and an inner iron/chromium oxide layer of a non-stoichiometric iron chromite (Fe,Cr) 3 O 4 . Preliminary results, with AISI 316L and Alloy 800, for two exposure periods (168 and 336 h), are also reported. The morphology shown for the oxide films grown on both materials up to 336 h of oxidation in supercritical water, resembles that of a duplex layer film like that shown by stainless steels and Alloy 800 oxide films grown in a in a high temperature and pressure (220-350ºC) of a primary or secondary coolant of a plant. (author) [es

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of resistance-spot-welded joints for A5052 aluminum alloy and DP 600 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jianbin [College of Automotive Collaborative Innovation Center, Chongqing University, No. 174, Shazheng Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yuan, Xinjian, E-mail: xinjianyuan@yahoo.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, Shazheng Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400044 (China); Hu, Zhan; Sun, Changzheng; Zhang, Yanxin; Zhang, Yuxuan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, Shazheng Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2016-10-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of resistance-spot-welded A5052 aluminum alloy and DP 600 dual-phase steel joint were studied. The fusion zone (FZ) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of DP 600 exhibited lath martensite and ferrite-martensite structures, respectively. The microstructure of FZ and HAZ in the A5052 side was composed of cellular crystals and the boundary region of FZ exhibited a columnar crystal morphology. A Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} intermetallic compound (IMC) layer with 3.3 μm thickness was found adjacent to the DP 600 side, whereas a needle-shaped Fe{sub 4}Al{sub 13} IMC layer with length of 0.67 μm to 15.8 μm was found adjacent to the aluminum alloy side. The maximum tensile shear load of the A5052/DP 600 joint was 5.5 KN, with a corresponding molten nugget diameter of 6.3 mm. The fracture morphology of the optimized A5052/DP 600 joint was mainly an elongated dimple fracture accompanied by cleavage fracture. - Highlights: •A5052 and DP 600 with large gaps in properties were investigated by RSW. •The microstructures of RSW joints in DP 600/A5052 were examined detailedly. •The micro/macro-characteristics and strength relations of joints were analyzed.

  13. Mechanical property changes induced in structural alloys by neutron irradiations with different helium to displacement ratios*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, L. K.; Grossbeck, M. L.

    1988-07-01

    Effects of helium on mechanical properties of irradiated structural materials are reviewed. In particular, variations in response to the ratio of helium to displacement damage serve as the focus. Ductility in creep and tensile tests is emphasized. A variety of early work has led to the current concentration on helium effects for fusion reactor materials applications. A battery of techniques has been developed by which the helium to displacement ratio can be varied. Our main discussion is devoted to the techniques of spectral tailoring and isotopic alloying currently of interest for mixed-spectrum reactors. Theoretical models of physical mechanisms by which helium interacts with displacement damage have been developed in terms of hardening to dislocation motion and grain boundary cavitation. Austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels and vanadium alloys are considered. In each case, work at low strain rates, where the main problems may lie, at the helium to displacement ratios appropriate to fusion reactor materials is lacking. Recent experimental evidence suggests that both in-reactor and high helium results may differ substantially from post-irradiation or low helium results. It is suggested that work in these areas is especially needed.

  14. PLEPS study of thermal annealing influence on binary Fe-11.62 % Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sojak, S.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, V.; Stancek, S.; Vitazek, K.; Stacho, M.; Veternikova, J.; Sabelova, V.; Krsjak, V.; Egger, W.; Ravelli, L.; Skarba, M.; Priputen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Lifetime of structural materials is one of the crucial factors for operation of nuclear power plants (NPP). Therefore, high expectations and requirements are put on these materials from the radiation, heat and mechanical resistance point of view. Even higher stresses are expected in new generations of nuclear power plants, such as Generation IV and fusion reactors. Therefore, investigation of new structural materials is among others focused on study of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels with good characteristics as lower activation, good resistance to volume swelling, good radiation, and heat resistance (up to 550 grad C). Our research is focused on study of radiation damage simulated by ion implantations and thermal treatment evaluation of RAFM steels in form of binary Fe-Cr model alloys. Due to the defect production by ions, there was applied an approach for restoration of initial physical and mechanical characteristics of structural materials in the form of thermal annealing, with goal to decrease size and amount of accumulated defects. Experimental analysis of material damage at microstructural level was performed by Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) at the high intensity positron source NEPOMUC at the Munich research reactor FRM-II. (authors)

  15. Microstructure evolution of the oxide dispersion strengthened CLAM steel during mechanical alloying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Liangliang [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Liu, Shaojun, E-mail: shaojun.liu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Mao, Xiaodong [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A nano-sized oxides dispersed ODS-CLAM steel was obtained by MA and HIP. • A minimum saturated grain size of down to 30 nm was achieved by varying the milling time from 0 to 100 h. • Solution of W in the MA powder could be significantly improved by increasing MA rotation speed. - Abstracts: Oxide dispersion strengthened Ferritic/Martensitic steel is considered as one of the most potential structural material for future fusion reactor, owing to its high mechanical properties and good irradiation resistance. The oxide dispersion strengthened China Low Activation Martensitic (ODS-CLAM) steel was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The microstructural evolutions during the process of ball milling and subsequent consolidation were investigated by SEM, XRD and TEM. The results showed that increasing the milling time during the first 36 h milling could effectively decrease the grain size to a value of around 30 nm, over which grain sized remained nearly constant. Increasing the rotation speed promoted the solution of tungsten (W) element obviously and decreased the grain size to a certain degree. Observation on the consolidated and further heat-treated ODS-CLAM steel samples indicated that a martensite microstructure with a high density of nano-particles was achieved.

  16. Development and analysis of diffusion bonding techniques for LBE-cooled spallation targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.T., E-mail: atnelson@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hosemann, P. [University of California - Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Maloy, S.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Spallation sources incorporating solid targets may be driven to utilize liquid metal coolants by neutronics or temperature concerns. If tungsten is chosen as the target material, it will require cladding given its poor performance under irradiation. One option to meet this need are ferritic/martensitic stainless steel alloys. This study investigates possible diffusion bonding techniques suitable to clad tungsten targets with HT9, a high chromium stainless steel familiar to the nuclear industry. A test bonding matrix was performed to identify bonding conditions and process parameters suitable for the three material systems of interest (HT9/Ta, HT9/W, and HT9/HT9). Temperatures of 900 and 1060 Degree-Sign C were investigated along with bonding pressures of 7 and 70 MPa. A nominal soak time of 3 h was used for all tests. Three interlayers were investigated: pure nickel, Ni-6P, and vanadium. Finally, different surface preparation techniques for the tungsten were explored in order to gage their effect on the bond quality. Following joining, the bonds were characterized using an array of microscopy and micromechanical techniques to determine the resulting interface character. The nickel and NiP coatings were found to stabilize austenite at the HT9 surface during bonding, while the vanadium remained generally inert given good solubility in each of the three systems. Intermetallic formation is also a significant concern at elevated bonding temperatures as FeTa, FeW, NiTa, and NiW each rapidly form during interdiffusion. Multiple failures were observed through crack propagation parallel to the interface along the intermetallic phases. Differing contraction rates among the base materials also resulted in brittle fracture within the tungsten during cooling from bonding temperatures. Bonding performed at 900 Degree-Sign C under 70 MPa for 3 h with the inclusion of a vanadium interlayer was found to be superior of the conditions explored in this work.

  17. OKMC study of the effect of grain boundaries in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Becquart, C.S.; Malerba, L.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-Cr-C alloys with chromium concentrations in the range from about 2 wt % to 12 wt % form ferritic-martensitic structures by rapid cooling from the austenite state already in the presence of relatively low carbon concentrations. In this process it is possible to obtain different ratios of ferrite and martensite, as well as formation of carbides, by varying the thermal treatment. The presence of ferrite or martensite might have an influence on the nano-structural evolution under irradiation of these alloys. Here, considering a tempered martensite reference alloy with 9% Cr, we make use of an already validated object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model in order to study the possible effect of the formation of martensite laths on the material nano-structural evolution under neutron irradiation, assuming that the relevant boundaries act as sinks for radiation defects. The results show that the reduction of the grain size (including in this definition the average size of prior austenite grains, blocks and laths) does not play any relevant role until sizes of the order of about 0.5 μm are reached: for smaller grains the number of defects being absorbed by the boundaries becomes dominant. However, this threshold is lower than the experimentally observed martensite lath dimensions, thereby suggesting that what makes the difference in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys with respect to ferrite concerning events and mechanisms taking place during irradiation are not the lath boundaries as sinks. Differences between the nano-structural evolution in ferrite and martensite should therefore be ascribed to other factors. This document is composed of an article and the presentation slides. (authors)

  18. Corrosion of steels in molten gallium (Ga), tin (Sn) and tin lithium alloy (Sn–20Li)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Masatoshi, E-mail: kondo.masatoshi@nr.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ishii, Masaomi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 502-5292 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Corrosion of RAFM steel, JLF-1, in liquid Sn–20Li was caused by the formation of Fe-Sn alloyed layer. - Highlights: • The corrosion tests were performed for the reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel JLF-1 and the austenitic steel SUS316 in liquid Ga, Sn and Sn-20Li at 873 K up to 750 h. • The weight loss of the specimens exposed to liquid Ga, Sn and Sn-20Li was evaluated. • The corrosion of the steels in liquid Ga was caused by the alloying reaction between Ga and Fe on the steel surface. • The corrosion of the steels in liquid Sn was caused by the alloying reaction between Sn and Fe on the steel surface. • The corrosion of the steels in liquid Sn-20Li was caused by the formation of the Fe-Sn alloyed layer and the diffusion of Sn and Li into the steel matrix. - Abstract: The compatibility of steels in liquid gallium (Ga), tin (Sn) and tin lithium alloy (Sn–20Li) was investigated by means of static corrosion tests. The corrosion tests were performed for reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel JLF-1 (JOYO-HEAT, Fe–9Cr–2W–0.1C) and austenitic steel SUS316 (Fe–18Cr–12Ni–2Mo). The test temperature was 873 K, and the exposure time was 250 and 750 h. The corrosion of these steels in liquid Ga, Sn and Sn–20Li alloy was commonly caused by the formation of a reaction layer and the dissolution of the steel elements into the melts. The reaction layer formed in liquid Ga was identified as Fe{sub 3}Ga from the results of metallurgical analysis and the phase diagram. The growth rate of the reaction layer on the JLF-1 steel showed a parabolic rate law, and this trend indicated that the corrosion could be controlled by the diffusion process through the layer. The reaction layer formed in liquid Sn and Sn–20Li was identified as FeSn. The growth rate had a linear function with exposure time. The corrosion in Sn and Sn–20Li could be controlled by the interface reaction on the layer. The growth rate of the layer formed

  19. Corrosion of steels in molten gallium (Ga), tin (Sn) and tin lithium alloy (Sn–20Li)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masatoshi; Ishii, Masaomi; Muroga, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Corrosion of RAFM steel, JLF-1, in liquid Sn–20Li was caused by the formation of Fe-Sn alloyed layer. - Highlights: • The corrosion tests were performed for the reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel JLF-1 and the austenitic steel SUS316 in liquid Ga, Sn and Sn-20Li at 873 K up to 750 h. • The weight loss of the specimens exposed to liquid Ga, Sn and Sn-20Li was evaluated. • The corrosion of the steels in liquid Ga was caused by the alloying reaction between Ga and Fe on the steel surface. • The corrosion of the steels in liquid Sn was caused by the alloying reaction between Sn and Fe on the steel surface. • The corrosion of the steels in liquid Sn-20Li was caused by the formation of the Fe-Sn alloyed layer and the diffusion of Sn and Li into the steel matrix. - Abstract: The compatibility of steels in liquid gallium (Ga), tin (Sn) and tin lithium alloy (Sn–20Li) was investigated by means of static corrosion tests. The corrosion tests were performed for reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel JLF-1 (JOYO-HEAT, Fe–9Cr–2W–0.1C) and austenitic steel SUS316 (Fe–18Cr–12Ni–2Mo). The test temperature was 873 K, and the exposure time was 250 and 750 h. The corrosion of these steels in liquid Ga, Sn and Sn–20Li alloy was commonly caused by the formation of a reaction layer and the dissolution of the steel elements into the melts. The reaction layer formed in liquid Ga was identified as Fe 3 Ga from the results of metallurgical analysis and the phase diagram. The growth rate of the reaction layer on the JLF-1 steel showed a parabolic rate law, and this trend indicated that the corrosion could be controlled by the diffusion process through the layer. The reaction layer formed in liquid Sn and Sn–20Li was identified as FeSn. The growth rate had a linear function with exposure time. The corrosion in Sn and Sn–20Li could be controlled by the interface reaction on the layer. The growth rate of the layer formed in

  20. Microstructural examination of commercial ferritic alloys at 299 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-11-01

    Microstructures and density change measurements are reported for Martensitic commercial steels HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-lMo (T9) and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys MA956 and NU957 following irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA at 420 degrees C to 200 DPA. Swelling as determined by density change remains below 2% for all conditions. Microstructures are found to be stable except in recrystallized grains of MA957, which are fabrication artifacts, with only minor swelling in the Martensitic steels and α' precipitation in alloys with 12% or more chromium. These results further demonstrate the high swelling resistance and microstructural stability of the ferritic alloy class

  1. Study of the evolution of irradiation induced defects in FeCrx model alloys for fusion applications by means of in-situ resistivity techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Ferrer Ferrán, B.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors. These steels can, to a first approximation, be modelled by considering the behavior of binary Fe-Cr alloys. It has been shown that a significant amount of Cr, in the range of 6-14at%, is necessary to provide good mechanical properties of radiation and corrosion resistance. The microstructure evolution induced by neutron irradiation is known to depend on the Cr content. Current knowledge of the role of Cr in the effects of neutron radiation is therefore essential, but still incomplete. The current objective is to extend the experimental study of the point-defect interaction and kinetics in concentrated alloys. This would allow increasing a reliable database of experimental results for validation of computational simulations in order to consolidate the development of models. Thus, to this end, a suitable experimental set-up has been designed and built and subsequently Resistivity Recovery experiments have been run in Fe1-x-Crx (x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.14)...(Author)

  2. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Robertson, Ian [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Sehitoglu, Huseyin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Sofronis, Petros [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Gewirth, Andrew [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  3. Radiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: Atomistic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Malerba, Lorenzo; Bonny, Giovanni; Castin, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    High-Cr ferritic-martensitic steels are the most promising candidate structural materials for future advanced fission reactors, as well as for fusion systems, due to their better thermomechanical properties and higher radiation resistance as compared to austenitic steels. The performance of these steels, especially under irradiation, appears to be largely determined by the Cr content. For instance, the current choice of steel compositions around ∼9 wt% Cr is mainly based on the observation of a local minimum in the ductile-brittle transition temperature shift at this composition. On the other hand, reduced void swelling is observed between 3 and 12 wt% Cr. The origin of these and other Cr-dependent effects remained unexplained for a long time, thereby calling for a physical modelling effort addressing these questions. In this presentation, an overview is given on the effort made in recent years to construct a whole modelling framework, from ab initio to dislocations, to provide explanations to the above-mentioned issues. Ab initio calculations combined to the development of the interatomic potentials capable of grasping key features of Cr atoms embedded in perfect and defected Fe matrix, were required. Primary damage, defect migration, Cr mass transport, phase separation, Cr-defect segregation and dislocation-defect interactions could then be studied using fully atomistic approaches. Our research shows that many of the effects of Cr content on the behaviour of these alloys under irradiation can be attributed to the only recently highlighted high solubility of Cr in Fe (∼10 wt%), below which, in addition, Cr atoms tend to order. The presentation will clarify how this aspect, combined with the high affinity between Cr atoms and self-interstitials defects, influences and partly explain both microstructure evolution and mechanical behaviour of high-Cr steels under irradiation. (author)

  4. Processing, Microstructure, and Material Property Relationships Following Friction Stir Welding of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Fast, 200 Ferritic- martensitic steels , ODS alloys Stainless steels Lead fast reactor Lead or lead- bismuth 800 Fast, 150 Ferritic- martensitic ...from Zinkle [from 1]. T22, T9, T91, E911, NF12, NF616, and SAVE12 are all Ferritic or Martensitic steels with variations in alloy concentrations and...manufacturing techniques. Similarly HCM12 and HCM12A are High Chromium Martensitic steels

  5. Microstructure of oxide dispersion strengthened Eurofer and iron-chromium alloys investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering and transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintze, C. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Bergner, F., E-mail: f.bergner@fzd.de [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Ulbricht, A. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Hernandez-Mayoral, M. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Keiderling, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Lindau, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Weissgaerber, T. [Fraunhofer Institute IFAM-Dresden, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthening of ferritic/martensitic chromium steels is a promising route for the extension of the range of operation temperatures for nuclear applications. The investigation of dedicated model alloys is an important means in order to separate individual effects contributing to the mechanical behaviour under irradiation and to improve mechanistic understanding. A powder metallurgy route based on spark plasma sintering was applied to fabricate oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe9Cr model materials. These materials along with Eurofer97 and ODS-Eurofer were investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and TEM. For Fe9Cr-0.6 wt.%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TEM results indicate a peak radius of the size distribution of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles of 4.2 nm with radii ranging up to 15 nm, and a volume fraction of 0.7%, whereas SANS indicates a peak radius of 3.8 nm and a volume fraction of 0.6%. It was found that the non-ODS Fe9Cr and Eurofer97 are suitable reference materials for ODS-Fe9Cr and ODS-Eurofer, respectively, and that the ODS-Fe9Cr variants are suitable model materials for the separated investigation of irradiation-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle interaction effects.

  6. A phase-field and electron microscopy study of phase separation in Fe-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedstroem, Peter, E-mail: pheds@kth.se [Materials Science and Engineering, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Baghsheikhi, Saeed [Materials Science and Engineering, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Liu, Ping [Sandvik Materials Technology, R and D Centre, SE-81181 Sandviken (Sweden); Odqvist, Joakim [Materials Science and Engineering, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Sandvik Materials Technology, R and D Centre, SE-81181 Sandviken (Sweden)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental characterization and Phase-field modeling of phase separation in Fe-Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transition from particle-like to spinodal-like structure observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural evolution generates increased hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results in agreement with recent thermodynamic description. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative kinetic modeling must include thermal noise and improved kinetic data. - Abstract: Phase separation in the binary Fe-Cr system, the basis for the entire stainless steel family, is considered responsible for the low temperature embrittlement in ferritic, martensitic and duplex stainless steels. These steels are often used in load-bearing applications with considerable service time at elevated temperature. Thus, understanding the effect of microstructure on mechanical properties and predicting dynamics of phase separation are key issues. In the present work, experimental evaluation of structure and mechanical properties in binary Fe-Cr alloys as well as phase-field modeling, using a new thermodynamic description of Fe-Cr, is conducted. A significant hardening evolution with time is found for alloys aged between 400 and 550 Degree-Sign C, and it can be attributed to phase separation. The decomposed structure changed with increasing Cr content at 500 Degree-Sign C, with a more particle-like structure at 25 wt% Cr and a more spinodal-like structure at 30 wt% Cr. The observed transition of structure agrees with the thermodynamically predicted spinodal, although the transition is expected to be gradual. The phase-field simulations qualitatively agree with experiments. However, to enable accurate quantitative predictions, the diffusional mobilities must be evaluated further and thermal fluctuations as well as 3D diffusion fields must be properly accounted for.

