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Sample records for fermenting neutrophilic crenarchaeote

  1. fermentation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-05-17

    May 17, 2012 ... osmotic pressure, ethanol stress and other metabolic inhibitors accumulation in broth. At 48 h, the maximum ethanol concentration reached 137 g L-1, after which fermentation ended with the residual glucose at approximately 4.71 g L-1 and the volumetric productivity at approximately 2.54 g L-1 h-1.

  2. Novel cultivation-based approach to understanding the miscellaneous crenarchaeotic group (MCG) archaea from sedimentary ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagen, Emma J; Huber, Harald; Meador, Travis; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Thomm, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The uncultured miscellaneous crenarchaeotic group (MCG) archaea comprise one of the most abundant microbial groups in the Earth's subsurface environment. However, very little information is available regarding the lifestyle, physiology, and factors controlling the distribution of members of this group. We established a novel method using both cultivation and molecular techniques, including a pre-PCR propidium monoazide treatment, to investigate viable members of the MCG in vitro. Enrichment cultures prepared from estuarine sediment were provided with one of a variety of carbon substrates or cultivation conditions and incubated for 3 weeks. Compared with the samples from time zero, there was an order-of-magnitude increase in the number of MCG 16S rRNA genes in almost all cultures, indicating that MCG archaea are amenable to in vitro cultivation. None of the tested substrates or conditions significantly stimulated growth of MCG archaea more than the basal medium alone; however, glycerol (0.02%) had a significantly inhibitory effect (P medium, addition of amino acids, H2-CO2 as the gas phase, or initial aerobic conditions) revealed that the majority of viable MCG archaea were affiliated with the MCG-8 and MCG-4 clusters. There were no significant differences in MCG diversity between these treatments, also indicating that some members of MCG-4 and MCG-8 are tolerant of initially oxic conditions. The methods outlined here will be useful for further investigation of MCG archaea and comparison of substrates and cultivation conditions that influence their growth in vitro.

  3. Genetic and functional properties of uncultivated thermophilic crenarchaeotes from a subsurface gold mine as revealed by analysis of genome fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunoura, Takuro; Hirayama, Hisako; Takami, Hideto; Oida, Hanako; Nishi, Shinro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Suzuki, Yohey; Inagaki, Fumio; Takai, Ken; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2005-12-01

    Within a phylum Crenarchaeota, only some members of the hyperthermophilic class Thermoprotei, have been cultivated and characterized. In this study, we have constructed a metagenomic library from a microbial mat formation in a subsurface hot water stream of the Hishikari gold mine, Japan, and sequenced genome fragments of two different phylogroups of uncultivated thermophilic Crenarchaeota: (i) hot water crenarchaeotic group (HWCG) I (41.2 kb), and (ii) HWCG III (49.3 kb). The genome fragment of HWCG I contained a 16S rRNA gene, two tRNA genes and 35 genes encoding proteins but no 23S rRNA gene. Among the genes encoding proteins, several genes for putative aerobic-type carbon monoxide dehydrogenase represented a potential clue with regard to the yet unknown metabolism of HWCG I Archaea. The genome fragment of HWCG III contained a 16S/23S rRNA operon and 44 genes encoding proteins. In the 23S rRNA gene, we detected a homing-endonuclease encoding a group I intron similar to those detected in hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota and Bacteria, as well as eukaryotic organelles. The reconstructed phylogenetic tree based on the 23S rRNA gene sequence reinforced the intermediate phylogenetic affiliation of HWCG III bridging the hyperthermophilic and non-thermophilic uncultivated Crenarchaeota.

  4. Neutrophils at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauseef, William M; Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this Review we discuss data demonstrating recently recognized aspects of neutrophil homeostasis in the steady state, granulopoiesis in 'emergency' conditions and interactions of neutrophils with the adaptive immune system. We explore in vivo observations of the recruitment of neutrophils from...

  5. Chronic neutrophilic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeweg, Arthur; Burch, Micah; Krause, John R

    2018-01-01

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia is a rare myeloproliferative disorder characterized by a sustained peripheral blood neutrophilia, absence of the BCR/ABL oncoprotein, bone marrow hypercellularity with less than 5% myeloblasts and normal neutrophil maturation, and no dysplasia. This leukemia has been associated with mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (CSF3R) that may activate this receptor, leading to the proliferation of neutrophils that are the hallmark of chronic neutrophilic leukemia. We present a case of chronic neutrophilic leukemia and discuss the criteria for diagnosis and the significance of mutations found in this leukemia.

  6. Mitochondria in neutrophil apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raam, B. J.; Verhoeven, A. J.; Kuijpers, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    Central in the regulation of the short life span of neutrophils are their mitochondria. These organelles hardly contribute to the energy status of neutrophils but play a vital role in the apoptotic process. Not only do the mitochondria contain cytotoxic proteins that are released during apoptosis

  7. Apoptosis of neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maianski, N. A.; Maianski, A. N.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Roos, D.

    2004-01-01

    Regulation of the neutrophil life span by apoptosis provides a fine balance between their function as effector cells of host defense and a safe turnover of these potentially harmful cells. Alterations of neutrophil apoptosis are associated with a number of diseases. As do other cell types,

  8. Autophagy Primes Neutrophils for Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation during Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Youn, Young-Jin; Kim, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, So-Hee; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Kim, Shin; Lee, Myung Goo; Jung, Ki-Suck; Park, Yong Bum; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Ko, Yousang; Lee, Suh-Young; Koh, Younsuck; Park, Myung Jae; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2017-09-01

    Neutrophils are key effectors in the host's immune response to sepsis. Excessive stimulation or dysregulated neutrophil functions are believed to be responsible for sepsis pathogenesis. However, the mechanisms regulating functional plasticity of neutrophils during sepsis have not been fully determined. We investigated the role of autophagy in neutrophil functions during sepsis in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Neutrophils were isolated from patients with sepsis and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The levels of reactive oxygen species generation, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, and granule release, and the autophagic status were evaluated. The effect of neutrophil autophagy augmentation was further evaluated in a mouse model of sepsis. Neutrophils isolated from patients who survived sepsis showed an increase in autophagy induction, and were primed for NET formation in response to subsequent PMA stimulation. In contrast, neutrophils isolated from patients who did not survive sepsis showed dysregulated autophagy and a decreased response to PMA stimulation. The induction of autophagy primed healthy neutrophils for NET formation and vice versa. In a mouse model of sepsis, the augmentation of autophagy improved survival via a NET-dependent mechanism. These results indicate that neutrophil autophagy primes neutrophils for increased NET formation, which is important for proper neutrophil effector functions during sepsis. Our study provides important insights into the role of autophagy in neutrophils during sepsis.

  9. d(− Lactic Acid-Induced Adhesion of Bovine Neutrophils onto Endothelial Cells Is Dependent on Neutrophils Extracellular Traps Formation and CD11b Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Alarcón

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bovine ruminal acidosis is of economic importance as it contributes to reduced milk and meat production. This phenomenon is mainly attributed to an overload of highly fermentable carbohydrate, resulting in increased d(− lactic acid levels in serum and plasma. Ruminal acidosis correlates with elevated acute phase proteins in blood, along with neutrophil activation and infiltration into various tissues leading to laminitis and aseptic polysynovitis. Previous studies in bovine neutrophils indicated that d(− lactic acid decreased expression of L-selectin and increased expression of CD11b to concentrations higher than 6 mM, suggesting a potential role in neutrophil adhesion onto endothelia. The two aims of this study were to evaluate whether d(− lactic acid influenced neutrophil and endothelial adhesion and to trigger neutrophil extracellular trap (NET production (NETosis in exposed neutrophils. Exposure of bovine neutrophils to 5 mM d(− lactic acid elevated NET release compared to unstimulated neutrophil negative controls. Moreover, this NET contains CD11b and histone H4 citrullinated, the latter was dependent on PAD4 activation, a critical enzyme in DNA decondensation and NETosis. Furthermore, NET formation was dependent on d(− lactic acid plasma membrane transport through monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1. d(− lactic acid enhanced neutrophil adhesion onto endothelial sheets as demonstrated by in vitro neutrophil adhesion assays under continuous physiological flow conditions, indicating that cell adhesion was a NET- and a CD11b/ICAM-1-dependent process. Finally, d(− lactic acid was demonstrated for the first time to trigger NETosis in a PAD4- and MCT1-dependent manner. Thus, d(− lactic acid-mediated neutrophil activation may contribute to neutrophil-derived pro-inflammatory processes, such as aseptic laminitis and/or polysynovitis in animals suffering acute ruminal acidosis.

  10. Neutrophils, from marrow to microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow from stem cells that proliferate and differentiate to mature neutrophils fully equipped with an armory of granules. These contain proteins that enable the neutrophil to deliver lethal hits against microorganisms, but also to cause great tissue damage. N...... microorganisms by microbicidal agents liberated from granules or generated by metabolic activation. As a final act, neutrophils can extrude stands of DNA with bactericidal proteins attached that act as extracellular traps for microorganisms....

  11. Neutrophils, from marrow to microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow from stem cells that proliferate and differentiate to mature neutrophils fully equipped with an armory of granules. These contain proteins that enable the neutrophil to deliver lethal hits against microorganisms, but also to cause great tissue damage...

  12. [The participation of neutrophilic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic elevated blood immune complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidiuk, M M; Chop'iak, V V; Liubinets', L A; Pavlovich, S I; Nykytiuk, H P; Porokhovs'ka, Z S

    1997-01-01

    For reproduction of chronic hyperimmunocomplexemia model the classic Cochrane C. G., 1973 elaboration was used. The circulating immune complexes (CIC) were identified by precipitation methods, and fixated--by immunofluorescent in endothelium reproduction of aorta, and their clearance organs--liver and spleen. The estimation of neutrophil status was carried out according to rosette-forming neutrophils ability--by latex, zimosane, mieloperoxidasa, NST tests. The growth of large and middle CIC in vessel bed was estimated, their fixation in aorta bifurcation, and also on liver and spleen calls, but their intensivity is less, comparing to aorta endothelium. The neutrophil status was characterised by O-neutrophils growth, strengthening of capturing macrophages function, considerable activation of fermentative polynuclear systems, although reserve possibilities in them grew in less degree. Morphologic investigations allow to speak mediatingly about neutrophils participation in endotheliocytes damage, and also about their ability to secure the mononuclear cells further participation in damaging of aorta walls and partially of liver and spleen.

  13. Fervidicoccus fontis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, thermophilic crenarchaeote from terrestrial hot springs, and proposal of Fervidicoccaceae fam. nov. and Fervidicoccales ord. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevalova, Anna A; Bidzhieva, Salima Kh; Kublanov, Ilya V; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Liu, Xiaolei L; Mardanov, Andrey V; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2010-09-01

    Two novel thermophilic and slightly acidophilic strains, Kam940(T) and Kam1507b, which shared 99 % 16S rRNA gene sequence identity, were isolated from terrestrial hot springs of the Uzon caldera on the Kamchatka peninsula. Cells of both strains were non-motile, regular cocci. Growth was observed between 55 and 85 degrees C, with an optimum at 65-70 degrees C (doubling time, 6.1 h), and at pH 4.5-7.5, with optimum growth at pH 5.5-6.0. The isolates were strictly anaerobic organotrophs and grew on a narrow spectrum of energy-rich substrates, such as beef extract, gelatin, peptone, pyruvate, sucrose and yeast extract, with yields above 10(7) cells ml(-1). Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate and nitrate added as potential electron acceptors did not stimulate growth when tested with peptone. H(2) at 100 % in the gas phase inhibited growth on peptone. Glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) with zero to four cyclopentyl rings were present in the lipid fraction of isolate Kam940(T). The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain Kam940(T) was 37 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolates were archaea of the phylum Crenarchaeota, only distantly related to the cultured members of the class Thermoprotei (no more than 89 % identity), and formed an independent lineage adjacent to the orders Desulfurococcales and Acidilobales and clustering only with uncultured clones from hot springs of Yellowstone National Park and Iceland as the closest relatives. On the basis of their phylogenetic position and novel phenotypic features, isolates Kam940(T) and Kam1507b are proposed to be assigned to a new genus and species, Fervidicoccus fontis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Fervidicoccus fontis is strain Kam940(T) (=DSM 19380(T) =VKM B-2539(T)). The phylogenetic data as well as phenotypic properties suggest that the novel crenarchaeotes form the basis of a new family, Fervidicoccaceae fam. nov., and order, Fervidicoccales ord. nov

  14. Vegetable Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Eifert, Joell

    2014-01-01

    People have been fermenting vegetables for centuries to increase the stability of fresh foods, to make the foods safer to eat in the absence of refrigeration and to enhance their flavor. Today, vegetable fermentation is done on a large-scale setting in factories as well as in households across the world. In the United States, the primary vegetables fermented are cucumbers (pickles), cabbage (sauerkraut and Kimchi) and olives. In many parts of the world, especially in developing countries wher...

  15. Human neutrophil alloantigens systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyse Moritz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil alloantigens are involved in a variety of clinical conditions including immune neutropenias, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI, refractoriness to granulocyte transfusions and febrile transfusion reactions. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the characterization of the implicated antigens. Currently, seven antigens are assigned to five human neutrophil antigen (HNA systems. The HNA-1a, HNA-1b and HNA-1c antigens have been identified as polymorphic forms of the neutrophil Fcγ receptor IIIb (CD16b, encoded by three alleles. Recently, the primary structure of the HNA-2a antigen was elucidated and the HNA-2a-bearing glycoprotein was identified as a member of the Ly-6/uPAR superfamily, which has been clustered as CD177. The HNA-3a antigen is located on a 70-95 kDa glycoprotein; however, its molecular basis is still unknown. Finally, the HNA-4a and HNA-5a antigens were found to be caused by single nucleotide mutations in the αM (CD11b and αL (CD11a subunits of the leucocyte adhesion molecules (β2 integrins. Molecular and biochemical characterization of neutrophil antigenshave expanded our diagnostic tools by the introduction of genotyping techniques and immunoassays for antibody identification. Further studies in the field of neutrophil immunology will facilitate the prevention and management of transfusion reactions and immune diseases caused by neutrophil antibodies.Os aloantígenos de neutrófilos estão associados a várias condições clínicas como neutropenias imunes, insuficiência pulmonar relacionada à transfusão (TRALI, refratariedade à transfusão de granulócitos, e reações transfusionais febris. Na última década, foi observado considerável progresso na caracterização dos aloantígenos envolvidos nestas condições clínicas. Atualmente sete antígenos estão incluídos em cinco sistemas de antígenos de neutrófilo humano (HNA. Os antígenos HNA-1a, HNA-1b e HNA-1c foram

  16. Neutrophil extracellular traps - the dark side of neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole E.; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were discovered as extracellular strands of decondensed DNA in complex with histones and granule proteins, which were expelled from dying neutrophils to ensnare and kill microbes. NETs are formed during infection in vivo by mechanisms different from those ori...

  17. Neutrophil Activation During Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Laure; Meziani, Ferhat; Helms, Julie

    2018-04-01

    In addition to their well-known role as the cellular mediators of immunity, key other roles have been identified for neutrophils during septic shock. Importantly, neutrophils indeed play a critical role in the recently described immunothrombosis concept and in septic shock-induced coagulopathy. Septic shock is one of the most severe forms of infection, characterized by an inadequate host response to the pathogenic organism. This host response involves numerous defense mechanisms with an intense cellular activation, including neutrophil activation. Neutrophils are key cells of innate immunity through complex interactions with vascular cells and their activation may participate in systemic tissue damages. Their activation also leads to the emission of neutrophil extracellular traps, which take part in both pathogen circumscription and phagocytosis, but also in coagulation activation. Neutrophils thus stand at the interface between hemostasis and immunity, called immunothrombosis.The present review will develop a cellular approach of septic shock pathophysiology focusing on neutrophils as key players of septic shock-induced vascular cell dysfunction and of the host response, associating immunity and hemostasis. We will therefore first develop the role of neutrophils in the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity, and will then highlight recent advances in our understanding of immunothrombosis septic shock-induced coagulopathy.

  18. Targeting neutrophilic inflammation in severe neutrophilic asthma : can we target the disease-relevant neutrophil phenotype?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnzeel, Piet L B; Uddin, Mohib; Koenderman, Leo

    2015-01-01

    In severe, neutrophilic asthma, neutrophils are thought to have an important role in both the maintenance of the disease and during exacerbations. These patients often display excessive, mucosal airway inflammation with unresolving neutrophilia. Because this variant of asthma is poorly controlled by

  19. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda Cortés-Vieyra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed.

  20. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet′s syndrome is characterized by erythematous tender nodules and plaques over face and extremities. Fever, leukocytosis with neutrophilia, and a neutrophilic infiltrate in the dermis are characteristic features. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands is a rare localized variant of Sweet′s syndrome occurring predominantly over dorsa of hands. Various degrees of vascular damage may be observed on histopathology of these lesions. Both Sweet′s syndrome and its dorsal hand variant have been reported in association with malignancies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and drugs. We report a patient with neutrophilic dermatoses of dorsal hands associated with erythema nodosum. He showed an excellent response to corticosteroids and dapsone.

  1. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies stimulate release of neutrophil microparticles.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hong, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) may contribute to the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis are not well understood. In this study, both polyclonal ANCAs isolated from patients and chimeric proteinase 3-ANCA induced the release of neutrophil microparticles from primed neutrophils. These microparticles expressed a variety of markers, including the ANCA autoantigens proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. They bound endothelial cells via a CD18-mediated mechanism and induced an increase in endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, production of endothelial reactive oxygen species, and release of endothelial IL-6 and IL-8. Removal of the neutrophil microparticles by filtration or inhibition of reactive oxygen species production with antioxidants abolished microparticle-mediated endothelial activation. In addition, these microparticles promoted the generation of thrombin. In vivo, we detected more neutrophil microparticles in the plasma of children with ANCA-associated vasculitis compared with that in healthy controls or those with inactive vasculitis. Taken together, these results support a role for neutrophil microparticles in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis, potentially providing a target for future therapeutics.

  2. Neutrophil programming dynamics and its disease relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Taojing; Geng, Shuo; Li, Liwu

    2017-11-01

    Neutrophils are traditionally considered as first responders to infection and provide antimicrobial host defense. However, recent advances indicate that neutrophils are also critically involved in the modulation of host immune environments by dynamically adopting distinct functional states. Functionally diverse neutrophil subsets are increasingly recognized as critical components mediating host pathophysiology. Despite its emerging significance, molecular mechanisms as well as functional relevance of dynamically programmed neutrophils remain to be better defined. The increasing complexity of neutrophil functions may require integrative studies that address programming dynamics of neutrophils and their pathophysiological relevance. This review aims to provide an update on the emerging topics of neutrophil programming dynamics as well as their functional relevance in diseases.

  3. Fermentation Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C. P. L., Jr.; Grady, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from the fermentation industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review focuses on: (1) alcoholic beverage production; (2) pharmaceuticals and biochemicals production; and (3) biomass production. A list of 62 references is also presented. (HM)

  4. Neutrophil extracellular traps go viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Schönrich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as a first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils to produce extracellular traps (NETs in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently was it recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs.

  5. Myeloperoxidase attracts neutrophils by physical forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinke, Anna; Nussbaum, Claudia; Kubala, Lukas; Friedrichs, Kai; Rudolph, Tanja K.; Rudolph, Volker; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Schroeder, Christine; Benten, Daniel; Lau, Denise; Szocs, Katalin; Furtmueller, Paul G.; Heeringa, Peter; Sydow, Karsten; Duchstein, Hans-Juergen; Ehmke, Heimo; Schumacher, Udo; Meinertz, Thomas; Sperandio, Markus; Baldus, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) remains a paramount prerequisite in innate immune defense and a critical cofounder in inflammatory vascular disease. Neutrophil recruitment comprises a cascade of concerted events allowing for capture, adhesion and extravasation of the leukocyte.

  6. Immune modulation by neutrophil subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    We show that human neutrophils can suppress T-cell proliferation in acute systemic inflammation and thus have anti-inflammatory functions, next to their well-known pro-inflammatory functions. The suppression is mediated by ROS production and integrin MAC-1, which are also important for the

  7. Oxidant activation of neutrophil collagenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthukumaran, G.; Amoruso, M.A.; Berg, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidant gas exposure leads to lung injury characterized by acute inflammation, connective tissue breakdown and alveolar damage. In an effort to better understand the mechanism for oxidant gas injury human peripheral neutrophils were isolated and incubated with 14 C-proline labelled extracellular matrix. Neutrophils in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) alone (to stimulate the secretion of collagenase from specific granules) had no effect on the matrix. When neutrophils were incubated with PMA and 2 mM p-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA), the latter a known activator of collagenase, extensive degradation of the matrix was observed. The generation of the characteristic 3/4- and 1/4-clip fragments of Type I collagen was an indication that the major enzymatic activity operative was collagenase. This was further supported by its requirement for Ca 2+ and inhibition of enzymatic activity by EDTA. Further experiments indicated that 10 μM oxidized glutathione could replace APMA in activating the secreted collagenase. Since GSH is thought to be the major physiological antioxidant in the lung, the degradation of connective tissue caused by inflammation from oxidant gas injury may be attributed to the oxidation of GSH to GSSG with resultant activation of neutrophil collagenase

  8. Cytoplasmic lipid bodies of human neutrophilic leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, P.F.; Ackerman, S.J.; Nicholson-Weller, A.; Dvorak, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The morphology and function of cytoplasmic lipid bodies in human neutrophils were evaluated. By transmission electron microscopy, neutrophil lipid bodies were cytoplasmic inclusions, usually several microns in diameter, that occasionally coalesced to attain a diameter up to 7 microM. Neutrophil lipid bodies were not enveloped by membrane but were often surrounded by a more electron-dense shell at their periphery. Normal peripheral blood neutrophils contained an average of approximately one lipid body per cell. Lipid bodies appeared in greater numbers in neutrophils from inflammatory lesions. Perturbation of neutrophils during conventional methods of cell isolation and purification modestly increased lipid body numbers in neutrophils, whereas incubation of neutrophils with 1 microM oleic acid rapidly induced lipid body formation over 30 to 60 minutes. After granulocytes were incubated for 2 hours with 3H-fatty acids, including arachidonic, oleic, and palmitic acids, electron microscopic autoradiography demonstrated that lipid bodies represented the predominant intracellular sites of localization of each of the three 3H-fatty acids. There was lesser labeling noted in the perinuclear cisterna, but not in cell membranes. Virtually all of each of the three 3H-fatty acids incorporated by the neutrophils were esterified into chromatographically resolved classes of neutral lipids or phospholipids. These findings indicate that cytoplasmic lipid bodies are more prominent in neutrophils in vivo engaged in inflammatory responses and that these organelles in human neutrophils function as sites of deposition of esterified, incorporated fatty acids

  9. Dihydroxyoctadecamonoenoate esters inhibit the neutrophil ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    The leukotoxins (±)9(10)-epoxy-12Z- and (±)12(13)-epoxy-. 9Z-octadecenoic acid [9(10)- and 12(13)]-EpOME (figure. 1A) are produced by inflammatory leukocytes such as neutrophils and macrophages (Ozawa et al 1988b; Zhang et al 1995; Hayakawa et al 1986). Plasma levels of the. EpOMEs are elevated in patients ...

  10. Neutrophil activation by Campylobacter concisus

    OpenAIRE

    S?rensen, Nina B; Nielsen, Hans L; Varming, Kim; Nielsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Background Campylobacter concisus is an emerging enteric pathogen associated with prolonged diarrhoea and possibly inflammatory bowel disease in children as well as adults, but the interaction with cells of the innate immune system is unclear. The magnitude of systemic immunoglobulin response in acute infection is unknown. Methods Neutrophils from healthy volunteers were activated with five faecal isolates of C. concisus from patients with gastroenteritis as well as the oral reference strain ...

  11. Activation of Neutrophils by Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Goncalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoparticles (NPs has increased in the past few years in various fields, including defence, aerospace, electronics, biology, medicine, and so forth. and in applications such as diagnostic technology, bioimaging, and drug/gene delivery. Thus, human exposure to NPs and nanomaterials is unavoidable and will certainly expand in the future resulting in a growing interest in nanotoxicology, the study of toxicity of nanomaterials. A number of studies have reported the effects of NPs in respect to pulmonary inflammation by investigating in vitro activation of pulmonary cells with NPs and in vivo in a variety of models in which neutrophils appear to be the predominant leukocyte cell type in lungs and in bronchoalveolar lavages following inhalation or intratracheal instillation of NPs. Despite the fact that several studies have reported an increased number of neutrophils, the literature dealing with the direct activation of neutrophils by a given NP is poorly documented. This paper will summarize the current literature in this latter area of research and will end with a perspective view in which our laboratory will be involved in the following years.

  12. Altered neutrophil trafficking during sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ren-Feng; Riedemann, Niels C; Laudes, Ines J; Sarma, Vidya J; Kunkel, Robin G; Dilley, Kari A; Paulauskis, Joseph D; Ward, Peter A

    2002-07-01

    In sepsis, dysregulation of the inflammatory system is well known, as reflected in excessive inflammatory mediator production, complement activation, and appearance of defects in phagocytic cells. In the current study sepsis was induced in rats by cecal ligation/puncture. Early in sepsis the beta(1) and beta(2) integrin content on blood neutrophils increased in a nontranscriptional manner, and the increase in beta(2), but not beta(1), integrin content was C5a dependent. Similar changes could be induced in vitro on blood neutrophils following contact with phorbol ester or C5a. Direct injury of lungs of normal rats induced by deposition of IgG immune complexes (IgG-IC) caused 5-fold increases in the myeloperoxidase content that was beta(2), but not beta(1), dependent. In contrast, in cecal ligation/puncture lungs myeloperoxidase increased 10-fold after IgG immune complex deposition and was both beta(1) and beta(2) integrin dependent. These data suggest that sepsis causes enhanced neutrophil trafficking into the lung via mechanisms that are not engaged in the nonseptic state.

  13. Neutrophils Compromise Retinal Pigment Epithelial Barrier Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehao Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that neutrophils and their secreted factors mediate breakdown of the integrity of the outer blood-retina-barrier by degrading the apical tight junctions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. The effect of activated neutrophils or neutrophil cell lysate on apparent permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants was evaluated by measuring [H] mannitol flux in a modified Ussing chamber. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 in murine peritoneal neutrophils, and the effects of neutrophils on RPE tight-junction protein expression were assessed by confocal microscopy and western blot. Our results revealed that basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophils decreased occludin and ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours and increased the permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants by >3-fold (P<.05. Similarly, basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophil lysate decreased ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours (P<.05 and increased permeability of explants by 75%. Further, we found that neutrophils prominently express MMP-9 and that incubation of explants with neutrophils in the presence of anti-MMP-9 antibody inhibited the increase in permeability. These data suggest that neutrophil-derived MMP-9 may play an important role in disrupting the integrity of the outer blood-retina barrier.

  14. Effect of sevoflurane on human neutrophil apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tyther, R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Both chronic occupational exposure to volatile anaesthetic agents and acute in vitro exposure of neutrophils to isoflurane have been shown to inhibit the rate of apoptosis of human neutrophils. It is possible that inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis arises through delaying mitochondrial membrane potential collapse. We assessed mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis in unexposed neutrophils and neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane in vivo. METHODS: A total of 20 mL venous blood was withdrawn pre- and postinduction of anaesthesia, the neutrophils isolated and maintained in culture. At 1, 12 and 24 h in culture, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was assessed by dual staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. Mitochondrial depolarization was measured using the dual emission styryl dye JC-1. RESULTS: Apoptosis was significantly inhibited in neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane in vivo at 24 (exposed: 38 (12)% versus control: 28 (11)%, P = 0.001), but not at 1 or 12 h, in culture. Mitochondrial depolarization was not delayed in neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane. CONCLUSIONS: The most important findings are that sevoflurane inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in vivo and that inhibition is not mediated primarily by an effect on mitochondrial depolarization.

  15. Neutrophil Responses to Sterile Implant Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Jhunjhunwala

    Full Text Available In vivo implantation of sterile materials and devices results in a foreign body immune response leading to fibrosis of implanted material. Neutrophils, one of the first immune cells to be recruited to implantation sites, have been suggested to contribute to the establishment of the inflammatory microenvironment that initiates the fibrotic response. However, the precise numbers and roles of neutrophils in response to implanted devices remains unclear. Using a mouse model of peritoneal microcapsule implantation, we show 30-500 fold increased neutrophil presence in the peritoneal exudates in response to implants. We demonstrate that these neutrophils secrete increased amounts of a variety of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, we observe that they participate in the foreign body response through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs on implant surfaces. Our results provide new insight into neutrophil function during a foreign body response to peritoneal implants which has implications for the development of biologically compatible medical devices.

