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Sample records for ferritic spheroidal graphite

  1. Influence of boron on ferrite formation in copper-added spheroidal graphite cast iron

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    Ying Zou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the original work of the authors published recently, describing the influence of B on the matrix of the Cuadded spheroidal graphite cast iron. The effect of Cu has been corrected as a ferrite formation promoter in the matrix of the grey cast iron by the usage of high-purity material. Also, this paper focuses on the ferrite formation and the observation of the Cu distribution in the B-added and B-free Cu-containing spheroidal graphite cast iron. The Cu film on the spheroidal graphite can be successfully observed in the B-free sample using a special etching method. However, in the B-added sample, no Cu film could be found, while the secondary graphite was formed on the surface of the spheroidal graphite. The interaction between B and Cu is stressed as a peculiar phenomenon by the employment of a contrast experiment of B and Mn. The heat treatment could make Cu precipitate more significantly in the eutectic cells and in the matrix in the form of large Cu particles because of the limited solubility of Cu.

  2. Fractal Model of the Spheroidal Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.Y.HE; K.Z.HWANG

    1996-01-01

    In this paper,a fractal model about the microstructure of spheroidal-graphite is presented through the research on the surface form and the analysis to microregion.The fractal dimension is calculated and the forming mechanism is also discussed.

  3. Valence electron theory of graphite spheroidizing in primary crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志林; 孙振国; 李志林

    1995-01-01

    Bond-length-difference (BLD) analysis results show that austenrte and cementite containing Mg, Zr. S have very different valence electron structures from Fe -C austenite and cementite. We find that this difference is the tie of absorption hypothesis, surface tension hypothesis, undercooling hypothesis in graphite spheroidizing theory. By using "the model of valence electron theory of drag-like effect" in our previous paper in crystallization theory, the spheroidizing effect of Mg and Zr and the anti-spheroidizing effect of S can be explained with the valence electron structure data of phases. Therefore, electron theory of graphite spheroidizing can be advanced.

  4. Wearing Quality of Austenitic, Duplex Cast Steel, Gray and Spheroidal Graphite Iron

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    S. Pietrowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents the research results of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing and liquid friction of new austenitic, austenitic-ferritic (“duplex” cast steel and gray cast iron EN-GJL-250, spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3, pearlitic with ledeburitic carbides and spheroidal graphite iron with ledeburitic carbides with a microstructure of the metal matrix: pearlitic, upper bainite, mixture of upper and lower bainite, martensitic with austenite, pearlitic-martensitic-bainitic-ausferritic obtained in the raw state. The wearing quality test was carried out on a specially designed and made bench. Resistance to abrasion wear was tested using sand paper P40. Resistance to adhesive wear was tested in interaction with steel C55 normalized, hardened and sulfonitrided. The liquid friction was obtained using CASTROL oil. It was stated that austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a similar value of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing friction. The smallest decrease in mass was shown by the cast steel in interaction with the sulfonitrided steel C55. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex��� in different combinations of friction pairs have a higher wear quality than gray cast iron EN-GJL- 250 and spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a lower wearing quality than the spheroidal graphite iron with bainitic-martensitic microstructure. In the adhesive wear test using CASTROL oil the tested cast steels and cast irons showed a small mass decrease within the range of 1÷2 mg.

  5. Effect of bainite transformation and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Abe, Toshihiko; Tada, Shuji

    1996-06-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) has excellent mechanical properties, but its Young's modulus is low. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel (AGS) has been developed in order to obtain a new material with superior mechanical properties to ADI. Its carbon content (approximately 1.0 pct) is almost one-third that of a standard ADI; thus, the volume of graphite is also less. Young's modulus of AGS is 195 to 200 GPa and is comparable to that of steel. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel has an approximately 200 MPa higher tensile strength than ADI and twice the Charpy absorbed energy of ADI. The impact properties and the elongation are enhanced with increasing volume fraction of carbon-enriched retained austenite. At the austempering temperature of 650 K, the volume fraction of austenite is approximately 40 pct for 120 minutes in the 2.4 pct Si alloy, although it decreases rapidly in the 1.4 pct Si alloy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that appropriate quantity of silicon retards the decomposition of the carbon-enriched retained austenite. For austempering at 570 K, the amount of the carbon-enriched austenite decreases and the ferrite is supersaturated with carbon, resulting in high tensile strength but low toughness.

  6. Effect of bainite transformation and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel

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    Takahashi, Toshio; Abe, Toshihiko; Tada, Shuji [Tohoku National Industrial Research Inst., Sendai (Japan). Materials Engineering Div.

    1996-06-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) has excellent mechanical properties, but its Young`s modulus is low. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel (AGS) has been developed in order to obtain a new material with superior mechanical properties to ADI. Its carbon content (approximately 1.0 pct) is almost one-third that of a standard ADI; thus, the volume of graphite is also less. Young`s modulus of AGS is 195 to 200 GPa and is comparable to that of steel. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel has an approximately 200 MPa higher tensile strength than ADI and twice the Charpy absorbed energy of ADI. The impact properties and the elongation are enhanced with increasing volume fraction of carbon-enriched retained austenite. At the austempering temperature of 650 K, the volume fraction of austenite is approximately 40 pct for 120 minutes in the 2.4 pct Si alloy, although it decreases rapidly in the 1.4 pct Si alloy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that appropriate quantity of silicon retards the decomposition of the carbon-enriched retained austenite. For austempering at 570 K, the amount of the carbon-enriched austenite decreases and the ferrite is supersaturated with carbon, resulting in high tensile strength but low toughness.

  7. Characterisation of austempered spheroidal graphite aluminium cast iron

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    Boutorabi, S.M.A. [Iran Univ. of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials

    1997-06-01

    The micro constituents of austempered spheroidal graphite aluminium cast iron were investigated. The heat tinting, special etching and microhardness measurement techniques were used. The results showed that the colour of each micro constituents and the hardness values in austempered ductile iron depend on the carbon content of each phase. The above techniques were supported by using an special etching which showed similar differences in each phase. It was shown that the heat tinting and special etching are reliable tools to characterise the complex matrix of ADI. The microhardness data supported interestingly the colour changes in above technique. (orig.)

  8. Formation of microstructures in the spheroidal graphite cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Daloz, D.; Bruneseaux, F.; Lesoult, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pipeline systems for hydraulic networks are obtained via centrifugal casting of spheroidal graphite cast iron. The very high cooling rate that is achieved in the skin of the product can sometimes lead to carbide instead of graphite in cast iron. An experimental device has been built in the laboratory that allows reproducing the extreme thermal conditions encountered during formation of skin of centrifugally cast pipes. Liquid metal droplets fall on a cold substrate. Rapid directional solidification occurs. The temperature evolution of the lower surface of the droplet is recorded during the very first moment of the solidification (t cast state and the heat-treated state. They are compared to the centrifugally cast ones. A model of directional solidification of cast iron under a very large temperature gradient has been built. It allows explaining the transition from stable to metastable micro structure that was observed in the products and reproduced in the laboratory samples.

  9. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of TiC Coating Deposited on Spheroidized Graphite Cast Iron Using Laser Surfacing

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    E. R. I. Mahmoud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spheroidal graphite cast iron was laser cladded with TiC powder using a YAG fiber laser at powers of 700, 1000, 1500 and 2000 W. The powder was preplaced on the surface of the specimens with 0.5 mm thickness. Sound cladding and fusion zones were observed at 700, 1000 and 1500 W powers. However, at 2000 W, cracking was observed in the fusion zone. At 700 W, a build-up zone consisted of fine TiC dendrites inside a matrix composed of martensite, cementite (Fe3C, and some blocks of retained austenite was observed. In this zone, all graphite nodules were totally melted. In the fusion zone, some undissolved and partially dissolved graphite nodules appeared in a matrix containing bainite, ferrite, martensite and retained austenite. At 1500 W, the fusion zone had more iron carbides and ferrite, and the HAZ consisted of martensitic structure. At 2000 W, the build-up zone was consisted of TiC particles precipitated in a matrix of eutectic carbides, martensite plus an inter-lamellar retained austenite. The hardness of the cladded area was remarkably improved (1330 HV in case of 700 W: 5.5 times of the hardness of substrate

  10. Nucleation and Growth of Graphite in Eutectic Spheroidal Cast Iron: Modeling and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazo, Fernando D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2016-06-01

    A new model of graphite growth during the continuous cooling of eutectic spheroidal cast iron is presented in this paper. The model considers the nucleation and growth of graphite from pouring to room temperature. The microstructural model of solidification accounts for the eutectic as divorced and graphite growth rate as a function of carbon gradient at the liquid in contact with the graphite. In the solid state, the microstructural model takes into account three stages for graphite growth, namely (1) from the end of solidification to the upper bound of intercritical stable eutectoid, (2) during the intercritical stable eutectoid, and (3) from the lower bound of intercritical stable eutectoid to room temperature. The micro- and macrostructural models are coupled using a sequential multiscale approach. Numerical results for graphite fraction and size distribution are compared with experimental results obtained from a cylindrical cup, in which the graphite volumetric fraction and size distribution were obtained using the Schwartz-Saltykov approach. The agreements between the experimental and numerical results for the fraction of graphite and the size distribution of spheroids reveal the importance of numerical models in the prediction of the main aspects of graphite in spheroidal cast iron.

  11. Influence of molding sand on the number of grains graphite and on the rate of thin ferrite in pieces in a nodular iron ferritic matrix

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    B. Khatemi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The nodular cast irons are characterized by high mechanical properties compared to cast iron with lamellar graphite or vermiculargraphite. The ductile iron has already been the subject of many studies especially since the literature is rich on them, and sources of information are different. The fact is that the mechanical properties of nodular cast iron (FGS depend on the number of graphitegrains, their roundness, the solidification rate and nature of the matrix [3]. Many studies of nodular cast irons showed that the morespherical particles of graphite, the higher the mechanical properties are high. In gray cast irons, the graphite spheroids have anticrackingand give the ductile iron ductility. Note in this connection that the higher the number of graphite grains, the higher theductile iron has better mechanical properties. In cast iron, the nature of the matrix is depending on several parameters including thecooling rate of molten metal, the thickness, shape and dimensions of parts. The faster cooling is slow over rate of ferrite is important[3, 4]. In this paper, we tested three types of sand casting: sand –based sodium silicate, furan resin and green sand on samplesspherical graphite cast iron of different thickness. The objective in this article is to determine the number of grains of graphite andferrite for each type of sand casting under the same experimental conditions including the cooling rate and chemical composition ofthe liquid metal.

  12. Continuous cooling transformation behavior for heat treatment of spheroidal graphite cast iron. Kyujo kokuen chutetsu no netsushoriji ni okeru renzoku reikyaku hentai kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, T.; Matsumoto, H. (Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)); Kasugai, T. (National Research Institute for Metals, Tsukuba (Japan)); Koyama, M. (Automobile Foundry Co. Ltd., Yokohama (Japan))

    1992-08-25

    In order to study basic heat treatment properties of spheroidal graphite cast iron, the continuous cooling transformation(CCT) diagrams for the material equivallent to FCD700 under various austenitized conditions were obtained. There were 4 kinds of austenitized conditions varying from 1123K and 420s to 1323K and 1,800s. Eight kinds of cooling time from the austenitized temperature to 773K ranged from 6s to 4,000s. The transformation temperature was measured by a thermal expansion method. When the austenitized temperature was increased from 1123K to 1323K, ferrite and pearlite transformation regions moved a little in the CCT diagrams and the martensite transformation temperature decreased from 493K to 458K. The bainite region in the CCT diagrams disappeared at the austenite temperatures above 1223K. The nucleation sites of ferrite and pearlite in the spheroidal graphite cast iron were generated at grain boundary between austenite and graphite but not at grain boundary between austenites. The reason of such phenomena was also studied. 10 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Anodic Dissolution of Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron with Different Pearlite Areas in Sulfuric Acid Solutions

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    Yoshikazu Miyata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate equation of anodic dissolution reaction of spheroidal graphite cast iron in sulfuric acid solutions at 298 K has been studied. The cast irons have different areas of pearlite. The anodic Tafel slope of 0.043 V decade−1 and the reaction order with respect to the hydroxyl ion activity of 1 are obtained by the linear potential sweep technique. The anodic current density does not depend on the area of pearlite. There is no difference in the anodic dissolution reaction mechanisms between pure iron and spheroidal graphite cast iron. The anodic current density of the cast iron is higher than that of the pure iron.

  14. Influence of slit depth on impact value of ferritic nodular graphite cast iron. Feraito kyujo kokuen chutetsu no shogekichi ni oyobosu suritto fukasa no eikyo

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    Sunada, H. (Himegi Inst. of Technology, Hyogo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1992-10-15

    Impact experiment and fracture surface observations were carried out in order to study the effect of slit depth on the impact value during austempering of ferrite spheroidal graphite east iron. The tensile strength has been increased by austempering, however the impact value was not improved. The bending strength of slit bottom for each structure has been less influenced by slit depth, and it has been almost similar, The value obtained by the multiplication by binding coefficient has been higher than yield strength in case of ferrite structure, and it has been lower in case of bainitic structure. Cleavage facets along with the large dimples originating from graphites and small dimples from inclursions, have been observed on the impact fracture surface of ferrite structure, however in general, the fracture has been ductile. The deformation around the graphite has been small for bainitic structure, pseudo brittleness type fracture surface is formed, and has been less rough compared to ferrite structure. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Impact characteristics of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel. Austemper kyujo kokuen chuko no shogeki tokusei

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    Takahashi, T.; Tada, S.; Abe, T. (Government Industrial Research Institute, Tohoku, Sendai (Japan))

    1993-08-25

    Austempered ductile cast iron (ADI) has excellent mechanical properties both in strength and toughness, but the Young's modulus of ADI is lower than that of steel because ADI contains much graphite. In order to obtain better mechanical properties than ADI, spheroidal graphite cast steel containing less graphite by volume was austempered. The Young's modulus of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel (AGS) was 200 GPa, which was comparable to steel. The retained austenite volume of the sample containing 2.4% Si varied with the austempering conditions, but that of the sample containing 1.4% Si decreased in a shorter austempered time. As a result, it was found that Si affects stability of the retained austenite. Charpy impact value increased with increasing the retained austenite volume when the volume was above 15%. The impact value of AGS with 40% retained austenite was over twice as large as that of ADI austempered under the same conditions. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Shrinkage Behaviour of Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron in Green and Dry Sand Molds for the Benchmarking of Solidification Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of metallurgical and processing parameters on the formation of shrinkage cavities and porosities in spheroidal graphite cast iron have been studied, considering the parameters of carbon equivalent, inoculation, casting modulus, mold type (green or dry) and pouring temperature within specific ranges of these variables. Based on the orthogonal experiments, the metallurgical and processing parameters of the minimum casting shrinkage and the maximum casting shrinkage were obtained, and the effects of metallurgical and processing parameters on the formation of shrinkage cavities and porosities in spheroidal graphite cast iron castings were discussed. Finally,two regression equations relating these variables to the formation of shrinkage porosity were derived based upon the orthogonal experiments conducted.

  17. Formation of VC- composites surface layers on spheroidized graphite cast iron by laser surface cladding process

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    Essam R.I. Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spheroidal graphite cast iron was laser cladded with VC powder of 44-53 μm particle size using YAG Fiber laser at 500, 1000, and 1500 W processing power and fixed travelling speed of 4 mm/s. The powder was preplaced on the surface of the specimens with 0.5 mm thickness. To prevent the oxidation, argon gas was used as a shielding gas. After the treatment, three zones were resulted: build-up (cladding, fusion, and heat affected zones. The build-up zone was a composite structure consisted of VC particles/dendrites dispersed in a matrix of martensite, carbides and ledeburite structure. At 500 W, most of the VC particles were appeared as their original large size. When the laser power was increased to 1000 W or more, the VC particles were melted and then re-solidified in the form of fine dendrites. The surface hardness of the cladded area was remarkably improved. As the distance from the free surface increases, the hardness decreases. The average hardness value at the surface treated by 500 W was about 710 HV (3 times of the hardness of substrate, while it reached to about 1340 HV and 1520 HV at powers of 1000 W and 1500 W, respectively. The wear resistance of the laser treated samples was improved at all investigated laser processing powers, especially at 1000W and 1500 W.

  18. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  19. Application of successive austempering process to spheroidal graphite cast iron produced by inmold process. Inmold ho de seizoshita kyujo kokuen chutetsu eno chikuji austemper ho no tekiyo

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    Oide, T.; Ahmadabadi, M.; Kawashima, S. (Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1994-06-25

    Application of successive austempering process to the iron produced by inmold process leads to much higher graphite nodule count in the structure than the other spheroidizing methods. In this study, to improve the toughness of spheroidal graphite cast iron produced by inmold process, successive austempering process was applied to austemper ductile iron (ADI) production. Both hardenability and austemperability of the iron could be controlled with Mn alloying through the two-stage austempering at high and low temperatures. Higher retained austenite volume fraction and lower untransformed austenite volume fraction were obtained in the most suitable duplex upper and lower bainitic structure. It was confirmed that the impact energy of ADI treated by successive austempering process was remarkably much higher than the conventional austempering processes. In this process, an excellent value of toughness was obtained by selecting a combination of holding temperature and holding time, strictly. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅰ

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    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  1. Analysis and simulation of non-metallic inclusions in spheroidal graphite iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustal, B.; Schelnberger, B.; Bührig-Polaczek, A.

    2016-03-01

    Non-metallic inclusions in spheroidal cast iron (SGI) reduce fatigue strength and yield strength. This type of inclusion usually accumulates at grain boundaries. Papers addressing this topic show the overall impact of both the fraction of so-called white (carbides) and black (non-metallic) inclusions on mechanical properties. In the present work we focus on the origin and the formation conditions of black Mg-bearing inclusions, further distinguishing between Si-bearing and non-Si-bearing Mg inclusions. The formation was simulated applying thermodynamic approaches. Moreover, appropriate experiments have been carried out and a large number of particles have been studied applying innovative feature analysis with regard to shape, size, and composition. Magnesium silicates are predicted at elevated oxygen concentrations, whereas at low levels of oxygen sulphides and carbides appear at a late stage of solidification. Experiments with three consecutive flow obstacles show that the amount of magnesium silicates decrease after each of the three obstacles, whereas the fraction of non-Si-bearing inclusions remains approximately constant. The size of inclusions divides in halves over the flow path and the number of particles increases accordingly. We point out that based on feature analysis Mg-O-C bearing inclusion show disadvantageous form factors for which reason this kind of inclusions may be extremely harmful in terms of crack initiation. All results obtained indicate that magnesium silicates are entrapped on mould filling, whereas Mg-(O, C, S, P, N) bearing particles are precipitates at late stages of solidification. Consequently, the only avoidance strategy is setting up optimum retained magnesium content.

  2. Reduction of industrial waste by the employment of simultaneous desulfurization/graphite spheroidization method using magnesium; Maguneshiumu wo mochiita datsuryu/kokuen kyujoka doji shoriho no saiyo ni yoru sangyo haikibutsu no teigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toriyama, T.; Yamamuro, S.; Yoshida, A.; Ono, S. [Kurimoto Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-25

    The Sakai Factory of KURIMOTO LTD. employed a continuous porous plug desulfurization method in 1992. In this desulfurization method, the molten iron from a cupola is desulfurized with a desulfurizing agent in which calcium carbide and lime are mixed. This paper reports the details of the development of a simultaneous desulfurization/graphite spheroidization method using Mg, which aims at disusing the operation in a high-temperature environment and reducing the quantity of slag which is an industrial waste. The main results obtained are as follows. The quantity of desulfurized slag in a porous plug ladle could be reduced to zero. A total quantity of slag produced was reduced by about 70%, which was better than the target reduction. Owing to the employment of this simultaneous desulfurization/graphite spheroidization method using Mg, the operations of mixing the desulfurizing agent and removing desulfurized slag in a high-temperature environment were omitted. The S-value after the simultaneous desulfurization/graphite spheroidization became lower than 0.010%. It could be ascertained that the graphite spheroidization rate and mechanical properties of the product did not differ from those of the product obtained by a conventional desulfurization and fully satisfied the standard values of the product. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic spheroidal cast iron for heavy section; Microestructura y propiedades mecanicas de una fundicion esferoidal ferritca en bruto de colada para su uso en piezas de grandes dimensiones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Sanabria, A.; Fernandez-Carrasquilla, J.

    2006-07-01

    In order to carry out a study of the effect of the cooling rate, the composition and the microstructure upon the mechanical properties of a cast iron with nodular graphite and ferrite matrix for heavy sections, one cube with an edge of 300 nm was manufactured through casting in sand molds. This cube contains, as it is habitual, silicon and magnesium which proceed from the inoculation (ferrosilicon) and from the nodulizant (Fe-Si.Mg). The effects of the size, shape and distribution of the graphite nodules and of the microstructure of the matrix upon the mechanical resistance, impact behaviour and fracture toughness of this cast iron are investigated in two zones of the cube which have been casted with a different cooling rate: the thermal centre and the surface. The chemical compositions and the techniques used to perform the mechanical tests and the metallographic analysis are supplied. (Author)

  4. Graphitization of diamond with a metallic coating on ferritic matrix; Grafitizacao do diamante com revestimento metalico em matriz ferritica

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    Cabral, Stenio Cavalier; Oliveira, Hellen Cristine Prata de; Filgueira, Marcello, E-mail: stenio@uenf.b [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (PPGECM/CCT/UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia e Ciencia dos Materiais

    2010-07-01

    Iron is a strong catalyst of graphitization of diamonds. This graphitization occurs mainly during the processing of composites - conventional sintering or hot pressing, and during cutting operations. Aiming to avoid or minimize this deleterious effect, there is increasing use of diamond coated with metallic materials in the production of diamond tools processed via powder metallurgy. This work studies the influence of Fe on diamond graphitization diamond-coated Ti after mixing of Fe-diamonds, hot pressing parameters were performed with 3 minutes/35MPa/900 deg C - this is the condition of pressing hot used in industry for production of diamond tools. Microstructural features were observed by SEM, diffusion of Fe in diamond was studied by EDS. Graphitization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Fe not activate graphitization on the diamond under the conditions of hot pressing. (author)

  5. Microwave Absorbing Properties of Ferrite/Graphite Composite Coatings%铁氧体/石墨复合吸波涂层的微波吸收性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽熙; 张晶; 黄啸谷; 王洪洲; 张其土

    2011-01-01

    本文将固相法制备的磁损耗型Ba0.9Sm0.1Co2Fe16O27铁氧体与电损耗型石墨相结合,通过测试两者的电磁参数,采用YRcomputor软件模拟计算了双层复合吸波涂层的反射率。结果表明:铁氧体/石墨复合吸波涂层在2~8 GHz频段有较好的吸波性能;其中,下层为含量80 wt%的Ba0.9Sm0.1Co2Fe16O27,厚度1.5 mm,上层为10 wt%的石墨,厚度1.5 mm时,该复合涂层表现出优良的微波吸收特性,反射率损耗RL〈-10 dB时,带宽约为3 GHz(3.5~6.5 GHz),最大吸收值约为-27 dB。%Magnetic loss-type Ba0.9Sm0.1Co2Fe16O27 ferrite prepared by the solid state method and electric loss-type graphite were combined,and the electromagnetic parameters were tested.In addition,the reflectivity of the double layer composite coating was successfully simulated by YRcomputor software.It is shown that the ferrite/graphite composite coating exhibited excellent microwave absorbing properties in 2 ~ 8 GHz band.When the lower layer was 80 wt% Ba0.9Sm0.1Fe12O19 with a thickness of 1.5 mm and the upper layer was 10 wt% graphite with a thickness of 1.5 mm,the composite coating showed great microwave absorbing properties.The maximum value of reflection loss(RL) was-27 dB,and the frequency width reached to 3 GHz(3.5 ~ 6.5 GHz) when RL was below-10 dB.

  6. Graphite Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory measurements are used to constrain the dielectric tensor for graphite, from microwave to X-ray frequencies. The dielectric tensor is strongly anisotropic even at X-ray energies. The discrete dipole approximation is employed for accurate calculations of absorption and scattering by single-crystal graphite spheres and spheroids. For randomly-oriented single-crystal grains, the so-called 1/3 - 2/3 approximation for calculating absorption and scattering cross sections is exact in the limit a/lambda -> 0, provides better than ~10% accuracy in the optical and UV even when a/lambda is not small, but becomes increasingly inaccurate at infrared wavelengths, with errors as large as ~40% at lambda = 10 micron. For turbostratic graphite grains, the Bruggeman and Maxwell Garnett treatments yield similar cross sections in the optical and ultraviolet, but diverge in the infrared, with predicted cross sections differing by over an order of magnitude in the far-infrared. It is argued that the Maxwell Garnett estima...

  7. Interstellar Extinction by Spheroidal Dust Grains

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ranjan; Mukai, Tadashi; Vaidya, D. B.; Sen, Asoke K.; Okada, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Observations of interstellar extinction and polarization indicate that the interstellar medium consists of aligned non-spherical dust grains which show variation in the interstellar extinction curve for wavelengths ranging from NIR to UV. To model the extinction and polarization, one cannot use the Mie theory which assumes the grains as solid spheres. We have used a T-matrix based method for computing the extinction efficiencies of spheroidal silicate and graphite grains of different shapes (...

  8. Spheroidal wave functions

    CERN Document Server

    Flammer, Carson

    2005-01-01

    Intended to facilitate the use and calculation of spheroidal wave functions, this applications-oriented text features a detailed and unified account of the properties of these functions. Addressed to applied mathematicians, mathematical physicists, and mathematical engineers, it presents tables that provide a convenient means for handling wave problems in spheroidal coordinates.Topics include separation of the scalar wave equation in spheroidal coordinates, angle and radial functions, integral representations and relations, and expansions in spherical Bessel function products. Additional subje

  9. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Chunky graphite formation in small section ductile iron castings; Formacion de grafito chunky en piezas de pequeno espesor fabricadas utilizando fundicion de hierro con grafito esferoidal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asenjo, I.; Larranaga, P.; Sertucha, J.

    2011-07-01

    Chunky graphite is a degenerated graphite form which can be found in the thermal centre of ductile iron heavy section castings. Previous studies made on cubic blocks (300 and 180 mm in side) manufactured using alloys with fully ferritic matrix structures show that low cooling rates, excessive post-inoculation and high silicon and/or cerium contents in the melts are the most important factors that promote this kind of defect. The enhancement of these critical factors led to obtain chunky graphite in sections lower than 50 mm. Different experimental conditions have been used in order to establish the main parameters that affect this graphite malformation. The use of cutting-edge techniques in the analysis of chemical compositions has revealed that no significant differences can be found when comparing chunky areas and well-formed spheroidal graphite areas. On the other hand, it has not been possible to establish any correlation between the oxygen contents and the scale of the defect. However, it is noteworthy that the oxygen content is related to the use of magnesium or cerium as nodulized agent. (Author) 23 refs.

  11. Polymer bonded ferrite materials as EMC components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toepfer, J. [Fachhochschule Jena, FB Werkstofftechnik, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 2, 07745 Jena (Germany); Hermsdorfer Institut fuer Technische Keramik e.V., M.-Curie-Str. 17, 07629 Hermsdorf (Germany); Pawlowski, B. [Hermsdorfer Institut fuer Technische Keramik e.V., M.-Curie-Str. 17, 07629 Hermsdorf (Germany); Graebner, F. [IMG Nordhausen, An der Salza 8a, 99734 Nordhausen (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Polymer bonded ferrites composed of a mixture of Mn-Zn ferrites or Ni-Zn ferrites in a polymer binder (PE, PA) were prepared and tested as electromagnetic-wave absorbing materials. Test samples and cases were prepared by hot or injection molding. Permeability spectra show loss contributions in the frequency range 100-1000 MHz. Absorption measurements of injection molded polymer-ferrite cases display a 3-5 dB better attenuation characteristics compared to graphite-loaded polyamide housings. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Polymer-gebundene Ferritwerkstoffe auf der Basis von Ferrit (Mn-Zn oder Ni-Zn Ferrite) - Thermoplast Mischungen wurden praepariert und hinsichtlich ihrer Eignung zur Absorption elektromagnetischer Strahlung untersucht. Es wurden sowohl Testproben wie auch komplette Gehaeusekomponenten durch Heisspressen oder Spritzgiessen hergestellt. Die Permeabilitaetsspektren weisen verlustbehaftete Komponenten im Frequenzbereich von 100-1000 MHz auf. Schirmdaempfungsmessungen an spritzgegossenen Gehaeuseteilen zeigen eine um 3-5 dB bessere Daempfung im Vergleich zu Graphit-gefuellten Polyamid-Gehaeusen. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone, E-mail: dhlin@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-15

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  13. New Spheroidizing Technique of Ultra-High Carbon Steel With Aluminum Addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-juan; WANG Bao-qi; SONG Xiao-yan; GUO Su-zhen; GU Nan-ju

    2006-01-01

    A new spheroidizing process of ultra-high carbon steel (UHCS) containing C 1.55%, Cr 1.45%, and Al 1.5% in mass percent has been proposed. The effect of processing parameters on the microstructure was analyzed. The UHCS produced by this new process has a microstructure with recrystallized ferrite matrix and fine and uniform carbide particles. After this spheroidizing, the UHCS exhibits good mechanical properties at ambient temperature, for example σb=1 100 MPa, σs=915 MPa, δ=8% and high ratio of σs/σb.

  14. Investigation on the effects of milling atmosphere on synthesis of barium ferrite/magnetite nanocomposite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molaei, M.J.; Ataie, A.; Raygan, S.; Picken,n S.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this research, barium ferrite /magnetite nanocomposites synthesized via a mechano-chemical route. Graphite was used in order to reduce hematite content of barium ferrite to magnetite to produce a magnetic nanocomposite. The effects of processing conditions on the powder characteristics were inves

  15. Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le-Wei; Kang, Xiao-Kang; Leong, Mook-Seng

    2001-11-01

    The flagship monograph addressing the spheroidal wave function and its pertinence to computational electromagnetics Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory presents in detail the theory of spheroidal wave functions, its applications to the analysis of electromagnetic fields in various spheroidal structures, and provides comprehensive programming codes for those computations. The topics covered in this monograph include: Spheroidal coordinates and wave functions Dyadic Green's functions in spheroidal systems EM scattering by a conducting spheroid EM scattering by a coated dielectric spheroid Spheroid antennas SAR distributions in a spheroidal head model The programming codes and their applications are provided online and are written in Mathematica 3.0 or 4.0. Readers can also develop their own codes according to the theory or routine described in the book to find subsequent solutions of complicated structures. Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory is a fundamental reference for scientists, engineers, and graduate students practicing modern computational electromagnetics or applied physics.

  16. Dwarf Spheroidals in MOND

    CERN Document Server

    Angus, Garry W

    2008-01-01

    We take the line of sight velocity dispersions as functions of radius for 8 Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies and use Jeans analysis to calculate the mass-to-light ratios (M/L) in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). Using the latest structural parameters, distances and variable velocity anisotropy, we find 6/8 dwarfs have sensible M/L using only the stellar populations. Sextans and Draco, however, have M/L=9.2_{-3.0}^{+5.3} and 43.9_{-19.3}^{+29.0} respectively, which poses a problem. Apart from the need for Sextans' integrated magnitude to be reviewed, we propose tidal effects intrinsic to MOND, testable with numerical simulations, but fully orbit dependant, which are disrupting Draco. The creation of the Magellanic Stream is also re-addressed in MOND, the scenario being the stream is ram pressure stripped from the SMC as it crosses the LMC.

  17. GRAPHITE EXTRUSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benziger, T.M.

    1959-01-20

    A new lubricant for graphite extrusion is described. In the past, graphite extrusion mixtures have bcen composed of coke or carbon black, together with a carbonaceous binder such as coal tar pitch, and a lubricant such as petrolatum or a colloidal suspension of graphite in glycerin or oil. Sinee sueh a lubricant is not soluble in, or compatible with the biiider liquid, such mixtures were difficult to extrude, and thc formed pieees lacked strength. This patent teaches tbe use of fatty acids as graphite extrusion lubricants and definite improvemcnts are realized thereby since the fatty acids are soluble in the binder liquid.

  18. Ferrites and ceramic composites

    CERN Document Server

    Jotania, Rajshree B

    2013-01-01

    The Ferrite term is used to refer to all magnetic oxides containing iron as major metallic component. Ferrites are very attractive materials because they simultaneously show high resistivity and high saturation magnetization, and attract now considerable attention, because of the interesting physics involved. Typical ferrite material possesses excellent chemical stability, high corrosion resistivity, magneto-crystalline anisotropy, magneto-striction, and magneto-optical properties. Ferrites belong to the group of ferrimagnetic oxides, and include rare-earth garnets and ortho-ferrites. Several

  19. 钴铁氧体/膨胀石墨及其聚吡咯复合物的制备和油水分离性能%Preparation and Oil/Water Separation of Co-Ferrite/Expanded Graphite and Its Polypyrrole Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海峰; 马歌; 李良超; 吴锡植; 肖秋实; 许锋

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite/expanded graphite complex particles (CF/EG) and cobalt ferrite/expanded graphite/ polypyrrole composites (CF/EG/PPy) were prepared by chemical co-precipitation method and in-situ emulsion polymerization, respectively. The composition, structures, morphology, electrical and magnetic properties, and oil/ water separation property of samples were characterized by means of modern analytical techniques. The results indicated that CF particles embedded in layers of EG, and there was some interaction between the core (CF/EG) and shell (PPy) in the CF/EG/PPy composites. The oil/water separation effect of samples was proportional to the spacing of layers in EG, their sequence was EG >CF/EG >CF/EG/PPy. The CF/EG complex particles with magnetism could be easily recovered and had good performance for repeated use. And its efficiency by cycling of five times was not less than 90%.%用化学共沉淀法和原位乳液聚合法分别制备了钴铁氧体/膨胀石墨复合微粒(CF/EG)和钴铁氧体/膨胀石墨/聚吡咯复合物(CF/EG/PPy).用现代分析技术表征了样品的组成、结构、形貌、电-磁性能和油水分离性能.结果表明,CF粒子已填嵌入到膨胀石墨的层间,CF/EG/PPy复合物的核(CF/EG)和壳(PPy)之间存在着一定的相互作用,样品的油水分离效果与膨胀石墨的层间空隙成正比,其次序为:EG>CF/EG>CF/EG/PPy.磁性的CF/EG微粒回收容易,重复使用性能优良,循环5次的效率不低于90%.

  20. SIZE AND SHAPE FACTOR EXTREMES OF SPHEROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hlubinka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we consider random prolate (oblate spheroids and their random profiles. The limiting distribution of the extremal characteristics of the spheroids is related to the limiting distribution of the corresponding extremal characteristics of the profiles. The difference between the analysis of the prolate and oblate spheroids is discussed. We propose the possible application of the theoretical results.

  1. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    North, P.; Cescutti, G.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Lemasle, B.; Venn, K. A.; Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Primas, F.; Francois, P.

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other

  2. The Fundamental Manifold of Spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Zaritsky, D; Zabludoff, A I; Zaritsky, Dennis; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2006-01-01

    We present a unifying empirical description of the structural and kinematic properties of all spheroids embedded in dark matter halos. We find that the stellar spheroidal components of galaxy clusters, which we call cluster spheroids (CSphs) and which are typically one hundred times the size of normal elliptical galaxies, lie on a "fundamental plane" as tight as that defined by ellipticals (rms in effective radius of ~0.07), but that has a different slope. The slope, as measured by the coefficient of the log(sigma) term, declines significantly and systematically between the fundamental planes of ellipticals, brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), and CSphs.We attribute this decline primarily to a continuous change in M_e/L_e, the mass-to-light ratio within the effective radius r_e, with spheroid scale. The magnitude of the slope change requires that it arises principally from differences in the relative distributions of luminous and dark matter, rather than from stellar population differences such as in age and m...

  3. The Comparison of Selected Methods of Cast Iron Spheroidization in Industrial Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Válek

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Production of spheroidal graphite cast iron is today quite mastered technology. There are many methods achieving the nodular graphite morphology. Each of these methods have specific characteristics and requirements to technical support, properties and the type of applied modifier. Selection of the spheroidization method is dependent on foundry disposition, production character, economic balance, quality requirements, etc. In case of centrifugally casting the core, which fills body and neck of the roll, is created by ductile iron. Considering the sophisticated production of centrifugally cast rolls for hot rolling mills it is necessary to ensure a high reproducibility and reliability of ductile cast iron production quality in the bulk range of 9-18 t per tapping. These conditions are in the Roll Foundry in Vítkovicke Slevarny, spol. s r.o. provided and verified mastered overpour method and the newly injection of cored wire in the melt.

  4. On-line spheroidization process of medium-carbon low-alloyed cold heading steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Fu; Hao Yu; Pan Tao

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally manufactured 35CrMo cold heading steel must undergo spheroidization annealing before the cold heading process. In this paper, different types of deformation processes with various controlled cooling periods were operated to achieve on-line spheroidal cementite using the Gleeble-3500 simulation technique. According to the measured dynamic ferrite transformation temperature (Ad3), the deformation could be divided into two types:low temperature deformation at 810 and 780°C;“deformation-induced ferrite transformation”(DIFT) deformation at 750 and 720°C. Compared with the low temperature deformation, the DIFT deformation followed by accelerated cooling to 680°C is beneficial for the formation of spheroidal cementite. Samples subjected to both the low-temperature deformation and DIFT deformation can obtain granular bainite by accelerated cooling to 640°C;the latter may contribute to the formation of a fine dispersion of secondary constituents. Granular bainite can transform into globular pearlite rapidly during subcritical annealing, and the more the dis-perse phase, the more homogeneously distributed globular cementite can be obtained.

  5. Contribution to the influence of selected alloy elements on the strain cycling and creep behaviour of cast iron with spheroidal graphite at temperatures above 450 C; Beitrag zum Einfluss ausgewaehlter Legierungselemente auf das Dehnwechsel- und Zeitstandverhalten von Gusseisen mit Kugelgraphit bei Temperaturen oberhalb 450 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Susanne

    2012-02-15

    In this report for the first time an all-embracing databases was raised about the correlation of microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties concerning spheroidal cast iron at temperatures above 450 C. Its basic concept is a systematic variation of alloying elements and benchmarking fatigue and creep behavior of all created heats as a function of microstructure and alloys.

  6. Spheroidal Degeneration of the Cornea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Dinç

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A thirty-one-year-old male patient presented with bilateral epiphora and stinging sensation in the cornea. Detailed history revealed that a bilateral corneal scraping had been made regarding the initial diagnosis of fungal keratitis. His bestcorrected visual acuities were 20/20 and 20/30 in right and left eyes, respectively. Biomicroscopy showed bilateral amber colored spherules in the anterior stroma of the central cornea. The diagnosis of spheroidal corneal degeneration was established and symptomatic therapy with artificial tear drops was prescribed. Ultraviolet light is widely accepted to be the main etiological factor in the pathogenesis of spheroidal degeneration. Because of difficulties in the early stages of the diagnostic process of the disease, incorrect diagnoses can be made with inappropriate interventions. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2011; 41: 264-6

  7. Parametric Dwarf Spheroidal Tidal Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fleck, J J; Fleck, Jean-Julien; Kuhn, Jeff R.

    2003-01-01

    The time dependent tidal interaction of the Local Group Dwarf Spheroidal (dS) Galaxies with the Milky Way (MW) can fundamentally affect their dynamical properties. The model developed here extends earlier numerical descriptions of dS-MW tidal interactions. We explore the dynamical evolution of dS systems in circular or elliptical MW orbits in the framework of a parametric oscillator. An analytic model is developed and compared with more general numerical solutions and N-body simulation experiments.

  8. COMPUTER PROCESSING OF MICROSTRUCTURES OF IRON WITH DIFFERENT INCLUSIONS AMOUNTS OF LAMELLAR AND SPHERICAL GRAPHITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chichko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on cast iron microstructures with different amounts of impurities of plastic and nodular graphite given in CCITT 3443-87 “Cast iron with various forms of graphite. Methods for determining the structure “shows the possibilities of automated quantitative analysis of microstructures SG2, PG4, PG6, PG10, PG12 (Plastic Box and SHG2, SHG4, SHG6, SHG10, SHG12 (spheroidal graphite, which allows the development of methods for the determination of impurities of plastic and spherical graphite according to the microstructures image under the light microscope.

  9. Scalable robotic biofabrication of tissue spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehesz, A Nagy; Hajdu, Z; Visconti, R P; Markwald, R R; Mironov, V [Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Center, Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Brown, J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Beaver, W [York Technical College, Rock Hill, SC (United States); Da Silva, J V L, E-mail: mironovv@musc.edu [Renato Archer Information Technology Center-CTI, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-06-15

    Development of methods for scalable biofabrication of uniformly sized tissue spheroids is essential for tissue spheroid-based bioprinting of large size tissue and organ constructs. The most recent scalable technique for tissue spheroid fabrication employs a micromolded recessed template prepared in a non-adhesive hydrogel, wherein the cells loaded into the template self-assemble into tissue spheroids due to gravitational force. In this study, we present an improved version of this technique. A new mold was designed to enable generation of 61 microrecessions in each well of a 96-well plate. The microrecessions were seeded with cells using an EpMotion 5070 automated pipetting machine. After 48 h of incubation, tissue spheroids formed at the bottom of each microrecession. To assess the quality of constructs generated using this technology, 600 tissue spheroids made by this method were compared with 600 spheroids generated by the conventional hanging drop method. These analyses showed that tissue spheroids fabricated by the micromolded method are more uniform in diameter. Thus, use of micromolded recessions in a non-adhesive hydrogel, combined with automated cell seeding, is a reliable method for scalable robotic fabrication of uniform-sized tissue spheroids.

  10. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  11. Modern Ferrite Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Goldman, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Modern Ferrite Technology, 2nd Ed. offers the readers an expert overview of the latest ferrite advances as well as their applications in electronic components. This volume develops the interplay among material properties, component specification and device requirements using ferrites. Throughout, emphasis is placed on practical technological concerns as opposed to mathematical and physical aspects of the subject. The book traces the origin of the magnetic effect in ferrites from the level of the simplest particle and then increases the scope to include larger hierarchies. From the desired magnetic properties, the author deduces the physical and chemical material parameters, taking into consideration major chemistry, impurity levels, ceramic microstructures and grain boundary effects. He then discusses the processing conditions and associated conditions required for implementation. In addition to conventional ceramic techniques, he describes non-conventional methods such as co-precipitation, co-spray roasting ...

  12. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  13. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  14. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-03-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  15. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems.