  7. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  8. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430 degrees C to 67 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430 degrees C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430 degrees C to ∼67 dpa and at 370 degrees C to ∼15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430 degrees C to ∼67 dpa than after irradiation at 370 degrees C to ∼15 dpa

  9. Investigation of wetting property between liquid lead lithium alloy and several structural materials for Chinese DEMO reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Wang, Weihua; Jiang, Haiyan; Zuo, Guizhong; Pan, Baoguo; Xu, Wei; Chu, Delin; Hu, Jiansheng; Qi, Junli

    2017-10-01

    The dual-cooled lead lithium (PbLi) blanket is considered as one of the main options for the Chinese demonstration reactor (DEMO). Liquid PbLi alloy is used as the breeder material and coolant. Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, stainless steel and the silicon carbide ceramic matrix composite (SiCf) are selected as the substrate materials for different use. To investigate the wetting property and inter-facial interactions of PbLi/RAFM steel, PbLi/SS316L, PbLi/SiC and PbLi/SiCf couples, in this paper, the special vacuum experimental device is built, and the 'dispensed droplet' modification for the classic sessile droplet technique is made. Contact angles are measured between the liquid PbLi and the various candidate materials at blanket working temperature from 260 to 480 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to characterize the surface components of PbLi droplets and substrate materials, in order to study the element trans-port and corrosion mechanism. Results show that SiC composite (SiCf) and SiC ceramic show poor wetting properties with the liquid PbLi alloy. Surface roughness and testing temperature only provide tiny improvements on the wetting property below 480 °C. RAFM steel performs better wetting properties and corrosion residence when contacted with molten PbLi, while SS316L shows low corrosion residence above 420 °C for the decomposition of protective surface film mainly consisted of chromic sesquioxide. The results could provide meaningful compatibility database of liquid PbLi alloy and valuable reference in engineering design of candidate structural and functional materials for future fusion blanket.

  10. Fabrication technological development of the oxide dispersion strengthened alloy MA957 for fast reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ML Hamilton; DS Gelles; RJ Lobsinger; GD Johnson; WF Brown; MM Paxton; RJ Puigh; CR Eiholzer; C Martinez; MA Blotter

    2000-01-01

    A significant amount of effort has been devoted to determining the properties and understanding the behavior of the alloy MA957 to define its potential usefulness as a cladding material, in the fast breeder reactor program. The numerous characterization and fabrication studies that were conducted are documented in this report. The alloy is a ferritic stainless steel developed by International Nickel Company specifically for structural reactor applications. It is strengthened by a very fine, uniformly distributed yttria dispersoid. Its fabrication involves a mechanical alloying process and subsequent extrusion, which ultimately results in a highly elongated grain structure. While the presence of the dispersoid produces a material with excellent strength, the body centered cubic structure inherent to the material coupled with the high aspect ratio that results from processing operations produces some difficulties with ductility. The alloy is very sensitive to variations in a number of processing parameters, and if the high strength is once lost during fabrication, it cannot be recovered. The microstructural evolution of the alloy under irradiation falls into two regimes. Below about 550 C, dislocation development, αprime precipitation and void evolution in the matrix are observed, while above about 550 C damage appears to be restricted to cavity formation within oxide particles. The thermal expansion of the alloy is very similar to that of HT9 up to the temperature where HT9 undergoes a phase transition to austenitic. Pulse magnetic welding of end caps onto MA957 tubing can be accomplished in a manner similar to that in which it is performed on HT9, although the welding parameters appear to be very sensitive to variations in the tubing that result from small changes in fabrication conditions. The tensile and stress rupture behavior of the alloy are acceptable in the unirradiated condition, being comparable to HT9 below about 700 C and exceeding those of HT9 at

  11. Fabrication technological development of the oxide dispersion strengthened alloy MA957 for fast reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ML Hamilton; DS Gelles; RJ Lobsinger; GD Johnson; WF Brown; MM Paxton; RJ Puigh; CR Eiholzer; C Martinez; MA Blotter

    2000-03-27

    A significant amount of effort has been devoted to determining the properties and understanding the behavior of the alloy MA957 to define its potential usefulness as a cladding material, in the fast breeder reactor program. The numerous characterization and fabrication studies that were conducted are documented in this report. The alloy is a ferritic stainless steel developed by International Nickel Company specifically for structural reactor applications. It is strengthened by a very fine, uniformly distributed yttria dispersoid. Its fabrication involves a mechanical alloying process and subsequent extrusion, which ultimately results in a highly elongated grain structure. While the presence of the dispersoid produces a material with excellent strength, the body centered cubic structure inherent to the material coupled with the high aspect ratio that results from processing operations produces some difficulties with ductility. The alloy is very sensitive to variations in a number of processing parameters, and if the high strength is once lost during fabrication, it cannot be recovered. The microstructural evolution of the alloy under irradiation falls into two regimes. Below about 550 C, dislocation development, {alpha}{prime} precipitation and void evolution in the matrix are observed, while above about 550 C damage appears to be restricted to cavity formation within oxide particles. The thermal expansion of the alloy is very similar to that of HT9 up to the temperature where HT9 undergoes a phase transition to austenitic. Pulse magnetic welding of end caps onto MA957 tubing can be accomplished in a manner similar to that in which it is performed on HT9, although the welding parameters appear to be very sensitive to variations in the tubing that result from small changes in fabrication conditions. The tensile and stress rupture behavior of the alloy are acceptable in the unirradiated condition, being comparable to HT9 below about 700 C and exceeding those of HT9

  12. Corrosion of martensitic steels in flowing 17Li83Pb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Hocde, B.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    Corrosion of three martensitic steels - 1.4914, HT9 and T91 - in the presence of flowing 17Li83Pb is investigated in thermal convection loops Tulip entirely made of 1.4914 steel. Two 3000-hour tests were performed at maximal temperatures of respectively 450 and 475 0 C with a δT of 60 0 C and an alloy velocity of about 0.08 m.s -1 . In both tests, corrosion is characterized by an homogeneous dissolution of the steel without formation of a corrosion layer. Corrosion rate is constant and very temperature dependent: the sound-metal loss of 1.4914 steel is 22 μm. year -1 at 450 0 C and 40 μm.year -1 at 475 0 C. Behaviours of 1.4914 and HT9 steels are very similar whereas T91 steel is about 20% less corroded

  13. Effect of ferrite-martensite interface morphology on bake hardening response of DP590 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Arnab; Adhikary, Manashi; Venugopalan, T.; Singh, Virender; Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of martensite spatial distribution and its interface morphology on the bake hardening characteristics of a dual phase steel was investigated. In one case, typical industrial continuous annealing line parameters were employed to anneal a 67% cold rolled steel to obtain a dual phase microstructure. In the other case, a modified annealing process with changed initial heating rates and peak annealing temperature was employed. The processed specimens were further tensile pre-strained within 1–5% strain range followed by a bake hardening treatment at 170 °C for 20 min. It was observed that industrial continuous annealing line processed specimen showed a peak of about 70 MPa in bake-hardening index at 2% pre-strain level. At higher pre-strain values a gradual drop in bake-hardening index was observed. On the contrary, modified annealing process showed near uniform bake-hardening response at all pre-strain levels and a decrease could be noted only above 4% pre-strain. The evolving microstructure at each stage of annealing process and after bake-hardening treatment was studied using field emission scanning electron microscope. The microstructure analysis distinctly revealed differences in martensite spatial distribution and interface morphologies between each annealing processes employed. The modified process showed predominant formation of martensite within the ferrite grains with serrated lath martensite interfaces. This nature of the martensite was considered responsible for the observed improvement in the bake-hardening response. Furthermore, along with improved bake-hardening response negligible loss in tensile ductility was also noted. This behaviour was correlated with delayed micro-crack initiation at martensite interface due to serrated nature.

  14. Mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huaxin; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    The critical J-integrals of mode I (J IC ), mixed-mode I/III (J MC ), and mode III (J IIIC ) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J MC was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. Results showed that J MC and tearing modulus (T M ) values varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J MC and T M values occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where the load ratio of σ i /σ iii was 1.2 to 0.84. The J min was 240 Kj/M 2 , and ratios of J IC /J min and J IIIC /J min were 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. The morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J MC and T M values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J min remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J min

  15. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Low Activation Ferritic–Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  16. Recent results of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitsukawa, S. E-mail: jitsukawa@ifmif.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A.; Klueh, R.L.; Tavassoli, A.A.; Schaaf, B. van der; Odette, G.R.; Rensman, J.W.; Victoria, M.; Petersen, C

    2004-08-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in the international research effort on reduced-activation steels. Extensive tensile, fracture toughness, fatigue, and creep properties in unirradiated and irradiated conditions have been performed and evaluated. Since it is not possible to include all work in this limited review, selected areas will be presented to indicate the scope and progress of recent international efforts. These include (1) results from mechanical properties studies that have been combined in databases to determine materials design limits for the preliminary design of an ITER blanket module. (2) Results indicate that the effect of transmutation-produced helium on fracture toughness is smaller than indicated previously. (3) Further efforts to reduce irradiation-induced degradation of fracture toughness. (4) The introduction of a post-irradiation constitutive equation for plastic deformation. (5) The production of ODS steels that have been used to improve high-temperature strength. (6) The method developed to improve fracture toughness of ODS steels.

  17. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of the ferritic martensitic steel eurofer'97 after simulated service conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A. M.; Lapena, J.

    2002-01-01

    This report details the metallurgical characterization of the Eurofer'97 steel thermally aged in the range of temperatures from 400 degree centigrade to 600 degree centigrade up to 10000 H, microstructural studies and mechanical testing (hardness, tensile, Charpy and low cycle fatigue test) have been carried out

  18. Creep strength of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A.M.; Lapena, J.; Lindau, R.; Rieth, M.; Schirra, M.

    2005-01-01

    Creep rupture strength of tempered martensitic steel Eurofer'97 has been investigated. Different products form (plate and bar) have been tested in the temperature range from 450 deg. C to 650 deg. C at different loads. No significant differences in the creep rupture properties have been found between the studied product forms. The Eurofer'97 has shown adequate creep rupture strength levels at short creep rupture tests, similar to those of the F-82 H mod. steel. However, for long testing times (>9000 h) the results available up to now at 500 deg. C and 550 deg. C seem to indicate a change in the creep degradation mechanism

  19. Microstructural Characterization of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS-Fe-Cr Model Alloy s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Castro, V.; Jenkins, M.L. [Oxford Univ., Dept. of Materials (United Kingdom); Leguey, T.; Mufioz, A.; Pareja, R.; Monge, M.A. [Madrid Univ. Carlos 3, Dept. de Fisica (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels with Cr contents ranging between 9-12 wt% are promising candidates for use as structural materials in future fusion reactors. They are likely to be superior to austenitic steels because of their better thermal properties and higher swelling resistance. A major concern of these materials is their maximum service temperature, as this determines the overall efficiency of the reactor. It has been demonstrated that one way to increase this temperature is to homogeneously disperse hard nano-sized oxide particles, such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, into the steel matrix. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels produced by mechanical milling and hot isostatic pressing (HIP ) are considered as potential structural materials for fusion reactors. In Europe, efforts have been focused on the ODS-RAFM-9CrW steel EUROFER. These ODS steels show good tensile and creep properties, acceptable ductility, but poor impact properties. Microstructural characterization of real steels, especially of the structures of oxide/steel matrix interfaces which play an important role in the performance of the material, is a difficult task. In the present work we have fabricated and characterised a simpler model ODS system based on a Fe-Cr binary alloy, in the belief that this will help us better to understand complex ODS-RAFM steels. Two Fe-12wt% Cr batches, one containing 0.3 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the other Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} free have been produced by milling plus compaction by HIP. These materials are being characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy. Results will be compared with those obtained for ODS-EUROFER produced under the same conditions. (authors)

  20. Investigation on fuel-cladding chemical interaction in metal fuel for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Kenta; Nakamura, Kinya; Ogata, Takanari; Uwaba, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    During steady-state irradiation of metallic fuel in fast reactors, rare-earth fission products can react with stainless steel cladding at the fuel-cladding interface. The authors conducted isothermal annealing tests with some diffusion couples to investigate the structure of the wastage layer formed at the interface. Candidate cladding alloys, ferritic-martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) and oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel were assembled with rare-earth alloys, RE5 : La-Ce-Pr-Nd-Sm, which simulate the fission yield of rare-earth fission products. The diffusion couples were isothermally annealed in the temperature range of 500-650°C for up to 170 h. In both RE5/ODS-steel and RE5/PNC-FMS couples, the wastage layer of the two-phase region of the (Fe, Cr) 17 RE 2 matrix phase with the precipitation of the (Fe, RE, Cr) phase was formed. The structure was similar to that formed in RE5/Fe-12Cr and RE5/HT9 couples, which implies that the reaction between REs and steel is not significantly influenced by the minor alloying elements within the candidate cladding materials. It was also clarified that the increase in the wastage layer thickness was diffusion-controlled. The temperature dependence of the reaction rate constants were formulated, which can be the basis for the quantification of the wastage layer growth. (author)

  1. Permeation of deuterium implanted into vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Struttmann, D.A.

    1986-05-01

    Permeation of deuterium through the vanadium alloy, V-15Cr-5Ti, was investigated using 3-keV, D 3 + ion beams from a small accelerator. The experiments consisted of measurements of the deuterium reemission and permeation rates as a function of implantation fluence for 0.5-mm thick specimens heated to tempertures from 623 to 823 0 K. Implantation-side surface characterization was made by simultaneous measurements of sputtered ions with a secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS). Analyses of these measurements indicate that for the experimental conditions used, the steady-state deuterium permeation flux in V-15Cr-5Ti is approximately 18% of the implantation flux. This corresponds to approximately 1000 times that seen in the ferritic steel, HT-9, under comparable conditions. Measurement of deuterium diffusivity in V-15Cr-5Ti using permeation break-through times indicates D = 1.4 x 10 -8 exp(-.11 eV/kT) (m 2 /s)

  2. Construction of in-situ creep strain test facility for the SFR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Heo, Hyeong Min; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Sung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, in-situ laser inspection creep test machine was developed for the measuring the creep strain of SFR fuel cladding materials. Ferritic-martensitic steels are being considered as an attractive candidate material for a fuel cladding of a SFR due to their low expansion coefficients, high thermal conductivities and excellent irradiation resistances to a void swelling. HT9 steel (12CrMoVW) is initially developed as a material for power plants in Europe in the 1960. This steel has experienced to expose up to 200dpa in FFTE and EBR-II. Ferritic-Martensitic steel's maximum creep strength in existence is 180Mpa for 106 hour 600 .deg., but HT9 steel is 60Mpa. Because SFR is difficult to secure in developing and applying materials, HT9 steel has accumulated validated data and is suitable for SFR component. And also, because of its superior dimensional stability against fast neutron irradiation, Ferritic-martensitic steel of 9Cr and 12Cr steels, such as HT9 and FC92(12Cr-2W) are preferable to utilize in the fuel cladding of an SFR in KAERI. The pressurized thermal creep test of HT9 and FC92 claddings are being conducted in KAERI, but the change of creep strain in cladding is not easy to measure during the creep test due to its pressurized and closed conditions. In this paper, in-situ laser inspection pressurized creep test machine developed for SFR fuel cladding specimens is described. Moreover, the creep strain rate of HT9 at 650 .deg. C was examined from the in-situ laser inspection pressurized creep test machine.

  3. Corrosion of ferrous alloys in eutectic lead-lithium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-09-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained on austenitic prime candidate alloy (PCA) and Type 316 stainless steel and ferritic HT-9 and Fe-9Cr-1Mo steels in a flowing Pb-17 at. % Li environment at 727 and 700 K (454 and 427 0 C). The results indicate that the dissolution rates for both austenitic and ferritic steels in Pb-17Li are an order of magnitude greater than in flowing lithium. The influence of time, temperature, and alloy composition on the corrosion behavior in Pb-17Li is similar to that in lithium. The weight losses for the austenitic steels are an order of magnitude greater than for the ferritic steels. The rate of weight loss for the ferritic steels is constant, whereas the dissolution rates for the austenitic steels decrease with time. After exposure to Pb-17Li, the austenitic steels develop a very weak and porous ferrite layer which easily spalls from the specimen surface

  4. Charpy impact test results of ferritic alloys at a fluence of 6 x 1022n/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Charpy impact tests on specimens in the AD-2 reconstitution experiment were completed. One hundred ten specimens made of HT-9 base metal, 9Cr-1Mo base metal and 9Cr-1Mo weldment at various heat treatment conditions were tested in temperature range from -73 0 C to 260 0 C. The specimens were irradiated from 390 0 C to 550 0 C and the fluence of the specimens reached 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . This is the first time that the transition behavior of ferritic alloys at high fluence was obtained. This is also the first time that comprehensive results on the irradiated 9Cr-1Mo weldment are available. The test results show a small additional shift in transition temperature for HT-9 base metal irradiated at 390 0 C and 450 0 C as the fluence was raised to 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . At higher irradiation temperatures, however, the shift in transition temperature is less conclusive. Further reduction in USE was observed at higher fluence for all the irradiation temperatures. There is no apparent fluence effect for 9Cr-1Mo base metal at all the irradiation temperatures studied. Contrary to the previous finding on HT-9 base metal and weldment, the 9Cr-1Mo weldment shows a higher transition temperature ( + 60 0 C) and a higher USE ( + 100%) as compared to the 9Cr-1MO base metal for the same irradiation conditions. 6 references, 7 figures, 7 tables

  5. Irradiation hardening of Fe–9Cr-based alloys and ODS Eurofer: Effect of helium implantation and iron-ion irradiation at 300 °C including sequence effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintze, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Bergner, F., E-mail: f.bergner@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Hernández-Mayoral, M. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kögler, R.; Müller, G.; Ulbricht, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Single-beam, dual-beam and sequential iron- and/or helium-ion irradiations are widely accepted to emulate more application-relevant but hardly accessible irradiation conditions of generation-IV fission and fusion candidate materials for certain purposes such as material pre-selection, identification of basic mechanisms or model calibration. However, systematic investigations of sequence effects capable to critically question individual approaches are largely missing. In the present study, sequence effects of iron-ion irradiations at 300 °C up to 5 dpa and helium implantations up to 100 appm He are investigated by means of post-irradiation nanoindentation of an Fe9%Cr model alloy, ferritic/martensitic 9%Cr steels T91 and Eurofer97 and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Eurofer. Different types of sequence effects, both synergistic and antagonistic, are identified and tentative interpretations are suggested. It is found that different accelerated irradiation approaches have a great impact on the mechanical hardening. This stresses the importance of experimental design in attempts to emulate in-reactor conditions. - Highlights: • The single-beam He-ion implantations do not give rise to significant hardening. • The single-beam Fe-ion irradiations give rise to significant hardening, ΔH{sub Fe}. • Hardening due to sequential He-/Fe-ion irradiation is smaller than ΔH{sub Fe}. • Hardening due to simultaneous He-/Fe-ion irradiation is larger than ΔH{sub Fe}. • The He–Fe synergism for ODS-Eurofer is less pronounced than for Eurofer97.