  16. Neutrophil Reverse Migration Becomes Transparent with Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor W. Starnes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise control of neutrophil-mediated inflammation is critical for both host defense and the prevention of immunopathology. In vivo imaging studies in zebrafish, and more recently in mice, have made the novel observation that neutrophils leave a site of inflammation through a process called neutrophil reverse migration. The application of advanced imaging techniques to the genetically tractable, optically transparent zebrafish larvae was critical for these advances. Still, the mechanisms underlying neutrophil reverse migration and its effects on the resolution or priming of immune responses remain unclear. Here, we review the current knowledge of neutrophil reverse migration, its potential roles in host immunity, and the live imaging tools that make zebrafish a valuable model for increasing our knowledge of neutrophil behavior in vivo.

  17. Neutrophils in Tuberculosis: Heterogeneity Shapes the Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Infection with M. tuberculosis remains one of the most common infections in the world. The outcome of the infection depends on host ability to mount effective protection and balance inflammatory responses. Neutrophils are innate immune cells implicated in both processes. Accordingly, during M. tuberculosis infection, they play a dual role. Particularly, they contribute to the generation of effector T cells, participate in the formation of granuloma, and are directly involved in tissue necrosis, destruction, and infection dissemination. Neutrophils have a high bactericidal potential. However, data on their ability to eliminate M. tuberculosis are controversial, and the results of neutrophil depletion experiments are not uniform. Thus, the overall roles of neutrophils during M. tuberculosis infection and factors that determine these roles are not fully understood. This review analyzes data on neutrophil defensive and pathological functions during tuberculosis and considers hypotheses explaining the dualism of neutrophils during M. tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. PMID:28626346

  18. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg Bennike, Tue; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2015-01-01

    microscopy and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: We identified and quantified 5711 different proteins with proteomics. The abundance of the proteins calprotectin and lactotransferrin in the tissue correlated with the degree of tissue inflammation as determined by histology. However, fecal calprotectin did...... not correlate. Forty-six proteins were measured with a statistically significant differences in abundances between the UC colon tissue and controls. Eleven of the proteins with increased abundances in the UC biopsies were associated with neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular traps. The findings were...... validated by microscopy, where an increased abundance of neutrophils and the presence of neutrophil extracellular traps by extracellular DNA present in the UC colon tissue were confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: Neutrophils, induced neutrophil extracellular traps, and several proteins that play a part in innate...

  19. Re-Examining Neutrophil Participation in GN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Dawn J; Powell, David W; Miralda, Irina; Ward, Richard A; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2017-08-01

    Significant advances in understanding the pathogenesis of GN have occurred in recent decades. Among those advances is the finding that both innate and adaptive immune cells contribute to the development of GN. Neutrophils were recognized as key contributors in early animal models of GN, at a time when the prevailing view considered neutrophils to function as nonspecific effector cells that die quickly after performing antimicrobial functions. However, advances over the past two decades have shown that neutrophil functions are more complex and sophisticated. Specifically, research has revealed that neutrophil survival is regulated by the inflammatory milieu and that neutrophils demonstrate plasticity, mediate microbial killing through previously unrecognized mechanisms, demonstrate transcriptional activity leading to the release of cytokines and chemokines, interact with and regulate cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, and contribute to the resolution of inflammation. Therefore, neutrophil participation in glomerular diseases deserves re-evaluation. In this review, we describe advances in understanding classic neutrophil functions, review the expanded roles of neutrophils in innate and adaptive immune responses, and summarize current knowledge of neutrophil contributions to GN. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Neutrophil beta-2 microglobulin: an inflammatory mediator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, O W; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Borregaard, N

    1990-01-01

    vesicles, and plasma membrane. Beta 2m was released in the native form from neutrophils in response to stimulation with chemotactic stimuli and phorbol ester. The results of experiments designed to study the modification of native beta 2m by neutrophils indicated that neutrophils do not participate...... in the proteolysis of beta 2m. However, we demonstrated that native beta 2m following degranulation may be transformed to Des-Lys58-beta 2m by lymphocytes. We suggest that neutrophil beta 2m following exocytosis may be transformed to Des-Lys58-beta 2m, acting as an extracellular messenger between granulocytes...

  1. Complement Activation Induces Neutrophil Adhesion and Neutrophil-Platelet Aggregate Formation on Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Riedl

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: Therefore, our findings of (i neutrophils adhering to complement-activated endothelial cells, (ii the formation of neutrophil-platelet aggregates on endothelial cells, and (iii the ability of aHUS serum to induce similar effects identify a possible role for neutrophils in aHUS manifestation.

  2. Different innate neutrophil responses in controlled and uncontrolled asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Francesca; Foxley, Gloria; Gibson, Peter; Burgess, Janette; Baines, Katherine; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory viruses are a major cause of asthma exacerbations. Neutrophilic inflammation occurs during infections and is associated with difficult to treat asthma. The role of neutrophils in viral infections and whether neutrophil dysfunction contributes to exacerbation pathogenesis

  3. Neutrophil migration under normal and sepsis conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Yelena V; Kim, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil migration is critical for pathogen clearance and host survival during severe sepsis. Interaction of neutrophil adhesion receptors with ligands on endothelial cells results in firm adhesion of the circulating neutrophils, followed by neutrophil activation and directed migration to sites of infection through the basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix. Proteolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species are produced and released by neutrophils in response to a variety of inflammatory stimuli. Although these mediators are important for host defense, they also promote tissue damage. Excessive neutrophil migration during the early stages of sepsis may lead to an exaggerated inflammatory response with associated tissue damage and subsequent organ dysfunction. On the other hand, dysregulation of migration and insufficient migratory response that occurs during the latter stages of severe sepsis contributes to neutrophils' inability to contain and control infection and impaired wound healing. This review discusses the major steps and associated molecules involved in the balance of neutrophil trafficking, the precise regulation of which during sepsis spells life or death for the host.

  4. Neutrophils Cause an Intravascular Traffic Jam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minns, Martin S; Pearlman, Eric

    2018-01-10

    Neutrophil swarming is defined by large numbers of cells simultaneously and rapidly migrating to a site of injury or infection. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Lee et al. (2018) demonstrate that intravascular swarming of neutrophils occurs in response to Candida albicans infection and causes vascular occlusion and pathological sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neutrophil heterogeneity: implications for homeostasis and pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestre-Roig, Carlos; Hidalgo, Andres; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are polymorphonuclear leukocytes of the phagocytic system that act as first line of host defense against invading pathogens but are also important mediators of inflammation-induced injury. In contrast to other members of the innate immune system, neutrophils are classically considered a

  6. Neutrophil Segmentation Index Anomaly in Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neutrophil lobe count was conducted on the blood films of 262 patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Virus (AIDS) and 204 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) antibody-negative apparently healthy controls. The count for each group was evaluated for neutrophil segmentation index by standard method.

  7. Neutrophils: potential therapeutic targets in tularemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Ann H Allen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The central role of neutrophils in innate immunity and host defense has long been recognized, and the ability of these cells to efficiently engulf and kill invading bacteria has been extensively studied, as has the role of neutrophil apoptosis in resolution of the inflammatory response. In the past few years additional immunoregulatory properties of neutrophils were discovered, and it is now clear that these cells play a much greater role in control of the immune response than was previously appreciated. In this regard, it is noteworthy that Francisella tularensis is one of relatively few pathogens that can successfully parasitize neutrophils as well as macrophages, DC and epithelial cells. Herein we will review the mechanisms used by F. tularensis to evade elimination by neutrophils. We will also reprise effects of this pathogen on neutrophil migration and lifespan as compared with other infectious and inflammatory disease states. In addition, we will discuss the evidence which suggests that neutrophils contribute to disease progression rather than effective defense during tularemia, and consider whether manipulation of neutrophil migration or turnover may be suitable adjunctive therapeutic strategies.

  8. Neutrophil beta-2 microglobulin: an inflammatory mediator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, O W; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Borregaard, N

    1990-01-01

    Beta-2 microglobulin (beta 2m) constitutes the light invariant chain of HLA class I antigen, and is a constituent of mobilizable compartments of neutrophils. Two forms of beta 2m exist: native beta 2m and proteolytically modified beta 2m (Des-Lys58-beta 2m), which shows alpha mobility in crossed...... radioimmuno-electrophoresis. The modification of native beta 2m can be executed by membrane-associated activity of mononuclear cells, and Des-Lys58-beta 2m augments the production of interleukin 2. In this study we present evidence that human neutrophils contain native beta 2m in specific granules, secretory...... vesicles, and plasma membrane. Beta 2m was released in the native form from neutrophils in response to stimulation with chemotactic stimuli and phorbol ester. The results of experiments designed to study the modification of native beta 2m by neutrophils indicated that neutrophils do not participate...

  9. Contribution of neutrophils to acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neutrophils are regarded to play a key role in progression of ALI/ARDS. Neutrophils are the first cells to be recruited to the site of inflammation and have a potent antimicrobial armour that includes oxidants, proteinases and cationic peptides. Under pathological circumstances, however, unregulated release of these microbicidal compounds into the extracellular space paradoxically can damage host tissues. This review focuses on the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the lung and on the contribution of neutrophils to tissue damage in ALI.

  10. Protein modification by fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkholt, Helle Vibeke; Jørgensen, P.B.; Sørensen, Anne Dorthe

    1998-01-01

    The effect of fermentation on components of potential significance for the allergenicity of pea was analyzed. Pea flour was fermented with three lactic acid bacteria, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactococcus raffinolactis, and Lactobacillus plantarum, and two fungi, Rhizopus microsporus, var. oligosp...

  11. Neutrophil-Derived Cytosolic PLA2α Contributes to Bacterial-Induced Neutrophil Transepithelial Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonker, Lael M; Pazos, Michael A; Lanter, Bernard B; Mou, Hongmei; Chu, Kengyeh K; Eaton, Alexander D; Bonventre, Joseph V; Tearney, Guillermo J; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Hurley, Bryan P

    2017-10-15

    Eicosanoids are a group of bioactive lipids that are shown to be important mediators of neutrophilic inflammation; selective targeting of their function confers therapeutic benefit in a number of diseases. Neutrophilic airway diseases, including cystic fibrosis, are characterized by excessive neutrophil infiltration into the airspace. Understanding the role of eicosanoids in this process may reveal novel therapeutic targets. The eicosanoid hepoxilin A3 is a pathogen-elicited epithelial-produced neutrophil chemoattractant that directs transepithelial migration in response to infection. Following hepoxilin A3-driven transepithelial migration, neutrophil chemotaxis is amplified through neutrophil production of a second eicosanoid, leukotriene B4 (LTB4). The rate-limiting step of eicosanoid generation is the liberation of arachidonic acid by phospholipase A2, and the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2)α isoform has been specifically shown to direct LTB4 synthesis in certain contexts. Whether cPLA2α is directly responsible for neutrophil synthesis of LTB4 in the context of Pseudomonas aeruginosa- induced neutrophil transepithelial migration has not been explored. Human and mouse neutrophil - epithelial cocultures were used to evaluate the role of neutrophil-derived cPLA2α in infection-induced transepithelial signaling by pharmacological and genetic approaches. Primary human airway basal stem cell - derived epithelial cultures and micro-optical coherence tomography, a new imaging modality that captures two- and three-dimensional real-time dynamics of neutrophil transepithelial migration, were applied. Evidence from these studies suggests that cPLA2α expressed by neutrophils, but not epithelial cells, plays a significant role in infection-induced neutrophil transepithelial migration by mediating LTB4 synthesis during migration, which serves to amplify the magnitude of neutrophil recruitment in response to epithelial infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American

  12. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  13. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Probiotic fermented dairy products

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan Tamime; Rajka Božanić; Irena Rogelj

    2003-01-01

    Fermented dairy products are the most popular vehicle used in theindustry for the implantation of the probiotic microflora in humans. Therefore this paper provides an overview of new knowledge on probiotic fermented dairy products. It involves historical developments, commercial probiotic microorganisms and products, and their therapeutic properties, possibilities of quality improvement of different types of newly developed fermented dairy products together with fermented goat’s milk products.

  15. Probiotic fermented dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Tamime

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Fermented dairy products are the most popular vehicle used in theindustry for the implantation of the probiotic microflora in humans. Therefore this paper provides an overview of new knowledge on probiotic fermented dairy products. It involves historical developments, commercial probiotic microorganisms and products, and their therapeutic properties, possibilities of quality improvement of different types of newly developed fermented dairy products together with fermented goat’s milk products.

  16. GUT FERMENTATION SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    individuals who became intoxicated after consuming carbohydrates, which became fermented in the gastrointestinal tract. These claims of intoxication without drinking alcohol, and the findings on endogenous alcohol fermentation are now called Gut. Fermentation Syndrome. This review will concentrate on understanding ...

  17. NITRIC OXIDE ACTIVITY OF NEUTROPHIL IN BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OF THE CHILDREN WITH BACTERIAL AND VIRAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Molochniy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of nitric oxide activity of neutrophil leucocytic and freeradical processes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the children with bacterial and viral meningitison the acute period diseases. The peculiarities or activity of freeradical processes and nitric oxide of cerebrospinal fluid with bacterial meningitis in acute period diseases and activities of studies of ferments with the health children. 

  18. Genomics of chronic neutrophilic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Julia E.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a distinct myeloproliferative neoplasm with a high prevalence (>80%) of mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (CSF3R). These mutations activate the receptor, leading to the proliferation of neutrophils that are a hallmark of CNL. Recently, the World Health Organization guidelines have been updated to include CSF3R mutations as part of the diagnostic criteria for CNL. Because of the high prevalence of CSF3R mutations in CNL, it is tempting to think of this disease as being solely driven by this genetic lesion. However, recent additional genomic characterization demonstrates that CNL has much in common with other chronic myeloid malignancies at the genetic level, such as the clinically related diagnosis atypical chronic myeloid leukemia. These commonalities include mutations in SETBP1, spliceosome proteins (SRSF2, U2AF1), and epigenetic modifiers (TET2, ASXL1). Some of these same mutations also have been characterized as frequent events in clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential, suggesting a more complex disease evolution than was previously understood and raising the possibility that an age-related clonal process of preleukemic cells could precede the development of CNL. The order of acquisition of CSF3R mutations relative to mutations in SETBP1, epigenetic modifiers, or the spliceosome has been determined only in isolated case reports; thus, further work is needed to understand the impact of mutation chronology on the clonal evolution and progression of CNL. Understanding the complete landscape and chronology of genomic events in CNL will help in the development of improved therapeutic strategies for this patient population. PMID:28028025

  19. NEUTROPHIL ACTIVATION IN RESPONSE TO MONOMERIC MYELOPEROXIDASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorudko, Irina V; Grigorieva, Daria V; Sokolov, Alexey V; Shamova, Ekaterina V; Kostevich, Valeria A; Kudryavtsev, Igor V; Syromiatnikova, Elena D; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Panasenko, Oleg M

    2018-03-27

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an oxidant-producing enzyme that can also regulate cellular functions via its nonenzymatic effects. Mature active MPO isolated from normal human neutrophils is a 145 kDa homodimer, which consists of two identical protomers, connected by a single disulfide bond. By binding to CD11b/CD18 integrin, dimeric MPO induces neutrophil activation and adhesion augmenting leukocyte accumulation at sites of inflammation. This study was performed to compare the potency of dimeric and monomeric MPO to elicit selected neutrophil responses. Monomeric MPO (hemi-MPO) was obtained by treating the dimeric MPO by reductive alkylation. Analysis of the crucial signal transducer, intracellular Ca2+, showed that dimeric MPO induces Ca2+ mobilization from the intracellular calcium stores of neutrophils and influx of extracellular Ca2+ whereas effect of monomeric MPO on Са2+ increase in neutrophils was less. It was shown also that monomeric MPO was less sufficient than dimeric MPO to induce actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell survival and neutrophil degranulation. Furthermore, we have detected monomeric MPO in the blood plasma of patients with acute inflammation. Our data suggest that the decomposition of dimeric MPO into monomers can serve as a regulatory mechanism that controls MPO-dependent activation of neutrophils and reduces proinflammatory effects of MPO.

  20. Activation of bovine neutrophils by Brucella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleher, Lauren L; Skyberg, Jerod A

    2016-09-01

    Brucellosis is a globally important zoonotic infectious disease caused by gram negative bacteria of the genus Brucella. While many species of Brucella exist, Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis are the most common pathogens of humans and livestock. The virulence of Brucella is largely influenced by its ability to evade host factors, including phagocytic killing mechanisms, which are critical for the host response to infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the bovine neutrophil response to virulent Brucella spp. Here, we found that virulent strains of smooth B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, and virulent, rough, strains of Brucella canis possess similar abilities to resist killing by resting, or IFN-γ-activated, bovine neutrophils. Bovine neutrophils responded to infection with a time-dependent oxidative burst that varied little between Brucella spp. Inhibition of TAK1, or SYK kinase blunted the oxidative burst of neutrophils in response to Brucella infection. Interestingly, Brucella spp. did not induce robust death of bovine neutrophils. These results indicate that bovine neutrophils respond similarly to virulent Brucella spp. In addition, virulent Brucella spp., including naturally rough strains of B. canis, have a conserved ability to resist killing by bovine neutrophils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunophenotypical characterization of human neutrophil differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helena Mora; Jendholm, Johan; Fossum, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The current study reports a flow cytometry-based protocol for the prospective purification of human BM populations representing six successive stages of terminal neutrophil differentiation, including early promyelocytes and late promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, band cells, and PMN neutr...

  2. What really happens in the neutrophil phagosome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Current viewpoints concerning the bactericidal mechanisms of neutrophils are reviewed from a perspective that emphasizes challenges presented by the inability to duplicate ex vivo the intracellular milieu. Among the challenges considered are the influences of confinement upon substrate availability and reaction dynamics, direct and indirect synergistic interactions between individual toxins, and bacterial responses to stressors. Approaches to gauging relative contributions of various oxidative and nonoxidative toxins within neutrophils using bacteria and bacterial mimics as intrinsic probes are also discussed. PMID:22609248

  3. Cryptococcus neoformans modulates extracellular killing by neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asfia eQureshi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently established a key role for host sphingomyelin synthase (SMS in the regulation of the killing activity of neutrophils against Cryptococcus neoformans. In this work, we studied the effect of C. neoformans on the killing activity of neutrophils and whether SMS would still be a player against C. neoformans in immunocompromised mice lacking T and NK cells (Tgε26 mice. To this end, we analyzed whether C. neoformans would have any effect on neutrophil survival and killing in vitro and in vivo. We show that unlike C. albicans, neither the presence nor the capsule size of C. neoformans cells have any effect on neutrophil viability. Interestingly, melanized C. neoformans cells totally abrogated the killing activity of neutrophils. Next, we monitored how exposure of neutrophils to C. neoformans cells would interfere with any further killing activity of the medium and found that pre-incubation with live but not heat-killed fungal cells significantly inhibits further killing activity of the medium. We next studied whether activation of SMS at the site of C. neoformans infection is dependent on T and NK cells. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI tissue imaging in infected lung we found that similarly to previous observations in the isogenic wild type CBA/J mice, SM 16:0 levels are significantly elevated at the site of infection in mice lacking T and NK cells but only at early time points. This study highlights that C. neoformans may negatively regulate the killing activity of neutrophils and that SMS activation in neutrophils appears to be partially independent of T and/or NK cells.

  4. D-lactic acid interferes with the effects of platelet activating factor on bovine neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, P; Conejeros, I; Carretta, M D; Concha, C; Jara, E; Tadich, N; Hidalgo, M A; Burgos, R A

    2011-11-15

    D-lactic acidosis occurs in ruminants, such as cattle, with acute ruminal acidosis caused by ingestion of excessive amounts of highly fermentable carbohydrates. Affected animals show clinical signs similar to those of septic shock, as well as acute laminitis and liver abscesses. It has been proposed that the inflammatory response and susceptibility to infection could both be caused by the inhibition of phagocytic mechanisms. To determine the effects of d-lactic acid on bovine neutrophil functions, we pretreated cells with different concentrations of D-lactic acid and measured intracellular pH using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and calcium flux using FLUO-3 AM-loaded neutrophils. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using a luminol chemiluminescence assay, and MMP-9/gelatinase-B granule release was measured by zymography. CD11b and CD62L/l-selectin expression, changes in cell shape, superoxide anion production, phagocytosis of Escherichia coli-Texas red bioparticles, and apoptosis were all measured using flow cytometry. Our results demonstrated that D-lactic acid reduced ROS production, CD11b upregulation and MMP-9 release in bovine neutrophils treated with 100 nM platelet-activating factor (PAF). D-lactic acid induced MMP-9 release and, at higher concentrations, upregulated CD11b expression, decrease L-selectin expression, and induces late apoptosis. We concluded that D-lactic acid can interfere with neutrophil functions induced by PAF, leading to reduced innate immune responses during bacterial infections. Moreover, the increase of MMP-9 release and CD11b expression induced by 10mM D-lactic acid could promote an nonspecific neutrophil-dependent inflammatory reaction in cattle with acute ruminal acidosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of omeprazole treatment on the gut microflora and neutrophil function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrzewska, Maja; Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Olszańska, Dorota; Jurkowska, Grażyna; Garley, Marzena; Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jabłońska, Ewa; Jamiołkowski, Jacek; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk of Clostridium difficile infections. There are interactions between gut microbiota and innate immune cells including neutrophils. We evaluated the effect of treatment with omeprazole on the gut microflora and neutrophil function. In 50 patients, we evaluated the effect of 4-week omeprazole treatment (n=25 with 20mg per day and n=25 with 20mg twice daily) on intragastric pH, results of stool culture and lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) and neutrophil function. The treatment caused significant increase of the mean intragastric pH, especially in the group with 20mg omeprazole twice daily (from 2.05±0.59 to 5.06±1.6, P<0.001). In LHBT, the increase of hydrogen concentration was observed in higher percentage of patients with 20mg of omeprazole twice daily, compared to patients with the lower dose (42.1% vs 29.4%; ns). Four weeks of omeprazole treatment have caused considerable changes in stool culture results. Patients treated with higher dose of omeprazole have had some tendency to decrease diversity of colonic microflora in comparison with patients treated with the lower dose of omeprazole. Treatment with omeprazole did not result in C. difficile positive stool culture and had no significant effect on neutrophil function. Omeprazole treatment have caused considerable changes in stool culture results. Patients treated with the higher dose had some tendency to decreased diversity of colonic microflora and towards changes in fermenting bacteria of the gut. The potential effect of omeprazole on gut microflora does not depend on neutrophil function deterioration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Uribe-Querol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions.

  7. Asian fungal fermented food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nout, M.J.R.; Aidoo, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    In Asian countries, there is a long history of fermentation of foods and beverages. Diverse micro-organisms, including bacteria, yeasts and moulds, are used as starters, and a wide range of ingredients can be made into fermented foods. The main raw materials include cereals, leguminous seeds,

  8. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fermented milk for hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usinger, Lotte; Reimer, Christina; Ibsen, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Fermented milk has been suggested to have a blood pressure lowering effect through increased content of proteins and peptides produced during the bacterial fermentation. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease world wide and new blood pressure reducing lifestyle i...

  10. Food Technologies: Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nout, M.J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation refers to the use of microorganisms to achieve desirable food properties in the fermented food or beverage. Although the word ‘fermentation’ indicates ‘anaerobic metabolism,’ it is also used in a broader sense to indicate all anaerobic and aerobic microbiological and biochemical

  11. Neutrophils in Homeostasis, Immunity, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolás-Ávila, José Ángel; Adrover, José M; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2017-01-17

    Neutrophils were among the first leukocytes described and visualized by early immunologists. Prominent effector functions during infection and sterile inflammation classically placed them low in the immune tree as rapid, mindless aggressors with poor regulatory functions. This view is currently under reassessment as we uncover new aspects of their life cycle and identify transcriptional and phenotypic diversity that endows them with regulatory properties that extend beyond their lifetime in the circulation. These properties are revealing unanticipated roles for neutrophils in supporting homeostasis, as well as complex disease states such as cancer. We focus this review on these emerging functions in order to define the true roles of neutrophils in homeostasis, immunity, and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neutrophil granules in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häger, M; Cowland, J B; Borregaard, N

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophil granules store proteins that are critically important for the neutrophil to move from the vascular bed to tissues and to kill microorganisms. This is illustrated in nature when individual proteins are deleted due to inherited mutations of their cognate genes, and such deficiencies result...... in the conditions leucocyte adhesion deficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. The granules of the neutrophil have traditionally been divided into two or three major types but are instead a continuum where several subtypes can be identified with differences in protein content and propensity for mobilization....... This is explained by the 'targeting by timing hypothesis' which states that granules are filled with granule proteins that are synthesized at the time the granule is formed. The heterogeneity of granules arises because the synthesis of granule proteins is individually controlled and major differences exist...

  13. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed...... with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address...... issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules...

  14. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Ingar; Hajishengallis, George

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil–P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:26993626

  15. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil–P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

  16. GROUP B STREPTOCOCCUS CIRCUMVENTS NEUTROPHILS AND NEUTROPHIL EXTRACELLULAR TRAPS DURING AMNIOTIC CAVITY INVASION AND PRETERM LABOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldenow, Erica; Gendrin, Claire; Ngo, Lisa; Bierle, Craig; Vornhagen, Jay; Coleman, Michelle; Merillat, Sean; Armistead, Blair; Whidbey, Christopher; Alishetti, Varchita; Santana-Ufret, Veronica; Ogle, Jason; Gough, Michael; Srinouanprachanh, Sengkeo; MacDonald, James W; Bammler, Theo K; Bansal, Aasthaa; Liggitt, H. Denny; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Waldorf, Kristina M Adams

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) is associated with the majority of early preterm births, the temporal events that occur during MIAC and preterm labor are not known. Group B Streptococci (GBS) are β-hemolytic, gram-positive bacteria, which commonly colonize the vagina but have been recovered from the amniotic fluid in preterm birth cases. To understand temporal events that occur during MIAC, we utilized a unique chronically catheterized nonhuman primate model that closely emulates human pregnancy. This model allows monitoring of uterine contractions, timing of MIAC and immune responses during pregnancy-associated infections. Here, we show that adverse outcomes such as preterm labor, MIAC, and fetal sepsis were observed more frequently during infection with hemolytic GBS when compared to nonhemolytic GBS. Although MIAC was associated with systematic progression in chorioamnionitis beginning with chorionic vasculitis and progressing to neutrophilic infiltration, the ability of the GBS hemolytic pigment toxin to induce neutrophil cell death and subvert killing by neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in placental membranes in vivo facilitated MIAC and fetal injury. Furthermore, compared to maternal neutrophils, fetal neutrophils exhibit decreased neutrophil elastase activity and impaired phagocytic functions to GBS. Collectively, our studies demonstrate how a unique bacterial hemolytic lipid toxin enables GBS to circumvent neutrophils and NETs in placental membranes to induce fetal injury and preterm labor. PMID:27819066

  17. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential biological processes in healthy neonatal cord neutrophils and adult neutrophils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiang

    2014-06-11

    Neonatal neutrophils are characterized by the immaturity of bactericidal mechanisms that contributes largely to neonatal mortality. However, underlying molecular mechanism associated with the immaturity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analysis on neonatal neutrophils derived from human cord blood and adult peripheral neutrophils. A total of 1332 proteins were identified and quantified, and 127 proteins were characterized as differentially expressed between adult and cord neutrophils. The differentially expressed proteins are mapped in KEGG pathways into five clusters and indicated impaired functions of neonatal neutrophils in proteasome, lysosome, phagosome, and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In particular, many proteins associated with NETosis, a critical mechanism for antimicrobial process and auto-clearance, were also found to be downregulated in cord neutrophils. This study represents a first comparative proteome profiling of neonatal and adult neutrophils, and provides a global view of differentially expressed proteome for enhancing our understanding of their various functional difference. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Pathogenic Bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii Inhibits the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Suppressing Neutrophil Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Kamoshida

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hospital-acquired infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii have become problematic because of high rates of drug resistance. A. baumannii is usually harmless, but it may cause infectious diseases in an immunocompromised host. Although neutrophils are the key players of the initial immune response against bacterial infection, their interactions with A. baumannii remain largely unknown. A new biological defense mechanism, termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, has been attracting attention. NETs play a critical role in bacterial killing by bacterial trapping and inactivation. Many pathogenic bacteria have been reported to induce NET formation, while an inhibitory effect on NET formation is rarely reported. In the present study, to assess the inhibition of NET formation by A. baumannii, bacteria and human neutrophils were cocultured in the presence of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and NET formation was evaluated. NETs were rarely observed during the coculture despite neutrophil PMA stimulation. Furthermore, A. baumannii prolonged the lifespan of neutrophils by inhibiting NET formation. The inhibition of NET formation by other bacteria was also investigated. The inhibitory effect was only apparent with live A. baumannii cells. Finally, to elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, neutrophil adhesion was examined. A. baumannii suppressed the adhesion ability of neutrophils, thereby inhibiting PMA-induced NET formation. This suppression of cell adhesion was partly due to suppression of the surface expression of CD11a in neutrophils. The current study constitutes the first report on the inhibition of NET formation by a pathogenic bacterium, A. baumannii, and prolonging the neutrophil lifespan. This novel pathogenicity to inhibit NET formation, thereby escaping host immune responses might contribute to a development of new treatment strategies for A. baumannii infections.