  16. Magnetic-directed patterning of cell spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Benjamin R; Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2014-05-01

    We have described an approach to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) cell-based structures using functionalized super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as patterning agents to guide the assembly of endothelial cell spheroids into 3D patterns using the magnetic forces generated by a prefabricated magnetic template. SPIONs were first uptaken by endothelial cells before they were assembled into uniform-sized spheroids through a home-made robotic spheroid maker. To guide the magnetic spheroids, a unique magnetic template was fabricated using computer-aided design and cut from a magnetic sheet. The spheroids were then guided to the prefabricated magnetic template through the attractive magnetic forces between the SPIONs inside the endothelial cells and the magnetic template. Fusion of endothelial cell spheroids over time while adhered to the magnetic template allowed for the formation of 3D cell-based structures. Subsequent removal of the prefabricated magnetic template left 3-D endothelial cell sheets, which may be stacked to fabricate complicated 3D multicellular tissue structures. To enhance the cytocompatibility, SPIONs were silica-coated before use. At low concentrations, the SPIONs did not adversely affect cell viability, proliferation, and phenotype stability. Light and confocal microscopy showed that endothelial cell spheroids could be reproducibly created with high uniformity. The endothelial cells were able to remain viable and maintain the 3D structure in vitro. We have proved the concept to use SPIONs as a patterning agent to direct the attachment and self assembly of SPION-loaded endothelial cell spheroids on a prefabricated magnetic template for the formation of 3D cell based structures. A magnetic-directed technique allows quick patterning of cell spheroids in accordance with desirable magnetic patterns, therefore, holding promise for scalable fabrication of complicated 3D multicellular tissue structures. By varying the cell types and the

  17. Bistable flows in precessing spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, D

    2015-01-01

    Precession driven flows are found in any rotating container filled with liquid, when the rotation axis itself rotates about a secondary axis that is fixed in an inertial frame of reference. Because of its relevance for planetary fluid layers, many works consider spheroidal containers, where the uniform vorticity component of the bulk flow is reliably given by the well-known equations obtained by Busse in 1968. So far however, no analytical result on the solutions is available. Moreover, the cases where multiple flows can coexist have not been investigated in details since their discovery by Noir et al. (2003). In this work, we aim at deriving analytical results on the solutions, aiming in particular at, first estimating the ranges of parameters where multiple solutions exist, and second studying quantitatively their stability. Using the models recently proposed by Noir \\& C{\\'e}bron (2013), which are more generic in the inviscid limit than the equations of Busse, we analytically describe these solutions, ...

  18. Ferrite logic reliability study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, J. A.; Clark, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Development and use of digital circuits called all-magnetic logic are reported. In these circuits the magnetic elements and their windings comprise the active circuit devices in the logic portion of a system. The ferrite logic device belongs to the all-magnetic class of logic circuits. The FLO device is novel in that it makes use of a dual or bimaterial ferrite composition in one physical ceramic body. This bimaterial feature, coupled with its potential for relatively high speed operation, makes it attractive for high reliability applications. (Maximum speed of operation approximately 50 kHz.)

  19. Conjunctival spheroid degeneration. Recurrence after excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M S

    1982-06-01

    After excision of part of the conjunctiva in 15 eyes (14 subjects) due to spheroid degeneration, the author noticed only fairly small, varying numbers of autofluorescent and colourless spheroids-after an observation period of 18 months, only 6% of autofluorescent and 13% of colourless bodies were observed compared to the number before biopsy. Around the biopsy site only a few spheroids were seen, with a non-significant tendency to increase in number of the colourless bodies. In the cornea the band-shaped keratopathy had aggravated, with the formation of a small number of large, autofluorescent spheroids. A pinguecula recurred in a mild degree only in 3 out of 13 cases within 18 months.

  20. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    North, P; Jablonka, P; Hill, V; Shetrone, M; Letarte, B; Lemasle, B; Venn, K A; Battaglia, G; Tolstoy, E; Irwin, M J; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2012-01-01

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other elements in these galaxies, including alpha and iron-peak ones, which allowed us to build [Mn/Fe] and [Mn/alpha] versus [Fe/H] diagrams. The Mn abundances imply sub-solar [Mn/Fe] ratios for the stars in all four galaxies examined. In Sculptor, [Mn/Fe] stays roughly constant between [Fe/H]\\sim -1.8 and -1.4 and decreases at higher iron abundance. In Fornax, [Mn/Fe] does not vary in any significant way with [Fe/H]. The relation between [Mn/alpha] and [Fe/H] for the dSph galaxies is clearly systematically offset from that for the Milky Way, which reflects the different star formation histories of the respective galaxies. The [Mn/alpha] behavior can be interpreted as a result of the metal-dependent Mn yields of type II and ...

  1. Redistribution and Effect of Various Elements on the Morphology of Primary Graphite in Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lacaze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown repeatedly that many elements present as traces or at low level can affect graphite shape in cast irons. As part of a long term project aimed at clarifying the growth and the alteration of spheroidal graphite, a study on the effect of a few elements (Cu, Sn, Sb, and Ti on primary graphite growth was undertaken and analysed with reference to an alloy without any such additions. This work was performed by remelting alloys in graphite crucibles thus saturating the melt in carbon and enabling primary graphite to grow by controlled cooling of the melt above the eutectic temperature. Primary graphite growth in the reference alloy was observed to be lamellar, while the added elements were found to affect bulk graphite and to modify its outer shape, with Sb leading eventually to rounded agglomerates together with wavy lamellae. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to analyze the distribution of elements, and no build-up of trace elements at the graphite surface could be observed. Instead, it is established that the perturbation of bulk graphite is associated with inhomogeneous distribution of metallic elements inside graphite precipitates.

  2. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Von L. [Advanced Technology Inst., Virginia Beach, VA (United States)

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  3. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  4. A multicellular spheroid array to realize spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisawa, Yu-suke; Takagi, Airi; Nashimoto, Yuji; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel multicellular spheroid culture system that facilitates the easy preparation and culture of a spheroid microarray for the long-term monitoring of cellular activity. A spheroid culture device with an array of pyramid-like microholes was constructed in a silicon chip that was equipped with elastomeric microchannels. A cell suspension was introduced via the microfluidic channel into the microstructure that comprised silicon microholes and elastomeric microwells. A single spheroid can be formed and localized precisely within each microstructure. Since the culture medium could be replaced via the microchannels, a long-term culture (of approximately 2 weeks) is available on the chip. Measurement of albumin production in the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) showed that the liver-specific functions were maintained for 2 weeks. Based on the cellular respiratory activity, the cellular viability of the spheroid array on the chip was evaluated using scanning electrochemical microscopy. Responses to four different chemical stimulations were simultaneously detected on the same chip, thus demonstrating that each channel could be evaluated independently under various stimulation conditions. Our spheroid culture system facilitated the understanding of spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a single chip, thus functioning as a useful drug-screening device for cancer and liver cells.

  5. Bars and spheroids in gravimetry problem

    CERN Document Server

    Sizikov, Valery

    2016-01-01

    The direct gravimetry problem is solved by dividing each deposit body into a set of vertical adjoining bars, whereas in the inverse problem, each deposit body is modelled by a homogeneous ellipsoid of revolution (spheroid). Well-known formulae for the z-component of gravitational intensity for a spheroid are transformed to a convenient form. Parameters of a spheroid are determined by minimizing the Tikhonov smoothing functional with constraints on the parameters, which makes the ill-posed inverse problem by unique and stable. The Bulakh algorithm for initial estimating the depth and mass of a deposit is modified. The proposed technique is illustrated by numerical model examples of deposits in the form of two and five bodies. The inverse gravimetry problem is interpreted as a gravitational tomography problem or, in other words, as "introscopy" of Earth's crust and mantle.

  6. Use of spheroidal models in gravitational tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Sizikov, Valery

    2015-01-01

    The direct gravimetry problem is solved using the subdivision of each body of a deposit into a set of vertical adjoining bars, and in the inverse problem each body of a deposit is modeled by a uniform ellipsoid of revolution (spheroid). Well-known formulas for z-component of gravitational intensity of a spheroid are transformed to a convenient form. Parameters of a spheroid are determined by minimizing the Tikhonov smoothing functional using constraints on the parameters. This makes the ill-posed inverse problem by unique and stable. The Bulakh algorithm for initial estimating the depth and mass of a deposit is modified. The technique is illustrated by numerical model examples of deposits in the form of two and five bodies. The inverse gravimetry problem is interpreted as a gravitational tomography problem or the intravision of the Earth's crust and mantle.

  7. Radiation damage in graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, John Harry Walrond

    1965-01-01

    Nuclear Energy, Volume 102: Radiation Damage in Graphite provides a general account of the effects of irradiation on graphite. This book presents valuable work on the structure of the defects produced in graphite crystals by irradiation. Organized into eight chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the description of the methods of manufacturing graphite and of its physical properties. This text then presents details of the method of setting up a scale of irradiation dose. Other chapters consider the effect of irradiation at a given temperature on a physical property of graphite. This

  8. Charged fluid distribution in higher dimensional spheroidal space-time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G P Singh; S Kotambkar

    2005-07-01

    A general solution of Einstein field equations corresponding to a charged fluid distribution on the background of higher dimensional spheroidal space-time is obtained. The solution generates several known solutions for superdense star having spheroidal space-time geometry.

  9. Sulphur isotope ratios in the Canyon Diablo metallic spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwing, C. E.; Rees, C. E.; Thode, H. G.

    1983-09-01

    Nininger (1956) has discovered metallic spheroids in the soil surrounding Meteor Crater in Arizona. Nininger suggested that the spheroids condensed from the center of a homogeneous explosion-produced metallic vapor cloud. The present investigation is concerned with measurements of sulfur contents and delta S-34 values of metallic spheroids from the vicinity of Meteor Crater. It is found that the small metallic spheroids have lower sulfur contents and higher delta S-34 values than do the large spheroids. It is concluded that the observed isotopic patterns are unlikely to have arisen during desulfurization of the metallic liquid from which the spheroids were formed or during high temperature oxidation or the spheroids. The most likely process for the production of the observed delta S-34 values and sulfur contents is low temperature oxidation reactions experienced by the spheroids during their surface exposure following formation.

  10. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies keystones of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Gallagher, S; Wyse, F G

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  11. Stress Clamp Experiments on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Elgeti, Jens; Malaquin, Laurent; Basan, Markus; Risler, Thomas; Cabane, Bernard; Vignjevic, Danijela; Prost, Jacques; Cappello, Giovanni; Joanny, Jean-François; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.188102

    2011-01-01

    The precise role of the microenvironment on tumor growth is poorly understood. Whereas the tumor is in constant competition with the surrounding tissue, little is known about the mechanics of this interaction. Using a novel experimental procedure, we study quantitatively the effect of an applied mechanical stress on the long-term growth of a spheroid cell aggregate. We observe that a stress of 10 kPa is sufficient to drastically reduce growth by inhibition of cell proliferation mainly in the core of the spheroid. We compare the results to a simple numerical model developed to describe the role of mechanics in cancer progression.

  12. Nano-scale orientation mapping of graphite in cast irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theuwissen, Koenraad; Lacaze, Jacques [Institut CARNOT CIRIMAT, Université de Toulouse, ENSIACET, CS 44362, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Véron, Muriel [SIMAP, CNRS-Grenoble INP, BP 46 101 rue de la Physique, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Laffont, Lydia, E-mail: lydia.laffont@ensiacet.fr [Institut CARNOT CIRIMAT, Université de Toulouse, ENSIACET, CS 44362, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2014-09-15

    A diametrical section of a graphite spheroid from a ductile iron sample was prepared using the focused ion beam-lift out technique. Characterization of this section was carried out through automated crystal orientation mapping in a transmission electron microscope. This new technique automatically collects electron diffraction patterns and matches them with precalculated templates. The results of this investigation are crystal orientation and phase maps of the specimen, which bring new light to the understanding of growth mechanisms of this peculiar graphite morphology. This article shows that mapping the orientation of carbon-based materials such as graphite, which is difficult to achieve with conventional techniques, can be performed automatically and at high spatial resolution using automated crystal orientation mapping in a transmission electron microscope. - Highlights: • ACOM/TEM can be used to study the crystal orientation of carbon-based materials. • A spheroid is formed by conical sectors radiating from a central nuclei. • Misorientations exist within the conical sectors, defining various orientation domains.

  13. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  14. Zero-point energy in spheroidal geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Kitson, A. R.; Signal, A. I.

    2005-01-01

    We study the zero-point energy of a massless scalar field subject to spheroidal boundary conditions. Using the zeta-function method, the zero-point energy is evaluated for small ellipticity. Axially symmetric vector fields are also considered. The results are interpreted within the context of QCD flux tubes and the MIT bag model.

  15. Blue straggler stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Sigurdsson, S.; Irwin, M. J.; Battaglia, G.

    2007-01-01

    Blue straggler star (BSS) candidates have been observed in all old dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), however whether or not they are authentic BSSs or young stars has been a point of debate. To both address this issue and obtain a better understanding of the formation of BSSs in different environme

  16. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  17. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Hino; K. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamauchi; Y. Hirohata; K. Tsuzuki; Y.Kusama

    2005-01-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall,vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study,deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus.After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 kev D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316 L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention.Ferritic steel sample was

  18. Fatigue crack tip damaging micromechanisms in a ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Iacoviello

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the peculiar graphite elements shape, obtained by means of a chemical composition control (mainly small addition of elements like Mg, Ca or Ce, Ductile Cast Irons (DCIs are able to offer the good castability of gray irons with the high mechanical properties of irons (first of all, toughness. This interesting properties combination can be improved both by means of the chemical composition control and by means of different heat treatments(e.g. annealing, normalizing, quenching, austempering etc. In this work, fatigue crack tip damaging micromechanisms in a ferritic-pearlitic DCI were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope observations performed on a lateral surface of Compact Type (CT specimens during the fatigue crack propagation test (step by step procedure, performed according to the “load shedding procedure”. On the basis of the experimental results, different fatigue damaging micromechanisms were identified, both in the graphite nodules and in the ferritic – pearlitic matrix.

  19. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui;

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  20. Graphitic Carbons and Biosignatures

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, S.; Papineau, D

    2014-01-01

    The unambiguous identification of graphitic carbons as remains of life in ancient rocks is challenging because fossilized biogenic molecules are inevitably altered and degraded during diagenesis and metamorphism of the host rocks. Yet, recent studies have highlighted the possible preservation of biosignatures carried by some of the oldest graphitic carbons. Laboratory simulations are increasingly being used to better constrain the transformations of organic molecules into graphitic carbons in...

  1. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  2. Spheroidization by Plasma Processing and Characterization of Stainless Steel Powder for 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lina; Wang, Changzhen; Wu, Wenjie; Tan, Chao; Wang, Guoyu; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2017-10-01

    Stainless steel 316L (SS 316L) powder was spheroidized by plasma processing to improve its suitability for powder 3D printing. The obtained spheroidized (sphero) powder was characterized in terms of its crystalline phases, elemental composition, morphology, particle size and distribution, light absorption, and flow properties. The elemental composition of the sphero powder met the Chinese standard for SS 316L except for its Si content. The volume fraction of ferrite increased after plasma processing. Furthermore, plasma processing was shown to not only reduce the mean size of the particles in the size range of 10 to 100 μm but also generate particles in the size range of 0.1 to 10 μm. The smaller particles filled the voids among larger particles, increasing the powder density. The light absorption was also increased owing to enhanced internal reflection. Although the basic flow energy decreased after plasma processing, the flow function (FF) value was smaller for the sphero powder, indicating a lower flowability of the sphero powder. However, the density of SS 316L pieces printed with commercial and sphero powders was 98.76 pct and 98.16 pct of the SS 316L bulk density, respectively, indicating the suitability of the sphero powder for 3D printing despite an FF below 10.

  3. Thermodynamic Analysis of Cast Irons Solidification With Various Types of Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbel T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution summarises the results of oxygen activity determinations, which were measured and registered continuously in castings from cast irons with various types of graphite. The results were used to find the relationship between two variables: natural logarithm of oxygen activities and reverse value of thermodynamic temperature 1 /T. Obtained regression lines were used to calculate oxygen activity at different temperatures, to calculate Gibbs free energy ΔG at the different temperatures and to calculate the single ΔG value for significant temperature of the graphite solidification. The results were processed by a statistical analysis of data files for the different types of graphite with flake, vermicular and spheroidal graphite. Each material has its proper typical oxygen activities range and individual temperature function of Gibbs free energy for analysing and governing casting quality.

  4. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  5. Terahertz generation from graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakrishnan, G.; Chakkittakandy, R.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Generation of subpicosecond terahertz pulses is observed when graphite surfaces are illuminated with femtosecond near-infrared laser pulses. The nonlinear optical generation of THz pulses from graphite is unexpected since, in principle, the material possesses a centre of inversion symmetry.

  6. Microwave applications of soft ferrites

    CERN Document Server

    Pardavi-Horvath, M P

    2000-01-01

    Signal processing requires broadband, low-loss, low-cost microwave devices (circulators, isolators, phase shifters, absorbers). Soft ferrites (garnets, spinels, hexaferrites), applied in planar microwave devices, are reviewed from the point of view of device requirements. Magnetic properties, specific to operation in high-frequency electromagnetic fields, are discussed. Recent developments in thick film ferrite technology and device design are reviewed. Magnetic losses related to planar shape and inhomogeneous internal fields are analyzed.

  7. Pulsar searches in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Herrera, Eduardo; Maccarone, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We have been undertaking a comprehensive survey for pulsars and fast radio transients in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way using the Green Bank Radio Telescope operating at a central frequency of 350 MHz. Our search pipeline allows the detection of periodical signals and single dispersed pulses and it is optimized to search for millisecond radio pulsars. Here we present preliminary results of the searches we have conducted in the Ursa Minoris, Draco and Leo I dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. Our searches have revealed no periodic signals but a few unconfirmed millisecond single pulses at various dispersion measures, possibly related to neutron stars. Detecting neutron stars in these systems can potentially help to test the existence of haloes of dark matter surrounding these systems as predicted by Dehnen & King (2006).

  8. Making electromagnetic wavelets: II. Spheroidal shell antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Gerald [Center for Signals and Waves, 3803 Tonkawa Trail 2, Austin, TX (United States)

    2005-01-14

    In the companion paper, a charge-current distribution was obtained for radiating electromagnetic wavelets. However, it cannot be realized because of two drawbacks: (a) it requires the existence of magnetic charges, and (b) the charge-current distribution, which is concentrated on a spheroidal surface S{sub {alpha}}, is too singular for practical implementation. Both of these difficulties are resolved here. The first is resolved by using Hertz vectors to generate a charge-current distribution on S{sub {alpha}} due solely to bound electric charges. The second is resolved by replacing S{sub {alpha}} with a spheroidal shell of finite thickness. This generalizes the usual boundary conditions on an interface between electromagnetic media by allowing the transition to be gradual.

  9. Three-dimensional local residual stress and orientation gradients near graphite nodules in ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yubin; Andriollo, Tito; Fæster, Søren

    2016-01-01

    A synchrotron technique, differential aperture X-ray microscopy (DAXM), has been applied to characterize the microstructure and analyze the local mesoscale residual elastic strain fields around graphite nodules embedded in ferrite matrix grains in ductile cast iron. Compressive residual elastic...... but with a significant overprediction of the maximum strain. This is discussed in terms of stress relaxation during cooling or during storage by plastic deformation of the nodule, the matrix or both. Relaxation by plastic deformation of the ferrite is demonstrated by the formation of low energy dislocation cell...... structure also quantified by the DAXM technique....

  10. New Classes of Charged Spheroidal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thirukkanesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New classes of exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell system is found in closed form by assuming that the hypersurface is spheroidal. This is achieved by choosing a particular form for the electric field intensity. A class of solution is found for all positive spheroidal parameter for a specific form of electric field intensity. In general, the condition of pressure isotropy reduces to a difference equation with variable, rational coefficients that can be solved. Consequently, an explicit solution in series form is found. By placing restrictions on the parameters, it is shown that the series terminates and there exist two classes of solutions in terms of elementary functions. These solutions contain the models found previously in the limit of vanishing charge. Solutions found are directly relating the spheroidal parameter and electric field intensity. Masses obtained are consistent with the previously reported experimental and theoretical studies describing strange stars. A physical analysis indicates that these models may be used to describe a charged sphere.

  11. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Swetha Sara Philip; Deepa John; Sheeja Susan John

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  12. Directly spheroidizing during hot deformation in GCr15 steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-hui ZHU; Gang ZHENG

    2008-01-01

    The spheroidizing heat treatment is normally required prior to the cold forming in GCr15 steel in order to improve its machinability. In the conventional spher-oidizing process, very long annealing time, generally more than 10 h, is needed to assure proper spheroidizing. It results in low productivity, high cost, and especially high energy consumption. Therefore, the possibility of directly spheroidizing during hot deformation in GCr15 steel is preliminarily explored. The effect of hot deformation parameters on the final microstructure and hardness is investigated systematically in order to develop a directly spheroidizing technology. Experimental results illustrate that low deformation temperature and slow cooling rate is the favorite in directly softening and/or spheroidizing dur-ing hot deformation, which allows the properties of as-rolled GCr15 to be applicable for post-machining without requirement of prior annealing.

  13. Orbits in Homogeneous Oblate Spheroidal Gravitational Space-Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifu E. N.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The generalized Lagrangian in general relativistic homogeneous oblate spheroidal gravitational fields is constructed and used to study orbits exterior to homogenous oblate spheroids. Expressions for the conservation of energy and angular momentum for this gravitational field are obtained. The planetary equation of motion and the equation of motion of a photon in the vicinity of an oblate spheroid are derived. These equations have additional terms not found in Schwarzschild's space time.

  14. The structure and mechanical properties of pearlitic-ferritic vermicular cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the use of magnesium alloy in modern Tundish + Cored Wire injection method for production of vermicular graphite cast irons were described. The injection of Mg Cored Wire length is a treatment method which can be used to process iron melted in an electric induction furnace. This paper describes the results of using a high-magnesium ferrosilicon alloy in cored wire for the production of vermicular graphite cast irons at the; Tundish + Cored Wire to be injected methods (PE for pearlitic-ferritic matrix GJV with about 25 %ferrite content. The results of calculations and experiments have indicated the length of the Cored Wire to be injected basing on the initial sulfur content and weight of the treated melt. The paper presents a microstructure matrix and vermicular graphite in standard sample and different walled castings. The results of numerous trials have shown that the magnesium Tundish + PE Method process can produce high quality vermicular graphite irons under the specific industrial conditions of the above mentioned foundries.

  15. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  16. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  17. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  18. High power ferrite microwave switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  19. The use of ferrites at microwave frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Thourel, Léo

    1964-01-01

    The Use of Ferrites at Microwave Frequencies describes the applications of ferrites at microwave frequencies and the apparatus involved. Topics covered range from the properties of ferrites to gyromagnetic and non-reciprocal effects, ferrite isolators, circulators, and modulators. The use of ferrites in variable frequency filter cavities is also discussed. Mathematical explanations are reduced to the strict minimum and only the results of calculations are indicated. This book consists of seven chapters and opens with a review of the theory of magnetism, touching on subjects such as the BOHR m

  20. Attenuation of microwaves by poly-disperse small spheroid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peichang; Wang, Zhenhui

    1998-08-01

    Expressions for calculating the attenuation cross sections of poly-disperse, small spheroids, whose rotatory axes are in specific status, have been derived from a universal formula for calculating the attenuation cross section of a particle of arbitrary shape. Attenuation cross sections of liquid, ice, and spongy spheroidal droplets in different size and eccentricity at different wave lengths have been computed and analyzed.

  1. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis.

  2. Engineering analysis and development of the spheroid reservoir bioartificial liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Malcolm B; Corner, Stephen M; Amiot, Bruce P; Nyberg, Scott L

    2009-01-01

    A significant demand exists for a liver support device such as a Bioartifical Liver (BAL) to treat patients experiencing acute liver failure. This descriptive paper outlines the design and development of two of the key components of the Mayo Spheroid Reservoir Bioartificial Liver (SRBAL) system. One of the components is the multifunctional Spheroid Reservoir and the other is Multi-shelf Rocker. The Spheroid Reservoir provides an environment to support the viability and functionality of the hepatocyte spheroids at very high cell densities. The Spheroid Reservoir is the biologically active component of this extracorporeal liver support device. Since the Spheroid Reservoir is designed to support 200-400 grams of hepatocyte spheroids, a method to quickly produce large quantities of spheroids is required. The Multi-Shelf Rocker fulfills the production requirement by allowing the culturing of up to six liters of hepatocyte suspension in a conventional laboratory incubator. The SRBAL is designed to provide life sustaining liver-like function to patients in acute liver failure.

  3. Leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary leukodystrophy (POLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider, C; Van Gerpen, J A.; DeArmond, S; Shuster, E A.; Dickson, D W.; Wszolek, Z K.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and familial pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) present as adult-onset dementia with motor impairment and epilepsy. They are regarded as distinct diseases. We review data from the literature that support their being a single entity. Apart from a slightly older age at onset, a more rapid course, and more prominent pyramidal tract involvement, familial POLD is clinically similar to HDLS. Moreover, the pathologic hallmarks of the two diseases, axonal spheroids in HDLS and pigmented macrophages in POLD, can be identified in both conditions. This supports HDLS and POLD being referred collectively as adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP). GLOSSARY ALSP = adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia; HDLS = hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids; OLD = orthochromatic leukodystrophy; POLD = pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy. PMID:19487654

  4. Design of a Uranium Dioxide Spheroidization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Daniel P.; Mireles, Omar R.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2013-01-01

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) fuel cermets. The PSS process improves particle spherocity and surface morphology for coating by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Angular fully dense particles melt in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet at between 32-36 kW, and become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Particles range in size from 100 - 50 microns in diameter. Student s t-test and hypothesis testing of two proportions statistical methods were applied to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders show great than 800% increase in the number of spherical particles over the stock powder with the mean spherocity only mildly improved. It is recommended that powders be processed two-three times in order to reach the desired spherocity, and that process parameters be optimized for a more narrow particles size range. Keywords: spherocity, spheroidization, plasma, uranium-dioxide, cermet, nuclear, propulsion

  5. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  6. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL FUNDAMENTAL SOLUTION TO STOKES FLOW IN THE OBLATE SPHEROIDAL COORDINATES WITH APPLICATIONS TO MULTIPLES SPHEROID PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄宏; 严宗毅; 吴望一

    2002-01-01

    A new three-dimensional fundamental solution to the Stokes flow was proposedby transforming the solid harmonic functions in Lamb' s solution into expressions in terms ofthe oblate spheroidal coordinates. These fundamental solutions are advantageous in treatingflows past an arbitrary number of arbitrarily positioned and oriented oblate spheroids. Theleast squares technique was adopted herein so that the convergence difficulties oftenencountered in solving three-dimensional problems were completely avoided. The examplesdemonstrate that present approach is highly accurate, consistently stable andcomputationally efficient.The oblate spheroid may be used to model a variety of particle shapes between acircular disk and a sphere. For the first time, the effect of various geometric factors on theforces and torques exerted on two oblate spheroids were systematically studied by using theproposed fundamental solutions. The generality of this approach was illustrated by twoproblems of three spheroids.

  7. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  8. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  9. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  10. Ferrites – what is new?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Ranganathan; Anindita Ray

    2002-05-01

    Ferrites, combining insulating and ferrimagnetic properties, have long been used in technology. The aim of this paper is to focus on new features in these materials. In the classical theory of ferrimagnets, Neel had predicted the unusual thermal variation of the spontaneous magnetization, such as, the disappearance of the magnetization at a temperature which was not the Curie temperature but at a point where there was compensation of the spontaneous magnetization of the two sublattices. We show experimentally that temperature (K) in spinel oxide is different under the ZFC and FC magnetization method. To our knowledge, only limited attempt has been made to study K as very few systems exhibit such behavior. In general, some of the ferrites have specific semiconducting properties, e.g., a very low carrier mobility. We discuss the anomalies of the magneto-resistance in ferrites that occur at order–disorder and order–order magnetic phase transition along with our ac and dc conductivity data near the spin compensation temperature. Another notable feature of the ferrites is that, upon irradiation of heavy ions, one can tune the magnetic ordering on bulk sample without destructive effects, i.e., irradiation-induced magnetization. It is interesting to note that spinel ferrite (nano) particle is an ideal small particle magnetic system as the crystal chemistry issue can be controlled, unlike pure metal particle systems where the crystal chemistry issues are basically fixed. In relevance to this, we will also discuss the future prospects, namely, the effect of irradiation on small particle magnetism, as, so far, only a limited attempt has been made in this field.

  11. Lithium-Graphite Secondary Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    Used in the experiment that studied the effect of operating current. 6. Li/LiClO 4, PC (0.9M)/Graphite + Graphite glue on carbon cloth. 7. Li/ LiBF4 ...DMSU (1.0M)/Graphite + Graphite glue on carbon cloth. 8. Li/ LiBF4 , PC (1.5M)/Graphite + Graphite glue on carbon cloth. 9. Li/LiClO4, DMSU (2.1M)/Pt. 10... LiBF4 , PC(1.5 M)/Graphite + Graphite glue on carbon cloth. Cycles 1 and 2 51 24. Same as 23. Cycle no. 3, 1-6.3 mA, Q n=2.17 mEq 52 25. Typical

  12. Differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids under microgravity conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerwinka Wolfgang H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To develop and characterize a novel cell culture method for the generation of undifferentiated and differentiated human mesenchymal stem cell 3D structures, we utilized the RWV system with a gelatin-based scaffold. 3 × 106 cells generated homogeneous spheroids and maximum spheroid loading was accomplished after 3 days of culture. Spheroids cultured in undifferentiated spheroids of 3 and 10 days retained expression of CD44, without expression of differentiation markers. Spheroids cultured in adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation media exhibited oil red O staining and von Kossa staining, respectively. Further characterization of osteogenic lineage, showed that 10 day spheroids exhibited stronger calcification than any other experimental group corresponding with significant expression of vitamin D receptor, alkaline phosphatase, and ERp60 . In conclusion this study describes a novel RWV culture method that allowed efficacious engineering of undifferentiated human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids and rapid osteogenic differentiation. The use of gelatin scaffolds holds promise to design implantable stem cell tissue of various sizes and shapes for future regenerative treatment.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Microstructure Formation and Forecast of Mechanical Properties for Spheroidal Graphite Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin ZHAO; Shuping HOU; Haipeng LI; Aiwen HU

    2003-01-01

    The numerical simulation can overcome the hardship of mathematical analysis and experimental research, explicate the mechanism of microstructure shaping, predict mechanical properties and operating life of castings and then optimize technology and control

  14. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  15. Are z>2 Herschel galaxies proto-spheroids?

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzi, F; Gruppioni, C; Granato, G L; Cresci, G; Silva, L; Pozzetti, L; Matteucci, F; Zamorani, G

    2015-01-01

    We present a backward approach for the interpretation of the evolution of the near-infrared and the far-infrared luminosity functions across the redshift range 02 can be explained as progenitors of local spheroids caught during their formation. We also test the effects of mass downsizing by dividing the spheroids into three populations of different present-day stellar masses. The results obtained in this case confirm the validity of our approach, i.e. that the bulk of proto-spheroids can be modelled by means of a single model which describes the evolution of galaxies at the break of the present-day early type K-band LF.

  16. Modeling a spheroidal microswimmer and cooperative swimming in thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Theers, Mario; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hydrodynamic model for a spheroidal microswimmer with two tangential surface velocity modes. This model is analytically solvable and reduces to Lighthill's and Blake's spherical squirmer model in the limit of equal major and minor semi-axes. Furthermore, we present an implementation of such a spheroidal squirmer by means of multiparticle collision dynamics simulations. We investigate its properties as well as the scattering of two spheroidal squirmers in a slit geometry. Thereby we find a stable fixed point, where two pullers swim cooperatively forming a wedge-like conformation with a small constant angle.

  17. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  18. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  19. Graphite technology development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-07-01

    This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

  20. Magnetic Field Emissions for Ferrite and Non-Ferrite Geometries for Wireless Power Transfer to Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar; Schaltz, Erik

    2014-01-01

    . For geometries without ferrite, these zones can be defined only on basis of distance from coils. The simulation results indicate that magnetic field profile in the surroundings is influenced for ferrite based geometries and the three zones tend to overlap. This overlapping is studied via Comsol simulations...... profile of magnetic field emissions (with and without ferrite) for wireless power transfer to vehicles....

  1. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon

    2017-01-01

    Delocalized π electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, π electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The π electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negative Curie temperature, field irreversibility, and slow relaxation. The overall results indicate that magnetic moments in graphite oxide slowly interact and develop magnetic frustration. PMID:28327606

  2. Sonochemical Synthesis of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha P. Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite being a hard magnetic material with high coercivity and moderate magnetization has found wide-spread applications. In this paper, we have reported the sonochemical synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles using metal acetate precursors. The ferrite synthesis occurs in three steps (hydrolysis of acetates, oxidation of hydroxides, and in situ microcalcination of metal oxides that are facilitated by physical and chemical effects of cavitation bubbles. The physical and magnetic properties of the ferrite nano-particles thus synthesized have been found to be comparable with those reported in the literature using other synthesis techniques.

  3. Biological synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anal K. Jha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost green and reproducible yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediated biosynthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at close to room temperature in the laboratory. X-ray, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles, as well as a very few aggregate having the size of 3-15 nm, were found. The vibrating sample magnetometer measurement showed superparamagnetic behavior in cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. The mechanism involved in the biosynthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has also been discussed.

  4. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohsen Kazeminezhad

    2012-06-01

    In this research, an algorithm based on the -state Potts model is presented for modeling the austenite to ferrite transformation. In the algorithm, it is possible to exactly track boundary migration of the phase formed during transformation. In the algorithm, effects of changes in chemical free energy, strain free energy and interfacial energies of austenite–austenite, ferrite–ferrite and austenite–ferrite during transformation are considered. From the algorithm, the kinetics of transformation and mean ferrite grain size for different cooling rates are calculated. It is found that there is a good agreement between the calculated and experimental results.

  5. Microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured nickel ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John Jacob; M Abdul Khadar; Anil Lonappan; K T Mathew

    2008-11-01

    Nickel ferrite is one of the important ferrites used in microwave devices. In the present work, we have synthesized nanoparticles of nickel ferrite using chemical precipitation technique. The crystal structure and grain size of the particles are studied using XRD. The microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured nickel ferrite samples of three different average grain sizes and those of two sintered samples were studied. The parameters like dielectric constant, dielectric loss and heating coefficient of the nanoparticles samples are studied in the frequency range from 2.4 to 4 GHz. The values of these parameters are compared with those of sintered pellets of the same samples. All these parameters show size dependent variations.

  6. Microwave Ferrites for Cryogenic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    G. Dionne

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in microwave ferrite device technology have seen the introduction of superconductivity that virtually eliminates insertion losses due to electrical conduction in microstrip circuits. The conventional ferrimagnetic spinel and garnet compositions, however, are not generally optimized for temperatures in the vicinity of 77 K and may require chemical redesign in order to realize the full potential of these devices. For microwave transmission, absorption losses may be reduced by a ...

  7. Progress in ferrite phase shifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, C. R., Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Advances in the technology of reciprocal ferrite phase shifters are outlined. Nonlatching rotary-field phase shifters have been produced with enhanced phase accuracy and modest control power. A significant quantity of dual-mode latching units has been built at 35 GHz, with good results. Both types of phase shifter can be adapted to perform other functions in addition to phase shifting. Examples of phase shifters that perform duplexing and polarization switching functions are given.

  8. Delivery of Human Adipose Stem Cells Spheroids into Lockyballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Frederico D. A. S.; Gruber, Peter; Stuart, Mellannie P.; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Brakke, Ken; Kasyanov, Vladimir; da Silva, Jorge V. L.; Granjeiro, José M.; Mironov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) spheroids show enhanced regenerative effects compared to single cells. Also, spheroids have been recently introduced as building blocks in directed self-assembly strategy. Recent efforts aim to improve long-term cell retention and integration by the use of microencapsulation delivery systems that can rapidly integrate in the implantation site. Interlockable solid synthetic microscaffolds, so called lockyballs, were recently designed with hooks and loops to enhance cell retention and integration at the implantation site as well as to support spheroids aggregation after transplantation. Here we present an efficient methodology for human ASCs spheroids biofabrication and lockyballs cellularization using micro-molded non-adhesive agarose hydrogel. Lockyballs were produced using two-photon polymerization with an estimated mechanical strength. The Young’s modulus was calculated at level 0.1362 +/-0.009 MPa. Interlocking in vitro test demonstrates high level of loading induced interlockability of fabricated lockyballs. Diameter measurements and elongation coefficient calculation revealed that human ASCs spheroids biofabricated in resections of micro-molded non-adhesive hydrogel had a more regular size distribution and shape than spheroids biofabricated in hanging drops. Cellularization of lockyballs using human ASCs spheroids did not alter the level of cells viability (p › 0,999) and gene fold expression for SOX-9 and RUNX2 (p › 0,195). The biofabrication of ASCs spheroids into lockyballs represents an innovative strategy in regenerative medicine, which combines solid scaffold-based and directed self-assembly approaches, fostering opportunities for rapid in situ biofabrication of 3D building-blocks. PMID:27829016

  9. Diversity of cell-mediated adhesions in breast cancer spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascu, Andrea; Kubbies, Manfred

    2007-12-01

    Due to their three dimensional (3D) architecture, multicellular tumor spheroids mimic avascular tumor areas comprising the establishment of diffusion gradients, reduced proliferation rates and increased drug resistance. We have shown recently that the spontaneous formation of spheroids is restricted to a limited number of cell lines whereas the majority grow only as aggregates of cells with loose cell-cell contacts when cultured in 3D. However, by the addition of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM, Matrigel), aggregates can be transformed into spheroids with diffusion barriers and development of quiescent therapy-resistant cells. In this report, we investigated adhesion molecules responsible for rBM-driven versus spontaneous spheroid formation in a diverse population of eight breast tumor cell lines relevant for in vitro and in vivo antitumor drug testing. Inhibition of spheroid formation was monitored in the presence of adhesion molecule functional blocking antibodies and after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of E- and N-cadherin and integrin beta1 adhesion receptors. We identified that E-cadherin mediates the spontaneous formation of spheroids in MCF7, BT-474, T-47D and MDA-MB-361 cells, whereas N-cadherin is responsible for tight packing of MDA-MB-435S cells. In contrast, the matrix protein-induced transformation of 3D aggregates into spheroids in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells is mediated primarily by the collagen I/integrin beta1 interaction with no cadherin involvement. A combination of both, homophilic E-cadherin and integrin beta1/collagen I interaction establishes spheroids in MDA-MB-468 cells. These findings indicate that an evolutionary diverse and complex pattern of interacting cell surface proteins exists in breast cancer cells that determines the 3D growth characteristic in vitro, thereby influencing small molecule or antibody permeation in preclinical in vitro and in vivo tumor models.

  10. New static spheroidal solution in Jordan-Brands-Dicke theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyrev, S M

    2010-01-01

    The static spheroidal solutions of Jordan-Brands-Dicke theory (JBD) are studied. We consider the effect of the anisotropic stresses of scalar field on the shape of JBD self-graviting objects. It is shown that scalar fields can have significant effect on the structure and properties of self-graviting objects. In contrast with general relativity in JBD theory there are nonflat static spheroidal solutions.

  11. Spin canting in ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J., E-mail: jmarx@physik.uni-kl.de; Huang, H.; Salih, K. S. M.; Thiel, W. R.; Schünemann, V. [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Recently, an easily scalable process for the production of small (3 −7 nm) monodisperse superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles MeFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (Me = Zn, Mn, Co) from iron metal and octanoic acid has been reported (Salih et al., Chem. Mater. 25 1430–1435 2013). Here we present a Mössbauer spectroscopic study of these ferrite nanoparticles in external magnetic fields of up to B = 5 T at liquid helium temperatures. Our analysis shows that all three systems show a comparable inversion degree and the cationic distribution for the tetrahedral A and the octahedral B sites has been determined to (Zn{sub 0.19}Fe{sub 0.81}){sup A}[Zn{sub 0.81}Fe{sub 1.19}] {sup B}O{sub 4}, (Mn{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 0.85}){sup A}[Mn{sub 0.85}Fe{sub 1.15}] {sup B}O{sub 4} and (Co{sub 0.27}Fe{sub 0.73}){sup A}[Co{sub 0.73}Fe{sub 1.27}] {sup B}O{sub 4}. Spin canting occurs presumably in the B-sites and spin canting angles of 33°, 51° and 59° have been determined for the zinc, the manganese, and the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  12. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Alan R.

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant Upsilon (also known as the "mass term'' of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant Upsilon. In the introductory Chapter 1, we present some preliminary background material to define and motivate the study of wave dark matter and describe some of the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In Chapter 2, we present several different ways of describing a spherically symmetric spacetime and the resulting metrics. We then focus our discussion on an especially useful form of the metric of a spherically symmetric spacetime in polar-areal coordinates and its properties. In particular, we show how the metric component functions chosen are extremely compatible with notions in Newtonian mechanics. We also show the monotonicity of the Hawking mass in these coordinates. Finally, we discuss how these coordinates and the metric can be used to solve the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. In Chapter 3, we explore spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, the defining equations of wave dark matter, where the scalar field is of the form f(t, r) = eiotF(r) for some constant o ∈ R and complex-valued function F(r). We show that the corresponding metric is static if and only if F( r) = h(r)eia for some constant alpha ∈ R and real-valued function h(r). We describe the

  13. Magnetically levitated mesenchymal stem cell spheroids cultured with a collagen gel maintain phenotype and quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Lewis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multicellular spheroids are an established system for three-dimensional cell culture. Spheroids are typically generated using hanging drop or non-adherent culture; however, an emerging technique is to use magnetic levitation. Herein, mesenchymal stem cell spheroids were generated using magnetic nanoparticles and subsequently cultured within a type I collagen gel, with a view towards developing a bone marrow niche environment. Cells were loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, and suspended beneath an external magnet, inducing self-assembly of multicellular spheroids. Cells in spheroids were viable and compared to corresponding monolayer controls, maintained stem cell phenotype and were quiescent. Interestingly, core spheroid necrosis was not observed, even with increasing spheroid size, in contrast to other commonly used spheroid systems. This mesenchymal stem cell spheroid culture presents a potential platform for modelling in vitro bone marrow stem cell niches, elucidating interactions between cells, as well as a useful model for drug delivery studies.

  14. Spheroidal galactic halos and mirror dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2004-01-01

    Mirror matter has been proposed as a dark matter candidate. It has several very attractive features, including automatic stability and darkness, the ability to mimic the broad features of cold dark matter while in the linear density perturbation regime, and consistency with all direct dark matter search experiments, both negative (e.g. CDMS II) and positive (DAMA). In this paper we consider an important unsolved problem: Are there plausible reasons to explain why most of the mirror matter in spiral galaxies exists in the form of gaseous {\\it spheroidal} galactic halos around ordinary matter {\\it disks}? We compute an order-of-magnitude estimate that the mirror photon luminosity of a typical spiral galaxy today is around $10^{44}$ erg/s. Interestingly, this rate of energy loss is similar to the power supplied by ordinary supernova explosions. We discuss circumstances under which supernova power can be used to heat the gaseous part of the mirror matter halo and hence prevent its collapse to a disk. The {\\it mac...