  6. Experimental investigation of high He/dpa microstructural effects in neutron irradiated B-alloyed Eurofer97 steel by means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS and electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Coppola

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High He/dpa microstructural effects have been investigated, by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, in B-alloyed ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer97-1 (0.12 C, 9 Cr, 0.2V, 1.08W wt%, B contents variable between 10 and 1000ppm, neutron irradiated at the High Flux Reactor of the JRC-Petten at temperatures between 250 °C and 450 °C, up do a dose level of 16 dpa. Under these irradiation parameters, B activation is expected to produce corresponding helium contents variable between 80 and 5600appm, with helium bubble distributions relevant for the technological applications. The SANS measurements were carried out under magnetic field to separate nuclear and magnetic SANS components; a reference, un-irradiated sample was also measured to evaluate as accurately as possible the genuine effect of the irradiation on the microstructure. Increasing the estimated helium content from 400 to 5600appm, the analysis of the SANS cross-sections yields an increase in the volume fraction, attributed to helium bubbles, of almost one order of magnitude (from 0.007 to 0.038; furthermore, the difference between nuclear and magnetic SANS components is strongly reduced. These results are discussed in correlation with TEM observations of the same samples and are tentatively attributed to the effect of drastic microstructural changes in Eurofer97-1 for high He/dpa ratio values, possibly relating to the dissolution of large B-carbides due to transmutation reactions.

  7. The effect of composition on volatility from a copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K.A.; Smolik, G.R.; Wallace, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    During a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) activated structural material can be mobilized through oxidation. Information on how much material is mobilized in an accident is necessary for performing safety assessments of fusion reactor designs. The Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has an experimental program to measure mobilized mass as a function of temperature for various oxidizing environments. Materials studied have included beryllium (important because of its toxicity), copper alloys, a niobium alloy, PCA and HT-9 steel, tungsten (pure and an alloy), and a vanadium alloy. Some materials undergo a significant change in composition during irradiation. An example of this is copper (a candidate for the ITER first wall, divertor substrate, and various instrumentation probes and antennas), which can have as much as 1 wt% zinc due to transmutation. Additionally, as the design for ITER evolves, a slightly different copper alloy may be selected. Compositional changes may affect the extent that various elements are volatilized due to such mechanisms as diffusion through the alloy, and penetration and release from oxide layers formed on the material. To accurately calculate offsite doses for various irradiation scenarios, one must understand the effect of composition on volatility

  8. Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Modifications in Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Advanced Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Hosemann, Peter; Liu, Xiang

    2018-04-24

    This final technical report summarizes the research performed during October 2014 and December 2017, with a focus on investigating the radiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property modifications in optimized advanced alloys for sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) structural applications. To accomplish these objectives, the radiation responses of several different advanced alloys, including austenitic steel Alloy 709 (A709) and 316H, and ferritic/ martensitic Fe–9Cr steels T91 and G92, were investigated using a combination of microstructure characterizations and nanoindentation measurements. Different types of irradiation, including ex situ bulk ion irradiation and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) ion irradiation, were employed in this study. Radiation-induced dislocations, precipitates, and voids were characterized by TEM. Scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and/or atom probe tomography (APT) were used to study radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. Nanoindentation was used for hardness measurements to study irradiation hardening. Austenitic A709 and 316H was bulk-irradiated by 3.5 MeV Fe++ ions to up to 150 peak dpa at 400, 500, and 600°. Compared to neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) 316, the Frank loop density of ion-irradiated A709 shows similar dose dependence at 400°, but very different temperature dependence. Due to the noticeable difference in the initial microstructure of A709 and 316H, no systematic comparison on the Frank loops in A709 vs 316H was made. It would be helpful that future ion irradiation study on 316 stainless steel could be conducted to directly compare the temperature dependence of Frank loop density in ion-irradiated 316 SS with that in neutron-irradiated 316 SS. In addition, future neutron irradiation on A709 at 400–600° at relative high dose (>10 dpa) can be carried out to compare with ion-irradiated A709. The radiation

  9. Fe-Cr-V ternary alloy-based ferritic steels for high- and low-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieth, M.; Materna-Morris, E.; Dudarev, S.L.; Boutard, J.-L.; Keppler, H.; Mayor, J.

    2009-01-01

    The phase stability of alloys and steels developed for application in nuclear fission and fusion technology is one of the decisive factors determining the potential range of operating temperatures and radiation conditions that the core elements of a power plant can tolerate. In the case of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, the choice of the chemical composition is dictated by the phase diagram for binary FeCr alloys where in the 0-9% range of Cr composition the alloy remains in the solid solution phase at and below the room temperature. For Cr concentrations exceeding 9% the steels operating at relatively low temperatures are therefore expected to exhibit the formation of α' Cr-rich precipitates. These precipitates form obstacles for the propagation of dislocations, impeding plastic deformation and embrittling the material. This sets the low temperature limit for the use of of high (14% to 20%) Cr steels, which for the 20% Cr steels is at approximately 600 deg. C. On the other hand, steels containing 12% or less Cr cannot be used at temperatures exceeding ∼600 deg. C due to the occurrence of the α-γ transition (912 deg. C in pure iron and 830 deg. C in 7% Cr alloy), which weakens the steel in the high temperature limit. In this study, we investigate the physical properties of a concentrated ternary alloy system that attracted relatively little attention so far. The phase diagram of ternary Fe-Cr-V alloy shows no phase boundaries within a certain broad range of Cr and V concentrations. This makes the alloy sufficiently resistant to corrosion and suggests that steels and dispersion strengthened materials based on this alloy composition may have better strength and stability at high temperatures. Experimental heats were produced on a laboratory scale by arc melting the material components to pellets, then by melting the pellets in an induction furnace and casting the melt into copper moulds. The compositions in weight percent (iron base) are 10Cr5V, 10Cr

  10. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  11. Swelling and tensile properties of neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1990-07-01

    Vanadium-base alloys are candidates for use as structural material in magnetic fusion reactors. In comparison to other candidate structural materials (e.g., Type 316 stainless and HT-9 ferritic steels), vanadium-base alloys such as V-15Cr-5Ti and V-20Ti have intrinsically lower long-term neutron activation, neutron irradiation after-heat, biological hazard potential, and neutron-induced helium and hydrogen transmutation rates. Moreover, vanadium-base alloys can withstand a higher surface-heat, flux than steels because of their lower thermal stress factor. In addition to having these favorable neutronic and physical properties, a candidate alloy for use as structural material in a fusion reactor must have dimensional stability, i.e., swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement during the reactor lifetime at a level of structural strength commensurate with the reactor operating temperature and structural loads. In this paper, we present experimental results on the swelling and tensile properties of several vanadium-base alloys after irradiation at 420, 520, and 600 degree C to neutron fluences ranging from 0.3 to 1.9 x 10 27 neutrons/m 2 (17 to 114 atom displacements per atom [dpa])

  12. Mobility of dislocations in thermal aged and irradiated Fe-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terentyev, D.; Bonny, G.; Malerba, L.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The choice of the Cr concentration in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications is largely based on the observed minimum radiation-induced embrittlement, in terms of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift (ΔDBTT), found around 9%Cr [1]. To date, no physical explanation for the existence of this minimum has been provided. It is known that in high-Cr ferritic alloys the precipitation of the Cr-rich, coherent α' phase occurs for concentrations above 9% Cr, both due to irradiation or thermal ageing at high enough temperature [2]. The formation of a fine dispersion of precipitates can therefore explain the increased embrittlement above this concentration, but it is unclear why the ΔDBTT should increase also for lower Cr concentrations. In addition, it is suspected that under irradiation a' precipitation may be induced also for Cr contents below 9% [3]. At the same time, it is known that below 9% Cr ferritic alloys exhibit a tendency to ordering, i.e. Cr atoms are not distributed as in a random solid solution and try to be as far apart as possible from each other, thereby tending to create a superlattice [4]. In order to cast some light on the effect that these phase changes may have on dislocation motion in the presence of radiation damage, we study at the atomic level the mobility of dislocations in FeCr alloys of different concentrations where Cr is distributed in different fashions (i.e. ordered, clustered or in a random solid solution) and in the presence of radiation damage (e.g. point-defect clusters created by cascades). The microstructure will be obtained by making the system evolve according to the acting thermodynamic driving forces (also in the presence of defects) using Metropolis Monte Carlo techniques. Subsequently, the simulation of the dislocation motion will be performed using large scale molecular dynamics, whereby the corresponding stress-strain curve can be obtained. The

  13. Effect of mechanical alloying and compaction parameters on the mechanical properties and microstructure of EUROFER 97 ODS steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramar, A.; Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.; Schaeublin, R.

    2006-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic / martensitic (F/M) steels appear to be promising candidates for the future fusion reactor. Their inherent properties, good thermal conductivity, swelling resistance and low radiation damage accumulation, deriving from the base material EUROFER 97, are further enhanced by the presence of the fine dispersion of oxide particles. They would allow in principle for a higher operating temperature of the fusion reactor, which improves its thermal efficiency. In effect, their strength remains higher than the base material with increasing temperature. Their creep properties are also improved relatively to the base material. It is the pinning of dislocations at dispersed oxide particles that helps to improve the high temperature mechanical properties. EUROFER97 is a reduced activation F/M steel, whose chemical composition is 8.9 wt. % Cr, 1.1 wt. % W, 0.47 wt. % Mn, 0.2 wt. % V, 0.14 wt. % Ta and 0.11 wt. % C and Fe for the balance. A new ODS F/M steel based on EUROFER 97 is developed with the strengthening material as Y 2 O 3 maintained at 0.3wt% based on our past experience. The ODS powder is produced by a different powder metallurgy route. The Eurofer 97 atomized powder with particle sizes around 45 μm is ball milled in argon atmosphere in a planetary ball mill together with Yttria particles with sizes about 10 to 30 nm. The milled powders are now canned in a steel container. They are degassed at 450 o C for 3 hours under a vacuum of 10-5 mbar. The canned sample is sealed in vacuum and finally compacted by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) in argon atmosphere under a pressure of 180 MPa at 1000 o C for 1 hour. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction observations are done at regular intervals during ball milling to identify changes in the particle and crystallite size and in particular with the solubility of Yttria in the matrix. Further, The microstructure and mechanical properties of final compacted material is assessed. The

  14. Ion irradiation effects on high purity bcc Fe and model FeCr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Arunodaya

    2014-01-01

    FeCr binary alloys are a simple representative of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (F-M) steels, which are currently the most promising candidates as structural materials for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) and future fusion systems. However, the impact of Cr on the evolution of the irradiated microstructure in these materials is not well understood in these materials. Moreover, particularly for fusion applications, the radiation damage scenario is expected to be complicated further by the presence of large quantities of He produced by the nuclear transmutation (∼ 10 appm He/dpa). Within this context, an elaborate ion irradiation study was performed at 500 C on a wide variety of high purity FeCr alloys (with Cr content ranging from ∼ 3 wt.% to 14 wt.%) and a bcc Fe, to probe in detail the influence of Cr and He on the evolution of microstructure. The irradiations were performed using Fe self-ions, in single beam mode and in dual beam mode (damage by Fe ions and co-implantation of He), to separate ballistic damage effect from the impact of simultaneous He injection. Three different dose ranges were studied: high dose (157 dpa, 17 appm He/dpa for the dual beam case), intermediate dose (45 dpa, 57 appm He/dpa for dual beam case) and in-situ low dose (0.33 dpa, 3030 appm He/dpa for the dual beam case). The experiments were performed at the JANNuS triple beam facility and dual beam in situ irradiation facility at CEA-Saclay and CSNSM, Orsay respectively. The microstructure was principally characterized by conventional TEM, APT and EDS in STEM mode. The main results are as follows: 1) A comparison of the cavity microstructure in high dose irradiated Fe revealed strong swelling reduction by the addition of He. It was achieved by a drastic reduction in cavity sizes and an increased number density. This behaviour was observed all along the damage depth, up to the damage peak. 2) Cavity microstructure was also studied in the dual beam high dose

  15. Depth profiling of hydrogen in ferritic/martensitic steels by means of a tritium imaging plate technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Teppei; Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We applied a tritium imaging plate technique to depth profiling of hydrogen in bulk. ► Changes of hydrogen depth profiles in the steel by thermal annealing were examined. ► We proposed a release model of plasma-loaded hydrogen in the steel. ► Hydrogen is trapped at trapping sites newly developed by plasma loading. ► Hydrogen is also trapped at surface oxides and hardly desorbed by thermal annealing. -- Abstract: In order to understand how hydrogen loaded by plasma in F82H is removed by annealing at elevated temperatures in vacuum, depth profiles of plasma-loaded hydrogen were examined by means of a tritium imaging plate technique. Owing to large hydrogen diffusion coefficients in F82H, the plasma-loaded hydrogen easily penetrates into a deeper region becoming solute hydrogen and desorbs by thermal annealing in vacuum. However the plasma-loading creates new hydrogen trapping sites having larger trapping energy than that for the intrinsic sites beyond the projected range of the loaded hydrogen. Some surface oxides also trap an appreciable amount of hydrogen which is more difficult to remove by the thermal annealing

  16. In-situ neutron diffraction study on work-hardening behavior in a ferrite-martensite dual phase steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morooka, Satoshi; Sato, Naoko; Ojima, Mayumi; Harjo, Stefanus; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Tomota, Yo; Umezawa, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Strength and work-hardening in steels have been discussed from the viewpoint of heterogeneous deformation. In-situ neutron diffraction techniques made clear that the misfit strains between grains accompanied with the grain-scaled internal stress (intergranular stress). In the dual phase steel, the intergranular stress was superposed on phase stress. Both long-range internal stress and short-range one like forest dislocation hardening may cause the resistance for dislocation motion in the steels.

  17. Viscoplastic equations incorporated into a finite element model to predict deformation behavior of irradiated reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuanyuan, E-mail: 630wyy@163.com [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Jijun, E-mail: zhaojj@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Chi [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The initial internal variable in the Anand model is modified by considering both temperature and irradiation dose. • The tensile stress-strain response is examined and analyzed under different temperatures and irradiation doses. • Yield strengths are predicted as functions of strain rate, temperature and irradiation dose. - Abstract: The viscoplastic equations with a modified initial internal variable are implemented into the finite element code to investigate stress-strain response and irradiation hardening of the materials under increased temperature and at different levels of irradiated dose. We applied this model to Mod 9Cr-1Mo steel. The predicted results are validated by the experimentally measured data. Furthermore, they show good agreement with the previous data from a constitutive crystal plasticity model in account of dislocation and interstitial loops. Three previous hardening models for predicting the yield strength of the material are discussed and compared with our simulation results.

  18. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  19. Analysis of stress-induced Burgers vector anisotropy in pressurized tube specimens of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steel: JLF-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Shibayama, T.

    1998-01-01

    A procedure for determining the Burgers vector anisotropy in irradiated ferritic steels allowing identification of all a and all a/2 dislocations in a region of interest is applied to a pressurized tube specimen of JLF-1 irradiated at 430 C to 14.3 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or 61 dpa. Analysis of micrographs indicates large anisotropy in Burgers vector populations develop during irradiation creep

  20. Modification of vacuum plasma sprayed tungsten coating on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels by friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ozawa, Kazumi; Morisada, Yoshiaki; Noh, Sanghoon; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied on vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W to improve its low thermal conductivity and weakness due to high porosity. • FSP can achieve significant improvement both in mechanical and thermal properties of VPS-W coating. • It was indicated that the double pass FSP at 600 rpm/50 mm/min/2 ton on VPS-W show the most dense microstructure and hardest mechanical property. • Hardness test over FSPed VPS-W layer revealed that the hardness of W becomes higher than that of bulk W. • The thermal conductivity of double pass FSPed VPS-W was about 80% of bulk W at 200 °C, and it becomes equivalent to that of bulk W over 800 °C. - Abstract: Tungsten (W) is the primary candidate material as a plasma facing material in fusion devices, as for its high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity and low sputtering rate, and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) technique is preferred as it is applicable for large area without brittle interlayer, but the thermal conductivity of W layer is very poor, and easy to detach, mainly caused by its porous structure. W Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied on VPS-W to improve these poor properties, and it was suggested that FSP can contribute to significant improvement in both mechanical and thermal properties of the VPS-W coating.

  1. Precipitation behavior of Laves phase and its effect on toughness of 9Cr-2Mo ferritic-martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Y.; Wade, N.; Kunimitsu, S.; Urita, T.

    1986-01-01

    This study clarified the relationship between the toughness of a 9Cr-2Mo dual phase steel and precipitates formed during aging, with special attention to the Laves phase (Fe 2 Mo). The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) is increased and the upper shelf energy decreased when the Laves phase begins to precipitate during aging. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that elimination of Si in the steel reduces the precipitation of the Laves phase and results in maintaining good toughness. It is also noted that the toughness of the steel is controlled by the total amount of precipitates (Laves + carbides) in the aging at 873 K for more than 3.6x10 3 ks. A time-temperature-precipitation diagram for the Laves phase is established and it clearly shows that the precipitation of the Laves phase is markedly retarded by the decrease of Si content. In Si-free steel, no Laves phase is observed in the temperature and time range investigated. (orig.)

  2. Effect of Proton Irradiation on the Corrosion Behaviors of Ferritic/Martensitic Steel in Liquid Metal Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeonghyeon; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) are the candidates of GEN-IV nuclear energy systems. Among various liquid metals that can be used as primary coolant material, sodium is a world widely used coolant for GEN-IV reactors. In this study, as-received Gr.92 and irradiated Gr.92 specimen in the oxygen-saturated liquid sodium were examined at high temperature for 300h. The microstructure results reveal the information of the effect of irradiation and effect of the chrome concentration in specimen. From the SRIM result, penetration distance of 40 μm in stainless steel and nominal sample thickness of 30 μm was used to avoid the damage peak and any proton implantation and From the microstructural evaluation, chromium-rich zones existed under the surface of the both of non-irradiated and irradiated materials. The irradiated materials showed chromium-rich zones with larger depths than the non-irradiated specimens.