  19. Pathogenic Bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii Inhibits the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Suppressing Neutrophil Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoshida, Go; Kikuchi-Ueda, Takane; Nishida, Satoshi; Tansho-Nagakawa, Shigeru; Ubagai, Tsuneyuki; Ono, Yasuo

    2018-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii have become problematic because of high rates of drug resistance. A. baumannii is usually harmless, but it may cause infectious diseases in an immunocompromised host. Although neutrophils are the key players of the initial immune response against bacterial infection, their interactions with A. baumannii remain largely unknown. A new biological defense mechanism, termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), has been attracting attention. NETs play a critical role in bacterial killing by bacterial trapping and inactivation. Many pathogenic bacteria have been reported to induce NET formation, while an inhibitory effect on NET formation is rarely reported. In the present study, to assess the inhibition of NET formation by A. baumannii, bacteria and human neutrophils were cocultured in the presence of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and NET formation was evaluated. NETs were rarely observed during the coculture despite neutrophil PMA stimulation. Furthermore, A. baumannii prolonged the lifespan of neutrophils by inhibiting NET formation. The inhibition of NET formation by other bacteria was also investigated. The inhibitory effect was only apparent with live A. baumannii cells. Finally, to elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, neutrophil adhesion was examined. A. baumannii suppressed the adhesion ability of neutrophils, thereby inhibiting PMA-induced NET formation. This suppression of cell adhesion was partly due to suppression of the surface expression of CD11a in neutrophils. The current study constitutes the first report on the inhibition of NET formation by a pathogenic bacterium, A. baumannii, and prolonging the neutrophil lifespan. This novel pathogenicity to inhibit NET formation, thereby escaping host immune responses might contribute to a development of new treatment strategies for A. baumannii infections. PMID:29467765

  20. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases

  1. Phenotypic Diversity and Plasticity in Circulating Neutrophil Subpopulations in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Y. Sagiv

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Controversy surrounds neutrophil function in cancer because neutrophils were shown to provide both pro- and antitumor functions. We identified a heterogeneous subset of low-density neutrophils (LDNs that appear transiently in self-resolving inflammation but accumulate continuously with cancer progression. LDNs display impaired neutrophil function and immunosuppressive properties, characteristics that are in stark contrast to those of mature, high-density neutrophils (HDNs. LDNs consist of both immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and mature cells that are derived from HDNs in a TGF-β-dependent mechanism. Our findings identify three distinct populations of circulating neutrophils and challenge the concept that mature neutrophils have limited plasticity. Furthermore, our findings provide a mechanistic explanation to mitigate the controversy surrounding neutrophil function in cancer.

  2. Fermentative alcohol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Charles R.; Maiorella, Brian L.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Cysewski, Gerald R.

    1982-01-01

    An improved fermentation process for producing alcohol which includes the combination of vacuum fermentation and vacuum distillation. Preferably, the vacuum distillation is carried out in two phases, one a fermentor proper operated at atmospheric pressure and a flash phase operated at reduced pressure with recycle of fermentation brew having a reduced alcohol content to the fermentor, using vapor recompression heating of the flash-pot recycle stream to heat the flash-pot or the distillation step, and using "water load balancing" (i.e., the molar ratio of water in the fermentor feed is the same as the molar ratio of water in the distillation overhead).

  3. Exposure to Leishmania braziliensis triggers neutrophil activation and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A C Falcão

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils are the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are rapidly recruited to the sites of Leishmania inoculation. During Leishmania braziliensis infection, depletion of inflammatory cells significantly increases the parasite load whereas co-inoculation of neutrophils plus L. braziliensis had an opposite effect. Moreover, the co-culture of infected macrophages and neutrophils also induced parasite killing leading us to ask how neutrophils alone respond to an L. braziliensis exposure. Herein we focused on understanding the interaction between neutrophils and L. braziliensis, exploring cell activation and apoptotic fate. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Inoculation of serum-opsonized L. braziliensis promastigotes in mice induced neutrophil accumulation in vivo, peaking at 24 h. In vitro, exposure of thyoglycollate-elicited inflammatory or bone marrow neutrophils to L. braziliensis modulated the expression of surface molecules such as CD18 and CD62L, and induced the oxidative burst. Using mCherry-expressing L. braziliensis, we determined that such effects were mainly observed in infected and not in bystander cells. Neutrophil activation following contact with L. braziliensis was also confirmed by the release of TNF-α and neutrophil elastase. Lastly, neutrophils infected with L. braziliensis but not with L. major displayed markers of early apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: We show that L. braziliensis induces neutrophil recruitment in vivo and that neutrophils exposed to the parasite in vitro respond through activation and release of inflammatory mediators. This outcome may impact on parasite elimination, particularly at the early stages of infection.

  4. Impact of maternal gestational diabetes on neutrophil functions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    L-selectin (CD62L), is a cell adhesion molecule found on lymphocytes and the preimplantation embryo. It is a marker of neutrophil activation and an important mediator of neutrophil rolling and adhesion to activated endothelium17. Our results demonstrated that neutrophils from neonates of gestational diabetic mothers had ...

  5. Myeloperoxidase attracts neutrophils by physical forces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klinke, A.; Nussbaum, C.; Kubala, Lukáš; Friedrichs, K.; Rudolph, T.K.; Rudolph, V.; Paust, H.-J.; Schröder, Ch.; Benten, D.; Lau, D.; Szocs, K.; Furtmüller, P.G.; Heeringa, P.; Sydow, K.; Duchstein, H.-J.; Ehmke, H.; Schumacher, U.; Meinertz, T.; Sperandio, M.; Baldus, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 4 (2011), s. 1350-1358 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : myeloperoxidase * polymorphonuclear neutrophils * glycocalyx Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.898, year: 2011

  6. What really happens in the neutrophil phagosome?

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Current viewpoints concerning the bactericidal mechanisms of neutrophils are reviewed from a perspective that emphasizes challenges presented by the inability to duplicate ex vivo the intracellular milieu. Among the challenges considered are the influences of confinement upon substrate availability and reaction dynamics, direct and indirect synergistic interactions between individual toxins, and bacterial responses to stressors. Approaches to gauging relative contributions of various oxidativ...

  7. Rat Neutrophil Phagocytosis Following Feed Restriction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slapničková, Martina; Berger, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2002), s. 172-177 ISSN 0938-7714 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : circulating neutrophil * diet restriction * phagocytosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.167, year: 2001

  8. Neutrophils Induced Licensing of Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishiro Amano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells acquire effector function through a licensing process and exert anti-leukemia/tumor effect. However, there is no means to promote a licensing effect of allogeneic NK cells other than cytomegalovirus reactivation-induced licensing in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in human. In mice, a licensing process is mediated by Ly49 receptors which recognize self-major histocompatibility complex class I. The distribution of four Ly49 receptors showed similar pattern in congenic mice, B10, B10.BR, and B10.D2, which have B10 background. Forty Gy-irradiated 2×106 B10.D2 cells including splenocytes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells in untreated mice, or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treated mice were injected intraperitoneally into B10 mice. We found that murine NK cells were effectively licensed by intraperitoneal injection of donor neutrophils with its corresponding NK receptor ligand in B10 mice as a recipient and B10.D2 as a donor. Mechanistic studies revealed that NK cells showed the upregulation of intracellular interferon-γ and CD107a expression as markers of NK cell activation. Moreover, enriched neutrophils enhanced licensing effect of NK cells; meanwhile, licensing effect was diminished by depletion of neutrophils. Collectively, injection of neutrophils induced NK cell licensing (activation via NK receptor ligand interaction.

  9. Neutrophils in atherosclerosis. A brief overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartwig, H.; Silvestre Roig, C.; Daemen, M.; Lutgens, E.; Soehnlein, O.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the arterial wall and the continuous infiltration of leukocytes into the plaque enhances the progression of the lesion. Because of the scarce detection of neutrophils in atherosclerotic plaques compared to other immune cells, their contribution was

  10. Changes in Neutrophil Functions in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Simons, Elizabeth R.; Castro, Victoria; Pierson, Duane L.

    2002-01-01

    Neutrophil functions (phagocytosis, oxidative burst, degranulation) and expression of surface markers involved in these functions were studied in 25 astronauts before and after 4 space shuttle missions. Space flight duration ranged from 5 to 11 days. Blood specimens were obtained 10 days before launch (preflight or L-10), immediately after landing (landing or R+0), and again at 3 days after landing (postflight or R+3). Blood samples were also collected from 9 healthy low-stressed subjects at 3 time points simulating a 10-day shuttle mission. The number of neutrophils increased at landing by 85 percent when compared to the preflight numbers. Neutrophil functions were studied in whole blood using flow cytometric methods. Phagocytosis of E.coli-FITC and oxidative burst capacity of the neutrophils following the 9 to 11 day missions were lower at all three sampling points than the mean values for control subjects. Phagocytosis and oxidative burst capacity of the astronauts was decreased even 10-days before space flight. Mission duration appears to be a factor in phagocytic and oxidative functions. In contrast, following the short-duration (5-days) mission, these functions were unchanged from control values. No consistent changes in degranulation were observed following either short or medium length space missions. The expression of CD16, CD32, CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, L-selectin and CD36 was measured and found to be variable. Specifically, CD16 and CD32 did not correlate with the changes in oxidative burst and phagocytosis. We can conclude from this study that the stresses associated with space flight can alter the important functions of neutrophils.

  11. The cystic fibrosis neutrophil: a specialized yet potentially defective cell.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Elaine

    2012-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the commonest genetically inherited diseases in the world. It is characterized by recurrent respiratory tract infections eventually leading to respiratory failure. One of the hallmarks of this disease is a persistent and predominantly neutrophil driven inflammation. Neutrophils provide the first line of defence by killing and digesting phagocytosed bacteria and fungi, yet despite advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of CF, there remains a paradox of why recruited CF neutrophils fail to eradicate bacterial infections in the lung. This review describes mechanisms involved in neutrophil migration, microbial killing and apoptosis leading to inflammatory resolution. We discuss dysregulated neutrophil activity and consider genetic versus inflammatory neutrophil reprogramming in CF and ultimately pharmacological modulation of the CF neutrophil for therapeutic intervention.

  12. The cystic fibrosis neutrophil: a specialized yet potentially defective cell.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Elaine

    2011-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the commonest genetically inherited diseases in the world. It is characterized by recurrent respiratory tract infections eventually leading to respiratory failure. One of the hallmarks of this disease is a persistent and predominantly neutrophil driven inflammation. Neutrophils provide the first line of defence by killing and digesting phagocytosed bacteria and fungi, yet despite advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of CF, there remains a paradox of why recruited CF neutrophils fail to eradicate bacterial infections in the lung. This review describes mechanisms involved in neutrophil migration, microbial killing and apoptosis leading to inflammatory resolution. We discuss dysregulated neutrophil activity and consider genetic versus inflammatory neutrophil reprogramming in CF and ultimately pharmacological modulation of the CF neutrophil for therapeutic intervention.

  13.  Role of CEACAM in neutrophil activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pańczyszyn

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available  Neutrophils express many surface adhesion molecules, including CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM4, CEACAM6 and CEACAM8 glycoproteins, which play an important role in biological functions of neutrophils such as adhesion, phagocytosis, oxidative burst and degranulation. CEACAM3 activates neutrophils and initiates phagocytosis as a result of binding to bacterial Opa protein. In addition, CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 can delay apoptosis. All neutrophil CEACAMs, except for CEACAM3, can stimulate adhesion of neutrophils to endothelium. One CEACAM family member, CEA, which is not expressed by neutrophils, displays strong chemotactic activity, and probably can prime and/or activate neutrophils to adhesion. Induction of CEACAM signaling can be initiated by dimerization of CEACAMs and/or phosphorylation of their cytoplasmic domains. CEACAM signaling is often associated with an increase in the cytoplasmic calcium level.

  14. Multiple Phenotypic Changes Define Neutrophil Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralda, Irina; Uriarte, Silvia M.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, mitochondrial contents, and bacterial and viral products induces neutrophils to transition from a basal state into a primed one, which is currently defined as an enhanced response to activating stimuli. Although, typically associated with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase, primed neutrophils show enhanced responsiveness of exocytosis, NET formation, and chemotaxis. Phenotypic changes associated with priming also include activation of a subset of functions, including adhesion, transcription, metabolism, and rate of apoptosis. This review summarizes the breadth of phenotypic changes associated with priming and reviews current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind those changes. We conclude that the current definition of priming is too restrictive. Priming represents a combination of enhanced responsiveness and activated functions that regulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. PMID:28611952

  15. Multiple Phenotypic Changes Define Neutrophil Priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Miralda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, mitochondrial contents, and bacterial and viral products induces neutrophils to transition from a basal state into a primed one, which is currently defined as an enhanced response to activating stimuli. Although, typically associated with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS by the NADPH oxidase, primed neutrophils show enhanced responsiveness of exocytosis, NET formation, and chemotaxis. Phenotypic changes associated with priming also include activation of a subset of functions, including adhesion, transcription, metabolism, and rate of apoptosis. This review summarizes the breadth of phenotypic changes associated with priming and reviews current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind those changes. We conclude that the current definition of priming is too restrictive. Priming represents a combination of enhanced responsiveness and activated functions that regulate both adaptive and innate immune responses.

  16. Multiple Phenotypic Changes Define Neutrophil Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralda, Irina; Uriarte, Silvia M; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, mitochondrial contents, and bacterial and viral products induces neutrophils to transition from a basal state into a primed one, which is currently defined as an enhanced response to activating stimuli. Although, typically associated with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase, primed neutrophils show enhanced responsiveness of exocytosis, NET formation, and chemotaxis. Phenotypic changes associated with priming also include activation of a subset of functions, including adhesion, transcription, metabolism, and rate of apoptosis. This review summarizes the breadth of phenotypic changes associated with priming and reviews current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind those changes. We conclude that the current definition of priming is too restrictive. Priming represents a combination of enhanced responsiveness and activated functions that regulate both adaptive and innate immune responses.

  17. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  18. Sexy again: the renaissance of neutrophils in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Michael P; Broekaert, Sigrid M C; Erpenbeck, Luise

    2017-04-01

    Notwithstanding their prominent presence in psoriatic skin, the functional role of neutrophilic granulocytes still remains somewhat enigmatic. Sparked by exciting scientific discoveries regarding neutrophil functions within the last years, the interest in these short-lived cells of the innate immune system has been boosted recently. While it had been known for some time that neutrophils produce and respond to a number of inflammatory mediators, recent research has linked neutrophils with the pathogenic functions of IL-17, possibly in conjunction with the formation of NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps). Antipsoriatic therapies exert their effects, at least in part, through interference with neutrophils. Neutrophils also appear to connect psoriasis with comorbid diseases. However, directly tampering with neutrophil functions is not trivial as evinced by the failure of therapeutic approaches targeting redundantly regulated cellular communication networks. It has also become apparent that neutrophils link important pathogenic functions of the innate and the adaptive immune system and that they are intricately involved in regulatory networks underlying the pathophysiology of psoriasis. In order to advocate intensified research into the role of this interesting cell population, we here highlight some features of neutrophils and put them into perspective with our current view of the pathophysiology of psoriasis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of Isolation Techniques on Viability of Bovine Blood Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sláma

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of selected isolation methods on the viability of neutrophil granulocytes (neutrophils from the blood of healthy Holstein x Bohemian Red Pied crossbred heifers was evaluated. Two methods of neutrophil isolation were used: a neutrophil isolation on the basis of hypotonic erythrocyte lysis (in two variants: after the erythrocyte lysis proper, the cells were centrifuged at either 200 g or 1000 g, and b neutrophil isolation with FACS Lysing Solution as the lysing agent. The viability of the isolated neutrophils was evaluated on the basis of apoptosis and necrosis. The results obtained with flow cytometry (FCM suggest that, from the isolation techniques used, the method based on FACS Lysing Solution impaired the neutrophil viability least. After the application of this method, 5.36 ± 2.15% of neutrophils were apoptotic and 0.51 ± 0.12% were necrotic. In contrast, when the hypotonic erythrocyte lysis was used, the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils amounted to 42.14 ± 7.12% and 49.00 ± 14.70%, respectively, and 41.12 ± 5.55% and 36.91 ± 24.38% respectively of necrotic neutrophils (P < 0.01. This was also confirmed by the light microscopy. After the isolation with FASC Lysing Solution, 1.92 ± 1.74% of neutrophils were apoptotic and 1.05 ± 0.76% were necrotic, as distinct from after the hypotonic erythrocyte lysis where 9.43 ± 3.69% of neutrophils were apoptotic and 12.67 ± 4.74% of necrotic after centrifugation at 200 g, while 12.60 ± 4.35 were apoptotic and 14.96 ± 12.64% were necrotic after centrifugation at 1000 g. It follows from the above-mentioned data that hypotonic lysis is not a suitable method for the isolation of neutrophils, as the method itself markedly affects cell viability.

  20. Altered Neutrophil Function in Localized Juvenile Periodontitis: Intrinsic or Induced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sudha; Huang, Jian Ping; Piesco, Nicholas P; Suzuki, Jon B; Riccelli, Angelina E; Johns, Lee P

    1996-03-01

    Localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) is an aggressive periodontal disease of familial nature. Neutrophils from a majority of patients with this disease exhibit decreased Chemotaxis with increased adherence, oxidative burst, and degranulation in response to opsonized bacteria. It is proposed that the biological basis for these altered neutrophil functions in LJP may be due either to intrinsic cell abnormalities or to the effect of factors present in the sera of LJP patients, which can modulate neutrophil functions. LJP neutrophils exhibit a lower number of receptors for chemoattractants and GP-110 molecules which are known to facilitate Chemotaxis. Furthermore, these cells exhibit lower signal transduction in response to a biological stimulus. These observations suggest that intrinsic cellular defects may be responsible for altered neutrophil functions in LJP. However, healthy neutrophils, when treated with very low concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, also exhibit the characteristics of altered or "defective" LJP neutrophils. Additionally, healthy neutrophils, when treated with LJP serum, also exhibit many of the characteristics associated with LJP neutrophils. Attempts to identify these factors have shown that cytokines like TNF-α and/or IL1 β in LJP sera may be at least partially responsible for modulating neutrophil functions in LJP. These cytokines are primarily produced by activated macrophages, indicating a role for these cells in the etiology of LJP. The hyper-responsiveness of these cells to an immunologic challenge can result in local increases in cytokines leading to excessive bone loss and tissue damage at the site of infection, while systemic elevations in cytokines would lead to decreased neutrophil Chemotaxis, both of which are observed in LJP. Present evidence indicates that neutrophil functions are indeed altered in the majority of LJP patients. However, the biological basis for the alteration may not be due to the neutrophils themselves

  1. Filamentous Fungi Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Stocks, Stuart; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi (including microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae) represent an enormously important platform for industrial fermentation. Two particularly valuable features are the high yield coefficients and the ability to secrete products. However, the filamentous...... morphology, together with non-Newtonian rheological properties (shear thinning), result in poor oxygen transfer unless sufficient energy is provided to the fermentation. While genomic research may improve the organisms, there is no doubt that to enable further application in future it will be necessary...... to match such research with studies of oxygen transfer and energy supply to high viscosity fluids. Hence, the implementation of innovative solutions (some of which in principle are already possible) will be essential to ensure the further development of such fermentations....

  2. Characterization of Yersinia pestis Interactions with Human Neutrophils In vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia C. Dudte

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative, zoonotic, bacterial pathogen, and the causative agent of plague. The bubonic form of plague occurs subsequent to deposition of bacteria in the skin by the bite of an infected flea. Neutrophils are recruited to the site of infection within the first few hours and interactions between neutrophils and Y. pestis have been demonstrated in vivo. In contrast to macrophages, neutrophils have been considered non-permissive to Y. pestis intracellular survival. Several studies have shown killing of the vast majority of Y. pestis ingested by human neutrophils. However, survival of 10–15% of Y. pestis after phagocytosis by neutrophils is consistently observed. Furthermore, these surviving bacteria eventually replicate within and escape from the neutrophils. We set out to further characterize the interactions between Y. pestis and human neutrophils by (1 determining the effects of known Y. pestis virulence factors on bacterial survival after uptake by neutrophils, (2 examining the mechanisms employed by the neutrophil to kill the majority of intracellular Y. pestis, (3 determining the activation phenotype of Y. pestis-infected neutrophils, and (4 characterizing the Y. pestis-containing phagosome in neutrophils. We infected human neutrophils in vitro with Y. pestis and assayed bacterial survival and uptake. Deletion of the caf1 gene responsible for F1 capsule production resulted in significantly increased uptake of Y. pestis. Surprisingly, while the two-component regulator PhoPQ system is important for survival of Y. pestis within neutrophils, pre-induction of this system prior to infection did not increase bacterial survival. We used an IPTG-inducible mCherry construct to distinguish viable from non-viable intracellular bacteria and determined the association of the Y. pestis-containing phagosome with neutrophil NADPH-oxidase and markers of primary, secondary and tertiary granules. Additionally, we show that inhibition of

  3. Neutrophil FcγRIIA promotes IgG-mediated glomerular neutrophil capture via Abl/Src kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Furuhashi, Kazuhiro; Cullere, Xavier; Saggu, Gurpanna; Miller, Mark J; Chen, Yunfeng; Rosetti, Florencia; Hamilton, Samantha L; Yang, Lihua; Pittman, Spencer P; Liao, Jiexi; Herter, Jan M; Berry, Jeffrey C; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Zhu, Cheng; Tsokos, George C; Mayadas, Tanya N

    2017-10-02

    The kidney glomerular capillaries are frequent sites of immune complex deposition and subsequent neutrophil accumulation in post-infectious and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. However, the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment remain enigmatic, and there is no targeted therapeutic to avert this proximal event in glomerular inflammation. The uniquely human activating Fc receptor FcγRIIA promotes glomerular neutrophil accumulation and damage in anti-glomerular basement membrane-induced (anti-GBM-induced) glomerulonephritis when expressed on murine neutrophils. Here, we found that neutrophils are directly captured by immobilized IgG antibodies under physiological flow conditions in vitro through FcγRIIA-dependent, Abl/Src tyrosine kinase-mediated F-actin polymerization. Biophysical measurements showed that the lifetime of FcγRIIA-IgG bonds increased under mechanical force in an F-actin-dependent manner, which could enable the capture of neutrophils under physiological flow. Kidney intravital microscopy revealed that circulating neutrophils, which were similar in diameter to glomerular capillaries, abruptly arrested following anti-GBM antibody deposition via neutrophil FcγRIIA and Abl/Src kinases. Accordingly, inhibition of Abl/Src with bosutinib reduced FcγRIIA-mediated glomerular neutrophil accumulation and renal injury in experimental, crescentic anti-GBM nephritis. These data identify a pathway of neutrophil recruitment within glomerular capillaries following IgG deposition that may be targeted by bosutinib to avert glomerular injury.

  4. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Asquith, Becca; Macallan, Derek

    2016-06-30

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Advanced Role of Neutrophils in Common Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory diseases, always being a threat towards the health of people all over the world, are most tightly associated with immune system. Neutrophils serve as an important component of immune defense barrier linking innate and adaptive immunity. They participate in the clearance of exogenous pathogens and endogenous cell debris and play an essential role in the pathogenesis of many respiratory diseases. However, the pathological mechanism of neutrophils remains complex and obscure. The traditional roles of neutrophils in severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD, pneumonia, lung cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, bronchitis, and bronchiolitis had already been reviewed. With the development of scientific research, the involvement of neutrophils in respiratory diseases is being brought to light with emerging data on neutrophil subsets, trafficking, and cell death mechanism (e.g., NETosis, apoptosis in diseases. We reviewed all these recent studies here to provide you with the latest advances about the role of neutrophils in respiratory diseases.

  6. Localization and Functionality of the Inflammasome in Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakele, Martina; Joos, Melanie; Burdi, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the major fraction of circulating immune cells and are rapidly recruited to sites of infection and inflammation. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex that regulates the generation of IL-1 family proteins. The precise subcellular localization and functionality...... of the inflammasome in human neutrophils are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that highly purified human neutrophils express key components of the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3), and absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasomes, particularly apoptosis-associated speck-like protein...... and released as protein, highly purified neutrophils neither expressed nor released IL-1α at baseline or upon stimulation. Upon inflammasome activation, highly purified neutrophils released substantially lower levels of IL-1β protein compared with partially purified neutrophils. Serine proteases and caspases...

  7. Neutrophils and macrophages: The main partners of phagocyte cell systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel T. Silva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Biological cellular systems are groups of cells sharing a set of characteristics, mainly key function and origin. Phagocytes are crucial in the host defense against microbial infection. The previously proposed phagocyte cell systems including the most recent and presently prevailing one, the Mononuclear Phagocyte System (MPS, grouped mononuclear cells but excluded neutrophils, creating an unacceptable situation. As neutrophils are archetypical phagocytes that must be members of comprehensive phagocyte systems, M. T. Silva recently proposed the creation of a Myeloid Phagocyte System (MYPS that adds neutrophils to the MPS. The phagocytes grouped in the MYPS include the leukocytes neutrophils, inflammatory monocytes, macrophages and immature myeloid DCs. Here the justifications behind the inclusion of neutrophils in a phagocyte system is expanded and the MYPS are further characterized as a group of dedicated phagocytic cells that function in an interacting and cooperative way in the host defense against microbial infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are considered the main arms of this system.

  8. Systems biology of neutrophil differentiation and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard-Mönch, Kim; Porse, Bo T; Borregaard, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Systems biology has emerged as a new scientific field, which aims at investigating biological processes at the genomic and proteomic levels. Recent studies have unravelled aspects of neutrophil differentiation and immune responses at the systems level using high-throughput technologies....... These studies have identified a plethora of novel effector proteins stored in the granules of neutrophils. In addition, these studies provide evidence that neutrophil differentiation and immune response are governed by a highly coordinated transcriptional programme that regulates cellular fate and function...

  9. Diverse novel functions of neutrophils in immunity, inflammation, and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Mocsai, A.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils have long been considered simple suicide killers at the bottom of the hierarchy of the immune response. That view began to change 10–20 yr ago, when the sophisticated mechanisms behind how neutrophils locate and eliminate pathogens and regulate immunity and inflammation were discovered. The last few years witnessed a new wave of discoveries about additional novel and unexpected functions of these cells. Neutrophils have been proposed to participate in protection against intracellu...

  10. Fermentative Alcohol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martín, Mariano; Sánchez, Antonio; Woodley, John M.

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter we present some of key principles of bioreactor design for the production of alcohols by fermentation of sugar and syngas . Due to the different feedstocks, a detailed analysis of the hydrodynamics inside the units , bubble columns or stirred tank reactors , the gas-liquid mass...