  15. Life and times of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Salvadori, S; Schneider, R

    2008-01-01

    We propose a cosmological scenario for the formation and evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), satellites of the Milky Way (MW). An improved version of the semi-analytical code GAMETE (GAlaxy Merger Tree & Evolution) is used to follow the dSphs evolution simultaneously with the MW formation, matching the observed properties of both. In this scenario dSph galaxies represent fossil objects virializing at z = 7.2 +/- 0.7 (i.e. in the pre-reionization era z > z_rei = 6) in the MW environment, which at that epoch has already been pre-enriched up to [Fe/H] ~ -3; their dynamical masses are in the narrow range M = (1.6 +/- 0.7) x 10^8 M_sun, although a larger spread might be introduced by a more refined treatment of reionization. Mechanical feedback effects are dramatic in such low-mass objects, causing the complete blow-away of the gas ~100 Myr after the formation epoch: 99% of the present-day stellar mass, M_* = (3 +/- 0.7) x 10^6 M_sun, forms during this evolutionary phase, i.e. their age is >13 Gyr....

  16. Testing modified gravity with dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Haghi, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light ($M_*/L$) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion ($\\sigma_{\\emph{los}}$) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the modified gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant $M_*/L$ ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters $ \\alpha $ and $ \\mu $ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey catalogue of galaxies. We find that the derived $M_*/L$ ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of ...

  17. Testing modified gravity with dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, Hosein; Amiri, Vahid

    2016-12-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light (M*/L) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σlos) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the modified gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant M*/L ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters α and μ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey catalogue of galaxies. We find that the derived M*/L ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of the dSph with reasonable M*/L values, we must vary α and μ on a case by case basis. A common pair of values cannot be found for all dSphs. Comparing with the values found from rotation curve fitting, it appears that μ correlates strongly with galaxy luminosity, shedding doubt on it as a universal constant.

  18. Ferrite Solutions for Electromagnetic Shock Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Phillip D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dudley, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Primm, Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop tools and test procedures for identifying ferrites suitable for use in shock line applications. Electromagnetic shocklines have been used to provide fast rising voltage pulses for many applications. In these applications a slow rising pulse is injected into the line where currents drive the ferrites into saturation leading to a fast rising output pulse. A shockline’s unique capabilities could be applied to new detonator configurations. A properly conditioned voltage pulse is critical for fire set applications. A carefully designed shockline could provide a passive solution to generating a fast rising voltage pulse for the fire set. Traditional circuits use ferrites operating in a linear regime. Shock lines push the ferrites well into the nonlinear regime where very few tools and data currently exist. Ferrite material is key to the operation of these shock lines, and tools for identifying suitable ferrites are critical. This report describes an experimental setup to that allows testing of ferrite samples and comparison to models with the goal of identifying optimal ferrites for shockline use.

  19. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  20. Microwave Measurements of Ferrite Polymer Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dosoudil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the microwave measurements performed on the nickel-zinc sintered ferrite with the chemical formula Ni0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 produced by the ceramic technique and composite materials based on this ferrite and a non-magnetic polymer (polyvinyl chloride matrix. The prepared composite samples had the same particle size distribution 0-250um but different ferrite particle concentrations between 23 vol% and 80 vol%. The apparatus for measurement of the signal proportional to the absolute value of scattering parameter S11 (reflexion coefficient is described and the dependence of measured reflected signal on a bias magnetic field has been studied. By means of experiments, the resonances to be connected with the geometry of microwave experimental set-up were distinguished from ferromagnetic resonance arising in ferrite particles of composite structure. The role of local interaction fields of ferrite particles in composite material has been discussed.

  1. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Oltolina

    Full Text Available A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM. We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol.

  2. Graphite/Epoxy Deicing Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Dillehay, Michael E.; Stahl, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Heat applied close to surface protected. One ply of highly electrically- and thermally-conductive brominated-graphite fiber composite laminated between two plies of electrically-insulating composite material, with michel foil making contact with end portions of graphite fibers. Part of foil exposed beyond composite to serve as electrical contact. Graphite/Epoxy composite heater developed to prevent and reverse formation of ice on advanced composite surfaces of aircraft.

  3. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  4. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Shiju; Das, C. R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  5. Practical Rhumb Line Calculations on the Spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G. G.

    About ten years ago this author wrote the software for a suite of navigation programmes which was resident in a small hand-held computer. In the course of this work it became apparent that the standard text books of navigation were perpetuating a flawed method of calculating rhumb lines on the Earth considered as an oblate spheroid. On further investigation it became apparent that these incorrect methods were being used in programming a number of calculator/computers and satellite navigation receivers. Although the discrepancies were not large, it was disquieting to compare the results of the same rhumb line calculations from a number of such devices and find variations of some miles when the output was given, and therefore purported to be accurate, to a tenth of a mile in distance and/or a tenth of a minute of arc in position. The problem has been highlighted in the past and the references at the end of this show that a number of methods have been proposed for the amelioration of this problem. This paper summarizes formulae that the author recommends should be used for accurate solutions. Most of these may be found in standard geodetic text books, such as, but also provided are new formulae and schemes of solution which are suitable for use with computers or tables. The latter also take into account situations when a near-indeterminate solution may arise. Some examples are provided in an appendix which demonstrate the methods. The data for these problems do not refer to actual terrestrial situations but have been selected for illustrative purposes only. Practising ships' navigators will find the methods described in detail in this paper to be directly applicable to their work and also they should find ready acceptance because they are similar to current practice. In none of the references cited at the end of this paper has the practical task of calculating, using either a computer or tabular techniques, been addressed.

  6. Photoluminescent carbon nanotubes interrogate the permeability of multicellular tumor spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Janki; Roxbury, Daniel; Paknejad, Navid; Heller, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have been extensively investigated for cancer drug delivery and imaging applications. Nanoparticles that show promise in two-dimensional cell culture systems often fail in more complex environments, possibly due to the lack of penetration in dense, three-dimensional structures. Multicellular tumor spheroids are an emerging model system to investigate interactions of nanoparticles with 3D in vitro cell culture environments. Using the intrinsic near-infrared emission of semiconducting carbon nanotubes to optically reconstruct their localization within a three-dimensional volume, we resolved the relative permeability of two different multicellular tumor spheroids. Nanotube photoluminescence revealed that nanotubes rapidly internalized into MCF-7 breast cancer cell-derived spheroids, whereas they exhibited little penetration into spheroids derived from SK-136, a cell line that we developed from murine liver cancer. Characterization of the spheroids by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry revealed large differences in the extracellular matrix and interstitial spacing, which correlated directly with nanotube penetration. This platform portends a new approach to characterize the permeability of living multicellular environments. PMID:26456974

  7. Flexible PVC flame retarded with expandable graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Focke, WW

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available by the polymer matrix and the exfoliating graphite prevents the formation of a flammable air fuel mixture. Keywords: Expandable graphite; graphite oxide; graphite intercalation compound; exfoliation; thermal analysis ________________ *Corresponding author: Tel... char residue [6] and this contributes to the mechanisms of flame retardant action [5]. Expandable graphite (EG) is a partially oxidized form of graphite containing intercalated guest species (e.g., sulfuric acid anions) in-between the stacked...

  8. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  9. Graphitic packing removal tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  10. Stokesian swimming of a prolate spheroid at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    The swimming of a spheroid immersed in a viscous fluid and performing surface deformations periodically in time is studied on the basis of Stokes equations of low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. The average over a period of time of the swimming velocity and the rate of dissipation are given by integral expressions of second order in the amplitude of surface deformations. The first order flow velocity and pressure, as functions of spheroidal coordinates, are expressed as sums of basic solutions of Stokes equations. Sets of superposition coefficients of these solutions which optimize the mean swimming speed for given power are derived from an eigenvalue problem. The maximum eigenvalue is a measure of the efficiency of the optimal stroke within the chosen class of motions. The maximum eigenvalue for sets of low order is found to be a strongly increasing function of the aspect ratio of the spheroid.

  11. The effect of gravitational tides on dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nichols, Matthew; Jablonka, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the local environment on the evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies is poorly understood. We have undertaken a suite of simulations to investigate the tidal impact of the Milky Way on the chemodynamical evolution of dwarf spheroidals that resemble present day classical dwarfs using the SPH code GEAR. After simulating the models through a large parameter space of potential orbits the resulting properties are compared with observations from both a dynamical point of view, but also from the, often neglected, chemical point of view. In general, we find that tidal effects quench the star formation even inside gas-endowed dwarfs. Such quenching, may produce the radial distribution of dwarf spheroidals from the orbits seen within large cosmological simulations. We also find that the metallicity gradient within a dwarf is gradually erased through tidal interactions as stellar orbits move to higher radii. The model dwarfs also shift to higher $\\langle$[Fe/H]$\\rangle$/L ratios, but only when losing $>$$20...

  12. Induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten and molybdenum powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The melting, evaporation and oxidation behaviors as well as the solidification phenomena of tungsten and molybdenum in induction plasma were studied. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology and the cross section of plasma-processed powders. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the oxides formed on the particle surface of these two metals. The influence of spray chamber pressure on the spheroidization and oxidation phenomena was discussed. The results show that fewer Mo particles than W particles are spheroidized at the same powder feed rate under the same plasma spray condition although molybdenum has a lower melting point. A small fraction of tungsten is evaporized and condensed either on the surface of tungsten particles nearby or on the wall of spray chamber. Tungsten oxides were found in tungsten powder processed under soft vacuum condition. Extremely large grains form inside some spheroidized particles of tungsten powder.

  13. Numerical Study of the Sedimentation of Spheroidal Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ardekani, Mehdi Niazi; Breugem, Wim-Paul; Brandt, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The gravity-driven motion of rigid particles in a viscous fluid is relevant in many natural and industrial processes, yet this has mainly been investigated for spherical particles. We therefore consider the sedimentation of non-spherical (spheroidal) isolated and particle pairs in a viscous fluid via numerical simulations using the Immersed Boundary Method. The simulations performed here show that the critical Galileo number for the onset of secondary motions decreases as the spheroid aspect ratio departs from 1. Above this critical threshold, oblate particles perform a zigzagging motion whereas prolate particles rotate around the vertical axis while having their broad side facing the falling direction. Instabilities of the vortices in the wake follow when farther increasing the Galileo number. We also study the drafting-kissing-tumbling associated with the settling of particle pairs. We find that the interaction time increases significantly for non-spherical particles and, more interestingly, spheroidal part...

  14. Centrifugal force induced by relativistically rotating spheroids and cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Joseph; Bicak, Jiri; 10.1088/0264-9381/28/6/065004

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the gravitational potential of a Newtonian spheroidal shell we discuss electrically charged rotating prolate spheroidal shells in the Maxwell theory. In particular we consider two confocal charged shells which rotate oppositely in such a way that there is no magnetic field outside the outer shell. In the Einstein theory we solve the Ernst equations in the region where the long prolate spheroids are almost cylindrical; in equatorial regions the exact Lewis "rotating cylindrical" solution is so derived by a limiting procedure from a spatially bound system. In the second part we analyze two cylindrical shells rotating in opposite directions in such a way that the static Levi-Civita metric is produced outside and no angular momentum flux escapes to infinity. The rotation of the local inertial frames in flat space inside the inner cylinder is thus exhibited without any approximation or interpretational difficulties within this model. A test particle within the inner cylinder kept at rest with respect...

  15. Monoenergetic electron parameters in a spheroid bubble model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Sattarian; Sh.Rahmatallahpur; T.Tohidi

    2013-01-01

    A reliable analytical expression for the potential of plasma waves with phase velocities near the speed of light is derived.The presented spheroid cavity model is more consistent than the previous spherical and ellipsoidal models and it explains the mono-energetic electron trajectory more accurately,especially at the relativistic region.The maximum energy of electrons is calculated and it is shown that the maximum energy of the spheroid model is less than that of the spherical model.The electron energy spectrum is also calculated and it is found that the energy distribution ratio of electrons △E/E for the spheroid model under the conditions reported here is half that of the spherical model and it is in good agreement with the experimental value in the same conditions.As a result,the quasi-mono-energetic electron output beam interacting with the laser plasma can be more appropriately described with this model.

  16. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Basheer, Haneen A.; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D.; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC–19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC–19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  18. Fusion of uniluminal vascular spheroids: a model for assembly of blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul A; Argraves, W Scott; Gentile, Carmine; Neagu, Adrian; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J

    2010-02-01

    We evaluated the self-assembly properties of uniluminal vascular spheroids having outer layers of vascular smooth muscle cells and a contiguous inner layer of endothelial cells lining a central lumen. We showed that while pairs of uniluminal vascular spheroids suspended in culture medium fused to form a larger diameter spheroidal structure, spheroids in collagen hydrogels formed elongated structures. These findings highlight the potential use of uniluminal vascular spheroids as modules to engineer blood vessels. We also demonstrate that uniluminal vascular spheroid fusion conforms to models describing the coalescence of liquid drops. Furthermore, the fusion of uniluminal vascular spheroids in vitro closely resembled the in vivo process by which the descending aorta forms from the fusion of the paired dorsal aortae during embryonic development. Together, the findings indicate that tissue liquidity underlies uniluminal vascular spheroid fusion and that in vivo anastomosis of blood vessels may involve a similar mechanism.

  19. Graphite intercalation compounds and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Endo, Morinobu

    2003-01-01

    1. Introduction. 2. Synthesis and Intercalation Chemistry. 3. Structures and Phase Transitions. 4. Lattice Dynamics. 5. Electronic Structures. 6. Electron Transport Properties. 7. Magnetic Properties. 8. Surface Properties and Gas Adsorption. 9. GICs and Batteries. 10. Highly Conductive Graphite Fibers. 11. Exfoliated Graphite Formed by Intercalation. 12. Intercalated Fullerenes and Carbon Nanotubes. Index

  20. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R. [Francis Bitter Magnet Lab., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  1. Tailoring magnetic and dielectric properties of rubber ferrite composites containing mixed ferrites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Anantharaman; K A Malini; S Sindhu; E M Mohammed; S K Date; S D Kulkarni; P A Joy; Philip Kurian

    2001-12-01

    Rubber ferrite composites containing various mixed ferrites were prepared for different compositions and various loadings. The magnetic and dielectric properties of the fillers as well as the ferrite filled matrixes were evaluated separately. The results are correlated. Simple equations are proposed to predetermine the magnetic and dielectric properties. The validity of these equations is verified and they are found to be in good agreement. These equations are useful in tailoring the magnetic and dielectric properties of these composites with predetermined properties.

  2. Spinel ferrite thin-film synthesis by spin-spray ferrite plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai, Tran Hoang; Van, Ha Thi Bich; Phong, Tran Canh; Abe, Masanori

    2003-04-01

    By spin-spray ferrite plating with optimizing conditions in the oxidizing and reaction solutions, we can synthesize polycrystalline ferrite film of spinel type (Fe, M){sub 3}O{sub 4}, where M=Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, etc., in low temperatures (<100 deg. C). By this method we can synthesize Co, Co-Ni ferrite for perpendicular magnetic recording media with high coercivity H{sub c} in the plane perpendicular to the film.

  3. Long term project in ASDEX upgrade: Implementation of ferritic steel as in vessel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zammuto, I., E-mail: irene.zammuto@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Giannone, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Houben, A. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    A long term project is started at the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak aimed at the exploration of the compatibility of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFM) with fusion devices. The topic is oriented toward the preparation of future experiments such as ITER with its test blanket modules and DEMO with its first wall designed with RAFM. The goal of the project is to gather experience with ferromagnetic materials inside the vacuum vessel, dealing with magnetic perturbations, both in plasma and magnetic probes, and facing up the additional magnetic forces acting on the supporting structures. The project envisages a stepwise replacement of the traditional graphite tiles with ferritic steel. For the time being, the main AUG actor is the inner heat shield (IHS), but further development can be imagined in the future. Since 2013, two of the 15 tile rows of the IHS have been replaced with ferritic steel and since now the experimental campaign has not suffered any particular problem related to the perturbation field induced by the steel tiles, as predicted by the calculation. In the present paper, the preliminary study accomplished for the first phase for the evaluation of the forces and magnetic perturbation is reported, together with the further calculations required for the extension of the steel wall.

  4. Structural analysis of emerging ferrite: Doped nickel zinc ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajinder; Kumar, Hitanshu; Singh, Ragini Raj; Barman, P. B., E-mail: pb.barman@juit.ac.in [Nanotechnology Lab, Department of Physics & Materials Science, Jaypee University of Information Technology, Waknaghat, Solan (H.P)-173234 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Ni{sub 0.6-x}Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.033, 0.264) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and annealed at 900°C. Structural properties of all prepared samples were examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The partial formation of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) secondary phase with spinel phase cubic structure of undoped and cobalt doped nickel zinc ferrite was found by XRD peaks. The variation in crystallite size and other structural parameters with cobalt doping has been calculated for most prominent peak (113) of XRD and has been explained on the basis of cations ionic radii difference.

  5. Damage Analysis of a Ferritic SiMo Ductile Cast Iron Submitted to Tension and Compression Loadings in Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Hervas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tensile and compression tests were carried out on a ductile cast iron for temperatures up to 1073 K. The damage caused inside and around graphite nodules was evaluated as a function of the local equivalent plastic strain by using microstructural quantifications. The mechanical properties are strongly dependent on a temperature above 773 K. Concerning tensile behavior, an evolutional law issued from the Gurson model representing the void growth as a function of the deformation and temperature was successfully employed. It is demonstrated that the strain state and the temperature have a strong influence on the void growth function. In the case of compression tests, the temperature has a weak influence on the nodule deformation for temperatures lower than 773 K, and the mechanical behavior is driven by the viscoplastic properties of the ferrite. For higher temperatures, the mechanical properties in compression are progressively modified, since graphite nodules tend to remain spherical, and ferrite grains are severely deformed. A synthesis of the damage mechanisms is proposed in the studied range of temperature and plastic strain. It appears that the graphite nodule aspect ratio can be used as an indicator of the deformation under compression loading for temperatures ranging from room temperature to 673 K.

  6. Manganese ferrite thin films Part II: Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, W.S.

    1972-01-01

    Some properties of evaporated manganese ferrite thin films are investigated, e.g. resistivity, magnetization reversal, Curie temperature, Faraday rotation and optical absorption. The properties are partly related to the partial oxygen pressure present during a preceding annealing process.

  7. ALL-FERRITE RHIC INJECTION KICKER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAHN,H.; FISCHER,W.; PTITSYN,V.I.; TUOZZOLO,J.E.

    2001-06-18

    Ion beams are transferred from the AGS into RHIC in boxcar fashion as single bunches. The nominal design assumes 60 bunches per ring but increasing the number of bunches to gain luminosity is possible, thereby requiring injection kickers with a shorter rise time. The original injection system consists of traveling-wave dielectric loaded kicker magnets and a Blumlein pulser with a rise time adequate for the present operation. Voltage breakdown in the dielectric kickers suggested the use of all-ferrite magnets. In order to minimize the conversion cost, the design of the all-ferrite kicker uses the same components as the dielectric loaded units. The all-ferrite kickers showed in bench measured good breakdown properties and a current rise time of < 50 ns. A prototype kicker has been installed in the blue ring and was tested with beam. Beam measurements indicate suitability of all-ferrite kicker magnets for upgraded operation.

  8. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  9. Ferrite Nanoparticles in Pharmacological Modulation of Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Aparna; Radha, S.; Khan, Y.; Tilak, Priya

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in the targeted drug delivery of pharmacological agents : angiogenesis being one such novel application which involves formation of new blood vessels or branching of existing ones. The present study involves the use of ferrite nanoparticles for precise therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis. The ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts by a suitable base, were found to be 10-20 nm from X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. The magnetization measurements showed superparamagnetic behavior of the uncoated nanoparticles. These ferrite nanoparticles were found to be bio-compatible with lymphocytes and neural cell lines from the biochemical assays. The chick chorioallantoic membrane(CAM) from the shell of fertile white Leghorn eggs was chosen as a model to study angiogenic activity. An enhancement in the angiogenic activity in the CAM due to addition of uncoated ferrite nanoparticles was observed.

  10. Development and application of ferrite materials for low temperature co-fired ceramic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huai-Wu; Li, Jie; Su, Hua; Zhou, Ting-Chuan; Long, Yang; Zheng, Zong-Liang

    2013-11-01

    Development and application of ferrite materials for low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology are discussed, specifically addressing several typical ferrite materials such as M-type barium ferrite, NiCuZn ferrite, YIG ferrite, and lithium ferrite. In order to permit co-firing with a silver internal electrode in LTCC process, the sintering temperature of ferrite materials should be less than 950 °C. These ferrite materials are research focuses and are applied in many ways in electronics.

  11. The Birth of Open Separation on a Prolate Spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Vollmers (1983), and Costis, Polen , Hoang and Telionis (1988), will agree in detail with the solu- tions of the model problem but the latter allows the...7, pp. 435-454. Costis, C.E., Polen , D.M. Hoang, N.T. and Telionis, D.P. 1988 Laminar Separating Flow Over a Prolate Spheroid. To be published in J

  12. Sulphur, zinc and carbon in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skúladóttir, Ása

    2016-01-01

    The Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is a Milky Way satellite with predominantly old stellar population, and therefore the ideal target to study early chemical evolution. The chemical abundances of photospheres of stars reveal the composition of their birth environment; studying stars of different a

  13. Building blocks of the Milky Way's accreted spheroid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oirschot, Pim; Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    In the $\\Lambda$CDM model of structure formation, a stellar spheroid grows by the assembly of smaller galaxies, the so-called building blocks. Combining the Munich-Groningen semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with the high resolution Aquarius simulations of dark matter haloes, we study the

  14. Axisymmetric acoustic scattering from submerged prolate spheroidal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Jeffrey E.; Hayek, Sabih I.

    2005-09-01

    The equations of motion for nonaxisymmetric vibration of prolate spheroidal shells of constant thickness were derived using Hamilton's principle [S. I. Hayek and J. E. Boisvert, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2799-2811 (2003)]. The shell theory used in this derivation includes shear deformations and rotatory inertias. The shell displacements and rotations were expanded in infinite series of comparison functions. These include associated Legendre functions in terms of the prolate spheroidal angular coordinate and circular functions in the azimuthal angle coordinate. The shell is insonified by a plane wave incident along the major axis. The external (heavy) fluid loading impedance was computed using an eigenfunction expansion of prolate spheroidal wavefunctions. Far-field scattered acoustic pressure spectra are presented for several shell thickness-to-half-length ratios ranging from 0.005 to 0.1, and for various shape parameters, a, ranging from an elongated spheroidal shell (a=1.01) to a spherical shell (a~100). The far-field directivity of acoustic scattering is presented at selected frequencies. [Work supported by the ONR/ASEE Summer Faculty Research Program.

  15. Analytical Equation for Estimating Terminal Velocities of Spheroidal Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2007-06-01

    An analytical method for estimating the terminal velocities of spheroidal particles in a fluid medium has been derived form a graphical approach proposed by Haider and Levenspiel. Using an analytical equation enables the researcher to calculate the terminal velocities without resorting to graphical interpolations, thereby reducing errors and enabling terminal velocities to be estimated in automated calculations.

  16. The mass content of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M.; Andersen, J; BlandHawthorn, J; Nordstrom, B

    2009-01-01

    We present a new determination of the mass content of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on a novel approach which takes into account the two distinct stellar populations present in this galaxy. This method helps to partially break the well-known mass-anisotropy degeneracy present in the mo

  17. Building blocks of the Milky Way's accreted spheroid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oirschot, Pim; Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    In the $\\Lambda$CDM model of structure formation, a stellar spheroid grows by the assembly of smaller galaxies, the so-called building blocks. Combining the Munich-Groningen semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with the high resolution Aquarius simulations of dark matter haloes, we study the as

  18. Estimation of scattering from a moist rough surface with spheroidal dust particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2009-08-01

    The scattering from moisture rough surface with spheroidal dust particles having surface with spheroidal dust particles has recently received much attention. In part due to the recent prediction and observation of the spheroidal dust particles in rough surfaces under elastic wave by the Kirchhoff scattering model and scalar approximation with slope. Our analysis shows that the scattering depends on the moisture (2–4.5%) with spheroidal dust particles. At slightly moisture rough surface the dielectric properties increase with change in field amplitude in a rough surface with spheroidal dust particles.

  19. Mechanism of the Forming of Nodular Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a theory about the growth mechanism of bubble-screw dislocation of nodular graphite. Normally speaking, the crystallizing procedure of most nodular graphite is as follows: firstly, graphite generates nuclei on bubbles and fills them (mainly in the way of screw dislocation) forming the complete nuclei of nodular graphite-graphite bubble nuclei. Then, graphite grows up in the way of screw dislocation. Two important conditions concerning the production of nodular graphite are: (a) there is a relatively big interfacial energy between ferro liquid and graphite, and the one between ferro liquid and graphite prismatic plane is bigger than that between ferro liquid and graphite basal plane; (b) there are a certain amount of micro-bubbles in the melt.

  20. Automated, Multiplexed Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy Platform for Continuous Monitoring of Microtissue Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgel, Sebastian C; Diener, Laurin; Frey, Olivier; Kim, Jin-Young; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2016-11-15

    Microtissue spheroids in microfluidic devices are increasingly used to establish novel in vitro organ models of the human body. As the spheroids are comparably sizable, it is difficult to monitor larger numbers of them by optical means. Therefore, electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) emerges as a viable alternative to probing spheroid properties. Current spheroid EIS systems are, however, not suitable for investigating multiple spheroids in parallel over extended time in an automated fashion. Here we address this issue by presenting an automated, multiplexed EIS (AMEIS) platform for impedance analysis in a microfluidic setting. The system was used to continuously monitor the effect of the anticancer drug fluorouracil (5-FU) on HCT116 cancer spheroids. Simultaneous EIS monitoring of up to 15 spheroids was performed in parallel over 4 days at a temporal resolution of 2 min without any need for pumps. The measurements were continuous in nature, and the setup was kept in a standard incubator under controlled conditions during the measurements. A baseline normalization method to improve robustness and to reduce the influence of slow changes in the medium conductivity on the spheroid EIS readings has been developed and validated by experiments and means of a finite-element model. The same method and platform was then used for online monitoring of cardiac spheroids. The beating frequency of each cardiac spheroid could be read out in a completely automated fashion. The developed system constitutes a promising method for simultaneously evaluating drug impact and/or toxic effects on multiple microtissue spheroids.

  1. Reproducibility of Uniform Spheroid Formation in 384-Well Plates: The Effect of Medium Evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Viswanath; Fürst, Tomáš; Gurská, Soňa; Džubák, Petr; Hajdúch, Marián

    2016-10-01

    Spheroid cultures of cancer cells reproduce the spatial dimension-induced in vivo tumor traits more effectively than the conventional two-dimensional cell cultures. With growing interest in spheroids for high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, there is an increasing demand for cost-effective miniaturization of reproducible spheroids in microtiter plates (MPs). However, well-to-well variability in spheroid size, shape, and growth is a frequently encountered problem with almost every culture method that has prevented the transfer of spheroids to the HTS platform. This variability partly arises due to increased susceptibility of MPs to edge effects and evaporation-induced changes in the growth of spheroids. In this study, we examined the effect of evaporation on the reproducibility of spheroids of tumor and nontumor cell lines in 384-well plates, and show that culture conditions that prevent evaporation-induced medium loss result in the formation of uniform spheroids across the plate. Additionally, we also present a few technical improvements to increase the scalability of the liquid-overlay spheroid culturing technique in MPs, together with a simple software routine for the quantification of spheroid size. We believe that these cost-effective improvements will aid in further improvement of spheroid cultures for HTS drug discovery.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of carbon-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Hamed; Shokuhfar, Ali; Vahdati, Nima

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CFNPs) were prepared via a reverse micelle method. The CFNPs were subsequently coated with carbon shells by means of thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). In this process, acetylene gas (C2H2) was used as a carbon source and the coating was carried out for 1, 2, or 3 h at 750°C. The Ar/C2H2 ratio was 10:1. Heating during the TCVD process resulted in a NP core size that approached 30 nm; the thickness of the shell was less than 10 nm. The composition, structure, and morphology of the fabricated composites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and selected-area diffraction. A vibrating sample magnetometer was used to survey the samples' magnetic properties. The deposited carbon shell substantially affected the growth and magnetic properties of the CFNPs. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the carbon coating and revealed that the deposited carbon comprised graphite, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and diamond- like carbon. With an increase in coating time, the intensity ratio between the amorphous and ordered peaks in the Raman spectra decreased, which indicated an increase in crystallite size.

  3. Intercalated hybrid graphite fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is directed to a highly conductive lightweight hybrid material and methods of producing the same. The hybrid composite is obtained by weaving strands of a high strength carbon or graphite fiber into a fabric-like structure, depositing a layer of carbon onto the structure, heat treating the structure to graphitize the carbon layer, and intercalating the graphitic carbon layer structure. A laminate composite material useful for protection against lightning strikes comprises at least one layer of the hybrid material over at least one layer of high strength carbon or graphite fibers. The composite material of the present invention is compatible with matrix compounds, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which is the same as underlying fiber layers, and is resistant to galvanic corrosion in addition to being highly conductive. These materials are useful in the aerospace industry, in particular as lightning strike protection for airplanes.

  4. Titanium Carbide-Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-08

    titanium carbide , titanium carbide with free graphite, titanium carbide /vanadium carbide alloy with free graphite, and titanium carbide with...from melts. The test pins were drawn across hot pressed titanium carbide wear plates with 5 newtons of normal force. The lowest friction coefficient at...22 C was 0.12 obtained with pure titanium carbide . The lowest friction coefficient at 900 C was 0.19 obtained with titanium carbide with boron and

  5. Nanodisperse Nickel Ferrite: Methods of Production, Structure and Magnetic Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    N Zaporina; J Grabis; M Maiorov; A Krumina; G Heidemane; D Bocharov

    2012-01-01

      Nanodisperse Nickel Ferrite: Methods of Production, Structure and Magnetic Properties The nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared using combustion synthesis and plasma chemical synthesis based on evaporation of coarse-grained...

  6. Effects of temperature on internal friction of Graphit-iC graphite-like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-yong; Shi, Wen; Wan, Zi; Yuan, Jun-feng; Li, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    Graphit-iC graphite-like carbon coatings were deposited on SDC90 cold work die steel by using an unbalanced magnetron sputtering technology. Effects of the temperature on microstructure and internal friction of the carbon coatings were characterized by Raman spectroscopy (Raman) and a low-frequency mechanical analyzer (LMA-1) testing system. The results indicate that the internal friction of the two-side deposited carbon coatings is small (2.17×10-4), being higher than one of the substrate (1.63×10-4), and increases with temperature. However, there is an internal friction peak at 250°C accompanied with partial sp3 transferred to sp2 and increasing the intensity ratio ID/IG. There is gradual graphitization tendency of the carbon coatings as temperatures increase from 25°C to 350 °C. This would be progressive transformation from amorphous to crystalline.

  7. Binding and interstitial penetration of liposomes within avascular tumor spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostarelos, Kostas; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Papakostas, Alexandros; Yang, Wei-Hong; Ballangrud, Ase; Sgouros, George

    2004-11-20

    The liposomal delivery of cancer therapeutics, including gene therapy vectors, is an area of intense study. Poor penetration of liposomes into interstitial tumor spaces remains a problem, however. In this work, the penetration of different liposomal formulations into prostate carcinoma spheroids was examined. Spheroid penetration was assessed by confocal microscopy of fluorescently labeled liposomes. The impact of liposomal surface charge, mean diameter, lipid bilayer fluidity and fusogenicity on spheroid penetration was examined. A variety of different liposome systems relevant to clinical or preclinical protocols have been studied, including classical zwitterionic (DMPC:chol) and sterically stabilized liposomes (DMPC:chol:DOPE-PEG2000), both used clinically, and cationic liposomes (DMPC:DOPE:DC-chol and DOTAP), forming the basis of the vast majority of nonviral gene transfer vectors tested in various cancer trials. Surface interactions between strongly cationic vesicles and the tumor cells led to an electrostatically derived binding-site barrier effect, inhibiting further association of the delivery systems with the tumor spheroids (DMPC:DC-chol). However, inclusion of the fusogenic lipid DOPE and use of a cationic lipid of lower surface charge density (DOTAP instead of DC-chol) led to improvements in the observed intratumoral distribution characteristics. Sterically stabilized liposomes did not interact with the tumor spheroids, whereas small unilamellar classical liposomes exhibit extensive distribution deeper into the tumor volume. Engineering liposomal delivery systems with a relatively low charge molar ratio and enhanced fusogenicity, or electrostatically neutral liposomes with fluid bilayers, offered enhanced intratumoral penetration. This study shows that a delicate balance exists between the strong affinity of delivery systems for the tumor cells and the efficient penetration and distribution within the tumor mass, similar to previous work studying

  8. Measuring Permeability and Q-factor of Ferrite Toroids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuZhe; WangChunxiao; ZhangWenzhi

    2003-01-01

    In the process of design RF cavity of CSRe, we use ferrite as the loading material of cavity. The characteristic of ferrite directly affects whether the cavity can obtain the target designed, so the measurement of ferrite material appears most important obviously.

  9. Characteristics of Strain-Induced Ferrite in Low Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-juan; LIU Cui-qin; WANG Guo-dong; LIU Xiang-hua

    2003-01-01

    The strain-induced ferrite formed under different conditions was observed with SEM and optical microscope. The nucleation sites of strain-induced ferrite include grain boundary, grain inside, deformed band and annealing twin boundary. The shapes of the ferrite accordingly are equiaxed irregular polygonal, strip-shaped and acicular.

  10. Synthesis of ferrite and nickel ferrite nanoparticles using radio-frequency thermal plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S.; Taheri, M.; Carpenter, E.; Harris, V. G.; McHenry, M. E.

    2002-05-01

    Nanocrystalline (NC) ferrite powders have been synthesized using a 50 kW-3 MHz rf thermal plasma torch for high-frequency soft magnet applications. A mixed powder of Ni and Fe (Ni:Fe=1:2), a NiFe permalloy powder with additional Fe powder (Ni:Fe=1:2), and a NiFe permalloy powder (Ni:Fe=1:1) were used as precursors for synthesis. Airflow into the reactor chamber was the source of oxygen for oxide formation. XRD patterns clearly show that the precursor powders were transformed into NC ferrite particles with an average particle size of 20-30 nm. SEM and TEM studies indicated that NC ferrite particles had well-defined polygonal growth forms with some exhibiting (111) faceting and many with truncated octahedral and truncated cubic shapes. The Ni content in the ferrite particles was observed to increase in going from mixed Ni and Fe to mixed permalloy and iron and finally to only permalloy starting precursor. The plasma-torch synthesized ferrite materials using exclusively the NiFe permalloy precursor had 40%-48% Ni content in the Ni-ferrite particle, differing from the NiFe2O4 ideal stoichiometry. EXAFS was used to probe the cation coordination in low Ni magnetite species. The coercivity and Neel temperature of the high Ni content ferrite sample were 58 Oe and ˜590 °C, respectively.

  11. Tethered spheroids as an in vitro hepatocyte model for drug safety screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lei; Sakban, Rashidah Binte; Qu, Yinghua; Hong, Xin; Zhang, Wenxia; Nugraha, Bramasta; Tong, Wen Hao; Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Zheng, Baixue; Chau, Ian Yin-Yan; Jia, Ruirui; McMillian, Michael; Silva, Jose; Dallas, Shannon; Yu, Hanry

    2012-03-01

    Hepatocyte spheroids mimic many in vivo liver-tissue phenotypes but increase in size during extended culture which limits their application in drug testing applications. We have developed an improved hepatocyte 3D spheroid model, namely tethered spheroids, on RGD and galactose-conjugated membranes using an optimized hybrid ratio of the two bioactive ligands. Cells in the spheroid configuration maintained 3D morphology and uncompromised differentiated hepatocyte functions (urea and albumin production), while the spheroid bottom was firmly tethered to the substratum maintaining the spheroid size in multi-well plates. The oblate shape of the tethered spheroids, with an average height of 32 μm, ensured efficient nutrient, oxygen and drug access to all the cells within the spheroid structure. Cytochrome P450 induction by prototypical inducers was demonstrated in the tethered spheroids and was comparable or better than that observed with hepatocyte sandwich cultures. These data suggested that tethered 3D hepatocyte spheroids may be an excellent alternative to 2D hepatocyte culture models for drug safety applications.

  12. Mass transfer inside oblate spheroidal solids: modelling and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. F. Carmo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical solution of the unsteady diffusion equation describing mass transfer inside oblate spheroids, considering a constant diffusion coefficient and the convective boundary condition, is presented. The diffusion equation written in the oblate spheroidal coordinate system was used for a two-dimensional case. The finite-volume method was employed to discretize the basic equation. The linear equation set was solved iteratively using the Gauss-Seidel method. As applications, the effects of the Fourier number, the Biot number and the aspect ratio of the body on the drying rate and moisture content during the process are presented. To validate the methodology, results obtained in this work are compared with analytical results of the moisture content encountered in the literature and good agreement was obtained. The results show that the model is consistent and it may be used to solve cases such as those that include disks and spheres and/or those with variable properties with small modifications.

  13. A method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics using spheroidal kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Benz, Willy; Davies, Melvyn B.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) designed to model systems dominated by deformation along a preferential axis. These systems cause severe problems for SPH codes using spherical kernels, which are best suited for modeling systems which retain rough spherical symmetry. Our method allows the smoothing length in the direction of the deformation to evolve independently of the smoothing length in the perpendicular plane, resulting in a kernel with a spheroidal shape. As a result the spatial resolution in the direction of deformation is significantly improved. As a test case we present the one-dimensional homologous collapse of a zero-temperature, uniform-density cloud, which serves to demonstrate the advantages of spheroidal kernels. We also present new results on the problem of the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

  14. Plasma spheroidization of nickel powders in a plasma reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Shanmugavelayutham; V Selvarajan

    2004-10-01

    Thermal spray coatings of surfaces with metal, alloy and ceramic materials for protection against corrosion, erosion and wear is an intense field of research. The technique involves injection of the powder into a plasma flame, melting, acceleration of the powder particles, impact and bonding with the substrate. Feedstock powders of metals, alloys and ceramics for thermal spray applications have to meet several requirements. Particle shape, size and its distribution, powder flow characteristics and density are the important factors to be considered in order to ensure high spray efficiency and better coating properties. For smooth and uniform feeding of powders into plasma jet, the powder particles have to be spherical in shape. High temperatures and steep temperatures present in thermal plasma is exploited to spheroidize particles in the present investigation. Nickel powder particles in the size range from 40–100 m were spheroidized using plasma processing. SEM and optical micrographs showed spherical shape of processed particles.

  15. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We constrain the parameters of a self-interacting massive dark matter scalar particle in a condensate using the kinematics of the eight brightest dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way. For the case of an attractive self-interaction the condensate develops a mass density profile with a characteristic scale radius that is closely related to the fundamental parameters of the theory. We find that the velocity dispersion of dwarf spheroidal galaxies suggests a scale radius of the order of 1 kpc, in tension with previous results found using the rotational curve of low-surface-brightness and dwarf galaxies. We discuss the implications of our findings for the particle dark matter model and argue that a single classical coherent state cannot play, in general, a relevant role for the description of dark matter in galaxies.

  16. A VIRIAL CORE IN THE SCULPTOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnello, A.; Evans, N. W., E-mail: aagnello@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: nwe@ast.cam.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    The projected virial theorem is applied to the case of multiple stellar populations in the nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies. As each population must reside in the same gravitational potential, this provides strong constraints on the nature of the dark matter halo. We derive necessary conditions for two populations with Plummer or exponential surface brightnesses to reside in a cusped Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo. We apply our methods to the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal, and show that there is no NFW halo compatible with the energetics of the two populations. The dark halo must possess a core radius of {approx}120 pc for the virial solutions for the two populations to be consistent. This conclusion remains true, even if the effects of flattening or self-gravity of the stellar populations are included.

  17. Ferrite LTCC based phased array antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.

    2016-11-02

    Two phased array antennas realized in multilayer ferrite LTCC technology are presented in this paper. The use of embedded bias windings in these designs allows the negation of external magnets which are conventionally employed with bulk ferrite medium. This reduces the required magnetostatic field strength by 90% as compared to the traditional designs. The phase shifters are implemented using the SIW technology. One of the designs is operated in the half mode waveguide topology while the other design is based on standard full mode waveguide operation. The two phase shifter designs are integrated with two element patch antenna array and slotted SIW array respectively. The array designs demonstrate a beam steering of 30° and ±19° respectively for a current excitation of 200 mA. The designs, due to their small factor can be easily integrated in modern communication systems which is not possible in the case of bulk ferrite based designs.

  18. Dual-mode latching ferrite devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, Z.

    1986-05-01

    A primary consideration with microwave ferrite control devices is related to the switching speed. In order to achieve fast switching with the considered devices, an operation in the latching mode is required. A description is given of a new class of ferrite latching devices, taking into account latching quadrupole devices and their modifications. It is pointed out that the advantages of the new devices include fast switching, high electrical performance, and simple construction. According to the utilization of external or internal magnetic return paths, there are two modes of operation in latching ferrite devices. Attention is given to constructions and calculations, the design of a model for each of the two modes of operation, polarization insensitive phase shifters (PIPS) with external magnetic return paths, and PIPS with internal magnetic return paths.

  19. Scaffold-free Prevascularized Microtissue Spheroids for Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayaka, W L; Zhu, L; Hargreaves, K M; Jin, L; Zhang, C

    2014-12-01

    Creating an optimal microenvironment that mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural pulp and securing an adequate blood supply for the survival of cell transplants are major hurdles that need to be overcome in dental pulp regeneration. However, many currently available scaffolds fail to mimic essential functions of natural ECM. The present study investigated a novel approach involving the use of scaffold-free microtissue spheroids of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) prevascularized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in pulp regeneration. In vitro-fabricated microtissue spheroids were inserted into the canal space of tooth-root slices and were implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Histological examination revealed that, after four-week implantation, tooth-root slices containing microtissue spheroids resulted in well-vascularized and cellular pulp-like tissues, compared with empty tooth-root slices, which were filled with only subcutaneous fat tissue. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that the tissue found in the tooth-root slices was of human origin, as characterized by the expression of human mitochondria, and contained odontoblast-like cells organized along the dentin, as assessed by immunostaining for nestin and dentin sialoprotein (DSP). Vascular structures formed by HUVECs in vitro were successfully anastomosed with the host vasculature upon transplantation in vivo, as shown by immunostaining for human CD31. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that prevascularized, scaffold-free, microtissue spheroids can successfully regenerate vascular dental pulp-like tissue and also highlight the significance of the microtissue microenvironment as an optimal environment for successful pulp-regeneration strategies. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  20. Micromagnetic simulations of spinel ferrite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Christine C., E-mail: ccdantas@iae.cta.b [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil); Gama, Adriana M., E-mail: adriana-gama@uol.com.b [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents the results of simulations of the magnetization field ac response (at 2-12 GHz) of various submicron ferrite particles (cylindrical dots). The ferrites in the present simulations have the spinel structure, expressed here by M{sub 1}-{sub n}Zn{sub n}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (where M stands for a divalent metal), and the parameters chosen were the following: (a) for n=0: M={l_brace}Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Mg, Cu {r_brace}; (b) for n=0.1: M = {l_brace}Fe, Mg{r_brace} (mixed ferrites). These runs represent full 3D micromagnetic (one-particle) ferrite simulations. We find evidences of confined spin waves in all simulations, as well as a complex behavior nearby the main resonance peak in the case of the M = {l_brace}Mg, Cu{r_brace} ferrites. A comparison of the n=0 and n=0.1 cases for fixed M reveals a significant change in the spectra in M = Mg ferrites, but only a minor change in the M=Fe case. An additional larger scale simulation of a 3 by 3 particle array was performed using similar conditions of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite; n=0, M = Fe) one-particle simulation. We find that the main resonance peak of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} one-particle simulation is disfigured in the corresponding 3 by 3 particle simulation, indicating the extent to which dipolar interactions are able to affect the main resonance peak in that magnetic compound.