  3. Radiation effects in structural materials of spallation targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, P.

    2002-02-01

    Effects of radiation damage by protons and neutrons in structural materials of spallation neutron sources are reviewed. Effects of atomic displacements, defect mobility and transmutation products, especially hydrogen and helium, on physical and mechanical properties are discussed. The most promising candidate materials (austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels and refractory alloys) are compared, and needed investigations are identified.

  4. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  5. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eiholzer, C.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  6. Gas Gap Conductance between HT9 and SS316

    OpenAIRE

    Scoggins, Michael; Martinez, Chris; Song, Zhuorui

    2016-01-01

    inside a nuclear reactor, it is important to understand in detail the heat transfer between surfaces. This research aims to ensure the safety of new fuel experiments in the Idaho National Laboratory test reactor by studying the thermal properties of stainless steel and high temperature steel surfaces with a microscopic gas gap between them. The complex behavior of the gas requires a combination of experimental and theoretical modeling. A technique called laser flash analysis is being applied ...

  7. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken

  8. High temperature creep strength of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, high temperature strength of advanced radiation resistance ODS steel was investigated for the core structural material of next generation nuclear systems. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying, hot isostactic pressing and hot rolling processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels, and creep rupture test as well as tensile test were examined to investigate the behavior at high temperatures. ODS steels were fabricated by a mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes. Mechanical properties at high temperatures were investigated. The creep resistance of advanced radiation resistant ODS steels was more superior than those of ferritic/ martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel and even a conventional ODS steel.

  9. The microstructure of neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr alloys: A small-angle neutron scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintze, C.; Bergner, F.; Ulbricht, A.; Eckerlebe, H.

    2009-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic chromium steels are candidate materials for future applications in both Gen-IV fission and fusion technology. Experimental investigation of neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys is important in order to gain a better understanding of the interplay of chromium content and irradiation behaviour. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is particularly well suited to unfold the size distribution of non-planar irradiation-induced nanoscale features such as defect-solute clusters, nanovoids and α'- particles. This size distribution represents a statistically reliable average over a macroscopic volume. Assumptions on the dominant type of features can be checked against the ratio of magnetic and nuclear scattering. The materials investigated in this work are commercial-purity Fe-Cr alloys of nominal compositions Fe-2.5Cr, Fe-5Cr, Fe- 9Cr and Fe-12.5Cr (at %). Neutron irradiation was performed in the reactor BR2 at Mol (Belgium) at a temperature of 300 deg. C and neutron flux of 9 x 10 13 cm -2 s -1 (E > 1 MeV) [Matijasevic, JNM 377 (2008) 147]. The neutron exposures expressed in units of displacements per atom correspond to 0.6 and 1.5 dpa. A wavelength of 0.58 nm and three detector-sample distances of 1, 4 and 16 m were used in the SANS experiments carried out at the SANS-2 facility of GKSS Geesthacht (Germany). The samples were placed in a saturation magnetic field in order to separate magnetic and nuclear contributions. The scattering curves obtained for the unirradiated conditions of the four Fe-Cr alloys were taken as reference. We have found that the volume fraction of scatterers slightly increases with neutron exposure (Fe-9Cr) or exhibits a saturation-like behaviour (Fe-2.5Cr, Fe-5Cr and Fe-12.5Cr) and that the volume fraction at 1.5 dpa is an increasing function of the chromium level with a slight increase up to 9 at%Cr and a steep increase between 9 and 12.5 at%Cr. The radii of irradiation-induced scatterers are essentially less than 8 nm and

  10. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  11. Nonswelling alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  12. Nonswelling alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-01-01

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses

  13. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...... thermoelastic coefficients and age hardenable low expansion alloys....

  14. The effect of microstructural stability on long-term creep behaviour of 11 %Cr steels for steam power plants with operating steam temperatures up to 650 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Scholz, A.; Berger, C. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (DE). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde (IFW); Kauffmann, F.; Maile, K. [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Materialpruefungsanstalt (MPA); Mayer, K.H. [Alstom Power, Nuernberg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The investigations of advanced ferritic/martensitic steels for 650 C power plant components focus on the improvement of high-temperature creep properties with respect to chemical composition. This study deals with the development of new heat resistant 11-12%Cr ferritic-martensitic steels with sufficient creep and oxidation resistance up to 650 application by using basic principles and concepts of physical metallurgy. The highest creep strength could be achieved with a 0.04% Nb alloyed 11%CrWCoMoVB melt, which is in addition alloyed with a higher C and B content as well as with lower W and Co portions. The microstructure evolution during creep of this newly developed steel was investigated in comparison to a sister alloy which comprises 0.06% Ta instead of the Nb. (orig.)

  15. Materials science problems of blankets in Russian concept of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solonin, M.I.

    1998-01-01

    Structural materials, beryllium and tritium breeding materials proposed for blanket of Russian reactor DEMO and Test Modules for ITER are discussed. Main requirements for the materials are concerned with basis current designs of blankets and modules and possibility meet of ones for presence and developed alloys and materials discussed considered. Main properties and results of test of ferrite-martensite and vanadium alloys for DEMO and Test Modules are cited. Beryllium compositions used as component of first wall and neutron multiplier are discussed. Liquid lithium and ceramic (lithium orthosilicate) are treated as tritium breeding materials. Russian development of reactor experimental unit for tritium breeding zone using beryllium, lithium ceramic and ferrite-martensite alloys for structural materials is presented. (orig.)

  16. Superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to superconductors having high critical currents. The superconductor described comprises an alloy consisting of a matrix of a Type II superconductor which is a homogeneous mixture of 50 to 95 at.% Pb and 5 to 40 at.%Bi and/or 10 to 50 at.%In. Dispersed in the matrix is a material to provide pinning centres comprising from 0.01% to 20% by volume of the alloy; this material is a stable discontinuous phase of discrete crystalline particles of Cu, Mn, Te, Se, Ni, Ca, Cr, Ce, Ge or La, either in the form of the element or a compound with a component of the matrix. These particles should have an average diameter of not more than 2μ. A method for making this alloy is described. (U.K.)

  17. Silicon Alloying On Aluminium Based Alloy Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanto

    2002-01-01

    Silicon alloying on surface of aluminium based alloy was carried out using electron beam. This is performed in order to enhance tribological properties of the alloy. Silicon is considered most important alloying element in aluminium alloy, particularly for tribological components. Prior to silicon alloying. aluminium substrate were painted with binder and silicon powder and dried in a furnace. Silicon alloying were carried out in a vacuum chamber. The Silicon alloyed materials were assessed using some techniques. The results show that silicon alloying formed a composite metal-non metal system in which silicon particles are dispersed in the alloyed layer. Silicon content in the alloyed layer is about 40% while in other place is only 10.5 %. The hardness of layer changes significantly. The wear properties of the alloying alloys increase. Silicon surface alloying also reduced the coefficient of friction for sliding against a hardened steel counter face, which could otherwise be higher because of the strong adhesion of aluminium to steel. The hardness of the silicon surface alloyed material dropped when it underwent a heating cycle similar to the ion coating process. Hence, silicon alloying is not a suitable choice for use as an intermediate layer for duplex treatment

  18. Study on the Hot Extrusion Process of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byoungkwon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Ferritic/martensitic steel has a better thermal conductivity and swelling resistance than austenitic stainless steel. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited at up to 650 .deg. C. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels have been developed as the most prospective core structural materials for next generation nuclear systems because of their excellent high strength and irradiation resistance. The material performances of this new alloy are attributed to the existence of uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density, which is extremely stable at high temperature in a ferritic/martensitic matrix. This microstructure can be very attractive in achieving superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and thus, these favorable microstructures should be obtained through the controls of the fabrication process parameters during the mechanical alloying and hot consolidation procedures. In this study, a hot extrusion process for advanced radiation resistant ODS steel tube was investigated. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels. A microstructure observation and creep rupture test were examined to investigate the effects of the optimized fabrication conditions. Advanced radiation resistant ODS steel has been designed to have homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. For these characteristics, modified mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were developed. Microstructure observation revealed that the ODS steel has uniformly distributed fine-grain nano-oxide particles. The fabrication process for the tubing is also being propelled in earnest.

  19. Study on the Hot Extrusion Process of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byoungkwon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel has a better thermal conductivity and swelling resistance than austenitic stainless steel. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited at up to 650 .deg. C. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels have been developed as the most prospective core structural materials for next generation nuclear systems because of their excellent high strength and irradiation resistance. The material performances of this new alloy are attributed to the existence of uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density, which is extremely stable at high temperature in a ferritic/martensitic matrix. This microstructure can be very attractive in achieving superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and thus, these favorable microstructures should be obtained through the controls of the fabrication process parameters during the mechanical alloying and hot consolidation procedures. In this study, a hot extrusion process for advanced radiation resistant ODS steel tube was investigated. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels. A microstructure observation and creep rupture test were examined to investigate the effects of the optimized fabrication conditions. Advanced radiation resistant ODS steel has been designed to have homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. For these characteristics, modified mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were developed. Microstructure observation revealed that the ODS steel has uniformly distributed fine-grain nano-oxide particles. The fabrication process for the tubing is also being propelled in earnest

  20. Orientation relationship in various 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels-EBSD comparison between Nishiyama-Wassermann, Kurdjumov-Sachs and Greninger-Troiano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, F.; Bechade, J. L.; Fournier, B.

    2010-01-01

    EBSD measurements were carried out on four different martensitic steels (T91, P92, EM10 and Eurofer) in various metallurgical conditions (nine different microstructural states). The usual orientation relationships (ORs) between the parent austenitic phase and the resulting martensite in martensitic steels are those of Nishiyama-Wassermann (NW) and Kurjumov-Sachs (KS). The present study first proposes a methodology based on the combined analysis of the misorientation distribution, the pole figures (PFs) and the angle/axis pairs. This methodology leads to the conclusion that neither NW nor KS relationships are able to account for all the features observed whatever the material under study. A third OR proposed by Greninger and Troiano (GT) proves to describe the relationship between austenite and ferrite in all four different martensitic steels much more accurately. (authors)

  1. Influence of microstructural development during annealing at 780oC on creep resistance of ferritic-martensitic T91 (9%Cr-1%Mo-V-Nb) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Cicco, H; Zavaleta Gutierrez, N; Marrero, J; Luppo, M.I; Danon, C.A

    2006-01-01

    Due to its good properties of creep resistance, toughness and rust resistance, martensitic-ferritic 9%Cr-1%Mo steels are widely used for the production of heating plant components, boilers, heat exchangers, piping and tubing, etc. The effectiveness in steels of MX carbonitrides such as (Nb,V) (C,N) on improving creep resistance at high temperatures is well known. Controlling the behavior of the MX phases to precipitation, during annealing, is essential for obtaining a stable microstructure that can resist high temperatures. This study investigates the relationship between creep resistance and the microstructural changes that occur at different annealing times at a temperature of 780 o C -used industrially during the production and post-welding- in T91 steel. Creep trials were carried out at 600 o C and 190 MPa, and the samples were characterized using optic microscopy (OM), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the latter including a facility for energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Based on its morphological characteristics, the MX precipitates are classified into three types, types I, II and III. Tempering time at 780 o C has been found to be one of the factors that determines which MX is dominant in the annealed steel. The presence of type MX-III, formed by the secondary precipitation of a VN particle adhering to a NbX, commonly called 'wing', seems to favor creep resistance in these steels. This type of of precipitate, then, fills an effective role in the anchoring of dislocations during creep (cw)

  2. Positron annihilation studies on structural materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaraman, R.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Structural steels for nuclear reactors have renewed interest owing to the future advanced fission reactor design with increased burn-up goals as well as for fusion reactor applications. While modified austenitic steels continue to be the main cladding materials for fast breeder reactors, Ferritic/martensitic steels and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels are the candidate materials for future reactors applications in India. Sensitivity and selectivity of positron annihilation spectroscopy to open volume type defects and nano clusters have been extensively utilized in studying reactor materials. We have recently reviewed the application of positron techniques to reactor structural steels. In this talk, we will present successful application of positron annihilation spectroscopy to probe various structural materials such as D9, ferritic/martensitic, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels and related model alloys, highlighting our recent studies. (author)

  3. Translating VDM to Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausdahl, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    specifications. However, to take advantage of the automated analysis of Alloy, the model-oriented VDM specifications must be translated into a constraint-based Alloy specifications. We describe how a sub- set of VDM can be translated into Alloy and how assertions can be expressed in VDM and checked by the Alloy...

  4. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  5. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  6. Controlled Thermal Expansion Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There has always been a need for controlled thermal expansion alloys suitable for mounting optics and detectors in spacecraft applications.  These alloys help...

  7. Effect of self-ion irradiation on the microstructural changes of alloy EK-181 in annealed and severely deformed conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydogan, E. [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chen, T.; Gigax, J.G.; Chen, D.; Wang, X. [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Dzhumaev, P.S.; Emelyanova, O.V.; Ganchenkova, M.G.; Kalin, B.A.; Leontiva-Smirnova, M. [National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), Moscow (Russian Federation); Valiev, R.Z. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials and Nanocenter, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, Ufa (Russian Federation); Saint Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Enikeev, N.A.; Abramova, M.M. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials and Nanocenter, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, Ufa (Russian Federation); Wu, Y.; Lo, W.Y.; Yang, Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Short, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Maloy, S.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), Moscow (Russian Federation); Shao, L., E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    EK-181 is a low-activation ferritic/martensitic steel that is an attractive candidate for in-core component materials for both fast reactors and fusion reactors. To assess the effect of microstructural engineering on radiation response, two variants of EK-181 were studied: one in an annealed condition and the other subject to severe plastic deformation. These specimens were irradiated with 3.5 MeV Fe self-ions up to 400 peak displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures ranging from 400 °C to 500 °C. The deformation did not suppress swelling over the whole irradiated region. Instead, deformed samples showed higher swelling in the near-surface region. Void swelling was found to be correlated with grain boundary instability. Significant grain growth occurred when steady-state void growth started.

  8. Electronic structure of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenreich, H.; Schwartz, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    The description of electronic properties of binary substitutional alloys within the single particle approximation is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on a didactic exposition of the equilibrium properties of the transport and magnetic properties of such alloys. Topics covered include: multiple scattering theory; the single band alloy; formal extensions of the theory; the alloy potential; realistic model state densities; the s-d model; and the muffin tin model. 43 figures, 3 tables, 151 references

  9. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys.

  10. Summary of the U.S. specimen matrix for the HFIR 13J varying temperature irradiation capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    The US specimen matrix for the collaborative DOE/Monbusho HFIR 13J varying temperature irradiation capsule contains two ceramics and 29 different metals, including vanadium alloys, ferritic/martensitic steels, pure iron, austenitic stainless steels, nickel alloys, and copper alloys. This experiment is designed to provide fundamental information on the effects of brief low-temperature excursions on the tensile properties and microstructural evolution of a wide range of materials irradiated at nominal temperatures of 350 and 500 C to a dose of ∼5 dpa. A total of 340 miniature sheet tensile specimens and 274 TEM disks are included in the US-supplied matrix for the irradiation capsule

  11. Tensile properties of several 800 MeV proton-irradiated bcc metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Wechsler, M.S.; Tschalar, C.

    1987-01-01

    A spallation neutron source for the 600-MeV proton accelerator facility at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research (SIN) consists of a vertical cylinder filled with molten Pb-Bi. The proton beam enters the cylinder, passing upward through a window in contact with the Pb-Bi eutectic liquid that must retain reasonable strength and ductility upon irradiation at about 673 K to fluence of about 1 x 10/sup 25/ protons/m/sup 2/. Investigations are underway at the 800-MeV proton accelerator at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) to test the performance of candidate SIN window materials under appropriate conditions of temperature, irradiation, and environment. Based on considerations of chemical compatibility with molten Pb-Bi, as well as interest in identifying fundamental radiation damage mechanisms, Fe, Ta, Fe-2.25Cr-1Mo, and Fe-12Cr-1Mo(HT-9) were chosen as candidate materials. Sheet tensile samples, 0.5-mm thick, of the four materials were fabricated and heat treated. The samples were sealed inside capsules containing Pb-Bi and were proton-irradiated at LAMPF to two fluences, 4.8 and 54 x 10/sup 23/ p/m/sup 2/. The beam current was approximately equal to the 1 mA anticipated for the upgraded SIN accelerator. The power deposited by the proton beam in the capsules was sufficient to maintain sample temperatures of about 673 K. Post-irradiation tensile tests were conducted at room temperature at a strain rate of 9 x 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/. The yield and ultimate strengths increased upon irradiation in all materials, while the ductility decreased, as indicated by the uniform strain. The pure metals, Ta and Fe, exhibited the greatest radiation hardening and embrittlement. The HT-9 alloy showed the smallest changes in strength and ductility. The increase in strength following irradiation is discussed in terms of a dispersed-barrier hardening model, for which the barrier sizes and formation cross sections are calculated

  12. High strength alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  13. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  14. Results from the characterisation of the Futurix-FTA metal alloy transmutation fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rory Kennedy, J.; O'Holleran, Th.; Keiser, D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Idaho National Laboratory has been developing and irradiation testing a number of fuels and fuel types for actinide transmutation as part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Fuel types under consideration include both fertile (fast reactor systems) and fertile-free (accelerator-driven systems) metallic alloys. Most recently, fuel fabrication was completed and the fuel pins shipped to the fast flux Phenix reactor in Marcoule, France for irradiation testing as part of the FUTURIX-FTA experiment: an international experiment involving the USA, France, the European Commission and Japan. The metal alloy fuels for this experiment are the low-fertile U-29Pu-4Am-2Np-30Zr and the non-fertile Pu-12Am-40Zr. The fresh fuels have been fully characterised for chemical composition, phase, microstructure, thermal behaviour and fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction (FCCI). Preliminary FCCI results raised some safety concerns with respect to the formation of low melting phases and cladding degradation, which could preclude a fuel from consideration. Results from diffusion couple experiments between the non-fertile fuel Pu-12Am-40Zr and the ferritic HT9 and 422 stainless steels (SS) used in the AFC experiments in the ATR reactor (USA) compared to the austenitic AIM1 SS used in the FUTURIX-FTA experiments in the Phenix reactor (France) indicate significant inter-diffusion with the AIM1 SS. Up to about a 30-fold increase in the diffusion of iron (and accompanying Ni and Cr) into the fuel at 650 C was observed compared to the 422 SS studies. Comparable studies between the low-fertile U-29Pu-4Am-2Np-30Zr fuel alloy and the AIM1 SS show virtually no inter-diffusion. The Fe (along with small amounts of Ni and Cr) appears as small precipitates in the fuel alloy with only minor concentrations identified in the fuel alloy matrix. These results will be discussed in terms of mechanisms of the inter-diffusion and the difference in behaviour between the

  15. An exploratory study to determine applicability of nano-hardness and micro-compression measurements for yield stress estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosemann, P.; Swadener, J. G.; Kiener, D.; Was, G. S.; Maloy, S. A.; Li, N.