  11. Hypoxia upregulates neutrophil degranulation and potential for tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenderdos, Kim; Lodge, Katharine M; Hirst, Robert A; Chen, Cheng; Palazzo, Stefano G C; Emerenciana, Annette; Summers, Charlotte; Angyal, Adri; Porter, Linsey; Juss, Jatinder K; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2016-01-01

    Background The inflamed bronchial mucosal surface is a profoundly hypoxic environment. Neutrophilic airway inflammation and neutrophil-derived proteases have been linked to disease progression in conditions such as COPD and cystic fibrosis, but the effects of hypoxia on potentially harmful neutrophil functional responses such as degranulation are unknown. Methods and results Following exposure to hypoxia (0.8% oxygen, 3 kPa for 4 h), neutrophils stimulated with inflammatory agonists (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor or platelet-activating factor and formylated peptide) displayed a markedly augmented (twofold to sixfold) release of azurophilic (neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase), specific (lactoferrin) and gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase-9) granule contents. Neutrophil supernatants derived under hypoxic but not normoxic conditions induced extensive airway epithelial cell detachment and death, which was prevented by coincubation with the antiprotease α-1 antitrypsin; both normoxic and hypoxic supernatants impaired ciliary function. Surprisingly, the hypoxic upregulation of neutrophil degranulation was not dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), nor was it fully reversed by inhibition of phospholipase C signalling. Hypoxia augmented the resting and cytokine-stimulated phosphorylation of AKT, and inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)γ (but not other PI3K isoforms) prevented the hypoxic upregulation of neutrophil elastase release. Conclusion Hypoxia augments neutrophil degranulation and confers enhanced potential for damage to respiratory airway epithelial cells in a HIF-independent but PI3Kγ-dependent fashion. PMID:27581620

  12. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fermin E.; Borgogna, Timothy R.; Patel, Delisha M.; Sward, Eli W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions. PMID:28713774

  13. Neutrophil Interactions Stimulate Evasive Hyphal Branching by Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Ellett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA, primarily caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, is an opportunistic fungal infection predominantly affecting immunocompromised and neutropenic patients that is difficult to treat and results in high mortality. Investigations of neutrophil-hypha interaction in vitro and in animal models of IA are limited by lack of temporal and spatial control over interactions. This study presents a new approach for studying neutrophil-hypha interaction at single cell resolution over time, which revealed an evasive fungal behavior triggered by interaction with neutrophils: Interacting hyphae performed de novo tip formation to generate new hyphal branches, allowing the fungi to avoid the interaction point and continue invasive growth. Induction of this mechanism was independent of neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation, but could be phenocopied by iron chelation and mechanical or physiological stalling of hyphal tip extension. The consequence of branch induction upon interaction outcome depends on the number and activity of neutrophils available: In the presence of sufficient neutrophils branching makes hyphae more vulnerable to destruction, while in the presence of limited neutrophils the interaction increases the number of hyphal tips, potentially making the infection more aggressive. This has direct implications for infections in neutrophil-deficient patients and opens new avenues for treatments targeting fungal branching.

  14. Plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalinin in the General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Søren; Jensen, Jan S; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a glycoprotein stored in granules of neutrophil leukocytes participating in inflammatory and atherosclerotic processes and possibly plaque rupture. Despite the putative role of NGAL in atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction......=1120) and 15% (n=884) developed a major adverse cardiovascular event. Plasma NGAL associated strongly with all inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, total leukocyte count, neutrophil count) and inversely with estimated glomerular filtration rate (all, P... analysis identified neutrophil leukocyte count as the main determinant of plasma NGAL. During follow-up, participants with increasing NGAL had increased risk of all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiovascular event (both, P

  15. Neutrophil alterations in pregnancy-associated malaria and induction of neutrophil chemotaxis by Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, S.; Schmiegelow, C; Abu Abed, U

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is a severe form of the disease caused by sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs) in the developing placenta. Pathogenesis of PAM is partially based on immunopathology, with frequent monocyte infiltration into the placenta....... Neutrophils are abundant blood cells that are essential for immune defence but may also cause inflammatory pathology. Their role in PAM remains unclear. We analysed neutrophil alterations in the context of PAM to better understand their contribution to disease development. Pregnant women exposed to Plasmodium...... falciparum had decreased numbers of circulating neutrophils. Placental-like BeWo cells stimulated with malaria parasites produced the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8 and recruited neutrophils in a trans-well assay. Finally, immunostaining of a PAM placenta confirmed neutrophil accumulation...

  16. Redox reactions in food fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Egon Bech

    2018-01-01

    Food fermentations are typically performed without actively supplying air. Except for possible surface microorganisms, oxygen will only be transiently available and the redox reactions during the fermentation need to be in balance. Production of ATP from fermentation of carbohydrates typically in...... of the redox properties of strains used to compose food cultures.......Food fermentations are typically performed without actively supplying air. Except for possible surface microorganisms, oxygen will only be transiently available and the redox reactions during the fermentation need to be in balance. Production of ATP from fermentation of carbohydrates typically...... involves oxidative steps in the early part of the pathways whereas a multitude of different reactions are used as compensating reductions. Much of the diversity seen between food fermentations arise from the different routes and the different electron acceptors used by microorganisms to counterbalance...

  17. Proinflammatory mediators stimulate neutrophil-directed angiogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; vascular permeability factor) is one of the most potent proangiogenic cytokines, and it plays a central role in mediating the process of angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation. Neutrophils (PMNs) recently have been shown to produce VEGF. HYPOTHESIS: The acute inflammatory response is a potent stimulus for PMN-directed angiogenesis. METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and anti-human Fas monoclonal antibody. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs were then added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human microvessel endothelial cells and assessed for endothelial cell proliferation using 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling. Tubule formation was also assessed on MATRIGEL basement membrane matrix. Neutrophils were lysed to measure total VEGF release, and VEGF expression was detected using Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Lipopolysaccharide and TNF-alpha stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN VEGF (532+\\/-49 and 484+\\/-80 pg\\/mL, respectively; for all, presented as mean +\\/- SEM) compared with control experiments (32+\\/-4 pg\\/mL). Interleukin 6 and Fas had no effect. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs also resulted in significant increases (P<.005) in macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and tubule formation. Adding anti-human VEGF-neutralizing polyclonal antibody to stimulated PMN supernatant inhibited these effects. Total VEGF release following cell lysis and Western blot analysis suggests that the VEGF is released from an intracellular store. CONCLUSION: Activated human PMNs are directly angiogenic by releasing VEGF, and this has important implications for inflammation, capillary leak syndrome

  18. Rac1 deletion in mouse neutrophils has selective effects on neutrophil functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glogauer, Michael; Marchal, Christophe C.; Zhu, Fei; Worku, Aelaf; Clausen, Björn E.; Foerster, Irmgard; Marks, Peter; Downey, Gregory P.; Dinauer, Mary; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Defects in myeloid cell function in Rac2 knockout mice underline the importance of this isoform in activation of NADPH oxidase and cell motility. However, the specific role of Rac1 in neutrophil function has been difficult to assess since deletion of Rac1 results in embryonic lethality in mice. To

  19. Ranitidine improves postoperative monocyte and neutrophil function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Nielsen, H; Jensen, S

    1994-01-01

    -four patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were randomized to receive adjuvant treatment with ranitidine hydrochloride (100 mg) administered twice a day intravenously from skin incision for 4 days, followed by oral ranitidine hydrochloride (150 mg) administered twice a day for 5 days (n = 11...... to zymosan insignificantly on day 1 (P complications, which were related to decreased monocyte chemotaxis to C5a and increased neutrophil chemiluminescence to zymosan, compared with noninfected patients. A significant...... difference (P complications in ranitidine-treated patients. CONCLUSION: These results support previous studies...

  20. The role of neutrophils in equine laminitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leise, Britta

    2018-03-01

    Equine laminitis is a devastating disease in which failure of the adhesion between the digital dermal and epidermal laminae at the basement membrane results in crippling lameness and structural damage to the foot of the horse. Laminitis occurring secondary to sepsis is known to result from a significant inflammatory response that includes leukocyte emigration into the lamellar tissue. These leukocytes, in particular the neutrophil, have been extensively evaluated in experimental models of sepsis-related laminitis in the horse. This review will discuss the relevant findings elucidated from these models and how these findings have affected the development of therapies used to treat this crippling disease.

  1. Ranitidine improves postoperative monocyte and neutrophil function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Nielsen, H; Jensen, S

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The histamine H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine hydrochloride has been shown to improve trauma-, blood transfusion-, and sepsis-induced immunosuppression. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of ranitidine on postoperative impairment in monocyte and neutrophil function. METHODS: Twenty......-four patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were randomized to receive adjuvant treatment with ranitidine hydrochloride (100 mg) administered twice a day intravenously from skin incision for 4 days, followed by oral ranitidine hydrochloride (150 mg) administered twice a day for 5 days (n = 11...

  2. Tumor Associated Neutrophils in Human Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    an immunoglobulin G (IgG)-immune complex to trigger the more efficient FcgR-mediated antigen A B C D E Figure 7. APC-like Hybrid Neutrophils Are Able...CD14+CD86+CD206+CCR7+) (Fig1. B- D ). TCM collected from digested tumors where we did not find hybrid TANs was used to differentiate immature BMN into...ili ty d ye (F V D 6 60 ) none +TCM PBNs and BMNs survival 100 101 102 103 104 100 101 102 103 104 0 5.7 940 none CD15 PBNs day 3 PBNs day

  3. Gβ1 is required for neutrophil migration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Wenfan; Ye, Ding; Mersch, Kacey; Xu, Hui; Chen, Songhai; Lin, Fang

    2017-08-01

    Signaling mediated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for the migration of cells toward chemoattractants. The recruitment of neutrophils to injured tissues in zebrafish larvae is a useful model for studying neutrophil migration and trafficking in vivo. Indeed, the study of this process led to the discovery that PI3Kγ is required for the polarity and motility of neutrophils, features that are necessary for the directed migration of these cells to wounds. However, the mechanism by which PI3Kγ is activated remains to be determined. Here we show that signaling by specifically the heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gβ1 is critical for neutrophil migration in response to wounding. In embryos treated with small-molecule inhibitors of Gβγ signaling, neutrophils failed to migrate to wound sites. Although both the Gβ1 and Gβ4 isoforms are expressed in migrating neutrophils, only deficiency for the former (morpholino-based knockdown) interfered with the directed migration of neutrophils towards wounds. The Gβ1 deficiency also impaired the ability of cells to change cell shape and reduced their general motility, defects that are similar to those in neutrophils deficient for PI3Kγ. Transplantation assays showed that the requirement for Gβ1 in neutrophil migration is cell autonomous. Finally, live imaging revealed that Gβ1 is required for polarized activation of PI3K, and for the actin dynamics that enable neutrophil migration. Collectively, our data indicate that Gβ1 signaling controls proper neutrophil migration by activating PI3K and modulating actin dynamics. Moreover, they illustrate a role for a specific Gβ isoform in chemotaxis in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Salmonella transiently reside in luminal neutrophils in the inflamed gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Loetscher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enteric pathogens need to grow efficiently in the gut lumen in order to cause disease and ensure transmission. The interior of the gut forms a complex environment comprising the mucosal surface area and the inner gut lumen with epithelial cell debris and food particles. Recruitment of neutrophils to the intestinal lumen is a hallmark of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica infections in humans. Here, we analyzed the interaction of gut luminal neutrophils with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Tm in a mouse colitis model. RESULTS: Upon S. Tm(wt infection, neutrophils transmigrate across the mucosa into the intestinal lumen. We detected a majority of pathogens associated with luminal neutrophils 20 hours after infection. Neutrophils are viable and actively engulf S. Tm, as demonstrated by live microscopy. Using S. Tm mutant strains defective in tissue invasion we show that pathogens are mostly taken up in the gut lumen at the epithelial barrier by luminal neutrophils. In these luminal neutrophils, S. Tm induces expression of genes typically required for its intracellular lifestyle such as siderophore production iroBCDE and the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 encoded type three secretion system (TTSS-2. This shows that S. Tm at least transiently survives and responds to engulfment by gut luminal neutrophils. Gentamicin protection experiments suggest that the life-span of luminal neutrophils is limited and that S. Tm is subsequently released into the gut lumen. This "fast cycling" through the intracellular compartment of gut luminal neutrophils would explain the high fraction of TTSS-2 and iroBCDE expressing intra- and extracellular bacteria in the lumen of the infected gut. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, live neutrophils recruited during acute S. Tm colitis engulf pathogens in the gut lumen and may thus actively engage in shaping the environment of pathogens and commensals in the inflamed gut.

  5. Hidden truth of circulating neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in periodontally healthy smoker subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tobacco smoking is considered to be a major risk factor associated with periodontal disease. Smoking exerts a major effect on the protective elements of the immune response, resulting in an increase in the extent and severity of periodontal destruction. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess viability and phagocytic function of neutrophils in circulating blood of the smokers and nonsmokers who are periodontally healthy. Settings and Design: Two hundred subjects in the mean range of 20–30 years of age were included in the study population. It was a retrospective study carried out for 6 months. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects were divided into four groups: 50 nonsmokers, 50 light smokers (15 cigarettes/day. Full mouth plaque index, sulcus bleeding index, and probing depths were measured. Percentage viability of circulating neutrophils and average number of phagocytosed Candida albicans were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Means and standard deviations were calculated from data obtained within the groups. Comparison between the smokers and nonsmokers was performed by Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA analysis. Comparison between smoker groups was performed using Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test. Results: Percentage viability of neutrophils was significantly less in heavy smokers (66.9 ± 4.0, moderate (76.6 ± 4.2, light smokers (83.1 ± 2.5 as compared to nonsmokers (92.3 ± 2.6 (P < 0.01. The ability of neutrophils to phagocytose, i.e., mean particle number was significantly less in light smokers (3.5 ± 0.5, moderate smokers (2.3 ± 0.5, and heavy smokers (1.4 ± 0.5 compared to nonsmokers (4.9 ± 0.7 (P < 0.01 with evidence of dose-response effect. Conclusions: Smoking significantly affects neutrophils viability and phagocytic function in periodontally healthy population.

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein promotes TLR-4-dependent neutrophil extracellular trap formation by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle A Funchal

    Full Text Available Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis.

  7. Bovine Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Cast Neutrophil Extracellular Traps against the Abortive Parasite Neospora caninum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagra-Blanco, Rodolfo; Silva, Liliana M. R.; Muñoz-Caro, Tamara; Yang, Zhengtao; Li, Jianhua; Gärtner, Ulrich; Taubert, Anja; Zhang, Xichen; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Neospora caninum represents a relevant apicomplexan parasite causing severe reproductive disorders in cattle worldwide. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) generation was recently described as an efficient defense mechanism of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) acting against different parasites. In vitro interactions of bovine PMN with N. caninum were analyzed at different ratios and time spans. Extracellular DNA staining was used to illustrate the typical molecules of NETs [i.e., histones (H3), neutrophil elastase (NE), myeloperoxidase (MPO), pentraxin] via antibody-based immunofluorescence analyses. Functional inhibitor treatments were applied to reveal the role of several enzymes [NADPH oxidase (NOX), NE, MPO, PAD4], ATP-dependent P2Y2 receptor, store-operated Ca++entry (SOCE), CD11b receptor, ERK1/2- and p38 MAPK-mediated signaling pathway in tachyzoite-triggered NETosis. N. caninum tachyzoites triggered NETosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed NET structures being released by bovine PMN and entrapping tachyzoites. N. caninum-induced NET formation was found not to be NOX-, NE-, MPO-, PAD4-, ERK1/2-, and p38 MAP kinase-dependent process since inhibition of these enzymes led to a slight decrease of NET formation. CD11b was also identified as a neutrophil receptor being involved in NETosis. Furthermore, N. caninum-triggered NETosis depends on Ca++ influx as well as neutrophil metabolism since both the inhibition of SOCE and of P2Y2-mediated ATP uptake diminished NET formation. Host cell invasion assays indicated that PMN-derived NETosis hampered tachyzoites from active host cell invasion, thereby inhibiting further intracellular replication. NET formation represents an early and effective mechanism of response of the innate immune system, which might reduce initial infection rates during the acute phase of cattle neosporosis. PMID:28611772

  8. Electro-Fermentation - Merging Electrochemistry with Fermentation in Industrial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schievano, Andrea; Pepé Sciarria, Tommy; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; De Wever, Heleen; Puig, Sebastià; Andersen, Stephen J; Rabaey, Korneel; Pant, Deepak

    2016-11-01

    Electro-fermentation (EF) merges traditional industrial fermentation with electrochemistry. An imposed electrical field influences the fermentation environment and microbial metabolism in either a reductive or oxidative manner. The benefit of this approach is to produce target biochemicals with improved selectivity, increase carbon efficiency, limit the use of additives for redox balance or pH control, enhance microbial growth, or in some cases enhance product recovery. We discuss the principles of electrically driven fermentations and how EF can be used to steer both pure culture and microbiota-based fermentations. An overview is given on which advantages EF may bring to both existing and innovative industrial fermentation processes, and which doors might be opened in waste biomass utilization towards added-value biorefineries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Myeloperoxidase attracts neutrophils by physical forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinke, Anna; Nussbaum, Claudia; Kubala, Lukas; Friedrichs, Kai; Rudolph, Tanja K; Rudolph, Volker; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Schröder, Christine; Benten, Daniel; Lau, Denise; Szocs, Katalin; Furtmüller, Paul G; Heeringa, Peter; Sydow, Karsten; Duchstein, Hans-Jürgen; Ehmke, Heimo; Schumacher, Udo; Meinertz, Thomas; Sperandio, Markus; Baldus, Stephan

    2011-01-27

    Recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) remains a paramount prerequisite in innate immune defense and a critical cofounder in inflammatory vascular disease. Neutrophil recruitment comprises a cascade of concerted events allowing for capture, adhesion and extravasation of the leukocyte. Whereas PMN rolling, binding, and diapedesis are well characterized, receptor-mediated processes, mechanisms attenuating the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged glycocalyx of leukocyte and endothelium remain poorly understood. We provide evidence for myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant PMN-derived heme protein, facilitating PMN recruitment by its positive surface charge. In vitro, MPO evoked highly directed PMN motility, which was solely dependent on electrostatic interactions with the leukocyte's surface. In vivo, PMN recruitment was shown to be MPO-dependent in a model of hepatic ischemia and reperfusion, upon intraportal delivery of MPO and in the cremaster muscle exposed to local inflammation or to intraarterial MPO application. Given MPO's affinity to both the endothelial and the leukocyte's surface, MPO evolves as a mediator of PMN recruitment because of its positive surface charge. This electrostatic MPO effect not only displays a so far unrecognized, catalysis-independent function of the enzyme, but also highlights a principal mechanism of PMN attraction driven by physical forces.

  10. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  11. Characterization of neutrophil adhesion to different titanium surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ing blood; however, direct contact between the oxide layer of the implant and neutrophils has not been completely described. The aim of the present study is to compare ... Titanium surfaces; neutrophil morphology; adhesion molecules; inflammatory response; flow cytome- try; scanning electron microscopy. 1. Introduction.

  12. Early diagnostic method for sepsis based on neutrophil MR imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanhua Han

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Mouse and human neutrophils could be more effectively labelled by Mannan-coated SPION in vitro than Feridex. Sepsis analog neutrophils labelled by Mannan-coated SPIONs could be efficiently detected on MR images, which may serve as an early diagnostic method for sepsis.

  13. Regulation of calcium homeostasis in activated human neutrophils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. The objectives of the current study were to: (i) present an integrated model for the restoration of calcium homeostasis in activated human neutrophils based on current knowledge and recent research; and (ii) identify potential targets for the modulation of calcium fluxes in activated neutrophils based on this model ...

  14. Neutrophil functions in late preterm neonates with respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further studies are recommended to elucidate the exact mechanisms by which RDS can affect neutrophil functions and whether these effects are associated with increased incidence of infections. Keywords: Neutrophils, function, respiratory distress syndrome, late preterm, innate immunity, infections, adhesion molecules ...

  15. Influence of recombinant bovine gamma interferon on neutrophil function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the role of cytokines in enhancing neutrophil function, peripheral blood neutrophils from healthy cattle were preincubated with recombinant bovine gamma interferon (rboIFN-gamma). Pretreatment of neutrophils with rboIFN-gamma activated neutrophils to have enhanced antibody-dependent (ADCC) and -independent (AINC) cytotoxicity and impaired random migration. Neutrophil ingestion, superoxide anion production, and iodination activity were not consistently affected by rboIFN-gamma pretreatment. In order to better understand the activation process, the molecular events involved in the enhancement of neutrophil cytotoxicity and the inhibition random migration were investigated. Both RNA and protein syntheses by neutrophils were required for the enhancement of AINC activity and the inhibition of random migration, but were not required for the enhancement of ADCC by rboIFN-gamma. Specifically, rbo-IFN-gamma treatment of neutrophils enhanced the expression of two major proteins of molecular mass 60,000 and 94,000 as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide, linear-gradient gel electrophoresis and /sup 35/S-fluorography.

  16. Intergrin-dependent neutrophil migration in the injured mouse cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    As an early responder to an inflammatory stimulus, neutrophils must exit the vasculature and migrate through the extravascular tissue to the site of insult, which is often remote from the point of extravasation. Following a central epithelial corneal abrasion, neutrophils recruited from the peripher...

  17. Autophagy Is Required for Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek Bhattacharya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, an intracellular degradation and energy recycling mechanism, is emerging as an important regulator of immune responses. However, the role of autophagy in regulating neutrophil functions is not known. We investigated neutrophil biology using myeloid-specific autophagy-deficient mice and found that autophagy deficiency reduced neutrophil degranulation in vitro and in vivo. Mice with autophagy deficiency showed reduced severity of several neutrophil-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune disease models, including PMA-induced ear inflammation, LPS-induced breakdown of blood-brain barrier, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. NADPH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species generation was also reduced in autophagy-deficient neutrophils, and inhibition of NADPH oxidase reduced neutrophil degranulation, suggesting NADPH oxidase to be a player at the intersection of autophagy and degranulation. Overall, this study establishes autophagy as an important regulator of neutrophil functions and neutrophil-mediated inflammation in vivo.

  18. Diverse novel functions of neutrophils in immunity, inflammation, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mócsai, Attila

    2013-07-01

    Neutrophils have long been considered simple suicide killers at the bottom of the hierarchy of the immune response. That view began to change 10-20 yr ago, when the sophisticated mechanisms behind how neutrophils locate and eliminate pathogens and regulate immunity and inflammation were discovered. The last few years witnessed a new wave of discoveries about additional novel and unexpected functions of these cells. Neutrophils have been proposed to participate in protection against intracellular pathogens such as viruses and mycobacteria. They have been shown to intimately shape the adaptive immune response at various levels, including marginal zone B cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and T cell populations, and even to control NK cell homeostasis. Neutrophils have been shown to mediate an alternative pathway of systemic anaphylaxis and to participate in allergic skin reactions. Finally, neutrophils were found to be involved in physiological and pathological processes beyond the immune system, such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and thrombus formation. Many of those functions appear to be related to their unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. This review summarizes those novel findings on versatile functions of neutrophils and how they change our view of neutrophil biology in health and disease.

  19. Synchronisation of glycolytic oscillations in a suspension of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Poulsen, Allan K.; Olsen, Lars Folke

    Neutrophils are known to be able to synchronize their production of superoxide. We show that glycolysis is also synchronized in human neutrophils being in suspension and suggest that oscillations in glycolysis are driving the pulsatile production of superoxide. The synchronising agent remains so...... far unknown, however, much evident points to that it might be hydrogen peroxide or an intermediate in glycolysis....

  20. Neutrophilic inflammation in asthma: mechanisms and therapeutic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hun Soo; Lee, Tae-Hyeong; Jun, Ji Ae; Baek, Ae Rin; Park, Jong-Sook; Koo, So-My; Kim, Yang-Ki; Lee, Ho Sung; Park, Choon-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophilic airway inflammation represents a pathologically distinct form of asthma and frequently appears in symptomatic adulthood asthmatics. However, clinical impacts and mechanisms of the neutrophilic inflammation have not been thoroughly evaluated up to date. Areas covered: Currently, distinct clinical manifestations, triggers, and molecular mechanisms of the neutrophilic inflammation (namely Toll-like receptor, Th1, Th17, inflammasome) are under investigation in asthma. Furthermore, possible role of the neutrophilic inflammation is being investigated in respect to the airway remodeling. We searched the related literatures published during the past 10 years on the website of Pub Med under the title of asthma and neutrophilic inflammation in human. Expert commentary: Epidemiologic and experimental studies have revealed that the neutrophilic airway inflammation is induced by a wide variety of stimuli including ozone, particulate matters, cigarette smoke, occupational irritants, endotoxins, microbial infection and colonization, and aeroallergens. These triggers provoke diverse immune and inflammatory responses leading to progressive and sometimes irreversible airway obstruction. Clinically, neutrophilic airway inflammation is frequently associated with severe asthma and poor response to glucocorticoid therapy, indicating the need for other treatment strategies. Accordingly, therapeutics will be targeted against the main mediators behind the underlying molecular mechanisms of the neutrophilic inflammation.

  1. Carbohydrates for fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Dietmar

    2006-01-01

    Biomass accumulated by the photosynthetic fixation of carbon dioxide is the only renewable carbon source, and hence, the only renewable raw material for the chemical industry. Carbohydrates are the main constituents of biomass and occur as cell wall and storage carbohydrates, transportation carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. Cellulose, hemicelluloses and starch in particular as well as pectin, inulin and saccharose to a smaller extent are the most abundant carbohydrates. Glucose is the most important monosaccharide and monomer of polysaccharides in natural carbohydrates. Thus, it is the most abundant organic compound on earth. Production of pulp from wood cellulose, applications of starch for paper making as well as uses of glucose and saccharose for fermentation are the most important chemical and technical uses of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates used as fermentation feedstock are essential for the chemical industry. Their importance is steadily growing due to the increasing implementation of biotechnological processes.

  2. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, Michael D. [Leukocyte and Ion Channel Research Laboratory, School of Health and Biosciences, University of East London, Stratford Campus, London E15 4LZ (United Kingdom); Ahluwalia, Jatinder, E-mail: j.ahluwalia@uel.ac.uk [Leukocyte and Ion Channel Research Laboratory, School of Health and Biosciences, University of East London, Stratford Campus, London E15 4LZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  3. Accelerated apoptosis of neutrophils in familial Mediterranean fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manukyan, Gayane; Aminov, Rustam; Hakobyan, Gagik

    2015-01-01

    not revealed any conventional mechanisms contributing to the enhanced apoptotic rate of neutrophils in FMF. Although the exact molecular mechanisms of accelerated neutrophil apoptosis in FMF remain unknown, it may provide a protection against excessive inflammation and tissue damage due to a massive...... of systemic neutrophil apoptosis as well as the levels of proteins involved in apoptosis were investigated ex vivo in patients with FMF using flow cytometry and RT-qPCR. The freshly collected neutrophils from the patients in FMF remission displayed a significantly larger number of cells spontaneously entering...... apoptosis compared to control (6.27 ± 2.14 vs. 1.69 ± 0.18%). This elevated ratio was retained after 24 h incubation of neutrophils in the growth medium (32.4 ± 7.41 vs. 7.65 ± 1.32%). Correspondingly, the mRNA level for caspase-3 was also significantly increased under these conditions. In response...

  4. Visceral leishmaniasis patients display altered composition and maturity of neutrophils as well as impaired neutrophil effector functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endalew Yizengaw

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunologically, active visceral leishmaniasis (VL is characterised by profound immunosuppression, severe systemic inflammatory responses and an impaired capacity to control parasite replication. Neutrophils are highly versatile cells, which play a crucial role in the induction as well as the resolution of inflammation, the control of pathogen replication and the regulation of immune responses. Neutrophil functions have been investigated in human cutaneous leishmaniasis, however, their role in human visceral leishmaniasis is poorly understood.In the present study we evaluated the activation status and effector functions of neutrophils in patients with active VL and after successful anti-leishmanial treatment. Our results show that neutrophils are highly activated and have degranulated; high levels of arginase, myeloperoxidase and elastase, all contained in neutrophils’ granules, were found in the plasma of VL patients. In addition, we show that a large proportion of these cells are immature. We also analysed effector functions of neutrophils that are essential for pathogen clearance and show that neutrophils have an impaired capacity to release neutrophil extracellular traps, produce reactive oxygen species and phagocytose bacterial particles, but not Leishmania parasites.Our results suggest that impaired effector functions, increased activation and immaturity of neutrophils play a key role in the pathogenesis of VL.

  5. Health benefits of fermented foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şanlier, Nevin; Gökcen, Büşra Başar; Sezgin, Aybüke Ceyhun

    2017-09-25

    In the past, the beneficial effects of fermented foods on health were unknown, and so people primarily used fermentation to preserve foods, enhance shelf life, and improve flavour. Fermented foods became an important part of the diet in many cultures, and over time fermentation has been associated with many health benefits. Because of this, the fermentation process and the resulting fermented products have recently attracted scientific interest. In addition, microorganisms contributing to the fermentation process have recently been associated with many health benefits, and so these microorganisms have become another focus of attention. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been some of the most studied microorganisms. During fermentation, these bacteria synthesize vitamins and minerals, produce biologically active peptides with enzymes such as proteinase and peptidase, and remove some non-nutrients. Compounds known as biologically active peptides, which are produced by the bacteria responsible for fermentation, are also well known for their health benefits. Among these peptides, conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have a blood pressure lowering effect, exopolysaccharides exhibit prebiotic properties, bacteriocins show anti-microbial effects, sphingolipids have anti-carcinogenic and anti-microbial properties, and bioactive peptides exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, opioid antagonist, anti-allergenic, and blood pressure lowering effects. As a result, fermented foods provide many health benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and anti-atherosclerotic activity. However, some studies have shown no relationship between fermented foods and health benefits. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the health effects of fermented foods.