  1. VERITAS Deep Observations of the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Segue 1

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Decerprit, G; Dickherber, R; Dumm, J; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Ferrer, F; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lee, K; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Skole, C; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2012-01-01

    The VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes has carried out a deep observational program on the nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1. We report on the results of nearly 48 hours of good quality selected data, taken between January 2010 and May 2011. No significant $\\gamma$-ray emission is detected at the nominal position of Segue 1, and upper limits on the integrated flux are derived. According to recent studies, Segue 1 is the most dark matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal galaxy currently known. We derive stringent bounds on various annihilating and decaying dark matter particle models. The upper limits on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section are $\\mathrm{^{95% CL} \\lesssim 10^{-23} cm^{3} s^{-1}}$, improving our limits from previous observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies by at least a factor of two for dark matter particle masses $\\mathrm{m_{\\chi}\\gtrsim 300 GeV}$. The lower limits on the decay lifetime are at the level of $\\mathrm{\\tau^{95% CL} \\gtrsim 10^{24} s}$. Finally, we address the inte...

  2. Reparative Spheroids in HPV-Associated Chronic Cervicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy T. Sukhikh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spheroid cell structures (SCS described in cell culture are used to study cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the role of the SCS in the repair process in vivo remains unexplored. The aim of the study was to examine the cellular composition of the spherical structures and their functional significance in the repair of the squamous epithelium in human papilloma virus-associated chronic cervicitis (HPV-CC. Methods and Results: The cytology and biopsy materials from 223 patients with HPV-CC were subjected to molecular testing for HPV DNA by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (Real-Time PCR with genotyping and chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, as well as immunocytological and immunohistochemical analyses of p16INK4A, Ki67, SMA, Vimentin, CD34, E-cadherin, Oct4, CD44, CKW markers. In the stem cell niche zone, these spheroid structures were discovered having proliferative activity and showing signs of producing stem cells involved in the repair of the cervical mucosa in HPV-CC. Conclusion: The persistence of the HPV in the stem cell niche zone cells in the cervix determines the chronization of inflammation in this area, with the ability to perform pathological repair. The immunophenotype of the spheroid cell structures in the HPV-CC includes cells with signs of stem cells (‘stemness’ and the mesenchymal-epithelial transition.

  3. Silicon spheroidization treatment of thixoformed Al-Si-Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogris, E.; Uggowitzer, P.J. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Metallurgy; Luechinger, H. [SAG-Aluminium Lend GmbH und Co KG and THIXALLOY trademark Components GmbH und Co KG, Lend (Austria)

    2002-07-01

    Al-Si-Mg alloys are commonly used in the automobile industry because of their outstanding mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. The need of lighter and safer cars is the driving force behind research in the area of high strength light metal safety part applications. The strength level can be tuned by varying the amount of alloyed magnesium. Usually if strength is increased, ductility will decrease. Following the demands of the automotive industry, safety parts should have a minimum fracture elongation of 15% and a minimum yield strength of 150 MPa. The huge hurdle is the 15% fracture elongation which can not be reached by sand or die casting, but some relatively new alternative casting technologies, like Thioxocasting or New Rheocasting, yield encouraging ductility values. Recent research activity has focused on increasing strength and ductility, but so far the results have not yet been satisfying. This paper presents investigations on the spheroidization process of eutectic silicon and its positive effect on mechanical properties. It is shown that the spheroidization process is already finished after minutes of exposure to heat treatment. Metallographical and quantitative microstructural analysis is used to describe the growth and spheroidization process of the silicon crystals. Specimens of THIXALLOY trademark 630 (A356) thixocast components were heat treated for varied periods of time, aged and tested. Results show amazing improvements of ductility and strength in comparison to the as cast state. Maximum values of 18% fracture elongation and 230 MPa yield strength are reached. (orig.)

  4. Vibration of fluid-loaded hemi-prolate spheroidal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Jeffrey E.; Hayek, Sabih I.

    2003-04-01

    The equations of motion for nonaxisymmetric vibration of hemi-prolate spheroidal shells of constant thickness were derived using Hamilton's principle. The shell is clamped at the equator and is excited by mechanical surface force fields. The shell theory used in this derivation includes shear deformations and rotatory inertias. The displacements and rotations were expanded in an infinite series of comparison functions. The shell is fluid-filled and is submerged in an infinite fluid medium. The external and internal fluid loading impedances were computed using expansions of prolate spheroidal wavefunctions in each domain. The dynamic response of the fluid-loaded shell was determined using an axisymmetric normal surface force as the excitation input. Numerical results were obtained for the driving and transfer mobilities for several shell thickness-to-length ratios ranging from 0.005 to 0.1, and for various shape parameters, ``a,'' ranging from an elongated hemi-spheroidal shell (a=1.01) to a hemispherical shell (a=100). Results are presented for various combinations of external and internal fluid loading, and comparisons are made to the in-vacuo shell vibration. [Work supported by ONR and the Navy/ASEE Summer Faculty Program.

  5. TEM observation of sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hongya; LIU Zhengyi; ZENG Dechang

    2006-01-01

    Sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrites were studied using transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure morphology and its correlation with the magnetic properties. The present study shows that the microstructure of sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrites is an important parameter in determining their magnetic properties. The microstructure morphology in low-performance ferrite magnet is obviously different from high-performance one. Themagnetic properties of sintered permanent strontium ferrite depend strongly on the orientation degree of strong magnetic crystals. The presence of ferric oxidephase in ferrite magnet can deteriorate the magnetic properties. Moreover, proper quantities of crystal defects are beneficial to high coercive force due to the fixing of magnetic domain.

  6. Simulation of non-linear coaxial line using ferrite beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Tachi, K.; Takano, S.; Irisawa, J. [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology, Niigata (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    A ferrite sharpener is a non-linear coaxial line using ferrite beads, which produces high-voltage, high-dV/dt pulses. We have been examining the characteristics of ferrite sharpeners experimentally, varying various parameters. Also we have made the simulation of the ferrite sharpener and compared the predictions with the experimental results in detail to analyze the characteristics of the sharpener. In this report, calculating the magnetization M of the ferrite bead, we divide the bead into n sections radially instead of adopting M at the average radius in the previous report. (author)

  7. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  8. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  9. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  10. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  11. Scattering characteristics of conducting cylinder coated with nonuniform magnetized ferrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Bin-Jie; Edward Yung Kai-Ning; Zhang Jun; Toutain Serge

    2005-01-01

    An analytical technique, referred to as the scattering matrix method (SMM), is developed to analyse the scattering of a planar wave from a conducting cylinder coated with nonuniform magnetized ferrite. The SMM solution for the nonuniform ferrite coating can be reduced to the expressions for the scattering and penetrated coefficients in four particular cases: nonuniform magnetized ferrite cylinder, uniform magnetized ferrite-coated conducting cylinder, uniform ferrite cylinder as well as homogeneous dielectric-coated conducting cylinder. The resonant condition for the nonuniform ferrite coating is obtained. The distinctive differences in scattering between the nonuniform ferrite coating and the nonuniform dielectric coating are demonstrated. The effects of applied magnetic fields and wave frequencies on the scattering characteristics for two types of the linear profiles are revealed.

  12. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  13. Co-containing spinel ferrite thin-film perpendicular magnetic recording media with Mn-Zn ferrite backlayer

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Setsuo; Kuniki, Hirofumi; Kurisu, Hiroki; Matsuura, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Co-containing ferrite thin-film/Mn-Zn ferrite thin-film double-layered perpendicular media were prepared using reactive ECR sputtering and magnetron sputtering methods, and their magnetic and structural properties and recording characteristics were studied. The Mn-Zn ferrite thin-film backlayer had saturation magnetization of 3.5 kG and coercivity of 60 Oe. Reproduced voltage for the Co-containing ferrite thin-film/Mn-Zn ferrite thin-film double-layered medium was about twice of that for the ...

  14. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  15. Fluid absorption related to ion transport in human airway epithelial spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P S; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Larsen, P L

    1999-01-01

    , and amiloride inhibited both values. Fluid transport rates were calculated from repeated measurements of spheroid diameters. The results showed that 1) non-CF and CF spheroids absorbed fluid at identical rates (4.4 microl x cm(-2) x h(-1)), 2) amiloride inhibited fluid absorption to a lower residual level......) osmotic water permeabilities were equal in non-CF and CF spheroids ( approximately 27 x 10(-7) cm x s(-1) x atm(-1))....

  16. Multiparametric Analysis of Oncology Drug Screening with Aqueous Two-Phase Tumor Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi Thakuri, Pradip; Ham, Stephanie L; Luker, Gary D; Tavana, Hossein

    2016-11-07

    Spheroids present a biologically relevant three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and a unique tool for discovery of anticancer drugs. Despite being used in research laboratories for several decades, spheroids are not routinely used in the mainstream drug discovery pipeline primarily due to the difficulty of mass-producing uniformly sized spheroids and intense labor involved in handling, drug treatment, and analyzing spheroids. We overcome this barrier using a polymeric aqueous two-phase microtechnology to robotically microprint spheroids of well-defined size in standard 384-microwell plates. We use different cancer cells and show that resulting spheroids grow over time and display characteristic features of solid tumors. We demonstrate the feasibility of robotic, high-throughput screening of 25 standard chemotherapeutics and molecular inhibitors against tumor spheroids of three different cancer cell lines. This screening uses over 7000 spheroids to elicit high quality dose-dependent drug responses from spheroids. To quantitatively compare performance of different drugs, we employ a multiparametric scoring system using half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50), maximum inhibition (Emax), and area under the dose-response curve (AUC) to take into account both potency and efficacy parameters. This approach allows us to identify several compounds that effectively inhibit growth of spheroids and compromise cellular viability, and distinguish them from moderately effective and ineffective drugs. Using protein expression analysis, we demonstrate that spheroids generated with the aqueous two-phase microtechnology reliably resolve molecular targets of drug compounds. Incorporating this low-cost and convenient-to-use tumor spheroid technology in preclinical drug discovery will make compound screening with realistic tumor models a routine laboratory technique prior to expensive and tedious animal tests to dramatically improve testing throughput and efficiency and

  17. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, Helena, E-mail: hpardo@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay); Divine Khan, Ngwashi [Mantfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom); Faccio, Ricardo [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araujo-Moreira, F.M. [Grupo de Materiais e Dispositivos-CMDMC, Departamento de Fisica e Engenharia Fisica, UFSCar, Caixa Postal 676, 13565-905, Sao Carlos SP (Brazil); Fernandez-Werner, Luciana [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-08-15

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm{sup -1} showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  18. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  19. Experiments on Graphitization of Diamond in the Presence of Water: Implications for Exhumation of Ultrahigh Pressure Metamorphic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bannon, E. F.; Xia, G.; Green, H. W.; Wirth, R.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L.

    2012-12-01

    Diamond and graphite occur in the mantle, and crustal ultrahigh pressure metamorphic (UHPM) rocks. The stability fields of carbon are well studied experimentally, but the mechanisms of phase transformation are not well understood. Observations on natural samples from UHPM terranes show that graphitization of diamond is accompanied by the formation of disordered graphite containing nanometric fluid inclusions. Since the structures of diamond and graphite are very dissimilar, it is unlikely that a direct phase transformation would occur during the graphitization process. Such an assumption is also supported by higher enthalpy (1.897) and lower entropy (2.38) of C-diamond with respect of those of C-graphite (enthalpy = 0, entropy=5.74). At least three different mechanisms of diamond-to-graphite transformation have been proposed. To constrain this process we conducted a series of anhydrous and hydrous experiments in a piston-cylinder apparatus and a hydrous experiment in a multianvil apparatus using 20-40 micron size virgin diamonds as the starting material. The piston-cylinder experiments were conducted at P=1 GPa and T=1300oC. In the hydrous experiments 1.15 wt.%. Mg(OH)2 was added to the starting material as the H2O supply according to the breakdown reaction: Mg(OH)2 = MgO + H2O. The multianvil experiment was conducted at P=6GPa and T=1300oC with 1 wt.%. distilled water added to the starting diamonds. Run products were studied with SEM, FIB assisted TEM, and SEM-Raman. The anhydrous experiments show that diamond crystals are "integrated" together producing deformed polycrystallites with complicated textural patterns occurring at the grain boundaries. The hydrous experiments show the formation of metastable nanometric spheroidal carbon particles which were distributed on the surface and between the corners of the diamonds. The metastable phase existed for ~6 months before it decomposed into graphite flakes. The graphite flakes have a disordered structure which was

  20. Cracking behavior in a dissimilar weld between high silicon nodular cast iron and ferritic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghoon; Lee, Sangchul; Han, Kyutae; Hong, Seunggab; Lee, Changhee

    2010-06-01

    In this work, the microstructural evolution and cracking behavior of a dissimilar weld between high silicon nodular cast iron and ferritic stainless steel was investigated. An austenitic filler metal (Y309) was employed to produce the dissimilar weld. Microstructural analysis revealed that cracking formed at the unmixed zone (UMZ) and propagated into the partially melted zone (PMZ) in the bond line between the cast iron and the Y309, with hard layers formed around the bond line. The cracking behavior was strongly related to the difference in the melting points of cast iron and the Y309 filler metal, the local liquation of the laves phase, and the constitutional liquation between the graphite and austenite phases in the PMZ.

  1. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): the stellar mass budget of galaxy spheroids and discs

    OpenAIRE

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Lange, Rebecca; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S G; Kelvin, Lee S; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Andrews, Stephen K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E.; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Luke J. M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kafle, Prajwal R.

    2016-01-01

    We build on a recent photometric decomposition analysis of 7506 Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey galaxies to derive stellar mass function fits to individual spheroid and disc component populations down to a lower mass limit of log(M*/M⊙) = 8. We find that the spheroid/disc mass distributions for individual galaxy morphological types are well described by single Schechter function forms. We derive estimates of the total stellar mass densities in spheroidsspheroid = 1.24 ± 0.49 × 108 M...

  2. Increased Survival and Function of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids Entrapped in Instructive Alginate Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steve S.; Murphy, Kaitlin C.; Binder, Bernard Y.K.; Vissers, Caroline B.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies are under broad investigation for applications in tissue repair but suffer from poor cell persistence and engraftment upon transplantation. MSC spheroids exhibit improved survival, anti-inflammatory, and angiogenic potential in vitro, while also promoting vascularization when implanted in vivo. However, these benefits are lost once cells engage the tissue extracellular matrix and migrate from the aggregate. The efficacy of cell therapy is consistently improved when using engineered materials, motivating the need to investigate the role of biomaterials to instruct spheroid function. In order to assess the contribution of adhesivity on spheroid activity in engineered materials and promote the bone-forming potential of MSCs, we compared the function of MSC spheroids when entrapped in Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified alginate hydrogels to nonfouling unmodified alginate. Regardless of material, MSC spheroids exhibited reduced caspase activity and greater vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion compared with equal numbers of dissociated cells. MSC spheroids in RGD-modified hydrogels demonstrated significantly greater cell survival than spheroids in unmodified alginate. After 5 days in culture, spheroids in RGD-modified gels had similar levels of apoptosis, but more than a twofold increase in VEGF secretion compared with spheroids in unmodified gels. All gels contained mineralized tissue 8 weeks after subcutaneous implantation, and cells entrapped in RGD-modified alginate exhibited greater mineralization versus cells in unmodified gels. Immunohistochemistry confirmed more diffuse osteocalcin staining in gels containing spheroids compared with dissociated controls. This study demonstrates the promise of cell-instructive biomaterials to direct survival and function of MSC spheroids for bone tissue engineering applications. Significance Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) spheroids exhibit improved therapeutic potential in vitro

  3. Methods: Using Three-Dimensional Culture (Spheroids) as an In Vitro Model of Tumour Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leek, Russell; Grimes, David Robert; Harris, Adrian L; McIntyre, Alan

    Regions of hypoxia in tumours can be modelled in vitro in 2D cell cultures with a hypoxic chamber or incubator in which oxygen levels can be regulated. Although this system is useful in many respects, it disregards the additional physiological gradients of the hypoxic microenvironment, which result in reduced nutrients and more acidic pH. Another approach to hypoxia modelling is to use three-dimensional spheroid cultures. In spheroids, the physiological gradients of the hypoxic tumour microenvironment can be inexpensively modelled and explored. In addition, spheroids offer the advantage of more representative modelling of tumour therapy responses compared with 2D culture. Here, we review the use of spheroids in hypoxia tumour biology research and highlight the different methodologies for spheroid formation and how to obtain uniformity. We explore the challenge of spheroid analyses and how to determine the effect on the hypoxic versus normoxic components of spheroids. We discuss the use of high-throughput analyses in hypoxia screening of spheroids. Furthermore, we examine the use of mathematical modelling of spheroids to understand more fully the hypoxic tumour microenvironment.

  4. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar; Schaltz, Erik; Ahn, Seungyoung

    2015-01-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor...... and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending...... on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite on the other hand can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer...

  5. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  6. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  7. Temperature stabilization of microwave ferrite devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, R.; Wendt, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Thin-film heating element for strip-line circulator is sandwiched between insulation and copper laminations. Disks conform to shape of circulator ferrite disks and are installed between copper-clad epoxy ground planes. Heater design eliminates external cartridges and reduces weight by approximately one-third.

  8. Adding calcium improves lithium ferrite core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessoff, H.

    1969-01-01

    Adding calcium increases uniformity of grain growth over a wide range of sintering temperatures and reduces porosity within the grain. Ferrite cores containing calcium have square hysteresis loops and high curie temperatures, making them useful in coincident current memories of digital electronic computers.

  9. Transmission through Ferrite Samples at Submillimeter Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    y Y In all the equations given above, c and 1’e are, in general, complex. Measurements are generally made on the power transmitted which is ITaI ? in...Frequency (cm-’) using measurements of2T 1 given eby Figure 8. Power transmission coeffi- equation( 2),Tp1 = ITaI ~cient for 100-m-thick ferrite slab

  10. Spinel cobalt ferrite by complexometric synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham Duc Thang, P.D.T.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic fine particles of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) have been synthesized using complexometric method in which ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid C10H16N2O8 (EDTA) acts as a complexing agent. The crystallographic structure, microstructure and magnetic properties of the synthesized powder were

  11. Synthesis of lithium ferrites from polymetallic carboxylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEFANIA STOLERIU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ferrite was prepared by the thermal decomposition of three polynuclear complex compounds containing as ligands the anions of malic, tartaric and gluconic acid: (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O53(OH4(H2O2]×4H2O (I, (NH46[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O63(OH8]×2H2O (II and (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C6H11O73(OH7] (III. The polynuclear complex precursors were characterized by chemical analysis, IR and UV–Vis spectra, magnetic measurements and thermal analysis. The obtained lithium ferrites were characterized by XRD, scanning electron microscopy, IR spectra and magnetic measurements. The single α-Li0.5Fe2.5O4 phase was obtained by thermal decomposition of the tartarate complex annealed at 700 °C for 1 h. The magnetization value ≈ 50 emu g-1 is lower than that obtained for the bulk lithium ferrite due to the nanostructural character of the ferrite. The particle size was smaller than 100 nm.

  12. Ferrite Quantification Methodologies for Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Forgas Júnior

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to quantify ferrite content, three techniques, XRD, ferritoscope and optical metallography, were applied to a duplex stainless steel UNS S31803 solution-treated for 30 min at 1,000, 1,100 and 1,200 °C, and then compared to equilibrium of phases predicted by ThermoCalc® simulation. As expected, the microstructure is composed only by austenite and ferrite phases, and ferrite content increases as the solution treatment temperature increases. The microstructure presents preferred grains orientation along the rolling directions even for a sample solution treated for 30 min at 1,200 °C. For all solution treatment temperatures, the ferrite volume fractions obtained by XRD measurements were higher than those achieved by the other two techniques and ThermoCalc® simulation, probably due to texturing effect of previous rolling process. Values obtained by quantitative metallography look more assertive as it is a direct measurement method but the ferritoscope technique should be considered mainly for in loco measurement.

  13. Barium Ferrite Films Grown by Laser Ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Lodder, J.C.; Haan, de P.; Smithers, M.A.; Roesthuis, F.J.G.

    1998-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been used to grow barium ferrite films on Al2O3 single crystal substrates. When deposition occurs in an oxidising atmosphere at high temperatures, the films are single BaFe12O19 phase, very well oriented with (001) texture, and exhibit a large perpendicular magnetic a

  14. EFFECTS OF FRICTION STIR PROCESSING ON MICROSTRUCTURAL, HARDNESS AND DAMPING CHARACTERISTICS OF FERRITIC NODULAR CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDULSALAM Y.OBAID

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations had been done in this study to explore the effects of friction stir processing (FSP on the microstructure, hardness and damping capacity of fully ferrite nodular cast iron ASTM A536, grade 65-45-12. The main process parameters employed in this study were the rotational speed, translational speed and axial applied load which were varied within selected ranges. Their influence to be analysed and optimized for best process conditions compared with as cast material. Detailed investigations were carried out using optical microscopy, hardness test and impact test. Results showed that graphite grain refinements of 2-3 times the original size and phase transformations of a fully ferritic to bainite/martensite were achieved within the processed zone and across thickness. Matrix modifications caused improvement in hardness of 3.5 times compared to hardness of original cast iron. Increment in the damping capacity up to 14% was achieved. The stated improvements were related to the process parameters employed in the test.

  15. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  16. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  17. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  18. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hindlimb ischemia mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Su; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2014-02-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted ASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) spheroid in a hindlimb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hindlimbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) of spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The spheroid + LLLT group enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with other groups. The spheroid contributed tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs was increased by the decreased apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hindlimb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs group and spheroid group. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hindlimb.

  19. Differential cytotoxicity of copper ferrite nanoparticles in different human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Saquib, Quaiser; Khan, Shams T; Wahab, Rizwan; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2016-10-01

    Copper ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have the potential to be applied in biomedical fields such as cell labeling and hyperthermia. However, there is a lack of information concerning the toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. We explored the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human lung (A549) and liver (HepG2) cells. Copper ferrite NPs were crystalline and almost spherically shaped with an average diameter of 35 nm. Copper ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, evident by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide and neutral red uptake assays. However, we observed a quite different susceptibility in the two kinds of cells regarding toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. Particularly, A549 cells showed higher susceptibility against copper ferrite NP exposure than those of HepG2 cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential due to copper ferrite NP exposure was observed. The mRNA level as well as activity of caspase-3 enzyme was higher in cells exposed to copper ferrite NPs. Cellular redox status was disturbed as indicated by induction of reactive oxygen species (oxidant) generation and depletion of the glutathione (antioxidant) level. Moreover, cytotoxicity induced by copper ferrite NPs was efficiently prevented by N-acetylcysteine treatment, which suggests that reactive oxygen species generation might be one of the possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity caused by copper ferrite NPs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the mechanisms of differential toxicity of copper ferrite NPs in different types of cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Controlled graphitization as a potential option for improving wear resistance of unalloyed white irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, A. K.; Kumar, S.; Singh, Prakash

    1998-08-01

    Effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and resistance to abrasive wear has been studied in an unalloyed white iron used for manufacturing cylindrical pebbles used as grinding media by the cement and other industries. Heat treatment comprised holding at 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C, and 950 °C for 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes followed by oil quenching. Heat treatment in general improved the wear resistance over that in the as-cast (as-received) state. The extent of maximum improvement differed with temperature and in the decreasing order occurred at (1) 180 minutes, 800 °C, OQ; (2) 30 minutes, 950 °C, OQ; (3) 90 minutes, 900 °C, OQ; and (4) 180 minutes, 850 °C, OQ. From the point of view of commercial application, the heat treatment at (2) is most favored. Microstructural changes occurring during heat treating comprised (1) changes in matrix microstructure; (2) a reduction in volume fraction of massive carbides due to its part graphitization/destabilization; and (3) changes in graphite morphology, size, and distribution. Amongst the aforesaid changes, graphitization has emerged as the key parameter in improving wear resistance. Graphite morphology in a near-nodular form of optimum size and distribution was found to be most effective. Upon increasing the heat-treating temperature, the tendency of nodules to develop spikes increased. Similarly, interlinking of graphite flakes was also observed. These features and the possible formation of free ferrite adversely affected wear resistance. The role of other beneficial changes in the microstructure, e.g., globularization of carbides, possible retention of austenite, and formation of optimum volume fraction of martensite, have been duly considered while optimizing microstructure(s). The key feature of the present study is that, despite its fundamental significance, it has a well-focused application potential.

  1. Acetaminophen and acetone sensing capabilities of nickel ferrite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Shrabani; Kumari, Manisha; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2017-07-01

    Present work elucidates the gas sensing and electrochemical sensing capabilities of sol-gel-derived nickel ferrite (NF) nanostructures based on the electrical and electrochemical properties. In current work, the choices of target species (acetone and acetaminophen) are strictly governed by their practical utility and concerning the safety measures. Acetone, the target analyte for gas sensing measurement is a common chemical used in varieties of application as well as provides an indirect way to monitor diabetes. The gas sensing experiments were performed within a homemade sensing chamber designed by our group. Acetone gas sensor (NF pellet sensor) response was monitored by tracking the change in resistance both in the presence and absence of acetone. At optimum operating temperature 300 °C, NF pellet sensor exhibits selective response for acetone in the presence of other common interfering gases like ethanol, benzene, and toluene. The electrochemical sensor fabricated to determine acetaminophen is prepared by coating NF onto the surface of pre-treated/cleaned pencil graphite electrode (NF-PGE). The common name of target analyte acetaminophen is paracetamol (PC), which is widespread worldwide as a well-known pain killer. Overdose of PC can cause renal failure even fatal diseases in children and demand accurate monitoring. Under optimal conditions NF-PGE shows a detection limit as low as 0.106 μM with selective detection ability towards acetaminophen in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), which co-exists in our body. Use of cheap and abundant PGE instead of other electrodes (gold/Pt/glassy carbon electrode) can effectively reduce the cost barrier of such sensors. The obtained results elucidate an ample appeal of NF-sensors in real analytical applications viz. in environmental monitoring, pharmaceutical industry, drug detection, and health monitoring.

  2. Intraluminal Injection of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Spheroids Attenuates Experimental Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molendijk, Ilse; Barnhoorn, Marieke C; de Jonge-Muller, Eveline S M; Mieremet-Ooms, Marij A C; van der Reijden, Johan J; van der Helm, Danny; Hommes, Daniel W; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Verspaget, Hein W

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, mesenchymal stromal cells [MSCs] emerged as a promising therapeutic option for various diseases, due to their immunomodulatory properties. We previously observed that intraperitoneally injected MSCs in experimental colitis form spherical shaped aggregates. Therefore, we aggregated MSCs in vitro into spheroids and injected them intraluminally in mice with established colitis, to investigate whether these MSC spheroids could alleviate the colitis. We injected 0.5 x 10(6) MSCs in spheroids, 2.0 x 10(6) MSCs in spheroids, or phosphate-buffered saline [PBS] as a treatment control, via an enema in mice with established dextran sulphate sodium [DSS]-induced colitis. Body weight was measured daily and disease activity score was determined at sacrifice. Endoscopy was performed to evaluate mucosal healing. After sacrifice, both systemic and local inflammatory responses were evaluated. Intraluminally injected MSC spheroids alleviated DSS-induced colitis, resulting in significantly less body weight loss and lower disease activity score at sacrifice when a high dose of MSC spheroids was administered. However, the percentage of mucosal lesions in the distal colon and endoscopy scores were not significantly lower after treatment with 2.0 x 10(6) MSCs in spheroids compared with PBS-treated mice. Systemic inflammation marker serum amyloid A [SAA] was significantly reduced after treatment with 2.0 x 10(6) MSCs in spheroids. In addition, local cytokine levels of IFN-ɣ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17a, as well as numbers of macrophages and neutrophils, showed a clear decrease-though not always significant-after intraluminal injection of the MSC spheroids. Intraluminally injected MSC spheroids at least partially attenuate experimental colitis, with fewer phagocytes and proinflammmatory cytokines, when a high dose of MSCs in spheroids was administered. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  3. SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND THEIR HOST SPHEROIDS. I. DISASSEMBLING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savorgnan, G. A. D.; Graham, A. W., E-mail: gsavorgn@astro.swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using 3.6 μm Spitzer imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the K band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction, and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and—for the first time—2D kinematics, we were able to account for spheroids; large-scale, intermediate-scale, and nuclear disks; bars; rings; spiral arms; halos; extended or unresolved nuclear sources; and partially depleted cores. For each individual galaxy, we compared our best-fit model with previous studies, explained the discrepancies, and identified the optimal decomposition. Moreover, we have independently performed one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) decompositions and concluded that, at least when modeling large, nearby galaxies, 1D techniques have more advantages than 2D techniques. Finally, we developed a prescription to estimate the uncertainties on the 1D best-fit parameters for the 66 spheroids that takes into account systematic errors, unlike popular 2D codes that only consider statistical errors.

  4. OVCAR-3 spheroid-derived cells display distinct metabolic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Vermeersch

    Full Text Available Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells.To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines.These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines.Overall, we demonstrate for the first time that metabolism

  5. Graphite Surface Modification by Heterogeneous Nucleation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ran; LI Hongxia

    2006-01-01

    Flaky graphite particles were coated by ZrOCl2·8H2O as precursors by heterogeneous nucleation process.The effects of factors such as pH values (2.4-5.1),concentration of the precursor solution (0.005-0.1 mol·L-1 ) , mixing method of graphite and precursor solution on the surface modification of graphite were studied. Result shows that: 1) the preferable technical process for heterogeneous nucleation modified graphite is to mix the graphite suspension and precursor solution with concentration 0. 025 mol·L -1 and then drip ammonia water to adjust the pH value to 3.6; 2)By surface modification, the ZrO2 particles are evenly coated on graphite surface and therefore improve oxidation resistance and dispersion ability of graphite.

  6. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  7. Microstructure transformation of carbon nanofibers during graphitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; TANG Yuan-hong; LIN Liang-wu; ZHANG En-lei

    2008-01-01

    The mierostructures of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers(CNFs) before and after graphitization process were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry(XRD), near-edge-X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy(NEXAFS) and thermogravimetric analysis(TGA). The results indicate that although non-graphitized CNFs have the characteristics of higher disorder, a transformation is found in the inner layer of tube wall where graphite sheets become stiff, which demonstrates the characteristics of higher graphitization of graphitized CNFs. The defects in outer tube wall disappear because the amorphous carbon changes to perfect crystalline carbon after annealing treatment at about 2 800 ℃. TGA analysis in air indicates that graphitized CNFs have excellent oxidation resistance up to 857 ℃. And the graphitization mechanism including four stages was also proposed.

  8. Note: 3D printed spheroid for uniform magnetic field generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Y.; Aktaş, B.

    2016-10-01

    This article is focused on a novel and practical production method for a uniform magnetic field generator. The method involves building of a surface coil template using a desktop 3D printer and winding of a conducting wire onto the structure using surface grooves as a guide. Groove pattern was based on the parametric spheroidal helical coil formula. The coil was driven by a current source and the magnetic field inside was measured using a Hall probe placed into the holes on the printed structure. The measurements are found to be in good agreement with our finite element analysis results and indicate a fairly uniform field inside.

  9. Chemical Evolution of Mn in Three Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Men-Quan Liu; Jie Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Based on an improved model, more reasonable nucleosyn-thesis and explosion rate of SNeIa and CCSNe, we studied Mn evolution for three local dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), considering the detailed SNe yield and explosion rates for different types of progenitors. The results can explain the main observation ofMn abundance for tens stars in those dSphs, and give some constraints to the nucleosynthesis and explosion ratio of different types of supernovae and Star Formation Rates (SFR) in those dSphs.

  10. Short-term effects of radiation in glioblastoma spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg Petterson, Stine; Pind Jakobsen, Ida; Jensen, Stine Skov;

    2016-01-01

    and five days. We found a small reduction in primary spheroid size after radiation and an associated small increase in uptake of the cell death marker propidium iodide. Using immunohistochemistry, P53 expression was found to be significantly increased, whereas the Ki-67 proliferation index...... capacity. Gene expression analysis of nine stem cell- and two hypoxia-related genes did not reveal any upregulation after radiation. In conclusion, this study suggests that a major short-term effect of radiation is pronounced reduction of tumor cell proliferation. We found no upregulation of stem cell...

  11. VARIATIONS IN A UNIVERSAL DARK MATTER PROFILE FOR DWARF SPHEROIDALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardel, John R.; Gebhardt, Karl, E-mail: jardel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    Using a newly developed modeling technique, we present orbit-based dynamical models of the Carina, Draco, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. These models calculate the dark matter profiles non-parametrically without requiring any assumptions to be made about their profile shapes. By lifting this restriction, we discover a host of dark matter profiles in the dSphs that are different from the typical profiles suggested by both theorists and observers. However, when we scale these profiles appropriately and plot them on a common axis, they appear to follow an approximate r {sup –1} power law with considerable scatter.

  12. Microstructure of pre-sintered permanent magnetic strontium ferrite powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hongya; LIU Zhengyi; ZENG Dechang

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and characteristics of pre-sintered strontium ferrite powderwere investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The present study shows that the pre-sintered strontium ferrite powder is provided with a certain particle size distribution, which results in high-density magnets. The strontium ferrite particle has a laminar hexagonal structure with a size similar to ferrite single domain. Ferric oxidephase due to an incomplete solid phase reaction in the first sintering is discovered, which will deteriorate the magnetic properties of ferrite magnet. In addition, the waste ferrite magnets with needle shape arranging along C axis in good order into the powders are found, which have no negative effects on finished product quality.

  13. Ferrite-Piezoelectric Layered Composites: Synthesis and Magnetoelectric Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, R. W.; Srinivasan, G.

    2004-10-01

    The observation of strong magnetoelectric effects is reported in thick film bilayers and multilayers of ferrite-lead titanate zirconate (PZT). The ferrites used in our studies included pure and zinc substituted cobalt-, nickel- and lithium ferrites. Samples were prepared by sintering 10-40 mm thick films obtained by tape-casting. Measurements of ME voltage coefficients at 10-1000 Hz indicated a giant ME effect in nickel ferrite-PZT, but a relatively weak coupling in other ferrite-PZT systems. Evidence was found for enhancement in ME coefficients when Zn was substituted in ferrites. The Zn-assisted increase was attributed to low anisotropy and high permeability that resulted in favorable magneto-mechanical coupling in the composites. G. Srinivasan, E. T. Rasmussen, and R. Hayes, Phys. Rev. B 67, 014418 (2003) Supported by NSF and ARO grants.

  14. Trigonometric potentials arising from the spheroidal equation: Supersymmetric partners and integral formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel

    2016-06-01

    We construct supersymmetric partners of a quantum system featuring a class of trigonometric potentials that emerge from the spheroidal equation. Examples of both standard and confluent supersymmetric transformations are presented. Furthermore, we use integral formulas arising from the confluent supersymmetric formalism to derive new representations for single and multiple integrals of spheroidal functions.

  15. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the Stellar Mass Budget of Galaxy Spheroids and Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Moffett, Amanda J; Driver, Simon P; Robotham, Aaron S G; Kelvin, Lee S; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Andrews, Stephen K; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Luke J M; Holwerda, Benne W; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kafle, Prajwal R; Liske, Jochen; Meyer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We build on a recent photometric decomposition analysis of 7506 Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey galaxies to derive stellar mass function fits to individual spheroid and disk component populations down to a lower mass limit of log(M_*/M_sun)= 8. We find that the spheroid/disk mass distributions for individual galaxy morphological types are well described by single Schechter function forms. We derive estimates of the total stellar mass densities in spheroids (rho_spheroid = 1.24+/-0.49 * 10^8 M_sun Mpc^-3 h_0.7) and disks (rho_disk = 1.20+/-0.45 * 10^8 M_sun Mpc^-3 h_0.7), which translates to approximately 50% of the local stellar mass density in spheroids and 48% in disks. The remaining stellar mass is found in the dwarf "little blue spheroid" class, which is not obviously similar in structure to either classical spheroid or disk populations. We also examine the variation of component mass ratios across galaxy mass and group halo mass regimes, finding the transition from spheroid to disk mass dominance ...

  16. Generation of Multicellular Breast Cancer Tumor Spheroids: Comparison of Different Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Karolin; Haeger, Jan-Dirk; Heger, Julia; Pastuschek, Jana; Photini, Stella Mary; Yan, Yan; Lupp, Amelie; Pfarrer, Christiane; Mrowka, Ralf; Schleußner, Ekkehard; Markert, Udo R; Schmidt, André

    2016-12-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are widely used models in tumor research. Because of their three dimensional organization they can simulate avascular tumor areas comprising proliferative and necrotic cells. Nonetheless, protocols for spheroid generation are still inconsistent. Therefore, in this study the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 have been used to compare different spheroid generation models including hanging drop, liquid overlay and suspension culture techniques, each under several conditions. Experimental approaches differed in cell numbers (400-10,000), media and additives (25 % methocel, 25 % methocel plus 1 % Matrigel, 3.5 % Matrigel). In total, 42 different experimental setups have been tested. Generation of spheroids was evaluated by light microscopy and the structural composition was assessed immunohistochemically by means of Ki-67, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (cPARP) and mucin-1 (MUC-1) expression. Although the tested cell lines diverged widely in their capacity of forming spheroids we recommend hanging drops supplemented with 25 % methocel as the most reliable and efficient method with regard to success of generation of uniform spheroids, costs, experimental complexity and time expenditure in the different cell lines. MCF-7 cells formed spheroids under almost all analyzed conditions, and MDA-MB-231 cells under only one protocol (liquid overlay technique, 3.5 % Matrigel), while SK-BR-3 did not under neither condition. Therefore, we outline specific methods and recommend the use of adapted and standardized spheroid generation protocols for each cell line.

  17. Surface electric current distributions on spheres and spheroids as sources of pure quadrupole magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    L. Medina; E. Ley-Koo

    2011-01-01

    Neutral atom magnetic traps and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging require internal regions with constant gradient magnetic induction fields, which are identified as pure quadrupole fields. This contribution starts from such fields in the interior of spheres and spheroids in cartesian coordinates, identifying immediately their respective scalar magnetic potentials. Next, the corresponding potentials inside and outside are constructed using spherical and spheroidal harmonic functions, respecti...

  18. Rapid generation of single-tumor spheroids for high-throughput cell function and toxicity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascu, Andrea; Kubbies, Manfred

    2006-12-01

    Spheroids are widely used in biology because they provide an in vitro 3-dimensional (3D) model to study proliferation, cell death, differentiation, and metabolism of cells in tumors and the response of tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The methods of generating spheroids are limited by size heterogeneity, long cultivation time, or mechanical accessibility for higher throughput fashion. The authors present a rapid method to generate single spheroids in suspension culture in individual wells. A defined number of cells ranging from 1000 to 20,000 were seeded into wells of poly-HEMA-coated, 96-well, round-or conical-bottom plates in standard medium and centrifuged for 10 min at 1000 g. This procedure generates single spheroids in each well within a 24-h culture time with homogeneous sizes, morphologies, and stratification of proliferating cells in the rim and dying cells in the core region. Because a large number of tumor cell lines form only loose aggregates when cultured in 3D, the authors also performed a screen for medium additives to achieve a switch from aggregate to spheroid morphology. Small quantities of the basement membrane extract Matrigel, added to the culture medium prior to centrifugation, most effectively induced compact spheroid formation. The compact spheroid morphology is evident as early as 24 h after centrifugation in a true suspension culture. Twenty tumor cell lines of different lineages have been used to successfully generate compact, single spheroids with homogenous size in 96-well plates and are easily accessible for subsequent functional analysis.

  19. Abnormal hepatic copper accumulation of spheroid composed of liver cells from LEC rats in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, K; Yoshizawa, M; Satoh, T; Yoneda, S; Ohmichi, M; Yamazaki, M; Mori, Y; Suzuki, K T

    1995-11-01

    The LEC rat is a mutant strain displaying hereditary hepatitis, and shows abnormal accumulation of copper (Cu) similar to that occurring in Wilson's disease. We prepared a multicellular spheroid composed of LEC rat liver cells to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu. These multicellular spheroids were prepared by detaching the monolayer on the collagen-conjugated thermo-responsive polymer coated culture dish at a temperature below the critical solution temperature and culturing on the non-adhesive substratum. Long-term cultured spheroids of LEC rat liver cells as well as SD rat liver cells were attempted. Non-parenchymal cells obtained by collagenase perfusion from the LEC liver were fewer than those from the SD liver. Cells from the LEC rat, over 11 weeks of age, did not form a cell sheet; however, a mixture of parenchymal cells from LEC rats over aged 11 weeks and non-parenchymal cells from SD rats of any age yielded intact spheroids. We examined the toxicity, the accumulation and distribution of Cu in spheroids. The accumulation of Cu in LEC spheroids was higher than that in SD spheroids. Results suggest that spheroids consisting of LEC liver cells are useful as an alternative model to in vivo tests to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu in liver.

  20. Spot feeding spheroidal graphite iron with exothermic and insulating ram-up sleeves in vertically parted moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Smith, Nikolaj Kjelgaard

    2016-01-01

    Improvement of feeder technologies for energy savings incast iron foundries is not only the title of the project behind this dissertation, it is a good idea that can improve casting yield and reduce production cost, and in turn strengthening the foundries competitive advantage. The approach...... to solving feeding problems today is for a large part based on methodologies and know-how developed more than 50 years ago. This dissertation addresses the state-of-the-art as it is used presently in the foundries, reviewing the fundamentals of spot feeding cast iron....

  1. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  2. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyan P Ivanov

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  3. An investigation of co-fired varistor-ferrite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Rafferty, Aran; Gun'ko, Yurii; Raghavendra, Ramesh

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to co-fire crack-free varistor-ferrite ceramic multilayers fabricated via a dry pressing route. Multilayers were sintered using a standard industrial grade varistor sintering regime. Sinter shrinkages of both varistor and ferrite materials were measured using dilatometry and showed that the varistor shrunk significantly more than the ferrite material. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that no significant phase changes occurred in the materials under in...

  4. The Development of Low Activation Ferritic Steels for Fusion Application

    OpenAIRE

    Kohyama, A; Hishinuma, A.; Kohno, Y; Shiba, K; Sagara, A.