    2008-03-01

    The superior properties of ferritic/martensitic steels in a radiation environment (low swelling, low activation under irradiation and good corrosion resistance) make them good candidates for structural parts in future reactors and spallation sources. While it cannot substitute for true reactor experiments, irradiation by charged particles from accelerators can reduce the number of reactor experiments and support fundamental research for a better understanding of radiation effects in materials. Based on the nature of low energy accelerator experiments, only a small volume of material can be uniformly irradiated. Micro and nanoscale post irradiation tests thus have to be performed. We show here that nanoindentation and micro-compression testing on T91 and HT-9 stainless steel before and after ion irradiation are useful methods to evaluate the radiation induced hardening.

  16. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe–9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (K JQ ) at represented temperatures: 240–280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160–220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic–martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616

  17. Presentation of the results for deuterium retention and thermal release in a new type of low activation ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER / Результаты исследования по удержанию дейтерия и термической десорбции в условиях низкой активации ферритно-мартенситной стали EUROFER / Rezultati zadržavanja i termalne desorpcije deuterijuma u EUROFER-u, novoj vrsti feritno-martenzitnog čelika niske aktivacije

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Lj. Korica

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of the investigation into deuterium retention and thermal release in low activation ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER and its main components, Fe and Cr, using ion implantation, nuclear reaction depth profiling and the thermal desorption spectrometry technique. The samples were exposed to deuterium ECR plasma of 6.5*1024 Dm-2 fluence. Our NRA results show that, at 300 K, most of deuterium is trapped in the near-surface region. A part of the implanted deuterium diffuses into the bulk and is trapped by defects beyond the implantation range. The results of the TDS measurement of the Cr sample confirm the formation of an ordered Cr-hydride phase. / В данной статье приведены результаты исследований по удержанию и термической десорбции дейтерия в железе, хроме и сплаве EOROFER – представляющем новейший материал для фузионного (термоядерного реактора. Исследования показали следующие результаты: *Удержание дейтерия в хроме намного выше, чем в железе (из-за образования гибридов хрома *Удержание дейтерия в сплаве EUROFER выше на фактор 2, чем в железе *Выявлена специфиеская структура в концентрационном профиле железа и сплава EUROFER на глубине ~ 4 μm *Высокий уровень диффузии и удержания дейтерия свидетельствует о потенциальном применении Au в качестве диффузионного барьера в фузионном (термоядерном реакторе. / U ovom radu ispitivano je zadržavanje i termalna desorpcija deuterijuma u gvo

  18. Low activation ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  19. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  20. Influence of a doping by Al stainless steel on kinetics and character of interaction with the metallic nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nuclear fuel is a perspective kind of fuel for fast reactors. In this paper we conducted a study of the interaction between uranium-molybdenum alloy and ferritic- martensitic steels with additions of aluminum at a temperature of 700 ° C for 25 hours. The rate constants of the interaction layer growth at 700 °C is about 2.8.10-14 m2/s. It is established that doping Al stainless steel leads to decrease in interaction with uranium-molybdenum alloys. The phase composition of the interaction layer is determined.

  1. Substitution of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel for austentic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes the current program to develop a high-strength ferritic-martensitic steel. The alloy is essentially Fe-9% Cr-1% Mo with small additions of V and Nb and is known as modifed 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. Its elevated-temperature properties and design allowable stresses match those of type 304 stainless steel for temperatures up to 600 0 C and exceed those of other ferritic steels by factors of 2 to 3. The improved strength of this alloy permits its use in place of stainless steels for many applications

  2. FY 2017 – Thermal Aging Effects on Advanced Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Wei-Ying [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of the effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of existing laboratory-sized heats of Alloy 709 austenitic stainless steel and the completion of effort on the thermal aging effect on the tensile properties of optimized G92 ferritic-martensitic steel. The report is a Level 3 deliverable in FY17 (M3AT-17AN1602081), under the Work Package AT-17AN160208, “Advanced Alloy Testing - ANL” performed by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies Program.

  3. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  4. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM) alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable high-strength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO 2 laser . This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloy, over the last years. (Author) 16 refs

  5. Characterization and Modeling of Grain Boundary Chemistry Evolution in Ferritic Steels under Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquis, Emmanuelle [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels such as HT-9, T-91 and NF12 with chromium concentrations in the range of 9-12 at.% Cr and high Cr ferritic steels (oxide dispersion strengthened steels with 12-18% Cr) are receiving increasing attention for advanced nuclear applications, e.g. cladding and duct materials for sodium fast reactors, pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors and first wall structures in fusion reactors, thanks to their advantages over austenitic alloys. Predicting the behavior of these alloys under radiation is an essential step towards the use of these alloys. Several radiation-induced phenomena need to be taken into account, including phase separation, solute clustering, and radiation-induced segregation or depletion (RIS) to point defect sinks. RIS at grain boundaries has raised significant interest because of its role in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and corrosion of structural materials. Numerous observations of RIS have been reported on austenitic stainless steels where it is generally found that Cr depletes at grain boundaries, consistently with Cr atoms being oversized in the fcc Fe matrix. While FM and ferritic steels are also subject to RIS at grain boundaries, unlike austenitic steels, the behavior of Cr is less clear with significant scatter and no clear dependency on irradiation condition or alloy type. In addition to the lack of conclusive experimental evidence regarding RIS in F-M alloys, there have been relatively few efforts at modeling RIS behavior in these alloys. The need for predictability of materials behavior and mitigation routes for IASCC requires elucidating the origin of the variable Cr behavior. A systematic detailed high-resolution structural and chemical characterization approach was applied to ion-implanted and neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr alloys containing from 3 to 18 at.% Cr. Atom probe tomography analyses of the microstructures revealed slight Cr clustering and segregation to dislocations and

  6. Experimental Setup with Transient Behavior of Fuel Cladding of SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, June-Hyung; Ryu, Woo Seog; Park, Sang Gyu; Kim, Sung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Nowadays, in Korea, advanced cladding such as FC92 is developed and its transient behaviors are required for the safety analysis of SFR. Design and safety analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) require understanding fuel pin responses to a wide range of off-normal events. In a loss-of-flow (LOF) or transient over-power (TOP), the temperature of the cladding is rapidly increased above its steady-state service temperature. Transient tests have been performed in sections of fuel pin cladding and a large data base has been established for austenitic stainless steel such as 20% cold-worked 316 SS and ferritic/martensitic steels such as HT9. This paper summarizes the technical status of transient testing facilities and their results. Previous researches showed the transient behaviors of HT9 cladding. For the safety analyses in SFR in Korea, simulated transient tests with newly developed FC92 as well as HT9 cladding are being carried out.

  7. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  8. Shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA), when deformed, have the ability of returning, in certain circumstances, to their initial shape. Deformations related to this phenomenon are for polycrystals 1-8% and up to 15% for monocrystals. The deformation energy is in the range of 10 6 - 10 7 J/m 3 . The deformation is caused by martensitic transformation in the material. Shape memory alloys exhibit one directional or two directional shape memory effect as well as pseudoelastic effect. Shape change is activated by temperature change, which limits working frequency of SMA to 10 2 Hz. Other group of alloys exhibit magnetic shape memory effect. In these alloys martensitic transformation is triggered by magnetic field, thus their working frequency can be higher. Composites containing shape memory alloys can also be used as shape memory materials (applied in vibration damping devices). Another group of composite materials is called heterostructures, in which SMA alloys are incorporated in a form of thin layers The heterostructures can be used as microactuators in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Basic SMA comprise: Ni-Ti, Cu (Cu-Zn,Cu-Al, Cu-Sn) and Fe (Fe-Mn, Fe-Cr-Ni) alloys. Shape memory alloys find applications in such areas: automatics, safety and medical devices and many domestic appliances. Currently the most important appears to be research on magnetic shape memory materials and high temperature SMA. Vital from application point of view are composite materials especially those containing several intelligent materials. (author)

  9. Thermofluency in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco M, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented about the theoretical and experimental results obtained at present in thermofluency under radiation in zirconium alloys. The phenomenon of thermofluency is presented in a general form, underlining the thermofluency at high temperature because this phenomenon is similar to the thermofluency under radiation, which ocurrs in zirconium alloys into the operating reactor. (author)

  10. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  11. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  12. Neutron-absorbing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoi, K.I.; Arabei, L.B.; Gryaznov, G.M.; Levi, L.I.; Lunin, G.L.; Kozhukhov, V.M.; Markov, J.M.; Fedotov, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for the production of an alloy consiting of 1 to 20% In, 0.5 to 15% Sm, and from 3 to 18% Hf, the balance being Ni. Such alloys show a good absorption capacity for thermal and intermediate neutrons, good neutron capture efficiency, and good corrosion resistance, and find application in nuclear reactor automatic control and safety systems. The Hf provides for the maintenance of a reasonably high order of neutron capture efficiency throughout the lifetime of a reactor. The alloys are formed in a vacuum furnace operating with an inert gas atmosphere at 280 to 300 mm.Hg. They have a corrosion resistance from 3 to 3.5 times that of the Ag-based alloys commonly employed, and a neutron capture efficiency about twice that of the Ag alloys. Castability and structural strength are good. (U.K.)

  13. Alloying principles for magnesium base heat resisting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drits, M.E.; Rokhlin, L.L.; Oreshkina, A.A.; Nikitina, N.I.

    1982-01-01

    Some binary systems of magnesium-base alloys in which solid solutions are formed, are considered for prospecting heat resistant alloys. It is shown that elements having essential solubility in solid magnesium strongly decreasing with temperature should be used for alloying maqnesium base alloys with high strength properties at increased temperatures. The strengthening phases in these alloys should comprise essential quantity of magnesium and be rather refractory

  14. Physical metallurgy of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Researches in electric, magnetic, thermophysical properties of titanium alloys in the wide range of temperatures (from helium upto elevated one), as well as stability of phases in alloys of different types are generalized. Fundamental description of physical properties of binary model alloys is given. Acoustic emission, shape memory and Bauschinger effects, pseudoelasticity, aging and other aspects of physical metallurgy of titanium alloys are considered

  15. Technetium and technetium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijdo, W.L.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results of a literature survey on technetium and technetium alloys. The literature has been searched through 1993. The survey was focused on technetium and (binary cubic) technetium alloys, but other important information on technetium has not been omitted from this survey. This report has been written with the aim to collect more information about phase systems which could be of importance in the transmutation process by neutrons of technetium. With the information presented in this report, it should be possible to select a suitable technetium alloy for further investigation regarding to the transmutation process. (orig.)

  16. Positrons in amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Pierre.

    1981-07-01

    Positron annihilation techniques give interesting informations about ''empty spaces'' in amorphous alloys. The results of an extensive research work on the properties of either pre-existing or irradiation induced ''empty spaces'' in four amorphous alloys are presented. The pre-existing empty spaces appear to be small vacancy-like defects. The irradiation induced defects are ''close pairs'' with widely distributed configurations. There is a strong interaction between vacancy like and interstitial like components. A model is proposed, which explains the radiation resistance mechanism of the amorphous alloys. An extensive joint research work to study four amorphous alloys, Fe 80 B 20 ,Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 , Cu 50 Ti 50 , Pd 80 Si 20 , is summarized

  17. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  18. High-throughput design of low-activation, high-strength creep-resistant steels for nuclear-reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Qi; Zwaag, Sybrand van der [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Xu, Wei, E-mail: xuwei@ral.neu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, 110819, Shenyang (China); Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are prime candidate materials for structural applications in nuclear power reactors. However, their creep strength is much lower than that of creep-resistant steel developed for conventional fossil-fired power plants as alloying elements with a high neutron activation cannot be used. To improve the creep strength and to maintain a low activation, a high-throughput computational alloy design model coupling thermodynamics, precipitate-coarsening kinetics and an optimization genetic algorithm, is developed. Twelve relevant alloying elements with either low or high activation are considered simultaneously. The activity levels at 0–10 year after the end of irradiation are taken as optimization parameter. The creep-strength values (after exposure for 10 years at 650 °C) are estimated on the basis of the solid-solution strengthening and the precipitation hardening (taking into account precipitate coarsening). Potential alloy compositions leading to a high austenite fraction or a high percentage of undesirable second phase particles are rejected automatically in the optimization cycle. The newly identified alloys have a much higher precipitation hardening and solid-solution strengthening at the same activity level as existing reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels.

  19. Characteristics of mechanical alloying of Zn-Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.H.; Hong Kong Polytechnic; Perez Hernandez, A.; Lee, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Three pure elemental powder mixtures of Zn-22%Al-18%Cu, Zn-5%Al-11%Cu, and Zn-27%Al-3%Cu (in wt.%) were mechanically alloyed by steel-ball milling processing. The mechanical alloying characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. It was explored that mechanical alloying started with the formation of phases from pure elemental powders, and this was followed by mechanical milling-induced phase transformation. During mechanical alloying, phases stable at the higher temperatures formed at the near room temperature of milling. Nano-structure Zn-Al-based alloys were produced by mechanical alloying. (orig.)

  20. Refractory alloy component fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this report is to describe joining procedures, primarily welding techniques, which were developed to construct reliable refractory alloy components and systems for advanced space power systems. Two systems, the Nb-1Zr Brayton Cycle Heat Receiver and the T-111 Alloy Potassium Boiler Development Program, are used to illustrate typical systems and components. Particular emphasis is given to specific problems which were eliminated during the development efforts. Finally, some thoughts on application of more recent joining technology are presented. 78 figures

  1. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  2. Electroplating technologies of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Seung Ho; Jeong, Hyun Kyu; Hwnag, Sung Sik; Seo, Yong Chil; Kim, Dong Jin; Seo, Moo Hong

    2001-12-01

    In localization of electrosleeving technique, there are some problems like the following articles. Firstly, Patents published by OHT have claimed Ni-P, Ni-B alloy plating and Mo, Mn Cr, W, Co as a pinning agent. Secondly, alloy platings have many restrictions. There are some method to get alloy plating in spite of the various restrictions. If current density increase above limiting current density in one of the metals, both of the metals discharge at the same time. The addition of surface active agent(sufactant) in the plating solution is one of the methods to get alloy plating. Alloy plating using pulse current easily controls chemical composition and structure of deposit. Ni-Fe alloy plating is known to exhibit anomalous type of plating behavior in which deposition of the less noble metal is favoured. Presence of hypophohphite ion can control the iron codeposition by changing the deposition mechanism. Hypophohphite suppresses the deposition of Fe and also promotes Ni. Composite plating will be considered to improve the strength at the high temperature. Addition of particle size of 10δ400μm makes residual stress compressive in plate layer and suppress the grain growth rate at the high temperature. Addition of particle makes suface roughness high and fracture stress low at high temperature. But, selection of the kinds of particle and control of additives amount overcome the problems above

  3. A Critical Analysis of Grain-Size and Yield-Strength Dependence of Near-Threshold Fatigue-Crack Growth in Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-15

    of high-strength steel ), and a host of microstructural types (ferritic, martensitic, pearlitic, bainitic , austenitic). Accession For NTIS GRA&l DTIC...IN STEELS , : RPRNGO.RPRTNMR 1~A Tw.R CONTRACT OA4A&XMUt8~ G/~ ! R./koderl L.A./Cooleyad T.W./Crooker 2 .{I 9PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND A10R4SI...growth Steels Microstructure Ferrous alloys Structure-sensitive crack growth 20 ABSTRACT (Con~tinue an r*,er.. side it necesar and Identity by black

  4. Design of duplex low carbon steels for improved strength: weight applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, J.

    1977-08-01

    Duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels with excellent combinations of strength and formability have been selected from first principles, and their microstructure-property relationships established through a systematic investigation of a series of ternary Fe/X/0.1 C steels (X being varying amount of Cr and Si). Duplex processing consists of initial austenitization and quenching to form 100% martensite, followed by annealing in the (..cap alpha.. + ..gamma..) range and subsequent quenching. The resultant DFM morphology is controlled by the type and amount of alloying element X.