  6. Recombinant Zymomonas for pentose fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picataggio, Stephen K.; Zhang, Min; Eddy, Christina K.; Deanda, Kristine A.

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol.

  7. Pentose fermentation by recombinant zymomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picataggio, Stephen K.; Zhang, Min; Eddy, Christina K.; Deanda, Kristine A.; Finkelstein, Mark; Mohagheghi, Ali; Newman, Mildred M.; McMillan, James D.

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol.

  8. On the mechanism of oscillations in neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Barington, Torben; Olsen, Lars Folke

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the oscillatory generation of H(2)O(2) and oscillations in shape and size in neutrophils in suspension. The oscillations are independent of cell density and hence do not represent a collective phenomena. Furthermore, the oscillations are independent...... of the external glucose concentration and the oscillations in H(2)O(2) production are 180 degrees out of phase with the oscillations in NAD(P)H. Cytochalasin B blocked the oscillations in shape and size whereas it increased the period of the oscillations in H(2)O(2) production. 1- and 2-butanol also blocked...... the oscillations in shape and size, but only 1-butanol inhibited the oscillations in H(2)O(2) production. We conjecture that the oscillations are likely to be due to feedback regulations in the signal transduction cascade involving phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K). We have tested this using a simple mathematical...

  9. Activated signature of antiphospholipid syndrome neutrophils reveals potential therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jason S.; Meng, He; Coit, Patrick; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Sule, Gautam; Gandhi, Alex A.; Grenn, Robert C.; Mazza, Levi F.; Ali, Ramadan A.; Renauer, Paul; Wren, Jonathan D.; Bockenstedt, Paula L.; Wang, Hui; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2017-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies, present in one-third of lupus patients, increase the risk of thrombosis. We recently reported a key role for neutrophilsneutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), in particular — in the thrombotic events that define antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To further elucidate the role of neutrophils in APS, we performed a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of neutrophils isolated from patients with primary APS. Moreover, APS-associated venous thrombosis was modeled by treating mice with IgG prepared from APS patients, followed by partial restriction of blood flow through the inferior vena cava. In patients, APS neutrophils demonstrated a proinflammatory signature with overexpression of genes relevant to IFN signaling, cellular defense, and intercellular adhesion. For in vivo studies, we focused on P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), a key adhesion molecule overexpressed in APS neutrophils. The introduction of APS IgG (as compared with control IgG) markedly potentiated thrombosis in WT mice, but not PSGL-1–KOs. PSGL-1 deficiency was also associated with reduced leukocyte vessel wall adhesion and NET formation. The thrombosis phenotype was restored in PSGL-1–deficient mice by infusion of WT neutrophils, while an anti–PSGL-1 monoclonal antibody inhibited APS IgG–mediated thrombosis in WT mice. PSGL-1 represents a potential therapeutic target in APS. PMID:28931754

  10. Fluid phase recognition molecules in neutrophil-dependent immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillon, Sébastien; Ponzetta, Andrea; Magrini, Elena; Barajon, Isabella; Barbagallo, Marialuisa; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The innate immune system comprises both a cellular and a humoral arm. Neutrophils are key effector cells of the immune and inflammatory responses and have emerged as a major source of humoral pattern recognition molecules (PRMs). These molecules, which include collectins, ficolins, and pentraxins, are specialised in the discrimination of self versus non-self and modified-self and share basic multifunctional properties including recognition and opsonisation of pathogens and apoptotic cells, activation and regulation of the complement cascade and tuning of inflammation. Neutrophils act as a reservoir of ready-made soluble PRMs, such as the long pentraxin PTX3, the peptidoglycan recognition protein PGRP-S, properdin and M-ficolin, which are stored in neutrophil granules and are involved in neutrophil effector functions. In addition, other soluble PRMs, such as members of the collectin family, are not expressed in neutrophils but can modulate neutrophil-dependent immune responses. Therefore, soluble PRMs are an essential part of the innate immune response and retain antibody-like effector functions. Here, we will review the expression and general function of soluble PRMs, focusing our attention on molecules involved in neutrophil effector functions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoU augments neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Michael A; Lanter, Bernard B; Yonker, Lael M; Eaton, Alex D; Pirzai, Waheed; Gronert, Karsten; Bonventre, Joseph V; Hurley, Bryan P

    2017-08-01

    Excessive neutrophil infiltration of the lungs is a common contributor to immune-related pathology in many pulmonary disease states. In response to pathogenic infection, airway epithelial cells produce hepoxilin A3 (HXA3), initiating neutrophil transepithelial migration. Migrated neutrophils amplify this recruitment by producing a secondary gradient of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). We sought to determine whether this two-step eicosanoid chemoattractant mechanism could be exploited by the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ExoU, a P. aeruginosa cytotoxin, exhibits phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity in eukaryotic hosts, an enzyme critical for generation of certain eicosanoids. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neutrophil transepithelial migration, we evaluated the impact of ExoU expression on eicosanoid generation and function. We conclude that ExoU, by virtue of its PLA2 activity, augments and compensates for endogenous host neutrophil cPLA2α function, leading to enhanced transepithelial migration. This suggests that ExoU expression in P. aeruginosa can circumvent immune regulation at key signaling checkpoints in the neutrophil, resulting in exacerbated neutrophil recruitment.

  12. FOXO1 Regulates Bacteria-Induced Neutrophil Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu Dong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an essential role in the innate immune response to microbial infection and are particularly important in clearing bacterial infection. We investigated the role of the transcription factor FOXO1 in the response of neutrophils to bacterial challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis in vivo and in vitro. In these experiments, the effect of lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion in LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L mice was compared with matched littermate controls. FOXO1 deletion negatively affected several critical aspects of neutrophil function in vivo including mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow (BM to the vasculature, recruitment of neutrophils to sites of bacterial inoculation, and clearance of bacteria. In vitro FOXO1 regulated neutrophil chemotaxis and bacterial killing. Moreover, bacteria-induced expression of CXCR2 and CD11b, which are essential for several aspects of neutrophil function, was dependent on FOXO1 in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, FOXO1 directly interacted with the promoter regions of CXCR2 and CD11b. Bacteria-induced nuclear localization of FOXO1 was dependent upon toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and/or TLR4 and was significantly reduced by inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide synthase and deacetylases (Sirt1 and histone deacetylases. These studies show for the first time that FOXO1 activation by bacterial challenge is needed to mobilize neutrophils to transit from the BM to peripheral tissues in response to infection as well as for bacterial clearance in vivo. Moreover, FOXO1 regulates neutrophil function that facilitates chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and bacterial killing.

  13. Recurrent Malignancy-Associated Atypical Neutrophilic Dermatosis With Noninfectious Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Kathryn Nicole; Panach, Kamaldeep; Dominguez, Arturo Ricardo

    2017-12-01

    Sweet syndrome (SS) or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis presents with the sudden onset of fever, leukocytosis and tender, erythematous, edematous, well-demarcated papules and plaques that histopathologically demonstrate a dense neutrophilic infiltrate. A total of 20% of patients with SS have malignancy-associated disease that can present with bullous or atypical skin lesions that mimic pyoderma gangrenosum, another neutrophilic dermatosis. Both entities exist on a spectrum, and in the context of underlying malignancy, these neutrophilic diseases become less clinically distinct. The literature also describes life-threatening cases of neutrophilic dermatoses that mimic severe sepsis. We present a fatal case of a patient with chronic eosinophilic leukemia with recurrent episodes of malignancy-associated atypical neutrophilic dermatosis characterized by necrotic skin lesions, pulmonary infiltrates and noninfectious shock and we also summarize the clinical presentations of an additional 10 patients reported in the literature. We conducted a PubMed search of articles published up to and in 2015, focusing on the English and Spanish literature with SS cross-referenced with the following search terms: neutrophilic dermatosis, pyoderma gangrenosum, shock, multiorgan failure and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The articles were reviewed and the patients׳ clinical and laboratory findings were summarized. Cases of atypical neutrophilic dermatosis presenting with noninfectious shock syndrome are likely underrecognized clinically and underreported in the literature. Patients with malignancy-associated atypical neutrophilic dermatoses associated with noninfectious shock syndrome typically have multisystem disease characterized by recurrent episodes and typically have poor prognoses. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannat, Risat A.; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micro-machined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the KD of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against β2-integrins leads to a significant reduction but not an elimination of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation. PMID:20473350

  15. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannat, Risat A; Hammer, Daniel A [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 240 Skirkanich Hall, 210 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Robbins, Gregory P; Ricart, Brendon G [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 311A Towne Building, 220 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dembo, Micah, E-mail: hammer@seas.upenn.ed [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micromachined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the K{sub D} of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against {beta}{sub 2}-integrins leads to a significant reduction, but not an elimination, of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation.

  16. Alcohol by fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamoki, H.

    1973-08-22

    Alcohol was obtained by culturing Saccharomyces diastaticus and S. cerevisiae on a medium containing saccharified starch as the main carbon source. Starch was saccharified with either acid or enzyme. Thus, 185 ml fermented mash (10.52% EtOH) was obtained by culturing yeast starter on 200 ml saccharified solution containing yeast extract 2 and peptone 2 g for 94 hours at 30 degrees; the saccharified solution was prepared by adding 0.006 mole NaCl, 0.001 mole CaCl2, and 40 mg bacterial dextrinogenic amylase to 20% potato starch suspension and allowed to react for 30 minutes at 75 degrees.

  17. TRADITIONAL FERMENTED FOODS OF LESOTHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tendekayi H. Gadaga

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the traditional methods of preparing fermented foods and beverages of Lesotho. Information on the preparation methods was obtained through a combination of literature review and face to face interviews with respondents from Roma in Lesotho. An unstructured questionnaire was used to capture information on the processes, raw materials and utensils used. Four products; motoho (a fermented porridge, Sesotho (a sorghum based alcoholic beverage, hopose (sorghum fermented beer with added hops and mafi (spontaneously fermented milk, were found to be the main fermented foods prepared and consumed at household level in Lesotho. Motoho is a thin gruel, popular as refreshing beverage as well as a weaning food. Sesotho is sorghum based alcoholic beverage prepared for household consumption as well as for sale. It is consumed in the actively fermenting state. Mafi is the name given to spontaneously fermented milk with a thick consistency. Little research has been done on the technological aspects, including the microbiological and biochemical characteristics of fermented foods in Lesotho. Some of the traditional aspects of the preparation methods, such as use of earthenware pots, are being replaced, and modern equipment including plastic utensils are being used. There is need for further systematic studies on the microbiological and biochemical characteristics of these these products.

  18. Hydrogen Production by Thermophilic Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Willquist, K.; Zeidan, A.A.; Vrije, de T.; Mars, A.E.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Of the many ways hydrogen can be produced, this chapter focuses on biological hydrogen production by thermophilic bacteria and archaea in dark fermentations. The thermophiles are held as promising candidates for a cost-effective fermentation process, because of their relatively high yields and broad

  19. Low molecular weight heparins prevent the induction of autophagy of activated neutrophils and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Angelo A; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; D'Angelo, Armando; Maugeri, Norma

    2017-09-01

    The protection exerted by neutrophils against invading microbes is partially mediated via the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In sterile conditions NETs are damaging species, enriched in autoantigens and endowed with the ability to damage the vessel wall and bystander tissues, to promote thrombogenesis, and to impair wound healing. To identify and reposition agents that can be used to modulate the formation of NETs is a priority in the research agenda. Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) are currently used, mostly on an empirical basis, in conditions in which NETs play a critical role, such as pregnancy complications associated to autoimmune disease. Here we report that LMWHs induce a profound change in the ability of human neutrophils to generate NETs and to mobilize the content of the primary granules in response to unrelated inflammatory stimuli, such as IL-8, PMA and HMGB1. Autophagy consistently accompanies NET generation in our system and autophagy inhibitors, 3-MA and wortmannin, prevent NET generation. Pretreatment with LMWH in vitro critically jeopardizes neutrophil ability to activate autophagy, a mechanism that might contribute to neutrophil unresponsiveness. Finally, we verified that treatment of healthy volunteers with a single prophylactic dose of parnaparin abrogated the ability of neutrophils to activate autophagy and to generate NETs. Together, these results support the contention that neutrophils, and NET generation in particular, might represent a preferential target of the anti-inflammatory action of LMWH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species.

  1. Neutrophil elastase-deficient mice form neutrophil extracellular traps in an experimental model of deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinod, K; Witsch, T; Farley, K; Gallant, M; Remold-O'Donnell, E; Wagner, D D

    2016-03-01

    ESSENTIALS: Neutrophil elastase (NE) plays a role in extracellular trap formation (NETosis) triggered by microbes. The contribution of NE was evaluated in mouse NETosis models of sterile inflammation and thrombosis. NE is not required for mouse neutrophil NET production in vitro with non-infectious stimuli. NE deficiency had no significant effect on thrombosis in the inferior vena cava stenosis model. Neutrophil serine proteases have been implicated in coagulation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. In human neutrophils, neutrophil elastase (NE) translocates to the nucleus during NETosis and cleaves histones, thus aiding in chromatin decondensation. NE(-/-) mice were shown not to release NETs in response to microbes. However, mouse studies evaluating the role of NE in NET formation in sterile inflammation and thrombosis are lacking. We wished to establish if neutrophils from NE(-/-) mice have a defect in NETosis, similar to peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4(-/-)) mice, and how this might have an impact on venous thrombosis, a model where NETs are produced and are crucial to thrombus development. We performed in vitro NET assays using neutrophils from wild-type (WT), NE(-/-), SerpinB1 (SB1)(-/-) and NE(-/-) SB1(-/-) mice. We compared WT and NE(-/-) animals using the inferior vena cava stenosis model of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Neutrophil elastase deficiency resulted in a small reduction in ionomycin-induced NET formation in vitro without affecting histone citrullination. However, NET production in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or platelet activating factor was normal in neutrophils from two independent NE-deficient mouse lines, and in NE(-/-) SB1(-/-) as compared with SB1(-/-) neutrophils. NE deficiency or inhibition did not prevent NETosis in vivo or DVT outcome. Neutrophil elastase is not required for NET formation in mice. NE(-/-) mice, which form pathological venous thrombi containing NETs, do not phenocopy PAD4(-/-) mice in in

  2. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutrophil superoxide-anion generating capacity in chronic smoking ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reflected by lag time of conjugated diene formation) was higher in the supplemented group than in the placebo group (+ 22%, < 0.0001). Superoxide generating capacity of neutrophils and superoxide production in diluted whole blood did not differ ...

  4. Neutrophil evasion strategies by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Megan L; Surewaard, Bas G J

    2018-03-01

    Humans are well equipped to defend themselves against bacteria. The innate immune system employs diverse mechanisms to recognize, control and initiate a response that can destroy millions of different microbes. Microbes that evade the sophisticated innate immune system are able to escape detection and could become pathogens. The pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are particularly successful due to the development of a wide variety of virulence strategies for bacterial pathogenesis and they invest significant efforts towards mechanisms that allow for neutrophil evasion. Neutrophils are a primary cellular defense and can rapidly kill invading microbes, which is an indispensable function for maintaining host health. This review compares the key features of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in epidemiology, with a specific focus on virulence mechanisms utilized to evade neutrophils in bacterial pathogenesis. It is important to understand the complex interactions between pathogenic bacteria and neutrophils so that we can disrupt the ability of pathogens to cause disease.

  5. Cryptococcal capsular glucuronoxylomannan reduces ischaemia-related neutrophil influx

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellerbroek, PM; Schoemaker, RG; van Veghel, R; Hoepelman, AIM; Coenjaerts, FEJ

    Background The capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) of Cryptococcus neoformans interferes with the chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of neutrophils. Intravenous administration of purified GXM has been shown to reduce the influx of inflammatory cells in an animal model of

  6. Neutrophil elastase-mediated increase in airway temperature during inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Annika; Belaaouaj, Azzaq; Bissinger, Rosi

    2014-01-01

    in the exhaled air of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To further test our hypothesis, a pouch inflammatory model using neutrophil elastase-deficient mice was employed. Next, the impact of temperature changes on the dominant CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth was tested by plating method and RNAseq. Results...... Here we show a temperature of ~ 38 °C in neutrophil-dominated mucus plugs of chronically infected CF patients and implicate neutrophil elastase:α1-proteinase inhibitor complex formation as a relevant mechanism for the local temperature rise. Gene expression of the main pathogen in CF, P. aeruginosa......, under anaerobic conditions at 38 °C vs 30 °C revealed increased virulence traits and characteristic cell wall changes. Conclusion Neutrophil elastase mediates increase in airway temperature, which may contribute to P. aeruginosa selection during the course of chronic infection in CF....

  7. Actin polymerization contributes to neutrophil chemotactic dysfunction following thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasslen, S R; Ahrenholz, D H; Solem, L D; Nelson, R D

    1992-11-01

    The agent(s) and mechanism(s) responsible for suppression of neutrophil chemotaxis in association with major thermal injury have not been identified. We have proposed that the reduced random motility characterizing patients' cells may contribute to their generalized chemotactic dysfunction. Here we report that actin polymerization may be responsible for the loss of neutrophil motility associated with major thermal injury. Using a fluorescent ligand specific for polymerized or filamentous actin (NBD-phallacidin) in conjunction with flow cytometry, we have discovered that peripheral blood and exudate neutrophils from patients with major thermal injury contain increased levels of actin in a stably polymerized form. Because cyclic polymerization and depolymerization of actin is essential to cell motility, we suggest that actin polymerization may contribute in a major way to the attenuation of neutrophil random and chemotactic functions induced by major thermal injury.

  8. Strain-Specific Impact of Fusobacterium nucleatum on Neutrophil Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgan, Şivge; Kansal, Shevali; Nguyen, Daniel; Stephens, Danielle; Koroneos, Yannis; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2017-04-01

    Neutrophil function is critical for initiation and progression of infecto-inflammatory diseases. Key quorum-sensing plaque bacteria, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum, act as bridging species between early and late colonizer pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, as the biofilm ages and periodontal inflammation increases. This study is designed to determine impact of different F. nucleatum strains on neutrophil function. Cells of human promyelocytic leukemia cell line-60 were differentiated into neutrophil-like cells and cultured with F. nucleatum strains of subspecies (ssp.) nucleatum ATCC 25586, ssp. polymorphum ATCC 10953, and ssp. vincentii ATCC 49256. Neutrophil phagocytosis of F. nucleatum strains and neutrophil apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide generation was measured by cytochrome C reduction in the presence and absence of N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP) (1 μM) stimulation. Proinflammatory cytokine release was determined after 2, 6, and 24 hours of culture in the presence/absence of different F. nucleatum strains. Expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, and nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B mRNA levels were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Each experiment was repeated at least three times in triplicate. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance followed by post hoc Bonferroni correction. All strains of F. nucleatum significantly increased phagocytic capacity of neutrophils. Neutrophil phagocytosis of F. nucleatum ssp. polymorphum was significantly greater than that of F. nucleatum ssp. vincentii and ssp. nucleatum (P nucleatum ssp. nucleatum and ssp. polymorphum significantly blocked fMLP-induced superoxide generation (P nucleatum vincentii also reduced superoxide generation (25%), the impact was not as strong as that of ssp. nucleatum (83%) and ssp. polymorphum (100%). All F. nucleatum strains stimulated significant increase in neutrophil apoptosis compared with control (P

  9. Demonstration of the neutrophil granulocyte functional capacity in silicosis, using the NBT test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, T; Cojocaru, M

    1995-01-01

    The functional capacity of neutrophils was studied using the NBT test in 68 patients with silicosis in various evolutive stages, comparatively with a group of 35 controls. The NBT test showed an initial increase of nonspecific cellular reactivity which decreased as the disease evolved. The results in the control group showed 9 +/- 5% NBT positive neutrophils. The highest proportion of NBT positive neutrophils (17.6 +/- 2.3, p NBT positive neutrophils may be considered as a biochemical marker of neutrophil functionality.

  10. Effects of Acrolein on Leukotriene Biosynthesis in Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Zemski Berry, Karin A.; Henson, Peter M.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Acrolein is a toxic, highly reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde that is present in high concentrations in cigarette smoke. In the current study, the effect of acrolein on eicosanoid synthesis in stimulated human neutrophils was examined. Eicosanoid synthesis in neutrophils was initiated by priming with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and subsequent stimulation with formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and 5-LO products in addition to small amounts of COX produc...

  11. (AJST) INFLUENCE OF FERMENTATION AND COWPEA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opiyo

    Cowpeas was the main source of glucose/galactose. Fermentation caused a reduction in stacchyose and glucose/galactose. The mixing of cowpea flour with fermented maize dough prior to drying (single component fermentation) gave similar effects on sugar concentrations as detected in the co-fermented samples ...

  12. Anandamide and neutrophil function in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Ines; Schelling, Gustav; Eisner, Christoph; Richter, Hans Peter; Krauseneck, Till; Vogeser, Michael; Hauer, Daniela; Campolongo, Patrizia; Chouker, Alexander; Beyer, Antje; Thiel, Manfred

    2008-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common stress-related painful disorder. There is considerable evidence of neuroimmunologic alterations in FM which may be the consequence of chronic stress and pain or causally involved in the development of this disorder. The endocannabinoid system has been shown to play a pivotal role in mammalian nociception, is activated under stressful conditions and can be an important signaling pathway for immune modulation. The endocannabinoid system could therefore be involved in the complex pathophysiology of FM. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating the effects of stress hormones and the endocannabinoid anandamide on neutrophil function in patients with FM. We determined plasma levels of catecholamines, cortisol and anandamide in 22 patients with primary FM and 22 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Neutrophil function was characterized by measuring the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release (oxidative stress) and the ingestion capabilities of neutrophils (microbicidal function). FM patients had significantly higher norepinephrine and anandamide plasma levels. Neutrophils of FM patients showed an elevated spontaneous H2O2 production. The ability of neutrophils to adhere was negatively correlated with serum cortisol levels. Adhesion and phagocytosis capabilities of neutrophils correlated positively with anandamide plasma levels. In conclusion, patients with FM might benefit from pharmacologic manipulation of endocannabinoid signaling which should be tested in controlled studies.

  13. Chemotactic Activity on Human Neutrophils to Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate chemotactic activity o neutrophil to S. mutans. Chemotaxis assay was performed in blind well chambers. Materials and Methods: Hanks balanced salt solution (HBSS containing 106 S. mutans,  108 S. mutans, 10-8 M fMLP, or HBSS alone were placed in the lower wells of the chamber and covered with polycorbonate membrane filter. Neutrophils suspension (2x105 cells was then placed in the upper compartment. After incubation for 60 mins at 37ºC in a humidified atmosphere with 5% CO2, the filters were removed and stained with Giemsa. Result: ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences among groups (p<0.05, indicating that S. mutans induced neutrophils chemotaxis. The number of neutrophils migration in response to 108 S. mutans and 106 S. mutans were signifiantly greater compared to fMLP (p<0.05. Conclusion: S. mutans may activate human neutrophils, resulting in the chemotaxis of the neutrophils.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i2.99

  14. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  15. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  16. Fermented Broth in Tyrosinase- and Melanogenesis Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Feng Chan; Ching-Cheng Huang; Ming-Yuan Lee; Yung-Sheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Fermented broth has a long history of applications in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Recently, the use of fermented broth in skin care products is in ascendance. This review investigates the efficacy of fermented broth in inhibiting tyrosinase and melanogenesis. Possible active ingredients and hypopigmentation mechanisms of fermented broth are discussed, and potential applications of fermented broth in the cosmetic industry are also addressed.

  17. Fermented Broth in Tyrosinase- and Melanogenesis Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Feng Chan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fermented broth has a long history of applications in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Recently, the use of fermented broth in skin care products is in ascendance. This review investigates the efficacy of fermented broth in inhibiting tyrosinase and melanogenesis. Possible active ingredients and hypopigmentation mechanisms of fermented broth are discussed, and potential applications of fermented broth in the cosmetic industry are also addressed.

  18. Transcriptomic analysis comparing tumor-associated neutrophils with granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and normal neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi G Fridlender

    Full Text Available The role of myeloid cells in supporting cancer growth is well established. Most work has focused on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC that accumulate in tumor-bearing animals, but tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN are also known to be capable of augmenting tumor growth. However, little is known about their evolution, phenotype, and relationship to naïve neutrophils (NN and to the granulocytic fraction of MDSC (G-MDSC.In the current study, a transcriptomics approach was used in mice to compare these cell types. Our data show that the three populations of neutrophils are significantly different in their mRNA profiles with NN and G-MDSC being more closely related to each other than to TAN. Structural genes and genes related to cell-cytotoxicity (i.e. respiratory burst were significantly down-regulated in TAN. In contrast, many immune-related genes and pathways, including genes related to the antigen presenting complex (e.g. all six MHC-II complex genes, and cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-1-α/β, were up-regulated in G-MDSC, and further up-regulated in TAN. Thirteen of the 25 chemokines tested were markedly up-regulated in TAN compared to NN, including striking up-regulation of chemoattractants for T/B-cells, neutrophils and macrophages.This study characterizes different populations of neutrophils related to cancer, pointing out the major differences between TAN and the other neutrophil populations.

  19. Modelling ethanol production from cellulose: separate hydrolysis and fermentation versus simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drissen, R.E.T.; Maas, R.H.W.; Tramper, J.; Beeftink, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    In ethanol production from cellulose, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentative conversion may be performed sequentially (separate hydrolysis and fermentation, SHF) or in a single reaction vessel (simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, SSF). Opting for either is essentially a trade-off between

  20. Starter cultures for kimchi fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mo-Eun; Jang, Ja-Young; Lee, Jong-Hee; Park, Hae-Woong; Choi, Hak-Jong; Kim, Tae-Woon

    2015-05-01

    Kimchi is a traditional Korean vegetable product that is naturally fermented by various microorganisms present in the raw materials. Among these microorganisms, lactic acid bacteria dominate the fermentation process. Natural fermentation with unsterilized raw materials leads to the growth of various lactic acid bacteria, resulting in variations in the taste and quality of kimchi, which may make it difficult to produce industrial-scale kimchi with consistent quality. The use of starter cultures has been considered as an alternative for the industrial production of standardized kimchi, and recent trends suggest that the demand for starter cultures is on the rise. However, several factors should be carefully considered for the successful application of starter cultures for kimchi fermentation. In this review, we summarize recent studies on kimchi starter cultures, describe practical problems in the application of industrial-scale kimchi production, and discuss the directions for further studies.

  1. Differential expression of granulopoiesis related genes in neutrophil subsets distinguished by membrane expression of CD177

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Nan; Mora-Jensen, Helena; Theilgaard-Mønch, Kim

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Differential gene expression in CD177+ and CD177- neutrophils was investigated, in order to detect possible differences in neutrophil function which could be related to the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated Vasculitides (AAV). METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from healthy controls (HC)...... distribution of CD177+ and CD177- subsets but may be associated with neutrophil activation during on-going inflammation.......OBJECTIVE: Differential gene expression in CD177+ and CD177- neutrophils was investigated, in order to detect possible differences in neutrophil function which could be related to the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated Vasculitides (AAV). METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from healthy controls (HC...... quantitative-PCR. CD177 expression on neutrophil precursors in bone marrow was analyzed using quantitative PCR and flowcytometry. RESULTS: The proportion of CD177+ cells increased during neutrophil maturation in bone marrow. Fold change analysis of gene expression profile of sorted CD177+ and CD177...