    1997-01-01

    The development of low-activation ferritic/martensitic steels is a key to the achievement of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally attractive and economically competitive energy source. The Japanese and the European Fusion Materials programs have put low-activation ferritic and martensitic steels R & D at the highest priority for a demonstration reactor (DEMO) and the beyond. An international collaborative test program on low-activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion is in progres...

  5. HYDROTHERMAL SYNTHESIS OF NANO-METER MICROPOROUS ZINC FERRITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Hu; Ping Guan; Xin Yan

    2004-01-01

    Nano-meter microporous zinc ferrite was prepared by a hydrothermal method, using triethylamine as a template. Adsorption curves showed that the product had a microporous structure. The effects of precursor pH, reaction temperature and reaction time on the preparation were studied, yielding optimal conditions: pH=11,448 K, 360 min. The morphology of zinc ferrite as observed by TEM, showed that zinc ferrite was well-crystallized and well-dispersed with little conglomeration.

  6. Annealing-induced Grain Refinement in a Nanostructured Ferritic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Limin Wang; Zhenbo Wangt; Sheng Guo; Ke Lu

    2012-01-01

    A nanostructured surface layer with a mean ferrite grain size of -8 nm was produced on a Fe-gCr steel by means of surface mechanical attrition treatment. Upon annealing, ferrite grains coarsen with increasing temperature and their sizes increase to -40 nm at 973 K. Further increasing annealing temperature leads to an obvious reduction of ferrite grain sizes, to -14 nm at 1173 K. The annealing-induced grain refinement is analyzed in terms of phase transformations in the nanostructured steel.

  7. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie, E-mail: leejay1986@163.com; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-07

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time. - Highlights: • Fully algebraic solutions for the spheroidal droplet evaporation rate is obtained. • We examine the effect of aspect ratio on the droplet evaporation. • We propose a calculation method of Nusselt number for spheroidal droplet.

  8. The low-frequency dielectric response of charged oblate spheroidal particles immersed in an electrolyte

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Sen, Pabitra N

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-frequency polarization response of a surface-charged oblate spheroidal particle immersed in an electrolyte solution. Because the charged spheroid attracts counter-ions which form the electric double layer around the particle, using usual boundary conditions at the interface between the particle and electrolyte can be quite complicated and challenging. Hence, we generalize Fixman's boundary conditions, originally derived for spherical particles, to the case of the charged oblate spheroid. Given two different counter-ion distributions in the thin electric double layer limit, we obtain analytic expressions for the polarization coefficients to the first non-trivial order in frequency. We find that the polarization response normal to the symmetry axis depends on the total amount of charge carried by the oblate spheroid while that parallel to the symmetry axis is suppressed when there is less charge on the edge of the spheroid. We further study the overall dielectric response for a dilute suspensio...

  9. High-Throughput Spheroid Screens Using Volume, Resazurin Reduction, and Acid Phosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Grabowska, Anna M; Garnett, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Mainstream adoption of physiologically relevant three-dimensional models has been slow in the last 50 years due to long, manual protocols with poor reproducibility, high price, and closed commercial platforms. This chapter describes high-throughput, low-cost, open methods for spheroid viability assessment which use readily available reagents and open-source software to analyze spheroid volume, metabolism, and enzymatic activity. We provide two ImageJ macros for automated spheroid size determination-for both single images and images in stacks. We also share an Excel template spreadsheet allowing users to rapidly process spheroid size data, analyze plate uniformity (such as edge effects and systematic seeding errors), detect outliers, and calculate dose-response. The methods would be useful to researchers in preclinical and translational research planning to move away from simplistic monolayer studies and explore 3D spheroid screens for drug safety and efficacy without substantial investment in money or time.

  10. Building Blocks of the Milky Way's Accreted Spheroid

    CERN Document Server

    van Oirschot, Pim; Helmi, Amina; Nelemans, Gijs

    2016-01-01

    In the $\\Lambda$CDM model of structure formation, a stellar spheroid grows by the assembly of smaller galaxies, the so-called building blocks. Combining the Munich-Groningen semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with the high resolution Aquarius simulations of dark matter haloes, we study the assembly history of the stellar spheroids of six Milky Way-mass galaxies, focussing on building block properties such as mass, age and metallicity. These properties are compared to those of the surviving satellites in the same models. We find that the building blocks have higher star formation rates on average, and this is especially the case for the more massive objects. At high redshift these dominate in star formation over the satellites, whose star formation timescales are longer on average. These differences ought to result in a larger $\\alpha$-element enhancement from Type II supernovae in the building blocks (compared to the satellites) by the time Type Ia supernovae would start to enrich them in iron, explain...

  11. Mergers and the outside-in formation of dwarf spheroidals

    CERN Document Server

    Benítez-Llambay, Alejandro; Abadi, Mario G; Gottloeber, Stefan; Yepes, Gustavo; Hoffman, Yehuda; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of the Local Group to explore the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We find that a number of simulated dwarfs form "outside-in", with an old, metal-poor population that surrounds a younger, more concentrated metal-rich component, reminiscent of dwarf spheroidals like Sculptor or Sextans. We focus on a few examples where stars form in two populations distinct in age in order to elucidate the origin of these gradients. The spatial distributions of the two components reflect their diverse origin; the old stellar component is assembled through mergers, but the young population forms largely in situ. The older component results from a first episode of star formation that begins early but is quickly shut off by the combined effects of stellar feedback and reionization. The younger component forms when a late accretion event adds gas and reignites star formation. The effect of mergers is to disperse the old stellar population, incr...

  12. Structural analysis of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present wide-field g- and i-band stellar photometry of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its surrounding area out to four times its half-light radius (rh = 695 pc), based on images obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO. We find clear evidence of stellar substructure associated with the galaxy, extending to a distance of 82 arcmin (2 kpc) from its centre. We perform a statistical analysis of the overdensities and find three distinct features, as well as an extended halo-like structure, to be significant at the 99.7 per cent confidence level or higher. Unlike the extremely elongated and extended substructures surrounding the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the overdensities seen around Sextans are distributed evenly about its centre, and do not appear to form noticeable tidal tails. Fitting a King model to the radial distribution of Sextans stars yields a tidal radius rt = 83.2 arcmin ± 7.1 arcmin (2.08 ± 0.18 kpc), which implies the majority of detected substructure is gravitationally bound to the galaxy. This finding suggests that Sextans is not undergoing significant tidal disruption from the Milky Way, supporting the scenario in which the orbit of Sextans has a low eccentricity.

  13. Dynamics of prolate spheroidal mass distributions with varying eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Rathulnath, R

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the potential for a prolate spheroidal distribution as in a dark matter halo with a radially varying eccentricity. This is obtained by summing up the shell-by-shell contributions of isodensity surfaces, which are taken to be concentric and with a common polar axis and with an axis ratio that varies with radius. Interestingly, the constancy of potential inside a shell is shown to be a good approximation even when the isodensity contours are dissimilar spheroids, as long as the radial variation in eccentricity is small as seen in realistic systems. We consider three cases where the isodensity contours are more prolate at large radii, or are less prolate, or have a constant eccentricity. Other relevant physical quantities like the rotation velocity, the net orbital and vertical frequency due to the halo and an exponential disc of finite thickness embedded in it are obtained. We apply this to the kinematical origin of Galactic warp, and show that a prolate shaped halo is not conducive t...

  14. Discriminating Between the Physical Processes that Drive Spheroid Size Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Hernquist, Lars; Wuyts, Stijn; Cox, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    Massive galaxies at high-z have smaller effective radii than those today, but similar central densities. Their size growth therefore relates primarily to the evolving abundance of low-density material. Various models have been proposed to explain this evolution, which have different implications for galaxy, star, and BH formation. We compile observations of spheroid properties as a function of redshift and use them to test proposed models. Evolution in progenitor gas-richness with redshift gives rise to initial formation of smaller spheroids at high-z. These systems can then evolve in apparent or physical size via several channels: (1) equal-density 'dry' mergers, (2) later major or minor 'dry' mergers with less-dense galaxies, (3) adiabatic expansion, (4) evolution in stellar populations & mass-to-light-ratio gradients, (5) age-dependent bias in stellar mass estimators, (6) observational fitting/selection effects. If any one of these is tuned to explain observed size evolution, they make distinct predict...

  15. Study on the effects of nylon-chitosan-blended membranes on the spheroid-forming activity of human melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Hsiao, Wen-Chu; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Yu, Hsin-Su; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Lai, Juin-Yih; Young, Tai-Horng

    2006-10-01

    Though reported limitedly in tissue engineering, modification of cellular functions can be achieved by culturing them into multicellular spheroids. We have shown melanocytes form spheroids on chitosan surface. However, how biomaterials promote spheroid formation has never been systemically investigated. In this work, nylon, which inhibits melanocyte spheroid formation, and chitosan, which promotes melanocyte spheroid formation, are used to prepare nylon/chitosan-blended membranes. Membranes composed of pure nylon, pure chitosan and various ratios of nylon and chitosan are employed to examine their effects on spheroid formation. Melanocytes show better adhesion to nylon membranes than that to chitosan membranes. In blended membranes, as more nylon is incorporated, cell adhesion increases and the trend for spheroid formation decreases. Melanocytes can only form spheroids on membranes with poorer cell adhesion. Examining the surface of the blended membranes shows phase separation of nylon and chitosan. As nylon content increases, the nylon phase on the membrane surface increases and thereby enhances cell adhesion. The opposite trend for cell adhesion and spheroid formation substantiates our hypothesis of spheroid formation on biomaterials: a balance between cell-substrate interaction and cell-cell interaction. The decrease in cell-substrate interaction tilts the balance to a state more favorable for spheroid formation. Our work can serve as a model to investigate the relative strengths of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and also pave way to design blended membranes with desired physical properties while preserving the spheroid-forming activity.

  16. Tunable dielectric properties of ferrite-dielectric based metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, K; Huang, K; Zeng, L Y; Zhou, M H; Wang, Q M; Wang, Y G; Lei, M

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices.

  17. Ferrite microwave electronics Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-07-01

    Research reports on single crystals, thin films, dielectrics, semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, phase shifters, and waveguide components are cited. Studies on the microwave properties of ferrites are included.

  18. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  19. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  20. Primary structural dynamics in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Sascha; Liang Wenxi; Zewail, Ahmed H, E-mail: zewail@caltech.edu [Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology, Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The structural dynamics of graphite and graphene are unique, because of the selective coupling between electron and lattice motions and hence the limit on electric and electro-optic properties. Here, we report on the femtosecond probing of graphite films (1-3 nm) using ultrafast electron crystallography in the transmission mode. Two time scales are observed for the dynamics: a 700 fs initial decrease in diffraction intensity due to lattice phonons in optically dark regions of the Brillouin zone, followed by a 12 ps decrease due to phonon thermalization near the {Gamma} and K regions. These results indicate the non-equilibrium distortion of the unit cells at early time and the subsequent role of long-wavelength atomic motions in the thermalization process. Theory and experiment are now in agreement regarding the nature of nuclear motions, but the results suggest that potential change plays a role in the lateral dynamics of the lattice.

  1. Ferritic-austenitic cast steel - selected problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Stradomski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The author has been involved in the problems occurring in the manufacture of ferritic-austenitic cast steel castings for many years. The author’s remarks and investigation results reported in this article will enable potential manufacturers to determine their own technical capabilities and structural determinants related to the chemical composition of material, which are crucial to the good quality of a casting. Particular emphasis should be laid on the role of enhanced carbon content, the presence of copper, the precipitates of the ζ phase, and the nature of solidification structure in the tendency of duplex-type cast steel to cracking. It seems that in view of the pro-ecological activities undertaken, including flue gas desulphurization in coal-fired power plants, efforts should be made in steel foundries to introduce selected grades of ferritic-austenitic cast steel to production.

  2. Generation of co-culture spheroids as vascularisation units for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Walser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell spheroids represent attractive building units for bone tissue engineering, because they provide a three-dimensional environment with intensive direct cell-cell contacts. Moreover, they allow for co-culture of both osteoblasts and vessel-forming cells, which may markedly increase their survival and vascularisation after transplantation. To test this hypothesis, we generated co-culture spheroids by aggregating different combinations of primary human osteoblasts (HOB, human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC and normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF using the liquid overlay technique. Mono-culture spheroids consisting either of HOB or HDMEC served as controls. After in vitro characterisation, the different spheroids were transplanted into dorsal skinfold chambers of CD1 nu/nu mice to study in vivo their viability and vascularisation over a 2-week observation period by means of repetitive intravital fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. In vitro, co-culture spheroids containing HDMEC rapidly formed dense tubular vessel-like networks within 72 h and exhibited a significantly decreased rate of apoptotic cell death when compared to mono-culture HDMEC spheroids. After transplantation, these networks interconnected to the host microvasculature by external inosculation. Of interest, this process was most pronounced in HOB-HDMEC spheroids and could not further be improved by the addition of NHDF. Accordingly, HOB-HDMEC spheroids were larger when compared to the other spheroid types. These findings indicate that HOB-HDMEC spheroids exhibit excellent properties to preserve viability and to promote proliferation and vascularisation. Therefore, they may be used as functional vascularisation units in bone tissue engineering for the seeding of scaffolds or for the vitalisation of non-healing large bone defects.

  3. Geometric phases in graphitic cones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtado, Claudio [Departamento de Fisica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)], E-mail: furtado@fisica.ufpb.br; Moraes, Fernando [Departamento de Fisica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Carvalho, A.M. de M [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, BR116-Norte, Km 3, 44031-460 Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil)

    2008-08-04

    In this Letter we use a geometric approach to study geometric phases in graphitic cones. The spinor that describes the low energy states near the Fermi energy acquires a phase when transported around the apex of the cone, as found by a holonomy transformation. This topological result can be viewed as an analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The topological analysis is extended to a system with n cones, whose resulting configuration is described by an effective defect00.

  4. High Efficiency ELID Grinding of Garnet Ferrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hard and brittle materials such as ferrite, optical glass and ceramics have been widely used in many fields because of their good characteristics and still gain more attentions. However, it is difficult to machine and get good surface quality. Some parts made of these materials have large machining allowances and need to be produced with large batch, but the machining efficiency is very low with usual grinding method. So it is of great importance to research the high efficiency grinding technology of hard ...

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Manganese Ferrite Aluminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Dhiman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum doped manganese ferrites MnAlxFe2−xO4 with 0.0≤x≤1.0 have been prepared by the double ceramic route. The formation of mixed spinel phase has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The unit cell parameter `aO' is found to decrease linearly with aluminum concentration due to smaller ionic radius of aluminum. The cation distributions were estimated from X-ray diffraction intensities of various planes. The theoretical lattice parameter, X-ray density, oxygen positional parameter, ionic radii, jump length, and bonds and edges lengths of the tetrahedral (A and octahedral (B sites were determined. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra recorded at room temperature were fitted with two sextets corresponding to Fe3+ ions at A- and B-sites. In the present ferrite system, the area ratio of Fe3+ ions at the A- and B-sites determined from the spectral analysis of Mössbauer spectra gives evidence that Al3+ ions replace iron ions at B-sites. This change in the site preference reflects an abrupt change in magnetic hyperfine fields at A- and B-sites as aluminum concentration increases, which has been explained on the basis of supertransferred hyperfine field. On the basis of estimated cation distribution, it is concluded that aluminum doped manganese ferrites exhibit a 55% normal spinel structure.

  6. The Formation Process of Silico-Ferrite of Calcium (SFC) from Binary Calcium Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiang; Guo, Xing-Min

    2014-08-01

    Silico-ferrite of calcium (SFC) is a significant equilibrium crystalline phase in the Fe2O3-CaO-SiO2 (FCS) ternary system and a key bonding phase in the sintering process of fine iron ore. In this work, the formation process of SFC from binary calcium ferrite has been determined by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Experiments were carried out under air at 1473 K (1200 °C) by adding SiO2 and Fe2O3 into CaO·Fe2O3 (CF). It was found that the formation of SFC is dominated by solid-state reactions in the FCS ternary system, in which Fe2O3 reacts with CaO·Fe2O3 to form the binary calcium ferrite phase. The chemical composition of binary calcium ferrite is Ca2.5Fe15.5O25 and approximately Ca2Fe12O20 (CaO·3Fe2O3). Then Si4+ and Ca2+ ions take the place of Fe3+ ion in preference located on the octahedral layers which belongs to (0 0 18) plane of binary calcium ferrite. The crystal structure of binary calcium ferrite gradually transforms from orthorhombic to triclinic, and the grain is refined with the addition of silica due to the smaller radius of Si4+ ion. A solid solution SFC forms completely when the content of SiO2 reaches approximately 3.37 wt pct at 1473 K (1200 °C).

  7. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  8. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  9. Tribology of Graphite-Filled Polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Gilardi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-lubricating polymer compounds are currently used for a wide range of applications such as bearings, gears, and water meters. Under severe conditions such as high pressure, high velocity, and/or high temperatures, the material fails (PV limit. In this study, we investigated the effect of graphite on the tribological properties of polystyrene (PS with “ball-on-three-plates” tests. Graphite-filled PS plates were produced via an internal mixer and compression molding. Unhardened steel (1.4401 and nylon (PA66 balls were used for the tribological tests. Our results indicate that graphite loading, graphite type, and particle size have a big influence on the friction coefficient, the wear resistance, and the PV limit of PS both against steel and PA66. In particular, primary synthetic graphite performs better than secondary synthetic graphite due to the higher degree of crystallinity.

  10. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  11. Multifactorial Experimental Design to Optimize the Anti-Inflammatory and Proangiogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kaitlin C; Whitehead, Jacklyn; Falahee, Patrick C; Zhou, Dejie; Simon, Scott I; Leach, J Kent

    2017-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell therapies promote wound healing by manipulating the local environment to enhance the function of host cells. Aggregation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into three-dimensional spheroids increases cell survival and augments their anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic potential, yet there is no consensus on the preferred conditions for maximizing spheroid function in this application. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for forming MSC spheroids that simultaneously enhance their anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic nature. We applied a design of experiments (DOE) approach to determine the interaction between three input variables (number of cells per spheroid, oxygen tension, and inflammatory stimulus) on MSC spheroids by quantifying secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), two potent molecules in the MSC secretome. DOE results revealed that MSC spheroids formed with 40,000 cells per spheroid in 1% oxygen with an inflammatory stimulus (Spheroid 1) would exhibit enhanced PGE2 and VEGF production versus those formed with 10,000 cells per spheroid in 21% oxygen with no inflammatory stimulus (Spheroid 2). Compared to Spheroid 2, Spheroid 1 produced fivefold more PGE2 and fourfold more VEGF, providing the opportunity to simultaneously upregulate the secretion of these factors from the same spheroid. The spheroids induced macrophage polarization, sprout formation with endothelial cells, and keratinocyte migration in a human skin equivalent model-demonstrating efficacy on three key cell types that are dysfunctional in chronic non-healing wounds. We conclude that DOE-based analysis effectively identifies optimal culture conditions to enhance the anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic potential of MSC spheroids. Stem Cells 2017;35:1493-1504. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  12. Removal of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Smith, Tara E.

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. On of the isotopes of great concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates 14C is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented here is to develop a practical method by which 14C can be removed. In parallel with these efforts, the same irradiated graphite material is being characterized to identify the chemical form of 14C in irradiated graphite. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam®, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of 14C precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). During post-irradiation thermal treatment, graphite samples were heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without the addition of an oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon only were performed at 900 °C and 1400 °C to evaluate the selective removal of 14C. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 vol% oxygen at temperatures 700 °C and 1400 °C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of 14C. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient 14C removal.

  13. Optimization of Albumin Secretion and Metabolic Activity of Cytochrome P450 1A1 of Human Hepatoblastoma HepG2 Cells in Multicellular Spheroids by Controlling Spheroid Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tomoko; Tanaka, Yutaro; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ogino, Yuka; Kusamori, Kosuke; Mizuno, Narumi; Mizukami, Yuya; Shimizu, Kazunori; Konishi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are useful as three-dimensional cell culture systems and for cell-based therapies. Their successful application requires an understanding of the consequences of spheroid size for cellular functions. In the present study, we prepared multicellular spheroids of different sizes using the human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells, as hepatocytes are frequently used for in vitro drug screening and cell-based therapy. Precise polydimethylsiloxane-based microwells with widths of 360, 450, 560, and 770 µm were fabricated using a micromolding technique. Incubation of HepG2 cells in cell culture plates containing the microwells resulted in the formation of HepG2 spheroids with average diameters of 195, 320, 493, and 548 µm. The cell number per spheroid positively correlated with its diameter, and the viability of HepG2 cells was 94% or above for all samples. The smallest HepG2 spheroids showed the highest albumin secretion. On the other hand, the metabolic activity of 7-ethoxyresorufin, a fluorometric substrate for CYP1A1, increased with increasing spheroid size. These results indicate that controlling spheroid size is important when preparing HepG2 spheroids and that the size of HepG2 spheroids greatly influences the cellular function of HepG2 cells in the spheroids.

  14. UVES Abundances of Stars in Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Venn, Kim; Shetrone, Matt; Primas, Francesca; Hill, Vanessa; Kaufer, Andreas; Szeifert, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a galaxy in possession of a good quantity of gas must want to form stars. It is the details of how and why that baffle us all. The simplest theories either would have this process a carefully self-regulated affair, or one that goes completely out of control and is capable of wrecking the galaxy which hosts it. Of course the majority of galaxies seem to amble along somewhere between these two extremes, and the mean properties tend to favour a quiescent self-regulated evolutionary scenario. But there area variety of observations which require us to invoke transitory ‘bursts’ of star-formation at one time or another in most galaxy types. Several nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies have clearly determined star-formation histories with apparent periods of zero star formation followed by periods of fairly active star formation. If we are able to understand what separated these bursts we would understand several important phenomena in galaxy evolution. Were these galaxies able to clear out their gas reservoir in a burst of star formation? How did this gas return? or did it? Have these galaxies receieved gas from the IGM instead? Could stars from these types of galaxy contribute significantly to the halo population in our Galaxy? To answer these questions we need to combine accurate stellar photometry and Colour-Magnitude Diagram interpretation with detailed metal abundances to combine a star-formation rate versus time with a range of element abundances with time. Different elements trace different evolutionary process (e.g., relative contributions of type I and II supernovae). We often aren't even sure of the abundance spread in these galaxies. We have collected detailed high resolution UVES spectra of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I & Carina) to begin to answer these questions. This is a precursor study to a more complete study with FLAMES. We presented at this meeting the initial results for

  15. Graphite nanoplatelets produced by oxidation and thermal exfoliation of graphite and electrical conductivities of their epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Mohsin Ali; Westwood, Aidan; Brown, Andy; Hondow, Nicole; Stirling, Chris

    2012-12-01

    Graphite nanoplatelets were produced by sonication of thermally reduced graphite oxide produced from three precursor graphites. The thicknesses of the resulting graphite nanoplatlets were measured by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The type and size of the precursor graphite plays an important role in the final graphite nanoplatelet quality. The thinnest graphite nanoplatelets (average thickness of 4-7 nm) were obtained from Sri Lankan powdered graphite (average particle size of 0.1-0.2 mm). Thicker graphite nanoplatelets (average thickness of 30-60 nm), were obtained from a Canadian graphite (with an average flake size of 0.5-2 mm). Graphite nanoplatelets obtained by acid intercalation of Sri Lankan graphite were much thicker (an average thickness of 150 nm). Graphite nanoplatelet/epoxy composites containing 4 wt.% graphite nanoplatelets derived from Canadian or Sri Lankan natural graphite have electrical conductivities significantly above the percolation conductivity threshold. In contrast, corresponding composites, produced with (4 wt.%) commercial graphite nanoplatelets, either as-received or re-exfoliated, were electrically insulating. This behaviour is attributed to the highly wrinkled morphology, folded edges and abundant surface functional groups of the commercial graphite nanoplatelets. Thermal reduction of graphite oxide produced from natural flake graphite is therefore a promising route for producing graphite nanoplatelets fillers for electrically-conducting polymer composites.

  16. Role of intensive milling in the processing of barium ferrite/magnetite/iron hybrid magnetic nano-composites via partial reduction of barium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaei, M.J., E-mail: mj.molaee@merc.ac.ir [Materials and Energy Research Center, P.O. Box: 31787-316, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Delft Chem Tech, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft (Netherlands); Ataie, A.; Raygan, S. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box: 14395-553, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Picken, S.J. [Delft Chem Tech, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    In this research a mixture of barium ferrite and graphite was milled for different periods of time and then heat treated at different temperatures. The effects of milling time and heat treatment temperature on the phase composition, thermal behavior, morphology and magnetic properties of the samples have been investigated using X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques, respectively. X-ray diffraction results revealed that BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites form after a 20 h milling due to the partial reduction of BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}. High resolution transmission electron microscope images of a 40 h milled sample showed agglomerated structure consisting of nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 30 nm. Thermal analysis of the samples via differential thermal analysis indicated that for un-milled samples, heat treatment up to 900 °C did not result in α-Fe formation, while for a 20 h milled sample heat treatment at 700 °C resulted in reduction process progress to the formation of α-Fe. Wustite was disappeared in an X-ray diffraction pattern of a heat treated sample at 850 °C, by increasing the milling time from 20 to 40 h. By increasing the milling time, the structure of heat treated samples becomes magnetically softer due to an increase in saturation magnetization and a decrease in coercivity. Saturation magnetization and coercivity of a sample milled for 20 h and heat treated at 850 °C were 126.3 emu/g and 149.5 Oe which by increasing the milling time to 40 h, alter to 169.1 emu/g and 24.3 Oe, respectively. High coercivity values of milled and heat treated samples were attributed to the nano-scale formed iron particles. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Barium ferrite and graphite were treated mechano-thermally. • Increasing milling time increases reduction progress after heat treatment. • Composites

  17. Fully Automated One-Step Production of Functional 3D Tumor Spheroids for High-Content Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjaret, François; Fernandes, Mathieu; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Argento, Amelie; Degot, Sébastien; Young, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of spheroids within high-content screening (HCS) has lagged behind high-throughput screening (HTS) due to issues with running complex assays on large three-dimensional (3D) structures.To enable multiplexed imaging and analysis of spheroids, different cancer cell lines were grown in 3D on micropatterned 96-well plates with automated production of nine uniform spheroids per well. Spheroids achieve diameters of up to 600 µm, and reproducibility was experimentally validated (interwell and interplate CV(diameter) integration of micropatterned spheroid models within fundamental research and drug discovery applications.

  18. Oxidation performance of graphite material in reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowei LUO; Xinli YU; Suyuan YU

    2008-01-01

    Graphite is used as a structural material and moderator for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). When a reactor is in operation, graphite oxida-tion influences the safety and operation of the reactor because of the impurities in the coolant and/or the acci-dent conditions, such as water ingress and air ingress. In this paper, the graphite oxidation process is introduced, factors influencing graphite oxidation are analyzed and discussed, and some new directions for further study are pointed out.

  19. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  20. The Fracture Toughness of Nuclear Graphites Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erdman, III, Donald L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Rick R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunter, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hannel, Cara C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    New measurements of graphite mode I critical stress intensity factor, KIc (commonly referred to as the fracture toughness) and the mode II critical shear stress intensity, KIIc, are reported and compared with prior data for KIc and KIIc. The new data are for graphite grades PCEA, IG-110 and 2114. Variations of KIc and acoustic emission (AE) data with graphite texture are reported and discussed. The Codes and Standards applications of fracture toughness, KIc, data are also discussed. A specified minimum value for nuclear graphite KIc is recommended.

  1. AC induction field heating of graphite foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, James W.; Rios, Orlando; Kisner, Roger

    2017-08-22

    A magneto-energy apparatus includes an electromagnetic field source for generating a time-varying electromagnetic field. A graphite foam conductor is disposed within the electromagnetic field. The graphite foam when exposed to the time-varying electromagnetic field conducts an induced electric current, the electric current heating the graphite foam. An energy conversion device utilizes heat energy from the heated graphite foam to perform a heat energy consuming function. A device for heating a fluid and a method of converting energy are also disclosed.

  2. Nickel coated graphite fiber conductive composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.E.; Hall, D.E.; Luxon, B.A.

    1986-07-01

    Nickel coated graphite (NCG) fiber, consisting of a thin continuous plating of high purity nickel over an aerospace-grade graphite core, offers performance added features by combining the lightweight and high structural reinforcement of graphite fiber with the thermal and electrical conductivity of nickel. These NCG filaments, which are composite constructions in their own right, can be processed and impregnated with thermosetting or thermoplastic resins in the same manner that graphite fiber tows are processed and impregnated to produce roving, tape or fabric prepreg. Therefore, NCG fibers can be readily integrated into structural laminate assemblies using established composites-manufacturing practices.

  3. Identification of Lgr5-Independent Spheroid-Generating Progenitors of the Mouse Fetal Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana C. Mustata

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Immortal spheroids were generated from fetal mouse intestine using the culture system initially developed to culture organoids from adult intestinal epithelium. Spheroid proportion progressively decreases from fetal to postnatal period, with a corresponding increase in production of organoids. Like organoids, spheroids show Wnt-dependent indefinite self-renewing properties but display a poorly differentiated phenotype reminiscent of incompletely caudalized progenitors. The spheroid transcriptome is strikingly different from that of adult intestinal stem cells, with minimal overlap of Wnt target gene expression. The receptor LGR4, but not LGR5, is essential for their growth. Trop2/Tacstd2 and Cnx43/Gja1, two markers highly enriched in spheroids, are expressed throughout the embryonic-day-14 intestinal epithelium. Comparison of in utero and neonatal lineage tracing using Cnx43-CreER and Lgr5-CreERT2 mice identified spheroid-generating cells as developmental progenitors involved in generation of the prenatal intestinal epithelium. Ex vivo, spheroid cells have the potential to differentiate into organoids, qualifying as a fetal type of intestinal stem cell.

  4. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Shahzadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs are formed on the wetting layer (WL. However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere. In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  5. Early formation of massive, compact, spheroidal galaxies with classical profiles by violent disc instability or mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Ceverino, Daniel; Tweed, Dylan; Primack, Joel

    2014-01-01

    We address the formation of massive stellar spheroids between redshifts $z=4$ and 1 using a suite of AMR hydro-cosmological simulations. The spheroids form as bulges, and the spheroid mass growth is partly driven by violent disc instability (VDI) and partly by mergers. A kinematic decomposition to disc and spheroid yields that the mass fraction in the spheroid is between 50% and 90% and is roughly constant in time, consistent with a cosmological steady state of VDI discs that are continuously fed from the cosmic web. The density profile of the spheroid is typically classical, with a Sersic index $n = 4.5\\pm 1$, independent of whether it grew by mergers or VDI. The disc is characterized by $n=1.5\\pm 0.5$, and the whole galaxy by $n=3\\pm 1$. The high-redshift spheroids are compact due to the dissipative inflow of gas and the high universal density. The stellar surface density within the effective radius of each galaxy as it evolves remains roughly constant in time after its first growth. For galaxies of a fixed...

  6. Evaluation of bioactivity of octacalcium phosphate using osteoblastic cell aggregates on a spheroid culture device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahisa Anada

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Much attention has been paid to three-dimensional cell culture systems in the field of regenerative medicine, since three-dimensional cellular aggregates, or spheroids, are thought to better mimic the in vivo microenvironments compared to conventional monolayer cultured cells. Synthetic calcium phosphate (CaP materials are widely used as bone substitute materials in orthopedic and dental surgeries. Here we have developed a technique for constructing a hybrid spheroid consisting of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and synthetic CaP materials using a spheroid culture device. We found that the device is able to generate uniform-sized CaP/cell hybrid spheroids rapidly and easily. The results showed that the extent of osteoblastic differentiation from MSCs was different when cells were grown on octacalcium phosphate (OCP, hydroxyapatite (HA, or β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP. OCP showed the greatest ability to increase the alkaline phosphatase activity of the spheroid cells. The results suggest that the spheroids with incorporated OCP may be an effective implantable hybrid consisting of scaffold material and cells for bone regeneration. It is also possible that this CaP–cell spheroid system may be used as an in vitro method for assessing the osteogenic induction ability of CaP materials.

  7. Isolation, identification, and spheroids formation of breast cancer stem cells, therapeutics implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maytham Abbas Abboodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are population of cells present in tumors, which can undergo self-renewal and differentiation. Three-dimensional (3D in vitro models mimic features of the in vivo environment and provide unique perspectives on the behavior of stem cells. Materials and Methods: In this study, MDA-MB 231 cells were grown in two-dimensional (2D monolayers and 3D spheroid formats and CSCs were isolated and grown as spheroids. The isolated CSCs were subjected to molecular studies for detection of CD44, CD24, MMP1, ABCG2, ALDH1, and GAPDH markers. Results: The monolayer of CSCs grown as spheroids showed better growth rate than the MDA-MB 231 cells, which shows the efficacy of 3D spheroid format of growing CSCs. CD44 show increased expression in spheroids compared to 2D culture of MDA-MB 231. ALDH1 a key marker of breast stem cells was highly expressed in BCSCs and MDA-MB 231 grown in 3D, while being absent in CSCs and MDA-MB 231 cells grown in 2D. Conclusions: The CSCs grown as spheroids showed better growth rate, which showed the efficacy of 3D spheroid format for CSCs culture. Since the association between BCSCs prevalence and clinical outcome and the evidence presented in this study support key roles of CSCs in breast cancer metastasis and drug resistance, it has been proposed that new therapies must target these cells.

  8. Encapsulated multicellular tumor spheroids as a novel in vitro model to study small size tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markvicheva Elena

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Presently multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS are being widely used in various aspects of tumor biology, including studies in biology and photodynamic therapy. The cellular organization of spheroids allows the recreation of in vivo small tumors much better than all common two-dimensional in vitro models. The cell encapsulation method could be proposed as a novel technique to quickly and easily prepare a large number of spheroids with narrow size distribution within a desirable diameter range. Moreover, the proposed technique for spheroid generation using encapsulated growing tumor cells could provide entirely new avenues to develop a novel spheroid co-culture model (for instance, the in vitro co-cultvation of tumor cells and monocytes, or epithelial cells, or fibroblasts etc. The current research was aimed at developing a simple and reliable method to encapsulate tumor cells and to cultivate them in vitro. In order to generate spheroids, MCF-7 cells were encapsulated and cultivated in 200 ml T-flasks in a 5% CO2 atmosphere at 37°C for 4-5 weeks. The cell proliferation was easily observed using a light microscope. The cells grew in aggregates increasing in size with time. The cell growth resulted in the formation of large cell clusters (spheroids which filled the whole microcapsule volume in 4-5 weeks.

  9. Electromagnetic scattering by spheroidal volumes of discrete random medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.

    2017-10-01

    We use the superposition T-matrix method to compare the far-field scattering matrices generated by spheroidal and spherical volumes of discrete random medium having the same volume and populated by identical spherical particles. Our results fully confirm the robustness of the previously identified coherent and diffuse scattering regimes and associated optical phenomena exhibited by spherical particulate volumes and support their explanation in terms of the interference phenomenon coupled with the order-of-scattering expansion of the far-field Foldy equations. We also show that increasing nonsphericity of particulate volumes causes discernible (albeit less pronounced) optical effects in forward and backscattering directions and explain them in terms of the same interference/multiple-scattering phenomenon.

  10. Spheroid degeneration of conjunctiva and cornea. Two years' follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M

    1980-10-01

    Twenty-six subjects with spheroid degeneration were followed up after two years. The number of colourless conjunctival droplets was seen to have increased by on an average 46% (2 alpha = 0.05) and that of autofluorescent conjunctival droplets by 223% (2 alpha less than 0.01). Counting within the individual sites sites disclosed that some droplets will disappear (not less than 30 and 21% respectivelY), while recently formed will constitute at least 76 and 243%. The number of areas with band-shaped keratopathy was found to rise from 3 to 26 (P less than 0.001) out of 104 possibilities, (nasally and temporally of right and left eye). Vital staining (fluorescein, rose bengal, tetrazolium, alcian blue) showed the epithelium above the droplets to be intact, and the droplet-containing eyes were found not to be abnormally dry (break up time, tear production).

  11. The influence of binary stars on dwarf spheroidal galaxy kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, J C; Annan, J D

    1995-01-01

    We have completed a Monte-Carlo simulation to estimate the effect of binary star orbits on the measured velocity dispersion in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. This paper analyses previous attempts at this calculation, and explains the simulations which were performed with mass, period and ellipticity distributions similar to that measured for the solar neighbourhood. The conclusion is that with functions such as these, the contribution of binary stars to the velocity dispersion is small. The distributions are consistent with the percentage of binaries detected by observations, although this is quite dependent on the measuring errors and on the number of years over which measurements have been taken. For binaries to be making a significant contribution to the dispersion measured in dSph galaxies, the distributions of the orbital parameters would need to be very different from those of stars in the solar neighbourhood. In particular more smaller period orbits with higher mass secondaries would be required. The shape...

  12. Eigenvalue spectrum of the spheroidal harmonics: A uniform asymptotic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-06-01

    The spheroidal harmonics Slm (θ ; c) have attracted the attention of both physicists and mathematicians over the years. These special functions play a central role in the mathematical description of diverse physical phenomena, including black-hole perturbation theory and wave scattering by nonspherical objects. The asymptotic eigenvalues {Alm (c) } of these functions have been determined by many authors. However, it should be emphasized that all the previous asymptotic analyzes were restricted either to the regime m → ∞ with a fixed value of c, or to the complementary regime | c | → ∞ with a fixed value of m. A fuller understanding of the asymptotic behavior of the eigenvalue spectrum requires an analysis which is asymptotically uniform in both m and c. In this paper we analyze the asymptotic eigenvalue spectrum of these important functions in the double limit m → ∞ and | c | → ∞ with a fixed m / c ratio.

  13. Eigenvalue spectrum of the spheroidal harmonics: A uniform asymptotic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-01-01

    The spheroidal harmonics $S_{lm}(\\theta;c)$ have attracted the attention of both physicists and mathematicians over the years. These special functions play a central role in the mathematical description of diverse physical phenomena, including black-hole perturbation theory and wave scattering by nonspherical objects. The asymptotic eigenvalues $\\{A_{lm}(c)\\}$ of these functions have been determined by many authors. However, it should be emphasized that all previous asymptotic analyzes were restricted either to the regime $m\\to\\infty$ with a fixed value of $c$, or to the complementary regime $|c|\\to\\infty$ with a fixed value of $m$. A fuller understanding of the asymptotic behavior of the eigenvalue spectrum requires an analysis which is asymptotically uniform in both $m$ and $c$. In this paper we analyze the asymptotic eigenvalue spectrum of these important functions in the double limit $m\\to\\infty$ and $|c|\\to\\infty$ with a fixed $m/c$ ratio.

  14. Landslides and Mass Shedding on Spinning Spheroidal Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Scheeres, D J

    2014-01-01

    Conditions for regolith landslides to occur on spinning, gravitating spheroidal asteroids and their aftermath are studied. These conditions are developed by application of classical granular mechanics stability analysis to the asteroid environment. As part of our study we determine how slopes evolve across the surface of these bodies as a function of spin rate, the dynamical fate of material that exceeds the angle of repose, and an analysis of how the shape of the body may be modified based on these results. We find specific characteristics for body surfaces and shapes when spun near the surface disruption limit and develop what their observable implications are. The small, oblate and rapidly spinning asteroids such as 1999 KW4 Alpha and 2008 EV5 exhibit some of these observable traits. The detailed mechanisms outlined here can also provide insight and constraints on the recently observed active asteroids such as P/2013 P5, and the creation of asteroidal meteor streams.

  15. Photoelectrochemical properties of ferrites with the spinel structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haart, L.G.J. De; Blasse, G.

    1985-01-01

    The photoelectrochemical properties of the ferrites ZnFe2O4, MgFe2O4 and Li0.5O4 with the spinel structure are reported. The ferrites seem reasonable candidates for photoanodes in a photoelectrochemical cell, because of their 2.2 eV bandgap. The results show, however, that the visible absorptivity,

  16. A model for ferrite-loaded transversely biased coaxial resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acar, Öncel; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a simple model for shortened coaxial cavity resonators with transversely biased ferrite elements. The ferrite allows the resonance frequency to be tuned, and the presented model provides a method of approximately calculating these frequencies to generate the tuning curve...

  17. Fundamental study of a one-step ambient temperature ferrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fundamental study of a one-step ambient temperature ferrite process for treatment ... The approach involves the controlled oxidation of ferrous-containing AMD water at ... The resulting oxidation product is the ferrite (M13+2M22+O4) magnetite ...

  18. Structural investigation of an extended milled ferrite powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisin, A.M.; Macrin, M. (Institutul de Cercetari Electronice, Bucharest (Romania))

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the structural modifications introduced by the extended milling and annealing processes in the barium ferrite powder during its preparation is presented. X-ray diffraction measuements on a barium ferrite powder in various milling and annealing conditions have been carried out and the results concerning the phase compositions, lattice constants and crystallite sizes are discussed.

  19. Defects, phase transformations and magnetic properties of lithium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, R.K.

    1977-03-01

    Achieving suitable magnetic properties in ceramic ferrites through thermomechanical treatments rather than through varying the processing and fabrication parameters alone has been investigated. Ferrimagnetic lithium ferrite and some other spinel structure materials were chosen for this investigation. Extensive characterization of phase transformations and lattice defects was done.

  20. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time.

  1. Motion of a rigid prolate spheroid in a sound wave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongkun; Hong, Lianjin

    2014-08-01

    The motions of a rigid and unconstrained prolate spheroid subjected to plane sound waves are computed using preliminary analytic derivation and numerical approach. The acoustically induced motions are found comprising torsional motion as well as translational motion in the case of acoustic oblique incidence and present great relevance to the sound wavelength, body geometry, and density. The relationship between the motions and acoustic particle velocity is obtained through finite element simulation in terms of sound wavelengths much longer than the overall size of the prolate spheroid. The results are relevant to the design of inertial acoustic particle velocity sensors based on prolate spheroids.

  2. Shape effects on dynamics of inertia-free spheroids in wall turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy; Zhao, Lihao; Andersson, Helge I. [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-06-15

    The rotational motion of inertia-free spheroids has been studied in a numerically simulated turbulent channel flow. Although inertia-free spheroids were translated as tracers with the flow, neither the disk-like nor the rod-like particles adapted to the fluid rotation. The flattest disks preferentially aligned their symmetry axes normal to the wall, whereas the longest rods were parallel with the wall. The shape-dependence of the particle orientations carried over to the particle rotation such that the mean spin was reduced with increasing departure from sphericity. The streamwise spin fluctuations were enhanced due to asphericity, but substantially more for prolate than for oblate spheroids.

  3. Solution of Axisymmetric Potential Problem in Oblate Spheroid Using the Exodus Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Momoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of Exodus method for computing potential distribution within a conducting oblate spheroidal system. An explicit finite difference method for solving Laplace’s equation in oblate spheroidal coordinate systems for an axially symmetric geometry was developed. This was used to determine the transition probabilities for the Exodus method. A strategy was developed to overcome the singularity problems encountered in the oblate spheroid pole regions. The potential computation results obtained correlate with those obtained by exact solution and explicit finite difference methods.