  5. Texture in low-alloyed uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sariel, J.

    1982-08-01

    The dependence of the preferred orientation of cast and heat-treated polycrystalline adjusted uranium and uranium -0.1 w/o chromium alloys on the production process was studied. The importance of obtaining material free of preferred orientation is explained, and a survey of the regular methods to determine preferred orientation is given. Dilatometry, tensile testing and x-ray diffraction were used to determine the extent of the directionality of these alloys. Data processing showed that these methods are insufficient in a case of a material without any plastic forming, because of unreproducibility of results. Two parameters are defined from the results of Schlz's method diffraction test. These parameters are shown theoretically and experimentally (by extreme-case samples) to give the deviation from isotropy. Application of these parameters to the examined samples showes that cast material has preferred orientation, though it is not systematic. This preferred orientation was reduced by adequate heat treatments

  6. WC-3015 alloy (high-temperature alloy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    WC-3015 Nb alloy containing 28 to 30 Hf, 1 to 2 Zr, 13 to 16 W, 0 to 4 Ta, 0 to 5 Ti, 0.07 to 0.33 C, less than or equal to 0.02 N, less than or equal to 0.03 O, less than or equal to 0.001 H was developed for use at high temperature in oxidizing environments. Its composition can be tailored to meet specific requirements. When WC-3015 is exposed to O at elevated temperature, Hf and Nb oxidized preferentially and HfO 2 dissolves in Nb 2 O 5 to form 6HfO-Nb 2 O 5 . This complex oxide has a tight cubic lattice which resists the diffusion of O into the substrate. During 24-h exposure to air at 2400 0 F, the alloy oxidizes to a depth of approximately 0.035 in. with a surface recession of 0 to 0.004 in. Oxidation resistance of WC-3015 welds and base material can be further enhanced greatly by applying silicide coatings. WC-3015 alloy can be machined by conventional and electrical-discharge methods. It can be hot worked readily by extrusion, forging or rolling. Cold working can be used at room or elevated temperature. It can be welded by the electron-beam or Tig processes. Physical constants, typical mechanical properties at 75 to 2400 0 F, and effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile and stress-rupture properties of the alloy are tabulated

  7. A study in the surface treatment of the barrier of a nuclear fuel protector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yo Seung; Chang, Si Young; Lee, Du Hyung; Noh, Bong Hyun; Kim, Ye Na [Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Materials used in the nuclear power plant, such as pipe, are needed to endure severe corrosion because they could expose the high temperature coolant under radiation. Up to now, the HT9 steel(12Cr-1MoVW) which is one of Ferritic Martensite Stainless steels has been applied because of its high swelling resistance. However, its applications are limited to the temperature of approximately 500 .deg. C. Therefore, it has been strongly demanded that the materials have excellent corrosion resistance concurrent with high mechanical properties such as fracture toughness and irradiation resistance at higher temperatures of more than 500 .dec. C for high efficiency of operating reactor. In order to overcome the corrosion problem of irradiated HT9 steel causing severe environmental problem, particularly, the ceramic coating methods could be applied. Recently, plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) emerged as a novel technique being capable of thick, dense and hard oxide ceramic coatings on the surface of light materials. In this study, we focused on applying the newly developed coating method, Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) which was mainly developed for non-ferrous materials such as Al, Mg and Ti, for the HT9 steel. And then, we investigated and evaluated the possibility of application of PEO method for HT9 steel treated with/without aluminum cladding based on the microstructure observation of coatings formed under various processing parameters such as current ratio, electrolyte and time. Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) treatment, which is an advancement of the conventional electrochemical anodizing treatment and leads to the local formation of a plasma by a spark on the metal surface, is expected to be a promising surface treatment that can overcome the drawbacks of HT9 steel. We applied PEO treatment for HT9 steel. We tried to find the effect of processing parameters, such as coating time, current ratio and electrolyte, on PEO coatings of HT9 steel, and also studied

  8. Aluminum fin-stock alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, R.M.; Mutasher, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum alloys have long been used in the production of heat exchanger fins. The comparative properties of the different alloys used for this purpose has not been an issue in the past, because of the significant thickness of the finstock material. However, in order to make fins lighter in weight, there is a growing demand for thinner finstock materials, which has emphasized the need for improved mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance. The objective of this project is to determine the effect of iron, silicon and manganese percentage increment on the required mechanical properties for this application by analyzing four different aluminum alloys. The four selected aluminum alloys are 1100, 8011, 8079 and 8150, which are wrought non-heat treatable alloys with different amount of the above elements. Aluminum alloy 1100 serve as a control specimen, as it is commercially pure aluminum. The study also reports the effect of different annealing cycles on the mechanical properties of the selected alloys. Metallographic examination was also preformed to study the effect of annealing on the precipitate phases and the distribution of these phases for each alloy. The microstructure analysis of the aluminum alloys studied indicates that the precipitated phase in the case of aluminum alloys 1100 and 8079 is beta-FeAI3, while in 8011 it is a-alfa AIFeSi, and the aluminum alloy 8150 contains AI6(Mn,Fe) phase. The comparison of aluminum alloys 8011 and 8079 with aluminum alloy 1100 show that the addition of iron and silicon improves the percent elongation and reduces strength. The manganese addition increases the stability of mechanical properties along the annealing range as shown by the comparison of aluminum alloy 8150 with aluminum alloy 1100. Alloy 8150 show superior properties over the other alloys due to the reaction of iron and manganese, resulting in a preferable response to thermal treatment and improved mechanical properties. (author)

  9. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells.......In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells....

  10. Alloy development for fast induced radioactivity decay for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1984-03-01

    The Cr-Mo ferritic (martensitic) steels and austenitic stainless steels (primarily type 316 and variations on that composition) are the leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment produces long-lived radioactive isotopes. These isotopes lead to difficult radioactive waste disposal problems once the structure is removed from service. Such problems could be reduced by developing steels that contain only elements that produce radioactive isotopes that decay to low levels in a reasonable time (tens of years instead of hundreds or thousands of years). This report discusses the development of such steels by making elemental substitutions in the steels now under consideration. Molybdenum must be replaced in the Cr-Mo steels; nickel and molybdenum both must be replaced in the austenitic stainless steels (the nitrogen concentration must be limited, and niobium, maintained to extremely low levels). Appropriate substitutions are tungsten for molybdenum in the Cr-Mo steels and manganese for nickel in the austenitic stainless steels. Indications are that suitable ferritic steels can be developed, but development of a nickel-free austenitic stainless steel with properties similar to the Cr-Ni stainless steels appears to be much more complex

  11. INVESTIGATION OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS MACHINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berat Barıs BULDUM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Magnesium alloy developments have traditionally been driven by industry requirements for lightweight materials to operate under increasingly demanding conditions. Magnesium alloys have always been attractive to designers due to their low density, only two thirds that of aluminium and its alloys [1]. The element and its alloys take a big part of modern industry needs. Especially nowadays magnesium alloys are used in automotive and mechanical (trains and wagons manufacture, because of its lightness and other features. Magnesium and magnesium alloys are the easiest of all metals to machine, allowing machining operations at extremely high speed. All standard machining operations such as turning, drilling, milling, are commonly performed on magnesium parts.

  12. Structural thermodynamics of alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Manenc, Jack

    1973-01-01

    Technical progress has for a very long time been directly dependent on progress in metallurgy, which is itself connected with improvements in the technology of alloys. Metals are most frequently used in the form of alloys for several reasons: the quantity of pure metal in its native state in the earth's crust is very limited; pure metals must be extracted from ores which are themselves impure. Finally, the methods of treatment used lead more easily to alloys than to pure metals. The most typical case is that of iron, where a pure ore may be found, but which is the starting point for cast iron or steel, alloys of iron and carbon. In addition, the properties of alloys are in general superior to those of pure metals and modem metallurgy consists of controlling these properties so as to make them conform to the requirements of the design office. Whilst the engineer was formerly compelled to adapt his designs and constructions to the materials available, such as wood, stone, bronze, iron, cast iron and ordinary st...

  13. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Peter [Houston, TX; Koh, Shirlaine [Houston, TX; Mani, Prasanna [Houston, TX; Ratndeep, Srivastava [Houston, TX

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  14. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  15. Alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Bellon, P.; Soisson, F.

    1997-01-01

    During the last two decades, some effort has been devoted to establishing a phenomenology for alloys under irradiation. Theoretically, the effects of the defect supersaturation, sustained defect fluxes and ballistic mixing on solid solubility under irradiation can now be formulated in a unified manner, at least for the most simple cases: coherent phase transformations and nearest-neighbor ballistic jumps. Even under such restrictive conditions, several intriguing features documented experimentally can be rationalized, sometimes in a quantitative manner and simple qualitative rules for alloy stability as a function of irradiation conditions can be formulated. A quasi-thermodynamic formalism can be proposed for alloys under irradiation. However, this point of view has limits illustrated by recent computer simulations. (orig.)

  16. Nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Nickel based alloy, the characteristic of which is that it mainly includes in percentages by weight: 57-63 Ni, 7-18 Cr, 10-20 Fe, 4-6 Mo, 1-2 Nb, 0.2-0.8 Si, 0.01-0.05 Zr, 1.0-2.5 Ti, 1.0-2.5 Al, 0.02-0.06 C and 0.002-0.015 B. The aim is to create new nickel-chromium alloys, hardened in a solid solution and by precipitation, that are stable, exhibit reduced swelling and resistant to plastic deformation inside the reactor. These alloys of the gamma prime type have improved mechanical strengthm swelling resistance, structural stability and welding properties compared with Inconel 625 [fr

  17. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, G.W.; Davis, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500 0 C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150 0 C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement

  18. Silumins alloy crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research, by ATD method, of hypo-, near- and hyperutectic silumins crystallization containing the following alloying additives: Mg, Ni, Cu, Cr, Mo, W, V. It has been shown that, depending on their concentration may crystallize pre-eutectic or eutectic multicomponent phases containing these alloy additives. It has been revealed that any subsequent crystallizable phase nucleate and grows near the liquid/former crystallized phase interface. In multiphases compound also falls the silicon, resulting in a reduction in its quantity and the fragmentation in the eutectic mixture. As a result, it gets a high hardness of silumins in terms of 110-220HB.

  19. Shape memory effect alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshimizu, S.

    1992-01-01

    Although the pseudo- or super-elasticity phenomena and the shape memory effect were known since the 1940's, the enormous curiosity and the great interest to their practical applications emerged with the development of the NITINOL alloy (Nickel-Titanium Naval Ordance Laboratory) by the NASA during the 1960's. This fact marked the appearance of a new class of materials, popularly known as shape memory effect alloys (SMEA). The objective of this work is to present a state-of-the-art of the development and applications for the SMEA. (E.O.)

  20. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of

  1. Galvanic corrosion in odontological alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesgo, O.; Bianchi, G.L.; Duffo, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Galvanic corrosion can occur when different alloys are placed in direct contact within the oral cavity or within tissues. Concern has been expressed associated with the coupling of selected restorative materials as well as implant material with various alloys used for restorative procedures. This could be critical if the crown or bridge had subgingival finish line with a metallic zone in contact with the tissue, and the implant was made in titanium alloy. The present work shows the results of galvanic coupling studies done on implants of titanium alloy connected to nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys. (Author)

  2. Borated aluminum alloy manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Kajihara, Katsura; Aruga, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    Borated aluminum alloy is used as the basket material of cask because of its light weight, thermal conductivity and superior neutron absorbing abilities. Kobe Steel has developed a unique manufacturing process for borated aluminum alloy using a vacuum induction melting method. In this process, aluminum alloy is melted and agitated at higher temperatures than common aluminum alloy fabrication methods. It is then cast into a mold in a vacuum atmosphere. The result is a high quality aluminum alloy which has a uniform boron distribution and no impurities. (author)

  3. Fracture of Shape Memory Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Shuichi; Otsuka, Kazuhiro

    1981-01-01

    The initiation and the propagation of cracks during both quenching and deformation in polycrystalline Cu-Al-Ni alloys have been investigated under various conditions. The fracture surfaces of Ti-Ni and Cu-Al-Ni alloys were also observed by a scanning electron microscope. From these results, it was concluded that the brittleness of Cu-Al-Ni alloy and other β phase alloys are due to large elastic anisotropy and large grain sizes, while that the large ductility in Ti-Ni alloy being due to the sm...

  4. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  5. Ferromagnetic bulk glassy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akihisa; Makino, Akihiro; Mizushima, Takao

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the review on the formation, thermal stability and magnetic properties of the Fe-based bulk glassy alloys in as-cast bulk and melt-spun ribbon forms. A large supercooled liquid region over 50 K before crystallization was obtained in Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si), Fe-(Cr, Mo, Nb)-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B) and (Fe, Co, Ni)-Zr-M-B (M=Ti, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo and W) systems and bulk glassy alloys were produced in a thickness range below 2 mm for the Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) system and 6 mm for the Fe-Co-(Zr, Nb, Ta)-(Mo, W)-B system by copper-mold casting. The ring-shaped glassy Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) alloys exhibit much better soft magnetic properties as compared with the ring-shaped alloy made from the melt-spun ribbon because of the formation of the unique domain structure. The good combination of high glass-forming ability and good soft magnetic properties indicates the possibility of future development as a new bulk glassy magnetic material

  6. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Magnesium secondary alloys: Alloy design for magnesium alloys with improved tolerance limits against impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blawert, C., E-mail: carsten.blawert@gkss.d [GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Fechner, D.; Hoeche, D.; Heitmann, V.; Dietzel, W.; Kainer, K.U. [GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Zivanovic, P.; Scharf, C.; Ditze, A.; Groebner, J.; Schmid-Fetzer, R. [TU Clausthal, Institut fuer Metallurgie, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    The development of secondary magnesium alloys requires a completely different concept compared with standard alloys which obtain their corrosion resistance by reducing the levels of impurities below certain alloy and process depending limits. The present approach suitable for Mg-Al based cast and wrought alloys uses a new concept replacing the {beta}-phase by {tau}-phase, which is able to incorporate more impurities while being electro-chemically less detrimental to the matrix. The overall experimental effort correlating composition, microstructure and corrosion resistance was reduced by using thermodynamic calculations to optimise the alloy composition. The outcome is a new, more impurity tolerant alloy class with a composition between the standard AZ and ZC systems having sufficient ductility and corrosion properties comparable to the high purity standard alloys.

  8. Hardening of niobium alloys at precrystallization annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.V.; Pustovalov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Niobium base alloys were investigated. It is shown that precrystallization annealing of niobium-molybdenum, niobium-vanadium and niobium-zirconium alloys elevates much more sufficiently their resistance to microplastic strains, than to macroplastic strains. Hardening effect differs sufficiently for different alloys. The maximal hardening is observed for niobium-vanadium alloys, the minimal one - for niobium-zirconium alloys

  9. Grindability of dental magnetic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Eisei; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu; Kimura, Kohei

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the grindability of cast magnetic alloys (Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and magnetic stainless steel) was evaluated and compared with that of conventional dental casting alloys (Ag-Pd-Au alloy, Type 4 gold alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy). Grindability was evaluated in terms of grinding rate (i.e., volume of metal removed per minute) and grinding ratio (i.e., volume ratio of metal removed compared to wheel material lost). Solution treated Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy had a significantly higher grinding rate than the aged one at a grinding speed of 750-1500 m x min(-1). At 500 m x min(-1), there were no significant differences in grinding rate between solution treated and aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloys. At a lower speed of 500 m x min(-1) or 750 m x min(-1), it was found that the grinding rates of aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and stainless steel were higher than those of conventional casting alloys.

  10. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  11. Interphase thermodynamic bond in heterogeneous alloys: effects on alloy properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, A.M.; Konovalov, Yu.V.; Yuferov, O.I.

    2005-01-01

    Inconsistency between a conventional thermodynamic description of alloys as a mechanical mixture of phases and a real alloys state as a common thermodynamic system in which there is a complicated physical-chemical phases interaction has been considered. It is supposed that in heterogeneous alloys (eutectic ones, for instance), so called interphase thermodynamic bond can become apparent due to a partial electron levels splitting under phase interaction. Thermodynamic description of phase equilibrium in alloys is proposed taking into account a thermodynamic bond for the system with phase diagram of eutectic type, and methods of the value of this bond estimation are presented. Experimental evidence (Al-Cu-Si, Al-Si-Mg-Cu, U-Mo + Al) of the effect of interphase thermodynamic bond on temperature and enthalpy of melting of alloys are produced as well as possibility of its effects on alloys electrical conduction, strength, heat and corrosion resistance is substantiated theoretically [ru

  12. Experimental study of W-Eurofer laser brazing for divertor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munez, C.J., E-mail: claudio.munez@urjc.es [Dept. de Tecnologia Mecanica, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain); Garrido, M.A. [Dept. de Tecnologia Mecanica, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain); Rams, J.; Urena, A. [Dept. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Laser brazing system as a suitable technique to joint W and Eurofer alloys. > High residual stresses at the bonding were produced. > Laser brazing of powder metallurgy W alloys added porosity in the solidified pool. > The CSM methodology as a suitable technique to discriminate zones of welding joints. - Abstract: This work can be considered as a preliminary evaluation of the potential of laser brazing for joining tungsten based alloys to reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels (Eurofer). Brazing of tungsten and EUROFER alloys using a 55Ni-45Ti alloy as a brazer and a high power diode laser (HPDL) as a power source has been investigated. The brazed joints showed solidified pools with good superficial aspect and a high degree of wettability with the both parent sheets, presumably because of the active effect of titanium. Metallurgical brazeability was investigated and nanoindentation measurements were done to evaluate local hardening and stiffness effects associated to dilution phenomena.

  13. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  14. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  15. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  16. Metastable superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.

    1978-07-01

    The study of metastable metals and alloys has become one of the principal activities of specialists working in the field of superconducting materials. Metastable crystalline superconductors such as the A15-type materials have been given much attention. Non-crystalline superconductors were first studied over twenty years ago by Buckel and Hilsch using the technique of thin film evaporation on a cryogenic substrate. More recently, melt-quenching, sputtering, and ion implantation techniques have been employed to produce a variety of amorphous superconductors. The present article presents a brief review of experimental results and a survey of current work on these materials. The systematics of superconductivity in non-crystalline metals and alloys are described along with an analysis of the microscopic parameters which underlie the observed trends. The unique properties of these superconductors which arise from the high degree of structural disorder in the amorphous state are emphasized

  17. Rare earth metal alloy magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, I.R.; Evans, J.M.; Nyholm, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth metal alloy magnets and to methods for their production. The technique is based on the fact that rare earth metal alloys (for e.g. cerium or yttrium) which have been crumbled to form a powder by hydride formation and decomposition can be used for the fabrication of magnets without the disadvantages inherent in alloy particle size reduction by mechanical milling. (UK)

  18. Thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorev, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of the theory and practical application of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys are presented. On the basis of the systematic investigations developed are the methods of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys, established are the optimum procedures and produced are the bases of their industrial application with an account of alloy technological peculiarities and the procedure efficiency. It is found that those strengthening methods are more efficient at which the contribution of dispersion hardening prevails over the strengthening by phase hardening

  19. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  20. Superplasticity of amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Yu.B.; Likhachev, V.L.; Sen'kov, O.N.

    1988-01-01

    Results of mechanical tests of Co 57 Ni 10 Fe 5 Si 11 B 17 amorphous alloy are presented and the effect of crystallization, occurring during deformation process, on plastic low characteristics is investiagted. Superplasticity of amorphous tape is investigated. It is shown, that this effect occurs only when during deformation the crystallization takes place. Process model, based on the usage disclination concepts about glass nature, is suggested

  1. Shape memory alloy actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  2. Nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    The specified alloys consist of Ni, Cr and Fe as main constituents, and Mo, Nb, Si, Zr, Ti, Al, C and B as minor constituents. They are said to exhibit high weldability and long-time structural stability, as well as low swelling under nuclear radiation conditions, making them especially suitable for use as a duct material and control element cladding for sodium-cooled nuclear reactors. (U.K.)

  3. Aluminum alloy impact sparkling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dudyk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cast machine parts are widely used in many branches of industry. A very important issue is gaining the appropriate knowledge relating to the application of castings in places of explosion risks including but not limited to mining, chemical industry and rescue works. A possibility of explosion risks occurrence following the impact sparkling of the cast metal parts is still not solved problem in scientific research. In relation to this issue, in this article, the results of the study are presented, and relating to the tendency to impact sparkling of the aluminium alloys used in machine building. On the grounds of the results obtained, it was demonstrated that the registered impact sparkles bunches of feathers from the analyzed alloys: AlSi7Mg, (AK7; AlSi9Mg, (AK9; AlSi6Cu4, (AK64 and AlSi11, (AK11 show significant differences between each other. The quantitative analysis of the temperature distribution and nuclei surface area performed on the example of the alloy AK9 (subjected to defined period of corrosion allows for the statement that they are dangerous in conditions of explosion risk. Following this fact, designers and users of machine parts made from these materials should not use them in conditions where the explosive mixtures occur.