  2. Effects of acrolein on leukotriene biosynthesis in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Karin A Zemski; Henson, Peter M; Murphy, Robert C

    2008-12-01

    Acrolein is a toxic, highly reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde that is present in high concentrations in cigarette smoke. In the current study, the effect of acrolein on eicosanoid synthesis in stimulated human neutrophils was examined. Eicosanoid synthesis in neutrophils was initiated by priming with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and subsequent stimulation with formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products in addition to small amounts of cyclooxygenase (COX) products were detected using LC/MS/MS. A dose-dependent decrease in the formation of 5-LO products was observed in GM-CSF/fMLP-stimulated neutrophils when acrolein (0-50 microM) was present with almost complete inhibition at > or = 25 microM acrolein. The production of COX products was not affected by acrolein in these cells. The effect of acrolein was examined on key parts of the eicosanoid pathway, such as arachidonic acid release, intracellular calcium ion concentration, and adenosine production. In addition, the direct effect of acrolein on 5-LO enzymatic activity was probed using a recombinant enzyme. Some of these factors were affected by acrolein but did not completely explain the almost complete inhibition of 5-LO product formation in GM-CSF/fMLP-treated cells with acrolein. In addition, the effect of acrolein on different stimuli that initiate the 5-LO pathway [platelet-activating factor (PAF)/fMLP, GM-CSF/PAF, opsonized zymosan, and A23187] was examined. Acrolein had no significant effect on the leukotriene production in neutrophils stimulated with PAF/fMLP, GM-CSF/ PAF, or OPZ. Additionally, 50% inhibition of the 5-LO pathway was observed in A23187-stimulated neutrophils. Our results suggest that acrolein has a profound effect on the 5-LO pathway in neutrophils, which may have implications in disease states, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other pulmonary disease, where both activated neutrophils and acrolein are

  3. OXYGEN MANAGEMENT DURING ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    MOENNE VARGAS, MARÍA ISABE

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen additions are a common practice in winemaking, as oxygen has a positive effect in fermentative kinetics, biomass synthesis and improvement of color, structure and :flavor in treated wines. However, most oxygen additions are carried out heuristically through pump-over operations solely on a know-how basis, which is difficult to manage in terms of the exact quantity of oxygen transferred to the fermenting must. It is important to estímate the amount of oxygen added because...

  4. Platelet modulation of human neutrophil functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarrity, S.T.; Hyers, T.M.; Webster, R.O.

    1986-03-01

    The combined presence of platelets (PLTS) and neutrophils (PMN) at inflammatory sites has led to examination of the hypothesis that interaction of these cells modulates their responses to stimuli. Gel-filtered human PLTS (GFP) were found to inhibit N-formyl-met-leu-phe (FMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulated PMN O/sub 2//sup -/ generation in a concentration-dependent fashion. The heat-stable inhibitory activity was present in the supernatants of GFP after incubation with FMLP (10/sup -7/M), thrombin (0.5 U/ml) or ADP (20 ..mu..M), suggesting a role for PLT release products. PLT lysates added to PMN produced up to 80% inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ generation for PMA and 40% for FMLP. Like GFP, lysates failed to scavenge O/sub 2/..pi.. produced by xanthine oxidase-hypoxanthine. The inhibitory activity could not be ascribed to serotonin or adenosine. PLT lysates failed to compete with /sup 3/H-FMLP for binding to PMN. Sephadex G-200 fractionation of PLT lysates releaved two peaks of inhibitory activity with apparent Mr > 200,000 and < 14,000 Daltons. Pretreatment of PMN with PLT lysates also results in a concentration-dependent inhibition of degranulation provoked by FMLP (2 x 10/sup -7/M) or PMA (2 ng/ml) and PMN chemotaxis to FMLP (10/sup -8/M). These studies indicate that preformed PLT mediator(s) released in response to physiological stimuli may limit tissue damage by PMN at sites of inflammation.

  5. Neutrophil labeling with [{sup 99m}Tc]-technetium stannous colloid is complement receptor 3-mediated and increases the neutrophil priming response to lipopolysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, Hayley [School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Ramsay, Stuart C. [School of Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland (Australia) and Townsville Nuclear Medicine, Mater Hospital, Townsville, Queensland 4812 (Australia)]. E-mail: stuart.ramsey@jcu.edu.au; Barnes, Jodie [School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Maggs, Jacqueline [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Townsville Hospital, Townsville, Queensland 4814 (Australia); Cassidy, Nathan [Townsville Nuclear Medicine, Mater Hospital, Townsville, Queensland 4812 (Australia); Ketheesan, Natkunam [School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); School of Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland (Australia)

    2006-04-15

    Introduction: [{sup 99m}Tc]-technetium stannous colloid (TcSnC)-labeled white cells are used to image inflammation. Neutrophil labeling with TcSnC is probably phagocytic, but the phagocytic receptor involved is not known. We hypothesised that complement receptor 3 (CR3) plays a key role. Phagocytic labeling could theoretically result in neutrophil activation or priming, affecting the behaviour of labeled cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis side scatter measurements can assess neutrophil activation and priming. Methods: We tested whether TcSnC neutrophil labeling is CR3-mediated by assessing if neutrophil uptake of TcSnC was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed at the CD11b component of CR3. We tested if TcSnC-labeled neutrophils show altered activation or priming status, comparing FACS side scatter in labeled and unlabeled neutrophils and examining the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a known priming agent. Results: Anti-CD11b mAb reduced neutrophil uptake of TcSnC in a dose-dependent fashion. Labeled neutrophils did not show significantly increased side scatter compared to controls. LPS significantly increased side scatter in control cells and labeled neutrophils. However, the increase was significantly greater in labeled neutrophils than unlabeled cells. Conclusions: Neutrophil labeling with TcSnC is related to the function of CR3, a receptor which plays a central role in phagocytosis. TcSnC labeling did not significantly activate or prime neutrophils. However, labeled neutrophils showed a greater priming response to LPS. This could result in labeled neutrophils demonstrating increased adhesion on activated endothelium at sites of infection.

  6. Formation of neutrophil extracellular traps under low oxygen level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Branitzki-Heinemann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs have been characterized as a fundamental host innate immune defense mechanism. Conversely, excessive NET release may have a variety of detrimental consequences for the host. A fine balance between NET formation and elimination is necessary to sustain a protective effect during an infectious challenge. Our own recently published data revealed that stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α by the iron chelating HIF-1α-agonist desferoxamine or AKB-4924 enhanced the release of phagocyte extracellular traps. Since HIF-1α is a global regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen, we hypothesized that NET formation may be similarly increased under low oxygen conditions. Hypoxia occurs in tissues during infection or inflammation, mostly due to overconsumption of oxygen by pathogens and recruited immune cells. Therefore, experiments were performed to characterize the formation of NETs under hypoxic oxygen conditions compared to normoxia. Human blood-derived neutrophils were isolated and incubated under normoxic (21% oxygen level and compared to hypoxic (1% conditions. Dissolved oxygen levels were monitored in the primary cell culture using a Fibox4-PSt3 measurement system. The formation of NETs was quantified by fluorescence microscopy in response to the known NET-inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA or S. aureus wildtype and a nuclease-deficient mutant. In contrast to our hypothesis, spontaneous NET formation of neutrophils incubated under hypoxia was distinctly reduced compared to control neutrophils incubated under normoxia. Furthermore, neutrophils incubated under hypoxia showed significantly reduced formation of NETs in response to PMA. Gene expression analysis revealed that mRNA level of hif-1α as well as hif-1α target genes was not altered. However, in good correlation to the decreased NET formation under hypoxia, the cholesterol content of the neutrophils was

  7. Leukocyte subsets and neutrophil function after short-term spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, R. P.; Sams, C. F.; Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Jones, M. L.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in leukocyte subpopulations and function after spaceflight have been observed but the mechanisms underlying these changes are not well defined. This study investigated the effects of short-term spaceflight (8-15 days) on circulating leukocyte subsets, stress hormones, immunoglobulin levels, and neutrophil function. At landing, a 1.5-fold increase in neutrophils was observed compared with preflight values; lymphocytes were slightly decreased, whereas the results were variable for monocytes. No significant changes were observed in plasma levels of immunoglobulins, cortisol, or adrenocorticotropic hormone. In contrast, urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol were significantly elevated at landing. Band neutrophils were observed in 9 of 16 astronauts. Neutrophil chemotactic assays showed a 10-fold decrease in the optimal dose response after landing. Neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells was increased both before and after spaceflight. At landing, the expression of MAC-1 was significantly decreased while L-selectin was significantly increased. These functional alterations may be of clinical significance on long-duration space missions.

  8. Aging and cancer: The role of macrophages and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackaman, Connie; Tomay, Federica; Duong, Lelinh; Abdol Razak, Norbaini Bintu; Pixley, Fiona J; Metharom, Pat; Nelson, Delia J

    2017-07-01

    Impaired immune function has been implicated in the declining health and higher incidence of cancer in the elderly. However, age-related changes to immunity are not completely understood. Neutrophils and macrophages represent the first line of defence yet their ability to phagocytose pathogens decrease with aging. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are critical in eliminating tumors, but T cell function is also compromised with aging. T cell responses can be regulated by macrophages and may depend on the functional phenotype macrophages adopt in response to microenvironmental signals. This can range from pro-inflammatory, anti-tumorigenic M1 to anti-inflammatory, pro-tumorigenic M2 macrophages. Macrophages in healthy elderly adipose and hepatic tissue exhibit a more pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype compared to young hosts whilst immunosuppressive M2 macrophages increase in elderly lymphoid tissues, lung and muscle. These M2-like macrophages demonstrate altered responses to stimuli. Recent studies suggest that neutrophils also regulate T cell function and, like macrophages, neutrophil function is modulated with aging. It is possible that age-modified tissue-specific macrophages and neutrophils contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation that is associated with dysregulated macrophage-mediated immunosuppression, which together are responsible for development of multiple pathologies, including cancer. This review discusses recent advances in macrophage and neutrophil biology in healthy aging and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin lα or 1β. The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes

  10. Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Background: Patients with rosacea demonstrate a higher density of Demodex mites in their skin than controls. A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR or ocular rosacea thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the etiology of this condition. Objectives: To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite. Methods: Bacterial cells were lysed and proteins were partially purified by AKTA-FPLC. Isolated neutrophils were exposed to bacterial proteins and monitored for alterations in migration, degranulation and cytokine production. Results: Neutrophils exposed to proteins from Bacillus cells demonstrated increased levels of migration and elevated release of MMP-9, an enzyme known to degrade collagen and cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide. In addition neutrophils exposed to the bacterial proteins demonstrated elevated rates of Il-8 and TNF-alpha production. Conclusions: Proteins produced by a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite have the ability to increase the migration, degranulation and cytokine production abilities of neutrophils. These results suggest that bacteria may play a role in the inflammatory erythema associated with rosacea.

  11. Burn injury reduces neutrophil directional migration speed in microfluidic devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L Butler

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermal injury triggers a fulminant inflammatory cascade that heralds shock, end-organ failure, and ultimately sepsis and death. Emerging evidence points to a critical role for the innate immune system, and several studies had documented concurrent impairment in neutrophil chemotaxis with these post-burn inflammatory changes. While a few studies suggest that a link between neutrophil motility and patient mortality might exist, so far, cumbersome assays have prohibited exploration of the prognostic and diagnostic significance of chemotaxis after burn injury. To address this need, we developed a microfluidic device that is simple to operate and allows for precise and robust measurements of chemotaxis speed and persistence characteristics at single-cell resolution. Using this assay, we established a reference set of migration speed values for neutrophils from healthy subjects. Comparisons with samples from burn patients revealed impaired directional migration speed starting as early as 24 hours after burn injury, reaching a minimum at 72-120 hours, correlated to the size of the burn injury and potentially serving as an early indicator for concurrent infections. Further characterization of neutrophil chemotaxis using this new assay may have important diagnostic implications not only for burn patients but also for patients afflicted by other diseases that compromise neutrophil functions.

  12. Radiation-induced muscositis and neutrophil granulocytes in oral mucosa; Strahleninduzierte Mukositis und neutrophile Granulozyten in der Mundschleimhaut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidberger, H.; Rave-Fraenk, M.; Kim, S.; Hille, A.; Pradier, O.; Hess, C.F. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Univ. Goettingen (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    Background: Chemotherapy-induced mucositis can be related to a decrease in oral neutrophils. We tested the relationship between radiation-induced mucositis and oral neutrophil counts. Patients and Methods: Oral neutrophil counts were obtained for ten patients with head and neck cancer who received radiotherapy of the pharynx and oral cavity. Four patients received additional chemotherapy (5-FU, Mitomycin). Counts were obtained before and during treatment; four healthy volunteers were included in the study as well. For evaluation, a quantitative mouth rinse assay, including neutrophil-staining with acridin-orange, was applied. Results: We observed large inter-individual variations with respect to neutrophil counts for patients and control persons (Table 1). During treatment (irradiation or chemoirradiation), large intra-individual variations were seen additionally (Figure 1). We found a correlation between neutrophil counts and clinical reaction grade. Neutrophil counts increased with increasing mucositis (Figure 2). This increase was more pronounced for patients treated with chemoirradiation compared to radiation alone. Treatment breaks at weekends had no clear influence on neutrophil counts. Conclusions: We observed a weak correlation between neutrophil counts and clinical reaction grade. However, the variations in neutrophil counts are too large to utilize this parameter as a surrogate for clinical mucositis grading. The assumption that a decrease in oral neutrophils is associated with radiation-induced mucositis was clearly negated. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die chemotherapieinduzierte Mukositis kann mit einer Verarmung der Mundschleimhaut an neutrophilen Granulozyten vergesellschaftet sein. Wir ueberprueften den Zusammenhang zwischen der radiogenen Mukositis und der Anzahl neutrophiler Granulozyten. Patienten und Methoden: Bei zehn Patienten mit Tumoren der Kopf-Hals-Region, die sich einer Strahlentherapie unterzogen, wurde die Anzahl enoraler neutrophiler

  13. An Elucidation of Neutrophil Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Morris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH. We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection.

  14. Oxidative product formation in irradiated neutrophils. A flow cytometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolber, R.A.; Duque, R.E.; Robinson, J.P.; Oberman, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on neutrophil oxidative function was evaluated using a flow cytometric assay of intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) production. This assay quantitates the H 2 O 2 -dependent conversion of the nonfluorescent compound, 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH), into fluorescent 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) on a single-cell basis. Intracellular H 2 O 2 production in response to stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate was not affected by neutrophil irradiation at doses up to 2500 rad. In addition, irradiation of intracellular DCFH and aqueous 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) resulted in DCF production, which suggested that oxidative molecules produced by aqueous radiolysis were detected by this assay. This study indicates that radiation doses of 1500 to 2500 rad, which are sufficient to prevent induction of graft-versus-host disease by transfused blood components, are not deleterious to neutrophil oxidative metabolism

  15. Regulation by C5a of neutrophil activation during sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedemann, Niels C; Guo, Ren-Feng; Bernacki, Kurt D; Reuben, Jayne S; Laudes, Ines J; Neff, Thomas A; Gao, Hongwei; Speyer, Cecilia; Sarma, Vidya J; Zetoune, Firas S; Ward, Peter A

    2003-08-01

    In sepsis, there is evidence that excessive C5a generation leads to compromised innate immune functions, being associated with poor outcome. We now report that in vitro exposure of neutrophils to C5a causes increased levels of IkappaBalpha, decreased NF-kappaB-dependent gene transcription of TNFalpha, and decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNFalpha production. Similar findings were obtained with neutrophils from cecal ligation/puncture (CLP)-induced septic rats. Such changes were reversed by antibody-induced in vivo blockade of C5a. In contrast, in vitro exposure of alveolar macrophages to C5a and LPS resulted in enhanced production of TNFalpha and no increase in IkappaBalpha. These data suggest that CLP-induced sepsis causes a C5a-dependent dysfunction of neutrophils, which is characterized by altered signaling associated with NF-kappaB activation.

  16. Spontaneous neutrophil activation in HTLV-1 infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline B. Guerreiro

    Full Text Available Human T cell lymphotropic Virus type-1 (HTLV-1 induces lymphocyte activation and proliferation, but little is known about the innate immune response due to HTLV-1 infection. We evaluated the percentage of neutrophils that metabolize Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT to formazan in HTLV-1 infected subjects and the association between neutrophil activation and IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha levels. Blood was collected from 35 HTLV-1 carriers, from 8 patients with HAM/TSP (HTLV-1- associated myelopathy; 22 healthy individuals were evaluated for spontaneous and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated neutrophil activity (reduction of NBT to formazan. The production of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha by unstimulated mononuclear cells was determined by ELISA. Spontaneous NBT levels, as well as spontaneous IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha production, were significantly higher (p<0.001 in HTLV-1 infected subjects than in healthy individuals. A trend towards a positive correlation was noted, with increasing percentage of NBT positive neutrophils and levels of IFN-gamma. The high IFN-gamma producing HTLV-1 patient group had significantly greater NBT than healthy controls, 43±24% and 17±4.8% respectively (p< 0.001, while no significant difference was observed between healthy controls and the low IFN-gamma-producing HTLV-1 patient group (30±20%. Spontaneous neutrophil activation is another marker of immune perturbation resulting from HTLV-1 infection. In vivo activation of neutrophils observed in HTLV-1 infected subjects is likely to be the same process that causes spontaneous IFN-gamma production, or it may partially result from direct IFN-gamma stimulation.

  17. A Neutrophil Phenotype Model for Extracorporeal Treatment of Sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Malkin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play a central role in eliminating bacterial pathogens, but may also contribute to end-organ damage in sepsis. Interleukin-8 (IL-8, a key modulator of neutrophil function, signals through neutrophil specific surface receptors CXCR-1 and CXCR-2. In this study a mechanistic computational model was used to evaluate and deploy an extracorporeal sepsis treatment which modulates CXCR-1/2 levels. First, a simplified mechanistic computational model of IL-8 mediated activation of CXCR-1/2 receptors was developed, containing 16 ODEs and 43 parameters. Receptor level dynamics and systemic parameters were coupled with multiple neutrophil phenotypes to generate dynamic populations of activated neutrophils which reduce pathogen load, and/or primed neutrophils which cause adverse tissue damage when misdirected. The mathematical model was calibrated using experimental data from baboons administered a two-hour infusion of E coli and followed for a maximum of 28 days. Ensembles of parameters were generated using a Bayesian parallel tempering approach to produce model fits that could recreate experimental outcomes. Stepwise logistic regression identified seven model parameters as key determinants of mortality. Sensitivity analysis showed that parameters controlling the level of killer cell neutrophils affected the overall systemic damage of individuals. To evaluate rescue strategies and provide probabilistic predictions of their impact on mortality, time of onset, duration, and capture efficacy of an extracorporeal device that modulated neutrophil phenotype were explored. Our findings suggest that interventions aiming to modulate phenotypic composition are time sensitive. When introduced between 3-6 hours of infection for a 72 hour duration, the survivor population increased from 31% to 40-80%. Treatment efficacy quickly diminishes if not introduced within 15 hours of infection. Significant harm is possible with treatment durations ranging from 5

  18. Fermentation of irradiated sugarcane must

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcarde, Andre Ricardo; Horii, Jorge [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao]. E-mail: aralcard@esalq.usp.br; Walder, Julio Marcos Melges [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia

    2003-12-01

    Bacillus and Lactobacillus are bacteria that usually contaminate the ethanolic fermentation by yeasts and my influence yeast viability. As microorganisms can be killed by ionizing radiation, the efficacy of gamma radiation in reducing the population of certain contaminating bacteria from sugarcane must was examined and, as a consequence, the beneficial effect of lethal doses of radiation on some parameters of yeast-based ethanolic fermentation was verified. Must from sugarcane juice was inoculated with bacteria of the general Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The contaminated must was irradiated with 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kGy of gamma radiation. After ethanolic fermentation by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) the total and volatile acidity produced during the process were evaluated: yeast viability and ethanol yield were also recorded. Treatments of gamma radiation reduced the population of the contaminating bacteria in the sugarcane must. The acidity produced during the fermentation decreased as the dose rate of radiation increased. Conversely, the yeast viability increased as the dose rate of radiation increased. Gamma irradiation was an efficient treatment to decontaminate the must and improved its parameters related to ethanolic fermentation, including ethanol yield, which increased 1.9%. (author)

  19. A case of refractory chronic neutrophilic pustular folliculitis treated with adalimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Freja Laerke; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophilic folliculitis is an often overlooked chronic condition characterized by a monomorphic eruption of "sterile" papulopustules. Neutrophilic folliculitis is often refractory to conventional treatment with topical and systemic antibiotics or isotretinoin. We report a case of severe pustular...

  20. The emerging role of neutrophils in thrombosis – The journey of TF through NETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eKambas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of TF by neutrophils and their contribution in thrombosis was until recently a matter of scientific debate. Experimental data suggested the de novo TF production by neutrophils under inflammatory stimuli, while others proposed that these cells acquired microparticle-derived TF. Recent experimental evidence revealed the critical role of neutrophils in thrombotic events. Neutrophil derived TF has been implicated in this process in several human and animal models. Additionally, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET release has emerged as a major contributor in neutrophil-driven thrombogenicity in disease models including sepsis, deep venous thrombosis and malignancy. It is suggested that NETs provide the scaffold for fibrin deposition and platelet entrapment and subsequent activation. The recently reported autophagy-dependent extracellular delivery of TF in NETs further supports the involvement of neutrophils in thrombosis. Herein, we seek to review novel data regarding the role of neutrophils in thrombosis, emphasizing the implication of TF and NETs.

  1. Functional characterization of mitochondria in neutrophils: a role restricted to apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maianski, N. A.; Geissler, J.; Srinivasula, S. M.; Alnemri, E. S.; Roos, D.; Kuijpers, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondria are known to combine life-supporting functions with participation in apoptosis by controlling caspase activity. Here, we report that in human blood neutrophils the mitochondria are different, because they preserve mainly death-mediating abilities. Neutrophil mitochondria hardly

  2. Increased neutrophil priming and sensitization before commencing cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgical patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; Schoen, P; Tigchelaar, [No Value; Loef, BG; Ebels, T; Rankin, AJ; van Oeveren, W

    2002-01-01

    Background. Neutrophil activation is implicated in postoperative complications in patients having cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study was designed to determine the temporal fluctuations in the primability of neutrophils in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative

  3. Analyzing Neutrophil Morphology, Mechanics, and Motility in Sepsis : Options and Challenges for Novel Bedside Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld, Rens; Molema, Grietje; Plötz, Frans B

    Objective: Alterations in neutrophil morphology (size, shape, and composition), mechanics (deformability), and motility (chemotaxis and migration) have been observed during sepsis. We combine summarizing features of neutrophil morphology, mechanics, and motility that change during sepsis with an

  4. CXCR2 mediates NADPH oxidase-independent neutrophil extracellular trap formation in cystic fibrosis airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcos, Veronica; Zhou, Zhe; Yildirim, Ali Onder; Bohla, Alexander; Hector, Andreas; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Wiedenbauer, Eva-Maria; Krautgartner, Wolf Dietrich; Stoiber, Walter; Belohradsky, Bernd H.; Rieber, Nikolaus; Kormann, Michael; Koller, Barbara; Roscher, Adelbert; Roos, Dirk; Griese, Matthias; Eickelberg, Oliver; Döring, Gerd; Mall, Marcus A.; Hartl, Dominik

    2010-01-01

    Upon activation, neutrophils release DNA fibers decorated with antimicrobial proteins, forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Although NETs are bactericidal and contribute to innate host defense, excessive NET formation has been linked to the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory diseases.

  5. Treatment of biomass to obtain fermentable sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Tucker, Melvin [Lakewood, CO; Elander, Richard [Evergreen, CO; Hennessey, Susan M [Avondale, PA

    2011-04-26

    Biomass is pretreated using a low concentration of aqueous ammonia at high biomass concentration. Pretreated biomass is further hydrolyzed with a saccharification enzyme consortium. Fermentable sugars released by saccharification may be utilized for the production of target chemicals by fermentation.

  6. Experiments with Fungi Part 2: Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Michele; Hetherington, Shane

    1996-01-01

    Gives details of three experiments with alcoholic fermentation by yeasts which yield carbon dioxide and ethanol. Lists procedures for making cider, vinegar, and fermentation gases. Provides some historical background and detailed equipment requirements. (DDR)

  7. Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

    People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

  8. Evidence for activation of a respiratory burst in the interaction of human neutrophils with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    OpenAIRE

    May, M E; Spagnuolo, P J

    1987-01-01

    We examined the capacity of human neutrophils to develop a respiratory burst, as monitored by superoxide release, in response to interaction with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Serum-opsonized, heat-killed mycobacteria induced significant release of superoxide from neutrophils after 30 min of exposure, with a maximum release of 34 +/- 1.7 nmol/30 min per 5 X 10(6) neutrophils occurring with a mycobacterium/neutrophil ratio of 40:1. Similar levels of superoxide release were induced by live mycoba...

  9. PYRUVATE FERMENTATION BY STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEIBEL, R H; NIVEN, C F

    1964-07-01

    Deibel, R. H. (American Meat Institute Foundation, Chicago, Ill.), and C. F. Niven, Jr. Pyruvate fermentation by Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 88:4-10. 1964.-Streptococcus faecalis, as opposed to S. faecium, utilizes pyruvate as an energy source for growth. The fermentation is adaptive, as demonstrated by growth experiments in a casein-hydrolysate medium and the fermentation of pyruvate by cell suspensions. The principal products of pyruvate catabolism were acetoin, CO(2), and lactic, acetic, and formic acids, although carbon recoveries were low due to the formation of slime. End-product analyses suggested that both the phosphoroclastic and dismutation systems were active in pyruvate breakdown. Studies with cell-free extracts indicated a thiamine diphosphate requirement for active pyruvate catabolism. The involvement of lipoic acid in the phosphoroclastic system was investigated, and, although inconclusive results were obtained, no association of this cofactor with phosphoroclastic activity could be made.

  10. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Jin

    Full Text Available Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40, i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better

  11. The alteration in peripheral neutrophils of patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgenyevna Muravlyova Larissa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings have demonstrated the impaired functions of neutrophils of patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of our research was to study oxidative modified proteins, as well as the histone spectrum in neutrophils drawn from patients with chronic kidney disease, and to estimate the ability of neutrophils to form spontaneous neutrophil extracellular traps. In this work, we have assumed that metabolic alteration in neutrophils may develop at early stages of chronic kidney disease. Materials and methods: Neutrophils obtained from patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease and degrees of chronic renal failure were used. As control, blood samples obtained from 32 healthy individuals was employed. In the examined neutrophils, advanced oxidation protein products, protein reactive carbonyl derivatives, as well as nucleosomal histones were detected. The ability of neutrophils to form spontaneous neutrophil extracellular traps was estimated. Our results have demonstrated an increase of nucleosomal histones in neutrophils of all patients with chronic kidney disease. Moreover, our work fixes the rate of growth of intracellular advanced oxidation protein products and the decreasing of protein reactive carbonyl derivatives in neutrophils from patients with chronic kidney disease. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of the neutrophils with altered oxidative status and the decomposition of the histone spectrum in the circulation of patients with chronic kidney disease.

  12. Evidence for a self-enforcing inflammation in neutrophil-mediated chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    In summary, this thesis provides evidence for the self-sustaining role of neutrophils in the inflammatory state in the pathogenesis of COPD and CD. In active disease, neutrophils release proteolytic enzymes that breakdown collagen. One of the collagen fragments can be neutrophilic chemoattractant

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor delays neutrophil apoptosis by inhibition of calpains upstream of caspase-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raam, Bram J.; Drewniak, Agata; Groenewold, Vincent; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophils have a very short life span and undergo apoptosis within 24 hours after leaving the bone marrow. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is essential for the recruitment of fresh neutrophils from the bone marrow but also delays apoptosis of mature neutrophils. To determine the

  14. Neutrophil extracellular traps in the host defense against sepsis induced by Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Hanna K.; Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Achouiti, Ahmed; van der Meer, Anne J.; Bulder, Ingrid; Stephan, Femke; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Day, Nick P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.; Zeerleder, Sacha; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a central player in the host response to bacteria: neutrophils release extracellular DNA (nucleosomes) and neutrophil elastase to entrap and kill bacteria. We studied the role of NETs in Burkholderia pseudomallei infection (melioidosis), an important cause

  15. Two independent killing mechanisms of Candida albicans by human neutrophils: evidence from innate immunity defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, R.P.; Hamme, J.L. van; Tool, A.T.; Houdt, M. van; Verkuijlen, P.J.; Herbst, M.; Liese, J.G.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Roos, D.; Berg, T.K. van den; Kuijpers, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections, accompanied by high rates of mortality, represent an increasing problem in medicine. Neutrophils are the major effector immune cells in fungal killing. Based on studies with neutrophils from patients with defined genetic defects, we provide evidence that human neutrophils

  16. Thua nao: Thai fermented soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekachai Chukeatirote

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thua nao is a traditionally fermented food in Thailand. It is manufactured by fermenting cooked soybeans with naturally occurring microbes. There are also similar products including natto in Japan, kinema in India, and chongkukjang in Korea. In Thailand, thua nao is widely consumed, especially by people in the northern part. The product is generally regarded as a protein supplement and widely used as a condiment. Two major types of thua nao can be distinguished; fresh and dried forms. To date, scientific information on thua nao is scarce and thus this article aims to document the updated knowledge of Thai thua nao.