  4. Leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary leukodystrophy (POLD): a single entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider, C; Van Gerpen, J A; DeArmond, S; Shuster, E A; Dickson, D W; Wszolek, Z K

    2009-06-02

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and familial pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) present as adult-onset dementia with motor impairment and epilepsy. They are regarded as distinct diseases. We review data from the literature that support their being a single entity. Apart from a slightly older age at onset, a more rapid course, and more prominent pyramidal tract involvement, familial POLD is clinically similar to HDLS. Moreover, the pathologic hallmarks of the two diseases, axonal spheroids in HDLS and pigmented macrophages in POLD, can be identified in both conditions. This supports HDLS and POLD being referred collectively as adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP).

  5. Modeling non-saturated ferrite-based devices: Application to twin toroid ferrite phase shifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gouellec, A.; Vérissimo, G.; Laur, V.; Queffelec, P.; Albert, I.; Girard, T.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a new set of tools developed to improve the conception and modeling of non-saturated ferrite-based devices such as twin toroid phase shifters. These new simulation tools benefit from a generalized permeability tensor model able to describe the permeability tensor of a ferrite sample whatever its magnetization state. This model is coupled to a homemade 3D multi-scale magnetostatic analysis program, which describes the evolution of the magnetization through the definition of a hysteresis loop in every mesh cell. These computed spectra are then integrated into 3D electromagnetic simulation software that retains the spatial variations of the ferrite properties by using freshly developed macro programming functions. This new approach allows the designers to accurately model complex ferrite devices such as twin toroid phase shifters. In particular, we demonstrated a good agreement between simulated and measured phase shifts as a function of applied current values with a predicted maximum phase shift of 0.96 times the measured value.

  6. Substrate integrated ferrite phase shifters and active frequency selective surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, B M

    2002-01-01

    There are two distinct parts to this thesis; the first investigates the use of ferrite tiles in the construction of printed phase shifting transmission lines, culminating in the design of two compact electromagnetic controlled beam steered patch and slot antenna arrays. The second part investigates the use of active frequency selective surfaces (AFSS), which are later used to cover a uPVC constructed enclosure. Field intensity measurements are taken from within the enclosure to determine the dynamic screening effectiveness. Trans Tech G-350 Ferrite is investigated to determine its application in printed microstrip and stripline phase shifting transmission lines. 50-Ohm transmission lines are constructed using the ferrite tile and interfaced to Rogers RT Duroid 5870 substrate. Scattering parameter measurements are made under the application of variable magnetic fields to the ferrite. Later, two types of planar microwave beam steering antennas are constructed. The first uses the ferrites integrated into the Dur...

  7. Electrical transport behavior of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatak, S. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Deemed University, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Sinha, M. [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India); Meikap, A.K., E-mail: meikapnitd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Deemed University, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Pradhan, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the direct current conductivity, alternate current conductivity and dielectric properties of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite below room temperature. The frequency exponent (s) of conductivity shows an anomalous temperature dependency. The magnitude of the temperature exponent (n) of dielectric permittivity strongly depends on frequency and its value decreases with increasing frequency. The grain boundary contribution is dominating over the grain contribution in conduction process and the temperature dependence of resistance due to grain and grain boundary contribution exhibits two activation regions. The ferrite shows positive alternating current magnetoconductivity. The solid state processing technique was used for the preparation of nanocrystalline ferrite powder from oxides of magnesium, zinc and iron. The X-ray diffraction methods were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained ferrite, while multimeter, impedance analyzer, liquid nitrogen cryostat and electromagnet were used in the study of conducting and dielectric properties of ferrite.

  8. Electronic structure of graphite; Elektronische Struktur von Graphit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsheimer, W.

    2000-07-01

    In an all-electron calculation ab initio the electronic properties of graphite in the ground state were self-consistently determined by means of the MAPW procedure in warped-muffin-tin approximation. many- particle effects were regarded in the framework of the density- functional theory in the parametrization of the local density approximation of Hedin and Lundqvist. Starting from the determined self-consistent one-particle potential via the Fourier transformed of the Bloch wave functions the electronic momentum densities perpendicular and parallel to the layer-planes of all occupied states of graphite were calculated and compared with newer experimental and theoretical values. The special approach of the MAPW mehtod guarantees continuousness of the wave function and its first derivative in the whole Wigner-Seitz cell and by this a fast decreasement of the Fourier coefficients. This fact was used for the calculation of the easily accessible Compton profiles, which represent an integration over all components of the momentum density in the crystal direction of interest. These results, especially the anisotropic Compton profile, were also compared with experimental works and other calculations.

  9. Analysis of Wigner energy release process in graphite stack of shut-down uranium-graphite reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bespala, E. V.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Data, which finding during thermal differential analysis of sampled irradiated graphite are presented. Results of computational modeling of Winger energy release process from irradiated graphite staking are demonstrated. It's shown, that spontaneous combustion of graphite possible only in adiabatic case.

  10. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng, E-mail: wsc33333@163.com; Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  11. Assessment of the integrity of ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joints of different grades of Cr-Mo ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    2010-07-01

    Integrity of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800, 9Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800 and 9Cr-1Mo-VNb / Alloy 800 ferritic-austenitic dissimilar joints, fusion welded employing Inconel 182 electrode, has been assessed under creep conditions at 823 K. The dissimilar weld joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals. The strength reduction was more for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and least for 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. The failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of heat-affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with decrease in stress. At still lower stresses the failure occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface. Localized creep deformation and cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure whereas creep cavitation at the weld interface particles induced ferritic / austenitic interface cracking due to high creep strength mismatch across it. Micromechanisms of type IV failure and interface cracking in the ferritic / austenitic joints and different susceptibility to failure for different grades of ferritic steels are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing and finite element analysis. (Note from indexer: paper contains many typographical errors.)

  12. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V. [Instituto de Tecnologías y Ciencias de la Ingeniería, “Ing. H. Fernández Long,” Av. Paseo Colón 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Institut Universitari de Ciència dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Agouram, S. [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  13. Significance of primary irradiation creep in graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally primary irradiation creep is introduced into graphite analysis by applying the appropriate amount of creep strain to the model at the initial time-step. This is valid for graphite components that are subjected to high fast neutron flux...

  14. Structure-Property Relationships in Intercalated Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-10

    and . vermicular graphite host materials. Detailed TEM results show that the glassy phase is induced by the electron beam irradiation through a...sample thickness could be related to the observation of a glass phase, experiments were carried out using both kish and vermicular graphite host materials

  15. Tire containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A tire, tire lining or inner tube, containing a polymer composite, made of at least one rubber and/or at least one elastomer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g.

  16. Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

    2013-10-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900°C. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

  17. Magnetic resonance in superparamagnetic zinc ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jitendra Pal Singh; Gagan Dixit; R C Srivastava; Hemant Kumar; H M Agrawal; Prem Chand

    2013-08-01

    In the present work, we have synthesized zinc ferrite nanoparticles by nitrate method. Presence of almost zero value of coercivity and remanence in the hysteresis of these samples shows the superparamagnetic nature at room temperature. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on these samples in the temperature range 120–300 K indicates the systematic variation of the line-shapes of the spectra with temperature. Both gvalue and peak-to-peak linewidth decrease with increase in temperature. The variation of g-values and peak-topeak linewidth with temperature has been fitted with existing models and we observed different values of activation energies of the spins for both the samples.

  18. CASS Ferrite and Grain Structure Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruud, Clayton O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Michael T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-13

    This document summarizes the results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine whether, based on experimental measurements, a correlation existed between grain structure in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping and ferrite content of the casting alloy. The motivation for this research lies in the fact that ultrasonic testing (UT) is strongly influenced by CASS grain structure; knowledge of this grain structure may help improve the ability to interpret UT responses, thereby improving the overall reliability of UT inspections of CASS components.

  19. Atomically flat ultrathin cobalt ferrite islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-García, Laura; Quesada, Adrián; Munuera, Carmen; Fernández, Jose F; García-Hernández, Mar; Foerster, Michael; Aballe, Lucía; de la Figuera, Juan

    2015-10-21

    A route for fabricating structurally perfect cobalt ferrite magnetic nanostructures is demonstrated. Ultrathin islands of up to 100 μm(2) with atomically flat surfaces and free from antiphase boundaries are developed. The extremely low defect concentration leads to a robust magnetic order, even for thicknesses below 1 nm, and exceptionally large magnetic domains. This approach allows the evaluation of the influence of specific extrinsic effects on domain wall pinning. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  1. Fiber release characteristics of graphite hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers different material concepts that can be fabricated of hybridized composites which demonstrate improved graphite fiber retention capability in a severe fire without significant reduction to the composite properties. More than 30 panels were fabricated for mechanical and fire tests, the details and results of which are presented. Methods of composite hybridization investigated included the addition of oxidation resistant fillers to the resin, mechanically interlocking the graphite fibers by the use of woven fabrics, and the addition of glass fibers and glass additives designed to melt and fuse the graphite fibers together. It is concluded that a woven fabric with a serving of glass around each graphite tow is by far the superior of those evaluated: not only is there a coalescing effect in each graphite layer, but there is also a definite adhesion of each layer to its neighbor.

  2. Significance of primary irradiation creep in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erasmus, Christiaan, E-mail: christiaan.erasmus@gmail.com [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Proprietary) Limited, PO Box 9396, Centurion 0046 (South Africa); Kok, Schalk [Advanced Mathematical Modelling, CSIR Modelling and Digital Science, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Hindley, Michael P. [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Proprietary) Limited, PO Box 9396, Centurion 0046 (South Africa)

    2013-05-15

    Traditionally primary irradiation creep is introduced into graphite analysis by applying the appropriate amount of creep strain to the model at the initial time-step. This is valid for graphite components that are subjected to high fast neutron flux fields and constant stress fields, but it does not allow for the effect of movement of stress locations around a graphite component during life, nor does it allow primary creep to be applied rate-dependently to graphite components subject to lower fast neutron flux. This paper shows that a differential form of primary irradiation creep in graphite combined with the secondary creep formulation proposed by Kennedy et al. performs well when predicting creep behaviour in experimental samples. The significance of primary irradiation creep in particular in regions with lower flux is investigated. It is shown that in low flux regions with a realistic operating lifetime primary irradiation creep is significant and is larger than secondary irradiation creep.

  3. Damping behavior of synthetic graphite beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to obtain the damping factor (xi as well as the elasticity modulus (E of two kinds of synthetic graphite (HLM and ATJ, using the modal analysis technique. Prismatic beams of square section (~ 11 x 11 mm and length over thickness ratio (L/t of about 22.7 were tested in the free - free boundary condition. The first four modes of vibration were taken into account in the non-destructive evaluation of the materials. In addition, numerical simulations were also carried out in this investigation. The agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results was quite good. The average values of E and xi for the HLM graphite were 20% and 90% higher, respectively, than those presented by the ATJ graphite, indicating that the HLM graphite has, proportionally, more damping mechanisms than the ATJ graphite.

  4. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    CERN Document Server

    Mitri, F G

    2015-01-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (\\theta = \\pi) in the near-field and the backscattering form function in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam \\beta, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) due to the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigati...

  5. Green's function and image system for the Laplace operator in the prolate spheroidal geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Changfeng; Deng, Shaozhong

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper, electrostatic image theory is studied for Green's function for the Laplace operator in the case where the fundamental domain is either the exterior or the interior of a prolate spheroid. In either case, an image system is developed to consist of a point image inside the complement of the fundamental domain and an additional symmetric continuous surface image over a confocal prolate spheroid outside the fundamental domain, although the process of calculating such an image system is easier for the exterior than for the interior Green's function. The total charge of the surface image is zero and its centroid is at the origin of the prolate spheroid. In addition, if the source is on the focal axis outside the prolate spheroid, then the image system of the exterior Green's function consists of a point image on the focal axis and a line image on the line segment between the two focal points.

  6. Study of human prostate spheroids treated with zinc using X-ray microfluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Pereira, Gabriela R., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: gpereira@metalmat.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Carlos A.N., E-mail: cansantos.bio@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (DIPRO/INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Nasciutti, Luiz E., E-mail: nasciutt@ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (ICB/CCS/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Interacoes Celulares; Souza, Pedro A.V.R., E-mail: pedroaugustoreis@uol.com.br [Hospital Federal do Andarai (HFA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Urologia; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Estatual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Spheroids cell culture is a useful technique for tissue engineering or regenerative medicine re-search, pharmacological and toxicological studies, and fundamental studies in cell biology. In this study, we investigated Zn distribution in cell spheroids in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (DU145) and analyzed the differences in the response to Zinc (0-150 μM) treatment. The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed non-uniform distribution of Zn in all the spheroids analyzed. The differential response to zinc of DU145 and BPH cell spheroids suggests that zinc may have an important role in prostate cancer and BPH diagnosis. (author)

  7. Patient-specific three-dimensional explant spheroids derived from human nasal airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, June Kehlet; Stevens, Elizabeth Munkebjerg; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional explant spheroid formation is an ex vivo technique previously used in studies of airway epithelial ion and water transport. Explanted cells and sheets of nasal epithelium form fully differentiated spheroids enclosing a partly fluid-filled lumen with the ciliated apical....... Nasal ciliary cells and sheets were removed on day 1 by nasal brush biopsy and analyzed with regard to ciliary beat pattern-and frequency using high-speed video imaging for standard reference values. Three-dimensional explant spheroid formation was initiated in the same individual on the same day...... was successful in 15 out of 18 (82%) sampled individuals. Thus, formation was successful in seven healthy controls and eight PCD patients, while unsuccessful in 3 with PCD due to infection. Median (range) number of days in culture before harvesting of spheroids was 4 (1-5) in healthy versus 2 (1-5) in PCD...

  8. Surface chemistry-mediated penetration and gold nanorod thermotherapy in multicellular tumor spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shubin; Ma, Xiaowei; Ma, Huili; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liu, Juan; Hou, Shuai; Meng, Jie; Wang, Paul C.; Wu, Xiaochun; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit.We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods section. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31877f

  9. Inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in wider size range and aspect ratio range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-spherical particle sizing is very important in the aerosol science, and it can be determined by the light extinction measurement. This paper studies the effect of relationship of the size range and aspect ratio range on the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution by the dependent mode algorithm. The T matrix method and the geometric optics approximation method are used to calculate the extinction efficiency of the spheroids with different size range and aspect ratio range, and the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in these different ranges is conducted. Numerical simulation indicates that a fairly reasonable representation of the spheroid particle size distribution can be obtained when the size range and aspect ratio range are suitably chosen.

  10. Spheroids at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary are altered impact droplets of basaltic composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, A.; Hay, R.L.; Alvarez, W.; Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.; Alvarez, L.W.; Smit, J.

    1983-11-01

    Sand-size spheroids of K-feldspar in the Cretaceous-Tertiary (C-T) boundary clay at Caravaca, southern Spain, were interpreted by Smit and Klaver as having solidified from a melt resulting from the impact of a large extraterrestrial body. Sand-size spheroids of K-feldspar, glauconite, and magnetite-quartz have been found in the C-T boundary clay in northern Italy, and spheroids of K-feldspar and pyrite were found in the boundary clay at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 465A, in the central Pacific. These spheroids have textures similar to those of rapidly crystallized feldspar and mafic silicates. They are interpreted as diagenetically altered microcrystalline spherules of basaltic composition produced by the impact of a large asteroid in an ocean basin at the end of the Cretaceous. They are analogous to the glassy microtektites produced by impacts on more siliceous target rocks. 21 references, 4 figures.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with spheroids (HDLS) and familial pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD), both of which cause very similar white matter damage and cognitive and movement problems. POLD was thought to be distinguished by the presence ...

  12. Spheroid culture as a tool for creating 3D complex tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennema, Eelco; Rivron, Nicolas; Rouwkema, Jeroen; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2013-02-01

    3D cell culture methods confer a high degree of clinical and biological relevance to in vitro models. This is specifically the case with the spheroid culture, where a small aggregate of cells grows free of foreign materials. In spheroid cultures, cells secrete the extracellular matrix (ECM) in which they reside, and they can interact with cells from their original microenvironment. The value of spheroid cultures is increasing quickly due to novel microfabricated platforms amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS) and advances in cell culture. Here, we review new possibilities that combine the strengths of spheroid culture with new microenvironment fabrication methods that allow for the creation of large numbers of highly reproducible, complex tissues.

  13. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  14. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  15. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Langan

    Full Text Available Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid and absolute size (118±32 μm allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid cultures in biomedical and

  16. The fusion of tissue spheroids attached to pre-stretched electrospun polyurethane scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vince Beachley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Effective cell invasion into thick electrospun biomimetic scaffolds is an unsolved problem. One possible strategy to biofabricate tissue constructs of desirable thickness and material properties without the need for cell invasion is to use thin (<2 µm porous electrospun meshes and self-assembling (capable of tissue fusion tissue spheroids as building blocks. Pre-stretched electrospun meshes remained taut in cell culture and were able to support tissue spheroids with minimal deformation. We hypothesize that elastic electrospun scaffolds could be used as temporal support templates for rapid self-assembly of cell spheroids into higher order tissue structures, such as engineered vascular tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate how the attachment of tissue spheroids to pre-stretched polyurethane scaffolds may interfere with the tissue fusion process. Tissue spheroids attached, spread, and fused after being placed on pre-stretched polyurethane electrospun matrices and formed tissue constructs. Efforts to eliminate hole defects with fibrogenic tissue growth factor-β resulted in the increased synthesis of collagen and periostin and a dramatic reduction in hole size and number. In control experiments, tissue spheroids fuse on a non-adhesive hydrogel and form continuous tissue constructs without holes. Our data demonstrate that tissue spheroids attached to thin stretched elastic electrospun scaffolds have an interrupted tissue fusion process. The resulting tissue-engineered construct phenotype is a direct outcome of the delicate balance of the competing physical forces operating during the tissue fusion process at the interface of the pre-stretched elastic scaffold and the attached tissue spheroids. We have shown that with appropriate treatments, this process can be modulated, and thus, a thin pre-stretched elastic polyurethane electrospun scaffold could serve as a supporting template for rapid biofabrication of thick tissue

  17. β-Catenin-regulated ALDH1A1 is a target in ovarian cancer spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condello, S; Morgan, C A; Nagdas, S; Cao, L; Turek, J; Hurley, T D; Matei, D

    2015-04-30

    Cancer cells form three-dimensional (3D) multicellular aggregates (or spheroids) under non-adherent culture conditions. In ovarian cancer (OC), spheroids serve as a vehicle for cancer cell dissemination in the peritoneal cavity, protecting cells from environmental stress-induced anoikis. To identify new targetable molecules in OC spheroids, we investigated gene expression profiles and networks upregulated in 3D vs traditional monolayer culture conditions. We identified ALDH1A1, a cancer stem cell marker as being overexpressed in OC spheroids and directly connected to key elements of the β-catenin pathway. β-Catenin function and ALDH1A1 expression were increased in OC spheroids vs monolayers and in successive spheroid generations, suggesting that 3D aggregates are enriched in cells with stem cell characteristics. β-Catenin knockdown decreased ALDH1A1 expression levels and β-catenin co-immunoprecipitated with the ALDH1A1 promoter, suggesting that ALDH1A1 is a direct β-catenin target. Both short interfering RNA-mediated β-catenin knockdown and A37 ((ethyl-2-((4-oxo-3-(3-(pryrrolidin-1-yl)propyl)-3,4-dihydrobenzo [4,5]thioeno [3,2-d]pyrimidin-2-yl)thio)acetate)), a novel ALDH1A1 small-molecule enzymatic inhibitor described here for the first time, disrupted OC spheroid formation and cell viability (Pmodel. These data strongly support the role of β-catenin-regulated ALDH1A1 in the maintenance of OC spheroids and propose new ALDH1A1 inhibitors targeting this cell population.

  18. Tumor-derived spheroids: Relevance to cancer stem cells and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sato, Ai; Yamawaki, Kaoru; Enomoto, Takayuki; Okamoto, Koji

    2017-03-01

    Recently, many types of in vitro 3-D culture systems have been developed to recapitulate the in vivo growth conditions of cancer. The cancer 3-D culture methods aim to preserve the biological characteristics of original tumors better than conventional 2-D monolayer cultures, and include tumor-derived organoids, tumor-derived spheroids, organotypic multicellular spheroids, and multicellular tumor spheroids. The 3-D culture methods differ in terms of cancer cell sources, protocols for cell handling, and the required time intervals. Tumor-derived spheroids are unique because they are purposed for the enrichment of cancer stem cells (CSCs) or cells with stem cell-related characteristics. These spheroids are grown as floating spheres and have been used as surrogate systems to evaluate the CSC-related characteristics of solid tumors in vitro. Because eradication of CSCs is likely to be of clinical importance due to their association with the malignant nature of cancer cells, such as tumorigenicity or chemoresistance, the investigation of tumor-derived spheroids may provide invaluable clues to fight against cancer. Spheroid cultures have been established from cancers including glioma, breast, colon, ovary, and prostate cancers, and their biological and biochemical characteristics have been investigated by many research groups. In addition to the investigation of CSCs, tumor-derived spheroids may prove to be instrumental for a high-throughput screening platform or for the cultivation of CSC-related tumor cells found in the circulation or body fluids. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Radioresistance of human glioma spheroids and expression of HSP70, p53 and EGFr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedrigo Carlos A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy is routinely prescribed for high-grade malignant gliomas. However, the efficacy of this therapeutic modality is often limited by the occurrence of radioresistance, reflected as a diminished susceptibility of the irradiated cells to undergo cell death. Thus, cells have evolved an elegant system in response to ionizing radiation induced DNA damage, where p53, Hsp70 and/or EGFr may play an important role in the process. In the present study, we investigated whether the content of p53, Hsp70 and EGFr are associated to glioblastoma (GBM cell radioresistance. Methods Spheroids from U-87MG and MO59J cell lines as well as spheroids derived from primary culture of tumor tissue of one GBM patient (UGBM1 were irradiated (5, 10 and 20 Gy, their relative radioresistance were established and the p53, Hsp70 and EGFr contents were immunohistochemically determined. Moreover, we investigated whether EGFr-phospho-Akt and EGFr-MEK-ERK pathways can induce GBM radioresistance using inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059 and Akt (wortmannin. Results At 5 Gy irradiation UGBM1 and U-87MG spheroids showed growth inhibition whereas the MO59J spheroid was relatively radioresistant. Overall, no significant changes in p53 and Hsp70 expression were found following 5 Gy irradiation treatment in all spheroids studied. The only difference observed in Hsp70 content was the periphery distribution in MO59J spheroids. However, 5 Gy treatment induced a significant increase on the EGFr levels in MO59J spheroids. Furthermore, treatment with inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059 and Akt (wortmannin leads to radiosensitization of MO59J spheroids. Conclusions These results indicate that the PI3K-Akt and MEK-ERK pathways triggered by EGFr confer GBM radioresistance.

  20. Scalable spheroid model of human hepatocytes for hepatitis C infection and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Nugraha, Bramasta; Triyatni, Miriam; Hart, Stefan; Sankuratri, Suryanarayana; Yu, Hanry

    2014-07-07

    Developing effective new drugs against hepatitis C (HCV) virus has been challenging due to the lack of appropriate small animal and in vitro models recapitulating the entire life cycle of the virus. Current in vitro models fail to recapitulate the complexity of human liver physiology. Here we present a method to study HCV infection and replication on spheroid cultures of Huh 7.5 cells and primary human hepatocytes. Spheroid cultures are constructed using a galactosylated cellulosic sponge with homogeneous macroporosity, enabling the formation and maintenance of uniformly sized spheroids. This facilitates easy handling of the tissue-engineered constructs and overcomes limitations inherent of traditional spheroid cultures. Spheroids formed in the galactosylated cellulosic sponge show enhanced hepatic functions in Huh 7.5 cells and maintain liver-specific functions of primary human hepatocytes for 2 weeks in culture. Establishment of apical and basolateral polarity along with the expression and localization of all HCV specific entry proteins allow for a 9-fold increase in viral entry in spheroid cultures over conventional monolayer cultures. Huh 7.5 cells cultured in the galactosylated cellulosic sponge also support replication of the HCV clone, JFH (Japanese fulminant hepatitis)-1 at higher levels than in monolayer cultures. The advantages of our system in maintaining liver-specific functions and allowing HCV infection together with its ease of handling make it suitable for the study of HCV biology in basic research and pharmaceutical R&D.

  1. A microfluidic platform for chemoresistive testing of multicellular pleural cancer spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppen, Janine; Cortes-Dericks, Lourdes; Marconi, Emanuele; Karoubi, Golnaz; Schmid, Ralph A; Peng, Renwang; Marti, Thomas M; Guenat, Olivier T

    2014-03-21

    This study reports on a microfluidic platform on which single multicellular spheroids from malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), an aggressive tumor with poor prognosis, can be loaded, trapped and tested for chemotherapeutic drug response. A new method to detect the spheroid viability cultured on the microfluidic chip as a function of the drug concentration is presented. This approach is based on the evaluation of the caspase activity in the supernatant sampled from the chip and tested using a microplate reader. This simple and time-saving method does only require a minimum amount of manipulations and was established for very low numbers of cells. This feature is particularly important in view of personalised medicine applications for which the number of cells obtained from the patients is low. MPM spheroids were continuously perfused for 48 hours with cisplatin, one of the standard chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat MPM. The 50% growth inhibitory concentration of cisplatin in perfused MPM spheroids was found to be twice as high as in spheroids cultured under static conditions. This chemoresistance increase might be due to the continuous support of nutrients and oxygen to the perfused spheroids.

  2. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  3. Use of Specific Properties of Zinc Ferrite in Innovative Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kmita A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Zinc ferrite ZnFe2O4 both in the micro and nano scale is widely used in various fields. The article discusses the structure of this compound and its properties in the nanoscale, which is clearly different from those which the ferrite shows in the microscale. The properties of dust generated electric arc furnace, which can contain up to 40% zinc, substantially in the form of ZnFe2O4 are disscused here. Specific properties (electric, magnetic, thermal of zinc ferrite nanoparticles determine the very wide possibilities of their use, inter alia as catalysts, absorbents, gas sensors, and a tool to combat cancer.

  4. Dysprosium Modification of Cobalt Ferrite Ionic Magnetic Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Rong-li; LIU Yong-chao; GENG Quan-rong; ZHAO Wen-tao

    2005-01-01

    Dysprosium composite cobalt ferrite ionic magnetic fluids were prepared by precipitation in the presence of Tri-sodium citrate. Influence of dysprosium modification on magnetic property is studied. The result shows that magnetic response toward exterior magnetic field can be improved by adding Dy3+. Studies also show that the increase of reaction temperature may improve the modification effect of dysprosium. By adding dysprosium ions, the average diameter of the magnetic nanoparticles will be decreased evidently. It is clear that the particles appear as balls, Cobalt ferrite with sizes of 12-15 nm, rare earth composite cobalt ferrite with sizes of 6-8 nm.

  5. Preparation and characterization of rice husk/ferrite composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A novel ferrite composite using rice husk as substrate has been prepared via high temperature treatment under nitrogen atmosphere.The rice husk substrate consists of porous activated carbon and silica,where spinel ferrite particles with average diameter of 59 nm are distributed.The surface area of the composite is greater than 170 m~2 g~(-1) and the bulk density is less than 0.6 g cm~(-3).Inert atmosphere is indispensable for the synthesis of pure ferrite composites,while different preparation temperatur...

  6. Nickel hydroxide/cobalt-ferrite magnetic nanocatalyst for alcohol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Pooja B; Inam, Fawad; Bhat, Badekai Ramachandra

    2014-08-11

    A magnetically separable, active nickel hydroxide (Brønsted base) coated nanocobalt ferrite catalyst has been developed for oxidation of alcohols. High surface area was achieved by tuning the particle size with surfactant. The surface area of 120.94 m2 g(-1) has been achieved for the coated nanocobalt ferrite. Improved catalytic activity and selectivity were obtained by synergistic effect of transition metal hydroxide (basic hydroxide) on nanocobalt ferrite. The nanocatalyst oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols efficiently (87%) to corresponding carbonyls in good yields.

  7. Modeling of Incubation Time for Austenite to Ferrite Phase Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiao-guang; LIU Zhen-yu; WU Di; WANG Wei; JIAO Si-hai

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the classical nucleation theory, a new model of incubation time for austenite to ferrite transformation has been developed, in which the effect of deformation on austenite has been taken into consideration. To prove the precision of modeling, ferrite transformation starting temperature (Ar3) has been calculated using the Scheil′s additivity rule, and the Ar3 values were measured using a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. The Ar3 values provided by the modeling method coincide with the measured ones, indicating that the model is precise in predicting the incubation time for austenite to ferrite transformation in hot deformed steels.

  8. Ultra-fine ferrite grains obtained in the TSDR process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Zhang; Wangyue Yang; Chunxia Xue; Zuqing Sun

    2008-01-01

    By careful design of rolling schedule, ultra-fine (~2 μm) ferrite grains in a low carbon high niobium (0.09wt%Nb) micro-alloying steel with average austenite grain sizes above 800 μm can be achieved in the simulated thin slab direct rolling process. The 5-pass deformation was divided into two stages: the refinement of austenite through complete recrystallization and the refinement of ferrite through dynamic strain-induced transformation. The effects of Nb in solution and strain-induced NbCN precipitates on the fer-rite transformation were also extensively discussed.

  9. Ferric Oxide from Hematite Used in Microwave Ferrite Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ferric Oxide is an essential and raw material in the production of ferrite materials. At present, ferric oxide used by many domestic factories is mainly produced by chemical method. In this paper, we use ferric oxide refined from hematite and applied in the microwave ferrite material production test. Compared with the normal ferric oxide, we get the same or similar results. It shows that ferric oxide from hematite and applied in the microwave ferrite material production test. Compared with the normal ferric oxide, we get the same or similar results. It shows that ferric oxide from hematite has a bright application prospect.

  10. Using Cored Wires Injection 2PE-9 Method in the Production of Ferritic Si-Mo Ductile Iron Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guzik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the use of modern two cored wires injection method for production of ferritic nodular cast iron (ductile iron with use of unique implementation of drum ladle as a treatment / transport and casting ladle instead vertical treatment ladle was described. The injection of length of Ø 9mm wires, cored: in FeSi + Mg nodulariser mixture and inoculant master alloy is a treatment method which can be used to produce iron melted in coreless induction furnace. This paper describes the results and analysis of using this method for optimal production of ductile iron under specific industrial conditions. It means, that length of nodulariser wire plus treatment and pouring temperatures were optimized. In this case, was taken ductile iron with material designation: EN-GJS-SiMo40-6 Grade according EN 16124:2010 E. Microstructure of great number of trials was controlled on internally used sample which has been correlated with standardsample before. The paper presents typical ferritic metallic matrix and nodular graphite. Additionally, mechanical properties were checked in some experiments. Mean values of magnesium recovery and cost of this new method from optimized process parameters werecalculated as well.

  11. Catalytic Graphitization of Phenolic Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Zhao; Huaihe Song

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic graphitization of thermal plastic phenolic-formaldehyde resin with the aid of ferric nitrate (FN) was studied in detail. The morphologies and structural features of the products including onion-like carbon nanoparticles and bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. It was found that with the changes of loading content of FN and residence time at 1000℃, the products exhibited various morphologies. The TEM images showed that bamboo-shaped carbon nanotube consisted of tens of bamboo sticks and onion-like carbon nanoparticle was made up of quasi-spherically concentrically closed carbon nanocages.

  12. Fracture mechanics of PGX graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, F.H.; Vollman, R.E.; Cull, A.D.

    1981-03-01

    Fracture mechanics tests were performed on grade PGX graphite. A compact tension specimen configuration which yields consistent values of the opening mode critical stress intensity factor K/sub IC/, was designed. For the calculation of the fracture toughness and crack growth rate the concept of the effective crack length is used. It corresponds to the crack length of a machined notched specimen with the same compliance. Fracture toughness testing was performed in two environments, air and helium, both at room temperature. The critical stress intensity factor, K/sub IC/, is calculated based on the maximum load and the effective crack length. The fatigue crack growth test was performed in air only. A break-in period was observed for the machined notch to develop into a naturally occurring crack path. Half of the fatigue life was spent in this period.

  13. 形变-球化退火共析钢的组织和性能%Microstructure and properties of eutectoid steel processed by deformation and spheroidizing annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑成思; 李龙飞

    2015-01-01

    Eutectoid steel with spheroidal pearlite was processed using subcritical annealing, and eutectoid steel with the microstructure consisting of fine-grained ferrite matrix (α) and cementite particles (θ) , i.e., fine (α+θ) structure, was formed by the warm deformation and divorced eutectoid transformation.The microstructure and the mechanical properties were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and room-temperature tensile test for eutectoid steel with spheroidal pearlite or fine (α+θ) structure.The results show that fine (α+θ) structure with high spheroidization rate can be obtained by the warm deformation and divorced eutectoid transformation in short time in comparison with subcritical annealing for eutectoid steel.Warm deformation of pearlite and proper temperature and time of austenitizing are critical to obtain a microstructure consisting of austenite and cementite particles suitable for divorced eutectoid transformation.The prolonged isothermal time in the temperature under the A1 causes the increase in the average size of ferrite grains and cementite particles but the decrease in the strength and the elongation for eutectoid steel with fine (α+θ) structure.%以共析钢为研究对象,通过亚温球化退火制备了一种球化珠光体,利用珠光体温变形和离异共析原理制备了3种高球化率的细晶铁素体(α)+渗碳体粒子(θ)复相组织,即细晶(α+θ)复相组织,并结合SEM和室温单轴拉伸试验等手段研究了其显微组织和力学性能。结果表明:与亚温球化退火相比,利用珠光体温变形和离异共析原理可以快速制备高球化率的细晶(α+θ)复相组织。珠光体温变形以及合适的奥氏体等温时间和温度是获取适于发生离异共析转变的粥状组织的关键。随着A1以下温度等温时间的延长,细晶(α+θ)复相组织中的铁素体晶粒和渗碳体粒子平均尺寸增大,强度和伸长率减小。

  14. Supermassive black holes and their host spheroids I. Galaxy vivisection

    CERN Document Server

    Savorgnan, Giulia A D

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using $3.6 \\rm ~\\mu m$ $Spitzer$ imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the $K$-band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and - for the first time - 2D kinematics, we were able to account for sph...

  15. Comptonization of cosmic microwave background photons in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Evans, N. Wyn; Colafrancesco, S.

    2006-05-01

    We present theoretical modelling of the electron distribution produced by annihilating neutralino dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). In particular, we follow up the idea of Colafrancesco and find that such electrons distort the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For an assumed neutralino mass of 10 GeV and beam size of 1 arcsec, the SZ temperature decrement is of the order of nano-Kelvin for dSph models with a soft core. By contrast, it is of the order of micro-Kelvin for the strongly cusped dSph models favoured by some cosmological simulations. Although this is out of reach of current instruments, it may well be detectable by future mm telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimetre Array. We also show that the upscattered CMB photons have energies within reach of upcoming X-ray observatories, but that the flux of such photons is too small to be detectable now. None the less, we conclude that searching for the dark matter induced SZ effect is a promising way of constraining the dark distribution in dSphs, especially if the particles are light.

  16. Comptonisation of Cosmic Microwave Background Photons in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Culverhouse, T L; Colafrancesco, S; Culverhouse, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    We present theoretical modelling of the electron distribution produced by annihilating neutralino dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). In particular, we follow up the idea of Colafrancesco (2004) and find that such electrons distort the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. For an assumed neutralino mass of 10 GeV and beam size of 1'', the SZ temperature decrement is of the order of nano-Kelvin for dSph models with a soft core. By contrast, it is of the order of micro-Kelvin for the strongly cusped dSph models favoured by some cosmological simulations. Although this is out of reach of current instruments, it may well be detectable by future mm telescopes, such as ALMA. We also show that the upscattered CMB photons have energies within reach of upcoming X-ray observatories, but that the flux of such photons is too small to be detectable soon. Nonetheless, we conclude that searching for the dark matter induced Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect is a promising way of constraining ...

  17. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Domcke, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass $m_f$. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable to form a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting configuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to $m_f$. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the dispersion velocity of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit of the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that $m_f \\simeq 200$ eV. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance...

  18. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domcke, Valerie; Urbano, Alfredo, E-mail: valerie.domcke@sissa.it, E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it [SISSA - International School for Advanced Studies, via Bonomea 256, Trieste, 34136 Italy (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass m{sub f}. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable of forming a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting con figuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to m{sub f}. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the velocity dispersion of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit to the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that m{sub f}≅ 200 eV. Furthermore, we show that in this setup larger galaxies correspond to the non-degenerate limit of the gas. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance and the bound on the free-streaming length constrains the inflation model in terms of inflaton mass, its branching ratio into DM and the reheating temperature.

  19. The effect of tides on the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Giuseppina; Nipoti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of the mass distribution and dark-matter (DM) content of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are usually derived under the assumption that the effect of the tidal field of the host galaxy is negligible over the radial extent probed by kinematic data-sets. We assess the implications of this assumption in the specific case of the Fornax dSph by means of N-body simulations of a satellite orbiting around the Milky Way. We consider observationally-motivated orbits and we tailor the initial distributions of the satellite's stars and DM to match, at the end of the simulations, the observed structure and kinematics of Fornax. In all our simulations the present-day observable properties of Fornax are not significantly influenced by tidal effects. The DM component is altered by the interaction with the Galactic field (up to 20% of the DM mass within 1.6 kpc is lost), but the structure and kinematics of the stellar component are only mildly affected even in the more eccentric orbit (more than 99% of the stellar ...

  20. The structure of Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    del Pino, Andrés; Hidalgo, Sebastian L; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We analyze in detail the spatial distribution and kinematic properties of two different stellar populations in Andromeda II (And II) dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We obtained their detailed surface density maps, together with their radial density profiles. The two populations differ not only in age and metallicity, but also in their spatial distribution and kinematics. Old stars ($\\gtrsim 11$ Gyr) follow a round distribution well fitted by truncated density profiles. These stars rotate around the projected optical major axis of the galaxy with line-of-sight velocities $v_{los}(r_h) = 16 \\pm 3$ km s$^{-1}$ and a velocity gradient of $2.06 \\pm 0.21$ km s$^{-1}$ arcmin$^{-1}$. Intermediate-age stars ($\\lesssim 9$ Gyr) concentrate in the centre of the galaxy and form an elongated structure extending along the projected optical major axis. This structure appears to rotate with a steeper velocity gradient, $2.24 \\pm 0.22$ km s$^{-1}$ arcmin$^{-1}$, and around the optical minor axis. The centres of rotation and kinetic p...

  1. The Evolution of Spheroidal Galaxies in Different Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Fritz, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the kinematic and chemical evolution of 203 distant spheroidal (elliptical and S0) galaxies at 0.2

  2. Unbiased constraints on ultralight axion mass from dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzáles-Morales, Alma X; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Ureña-López, Luis

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that the internal dynamics of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can be used to test whether or not ultralight axions with $m_a\\sim 10^{-22}\\text{eV}$ are a preferred dark matter candidate. However, comparisons to theoretical predictions tend to be inconclusive for the simple reason that while most cosmological models consider only dark matter, one observes only baryons. Here we use realistic kinematic mock data catalogs of Milky Way dSph's to show that the "mass-anisotropy degeneracy" in the Jeans equations leads to biased bounds on the axion mass in galaxies with unknown dark matter halo profiles. In galaxies with multiple chemodynamical components this bias can be partly removed by modelling the mass enclosed within each subpopulation. However, analysis of the mock data reveals that the least-biased constraints on the axion mass result from fitting the luminosity-averaged velocity dispersion of the individual chemodynamical components directly. Applying our analysis to two dSph's with ...

  3. Kinematic sub-populations in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ural, Ugur; Koch, Andreas; Gilmore, Gerard; Beers, Timothy C; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N Wyn; Grebel, Eva K; Vidrih, Simon; Zucker, Daniel B

    2008-01-01

    We present new spectroscopic data for twenty six stars in the recently-discovered Canes Venatici I (CVnI) dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We use these data to investigate the recent claim of the presence of two dynamically inconsistent stellar populations in this system (Ibata et al., 2006). We do not find evidence for kinematically distinct populations in our sample and we are able to obtain a mass estimate for CVnI that is consistent with all available data, including previously published data. We discuss possible differences between our sample and the earlier data set and study the general detectability of sub-populations in small kinematic samples. We conclude that in the absence of supporting observational evidence (for example, metallicity gradients), sub-populations in small kinematic samples (typically fewer than 100 stars) should be treated with extreme caution, as their detection depends on multiple parameters and rarely produces a signal at the 3sigma confidence level. It is therefore essential to determi...

  4. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Zhen; Jing, Y P

    2015-01-01

    Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW) dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH) has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH using a simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe) as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass M_x of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of M_x depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = t_sat . Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > t_sat , part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  5. The Dynamical and Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Revaz, Y; Sawala, T; Hill, V; Letarte, B; Irwin, M; Battaglia, G; Helmi, A; Shetrone, M D; Tolstoy, E; Venn, K A

    2009-01-01

    We present a large sample of fully self-consistent hydrodynamical Nbody/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. The initial total mass (gas + dark matter) of these galaxies is the main driver of their evolution. Star formation (SF) occurs in series of short bursts. In massive systems, the very short intervals between the SF peaks mimic a continuous star formation rate, while less massive systems exhibit well separated SF bursts, as identified observationally. The delay between the SF events is controlled by the gas cooling time dependence on galaxy mass. The observed global scaling relations, luminosity-mass and luminosity-metallicity, are reproduced with low scatter. We take advantage of the unprecedentedly large sample size and data homogeneity of the ESO Large Programme DART, and add to it a few independent studies, to constrain the s...

  6. Conventional flow curves of liquid cast iron put on spheroidization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Borowiecki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the investigation was to confirm the hypothesis that the conventional flow curves of liquid cast iron put on sferoidization determined from the rod fluidity test are comparable to flow curves of liquids in environmental temperature. Moreover has been identified, that conventional flow curves for this liquid cast iron are similar to generalized non- Newtonian liquids curves.For rods with the diameters 3-8 mm there are three various curves:1 – the flow curve of liquid cast iron put on spheroidization overheated about 80 K resemble a shape adequately to a curve of densified liquid with shearing. This phenomenon can be caused by high overcooled and creation of crystallization nuclei;2 – metal alloys overheated about 180 K resemble a shape adequately to Newtonian liquid;3 – metal alloys overheated about 210 K resemble a shape of curve adequately to dispersed liquid with shearing. This phenomenon probably depends on influence of gas which creates on boundary of metal-sand mould.

  7. Metals Removed by Outflows from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, Evan N; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    The stars in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are significantly more metal-poor than would be expected from a closed box model of chemical evolution. Gas outflows likely carried away most of the metals produced by the dSphs. Based on previous Keck/DEIMOS observations and models, we calculate the mass in Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe expelled from each of eight dSphs. Essentially, these masses are the differences between the observed amount of metals present in the dSphs' stars today and the inferred amount of metals produced by supernovae. We conclude that the dSphs lost 96% to >99% of the metals their stars manufactured. We apply the observed mass function of Milky Way dSphs to the ejected mass function to determine that a single large dSph, like Fornax, lost more metals over 10 Gyr than all smaller dSphs combined. Therefore, small galaxies like dSphs are not significant contributors to the metal content of the intergalactic medium. Finally, we compare our ejected mass function to previo...