  4. Lithium alloy negative electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Robert A.

    The 1996 announcement by Fuji Photo Film of the development of lithium batteries containing convertible metal oxides has caused a great deal of renewed interest in lithium alloys as alternative materials for use in the negative electrode of rechargeable lithium cells. The earlier work on lithium alloys, both at elevated and ambient temperatures is briefly reviewed. Basic principles relating thermodynamics, phase diagrams and electrochemical properties under near-equilibrium conditions are discussed, with the Li-Sn system as an example. Second-phase nucleation, and its hindrance under dynamic conditions plays an important role in determining deviations from equilibrium behavior. Two general types of composite microstructure electrodes, those with a mixed-conducting matrix, and those with a solid electrolyte matrix, are discussed. The Li-Sn-Si system at elevated temperatures, and the Li-Sn-Cd at ambient temperatures are shown to be examples of mixed-conducting matrix microstructures. The convertible oxides are an example of the solid electrolyte matrix type. Although the reversible capacity can be very large in this case, the first cycle irreversible capacity required to convert the oxides to alloys may be a significant handicap.

  5. Castability of Traditionally Wrought Ni-Based Superalloys for USC Steam Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, P D; Cowen, C J; Hawk, J A; Evens, N; Maziasz, P

    2011-02-27

    The high temperature components within conventional coal fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. In order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased. The proposed steam temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work due to temperature limitations of this class of materials; thus Ni-based superalloys are being considered. The full size castings are quite substantial: ~4in thick, several feet in diameter and weigh 5-10,000lb each half. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled in order to produce relevant microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed in order to better deploy the alloy constituents. The castability of two traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys to which minor alloy adjustments have been made in order to improve foundry performance is further explored.

  6. Dose dependence of true stress parameters in irradiated bcc, fcc, and hcp metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, T. S.

    2007-04-01

    The dose dependence of true stress parameters has been investigated for nuclear structural materials: A533B pressure vessel steels, modified 9Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic martensitic steels, 316 and 316LN stainless steels, and Zircaloy-4. After irradiation to significant doses, these alloys show radiation-induced strengthening and often experience prompt necking at yield followed by large necking deformation. In the present work, the critical true stresses for deformation and fracture events, such as yield stress (YS), plastic instability stress (PIS), and true fracture stress (FS), were obtained from uniaxial tensile tests or calculated using a linear strain-hardening model for necking deformation. At low dose levels where no significant embrittlement was detected, the true fracture stress was nearly independent of dose. The plastic instability stress was also independent of dose before the critical dose-to-prompt-necking at yield was reached. A few bcc alloys such as ferritic martensitic steels experienced significant embrittlement at doses above ∼1 dpa; and the true fracture stress decreased with dose. The materials fractured before yield at or above 10 dpa.

  7. Metallurgical comparison between the experimental ED-ODS and commercial ODS steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Serrano, M.; Lapena, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Recently, reduced activation oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels have been identified as potential structural material candidates for first wall and blanket structures of fusion devices. These steels allow to increase the operation temperature of the fusion reactor, around of 100 deg. C or even more, because of their excellent thermal creep resistance. ODS steels are being developed and investigated for nuclear fission and fusion applications in Japan, Europe and the United States. Commercial ODS products, such as MA956 and PM2000 are available and are being used for high temperature applications. Since no reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are commercially available at present, the European Materials Fusion Programme has considered in the last years initiate adequate research activities to produce and characterize these materials to evaluate the feasibility of their use in the different blanket designs. Nowadays, the ODS steel that are being extensively investigated in Europe is the denominated EU-ODS. This alloy has the basic composition of the Eurofer'97 with 0.3% of Y 2 O 3 particles. In this paper, the metallurgical properties (microstructural, Charpy, etc) of the newly developed EU-ODS steel are presented and discussed together with the properties of the commercial MA956 and PM2000 ODS steels, also studied in this work, in order to show the differences and similarities between these ODS alloys. (authors)

  8. Impact toughness of laser alloyed aluminium AA1200 alloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ),. 559-563. [2] T. Tomida, K. Nakata, S. Saji, T. Kubo, T, Formation of metal matrix composite layer on aluminium alloy with TiC-Cu powder by laser surface alloying process; Surface and Coatings Technology; vol. 142-144, 2001, 585-589. [3] L. A. B...

  9. Titanium alloys. Advances in alloys, processes, products and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blenkinsop, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The last few years have been a period of consolidation of existing alloys and processes. While the aerospace industry remains the principal driving force for alloy development, the paper illustrates examples of new markets being established in 'older' alloys, by a combination of product/process development and a re-examination of engineering design parameters. Considerable attention is still being directed towards the titanium aluminide systems, but other more conventional alloy developments are underway aimed at specific engineering and process requirements, both in the aerospace and non-aerospace sectors. Both the advanced high temperature and conventional alloy developments are considered, before the paper goes on to assess the potential of new processes and products, like spray-forming, metal matrix composites and shaped-plate rolling. (orig.)

  10. ODS Alloys for Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Sung

    2006-01-01

    ODS (oxide dispersion strengthening) alloy is one of the potential candidate alloys for the cladding or in reactor components of Generation IV reactors and for the structural material even for fusion reactors. It is widely accepted as very resistant material to neutron irradiation as well as strong material at high temperature due to its finely distributed and stable oxide particles. Among Generation IV reactors SFR and SCWR are anticipated in general to run in the temperature range between 300 and 550 .deg. C, and the peak cladding temperature is supposed to reach at about 620 .deg. C during the normal operation. Therefore Zr.base alloys, which have been widely known and adopted for the cladding material due to their excellent neutron economics, are no more adequate at these operating conditions. Fe-base ODS alloys in general has a good high temperature strength at the above high temperature as well as the neutron resistance. In this study a range of commercial grade ODS alloys and their applications are reviewed, including an investigation of the stability of a commercial grade 20% Cr Fe-base ODS alloy(MA956). The alloy was evaluated in terms of the fracture toughness change along with the aging treatment. Also an attempt of the development of 9% Cr Fe-base ODS alloys is introduced

  11. Nickel alloys and high-alloyed special stainless steels. Properties, manufacturing, applications. 4. compl. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heubner, Ulrich; Kloewer, Jutta; Alves, Helena; Behrens, Rainer; Schindler, Claudius; Wahl, Volker; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the following eight topics: 1. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels - Material overview and metallurgical principles (U. Heubner); 2. Corrosion resistance of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (U. Heubner); 3. Welding of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (T. Hoffmann, M. Wolf); 4. High-temperature materials for industrial plant construction (J. Kloewer); 5. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels as hot roll clad composites-a cost-effective alternative (C. Schindler); 6. Selected examples of the use of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels in chemical plants (H. Alves); 7. The use of nickel alloys and stainless steels in environmental engineering (V. Wahl); 8: Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels for the oil and gas industry (R. Behrens).

  12. Corrosion of aluminum alloys as a function of alloy composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1969-10-01

    A study was initiated which included nineteen aluminum alloys. Tests were conducted in high purity water at 360 0 C and flow tests (approx. 20 ft/sec) in reactor process water at 130 0 C (TF-18 loop tests). High-silicon alloys and AlSi failed completely in the 360 0 C tests. However, coupling of AlSi to 8001 aluminum suppressed the failure. The alloy compositions containing iron and nickel survived tht 360 0 C autoclave exposures. Corrosion rates varied widely as a function of alloy composition, but in directions which were predictable from previous high-temperature autoclave experience. In the TF-18 loop flow tests, corrosion penetrations were similar on all of the alloys and on high-purity aluminum after 105 days. However, certain alloys established relatively low linear corrosion rates: Al-0.9 Ni-0.5 Fe-0.1 Zr, Al-1.0 Ni-0.15 Fe-11.5 Si-0.8 Mg, Al-1.2 Ni-1.8 Fe, and Al-7.0 Ni-4.8 Fe. Electrical polarity measurements between AlSi and 8001 alloys in reactor process water at temperatures up to 150 0 C indicated that AlSi was anodic to 8001 in the static autoclave system above approx. 50 0 C

  13. Aluminum alloy and associated anode and battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarcy, G.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an aluminum alloy. It comprises: eutectic amounts of at least two alloying elements selected from the group consisting of bismuth, cadmium, scandium, gallium, indium, lead, mercury, thallium, tin, and zinc with the balance being aluminum and the alloying elements being about 0.01 to 3.0 percent by weight of the alloy

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  15. General characteristics of eutectic alloy solidification mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaignan, Clement.

    1977-01-01

    The eutectic alloy sodification was studied in binary systems: solidification of non facetted - non facetted eutectic alloy (theoretical aspects, variation of the lamellar spacing, crystallographic relation between the various phases); solidification of facetted - non facetted eutectic alloy; coupled growth out of eutectic alloy; eutectic nucleation [fr

  16. Pareto-optimal alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bligaard, Thomas; Johannesson, Gisli Holmar; Ruban, Andrei

    2003-01-01

    Large databases that can be used in the search for new materials with specific properties remain an elusive goal in materials science. The problem is complicated by the fact that the optimal material for a given application is usually a compromise between a number of materials properties and the ......Large databases that can be used in the search for new materials with specific properties remain an elusive goal in materials science. The problem is complicated by the fact that the optimal material for a given application is usually a compromise between a number of materials properties...... and the cost. In this letter we present a database consisting of the lattice parameters, bulk moduli, and heats of formation for over 64 000 ordered metallic alloys, which has been established by direct first-principles density-functional-theory calculations. Furthermore, we use a concept from economic theory......, the Pareto-optimal set, to determine optimal alloy solutions for the compromise between low compressibility, high stability, and cost....

  17. Density of Liquid Ni-Cr Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The density of liquid Ni-Cr alloy was measured by a modified sessile drop method. The density of liquid Ni-Cr alloywas found to decrease with increasing temperature and Cr concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of liquidNi-Cr alloy increases with increasing the Cr concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of Ni-Cr alloy determinedin the present work shows a positive deviation from the linear molar volume.

  18. Alloying Solid Solution Strengthening of Fe-Ga Alloys: A First-Principle Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Kuiying; Cheng, Leon M

    2006-01-01

    ... and Co in cubic solid solution of Fe-Ga alloys. Mayer bond order "BO" values were used to evaluate the atomic bond strengths in the alloys, and were then used to assess the alloying strengthening characteristics...

  19. ALLOY DESIGN AND PROPERTY EVALUATION OF TI ALLOY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    1,2 DEPARTMENT OF METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA, NSUKKA, NIGERIA. 2 DEPT ... a result of this structural change, titanium alloys fall ... the phase stability and mechanical behaviours of Ti-.

  20. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida, A.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable highstrength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO2 laser. This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloys, over the last years.

    En el presente trabajo se estudia la aleación superficial mediante láser de aluminio con metales de transición. El cromo y el molibdeno son particularmente interesantes porque producen aleaciones de alta resistencia y por el bajo coeficiente de difusión y solución sólida en aluminio. Para producir estas aleaciones se ha seguido un procedimiento desarrollado en dos partes. En primer lugar, el material se alea usando una baja velocidad de procesado y en segundo lugar la estructura se modifica mediante un refinamiento posterior. Este procedimiento se ha empleado en la producción de aleaciones Al-Cr, Al-Mo y Al-Nb mediante aleación con láser de CO2 de polvos de Cr, Mo o Nb en aluminio y la aleación 7175. Este trabajo es una revisión del desarrollado en el Instituto Superior Técnico de Lisboa en los últimos años.

  1. Microstructure refinement and strengthening mechanisms of a 9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel by zirconium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Hai Jian; Lu, Zheng; Wang, Dong Mei; Liu, Chunming

    2017-01-01

    To study the effects of zirconium (Zr) addition on the microstructure, hardness and the tensile properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels, two kinds of 9Cr-ODS ferritic-martensitic steels with nominal compositions (wt.%) of Fe-9Cr-2W-0.3Y_2O-3 and Fe-9Cr-2W-0.3Zr-0.3Y_2O_3 were fabricated by the mechanical alloying (MA) of premixed powders and then consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. The experimental results showed that the average grain size decreases with Zr addition. The trigonal δ-phase Y_4Zr_3O_1_2 oxides and body-centered cubic Y_2O_3 oxides are formed in the 9Cr-Zr-ODS steel and 9Cr non-Zr ODS steel, respectively, and the average size of Y_4Zr_3O_1_2 particles is much smaller than that of Y_2O_3. The dispersion morphology of the oxide particles in 9Cr-Zr-ODS steel is significantly improved and the number density is 1.1 x 10"2"3/m"3 with Zr addition. The 9Cr-Zr-ODS steel shows much higher tensile ductility, ultimate tensile strength and Vickers hardness at the same time

  2. Microstructure refinement and strengthening mechanisms of a 9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel by zirconium addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hai Jian; Lu, Zheng; Wang, Dong Mei; Liu, Chunming [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang (China)

    2017-02-15

    To study the effects of zirconium (Zr) addition on the microstructure, hardness and the tensile properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels, two kinds of 9Cr-ODS ferritic-martensitic steels with nominal compositions (wt.%) of Fe-9Cr-2W-0.3Y{sub 2}O-3 and Fe-9Cr-2W-0.3Zr-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were fabricated by the mechanical alloying (MA) of premixed powders and then consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. The experimental results showed that the average grain size decreases with Zr addition. The trigonal δ-phase Y{sub 4}Zr{sub 3}O{sub 12} oxides and body-centered cubic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxides are formed in the 9Cr-Zr-ODS steel and 9Cr non-Zr ODS steel, respectively, and the average size of Y{sub 4}Zr{sub 3}O{sub 12} particles is much smaller than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The dispersion morphology of the oxide particles in 9Cr-Zr-ODS steel is significantly improved and the number density is 1.1 x 10{sup 23}/m{sup 3} with Zr addition. The 9Cr-Zr-ODS steel shows much higher tensile ductility, ultimate tensile strength and Vickers hardness at the same time.

  3. Charpy impact test results of ferritic alloys from the HFIR[High Flux Isotope Reactor]-MFE-RB2 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-03-01

    Miniature Charpy specimens of HT-9 in base metal, weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) metal conditions, and 9Cr-1Mo in base metal and weld metal conditions have been tested following irradiation in HFIR-MFE-RB2 at 55 0 C to ≅10 dpa. All specimen conditions have degraded properties (both DBTT and USE) in comparison with specimens irradiated to lower dose. 9Cr-Mo degraded more than HT-9 and weld metal performed worse than base metal which performed worse than HAZ material. Property degradation was approximately linear as a function of dose, indicating that degradation response had not saturated by 10 dpa

  4. Manufacturing of High Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion they have high configurational entropy, and thus they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and phase stability. The present study investigates the microstructure of two single-phase face-centered cubic (FCC) HEAs, CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn, with special attention given to melting, homogenization and thermo-mechanical processing. Large-scale ingots were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent in small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was applied to both alloys in order to eliminate segregation due to normal ingot solidification. The alloys fabricated well, with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters being employed.

  5. Nickel and cobalt base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlle, P.

    1994-01-01

    Nickel base alloys have a good resistance to pitting, cavernous or cracks corrosion. Nevertheless, all the nickel base alloys are not equivalent. Some differences exit between all the families (Ni, Ni-Cu, Ni-Cr-Fe, Ni-Cr-Fe-Mo/W-Cu, Ni-Cr-Mo/W, Ni-Mo). Cobalt base alloys in corrosive conditions are generally used for its wear and cracks resistance, with a compromise to its localised corrosion resistance properties. The choice must be done from the perfect knowledge of the corrosive medium and of the alloys characteristics (chemical, metallurgical). A synthesis of the corrosion resistance in three medium (6% FeCl 3 , 4% NaCl + 1% HCl + 0.1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 , 11.5% H 2 SO 4 + 1.2% HCl + 1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 + 1% CuCl 2 ) is presented. (A.B.). 11 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs

  6. Magnetoimpedance effect in Nanoperm alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernando, B.; Alvarez, P.; Santos, J.D.; Gorria, P.; Sanchez, M.L.; Olivera, J.; Perez, M.J.; Prida, V.M.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of isothermal annealing (1 h at 600 deg. C in Ar atmosphere) on the soft magnetic properties and magnetoimpedance (MI) effect has been studied in ribbons of the following Nanoperm alloys: Fe 91 Zr 7 B 2 , Fe 88 Zr 8 B 4 , Fe 87 Zr 6 B 6 Cu 1 and Fe 8 Zr 1 B 1 . A maximum MI ratio of about 27% was measured for the nanocrystalline alloy Fe 87 Zr 6 B 6 Cu 1 at a driving frequency of 0.2 MHz. The thermal annealing led to magnetic softening for this alloy, while a hardening is observed for the Fe 8 Zr 1 B 1 alloy

  7. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo, L. del; Perez-Saez, R.B.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, L.; Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I.; Gonzalez-Martin, P.; Tello, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 μm), sample temperature (200-650 o C) and emission angle (0-85 o ) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  8. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, L. del, E-mail: leire.del-campo@cnrs-orleans.f [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Perez-Saez, R.B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.e [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Gonzalez-Fernandez, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Planta de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Gonzalez-Martin, P. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Parque empresarial San Fernando, Avda. Castilla 2, 28830 San Fernando de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Tello, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-01-21

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 {mu}m), sample temperature (200-650 {sup o}C) and emission angle (0-85{sup o}) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  9. First principles thermodynamics of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducastelle, F.

    1993-01-01

    We present a brief report on the methods of solid state physics (electronic structure, statistical thermodynamics) that allow us to discuss the phase stability of alloys and to determine their phase diagrams. (orig.)

  10. Auger electron spectroscopy of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijers, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis describes how the surface compositions of some alloys can be determined by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The motivation for this research and the reasons for the choice of alloy systems studied are formulated. The theoretical background of AES is briefly discussed and the apparatus used and the experimental procedures applied are described. Four alloy systems have been investigated in this thesis - Ni-Cu and Pd - Ag (consisting of a component active in most cataytic reactions - Ni and Pd; and a component which is almost inactive for a number of reactions - Cu and Ag) and Pt - Pd and Pt-Ir (consisting of two active components). Knowledge of the surface composition of the various alloy systems is shown to be essential for the interpretation of catalytic results. (Auth./C.F.)