  17. PAT tools for fermentation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Bolic, Andrijana; Svanholm, Bent

    2012-01-01

    The publication of the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) guidance has been one of the most important milestones for pharmaceutical production during the past ten years. The ideas outlined in the PAT guidance are also applied in other industries, for example the fermentation industry. Process...... knowledge is central in PAT projects. This manuscript therefore gives a brief overview of a number of PAT tools for collecting process knowledge on fermentation processes: on-line sensors, mechanistic models and small-scale equipment for high-throughput experimentation. The manuscript ends with a short...

  18. PAT tools for fermentation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    The publication of the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) guidance has been one of the most important milestones for pharmaceutical production during the past ten years. The ideas outlined in the PAT guidance are also applied in other industries, for example the fermentation industry. Process...... knowledge is central in PAT projects. This presentation therefore gives a brief overview of a number of PAT tools for collecting process knowledge on fermentation processes: - On-line sensors, where for example spectroscopic measurements are increasingly applied - Mechanistic models, which can be used...

  19. Biotransformation of algal waste by biological fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To treat this garbage of algae, we employed a biological fermentation process using lactic acid bacteria (BL11) and yeast (THE 16). These were isolated and selected for their acidifying and fermentation qualities, respectively. The fermentation resulted in a decrease of pH from 7.4 to 3.75 and a reduction of the different ...

  20. Macroscopic modelling of solid-state fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogschagen, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state fermentation is different from the more well known process of liquid fermentation because no free flowing water is present. The technique is primarily used in Asia. Well-known products are the foods tempe, soy sauce and saké. In industrial solid-state fermentation, the substrate usually

  1. Fermentation of pretreated corncob hemicellulose hydrolysate to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate the effect of unknown fermentation inhibitors in corncob hemicellulose acid hydrolysate processed by pretreatment and detoxification on fermentation, corncob hemicellulose acid hydrolysate and artificially prepared hydrolysate were fermented in parallel by Candida shehatae YHFK-2. The results show that ...

  2. Phytosynthesized iron nanoparticles: effects on fermentative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of FeSO4 and FeNPs on batch fermentative H2 production from glucose was investigated. The fermentation exper- iments reveal that the ... control (no supplementation) and FeSO4 containing media. The maximum H2 yield of 1.9 mol ... tion, dark fermentative process has been recognized as the most suitable because of its ...

  3. Traditional fermented foods and beverages of Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Misihairabgwi

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Fermented foods and beverages play a major role in the diet, socioeconomic, and cultural activities of the Namibian population. Most are spontaneously fermented. Research is scarce and should be conducted on the microbiology, biochemistry, nutritional value, and safety of the fermented foods and beverages to ensure the health of the population.

  4. Comparison of biochemical changes during alcoholic fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whatever the type of fermentation, yields of ethanol was highest at 30°C. Fermentation conducted with controlled yeast gave a better yield of ethanol with 8.4 % than spontaneous fermentation that yielded only 4.3 %. There were significant differences (p<0.05) between both alcohol productivity and yield at spontaneous and ...

  5. Fermentation du citron par inoculation microbienne | Bousmaha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work attempts to replace the traditional process known in Morocco by a controlled process allowing the fermentation and the preservation of lemon. We isolated and selected lactic bacteria and yeasts with big acidifying capacity and with high fermentative potential able to preserve and to ferment in a natural way ...

  6. Homogenization of Cocoa Beans Fermentation to Upgrade Quality Using an Original Improved Fermenter

    OpenAIRE

    Aka S. Koffi; N'Goran Yao; Philippe Bastide; Denis Bruneau; Diby Kadjo

    2017-01-01

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cocoa L.) are the main components for chocolate manufacturing. The beans must be correctly fermented at first. Traditional process to perform the first fermentation (lactic fermentation) often consists in confining cacao beans using banana leaves or a fermentation basket, both of them leading to a poor product thermal insulation and to an inability to mix the product. Box fermenter reduces this loss by using a wood with large thickness (e>3cm), but mixing to homogenize ...

  7. Olfactomedin 4 defines a subset of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Bohr, Christina T; Rørvig, Sara

    2012-01-01

    OLFM4 was identified initially as a gene highly induced in myeloid stem cells by G-CSF treatment. A bioinformatics method using a global meta-analysis of microarray data predicted that OLFM4 would be associated with specific granules in human neutrophils. Subcellular fractionation of peripheral b...

  8. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Drive Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, E.; Rother, N; Garsen, M.; Hofstra, J.M.; Satchell, S.C.; Hoffmann, M.; Loeven, M.A.; Knaapen, H.K.A.; Heijden, O.W.H. van der; Berden, J.H.M.; Hilbrands, L.B.; Vlag, J. van der

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: An excessive release and impaired degradation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) leads to the continuous exposure of NETs to the endothelium in a variety of hematologic and autoimmune disorders, including lupus nephritis. This study aims to unravel the mechanisms through which NETs

  9. Platelet indices and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in adults with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A study was performed in adults with acute appendicitis and matched controls to assess the utility of the platelet indices and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a diagnostic adjunct. Methods: Data were retrospectively collected from a complete blood count test of 155 adult patients (72 men and 83 women) with ...

  10. Circulating neutrophil transcriptome may reveal intracranial aneurysm signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent M Tutino

    Full Text Available Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (IAs are typically asymptomatic and undetected except for incidental discovery on imaging. Blood-based diagnostic biomarkers could lead to improvements in IA management. This exploratory study examined circulating neutrophils to determine whether they carry RNA expression signatures of IAs.Blood samples were collected from patients receiving cerebral angiography. Eleven samples were collected from patients with IAs and 11 from patients without IAs as controls. Samples from the two groups were paired based on demographics and comorbidities. RNA was extracted from isolated neutrophils and subjected to next-generation RNA sequencing to obtain differential expressions for identification of an IA-associated signature. Bioinformatics analyses, including gene set enrichment analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, were used to investigate the biological function of all differentially expressed transcripts.Transcriptome profiling identified 258 differentially expressed transcripts in patients with and without IAs. Expression differences were consistent with peripheral neutrophil activation. An IA-associated RNA expression signature was identified in 82 transcripts (p<0.05, fold-change ≥2. This signature was able to separate patients with and without IAs on hierarchical clustering. Furthermore, in an independent, unpaired, replication cohort of patients with IAs (n = 5 and controls (n = 5, the 82 transcripts separated 9 of 10 patients into their respective groups.Preliminary findings show that RNA expression from circulating neutrophils carries an IA-associated signature. These findings highlight a potential to use predictive biomarkers from peripheral blood samples to identify patients with IAs.

  11. On the Pharmacology of Oxidative Burst of Human Neutrophils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nosáľ, R.; Drábiková, K.; Jančinová, V.; Mačičková, T.; Pečivová, J.; Perečko, T.; Harmatha, Juraj; Šmidrkal, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, Suppl 4 (2015), S445-S452 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : human neutrophils * oxidative burst * chemiluminescence * protein kinase C * apoptosis Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/64/64_S445.pdf

  12. Pharmacological intervention with oxidative burst in human neutrophils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nosál, R.; Drábiková, K.; Jančinová, V.; Mačičková, T.; Pečivová, J.; Perečko, T.; Harmatha, Juraj

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2017), s. 56-60 ISSN 1337-6853 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : human neutrophils * oxidative burst * tharapeutical drugs * natural antioxidants Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry OBOR OECD: Pharmacology and pharmacy https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpdf/j/intox.2017.10.issue-2/intox-2017-0009/intox-2017-0009.pdf

  13. Activity of neutrophil elastase reflects the progression of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novovic, Srdan; Andersen, Anders M; Nord, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Neutrophil elastase (NE) concentration is associated with progression of acute pancreatitis (AP), but measuring total NE concentration includes biologically inactive NE. This study aims to investigate the relationship between NE activity and the aetiology and severity of AP...... was associated with predicted severity of AP and AP-associated respiratory failure. Specific NE inhibitors may have therapeutic potential in acute pancreatitis....

  14. Modulation of neutrophil oxidative burst via histamine receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Číž, Milan; Lojek, Antonín

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 1 (2013), s. 17-22 ISSN 0007-1188 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11010 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : neutrophil * oxidative burst * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.990, year: 2013

  15. Semi-Automatic Rating Method for Neutrophil Alkaline Phosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Kanae; Hashi, Kotomi; Goto, Misaki; Nishi, Kiyotaka; Maeda, Rie; Kono, Keigo; Yamamoto, Mai; Okada, Kazunori; Kaga, Sanae; Miwa, Keiko; Mikami, Taisei; Masauzi, Nobuo

    2017-01-01

    The neutrophil alkaline phosphatase (NAP) score is a valuable test for the diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms, but it has still manually rated. Therefore, we developed a semi-automatic rating method using Photoshop ® and Image-J, called NAP-PS-IJ. Neutrophil alkaline phosphatase staining was conducted with Tomonaga's method to films of peripheral blood taken from three healthy volunteers. At least 30 neutrophils with NAP scores from 0 to 5+ were observed and taken their images. From which the outer part of neutrophil was removed away with Image-J. These were binarized with two different procedures (P1 and P2) using Photoshop ® . NAP-positive area (NAP-PA) and granule (NAP-PGC) were measured and counted with Image-J. The NAP-PA in images binarized with P1 significantly (P < 0.05) differed between images with NAP scores from 0 to 3+ (group 1) and those from 4+ to 5+ (group 2). The original images in group 1 were binarized with P2. NAP-PGC of them significantly (P < 0.05) differed among all four NAP score groups. The mean NAP-PGC with NAP-PS-IJ indicated a good correlation (r = 0.92, P < 0.001) to results by human examiners. The sensitivity and specificity of NAP-PS-IJ were 60% and 92%, which might be considered as a prototypic method for the full-automatic rating NAP score. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Characterization of neutrophil adhesion to different titanium surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Topographic roughness was demonstrated as higher for SLA treated surfaces, measured by atomic force microscopy and elemental analysis was performed by energy dispersive X-ray, showing a similar composition for both surfaces. The adhesion of neutrophils to the `rough' Ti surface was initially stronger than adhesion ...

  17. (neutrophil) Activity, Chronic Gastritis, Gastric Atrophy And Intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidental (early gastric) cancer was found in 3%, dysplasia in 2% and reactive gastropathy in 7% of the cases. A statistically significant relationship was found between Helicobacter pylori colonization intensity and the degrees of neutrophil activity, chronic inflammation and intestinal metaplasia. Conclusion: We concluded ...

  18. Flavonoids inhibit the respiratory burst of neutrophils in mammals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Číž, Milan; Denev, P.; Kratchanova, M.; Vašíček, Ondřej; Ambrožová, Gabriela; Lojek, Antonín

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), ID 181295 ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/08/1753 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : flavonoids * neutrophils * respiratory burst Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2012

  19. Enhancement by platelets of oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, K.K.; Powell, J.; Johnson, K.J.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    When human blood neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes (consisting of IgG antibody) in the presence of platelets, there was a 2 to 10 fold enhancement in the generation of O- 2 and H 2 O 2 . This enhancement phenomenon was proportional to the dose of immune complex added and the number of platelets present. The response was not agonist specific since similar enhancement also occurred with the following agonists: phorbol myristate acetate, opsonized zymosan particles and the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-met-leu-phe. The platelet related phenomenon of enhanced O- 2 generation could not be reproduced by the addition of serotonin, histamine or platelet-derived growth factor and was not affected by prior treatment of platelets with cyclooxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin, piroxicam) or lipoxygenase inhibitors (nafazatrom, BW755C or nordihydroguaiaretic acid). However, activation of platelets by thrombin caused release into the platelet supernatant fluid of a factor that, only in the presence of immune complexes, caused enhanced O- 2 responses to neutrophils. These data indicate that platelets potentiate oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils and suggest a mechanisms by which platelets may participate in tissue injury which is mediated by oxygen radical products from activated neutrophils

  20. Enhancement by platelets of oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, K.K.; Powell, J.; Johnson, K.J.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    When human blood neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes (consisting of IgG antibody) in the presence of platelets, there was a 2 to 10 fold enhancement in the generation of O-/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. This enhancement phenomenon was proportional to the dose of immune complex added and the number of platelets present. The response was not agonist specific since similar enhancement also occurred with the following agonists: phorbol myristate acetate, opsonized zymosan particles and the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-met-leu-phe. The platelet related phenomenon of enhanced O-/sub 2/ generation could not be reproduced by the addition of serotonin, histamine or platelet-derived growth factor and was not affected by prior treatment of platelets with cyclooxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin, piroxicam) or lipoxygenase inhibitors (nafazatrom, BW755C or nordihydroguaiaretic acid). However, activation of platelets by thrombin caused release into the platelet supernatant fluid of a factor that, only in the presence of immune complexes, caused enhanced O-/sub 2/ responses to neutrophils. These data indicate that platelets potentiate oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils and suggest a mechanisms by which platelets may participate in tissue injury which is mediated by oxygen radical products from activated neutrophils.

  1. Yersinia pestis targets neutrophils via complement receptor 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Peter M.; Nero, Thomas; Bohman, Lesley; Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S.; Marketon, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia species display a tropism for lymphoid tissues during infection, and the bacteria select innate immune cells for delivery of cytotoxic effectors by the type III secretion system. Yet the mechanism for target cell selection remains a mystery. Here we investigate the interaction of Yersinia pestis with murine splenocytes to identify factors that participate in the targeting process. We find that interactions with primary immune cells rely on multiple factors. First, the bacterial adhesin Ail is required for efficient targeting of neutrophils in vivo. However, Ail does not appear to directly mediate binding to a specific cell type. Instead, we find that host serum factors direct Y. pestis to specific innate immune cells, particularly neutrophils. Importantly, specificity towards neutrophils was increased in the absence of bacterial adhesins due to reduced targeting of other cell types, but this phenotype was only visible in the presence of mouse serum. Addition of antibodies against complement receptor 3 and CD14 blocked target cell selection, suggesting that a combination of host factors participate in steering bacteria toward neutrophils during plague infection. PMID:25359083

  2. Granulocytic spongiotic papulovesiculosis (neutrophilic spongiosis: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhu Mendiratta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophilic spongiosis also known as granulocytic spongiotic papulovesiculosis (GSPV is an uncommon disorder of uncertain classification. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman suffering from recurrent episodes of itchy, grouped papulovesicles over her body, histologically showing granulocytic spongiosis. The eruptions showed complete response to dapsone.

  3. Neutrophil CD64 in early-onset neonatal sepsis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    new generation of tests to detect early systemic infections measures the up ... culture. Results: Neutrophil CD64 expression was increased significantly in neonates with neonatal sepsis than controls (p=0.001). Cases with history of premature rupture of ..... Khader Y, Amarin Z, Daoud A. Diagnostic markers for neonatal ...

  4. Neutrophil elastase and neurovascular injury following focal stroke and reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stowe, A.M.; Adair-Kirk, T.L.; Gonzales, E.R.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Shah, A.M.; Park, T.S.; Gidday, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) degrades basal lamina and extracellular matrix molecules, and recruits leukocytes during inflammation; however, a basic understanding of the role of NE in stroke pathology is lacking. We measured an increased number of extravascular NE-positive cells, as well as increased

  5. Polyphenol derivatives inhibit human neutrophil activity by suppressing oxidative burst

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drábiková, K.; Perečko, T.; Nosáľ, R.; Harmatha, Juraj; Šmidrkal, J.; Jančinová, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, Suppl.1 (2012), s. 31-31 ISSN 1337-6853. [Interdisciplinary Toxicological Conference & Advanced Toxicological Course /17./. 27.08.2012-31.08.2012, Stará Lesná] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : polyphenol derivatives * neutrophil activity * pinosylvin Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  6. Changes in neutrophil count, creatine kinases and muscle soreness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. A primary objective was to examine circulating neutrophil count after repeated bouts of downhill running. An additional aim was to determine creatine kinase (CK) levels during the initial 12 hours, after repeated DHRs. Design. Eleven healthy, untrained Caucasian males performed 2 x 60 min bouts of DHR ...

  7. On the pharmacology of oxidative burst of neutrophils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nosáľ, R.; Drábiková, K.; Harmatha, Juraj; Jančinová, V.; Mačičková, T.; Pečivová, J.; Perečko, T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2011), A51-A51 ISSN 1337-6853. [TOXCON 2011. Interdisciplinary Toxicology Conference /16./. 17.05.2011-20.05.2011, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : N-feruloyl- serotonin * oxidative burst * inhibition of neutrophil activation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  8. Use of absolute lymphocyte count or neutrophil ingestion rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to evaluate absolute lymphocyte count or neutrophil ingestion rate of NBT as alternative indices to CD4+ T cell count in the management of HIV/AIDS subjects. 158 adult participants (male = 70, female = 88) were recruited for the study and grouped as: (i) Symptomatic HIV subjects with or ...

  9. DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neutrophils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the apoptotic process in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) in dairy cattle during the transition period. Blood samples were collected from 4 dairy cattle at 3 weeks before the expected parturition (wk -3), parturition (wk 0) ...

  10. Nucleases from Prevotella intermedia can degrade neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doke, M; Fukamachi, H; Morisaki, H; Arimoto, T; Kataoka, H; Kuwata, H

    2017-08-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease caused by periodontal bacteria in subgingival plaque. These bacteria are able to colonize the periodontal region by evading the host immune response. Neutrophils, the host's first line of defense against infection, use various strategies to kill invading pathogens, including neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are extracellular net-like fibers comprising DNA and antimicrobial components such as histones, LL-37, defensins, myeloperoxidase, and neutrophil elastase from neutrophils that disarm and kill bacteria extracellularly. Bacterial nuclease degrades the NETs to escape NET killing. It has now been shown that extracellular nucleases enable bacteria to evade this host antimicrobial mechanism, leading to increased pathogenicity. Here, we compared the DNA degradation activity of major Gram-negative periodontopathogenic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We found that Pr. intermedia showed the highest DNA degradation activity. A genome search of Pr. intermedia revealed the presence of two genes, nucA and nucD, putatively encoding secreted nucleases, although their enzymatic and biological activities are unknown. We cloned nucA- and nucD-encoding nucleases from Pr. intermedia ATCC 25611 and characterized their gene products. Recombinant NucA and NucD digested DNA and RNA, which required both Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ for optimal activity. In addition, NucA and NucD were able to degrade the DNA matrix comprising NETs. © 2016 The Authors Molecular Oral Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Neutrophil superoxide-anion generating capacity in chronic smoking ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigated whether long-term -tocopherol therapy in chronic smoking affects superoxide generating capacity of neutrophils ex vivo. To this purpose, we randomly assigned 128 male chronic smokers (37 ± 21 pack years of smoking) to treatment with placebo ( = 64) or -tocopherol (400 IU dL--tocopherol daily, ...

  12. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Daniel; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    A group of pauci-immune vasculitides, characterized by neutrophil-rich necrotizing inflammation of small vessels and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), is referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs against proteinase 3 (PR3) (PR3-ANCA) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) (MPO-ANCA) are found in over 90% of patients with active disease, and these ANCAs are implicated in the pathogenesis of AAV. Dying neutrophils surrounding the walls of small vessels are a histological hallmark of AAV. Traditionally, it has been assumed that these neutrophils die by necrosis, but neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been visualized at the sites of vasculitic lesions. AAV patients also possess elevated levels of NETs in the circulation. ANCAs are capable of inducing NETosis in neutrophils, and their potential to do so has been shown to be affinity dependent and to correlate with disease activity. Neutrophils from AAV patients are also more prone to release NETs spontaneously than neutrophils from healthy blood donors. NETs contain proinflammatory proteins and are thought to contribute to vessel inflammation directly by damaging endothelial cells and by activating the complement system and indirectly by acting as a link between the innate and adaptive immune system through the generation of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. Injection of NET-loaded myeloid dendritic cells into mice results in circulating PR3- and MPO-ANCA and the development of AAV-like disease. NETs have also been shown to be essential in a rodent model of drug-induced vasculitis. NETs induced by propylthiouracil could not be degraded by DNaseI, implying that disordered NETs might be important for the generation of ANCAs. NET degradation was also highlighted in another study showing that AAV patients have reduced DNaseI activity resulting in less NET degradation. With this in mind, it might be that prolonged exposure to proteins in the NETs due to the overproduction of NETs and/or reduced

  13. Peritoneal neutrophil chemotaxis is impaired in biliary obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andy, O J; Grogan, J B; Griswold, J A; Scott-Conner, C E

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown impaired reticuloendothelial function in biliary obstruction. The chemotactic response of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from peripheral blood and peritoneal fluid of jaundiced rats (Group 1) was compared to that of sham operated controls (Group 2) and normal rats (Group 3). Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bile duct ligation or sham celiotomy. Studies were performed from 1 to 3 weeks after surgery. Mean serum bilirubin was 6.8 mg percent in Group 1 and normal in Groups 2 and 3. Peritoneal neutrophils were induced by intraperitoneal injection of 10 ml of 10 percent peptone broth 16 hours before the study, harvested from peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood, and isolated on Ficoll-Hypaque. F-met-leu-phe (FMLP) chemoattractant (10(-7) M) was used to induce migration of neutrophils across 3 mu filters. The filters were removed, mounted on slides, stained, and counts averaged for five oil immersion fields for each of three wells. Data were expressed as number of neutrophils per oil immersion field. Peritoneal neutrophil chemotaxis was significantly decreased in Group 1 (10.3 +/- 8.1) compared with Groups 2 (17.0 +/- 7.3) and 3 (20.2 +/- 6.4). A similar trend was noted in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from peripheral blood (Group 1: 13.1 +/- 7.8, Group 2: 18.2 +/- 6.7, Group 3: 17.4 +/- 5.9; P = 0.1). This impairment in neutrophil chemotaxis may contribute to the high rate of septic complications observed in the jaundiced host.

  14. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Mariano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS, Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS. qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  15. Neutrophils are not less sensitive than other blood leukocytes to the genomic effects of glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Gaelle; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Beauchamp, Guy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are generally considered less responsive to glucocorticoids compared to other inflammatory cells. The reported increase in human neutrophil survival mediated by these drugs partly supports this assertion. However, it was recently shown that dexamethasone exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in equine peripheral blood neutrophils. Few comparative studies of glucocorticoid effects in neutrophils and other leukocytes have been reported and a relative insensitivity of neutrophils to these drugs could not be ruled out. We assessed glucocorticoid-responsiveness in equine and human peripheral blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes. Blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes were isolated from 6 healthy horses and 4 human healthy subjects. Cells were incubated for 5 h with or without LPS (100 ng/mL) alone or combined with hydrocortisone, prednisolone or dexamethasone (10(-8) M and 10(-6) M). IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, glutamine synthetase and GR-α mRNA expression was quantified by qPCR. Equine neutrophils were also incubated for 20 h with or without the three glucocorticoids and cell survival was assessed by flow cytometry and light microscopy on cytospin preparations. We found that glucocorticoids down-regulated LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mRNA expression in both cell populations and species. These drugs also significantly increased glutamine synthetase gene expression in both equine cell populations. The magnitude of glucocorticoid response between cell populations was generally similar in both species. We also showed that dexamethasone had a comparable inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory gene expression in both human and equine neutrophils. As reported in other species, glucocorticoids significantly increase the survival in equine neutrophils. Glucocorticoids exert genomic effects of similar magnitude on neutrophils and on other blood leukocytes. We speculate that the poor response to glucocorticoids observed in some chronic

  16. Korean traditional fermented soybean products: Jang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghwa Shin

    2015-03-01

    Fermented products are going beyond the boundaries of their use as mere side dishes, and are seeing significant increases in their use as a functional food. Kanjang (fermented soy sauce, Doenjang (fermented soybean paste, and Gochujang (fermented red pepper paste are the most well-known fermented products in Korea. These products occupy an important place in people's daily lives as seasonings and are used in many side dishes. It has been proven through clinical studies that these products have many health benefits, such as their ability to fight cancer and diabetes, and to prevent obesity and constipation.

  17. Anaerobic xylose fermentation by Spathaspora passalidarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru

    2012-01-01

    A cost-effective conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into bioethanol requires that the xylose released from the hemicellulose fraction (20–40% of biomass) can be fermented. Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, efficiently ferments glucose but it lacks the ability to ferment xylose. Xylose-fermenting...... yeast such as Pichia stipitis requires accurately controlled microaerophilic conditions during the xylose fermentation, rendering the process technically difficult and expensive. In this study, it is demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions Spathaspora passalidarum showed high ethanol production...

  18. Mystery behind Chinese liquor fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Guangyuan; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Background Chinese liquor, a very popular fermented alcoholic beverage with thousands of years’ history in China, though its flavour formation and microbial process have only been partly explored, is facing the industrial challenge of modernisation and standardisation for food quality and safety as

  19. ENDOSPORES OF THERMOPHILIC FERMENTATIVE BACTERIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volpi, Marta

    2016-01-01

    solely based on endospores of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which presumably constitute only a small fraction of the total thermophilic endospore community reaching cold environments. My PhD project developed an experimental framework for using thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) to trace...

  20. Cleaning Validation of Fermentation Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Satu; Friis, Alan; Wirtanen, Gun

    2008-01-01

    Reliable test methods for checking cleanliness are needed to evaluate and validate the cleaning process of fermentation tanks. Pilot scale tanks were used to test the applicability of various methods for this purpose. The methods found to be suitable for validation of the clenlinees were visula o...

  1. Fumaric acid production by fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roa Engel, C.A.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Zijlmans, T.W.; Van Gulik, W.M.; Van der Wielen, L.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The potential of fumaric acid as a raw material in the polymer industry and the increment of cost of petroleum-based fumaric acid raises interest in fermentation processes for production of this compound from renewable resources. Although the chemical process yields 112% w/w fumaric acid

  2. Neutrophilic nodules in the intestinal walls of Japanese monkeys associated with the neutrophil chemotactic activity of larval extracts and secretions of Oesophagostomum aculeatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Y; Ishii, A; Owhashi, M; Miyoshi, M; Usui, M

    1985-01-01

    High neutrophil chemotactic activity was detected in the culture medium from Oesophagostomum aculeatum larvae in vitro using blind-well chambers with Millipore filters, and guinea pig leucocytes as indicator cells. Neutrophil chemotactic activity was also detected in the extract from larval worms in a dose dependent fashion. This activity was detected in the low molecular weight fractions adjacent to a sodium chloride marker by gel filtration on Sephadex G200. These results were further confirmed with monkey neutrophils. The possible role of this activity in the formation of granulomatous lesions rich in neutrophils found in O aculeatum infections in the Japanese monkey is discussed.

  3. The Brewing Process: Optimizing the Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora Coldea

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Beer is a carbonated alcoholic beverage obtained by alcoholic fermentation of malt wort boiled with hops. Brown beer obtained at Beer Pilot Station of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca was the result of a recipe based on blond, caramel and black malt in different proportions, water, hops and yeast. This study aimed to monitorize the evolution of wort in primary and secondary alcoholic fermentation in order to optimize the process. Two wort batches were assambled in order to increase the brewing yeast fermentation performance. The primary fermentation was 14 days, followed by another 14 days of secondary fermentation (maturation. The must fermentation monitoring was done by the automatic FermentoStar analyzer. The whole fermentation process was monitorized (temperature, pH, alcohol concentration, apparent and total wort extract.

  4. Fermentation of hexoses to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Lena [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology]|[Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept of Chemical Reaction Engineering

    2000-06-01

    The Goals of the project has been: to increase the ethanol yield by reducing the by-product formation, primarily biomass and glycerol, and to prevent stuck fermentations, i.e. to maintain a high ethanol production rate simultaneously with a high ethanol yield. The studies have been performed both in defined laboratory media and in a mixture of wood- and wheat hydrolysates. The yeast strains used have been both industrial strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and haploid laboratory strains. The Relevance of these studies with respect to production of ethanol to be used as fuel is explained by: With the traditional process design used today, it is very difficult to reach a yield of more than 90 % of the theoretical maximal value of ethanol based on fermented hexose. During 'normal' growth and fermentation conditions in either anaerobic batch or chemostat cultures, substrate is lost as biomass and glycerol in the range of 8 to 11 % and 6 to 11 % of the substrate consumed (kg/kg). It is essential to reduce these by-products. Traditional processes are mostly batch processes, in which there is a risk that the biocatalyst, i.e. the yeast, may become inactivated. If for example yeast biomass production is avoided by use of non-growing systems, the ethanol production rate is instantaneously reduced by at least 50%. Unfortunately, even if yeast biomass production is not avoided on purpose, it is well known that stuck fermentations caused by cell death is a problem in large scale yeast processes. The main reason for stuck fermentations is nutrient imbalances. For a good process economy, it is necessary to ensure process accessibility, i.e. to maintain a high and reproducible production rate. This will both considerably reduce the necessary total volume of the fermentors (and thereby the investment costs), and moreover minimize undesirable product fall-out.