  8. The Dearth of Neutral Hydrogen in Galactic Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Spekkens, K; Mason, B S; Willman, B; Aguirre, J E

    2014-01-01

    We present new upper limits on the neutral hydrogen (HI) content within the stellar half-light ellipses of 15 Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), derived from pointed observations with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as Arecibo L-band Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey and Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) data. All of the limits Mlim are more stringent than previously reported values, and those from the GBT improve upon contraints in the literature by a median factor of 23. Normalizing by V-band luminosity Lv and dynamical mass Mdyn, we find Mlim/Lv ~ 10^{-3} Mo/Lo and Mlim/Mdyn ~ 5 x 10^{-5}, irrespective of location in the Galactic halo. Comparing these relative HI contents to those of the Local Group and nearby neighbor dwarfs compiled by McConnachie, we find that the Galactic dSphs are extremely gas-poor. Our HI upper limits therefore provide the clearest picture yet of the environmental dependence of the HI content in Local Volume dwarfs. If ram pressure stripping explains the dearth of HI in these ...

  9. On the R-Process Enrichment of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bramante, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations of Reticulum II have uncovered an overabundance of r-process elements, compared to similar ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UFDs). Because the metallicity and star formation history of Reticulum II appear consistent with all known UFDs, the high r-process abundance of Reticulum II suggests enrichment through a single, rare event, such as a double neutron star (NS) merger. However, we note that this scenario is extremely unlikely, as binary stellar evolution models require significant supernova natal kicks to produce NS-NS or NS-black hole mergers, and these kicks would efficiently remove compact binary systems from the weak gravitational potentials of UFDs. We examine alternative mechanisms for the production of r-process elements in UFDs, including a novel mechanism wherein NSs in regions of high dark matter density implode after accumulating a black-hole-forming mass of dark matter. We find that r-process proto-material ejection by tidal forces, when a single neutron star implodes ...

  10. X-RAY SOURCES IN THE DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY DRACO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonbas, E. [University of Adiyaman, Department of Physics, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I., E-mail: edasonbas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with L{sub X} > 3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup −1} in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  11. Pseudoislet of hybrid cellular spheroids from commercial cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Y H; Nam, B M; Kim, B Y; Nemeno, J G; Lee, S; Yeo, J E; Yang, W; Park, S H; Kim, Y S; Lee, J I

    2013-10-01

    Investigators conducting diabetes-related research have focused on islet transplantation as a radical therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Pancreatic islet isolation, an essential process, is a very demanding work because of the proteolytic enzymes, species, treatment time, and individual difference. Replacement of primary isolated pancreatic islets must be carried out continuously for various in vitro tests, making primary isolated islets a useful tool for cell transplantation research. Hence, we sought to develop pseudoislets from commercial pancreas-derived cell lines. In this study, we used RIN-5F and RIN-m cells, which secrete insulin, somatostatin, or glucagon. To manufacture hybrid cellular spheroids, the cells were cultured under hanging drop plate and nonadhesive plate methods. We observed that hybrid cellular pseudoislets exhibited an oval shape, with sizes ranging from 590 to 1200 μm. Their morphology was similar to naïve islets. Cell line pseudoislets secreted and expressed insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry analyses. Thus, the current artificially manufactured biomimetic pseudoislets resembled pancreatic islets of the endocrine system, appearing as cellular aggregates that secreted insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. Enhanced immunoisolation techniques may lead to the development of new islet sources for pancreatic transplantation through this pseudoislet strategy.

  12. The early days of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Jablonka, P; Mashonkina, L; Hill, V; Revaz, Y; Shetrone, M; Starkenburg, E; Irwin, M; Tolstoy, E; Battaglia, G; Venn, K; Helmi, A; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the high resolution spectroscopic study of five -3.9<=[Fe/H]<=-2.5 stars in the Local Group dwarf spheroidal, Sculptor, thereby doubling the number of stars with comparable observations in this metallicity range. We carry out a detailed analysis of the chemical abundances of alpha, iron peak, light and heavy elements, and draw comparisons with the Milky Way halo and the ultra faint dwarf stellar populations. We show that the bulk of the Sculptor metal-poor stars follows the same trends in abundance ratios versus metallicity as the Milky Way stars. This suggests similar early conditions of star formation and a high degree of homogeneity of the interstellar medium. We find an outlier to this main regime, which seems to miss the products of the most massive of the TypeII supernovae. In addition to its value to help refining galaxy formation models, this star provides clues to the production of cobalt and zinc. Two of our sample stars have low odd-to-even barium isotope abundance ratios, suggesti...

  13. Jeans Analysis for Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies in Wave Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shu-Rong; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2016-01-01

    Observations suggest that dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies exhibit large constant-density cores in the centers, which can hardly be explained by dissipationless cold dark matter simulations. Wave dark matter (${\\psi {\\rm DM}}$), characterized by a single parameter, the dark matter particle mass $m_{\\psi}$, predicts a central soliton core in every galaxy arising from quantum pressure against gravity. Here we apply Jeans analysis to the kinematic data of eight classical dSphs so as to constrain $m_{\\psi}$, and obtain $m_{\\psi}=1.18_{-0.24}^{+0.28}\\times10^{-22}{\\,\\rm eV}$ and $m_{\\psi}=1.79_{-0.33}^{+0.35}\\times10^{-22}{\\,\\rm eV}~(2\\sigma)$ using the observational data sets of Walker et al. (2007) and Walker et al. (2009b), respectively. We show that the estimate of $m_{\\psi}$ is sensitive to the dSphs kinematic data sets and is robust to various models of stellar density profile. We also consider multiple stellar subpopulations in dSphs and find consistent results. This mass range of $m_{\\psi}$ is in good agre...

  14. Multiple stellar population in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy?

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, M; Pancino, E

    2001-01-01

    We present wide field (33 X 34 arcmin^2) multiband (BVI) CCD photometry (down to I <= 20.5) of the very low surface brightness dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Sextans. In the derived Color Magnitude Diagrams we have found evidences suggesting the presence of multiple stellar populations in this dSph. In particular we discovered: {\\it (i)} a Blue Horizontal Branch (HB) tail that appears to lie on a brighter sequence with respect to the prominent Red HB and the RR Lyrae stars, very similar to what found by Majewski et al. (1999) for the Sculptor dSph; {\\it (ii)} hints of a bimodal distribution in color of the RGB stars; {\\it (iii)} a double RGB-bump. All these features suggest that (at least) two components are present in the old stellar population of this galaxy: a main one with [Fe/H]~ -1.8 and a minor component around [Fe/H]<~ -2.3. The similarity with the Sculptor case may indicate that multiple star formation episodes are common also in the most nearby dSphs that ceased their star formation activity a...

  15. Spheroid model study comparing the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérard, Matthieu; Le Clerc, Justine; Watrin, Tanguy; Meary, Fleur; Pérez, Fabienne; Tricot-Doleux, Sylvie; Pellen-Mussi, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the biological effects of a new dentine substitute based on Ca₃SiO₅ (Biodentine™) for use in pulp-capping treatment, on pseudo-odontoblastic (MDPC-23) and pulp (Od-21) cells. The secondary objective was to evaluate the effects of Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on gene expression in cultured spheroids. We used the acid phosphatase assay to compare the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA. Cell differentiation was investigated by RT-qPCR. We investigated the expression of genes involved in odontogenic differentiation (Runx2), matrix secretion (Col1a1, Spp1) and mineralisation (Alp). ANOVA and PLSD tests were used for data analysis. MDPC-23 cells cultured in the presence of MTA had higher levels of viability than those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and control cells on day 7 (P = 0.0065 and P = 0.0126, respectively). For Od-21 cells, proliferation rates on day 7 were significantly lower in the presence of Biodentine or MTA than for control (P MTA than in those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and in control cells. Biodentine and MTA may modify the proliferation of pulp cell lines. Their effects may fluctuate over time, depending on the cell line considered. The observed similarity between Biodentine and MTA validates the indication for direct pulp-capping claimed by the manufacturers.

  16. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH usinga simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass Mx of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of Mx depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = tsat. Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > tsat, part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  17. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  18. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  19. Crystal Structure of Cold Compressed Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Maximilian; Flores-Livas, José A.; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Balima, Felix; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Machon, Denis; Pailhès, Stéphane; Willand, Alexander; Caliste, Damien; Botti, Silvana; San Miguel, Alfonso; Goedecker, Stefan; Marques, Miguel A. L.

    2012-02-01

    Through a systematic structural search we found an allotrope of carbon with Cmmm symmetry which we predict to be more stable than graphite for pressures above 10 GPa. This material, which we refer to as Z-carbon, is formed by pure sp3 bonds and it provides an explanation to several features in experimental x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra of graphite under pressure. The transition from graphite to Z-carbon can occur through simple sliding and buckling of graphene sheets. Our calculations predict that Z-carbon is a transparent wide band-gap semiconductor with a hardness comparable to diamond.

  20. Interface structure between tetraglyme and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Araki, Yuki; Umeda, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-09-01

    Clarification of the details of the interface structure between liquids and solids is crucial for understanding the fundamental processes of physical functions. Herein, we investigate the structure of the interface between tetraglyme and graphite and propose a model for the interface structure based on the observation of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids. The ordering and distorted adsorption of tetraglyme on graphite were observed. It is found that tetraglyme stably adsorbs on graphite. Density functional theory calculations supported the adsorption structure. In the liquid phase, there is a layered structure of the molecular distribution with an average distance of 0.60 nm between layers.

  1. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Effect of graphite content on electrochemical performance of Sn-SnSb/graphite composite powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sn-SnSb alloy was synthesized by reducing a aqueous solution containing Sn( Ⅱ ) and Sb(Ⅲ) salts with NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate. The product was characterized by X-ray diffractometry(XRD) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM).Sn-SnSb/graphite composite powders were prepared by mechanical milling and the mass fraction of graphite was increased from20% to 50%. The effect of graphite content on the electrochemical performance of Sn-SnSb/graphite composite electrode was investigated. The results show the increase of graphite content is in favor of enhancing the first charge-discharge efficiency and improving the cycle performance, but the capacity of the composite electrode decreases with increasing content of graphite.

  3. Electrochemical intercalation of potassium into graphite in KF melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Dongren [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, South Lushan Road, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Department of Chemical and Environmental engineering, Jiaozuo University, JiaoZuo 454003, Henan (China); Yang Zhanhong, E-mail: zhyang@mail.csu.edu.c [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, South Lushan Road, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Li Wangxing; Qiu Shilin; Luo Yingtao [Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041, Henan (China)

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical intercalation of potassium into graphite in molten potassium fluoride at 1163 K was investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic electrolysis and open-circuit potential measurements. It was found that potassium intercalated into graphite solely between graphite layers. In addition, the intercalation compound formed in graphite bulk in molten KF was quite unstable and decomposed very fast. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that a very dilute potassium-graphite intercalation compound was formed in graphite matrix in the fluoride melt. Analysis with scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope shows that graphite was exfoliated to sheets and tubes due to lattice expansion caused by intercalation of potassium in molten KF.

  4. Effect of Different Molding Materials on the Thin-Walled Compacted Graphite Iron Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górny, Marcin; Dańko, Rafał; Lelito, Janusz; Kawalec, Magdalena; Sikora, Gabriela

    2016-10-01

    This article addresses the effects of six mold materials used for obtaining thin-walled compacted graphite iron castings with a wall thickness of 3 mm. During this research, the following materials were analyzed: fine silica sand, coarse silica sand, cerabeads, molohite and also insulated materials in the shape of microspheres, including low-density alumina/silica ceramic sand. Granulometric and SEM observations indicate that the sand matrix used in these studies differs in terms of size, homogeneity and shape. This study shows that molds made with insulating sands (microspheres) possess both: thermal conductivity and material mold ability to absorb heat, on average to be more than five times lower compared to those of silica sand. In addition to that, the resultant peak of heat transfer coefficient at the mold/metal interface for microspheres is more than four times lower in comparison with fine silica sand. This is accompanied by a significant decrease in the cooling rate of metal in the mold cavity which promotes the development of compacted graphite in thin-walled castings as well as ferrite fractions in their microstructure.

  5. Experimental evaluation of the drag torque, drag force and Magnus force acting on a rotating prolate spheroid

    OpenAIRE

    Lukerchenko, N. (Nikolay); Keita, I. (Ibrahima); Kvurt, Y.; Miles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The drag torque, drag force and Magnus force acting on a spheroid rotating around its axis of symmetry and moving perpendicularly to this axis in initially quiescent water were studied using experimental data and numerical simulation. The prolate spheroid with ratio of the axes 4/3 was speeded up in special device, which ensured the required rotational and translational velocity in the given plane. A video system was used to record the spheroid motion in water. Using the video records the sph...

  6. Characterization of liver-specific structure and function during hepatocyte spheroid self-assembly: Implications for a bioartificial liver device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Julie Renee

    A hollow fiber bioreactor containing collagen-entrapped hepatocytes has been developed as a bioartificial liver device. For clinical application, further scale-up of the device is desirable. This may be achieved through the use of hepatocyte spheroids, which are compacted aggregates that exhibit prolonged viability, higher liver-specific function and a more tissue-like ultrastructure compared to hepatocytes cultured as monolayers. In order to gain a better understanding of structural changes in spheroids over the course of their self-assembly, confocal microscopy was used to optically section spheroids and monitor changes in situ. Channels within spheroids hypothesized to be bile canaliculi were first evaluated by monitoring the diffusion of a fluorescent tracer, FITC-dextran, into spheroids. Three-dimensional reconstruction of spheroids showed that a continuous network of channels was forming within spheroids. Functionality of these channels as bile canaliculi was demonstrated by monitoring secretion of a fluorescently tagged bile acid, FITC-glycocholate, by hepatocytes in spheroids. Secretion of FITC-glycocholate could be seen in both rat and porcine hepatocyte spheroids. To elucidate changes in metabolism occurring during spheroid self-assembly, metabolic flux analysis was applied to hepatocyte spinner cultures. Glucose, lactate, amino acid, albumin and urea concentration in culture medium were measured and used to estimate intracellular fluxes within hepatocytes. Metabolism before and after spheroid formation was compared. Overall, little difference was seen in metabolism before and after spheroid self-assembly. As the BAL approaches clinical trials, methods of bioreactor storage for shipping and inventory purposed need to be developed. Storage conditions were tested in various hepatocyte culture systems. A protocol for storing reactors for 24 hours without significant loss in function was developed. Further optimization will be necessary for storage for longer

  7. Microstructural Features During Strain Induced Ferrite Transformation in 08 and 20Mn Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure evolution during strain induced ferrite transformation was followed in thermal-simulation tests of clean 08 and 20Mn steels. The influences of carbon equivalence and initial austenite grain size on ferrite grain refinement and the volume fraction of ferrite during straining were inspected. The results revealed that the accelerating effect of ferrite transformation by strain was increased as the carbon equivalence decreased. However, finer ferrite grains were obtained at higher carbon content. At strain of ~1.5 ferrite grains less than 3m and 2m can be obtained in 08 and 20Mn steels respectively. Whereas the ferrite grain refinement in 08 steel was due to both effects of strain induced transformation and ferrite dynamic recrystallization, that in 20Mn was mainly due to strain induced transformation. Heavy strain can produce fine ferrite grains in coarse austenite grained 08 steel, but it would lead to band microstructure in coarse austenite grained 20Mn.

  8. Performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Department of Applied Chemistry, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The effect of negative to positive electrode materials' weight ratio on the electrochemical performance of both activated carbon (AC)/AC and AC/graphite capacitors has been investigated, especially in the terms of capacity and cycle-ability. The limited capacity charge mode has been proposed to improve the cycle performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite. (author)

  9. Effects of Graphite Form and Amount on Performance of Austempered Ductile Iron%石墨形态和数量对奥-贝球铁性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许太平; 徐伟; 蔡彦强; 贾连杰

    2013-01-01

    For the austempered ductile iron as required by tensile strength ≥1200MPa, elongation after fracture≥1% and energy absorption (sample without notch)≥35J, if its spheroidization rate is lower than level 3, the spheroidal graphite is thicker than level 6 and its amount per mm2 is less than 180, its mechanical performance after isothermal treatment will be difficult to suit the specification requirements.%对于要求抗拉强度≥1200MPa;断后伸长率逸1%;吸收能量(无缺口试样)≥35J的奥-贝球铁,如果其球化率差于3级,球墨粗于6级且每平方毫米球墨少于180个,等温处理后的力学性能不易达到规范要求。

  10. Performance Variation of Ferrite Magnet PMBLDC Motor with Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2015-01-01

    a different approach when deciding their operating point. In this work, laboratory measured BH curves of a ferrite magnet are used for estimating the possibility of demagnetization in a segmented axial torus (SAT) permanent magnet brushless DC (PMBLDC) motor. The BH characteristics for different temperatures...... have been used to study the performance variation of the ferrite magnet SAT PMBLDC motor with temperature. A detailed analysis is carried out to ensure that, the designed ferrite magnet motor is capable of delivering the specified torque throughout the operating speed, without any irreversible...... demagnetization of magnets. It has been shown that the ferrite magnet PMBLDC motor operation is influenced by the magnet temperature and the maximum motor speed for a given load torque decreases as the magnet temperature drops....

  11. New sintering process adjusts magnetic value of ferrite cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinal, A. W.

    1964-01-01

    A two-phase sintering technique based on time and temperature permits reversible control of the coercive threshold of sintered ferrite cores. Threshold coercivity may be controlled over a substantial range of values by selective control of the cooling rate.

  12. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, Ralph E.; Lee, Ronald S.; Weingart, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

  13. Mössbauer and magnetization studies of nanosize chromium ferrite

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Synthesized chromium ferrite powders were in good phase and .... This could be because in smaller particles sample defect density is very high due to more broken .... nanosize particles using co-precipitation technique followed by ball milling, ...

  14. Tunable dielectric properties of ferrite-dielectric based metamaterial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Bi

    Full Text Available A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices.

  15. Ferrite-filled cavities for compact planar resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, P. S.; Durrant, C. J.; Berry, S. J.; Sirotkin, E.; Hibbins, A. P.; Hicken, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sub-wavelength metallic planar cavities, closed at one end, have been constructed by wrapping aluminium foil around teflon or ferrite slabs. Finite cavity width perturbs the fundamental cavity mode frequency of ferrite-filled cavities due to different permeability inside and outside of the cavity, in contrast to teflon-filled cavities, while the cavity length required to achieve a specific resonance frequency is significantly reduced for a ferrite-filled cavity. Ferrite-filled cavities may be excited by an in-plane alternating magnetic field and may be advantageous for high-frequency (HF) and ultra HF tagging and radio frequency identification of metallic objects within security, manufacturing, and shipping environments.

  16. Application of Ferrite Nanomaterial in RF On-Chip Inductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Lin Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several kinds of ferrite-integrated on-chip inductors are presented. Ferrite nanomaterial applied in RF on-chip inductors is prepared and analyzed to show the properties of high permeability, high ferromagnetic resonance frequency, high resistivity, and low loss, which has the potential that will improve the performance of RF on-chip inductors. Simulations of different coil and ferrite nanomaterial parameters, inductor structures, and surrounding structures are also conducted to achieve the trend of gains of inductance and quality factor of on-chip inductors. By integrating the prepared ferrite magnetic nanomaterial to the on-chip inductors with different structures, the measurement performances show an obvious improvement even in GHz frequency range. In addition, the studies of CMOS compatible process to integrate the nanomaterial promote the widespread application of magnetic nanomaterial in RF on-chip inductors.

  17. Influence of Electropulsing Pretreatment on Solid-State Graphitization of Spherical Graphite Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qing-chun; LI Ren-xing; LIN Da-shuai; CHANG Guo-wei; ZHAI Qi-jie

    2012-01-01

    The solid-state graphitization process of spherical graphite iron after electropulsing pretreatment was ob- served in-situ by using a high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscope (HTCSLM). The influence of electro- pulsing pretreatment on the decomposition of cementite and the formation of graphite during the solid-state graphiti- zation was studied. The result indicates that the electropulsing pretreatment can accelerate the decomposition of ce mentite, and make more neonatal graphite in small size be formed near the cementite. The neonatal graphite nucle ates and grows chiefly at the temperature range of 800 to 850 ℃, and the average growth rate of neonatal graphite is 0. 034 μm2/s during the heating process. For the spherical graphite iron after normal and electropulsing pretreat- ment, the decomposition rate of cementite during the heating process is 0.16 and 0.24 μm2/s, respectively. Analy- sis shows that the electropulsing pretreatment promotes the dislocation accumulation near the cementite, conse- quently, the decomposition of cementite and the formation of neonatal graphite is accelerated during the solid-state graphitization.

  18. A micro-mechanical analysis of thermo-elastic properties and local residual stresses in ductile iron based on a new anisotropic model for the graphite nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriollo, Tito; Thorborg, Jesper; Tiedje, Niels; Hattel, Jesper

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the thermo-elastic behavior of the graphite nodules contained in ductile iron is derived on the basis of recent transmission electron microscopy investigations of their real internal structure. The proposed model is initially validated by performing a finite element homogenization analysis to verify its consistency with the room-temperature elastic properties of ductile iron measured at the macro scale. Subsequently, it is used to investigate the formation of local residual stresses around the graphite particles by simulating the manufacturing process of a typical ferritic ductile iron grade, and the results are compared with preliminary measurements using synchrotron x-rays. Finally, the obtained accurate description of the stress & strain field at the micro scale is used to shed light on common failure modes reported for the nodules and on some peculiar properties observed in ductile iron at both micro and macro scale.

  19. Primary exploration of conditions for hypothermic preservation of rat hepatocyte spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-ling LIU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To optimize conditions for hypothermic preservation of rat hepatocyte spheroids without freezing in order to facilitate the application of biological artificial liver. Methods Rat hepatic cells were isolated by a two-step perfusion method, and hepatocyte spheroids formed after 48 hours of rocking culture in serum free medium (SFM. Spheroids were then maintained in rocking culture at 37℃ (control condition, or cold stored at 4℃ for 24 or 48 hours in four different cold storage solutions: SFM alone; SFM+1mmol/L deferoxamine (Def ; SFM+1μmol/L cyclosporin A (CsA; and SFM+1mmol/L Def+1μmol/L CsA. After culturing for another 4 or 5 days, survival rate, changes in ultrastructure, and the production of albumin and urea were observed. Results Cold-induced injury could be reduced significantly by the addition of the iron chelators Def and CsA. The function and structure of hepatocyte spheroids stored in SFM+Def+CsA or SFM+Def for 24 hours were similar to those in control conditions. But the function was significantly reduced after hypothermic preservation in SFM alone. After cold storage for 48 hours, the ultrastructure of hepatocyte spheroids obviously changed and the number of dead cells increased. The survival rate of hepatocyte spheroids stored in SFM+Def+CsA or SFM+Def was significantly higher than that stored in SFM or SFM+CsA(P0.05. Conclusions Hepatocyte spheroids tolerate 24 hours of cold storage with stable viability and function. Hypothermic preservation increases the availability of cell-based therapy for liver diseases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.12.02

  20. Assembly of Hepatocyte Spheroids Using Magnetic 3D Cell Culture for CYP450 Inhibition/Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujan K. Desai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant need for in vitro methods to study drug-induced liver injury that are rapid, reproducible, and scalable for existing high-throughput systems. However, traditional monolayer and suspension cultures of hepatocytes are difficult to handle and risk the loss of phenotype. Generally, three-dimensional (3D cell culture platforms help recapitulate native liver tissue phenotype, but suffer from technical limitations for high-throughput screening, including scalability, speed, and handling. Here, we developed a novel assay for cytochrome P450 (CYP450 induction/inhibition using magnetic 3D cell culture that overcomes the limitations of other platforms by aggregating magnetized cells with magnetic forces. With this platform, spheroids can be rapidly assembled and easily handled, while replicating native liver function. We assembled spheroids of primary human hepatocytes in a 384-well format and maintained this culture over five days, including a 72 h induction period with known CYP450 inducers/inhibitors. CYP450 activity and viability in the spheroids were assessed and compared in parallel with monolayers. CYP450 activity was induced/inhibited in spheroids as expected, separate from any toxic response. Spheroids showed a significantly higher baseline level of CYP450 activity and induction over monolayers. Positive staining in spheroids for albumin and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2 indicates the preservation of hepatocyte function within spheroids. The study presents a proof-of-concept for the use of magnetic 3D cell culture for the assembly and handling of novel hepatic tissue models.

  1. Acoustic scattering of a Bessel vortex beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Partial-wave series representation of the acoustic scattering field of high-order Bessel vortex beams by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids using the modal matching method is developed. The method, which is applicable to slightly elongated objects at low-to-moderate frequencies, requires solving a system of linear equations which depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs), and satisfying the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface in the least-squares sense. This original semi-analytical approach developed for Bessel vortex beams is demonstrated for finite oblate and prolate spheroids, where the mathematical functions describing the spheroidal geometry are written in a form involving single angular (polar) integrals that are numerically computed. The transverse (θ = π / 2) and 3D scattering directivity patterns are evaluated in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid) not exceeding 3:1, the half-cone angle β and order m of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kr0. Periodic oscillations in the magnitude plots of the far-field scattering form function are observed, which result from the interference of the reflected waves with the circumferential (Franz') waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3D directivity patterns illustrate the far-field scattering from the spheroid, that vanishes in the forward (θ = 0) and backward (θ = π) directions. Particular applications in underwater acoustics and scattering, acoustic levitation and the detection of submerged elongated objects using Bessel vortex waves to name a few, would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  2. Orthogonality of Harmonic Potentials and Fields in Spheroidal Coordinates (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    Spherical harmonic scalar potentials are the independent solutions of the Laplace equation relevant in a spherical geometry; they are used widely in global geomagnetism and geodesy to represent the situation in the source-free region outside the Earth. It is well known that these harmonics are orthogonal over the sphere, as are the vector fields that are the gradients of the harmonics. If we have data (potential or field) over the sphere, this orthogonality enables us to use spherical harmonic analysis to determine separately the numerical coefficient relevant for each harmonic potential. But the Earth is better approximated by an oblate spheroid; and for sources near the surface it is more relevant to use a spheroidal coordinate system; in this case the appropriate solutions of the Laplace equation are now spheroidal harmonics. However these SPHEROIDAL harmonics are NOT orthogonal over the SPHEROID, and neither are the corresponding vector potential gradients. I show how this problem can be overcome by using an appropriate weighting factor that depends only on colatitude; the factor is different for potential and for field. By using the appropriate weighting factor it is then possible to do the spheroidal equivalent of spherical harmonic analysis, either for the scalar potential or the corresponding vector field. In the spherical case, because of the orthogonality it is possible to separate the total mean-square potential over the sphere into parts contributed by harmonics of different degrees, e.g. the 'degree variance' in geodesy. Similarly, in geomagnetism we have the 'power spectrum' that separates the total mean-square vector field into contributions from different degrees. But in the spheroidal case such a separation (of potential or field) is possible only if we use a WEIGHTED mean-square.

  3. Cytogenetic Damages from Iododeoxyuridine -induced Radiosensitivity with and without Methoxyamine in Human Glioblastoma Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Neshasteh-Riz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Iododeoxyuridine-induced Radiosensitivityi (IUdR is ahalogenated thymidine analogue recognized to be effective in vitro andin vivo radiosensitizer in human cancers. It is reported that Methoxyamine (MXpotentiates DNA damages in cancer cells with blocking the repair pathway ofIUdR damages. But studies, entirely, are restricted on monolayer culture cellsfrom human colon cancer cells. Spheroids are 3D form of cells that aggregateand grow together which resemble in vivo tumor models in several aspects andthe the results of such studies can be extended to tumor in vivo. The aim of thecurrent study was to evaluate DNA damages from IUdR and gamma rays withand without Methoxyamine in human Glioblastoma spheroids.Materials and Methods: The DNA induced damages in U87MG cell line werecompared using alkaline comet assay method. Experiments were performedwith two different sizes of spheroids (100μm and 300μm.Results: Evaluation of the effects of IUdR with and without MX pretreatmenton spheroids following ionizing radiation showed that MX increased the celldamages of IUdR with and without irradiation in both diameters spheroids. Thedamages were further increased in 100μm compared with 300μm diameter.Conclusion: Comparisons of tail moments in spheroids with 100 and 300μmdiameter showed that cell damages in larger spheroids, 300μm, are lesserthan smaller one, 100μm. This could be due to existence of G0 cells and cellswith longer cycle which IUdR was less incorporated into them. Thus, decreasein IUdR radiosensitization and base wxcision repair (BER, results in reductionof MX activities. Using agents for Inhibiting the activities of proteins whichare responsible for carrying the cells to G0 may be beneficial in solving suchproblems.

  4. Generation of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids with Microwell-Based Agarose Scaffolds for Drug Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gong

    Full Text Available Three dimensional multicellular aggregate, also referred to as cell spheroid or microtissue, is an indispensable tool for in vitro evaluating antitumor activity and drug efficacy. Compared with classical cellular monolayer, multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS offers a more rational platform to predict in vivo drug efficacy and toxicity. Nevertheless, traditional processing methods such as plastic dish culture with nonadhesive surfaces are regularly time-consuming, laborious and difficult to provide uniform-sized spheroids, thus causing poor reproducibility of experimental data and impeding high-throughput drug screening. In order to provide a robust and effective platform for in vitro drug evaluation, we present an agarose scaffold prepared with the template containing uniform-sized micro-wells in commercially available cell culture plates. The agarose scaffold allows for good adjustment of MCTS size and large-scale production of MCTS. Transparent agarose scaffold also allows for monitoring of spheroid formation under an optical microscopy. The formation of MCTS from MCF-7 cells was prepared using different-size-well templates and systematically investigated in terms of spheroid growth curve, circularity, and cell viability. The doxorubicin cytotoxicity against MCF-7 spheroid and MCF-7 monolayer cells was compared. The drug penetration behavior, cell cycle distribution, cell apoptosis, and gene expression were also evaluated in MCF-7 spheroid. The findings of this study indicate that, compared with cellular monolayer, MCTS provides a valuable platform for the assessment of therapeutic candidates in an in vivo-mimic microenvironment, and thus has great potential for use in drug discovery and tumor biology research.

  5. Dynamic Change of Polarity in Primary Cultured Spheroids of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma and Its Role in Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Hiroaki; Kondo, Jumpei; Sato, Yumi; Endo, Hiroko; Nakajima, Aya; Piulats, Jose M; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Itoh, Yu; Mizoguchi, Akira; Ohue, Masayuki; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells possess apical-basal polarity, which governs the exchange of nutrients and waste. Perturbation of cell polarity appears to be a general feature of cancers, although most colorectal cancers are differentiated adenocarcinomas, in which polarity is maintained to some extent. Little is known about the role of dysregulated polarity in cancer. The cancer tissue-originated spheroid method was applied to the preparation and culture of spheroids. Spheroids were cultured in suspension or in type I collagen gel. Polarity was assessed by IHC of apical markers and electron microscopy. Two types of polarity status in spheroids were observed: apical-in, with apical membrane located at cavities inside the spheroids in type I collagen gel; and apical-out, with apical membrane located at the outermost layer of spheroids in suspension. These polarities were highly interchangeable. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin attenuated the polarity switch. In patients, clusters of cancer cells that invaded vessels had both apical-in and apical-out morphologic features, whereas primary and metastatic tumors had apical-in features. In a mouse liver metastasis model, apical-out spheroids injected into the portal vein became apical-in spheroids in the liver within a few days. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin significantly decreased liver metastasis. Polarity switching was observed in spheroids and human cancer. The polarity switch was critical in an experimental liver metastasis model.

  6. Improvement of the Mechanical Properties of 1022 Carbon Steel Coil by Using the Taguchi Method to Optimize Spheroidized Annealing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cold forging is often applied in the fastener industry. Wires in coil form are used as semi-finished products for the production of billets. This process usually requires preliminarily drawing wire coil in order to reduce the diameter of products. The wire usually has to be annealed to improve its cold formability. The quality of spheroidizing annealed wire affects the forming quality of screws. In the fastener industry, most companies use a subcritical process for spheroidized annealing. Various parameters affect the spheroidized annealing quality of steel wire, such as the spheroidized annealing temperature, prolonged heating time, furnace cooling time and flow rate of nitrogen (protective atmosphere. The effects of the spheroidized annealing parameters affect the quality characteristics of steel wire, such as the tensile strength and hardness. A series of experimental tests on AISI 1022 low carbon steel wire are carried out and the Taguchi method is used to obtain optimum spheroidized annealing conditions to improve the mechanical properties of steel wires for cold forming. The results show that the spheroidized annealing temperature and prolonged heating time have the greatest effect on the mechanical properties of steel wires. A comparison between the results obtained using the optimum spheroidizing conditions and the measures using the original settings shows the new spheroidizing parameter settings effectively improve the performance measures over their value at the original settings. The results presented in this paper could be used as a reference for wire manufacturers.

  7. Improvement of the Mechanical Properties of 1022 Carbon Steel Coil by Using the Taguchi Method to Optimize Spheroidized Annealing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Lun

    2016-08-12

    Cold forging is often applied in the fastener industry. Wires in coil form are used as semi-finished products for the production of billets. This process usually requires preliminarily drawing wire coil in order to reduce the diameter of products. The wire usually has to be annealed to improve its cold formability. The quality of spheroidizing annealed wire affects the forming quality of screws. In the fastener industry, most companies use a subcritical process for spheroidized annealing. Various parameters affect the spheroidized annealing quality of steel wire, such as the spheroidized annealing temperature, prolonged heating time, furnace cooling time and flow rate of nitrogen (protective atmosphere). The effects of the spheroidized annealing parameters affect the quality characteristics of steel wire, such as the tensile strength and hardness. A series of experimental tests on AISI 1022 low carbon steel wire are carried out and the Taguchi method is used to obtain optimum spheroidized annealing conditions to improve the mechanical properties of steel wires for cold forming. The results show that the spheroidized annealing temperature and prolonged heating time have the greatest effect on the mechanical properties of steel wires. A comparison between the results obtained using the optimum spheroidizing conditions and the measures using the original settings shows the new spheroidizing parameter settings effectively improve the performance measures over their value at the original settings. The results presented in this paper could be used as a reference for wire manufacturers.

  8. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  9. Packing by random sequential addition of small blocks: pressure effects, orientational correlations and application to graphitic fillers in polymer matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Sergi, Danilo; Scocchi, Giulio; Ortona, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Packing is a complex phenomenon of prominence in many natural and industrial processes (liquid crystals, granular materials, infiltration, melting, flow, sintering, segregation, sedimentation, compaction, etc.). A variety of computational methods is available in particular for spheroid particles. Our aim is to develop strategies devised to fill free space in 3D by random hard blocks of varying size and orientation in order to reproduce the observed arrangement of graphitic assemblies into polymeric matrices. Random packing is improved by applying an external pressure implemented with a drifted diffusive motion of the fillers. Attention is also paid to the emergence of structural and orientational order. Interestingly, mixtures of fillers of irregular shapes can be dealt with efficiently using the proposed algorithm.

  10. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm/sup -1/ and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm/sup -1/, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  11. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  12. Burned Microporous Alumina-Graphite Brick

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the definition,classifica-tion,technical requirements,test methods,inspection rules,marking,packing,transportation and quality certificate of burned microporous alumina-graphite brick.

  13. Feasibility of intercalated graphite railgun armatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Gooden, Clarence E.; Yashan, Doreen; Naud, Steven

    1990-01-01

    Graphite intercalation compounds may provide an excellent material for the fabrication of electro-magnetic railgun armatures. As a pulse of power is fed into the armature the intercalate could be excited into the plasma state around the edges of the armature, while the bulk of the current would be carried through the graphite block. Such an armature would have the desirable characteristics of both diffuse plasma armatures and bulk conduction armatures. In addition, the highly anisotropic nature of these materials could enable the electrical and thermal conductivity to be tailored to meet the specific requirements of electromagnetic railgun armatures. Preliminary investigations were performed in an attempt to determine the feasibility of using graphite intercalation compounds as railgun armatures. Issues of fabrication, resistivity, stability, and electrical current spreading are addressed for the case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  14. Graphite Oxide and Aromatic Amines : Size Matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Diamanti, Evmorfi A. K.; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are performed in order to illuminate, for first time, the intercalation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic molecules into graphite oxide. Two representative molecules of this family, aniline and naphthalene amine are investigated. After intercalation, aniline

  15. Graphitic nanocapsules: design, synthesis and bioanalytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ding; Xu, Yiting; Zou, Yuxiu; Chen, Long; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2017-08-03

    Graphitic nanocapsules are emerging nanomaterials which are gaining popularity along with the development of carbon nanomaterials. Their unique physical and chemical properties, as well as good biocompatibility, make them desirable agents for biomedical and bioanalytical applications. Through rational design, integrating graphitic nanocapsules with other materials provides them with additional properties which make them versatile nanoplatforms for bioanalysis. In this feature article, we present the use and performance of graphitic nanocapsules in a variety of bioanalytical applications. Based on their chemical properties, the specific merits and limitations of magnetic, hollow, and noble metal encapsulated graphitic nanocapsules are discussed. Detection, multi-modal imaging, and therapeutic applications are included. Future directions and potential solutions for further biomedical applications are also suggested.

  16. Graphite Oxide and Aromatic Amines : Size Matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Diamanti, Evmorfi A. K.; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are performed in order to illuminate, for first time, the intercalation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic molecules into graphite oxide. Two representative molecules of this family, aniline and naphthalene amine are investigated. After intercalation, aniline molec

  17. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  18. Cadmium substituted high permeability lithium ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Bellad; S C Watawe; A M Shaikh; B K Chougule

    2000-04-01

    Polycrystalline Li0.5–/2 Cd Fe2.5–/2O4 ferrites where = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 were prepared by a double sintering ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The lattice parameter is found to increase monotonically with the cadmium content. It is explained in terms of the sizes of component ions. The grain size of the samples increases up to = 0.3 and then it decreases for higher values of . A similar trend is observed in the variation of Ms with Cd2+ content. The initial permeability () is however found to increase continuously with . The increase in is attributed to decrease of anisotropy constant K1 and higher grain size of the samples.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, J.S.; Yang, X.L.; Gao, L.

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powders with a partially inverted spinel structure were synthesized by high-energy ball milling in a closed container at ambient temperature from a mixture of alpha-Fe2O3 and ZnO crystalline powders in equimolar ratio. From low-temperature and in-field Mossbauer...... measurements it is revealed that ZnFe2O4 particles prepared are in superparamagnetic state at ambient temperature. A doublet with an average quadrupole splitting of 0.8 nm/s is observed for the as-milled sample at 295 K, which is much larger than that for bulk ZnFe2O4 prepared by traditional ceramic method...... and that for ultrafine ZnFe2O4 particles prepared by the co-precipitation method. This indicates larger structural defects in the nanometer-sized ZnFe2O4 particles prepared by high-energy ball milling....

  20. Structural properties of Cd–Co ferrites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S P Dalawai; T J Shinde; A B Gadkari; P N Vasambekar

    2013-10-01

    Ferrite samples with composition, CdCo1−Fe2O4 ( = 0.80, 0.85, 0.90, 0.95 and 1.0), were prepared by standard ceramic method and characterized by XRD, IR and SEM techniques. X-ray analysis confirms the formation of single phase cubic spinel structure. Lattice constant and grain size of the samples increase with increase in cadmium content. Bond length (A–O) and ionic radii (A) on -sites increase, whereas bond length (B–O) and ionic radii (B) on -site decrease. The crystallite sites of the samples lie in the range of 29.1–42.8 nm. IR study shows two absorption bands around 400 cm-1 and 600 cm-1 corresponding to tetrahedral and octahedral sites, respectively.

  1. New ferritic steels for advanced steam plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, K.H; Koenig, H. [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    During the last 15-20 years ferritic-martensitic 9-12 % chromium steels have been developed under international research programmes which permit inlet steam temperatures up to approx. 625 deg C and pressures up to about 300 bars, thus leading to improvements in thermal efficiency of around 8 % and a CO{sub 2} reduction of about 20 % versus conventional steam parameters. These new steels are already being applied in 13 European and 34 Japanese power stations with inlet steam temperature up to 610 deg C. This presentation will give an account of the content, scope and results of the research programmes and of the experience gained during the production of components which have been manufactured from the new steels. (orig.) 13 refs.

  2. Ethanol sensor based on nanocrystallite cadmium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadkari, Ashok B., E-mail: ashokgadkari88@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, GKG College, Kolhapur-416012 (India); Shinde, Tukaram J. [Department of Physics, KRP Kanya Mahavidyalaya, Islampur-415409 (India); Vasambekar, Pramod N. [Department of Electronics, Shivaji University Kolhapur-416004 (India)

    2015-06-24

    The cadmium ferrite was synthesized by oxalate co-precipitation method. The crystal structure and surface morphology were examined by X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques, respectively. The nanocrystallite CdFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} sensor was tested for LPG, Cl{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH. The sensitivity was measured at various operating temperatures in the range of 100-400°C. The sensor shows highest sensitivity and selectivity to C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH at 350°C. The response and recovery time was measured at operating temperature of 350°C. The sensor exhibits a lower response and recovery time for LPG and Cl{sub 2} as compared to ethanol.

  3. Joining Techniques for Ferritic ODS Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.G. Krishnardula; V.G. Krishnardula; D.E. Clark; T.C. Totemeier

    2005-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advanced joining techniques for ferritic oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys MA956 and PM2000. The joining techniques studied were resistance pressure welding (also known as pressure forge welding), transient liquid phase bonding, and diffusion bonding. All techniques were shown to produce sound joints in fine-grained, unrecrystallized alloys. Post-bond heat treatment to produce a coarse-grained, recrystallized microstructure resulted in grain growth across the bondline for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonds, giving microstructures essentially identical to that of the parent alloy in the recrystallized condition. The effects of bond orientation, boron interlayer thickness, and bonding parameters are discussed for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonding. The report concludes with a brief discussion of ODS joining techniques and their applicability to GEN IV reactor systems.

  4. Propagation along azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded circular waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R. S.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the modal dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic waves traveling along the azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded coaxial transmission line and the ferrite-loaded wire. The modal dispersion curves are used to determine the pass and stop bands of normal propagation. Boundary-value problems were solved with Bolle-Heller functions. The dispersion characteristics of transverse electric modes are presented as plots of the normalized propagation constant vs the normalized frequency.

  5. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    OpenAIRE

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X; N. Oono; Hayashi, S.(University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan); Ohtsuka, S; T. Kaito

    2014-01-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using alpha/gamma phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix c...

  6. Processing of Ultralow Carbon Pipeline Steels with Acicular Ferrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furen XIAO; Mingchun ZHAO; Yiyin SHAN; Bo LIAO; Ke YANG

    2004-01-01

    Acicular ferrite microstructure was achieved for an ultralow carbon pipeline steel through the improved thermomechanical control process (TMCP), which was based on the transformation process of deformed austenite of steel.Compared with commercial pipeline steels, the experimental ultralow carbon pipeline steel possessed the satisfied strength and toughness behaviors under the current improved TMCP, although it contained only approximately 0.025% C, which should mainly be attributed to the microstructural characteristics of acicular ferrite.