  11. Effect of Different Structural Materials on Neutronic Performance of a Hybrid Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Übeyli, Mustafa; Tel, Eyyüp

    2003-06-01

    Selection of structural material for a fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor is very important by taking into account of neutronic performance of the blanket. Refractory metals and alloys have much higher operating temperatures and neutron wall load (NWL) capabilities than low activation materials (ferritic/martensitic steels, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiC composites) and austenitic stainless steels. In this study, effect of primary candidate refractory alloys, namely, W-5Re, T111, TZM and Nb-1Zr on neutronic performance of the hybrid reactor was investigated. Neutron transport calculations were conducted with the help of SCALE 4.3 System by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with code XSDRNPM. Among the investigated structural materials, tantalum had the worst performance due to the fact that it has higher neutron absorption cross section than others. And W-5Re and TZM having similar results showed the best performance.

  12. Materials technology for fusion - Current status and future requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.E.; Bloom, E.E.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Smith, D.L.; Stevenson, R.D.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The general status of the materials research and development activities currently under way in support of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors in the United States is reviewed. In the area of magnetic confinement configurations, attention is given to development programs for first wall materials, which are at various stages for possible austenitic stainless steels, high-strength Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, reactive and refractory metal alloys, specially designed long-range ordered and rapidly solidified alloys, and ferritic/martensitic steels, and for tritium breeding materials, electrical insulators, ceramics, and coolants. The development of materials for inertial confinement reactors is also surveyed in relation to the protection scheme employed for the first wall and the effects of pulsed neutron irradiation. Finally, the materials requirements and selection procedures for the ETF/INTOR and Starfire tokamak reactor designs are examined. Needs for the expansion of research on nonfirst-wall materials and inertial confinement fusion reactor material requirements are pointed out

  13. Derivative spectrophotometry of cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of derivative spectrophotometry is briefly described, and derivative absorption spectra are presented for samarium, cobalt, and commercial Sm-Co alloys. It is shown that the use of derivative spectrophotometry not only improves the accuracy and selectivity of element determinations but also simplifies the analysis of alloys. Results of a statistical evaluation of the metrological characteristics of the analytical procedure described here are presented. 8 references

  14. Volatilization from PCA steel alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Petti, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    The mobilizations of key components from Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) steel alloy have been measured with laboratory-scale experiments. The experiments indicate most of the mobilization from PCA steel is due to oxide formation and spalling but that the spalled particles are large enough to settle rapidly. Based on the experiments, models for the volatization of iron, manganese, and cobalt from PCA steel in steam and molybdenum from PCA steel in air have been derived.

  15. The microstructures of ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, G.M.K.; Ranganathan, S.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomenon of ordering in substitutional alloys confers special properties on them by introducing various types of structures and structural defects. Some of the important structural defects (translational and rotational antiphase boundaries, dissociated antiphase boundaries and superdislocations) and their observation by various microscopical methods, with particular emphasis on the applications of the electron microscope are described with illustrations drawn from the studies on nickel-molybdenum and nickel-tungsten alloys. (M.G.B.)

  16. Laser welding of aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    This thesis treats laser welding of aluminium alloys from a practical perspective with elements of mathematical analysis. The theoretical work has in all cases been verified experimentally. The aluminium alloys studied are from the 5xxx and 6xxx groups which are common for example in the automotive industry. Aluminium has many unique physical properties. The properties which more than others have been shown to influence the welding process is its high reflection, high thermal conductivity, lo...

  17. Electrical conductivity in random alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, A.; Thakur, P.K.; Yussouff, M.

    1984-12-01

    Based on the augmented space formalism introduced by one of us and the use of the Ward identity and the Bethe-Sapeter equation, a formalism has been developed for the calculation of electrical conductivity for random alloys. A simple application is made to a model case, and it is argued that the formalism enables us to carry out viable calculations on more realistic models of alloys. (author)

  18. Electrical conductivity in random alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, A.; Yussouff, M.

    1983-06-01

    Starting from the augmented space formalism by one of us, and the use of the Ward identity and Bethe Salpeter equation, a complete formalism for the calculation of the electrical conductivity in tight-binding models of random binary alloys has been developed. The formalism is practical in the sense that viable calculations may be carried out with its help for realistics models of alloy systems. (author)

  19. Surface modification of 5083 Al alloy by electrical discharge alloying processing with a 75 mass% Si-Fe alloy electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambekova, Kuralay [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Rd., Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hung-Mao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Rd., Xinshi Dist., Tainan City 74448, Taiwan (China); Uan, Jun-Yen, E-mail: jyuan@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Rd., Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-01

    This study experimentally investigates the surface modification of 5083 Al alloy by the electrical discharge alloying (EDA) process with a Si-Fe alloy as an electrode. Samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and corrosion resistance tests. The micro-hardness of EDA alloyed layer was evidently higher than that of the base metal (5083 Al alloy). The TEM results show that the matrix of the alloyed layer has an amorphous-like structure; the matrix contains fine needle-like Si particles, block-like Si particles and nano-size Al{sub 4.5}FeSi and Al{sub 13}Fe{sub 4} particles. The TEM results support experimental results for the high hardness of the alloyed layer. Moreover, the EDA alloyed layer with composite microstructures has good corrosion resistance in NaCl aqueous solution.

  20. Electron-beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillant, Marcel; de Bony, Yves

    1980-08-15

    The objective of this article is to describe the status of the application of electron-beam welding to aluminum alloys. These alloys are widely employed in the aeronautics, space and nuclear industries.

  1. Thermodynamic Database for Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerlerud Perez, Rosa

    2003-05-01

    For many decades zirconium alloys have been commonly used in the nuclear power industry as fuel cladding material. Besides their good corrosion resistance and acceptable mechanical properties the main reason of using these alloys is the low neutron absorption. Zirconium alloys are exposed to a very severe environment during the nuclear fission process and there is a demand for better design of this material. To meet this requirement a thermodynamic database is developed to support material designers. In this thesis some aspects about the development of a thermodynamic database for zirconium alloys are presented. A thermodynamic database represents an important facility in applying thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for a given material providing: 1) relevant information about the thermodynamic properties of the alloys e.g. enthalpies, activities, heat capacity, and 2) significant information for the manufacturing process e.g. heat treatment temperature. The basic information in the database is first the unary data, i.e. pure elements; those are taken from the compilation of the Scientific Group Thermodata Europe (SGTE) and then the binary and ternary systems. All phases present in those binary and ternary systems are described by means of the Gibbs energy dependence on composition and temperature. Many of those binary systems have been taken from published or unpublished works and others have been assessed in the present work. All the calculations have been made using Thermo C alc software and the representation of the Gibbs energy obtained by applying Calphad technique

  2. Quasicrystal-reinforced Mg alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyun Kim, Young; Tae Kim, Won; Hyang Kim, Do

    2014-04-01

    The formation of the icosahedral phase (I-phase) as a secondary solidification phase in Mg-Zn-Y and Mg-Zn-Al base systems provides useful advantages in designing high performance wrought magnesium alloys. The strengthening in two-phase composites (I-phase + α -Mg) can be explained by dispersion hardening due to the presence of I-phase particles and by the strong bonding property at the I-phase/matrix interface. The presence of an additional secondary solidification phase can further enhance formability and mechanical properties. In Mg-Zn-Y alloys, the co-presence of I and Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 phases by addition of Ca can significantly enhance formability, while in Mg-Zn-Al alloys, the co-presence of the I-phase and Mg 2 Sn phase leads to the enhancement of mechanical properties. Dynamic and static recrystallization are significantly accelerated by addition of Ca in Mg-Zn-Y alloy, resulting in much smaller grain size and more random texture. The high strength of Mg-Zn-Al-Sn alloys is attributed to the presence of finely distributed Mg 2 Sn and I-phase particles embedded in the α -Mg matrix.

  3. Carbon Alloys-Multi-functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Eiichi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)], E-mail: yasuda.e.aa.@m.titech.ac.jp; Enami, Takashi; Hoteida, Nobuyuki [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Lanticse-Diaz, L.J. [University of the Philippines (Philippines); Tanabe, Yasuhiro [Nagoya University (Japan); Akatsu, Takashi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Last decade after our proposal of the 'Carbon Alloys' concept, many different kinds of Carbon Alloys, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, graphene sheet with magnetism, semi-conducting BCN compounds, graphite intercalation compounds, exfoliated carbon fiber, etc. have been found and developed. To extend the concept further, it is important to make it into intelligent materials by incorporating multiple functions. One example of the multi-functionalization is the development of homo-atomic Carbon Alloys from glassy carbon (GC) that exhibits high electrical conductivity and low gas permeability after treatment at critical conditions. Glassy carbon underwent metamorphosis to graphite spheres at HIP condition, and improved resistance to oxidation after alloying with Ta. The other one is shape utilization of the nano-sized carbon by understanding the effect of its large surfaces or interfaces in nanotechnology treatment. Recently carbon nanofiber was produced by polymer blend technology (PB) which was proposed by Prof. A. Oya during the Carbon Alloy project and progressed into intelligent carbon nanofiber (CNF) materials. CNF is combined into the polymer composites which is a candidate material for the bipolar separator in fuel cell. The superior properties, i.e., high electrical conductivity, high modulus, high strength, etc., of the CNF is being utilized in the preparation of this polymer composite.

  4. Synthesis of Nb-18%Al alloy by mechanical alloying method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymek, S.; Wrobel, M.; Dollar, M.

    1999-01-01

    The main goal of this study was attempt to employ by mechanical alloying to produce Nb-Al alloy. The Nb-rich alloy composition was selected in order to receive the ductile niobium solid solution (Nb ss ) phase in the final, equilibrium state. This ductile phase was believed to prevent crack propagation in the consolidated alloy and thus to improve its ductility and toughness. Elemental powders of niobium (99.8% pure and -325 mesh) and aluminium (99.9% pure and -325 mesh) were used as starting materials. These powders were mixed to give the nominal compositions od 82% Nb and 18% Al (atomic percent). Mechanical alloying was carried out in a Szegvari laboratory attritor mill in an argon atmosphere with the controlled oxygen level reduced to less than 10 ppm. The total milling time was 86 hours. During the course of milling powder samples were taken out after 5, 10 and 20 hours, which allowed characterization of the powder morphology and progress of the mechanical alloying process. The changes in particle morphology during milling were examined using a scanning electron microscope and the phase analysis was performed in a X-ray diffractometer with CoK α radiation. Initially, particles' size increased and their appearance changed from the regular to one of the flaky shape. X-ray diffraction patterns of examined powders as a function of milling time are presented. Peaks from Al, through much weaker than in the starting material, were still present after 5 hours of milling but disappeared completely after 10 hours of milling. With increasing milling time, the peaks became broader and their intensities decreased. Formation of amorphous phase was observed after 86 hours of milling. This was deducted from a diffuse halo observed at the 2Θ angle of about 27 o . Intermetallic phases Nb 3 Al and Nb 2 Al were found in the consolidated material only. (author)

  5. Progress in development of iron base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackay, V.V.; Parker, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    The ways of development of new iron base high-strength alloys are considered. Perspectiveness of ferritic steel strengthening with intermetallides (TaFe 2 , for instance) is shown. Favourable combination of plasticity, strength and fracture toughness in nickel-free iron-manganese alloys (16-20%) is also pointed out. A strength level of alloyed maraging steels can be achieved by changes in chemical composition and by proper heat treatments of low- and medium-alloyed steels

  6. Fe-Cr-Ni system alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    Phase diagram of Fe-Cr-Ni system, which is the basic one for production of corrosion resistant alloys, is considered. Data on corrosion resistance of such alloys are correlated depending on a number of factors: quality and composition of modifying elements, corrosion medium, temperature, alloy structure, mechanical and thermal treatment. Grades of Fe-Ni-Cr alloys are presented, and fields of their application are pointed out

  7. Mechanical behaviour of aluminium-lithium alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aluminium-lithium alloys hold promise of providing a breakthrough response to the crying need for lightweight alloys for use as structurals in aerospace applications. Considerable worldwide research has gone into developing a range of these alloys over the last three decades. As a result, substantial understanding has ...

  8. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...

  9. Ti-Pt Alloys form mechanical milling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nxumalo, S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available C maximum in these alloys. A few researchers have studied the martensitic transformation in TiPt alloys using arc melted cast samples. In this work high temperature shape memory alloys are targeted using powder metallurgy as a processing route....

  10. Fundamental Understanding of Ambient and High-Temperature Plasticity Phenomena in Structural Materials in Advanced Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, Chaitanya; Zhu, Ting; McDowell, David

    2013-11-17

    The goal of this research project is to develop the methods and tools necessary to link unit processes analyzed using atomistic simulations involving interaction of vacancies and interstitials with dislocations, as well as dislocation mediation at sessile junctions and interfaces as affected by radiation, with cooperative influence on higher-length scale behavior of polycrystals. These tools and methods are necessary to design and enhance radiation-induced damage-tolerant alloys. The project will achieve this goal by applying atomistic simulations to characterize unit processes of: 1. Dislocation nucleation, absorption, and desorption at interfaces 2. Vacancy production, radiation-induced segregation of substitutional Cr at defect clusters (point defect sinks) in BCC Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels 3. Investigation of interaction of interstitials and vacancies with impurities (V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, Al, Si, P, S) 4. Time evolution of swelling (cluster growth) phenomena of irradiated materials 5. Energetics and kinetics of dislocation bypass of defects formed by interstitial clustering and formation of prismatic loops, informing statistical models of continuum character with regard to processes of dislocation glide, vacancy agglomeration and swelling, climb and cross slip This project will consider the Fe, Fe-C, and Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic material system, accounting for magnetism by choosing appropriate interatomic potentials and validating with first principles calculations. For these alloys, the rate of swelling and creep enhancement is considerably lower than that of face-centered cubic (FCC) alloys and of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mo alloys. The team will confirm mechanisms, validate simulations at various time and length scales, and improve the veracity of computational models. The proposed research?s feasibility is supported by recent modeling of radiation effects in metals and alloys, interfacial dislocation transfer reactions in nano-twinned copper, and dislocation

  11. Magnesium and related low alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.; Caillat, R.; Darras, R.

    1959-01-01

    In the first part the authors examine the comparative corrosion of commercial magnesium, of a magnesium-zirconium alloy (0,4 per cent ≤ Zr ≤ 0,7 per cent) of a ternary magnesium-zinc-zirconium alloy (0,8 per cent ≤ Zn ≤ 1,2 per cent) and of english 'Magnox type' alloys, in dry carbon dioxide-free air, in damp carbon dioxide-free air, and in dry and damp carbon dioxide, at temperatures from 300 to 600 deg. C. In the second part the structural stability of these materials is studied after annealings, of 10 to 1000 hours at 300 to 450 deg. C. Variations in grain after these heat treatments and mechanical stretching properties at room temperature are presented. Finally various creep rate and life time diagrams are given for these materials, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 450 deg. C. (author) [fr

  12. Chloride removal from plutonium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP

  13. Alloy phase stability and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocks, G.M.; Pope, E.P.; Giamei, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    At the level of basic quantum theory the papers in this symposium reflect the great progress that has been made in understanding the physical properties of both ordered and disordered alloys based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). DFT provides a quantitative parameter-free (often referred to as first principles) theory of the ground state properties of these systems. This general approach has also been used in combination with classical elasticity and dislocation theory to provide the first quantitative understanding of some of the mechanical properties of intermetallic alloys. Recent advances have built on DFT theory to provide the first glimpses of a theory of the finite temperature phase stability of alloys. It is the strength of these first principles theories that the understanding of materials properties is in terms of the underlying electronic structure. At the level of atomistic simulation, based on semi-empirical potentials, again much progress has been made in understanding the properties of extended defects such as grain boundaries and dislocations. On the experimental front increasingly sophisticated tools are being brought to bear in order to understand both the underlying electronic structure and detailed atomic arrangements. This information, together with input from theory, is playing an increasing role in guiding alloy design efforts. At the more practical level a number of these sophisticated alloy design efforts have in recent years produced impressive results across a broad front. The properties of existing materials are continually being improved and new ones developed. Often this progress is based on a deeper understanding of the properties at the atomistic and electronic level. The design of new ordered intermetallic alloys that have reached or are reaching commercialization represents one of the major achievements of this investment of intellectual resources

  14. Theoretical studies of metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, J.S.; Wille, L.T.

    1991-07-01

    A new method to predict and understand the structure and phase stability of solid-solution alloys from a knowledge only of the atomic numbers of the constituent atoms is being developed. The coherent potential approximation will be used to obtain the electronic contribution to the energy and the Monte Carlo method of statistical mechanics will be used for the thermodynamic part of the calculation. An improved coherent potential approximation will be developed by combining the standard approach with the quadratic KKR (QKKR) band theory method. This will make it easier to predict the properties of alloys from first principles. The QKKR method will be developed further

  15. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  16. Hydrogen effects in aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Dexter, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The permeability of six commercial aluminum alloys to deuterium and tritium was determined by several techniques. Surface films inhibited permeation under most conditions; however, contact with lithium deuteride during the tests minimized the surface effects. Under these conditions phi/sub D 2 / = 1.9 x 10 -2 exp (--22,400/RT) cc (NTP)atm/sup -- 1 / 2 / s -1 cm -1 . The six alloys were also tested before, during, and after exposure to high pressure hydrogen, and no hydrogen-induced effects on the tensile properties were observed

  17. Phosphorus containing sintered alloys (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchnik, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus additives are considered for their effect on the properties of sintered alloys of different applications: structural, antifriction, friction, magnetic, hard, superhard, heavy etc. Data are presented on compositions and properties of phosphorus-containing materials produced by the powder metallurgy method. Phosphorus is shown to be an effective activator of sintering in some cases. When its concentration in the material is optimal it imparts the material such properties as strength, viscosity, hardness, wear resistance. Problems concerning powder metallurgy of amorphous phosphorus-containing alloys are reported

  18. Hot workability of aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yeon Chul; Oh, Kyung Jin

    1986-01-01

    Hot Workability of aluminium alloys, 2024, 6061 and 7075, has been studied by hot torsion tests at temperatures from 320 to 515 deg C and at strain rates from 1.26 x 10 -3 to 5.71 x 10 -3 sec -1 . Hot working condition of these aluminium alloys was determined quantitatively from the constitutive equations obtained from flow stress curves in torsion. Experimental data of the logarith of the Zener-Hollomonn parameter showed good linear relationships to the logarith of sinh(ασ-bar)

  19. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples.

  20. Mechanical properties of ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1977-06-01

    A survey is given of the metallophysical fundamentals of the mechanical properties of ordered two-phase alloys. Alloys of this type have a superlattice structure in a substitution mixed crystal. Ordering is achieved by slow cooling or by annealing below the critical temperature, during which ordering domains (antiphase domains) are formed. At a high degree of ordering, the dislocations are concentrated to form pairs, so-called super-dislocations. The mechanical properties may be selectively changed by varying different parameters (size of the ordering domains, degree of ordering, energy of the antiphase boundaries) by a special composition and heat treatment.(GSC) [de