  7. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  8. Formation of nanoscale titanium carbides in ferrite: an atomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanan; Hodgson, Peter; Kong, Lingxue; Gao, Weimin

    2016-03-01

    The formation and evolution of nanoscale titanium carbide in ferrite during the early isothermal annealing process were investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. The atomic interactions of titanium and carbon atoms during the initial formation process explained the atoms aggregation and carbides formation. It was found that the aggregation and dissociation of titanium carbide occurred simultaneously, and the composition of carbide clusters varied in a wide range. A mechanism for the formation of titanium carbide clusters in ferrite was disclosed.

  9. Ferrite bead effect on Class-D amplifier audio quality

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, Kevin El; Mrad, Roberto; Morel, Florent; Pillonnet, Gael; Vollaire, Christian; Nagari, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper studies the effect of ferrite beads on the audio quality of Class-D audio amplifiers. This latter is a switch-ing circuit which creates high frequency harmonics. Generally, a filter is used at the amplifier output for the sake of electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC). So often, in integrated solutions, this filter contains ferrite beads which are magnetic components and present nonlinear behavior. Time domain measurements and their equivalence in frequency do...

  10. Tuning the magnetism of ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viñas, S. Liébana [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Simeonidis, K. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Li, Z.-A.; Ma, Z. [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Myrovali, E.; Makridis, A.; Sakellari, D. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Angelakeris, M., E-mail: agelaker@auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Wiedwald, U.; Spasova, M. [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Farle, M., E-mail: michael.farle@uni-due.de [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    The importance of magnetic interactions within an individual nanoparticle or between adjacent ones is crucial not only for the macroscopic collective magnetic behavior but for the AC magnetic heating efficiency as well. On this concept, single-(MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} where M=Fe, Co, Mn) and core–shell ferrite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetically softer (MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) or magnetically harder (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) core and a magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) shell with an overall size in the 10 nm range were synthesized and studied for their magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. Magnetic measurements indicate that the coating of the hard magnetic phase (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} provides a significant enhancement of hysteresis losses over the corresponding single-phase counterpart response, and thus results in a multiplication of the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency opening a novel pathway for high-performance, magnetic hyperthermia agents. At the same time, the existence of a biocompatible Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} outer shell, toxicologically renders these systems similar to iron-oxide ones with significantly milder side-effects. - Highlights: • Magnetic hyperthermia is studied for 10 nm single and core/shell ferrite nanoparticles. • Maximum heating rate is observed for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • The increase is attributed to the interaction of phases with different anisotropy. • The presence of biocompatible Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} shell potentially minimizes toxic side-effects.

  11. Structure-Property Relationships in Intercalated Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-15

    2% 293 (1984). 45. "Raman Microprobe Studies of the Structure of SbCls-Graphite Intercalation Compounds’, L.E. McNeil, J. Steinbeck , L. Salamanca-Riba...Using the Rutherford Backscattering-Channeling Teachnique’, G. Braunstein, B. Elman, J. Steinbeck , M.S. Dresseihaus, T. Venkatesan and B. Wilkens, to be...8217Razuan Mcroprobe Observation of Intercalate Contraction In Graphite Inter- calation Compounds’, L.E. McNeil, J. Steinbeck , L. Salamancar-Riba, and G

  12. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chih-Yuan

    Alumina-graphite composites, which combine high wear resistance and self-lubricity, are a potential and promising candidate for advanced tribological applications. The processing, mechanical properties and tribology of alumina-graphite composites are discussed. Full density is difficult to achieve by a pressureless sintering route. Porosity of the composites increases with graphite content which causes the strength, modulus of elasticity, and hardness of the composites to decrease. The increased porosity does cause the fracture toughness to slightly increases. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites was studied with a pin-on-disk tribometer with emphasis on the following aspects: the graphite content in both pin and disk, the graphite flake size and the orientation of the graphite flakes. Scan electronic microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction are utilized to examine and characterize the wear debris and the worn surface. Results confirmed that it is necessary to optimize the structure and the supply of lubricant to improve the tribological behavior and that the arrangements of sliding couples also affect the tribology of self-lubricated ceramic composites. Continuous measurements of the friction coefficients were collected at high frequency in an attempt to correlate the tribology of alumina-graphite composites to vibrations introduced by friction. While these measurements indicate that the time frequency behavior of tribology is an important area of study, conclusions regarding the frequency response of different sliding couples could not be definitively stated. Finally, a new concept connecting instantaneous wear coefficient and instantaneous contact stress is proposed for prediction of wear behavior of brittle materials.

  13. Algorithm for Realistic Modeling of Graphitic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Khomenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for molecular dynamics simulations of graphitic systems using realistic semiempirical interaction potentials of carbon atoms taking into account both short-range and long-range contributions is proposed. Results of the use of the algorithm for a graphite sample are presented. The scalability of the algorithm depending on the system size and the number of processor cores involved in the calculations is analyzed.

  14. Electric properties of Co substituted Ni-Zn ferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodake, J.S. [Department of Physics, Solapur University, Solapur 413255, MS (India); Kambale, R.C., E-mail: rckambale@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416004 (India); Salvi, S.V. [Department of Physics, Birla college, Kalyan, Mumbai, MS (India); Sawant, S.R. [Department of Electronics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416004 (India); Suryavanshi, S.S., E-mail: sssuryavanshi@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, Solapur University, Solapur 413255, MS (India)

    2009-11-03

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Co-Zn ferrites have been synthesized by chemical co precipitation method, using oxalate precursors. The phase formation of the sintered ferrite was confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. The lattice parameter 'a' increases with the addition of Co{sup 2+} content in the Ni-Zn ferrites. The electrical resistivity (rho) of mixed Ni-Zn ferrites has been studied as a function of varying Co{sup 2+} compositions. The resistivity was found to increase with the addition Co content in the Ni-Zn ferrite matrix. The variation of dc resistivity as a function of temperature is almost linear up to the Curie temperature and thereafter a break occurs indicating a change of magnetic ordering from ferrimagnetism to paramagnetism. The values of activation energy in paramagnetic region are found to be greater than those in ferrimagnetic region, which suggests that the process of conduction is affected by the change in magnetic ordering. The dielectric properties were studied as a function of frequency by using an LCR precision meter bridge. It was observed that the dielectric constant (epsilon') and dielectric loss tangent (tan delta) decreases with the substitution of Co{sup 2+} content in the Ni-Zn ferrites.

  15. Coating of zinc ferrite particles with a conducting polymer, polyaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Brodinová, Jitka; Kalenda, Petr; Fedorova, Svetlana V; Prokes, Jan; Zemek, Josef

    2006-06-01

    Particles of zinc ferrite, ZnOFe2O3, were coated with polyaniline (PANI) phosphate during the in situ polymerization of aniline in an aqueous solution of phosphoric acid. The PANI-ferrite composites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the degree of coating with a conducting polymer. Even a low content of PANI, 1.4 wt%, resulted in the 45% coating of the particles' surface. On the other hand, even at high PANI content, the coating of ferrite surface did not exceeded 90%. This is explained by the clustering of hydrophobic aniline oligomers at the hydrophilic ferrite surface and the consequent irregular PANI coating. The conductivity increased from 2 x 10(-9) to 6.5 S cm(-1) with increasing fraction of PANI phosphate in the composite. The percolation threshold was located at 3-4 vol% of the conducting component. In the absence of any acid, a conducting product, 1.4 x 10(-2) Scm(-1), was also obtained. As the concentration of phosphoric acid increased to 3 M, the conductivity of the composites reached 1.8 S cm(-1) at 10-14 wt% of PANI. The ferrite alone can act as an oxidant for aniline; a product having a conductivity 0.11 S cm(-1) was obtained after a one-month immersion of ferrite in an acidic solution of aniline.

  16. Dielectric properties of Al-substituted Co ferrite nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A T Raghavender; K M Jadhav

    2009-12-01

    A series of polycrystalline spinel ferrites with composition, CoFe2–AlO4 (0 ≤ ≤ 1), have been synthesized by sol–gel method. The effect of Al-substitution on structural and dielectric properties is reported in this paper. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the nanocrystalline nature in the prepared ferrite samples. The particle size, , decreases with increase in Al-content. The lattice parameter, and X-ray density, x, decreased with increase in Al-content. The dielectric properties for all the samples have been studied as a function of frequency in the range 100 Hz–10 MHz. Dielectric properties such as dielectric constant, ′, dielectric loss, ″ and dielectric loss tangent, tan , have been studied for nanocrystalline ferrite samples as a function of frequency. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss obtained for the nanocrystalline ferrites proposed by this technique possess lower value than that of the ferrites prepared by other methods for the same composition. The low dielectric behaviour makes ferrite materials useful in high frequency applications.

  17. Intragranular ferrite morphologies in medium carbon vanadium-microalloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadel A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine TTT diagram of medium carbon V-N micro-alloyed steel with emphasis on the development of intragranular ferrite morphologies. The isothermal treatment was carried out at 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600°C. These treatments were interrupted at different times in order to analyze the evolution of the microstructure. Metallographic evaluation was done using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results show that at high temperatures (≥ 500°C polygonal intragranulary nucleated ferrite idiomorphs, combined with grain boundary ferrite and pearlite were produced and followed by an incomplete transformation phenomenon. At intermediate temperatures (450, 500°C an interloced acicular ferrite (AF microstructure is produced, and at low temperatures (400, 350°C the sheave of parallel acicular ferrite plates, similar to bainitic sheaves but intragranularly nucleated were observed. In addition to sheaf type acicular ferrite, the grain boundary nucleated bainitic sheaves are observed. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI174004

  18. Synthesis and characterization of biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Deb; J Giri; S Dasgupta; D Datta; D Bahadur

    2003-12-01

    Ferrite particles coated with biocompatible phases can be used for hyperthermia treatment of cancer. We have synthesized substituted calcium hexaferrite, which is not stable on its own but is stabilized with small substitution of La. Hexaferrite of chemical composition (CaO)0.75(La2O3)0.20(Fe2O3)6 was prepared using citrate gel method. Hydroxyapatite was prepared by precipitating it from aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2 and (NH4)2HPO4 maintaining pH above 11. Four different methods were used for coating of hydroxyapatite on ferrite particles. SEM with EDX and X-ray diffraction analysis shows clear evidence of coating of hydroxy-apatite on ferrite particles. These coated ferrite particles exhibited coercive field up to 2 kOe, which could be made useful for hysteresis heating in hyperthermia. Studies by culturing BHK-21 cells and WBC over the samples show evidence of biocompatibility. SEM micrographs and cell counts give clear indication of cell growth on the surface of the sample. Finally coated ferrite particle was implanted in Kasaulli mouse to test its biocompatibility. The magnetic properties and biocompatibility studies show that these hydroxyapatite coated ferrites could be useful for hyperthermia.

  19. APPLICATION OF MODIFYING ALLOYING ALLOY CONTAINING NANOSIZED POWDERS OF ACTIVE ELEMENTS IN PRODUCTION OF HIGH-STRENGTH CAST IRON WITH GLOBULAR GRAPHITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kalinichenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and practical interest is the application of alloying alloy-modifiers for secondary treatment of high-strength cast iron to stabilize the process of spheroidization graphite and achieving higher physical-mechanical properties of castings. The peculiarity of the high-strength cast irons manufacturing technology is their tendency to supercooling during solidification in the mold. This leads to the formation of shrinkage defects and structurally free cementite, especially in thin-walled sections of the finished castings. To minimize these effects in foundry practice during production of ductile iron the secondary inoculation is widely used. In this regard, the question of the choice of the additives with effective impact not only on the graphitization process but also on the formation of the metallic base of ductile iron is relevant. The aim of the present work is to study the peculiarities of structure formation in cast iron with nodular graphite when alloying alloy-modifier based on tin with additions of nanoparticles of titanium carbide, yttrium oxide and graphite nano-pipes is used for secondary treatment. Melting of iron in laboratory conditions was performed in crucible induction furnace IST-006 with an acid lining held. Spheroidizing treatment of melt was realized with magnesium containing alloying alloy FeSiMg7 by means of ladle method. Secondary treatment of high strength cast iron was carried out by addition of alloying alloy-modifier in an amount of 0.1% to the bottom of the pouring ladle. Cast samples for chemical composition analysis, study of microstructure, technological and mechanical properties of the resultant alloy were made. Studies have shown that the secondary treatment of high strength cast iron with developed modifier-alloying alloy results in formation of the perlite metallic base due to the tin impact and nodular graphite with regular shape under the influence of titanium carbide, yttrium oxide and graphite nano

  20. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  1. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  2. Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles (SCPs) as Chronological Markers in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornalley, D.; Rose, N.; Oppo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) are a component of fly-ash, the particulate by-product of industrial high-temperature combustion of coal and fuel-oil that is released to the atmosphere with flue-gases. They are morphologically distinct and have no natural sources making them unambiguous markers of contamination from these anthropogenic sources. In naturally accumulating archives, SCPs may be used as a chronological tool as they provide a faithful record of industrial emissions and deposition. While the timing of the first presence of SCP in the 19th century, and the observed sub-surface peak are dependent on factors such as sediment accumulation rates and local industrial history, a rapid increase in SCP inputs in the mid-20thcentury appears to be a global signal corresponding to an acceleration in global electricity demand following the Second World War and the use of fuel-oil in electricity production at an industrial scale for the first time. While this approach has been widely used in lake sediments, it has not been applied to marine sediments, although there is great potential. Improved dating of 19th-20th century marine sediments has particular relevance for developing reconstructions of recent multi-decadal climate and ocean variability, and for studies that aim to place 20thcentury climate change within the context of the last millennium. Here, we present data from three sediment cores from the continental slope south of Iceland to demonstrate the temporal and spatial replicability of the SCP record in the marine environment and compare these data with cores taken from more contaminated areas off the coast of the eastern United States. The improved age model constraints provided by the analysis of SCPs has enabled a more accurate assessment of the timing of recent abrupt climate events recorded in these archives and has thus improved our understanding of likely causal climate mechanisms.

  3. THE DEARTH OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN GALACTIC DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spekkens, Kristine; Urbancic, Natasha [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4 (Canada); Mason, Brian S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Willman, Beth [Haverford College, 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Aguirre, James E., E-mail: kristine.spekkens@rmc.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We present new upper limits on the neutral hydrogen (H I) content within the stellar half-light ellipses of 15 Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), derived from pointed observations with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as Arecibo L-band Fast ALFA survey and Galactic All-Sky Survey data. All of the limits M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim} are more stringent than previously reported values, and those from the GBT improve upon constraints in the literature by a median factor of 23. Normalizing by V-band luminosity L{sub V} and dynamical mass M {sub dyn}, we find M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim}/L{sub V}∼10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙}/L{sub ⊙} and M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim}/M{sub dyn}∼5×10{sup −5}, irrespective of location in the Galactic halo. Comparing these relative H I contents to those of the Local Group and nearby neighbor dwarfs compiled by McConnachie, we find that the Galactic dSphs are extremely gas-poor. Our H I upper limits therefore provide the clearest picture yet of the environmental dependence of the H I content in Local Volume dwarfs. If ram pressure stripping explains the dearth of H I in these systems, then orbits in a relatively massive Milky Way are favored for the outer halo dSph Leo I, while Leo II and Canes Venatici I have had a pericentric passage in the past. For Draco and Ursa Minor, the interstellar medium mass that should accumulate through stellar mass loss in between pericentric passages exceeds M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim} by a factor of ∼30. In Ursa Minor, this implies that either this material is not in the atomic phase, or that another mechanism clears the recycled gas on shorter timescales.

  4. Dating recent lake sediments using spheroidal carbonaceous particle (SCP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yanhong; WANG Sumin; XIA Weilan; LIU Jian

    2005-01-01

    Dating lake sediment using sedimentary event is the supplement and calibration to traditional dating by radionuclide such as 210Pb and 137Cs. Based on the change of spheroidal carbonaceous particle (SCP) concentration, the age sequence of lake sediments can be deduced. It is one of the dating methods using sedimentary event. SCP is formed from combustion of fossil fuel at high temperature up to 1750℃ and at a rate of heating of approaching 104 ℃/s. It can be dispersed to several hundred kilometers away from its source and deposited with precipitation or dryly deposited, and kept in sediments. Compared with Cs or Pb, there is no evidence for SCP that it decays in lake sediments and is un-removable once stored except by physical disturbance because it is mainly composed of element carbon. Handy method to extract, identify and calculate has been developed. Although fossil fuel has been used early in China, combustion at high temperature started later since emergence of electricity generation. The productivity of SCP is positively related with the generated thermal power, which is reflected as the SCP concentration in lake sediments increases with the increase of generated thermal power. Therefore, reliable sediment markers from the start of the SCP record and the remarkable variation can be used for dating purpose. In China, electricity industry started from the 1950s, and rapid increase of generated power took place since 1978. Based on these time markers, SCP time sequences of lake sediment cores LH and LL-4 from Longgan Lake, the middle reach of the Yangtze River, have been established, which is comparable with the results from 137Cs and 210Pb, and has eliminated the errors of dating using 137Cs and 210Pb.

  5. Predicting the growth of glioblastoma multiforme spheroids using a multiphase porous media model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascheroni, Pietro; Stigliano, Cinzia; Carfagna, Melania; Boso, Daniela P; Preziosi, Luigi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Schrefler, Bernhard A

    2016-10-01

    Tumor spheroids constitute an effective in vitro tool to investigate the avascular stage of tumor growth. These three-dimensional cell aggregates reproduce the nutrient and proliferation gradients found in the early stages of cancer and can be grown with a strict control of their environmental conditions. In the last years, new experimental techniques have been developed to determine the effect of mechanical stress on the growth of tumor spheroids. These studies report a reduction in cell proliferation as a function of increasingly applied stress on the surface of the spheroids. This work presents a specialization for tumor spheroid growth of a previous more general multiphase model. The equations of the model are derived in the framework of porous media theory, and constitutive relations for the mass transfer terms and the stress are formulated on the basis of experimental observations. A set of experiments is performed, investigating the growth of U-87MG spheroids both freely growing in the culture medium and subjected to an external mechanical pressure induced by a Dextran solution. The growth curves of the model are compared to the experimental data, with good agreement for both the experimental settings. A new mathematical law regulating the inhibitory effect of mechanical compression on cancer cell proliferation is presented at the end of the paper. This new law is validated against experimental data and provides better results compared to other expressions in the literature.

  6. A system for determining the pharmacology of indirect radiation sensitizer drugs on multicellular spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, N.; Bicher, H.I.; Hetzel, F.W.; Brown, M.

    1981-01-01

    We have characterized some of the physiology of multicellular spheroids of different sizes grown from Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells. Among the parameters studied were oxygen tension distributions within the spheroid. This was achieved using ultramicroelectrodes with tip diameters of 1-5 mu and a perfusion system whereby environmental conditions such as flow, temperature, and chemical makeup of the milieu could be measured and controlled. Plateau pO/sup 2/ values of less than 10 mm Hg were consistently obtained from spheroids under various conditions. We were able to modify these distributions by use of indirect radiation sensitizer drugs such as mechlorethamine HCl (mustargen) at nontoxic doses. We have also made determinations of the inhibitory capacities of several other drugs on the respiration rate of constituent cells of multicellular spheroids in single-cell suspensions. We have concluded that there are indeed hypoxic cells in spheroids whose radioresistance may be modified by essentially nontoxic levels of indirect radiosensitizer drugs and that the system described shows great promise for screening agents which may modify radiation response.

  7. Optical signature of multicellular tumor spheroid using index-mismatch-induced spherical aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, G.; Weiss, P.; Ducommun, B.; Lorenzo, C.

    2014-02-01

    The development of new cancer treatments and the early prediction of their therapeutic potential are often made difficult by the lack of predictive pharmacological models. The 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model offers a level of complexity that recapitulates the three-dimensional organization of a tumor and appears to be fairly predictive of therapeutic efficiency. The use of spheroids in large-scale automated screening was recently reported to link the power of a high throughput analysis to the predictability of a 3D cell model. The spheroid has a radial symmetry; this simple geometry allows establishing a direct correlation between structure and function. The outmost layers of MCTS are composed of proliferating cells and form structurally uniform domain with an approximate thickness of 100 microns. The innermost layers are composed of quiescent cells. Finally, cells in the center of the spheroid can form a necrotic core. This latest region is structurally heterogeneous and is poorly characterized. These features make the spheroid a model of choice and a paradigm to study the optical properties of various epithelial tissues. In this study, we used an in-vitro optical technique for label-free characterization of multicellular systems based on the index- mismatch induced spherical aberrations. We achieve to monitor and characterize the optical properties of MCTS. This new and original approach might be of major interest for the development of innovative screening strategies dedicated to the identification of anticancer drugs.

  8. Cell invasion in the spheroid sprouting assay: a spatial organisation analysis adaptable to cell behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blacher

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell spheroid assay provides a suitable in vitro model to study (lymph angiogenesis and test pro- and anti-(lymph angiogenic factors or drugs. Usually, the extent of cell invasion, observed through optical microscopy, is measured. The present study proposes the spatial distribution of migrated cells as a new descriptor of the (lymph angiogenic response. The utility of this novel method rests with its capacity to locally characterise spheroid structure, allowing not only the investigation of single and collective cell invasion but also the evolution of the spheroid core itself. Moreover, the proposed method can be applied to 2D-projected spheroid images obtained by optical microscopy, as well as to 3D images acquired by confocal microscopy. To validate the proposed methodology, endothelial cell invasion was evaluated under different experimental conditions. The results were compared with widely used global parameters. The comparison shows that our method prevents local spheroid modifications from being overlooked and leading to the possible misinterpretation of results.

  9. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Farid G

    2015-10-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (θ = π) in the near field and the backscattering form function in the far field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) because of the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3-D directivity patterns illustrate the near- and far-field axisymmetric scattering. Investigations in underwater acoustics, particle levitation, scattering, and the detection of submerged elongated objects and other related applications utilizing Bessel waves would benefit from the results of the present study.

  10. High-throughput generation of spheroids using magnetic nanoparticles for three-dimensional cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Choi, Jong-Ho; Kim, Minsoo; Rhee, Won Jong; Son, Boram; Jung, Hyun-Kyo; Park, Tai Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Various attempts have been made to develop three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture methods because 3-D cells mimic the structures and functional properties of real tissue compared with those of monolayer cultures. Here, we report on a highly simple and efficient 3-D spheroid generation method based on a magnetic pin-array system to concentrate magnetic nanoparticle-incorporated cells in a focal direction. This system was comprised only of external magnets and magnetically induced iron pins to generate a concentrated magnetic field for attracting cells in a focused direction. 3-D spheroid generation was achieved simply by adding magnetic nanoparticle-incorporated cells into a well and covering the plate with a magnetic lid. Cell clustering occurred rapidly within 5 min and created more compact cells with time through the focused magnetic force. This system ensured not only reproducible and size-controlled generation of spheroids but also versatile types of spheroids such as random mixed, core-shell, and fused spheroids, providing a very useful tool for various biological applications.

  11. Exploring Drug Dosing Regimens In Vitro Using Real-Time 3D Spheroid Tumor Growth Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Titus, Steven A; Brimacombe, Kyle; Michael, Sam; Sittampalam, Gurusingham; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer cell proliferation assays for cancer drug discovery have made the implementation of large-scale screens feasible but only seem to reflect a simplified view that oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes are the genetic drivers of cancer cell proliferation. However, there is now increased evidence that the cellular and physiological context in which these oncogenic events occur play a key role in how they drive tumor growth in vivo and, therefore, in how tumors respond to drug treatments. In vitro 3D spheroid tumor models are being developed to better mimic the physiology of tumors in vivo, in an attempt to improve the predictability and efficiency of drug discovery for the treatment of cancer. Here we describe the establishment of a real-time 3D spheroid growth, 384-well screening assay. The cells used in this study constitutively expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled the real-time monitoring of spheroid formation and the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on spheroid size at different time points of sphere growth and drug treatment. This real-time 3D spheroid assay platform represents a first step toward the replication in vitro of drug dosing regimens being investigated in vivo. We hope that further development of this assay platform will allow the investigation of drug dosing regimens, efficacy, and resistance before preclinical and clinical studies.

  12. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Santos, C.A.N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Pereira, G.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios Nao Destrutivos, Corrosao e Soldagem

    2013-08-15

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  13. Insights into the dynamics of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerpen, J A.; Wider, C; Broderick, D F.; Dickson, D W.; Brown, L A.; Wszolek, Z K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To report a new American family with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), including serial, presymptomatic and symptomatic, cranial MRIs from the proband. Methods: We report clinical and genealogic investigations of an HDLS family, sequential brain MRIs of the proband, and autopsy slides of brain tissue from the proband’s father. Results: We identified seven affected family members (five deceased). The mean age at symptomatic disease onset was 35 years (range: 20–57), and the mean disease duration was 16 years (range: 3–46). Five affected individuals initially manifested memory disturbance and behavioral changes, whereas two experienced a mood disorder as their presenting symptom. Our proband’s father had been diagnosed clinically with vascular dementia, but his brain autopsy was consistent with HDLS. The proband had a cranial MRI prior to symptom onset, with two subsequent MRIs performed during follow-up. These serial images reveal a progressive, confluent, frontal-predominant leukoencephalopathy with symmetric cortical atrophy. Conclusions: The proband of our newly identified hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) kindred had subtle evidence of an incipient leukoencephalopathy on a presymptomatic cranial MRI. Conceivably, MRI may facilitate identifying affected presymptomatic individuals within known HDLS kindreds, increasing the likelihood of isolating the causative genes. GLOSSARY DLS = diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids; FLAIR = fluid-attenuated inversion recovery; HDLS = hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids; LENAS = leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids; LFB = Luxol fast blue; NAL = neuroaxonal leukodystrophy; POLD = pigmentary type of orthochromatic leukodystrophy. PMID:18794495

  14. Synthesis, characterization and potential application of MnZn ferrite and MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Lingyan; Lim, I-Im S; Bao, Kun; Mott, Derrick; Park, Hye-Young; Luo, Jin; Hao, Shunli; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2009-05-01

    The ability to tune the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles by manipulating the composition or surface properties of the nanoparticles is important for exploiting the application of the nanomaterials. This report describes preliminary findings of an investigation of the viability of synthesizing MnZn ferrite and core @ shell MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles as potentially magnetization-tunable nanomaterials. The synthesis of the core-shell magnetic nanoparticles involved a simple combination of seed formation of the MnZn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles and surface coating of the seeds with gold shells. Water-soluble MnZn ferrite nanoparticles of 20-40 nm diameters and MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles of 30-60 nm have been obtained. The MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be viable in magnetic separation of nanoparticles via interparticle antibody-specific binding reactivity between antibodies on the gold shells of the core-shell magnetic particles and proteins on gold nanoparticles. These findings have significant implications to the design of the core @ shell magnetic nanomaterials with core composition tuned magnetization for bioassay application.

  15. Analytical modeling of demagnetizing effect in magnetoelectric ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayers taking into account a mechanical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyau, V.; Aubert, A.; LoBue, M.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the demagnetizing effect in ferrite/PZT/ferrite magnetoelectric (ME) trilayer composites consisting of commercial PZT discs bonded by epoxy layers to Ni-Co-Zn ferrite discs made by a reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. ME voltage coefficients (transversal mode) were measured on ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayer ME samples with different thicknesses or phase volume ratio in order to highlight the influence of the magnetic field penetration governed by these geometrical parameters. Experimental ME coefficients and voltages were compared to analytical calculations using a quasi-static model. Theoretical demagnetizing factors of two magnetic discs that interact together in parallel magnetic structures were derived from an analytical calculation based on a superposition method. These factors were introduced in ME voltage calculations which take account of the demagnetizing effect. To fit the experimental results, a mechanical coupling factor was also introduced in the theoretical formula. This reflects the differential strain that exists in the ferrite and PZT layers due to shear effects near the edge of the ME samples and within the bonding epoxy layers. From this study, an optimization in magnitude of the ME voltage is obtained. Lastly, an analytical calculation of demagnetizing effect was conducted for layered ME composites containing higher numbers of alternated layers (n ≥ 5). The advantage of such a structure is then discussed.

  16. Sorption Behaviours of Exfoliated Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴光泽; 伍川辉

    2002-01-01

    Exfoliated graphite (EG) is selected as a new kind of sorbent to sorb heavy oil spilled. In order to make use of EG more effectively, some basic experiments are performed to investigate its sorption properties,i.e., specific sorption, height of saturation layer, sorption time constant. In the present experiments, A-grade heavy oil is employed as a standard sorbate. It is concluded that 1) under the condition that the area of solid (filter bottom)-liquid (heavy oil) interface is a constant, specific sorption usually decreases when the amount of EG filled or the apparent bulk density increase; however, the specific sorption initially increases when the apparent bulk density is too low and the amount of EG filled is too much; 2) under the condition that the apparent bulk density of EG filled is a constant, the sorption time constant tends to increase when the amount of EG filled increases; however, for a constant amount of EG filled, the sorption time constant will decrease when the apparent bulk density increases.

  17. Comparison of tribological properties for graphite coatings used for remanufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yu-ling

    2005-01-01

    To improve the solid lubricity on the worn surface of frictional-pairs, a convenient and simple brushpainting technique was utilized to prepare the solid lubrication graphite coatings. The bonding between the coatings and substrate is good. To examine the influence of the different graphite contents on the tribological properties of the graphite coatings, the comparison experiments were carried out on the ring-on-block friction tester. The tribological results show a change law of saddle-shape between the tribological properties of graphite coatings and graphite content. When the amount of graphite is up to 28 g, the tribological properties of graphite coating are the best.The excellent anti-friction of the graphite coating is associated with the close-packed hexagonal crystal structure of graphite.

  18. Production of nuclear graphite in France; Production de graphite nucleaire en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, P.; Mondet, L. [Societe Pechiney, 74 - Chedde (France); Arragon, Ph.; Cornuault, P.; Gueron, J.; Hering, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [French] Le graphite destine a la construction des reacteurs est obtenu par le procede usuel: confection d'une pate a partir de coke de petrole et de brai, cuisson de cette pate (au four electrique) puis graphitation du produit cuit, egalement par chauffage electrique. L'usage du transport pneumatique et le controle des conditions cuisson et de graphitation ont permit d'augmenter la production de graphite nucleaire ainsi que de mieux controler ses proprietes physiques et mecaniques et de reduire au minimum les souillures accidentelles. (M.B.)

  19. Graphite waste management in Japan; Gestion des dechets de graphite au Japon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias, R.M

    2004-07-01

    This report indicates the origin (reactor and reflectors) and the quantity of graphite wastes, describes the extraction process, and then, the various ways of graphite waste processing implemented in Japan by different companies. These processes are: direct storage, incineration and isotopic separation, uranium carbide coating, impregnation. The report also mentions some emerging technologies and Japanese patents for incineration, isotopic separation, and other processes.

  20. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  1. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

  2. A Computational Method to Calculate the Exact Solution for Acoustic Scattering by Liquid Spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    González, Juan D; Blanc, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The problem of scattering of harmonic plane acoustic waves by liquid spheroids (prolate and oblate) is addressed from an analytical approach. Mathematically, it consists in solving the Helmholtz equation in an unbounded domain with Sommerfeld radiation condition at infinity. The domain where propagation takes place is characterised by density and sound speed values $\\rho_0$ and $c_0$, respectively, while $\\rho_1$ and $c_1$ are the corresponding density and sound speed values of an inmersed object that is responsible of the scattered field. Since Helmholtz equation is separable in prolate (oblate) spheroidal coordinates, its exact solution for the scattered field can be expressed as an expansion on prolate (oblate) spheroidal functions multiplied by coefficients whose values depend upon the boundary conditions verified at the medium-inmersed fluid obstacle interface. The general case ($c_0 \

  3. Polarimetric scattering and transmitting of the Stokes vector from a layer of chiral small spheroids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常梅; 金亚秋

    2002-01-01

    To measure fully polarimetric scattering from random chiral small spheroids,the 2 × 2 dimensional (2 × 2-D) complex scattering amplitude matrix of randomly oriented,chiral small spheroid is derived.Polarimetric scattering from a bounded layer of non-uniformly oriented,chirally-active small spheroids in the Mueller matrix solution is obtained.Co-polarized and cross-polarized backscattering and polarization degree for any polarized incidence (X,ψ) are numerically calculated.Transmitting of coherent Stokes parameters through the layer are also discussed.Either non-uniform orientation or chirality can yield non-diagonal extinction matrix κe and full eigenmatrix E due to the fact of forward depolarized-scattering functions , ≠ 0.Comparisons of fully polarimetric scattering from the chiral and achiral particulate media demonstrate the chirality effect on wave scattering and transmitting.``

  4. Monitoring the Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway in a 3D Spheroid Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondesert, Odile; Frongia, Céline; Clayton, Olivia; Boizeau, Marie-Laure; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the DNA-Damage Response (DDR) activated pathway in multicellular tumor spheroid models is an important challenge as these 3D models have demonstrated their major relevance in pharmacological evaluation. Herein we present DDR-Act-FP, a fluorescent biosensor that allows detection of DDR activation through monitoring of the p21 promoter p53-dependent activation. We show that cells expressing the DDR-Act-FP biosensor efficiently report activation of the DDR pathway after DNA damage and its pharmacological manipulation using ATM kinase inhibitors. We also report the successful use of this assay to screen a small compound library in order to identify activators of the DDR response. Finally, using multicellular spheroids expressing the DDR-Act-FP we demonstrate that DDR activation and its pharmacological manipulation with inhibitory and activatory compounds can be efficiently monitored in live 3D spheroid model. This study paves the way for the development of innovative screening and preclinical evaluation assays.

  5. Stable Ni isotopes and Be-10 and Al-26 in metallic spheroids from Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, S.; Herzog, G. F.; Hall, G. S.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Juenemann, D.

    1993-01-01

    The Canyon Diablo spheroids, which are found around Meteor Crater, Arizona, are nickel-enriched objects with diameters from less than 0.1 to several mm. Previous studies have suggested that the enrichment of nickel resulted either from shock-melting of S-rich areas followed by solidification of the liquids under strongly non-equilibrium conditions at rapid cooling rates during flight outward from the crater or from the selective oxidation of iron. Isotopic studies are an effective tool for constraining the degree of open-system evaporation experienced by a system. The purpose of this study was to see whether Ni isotopes had been fractionated by volatilization during spheroid formation. In addition, the cosmogenic nuclides Be-10 and Al-26 were measured to try to estimate the depths in the parent meteorite from which the spheroids came.

  6. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, T. A.; Mackey, A. D.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g- and i-band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct overdensity encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Boötes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Boötes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  7. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Bo\\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Roderick, T A; Jerjen, H; Da Costa, G S

    2016-01-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Bo\\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g and i band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct over-density encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Bo\\"otes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Bo\\"otes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Bo\\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  8. Physical facets of ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Bhaskar Rao; Sivasankar, Thirugnanasambandam; Sivakumar, Manickam; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2010-02-01

    This paper addresses the physical features of the ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles and tries to establish the relationship between cavitation physics and sonochemistry of the zinc ferrite synthesis. A dual approach of coupling experimental results with simulations of radial motion of cavitation bubbles has been adopted. The precursors for the zinc ferrite, viz. ZnO and Fe(3)O(4) are produced in situ by the hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates stimulated by (*)OH radicals produced from the transient collapse of the cavitation bubbles. Experiments performed under different conditions create significant variation in the production of (*)OH radicals, and hence, the rate of acetate hydrolysis. Correlation of the results of experiments and simulations sheds light on the important facets of the physical mechanism of ultrasonic cavitational zinc ferrite synthesis. It is revealed that too much or too little rate of acetate hydrolysis results in smaller particle size of zinc ferrite. The first effect of a higher rate of hydrolysis leads to excessively large growth of particles, due to which they become susceptible to the disruptive action of cavitation bubbles. Whereas, the second effect of too small rate of hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates restricts the growth of particles. It has been observed that the initial reactant concentration does not influence the mean particle size or the size distribution of zinc ferrite particles. The present investigation clearly confirms that the rate-controlling step of zinc ferrite synthesis through ultrasonic cavitational route is the rate of formation of (*)OH radicals from cavitation bubbles.

  9. Scattering from the Quasi-Optical Ferrite Circulator Using a Coupled Integral Equation/FEM Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, L. W.; Hoppe, D. J.; Chinn, G. C.; Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Ferrite materials are used in microwave devices that exploit the property of Faraday rotation to give non-reciprocal behavior. Examples of common waveguide components that use ferrite materials include circulators, isolators and gyrators.

  10. Unraveling the Effect of Thermomechanical Treatment on the Dissolution of Delta Ferrite in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezayat, Mohammad; Mirzadeh, Hamed; Namdar, Masih; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi

    2016-02-01

    Considering the detrimental effects of delta ferrite stringers in austenitic stainless steels and the industrial considerations regarding energy consumption, investigating, and optimizing the kinetics of delta ferrite removal is of vital importance. In the current study, a model alloy prone to the formation of austenite/delta ferrite dual phase microstructure was subjected to thermomechanical treatment using the wedge rolling test aiming to dissolve delta ferrite. The effect of introducing lattice defects and occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were investigated. It was revealed that pipe diffusion is responsible for delta ferrite removal during thermomechanical process, whereas when the DRX is dominant, the kinetics of delta ferrite dissolution tends toward that of the static homogenization treatment for delta ferrite removal that is based on the lattice diffusion of Cr and Ni in austenite. It was concluded that the optimum condition for dissolution of delta ferrite can be defined by the highest rolling temperature and strain in which DRX is not pronounced.

  11. Low temperature sintering of MgCuZn ferrite and its electrical and magnetic properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R Murthy

    2001-08-01

    The low temperature sintering of MgCuZn ferrite was investigated using the usual ceramic method. The effect of Cu substitution on the properties of MgZn ferrites was also investigated and it was found that the densification of MgCuZn ferrite is dependent upon Cu concentration. The sintered ferrite with a density of 4.93 g/cm3 and electrical resistivity > 1011-cm was obtained for the ferrite with 12 mol% Cu at relatively low sintering temperature (910°C). The magnetic properties of the ferrites also improved by the Cu substitution. The chip inductors made of the ferrite fired at 910 C with 12 mol% Cu exhibited higher d.c. resistance. From these studies it is concluded that the good quality chip inductor can be obtained using the MgCuZn ferrites.

  12. Synthesis of Novel Ferrite Based Recyclable Catalyst Used to Clean Dye and Emerging Contaminates from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herein, we describe synthesis of novel palladium, copper, cobalt and vanadium ferrites. The ferrites were synthesized by combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol. The particles phases were confirmed using X-ray diffraction and sizes were determined using particle size analyzer. ...

  13. Synthesis of Novel Ferrite Based Recyclable Catalyst Used to Clean Dye and Emerging Contaminates from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herein, we describe synthesis of novel palladium, copper, cobalt and vanadium ferrites. The ferrites were synthesized by combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol. The particles phases were confirmed using X-ray diffraction and sizes were determined using particle size analyzer. ...

  14. Performance of ferrite fillers on electrical behavior of polymer nanocomposite electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Kamlesh; Mauli Dwivedi, Mrigank; Singh, Markandey; Agrawal, S. L.

    2011-04-01

    Dispersal of nanofillers in polymer electrolytes have shown to improve the ionic properties of Polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based polymer electrolytes in recent times. The effects of different nanoferrite fillers (i.e., Al-Zn ferrite, Mg-Zn ferrite, and Zn ferrite) on the electrical transport properties have been studied here on the composite polymer electrolyte system. The interaction of salt/filler with electrolyte has been investigated by XRD studies. SEM image and infrared spectral studies give an indication of nanocomposite formation. In conductivity studies, all electrolyte systems are seen to follow universal power law. Composition dependence (with ferrite filler) gives the maximum conductivity in [93PEO-7NH4SCN]: X ferrite (where X = 2% in Al-Zn ferrite, 1% Mg-Zn ferrite, and 1% Zn ferrite) system.

  15. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  16. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  17. Supermassive Black Holes and their Host Spheroids III. The Mbh-nsph Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savorgnan, Giulia A. D.

    2016-04-01

    The Sérsic {R}1/n model is the best approximation known to date for describing the light distribution of stellar spheroidal and disk components, with the Sérsic index n providing a direct measure of the central radial concentration of stars. The Sérsic index of a galaxy’s spheroidal component, nsph, has been shown to tightly correlate with the mass of the central supermassive black hole, MBH. The {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} correlation is also expected from other two well known scaling relations involving the spheroid luminosity, Lsph: the {L}{sph}{--}{n}{sph} and the {M}{BH}{--}{L}{sph}. Obtaining an accurate estimate of the spheroid Sérsic index requires a careful modeling of a galaxy’s light distribution and some studies have failed to recover a statistically significant {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} correlation. With the aim of re-investigating the {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} and other black hole mass scaling relations, we performed a detailed (i.e., bulge, disks, bars, spiral arms, rings, halo, nucleus, etc.) decomposition of 66 galaxies, with directly measured black hole masses, that had been imaged at 3.6 μm with Spitzer. In this paper, the third of this series, we present an analysis of the {L}{sph}{--}{n}{sph} and {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} diagrams. While early-type (elliptical+lenticular) and late-type (spiral) galaxies split into two separate relations in the {L}{sph}{--}{n}{sph} and {M}{BH}{--}{L}{sph} diagrams, they reunite into a single {M}{BH}\\propto {n}{sph}3.39+/- 0.15 sequence with relatively small intrinsic scatter (ε ≃ 0.25 {dex}). The black hole mass appears to be closely related to the spheroid central concentration of stars, which mirrors the inner gradient of the spheroid gravitational potential.

  18. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-il Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation.

  19. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  20. PMR Graphite Engine Duct Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotler, C. L.; Yokel, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the cost and weight advantages that could be obtained by utilizing the graphite/PMR15 material system to replace titanium in selected turbofan engine applications. The first component to be selected as a basis for evaluation was the outer bypass duct of the General Electric F404 engine. The operating environment of this duct was defined and then an extensive mechanical and physical property test program was conducted using material made by processing techniques which were also established by this program. Based on these properties, design concepts to fabricate a composite version of the duct were established and two complete ducts fabricated. One of these ducts was proof pressure tested and then run successfully on a factory test engine for over 1900 hours. The second duct was static tested to 210 percent design limit load without failure. An improved design was then developed which utilized integral composite end flanges. A complete duct was fabricated and successfully proof pressure tested. The net results of this effort showed that a composite version of the outer duct would be 14 percent lighter and 30 percent less expensive that the titanium duct. The other type of structure chosen for investigation was the F404 fan stator assembly, including the fan stator vanes. It was concluded that it was feasible to utilize composite materials for this type structure but that the requirements imposed by replacing an existing metal design resulted in an inefficient composite design. It was concluded that if composites were to be effectively used in this type structure, the design must be tailored for composite application from the outset.