  5. Neutrophil recruitment to lymph nodes limits local humoral response to Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Kamenyeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils form the first line of host defense against bacterial pathogens. They are rapidly mobilized to sites of infection where they help marshal host defenses and remove bacteria by phagocytosis. While splenic neutrophils promote marginal zone B cell antibody production in response to administered T cell independent antigens, whether neutrophils shape humoral immunity in other lymphoid organs is controversial. Here we investigate the neutrophil influx following the local injection of Staphylococcus aureus adjacent to the inguinal lymph node and determine neutrophil impact on the lymph node humoral response. Using intravital microscopy we show that local immunization or infection recruits neutrophils from the blood to lymph nodes in waves. The second wave occurs temporally with neutrophils mobilized from the bone marrow. Within lymph nodes neutrophils infiltrate the medulla and interfollicular areas, but avoid crossing follicle borders. In vivo neutrophils form transient and long-lived interactions with B cells and plasma cells, and their depletion augments production of antigen-specific IgG and IgM in the lymph node. In vitro activated neutrophils establish synapse- and nanotube-like interactions with B cells and reduce B cell IgM production in a TGF-β1 dependent manner. Our data reveal that neutrophils mobilized from the bone marrow in response to a local bacterial challenge dampen the early humoral response in the lymph node.

  6. A novel bacterial transport mechanism of Acinetobacter baumannii via activated human neutrophils through interleukin-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoshida, Go; Tansho-Nagakawa, Shigeru; Kikuchi-Ueda, Takane; Nakano, Ryuichi; Hikosaka, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Ubagai, Tsuneyuki; Higashi, Shouichi; Ono, Yasuo

    2016-12-01

    Hospital-acquired infections as a result of Acinetobacter baumannii have become problematic because of high rates of drug resistance. Although neutrophils play a critical role in early protection against bacterial infection, their interactions with A. baumannii remain largely unknown. To elucidate the interactions between A. baumannii and human neutrophils, we cocultured these cells and analyzed them by microscopy and flow cytometry. We found that A. baumannii adhered to neutrophils. We next examined neutrophil and A. baumannii infiltration into Matrigel basement membranes by an in vitro transmigration assay. Neutrophils were activated by A. baumannii, and invasion was enhanced. More interestingly, A. baumannii was transported together by infiltrating neutrophils. Furthermore, we observed by live cell imaging that A. baumannii and neutrophils moved together. In addition, A. baumannii-activated neutrophils showed increased IL-8 production. The transport of A. baumannii was suppressed by inhibiting neutrophil infiltration by blocking the effect of IL-8. A. baumannii appears to use neutrophils for transport by activating these cells via IL-8. In this study, we revealed a novel bacterial transport mechanism that A. baumannii exploits human neutrophils by adhering to and inducing IL-8 release for bacterial portage. This mechanism might be a new treatment target. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  7. Factor XII and uPAR upregulate neutrophil functions to influence wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Evi X; Fang, Chao; Bane, Kara L; Long, Andy T; Naudin, Clément; Kucukal, Erdem; Gandhi, Agharnan; Brett-Morris, Adina; Mumaw, Michele M; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Merkulova, Alona; Reynolds, Cindy C; Alhalabi, Omar; Nayak, Lalitha; Yu, Wen-Mei; Qu, Cheng-Kui; Meyerson, Howard J; Dubyak, George R; Gurkan, Umut A; Nieman, Marvin T; Sen Gupta, Anirban; Renné, Thomas; Schmaier, Alvin H

    2018-01-29

    Coagulation factor XII (FXII) deficiency is associated with decreased neutrophil migration, but the mechanisms remain uncharacterized. Here, we examine how FXII contributes to the inflammatory response. In 2 models of sterile inflammation, FXII-deficient mice (F12-/-) had fewer neutrophils recruited than WT mice. We discovered that neutrophils produced a pool of FXII that is functionally distinct from hepatic-derived FXII and contributes to neutrophil trafficking at sites of inflammation. FXII signals in neutrophils through urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-mediated (uPAR-mediated) Akt2 phosphorylation at S474 (pAktS474). Downstream of pAkt2S474, FXII stimulation of neutrophils upregulated surface expression of αMβ2 integrin, increased intracellular calcium, and promoted extracellular DNA release. The sum of these activities contributed to neutrophil cell adhesion, migration, and release of neutrophil extracellular traps in a process called NETosis. Decreased neutrophil signaling in F12-/- mice resulted in less inflammation and faster wound healing. Targeting hepatic F12 with siRNA did not affect neutrophil migration, whereas WT BM transplanted into F12-/- hosts was sufficient to correct the neutrophil migration defect in F12-/- mice and restore wound inflammation. Importantly, these activities were a zymogen FXII function and independent of FXIIa and contact activation, highlighting that FXII has a sophisticated role in vivo that has not been previously appreciated.

  8. The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 modulates the inflammatory and host defense response of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alalwani, Sadek M; Sierigk, Johannes; Herr, Christian; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Gallo, Richard; Vogelmeier, Claus; Bals, Robert

    2010-04-01

    The human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide acts as an effector molecule of the innate immune system with direct antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects. The aim of this study was to test whether the cathelicidin LL-37 modulates the response of neutrophils to microbial stimulation. Human neutrophils were exposed to LPS, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa subsequent to incubation with LL-37 and cytokine release was measured by ELISA. The incubation with LL-37 significantly decreased the release of proinflammatory cytokines from stimulated human neutrophils. ROS production of neutrophils was determined by a luminometric and a flow cytometry method. The peptide induced the production of ROS and the engulfment of bacteria into neutrophils. Peritoneal mouse neutrophils isolated from CRAMP-deficient and WT animals were treated with LPS and TNF-alpha in the supernatant was measured by ELISA. Antimicrobial activity of neutrophils was detected by incubating neutrophils isolated from CRAMP-knockout and WT mice with bacteria. Neutrophils from CRAMP-deficient mice released significantly more TNF-alpha after bacterial stimulation and showed decreased antimicrobial activity as compared to cells from WT animals. In conclusion, LL-37 modulates the response of neutrophils to bacterial activation. Cathelicidin controls the release of inflammatory mediators while increasing antimicrobial activity of neutrophils.

  9. Commercialization of a novel fermentation concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar-Shaw, Kiran; Suryanarayan, Shrikumar

    2003-01-01

    Fermentation is the core of biotechnology where current methodologies span across technologies based on the use of either solid or liquid substrates. Traditionally, solid substrate fermentation technologies have been the widely practiced in the Far East to manufacture fermented foods such as soya sauce, sake etc. The Western World briefly used solid substrate fermentation for the manufacture of antibiotics and enzymes but rapidly replaced this technology with submerged fermentation which proved to be a superior technology in terms of automation, containment and large volume fermentation. Biocon India developed its enzyme technology based on solid substrate fermentation as a low-cost, low-energy option for the production of specialty enzymes. However, the limitations of applying solid substrate fermentation to more sophisticated biotechnology products as well as large volume fermentations were recognized by Biocon India as early as 1990 and the company embarked on a 8 year research and development program to develop a novel bioreactor capable of conducting solid substrate fermentation with comparable levels of automation and containment as those practiced by submerged fermentation. In addition, the novel technology enabled fed-batch fermentation, in situ extraction and other enabling features that will be discussed in this article. The novel bioreactor was christened the "PlaFractor" (pronounced play-fractor). The next level of research on this novel technology is now focused on addressing large volume fermentation. This article traces the evolution of Biocon India's original solid substrate fermentation to the PlaFractor technology and provides details of the scale-up and commercialization processes that were involved therein. What is also apparent in the article is Biocon India's commercially focused research programs and the perceived need to be globally competitive through low costs of innovation that address, at all times, processes and technologies that

  10. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I(e)) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I(e). In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 microM), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  11. Misoprostol Inhibits Equine Neutrophil Adhesion, Migration, and Respiratory Burst in an In Vitro Model of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Medlin Martin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In many equine inflammatory disease states, neutrophil activities, such as adhesion, migration, and reactive oxygen species (ROS production become dysregulated. Dysregulated neutrophil activation causes tissue damage in horses with asthma, colitis, laminitis, and gastric glandular disease. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs do not adequately inhibit neutrophil inflammatory functions and can lead to dangerous adverse effects. Therefore, novel therapies that target mechanisms of neutrophil-mediated tissue damage are needed. One potential neutrophil-targeting therapeutic is the PGE1 analog, misoprostol. Misoprostol is a gastroprotectant that induces intracellular formation of the secondary messenger molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP, which has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects on neutrophils. Misoprostol is currently used in horses to treat NSAID-induced gastrointestinal injury; however, its effects on equine neutrophils have not been determined. We hypothesized that treatment of equine neutrophils with misoprostol would inhibit equine neutrophil adhesion, migration, and ROS production, in vitro. We tested this hypothesis using isolated equine peripheral blood neutrophils collected from 12 healthy adult teaching/research horses of mixed breed and gender. The effect of misoprostol treatment on adhesion, migration, and respiratory burst of equine neutrophils was evaluated via fluorescence-based adhesion and chemotaxis assays, and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence, respectively. Neutrophils were pretreated with varying concentrations of misoprostol, vehicle, or appropriate functional inhibitory controls prior to stimulation with LTB4, CXCL8, PAF, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or immune complex (IC. This study revealed that misoprostol pretreatment significantly inhibited LTB4-induced adhesion, LTB4-, CXCL8-, and PAF-induced chemotaxis, and LPS-, IC-, and PMA-induced ROS production in a concentration-dependent manner. This data indicate that

  12. Autophagy Mediates Interleukin-1β Secretion in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Iula

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, a major pro-inflammatory cytokine, is a leaderless cytosolic protein whose secretion does not follow the classical endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi pathway, and for which a canonical mechanism of secretion remains to be established. Neutrophils are essential players against bacterial and fungi infections. These cells are rapidly and massively recruited from the circulation into infected tissues and, beyond of displaying an impressive arsenal of toxic weapons effective to kill pathogens, are also an important source of IL-1β in infectious conditions. Here, we analyzed if an unconventional secretory autophagy mechanism is involved in the exportation of IL-1β by these cells. Our findings indicated that inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine and Wortmannin markedly reduced IL-1β secretion induced by LPS + ATP, as did the disruption of the autophagic flux with Bafilomycin A1 and E64d. These compounds did not noticeable affect neutrophil viability ruling out that the effects on IL-1β secretion were due to cell death. Furthermore, VPS34IN-1, a specific autophagy inhibitor, was still able to reduce IL-1β secretion when added after it was synthesized. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ATG5 markedly reduced IL-1β secretion in neutrophil-differentiated PLB985 cells. Upon LPS + ATP stimulation, IL-1β was incorporated to an autophagic compartment, as was revealed by its colocalization with LC3B by confocal microscopy. Overlapping of IL-1β-LC3B in a vesicular compartment peaked before IL-1β increased in culture supernatants. On the other hand, stimulation of autophagy by cell starvation augmented the colocalization of IL-1β and LC3B and then promoted neutrophil IL-1β secretion. In addition, specific ELISAs indicated that although both IL-1β and pro-IL-1β are released to culture supernatants upon neutrophil stimulation, autophagy only promotes IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, the serine proteases inhibitor

  13. Thermotolerant fermenting yeasts for simultaneous saccharification fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairam Choudhary

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant renewable source of energy that has been widely explored as second-generation biofuel feedstock. Despite more than four decades of research, the process of ethanol production from lignocellulosic (LC biomass remains economically unfeasible. This is due to the high cost of enzymes, end-product inhibition of enzymes, and the need for cost-intensive inputs associated with a separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF process. Thermotolerant yeast strains that can undergo fermentation at temperatures above 40°C are suitable alternatives for developing the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process to overcome the limitations of SHF. This review describes the various approaches to screen and develop thermotolerant yeasts via genetic and metabolic engineering. The advantages and limitations of SSF at high temperatures are also discussed. A critical insight into the effect of high temperatures on yeast morphology and physiology is also included. This can improve our understanding of the development of thermotolerant yeast amenable to the SSF process to make LC ethanol production commercially viable.

  14. Suppression of neutrophil superoxide production by conventional peritoneal dialysis solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, B L; Gupta, D K; Nawab, Z M; Zhou, F Q; Rahman, M A; Daugirdas, J T

    1988-09-01

    The pH of conventional peritoneal dialysis solution is normally in the range of 5.0 to 5.5, because acid has been added during the manufacturing process to prevent caramelization of dextrose during sterilization. We studied the effects of normalizing the pH of conventional peritoneal dialysis solution on superoxide production by normal human neutrophils. At a pH of 6.0, superoxide generation was 4.07 +/- 2.56 (SD) nanomoles per million cells. With normalization of pH to 7.4, superoxide production was 19.3 +/- 7.3 (p less than 0.001). The results suggest that the unphysiologic acidity of conventional peritoneal dialysis solution has deleterious consequences on neutrophil superoxide formation.

  15. Neutrophil extracellular traps: double-edged swords of innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mariana J; Radic, Marko

    2012-09-15

    Spectacular images of neutrophils ejecting nuclear chromatin and bactericidal proteins, in response to microbes, were first reported in 2004. As externalized chromatin could entangle bacteria, these structures were named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Subsequent studies identified microorganisms and sterile conditions that stimulate NETs, as well as additional cell types that release extracellular chromatin. The release of NETs is the most dramatic stage in a cell death process called NETosis. Experimental evidence suggests that NETs participate in pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, with proposed involvement in glomerulonephritis, chronic lung disease, sepsis, and vascular disorders. Exaggerated NETosis or diminished NET clearance likely increases risk of autoreactivity to NET components. The biological significance of NETs is just beginning to be explored. A more complete integration of NETosis within immunology and pathophysiology will require better understanding of NET properties associated with specific disease states and microbial infections. This may lead to the identification of important therapeutic targets.

  16. Neutrophilic iron oxidizers adapted to highly oxic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    indicate that neutrophilic iron oxidizers in highly oxic environments like drinking water treatment systems can be abundant (5 E+04 to 7 E+05 cells per gram of wet sand material). It was furthermore observed that the diversity of the cultivated dominant iron oxidizers differs substantially from those......Rapid sand filtration is an economical way to treat anoxic groundwaters and involves aeration followed by particulate and soluble substrate removal via deep bed filtration. The anoxic source groundwater can contain several potential electron donors (CH4, Fe2+, Mn2+, NH4+ and assimilable organic...... carbon) while oxygen (O2) is the electron acceptor provided during the aeration process. Numerous previous studies have described neutrophilic iron oxidizers as a bacterial guild with a special niche preference, especially the transition zone between aerobic and anoxic regions, where abiotic chemical...

  17. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Zilio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer.

  18. Neutrophil Function in 8 Cases of Papillon-Lefevre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Lotfazar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Papillon Lefevre syndrome (PLS is a rate autosomal recessive disorder, which is characterized by palmar- plantar hyperkeratosis and rapid periodontal destruction of primary and permanent dentitions.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the peripheral blood neutrophil function including random locomotion, chemotaxis and oxidative mechanism of killing in a group of patients with PLS.Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from 8 PLS patients and 92 healthy control subjects. PMN mobility was measured by a modification of the micromethod of Addison and Babbage. Latex-Stimulated NBT reduction test described by Park et al was followed. Data were analyzed by Mann Whitney U test.Results: The chemotactic activity in the PLS group was significantly lower than control group (89.5±21.6 vs 113±16 mm, P0.05.Conclusion: The present study indicated an impaired neutrophil chemotaxis in PLS patients.

  19. Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, N.; Bergin, D.; Reeves, E.P.; McElvaney, N.G.; Kavanagh, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients with rosacea demonstrate a higher density of Demodex mites in their skin than do controls. A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR or ocular rosacea, thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the aetiology of this condition. Objectives To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated...

  20. The Effects of Exercise on Judoists’ Circulating Blood Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    A Zar

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Type, intensity and duration of exercises exert pivotal effects on athletes’ immune system and probably athletes’ susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. In this study we examined the effects of one session of moderate-intensity exercise on male judoists’ circulating blood neutrophil counts (BNC) and respiratory burst, and self-reported upper respiratory clinical infections 24 hours ...

  1. The Effects of Exercise on Judoists’ Circulating Blood Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Zar A.; Karimi F.; Hovanloo F.; Ansian A.; Piraki P.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Type, intensity and duration of exercises exert pivotal effects on athletes’ immune system and probably athletes’ susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. In this study we examined the effects of one session of moderate-intensity exercise on male judoists’ circulating blood neutrophil counts (BNC) and respiratory burst, and self-reported upper respiratory clinical infections 24 hours after the exercise and during the sport seasons.Methods: Ten male judo...

  2. Sex differences in prostaglandin biosynthesis in neutrophils during acute inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Simona; Rossi, Antonietta; Krauth, Verena; Dehm, Friederike; Troisi, Fabiana; Bilancia, Rossella; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Werz, Oliver; Sautebin, Lidia

    2017-01-01

    The severity and course of inflammatory processes differ between women and men, but the biochemical mechanisms underlying these sex differences are elusive. Prostaglandins (PG) and leukotrienes (LT) are lipid mediators linked to inflammation. We demonstrated superior LT biosynthesis in human neutrophils and monocytes, and in mouse macrophages from females, and we confirmed these sex differences in vivo where female mice produced more LTs during zymosan-induced peritonitis versus males. Here, ...

  3. Adipocytes and Neutrophils Give a Helping Hand to Pancreatic Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-08-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation can build up a confined microenvironment in pancreatic adenocarcinoma that is associated with increased desmoplasia, neutrophil recruitment, reduced delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs, and immune evasion. Targeting molecular pathways empowering this circuit might represent a necessary measure to reach clinical efficacy for combination therapies in patients with excess body weight. Cancer Discov; 6(8); 821-3. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Incio et al., p. 852. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Neutrophil chemotaxis by Propionibacterium acnes lipase and its inhibition.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, W L; Shalita, A R; Suntharalingam, K; Fikrig, S M

    1982-01-01

    The chemoattraction of Propionibacterium acnes lipase for neutrophils and the effect of lipase inhibitor and two antibiotic agents on the chemotaxis were evaluated. Of the various fractions tested, partially purified lipase (fraction 2c) was the most active cytotaxin produced by P. acnes. Serum mediators were not required for the generation of chemotaxis by lipase in vitro. Diisopropyl phosphofluoridate at low concentration (10(-4) mM) completely inhibited lipase activity as well as polymorph...

  5. Probiotics in Dairy Fermented Products

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade Araújo, Emiliane; Dos Santos Pires , Ana Clarissa; Soares Pinto, Maximiliano; Jan, Gwenael; De Carvahlo, Antonio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the role of probiotics for human health began as early as 1908 when Metchnikoff associated the intake of fermented milk with prolonged life (Lourens-Hattingh and Vilijoen, 2001b). However, the relationship between intestinal microbiota and good health and nutrition has only recently been investigated. Therefore, it was not until the 1960’s that health benefit claims began appearing on foods labels. In recent years,there has been an increasing interest in probiotic foods, which...

  6. Marine sponges as microbial fermenters

    OpenAIRE

    Hentschel, Ute; Usher, Kayley M.; Taylor, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of phylogenetically complex, yet highly sponge-specific microbial communities in marine sponges, including novel lineages and even candidate phyla, came as a surprise. At the same time, unique research opportunities opened up, because the microorganisms of sponges are in many ways more accessible than those of seawater. Accordingly, we consider sponges as microbial fermenters that provide exciting new avenues in marine microbiology and biotechnology. This review covers recent fi...

  7. Distinct neutrophil subpopulations phenotype by flow cytometry in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikentiou, Myrofora; Psarra, Katerina; Kapsimali, Violetta; Liapis, Konstantinos; Michael, Michalis; Tsionos, Konstantinos; Lianidou, Evi; Papasteriades, Chryssa

    2009-03-01

    The cardinal feature of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is dysplasia involving one or more myeloid cell lineages. In the present study, we used 4-color flow cytometric analysis to investigate dysgranulopoiesis in bone marrow specimens from 65 patients with MDS. The antigen expression patterns of total neutrophil granulocytes (TNG) and of the two distinct neutrophil granulocytic subpopulations (NGSs), NGS-1 (dimmer CD45 expression) and NGS-2 (stronger CD45 expression) identified on the side scatter (SS) vs. CD45-intensity plot, were studied. The neutrophil granulocytes from patients with MDS showed characteristic antigen expression aberrancies which were more pronounced in NGS-2 subpopulation. Studying separately the NGS-2 subpopulation with the CD16/MPO/LF combination, the low CD16(+)/MPO(+) and low CD16(+)/LF(+) percentages seemed to discriminate between lower-risk and higher-risk patients with MDS in most occasions. Furthermore, a detailed assessment of the NGS-1 and NGS-2 immunophenotypic patterns revealed early dysplastic changes, not otherwise observed by standard TNG analysis, especially in cases of lower-risk MDS.

  8. Elevated Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio in Recurrent Optic Neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Guclu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To demonstrate the relation between optic neuritis (ON and systemic inflammation markers as neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio, platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV, and red cell distribution width (RDW and furthermore to evaluate the utilization of these markers to predict the frequency of the ON episodes. Methods. Forty-two patients with acute ON and forty healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. The medical records were reviewed for age, sex, hemoglobin (Hb, Haematocrit (Htc, RDW, platelet count, MPV, white blood cell count (WBC, neutrophil and lymphocyte count, and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio. Results. The mean N/L ratio, platelet counts, and RDW were significantly higher in ON group (p=0.000, p=0.048, and p=0.002. There was a significant relation between N/L ratio and number of episodes (r=0.492, p=0.001. There was a statistically significant difference for MPV between one episode group and recurrent ON group (p=0.035. Conclusions. Simple and inexpensive laboratory methods could help us show systemic inflammation and monitor ON patients. Higher N/L ratio can be a useful marker for predicting recurrent attacks.

  9. The paradox of the neutrophil's role in tissue injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel, George B; Halterman, Marc W; Lichtman, Marshall A

    2011-03-01

    The neutrophil is an essential component of the innate immune system, and its function is vital to human life. Its production increases in response to virtually all forms of inflammation, and subsequently, it can accumulate in blood and tissue to varying degrees. Although its participation in the inflammatory response is often salutary by nature of its normal interaction with vascular endothelium and its capability to enter tissues and respond to chemotactic gradients and to phagocytize and kill microrganisms, it can contribute to processes that impair vascular integrity and blood flow. The mechanisms that the neutrophil uses to kill microorganisms also have the potential to injure normal tissue under special circumstances. Its paradoxical role in the pathophysiology of disease is particularly, but not exclusively, notable in seven circumstances: 1) diabetic retinopathy, 2) sickle cell disease, 3) TRALI, 4) ARDS, 5) renal microvasculopathy, 6) stroke, and 7) acute coronary artery syndrome. The activated neutrophil's capability to become adhesive to endothelium, to generate highly ROS, and to secrete proteases gives it the potential to induce local vascular and tissue injury. In this review, we summarize the evidence for its role as a mediator of tissue injury in these seven conditions, making it or its products potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Flavonoids Inhibit the Respiratory Burst of Neutrophils in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Ciz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils represent the front-line defence cells in protecting organisms against infection and play an irreplaceable role in the proper performance of the immune system. As early as within the first minutes of stimulation, neutrophilic NADPH oxidase is activated, and cells release large quantities of highly toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS. These oxidants can be highly toxic not only for infectious agents but also for neighboring host tissues. Since flavonoids exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, they are subjects of interest for pharmacological modulation of ROS production. The present paper summarizes contemporary knowledge on the effects of various flavonoids on the respiratory burst of mammalian neutrophils. It can be summarized that the inhibitory effects of flavonoids on the respiratory burst of phagocytes are mediated via inhibition of enzymes involved in cell signaling as well as via modulation of redox status. However, the effects of flavonoids are even more complex, and several sites of action, depending upon the flavonoid structure and way of application, are included.

  11. Colloidal polyaniline dispersions: antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucekova, Zdenka; Humpolicek, Petr; Kasparkova, Vera; Perecko, Tomas; Lehocký, Marián; Hauerlandová, Iva; Sáha, Petr; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2014-04-01

    Polyaniline colloids rank among promising application forms of this conducting polymer. Cytotoxicity, antibacterial activity, and neutrophil oxidative burst tests were performed on cells treated with colloidal polyaniline dispersions. The antibacterial effect of colloidal polyaniline against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was most pronounced for Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 3,500 μg mL(-1). The data recorded on human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and a mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell lines using an MTT assay and flow cytometry indicated a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of colloid, with the absence of cytotoxic effect at around 150 μg mL(-1). The neutrophil oxidative burst test then showed that colloidal polyaniline, in concentrations <150 μg mL(-1), was not able to stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils and whole human blood. However, it worked efficiently as a scavenger of those already formed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Neutrophil: A Cell with Many Roles in Inflammation or Several Cell Types?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rosales

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in the circulation, and have been regarded as first line of defense in the innate arm of the immune system. They capture and destroy invading microorganisms, through phagocytosis and intracellular degradation, release of granules, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps after detecting pathogens. Neutrophils also participate as mediators of inflammation. The classical view for these leukocytes is that neutrophils constitute a homogenous population of terminally differentiated cells with a unique function. However, evidence accumulated in recent years, has revealed that neutrophils present a large phenotypic heterogeneity and functional versatility, which place neutrophils as important modulators of both inflammation and immune responses. Indeed, the roles played by neutrophils in homeostatic conditions as well as in pathological inflammation and immune processes are the focus of a renovated interest in neutrophil biology. In this review, I present the concept of neutrophil phenotypic and functional heterogeneity and describe several neutrophil subpopulations reported to date. I also discuss the role these subpopulations seem to play in homeostasis and disease.

  13. Transcription profiling of sparkling wine second fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Penacho, Vanessa; Valero, Eva; González García, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    There is a specific set of stress factors that yeast cells must overcome under second fermentation conditions, during the production of sparkling wines by the traditional (Champenoise) method. Some of them are the same as those of the primary fermentation of still wines, although perhaps with a different intensity (high ethanol concentration, low pH, nitrogen starvation) while others are more specific to second fermentation (low temperature, CO 2 overpressure). The transcription profile of Sa...

  14. Fermentation characteristics of yeasts isolated from traditionally fermented masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Smid, E.J.; Boekhout, C.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Yeast strains were characterized to select potential starter cultures for the production of masau fermented beverages. The yeast species originally isolated from Ziziphus mauritiana (masau) fruits and their traditionally fermented fruit pulp in Zimbabwe were examined for their ability to ferment

  15. Microbial fermented tea - a potential source of natural food preservatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mo, H.Z.; Yang Zhu, Yang; Chen, Z.M.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial activities of microbial fermented tea are much less known than its health beneficial properties. These antimicrobial activities are generated in natural microbial fermentation process with tea leaves as substrates. The antimicrobial components produced during the fermentation process

  16. PERVAPORATION MEMBRANE SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE FERMENTATION PRODUCT RECOVERY AND DEHYDRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The economics of fermentative production of fuels and commodity chemicals can be a strong function of the efficiency with which the fermentation products are removed from the biological media. Due to growth inhibition by some fermentation products, including ethanol, concentrati...

  17. RhoA determines disease progression by controlling neutrophil motility and restricting hyperresponsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennings, Richard T; Strengert, Monika; Hayes, Patti

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil responses are central to host protection and inflammation. Neutrophil activation follows a two-step process where priming amplifies responses to activating stimuli. Priming is essential for life span extension, chemotaxis and respiratory burst activity. Here we show that the cytoskeletal...... organizer RhoA suppresses neutrophil priming via formins. Premature granule exocytosis in Rho-deficient neutrophils activated numerous signaling pathways and amplified superoxide generation. Deletion of Rho altered front-to-back coordination by simultaneously increasing uropod elongation, leading edge...... neutrophils exacerbated LPS-mediated lung injury, deleting Rho in innate immune cells was highly protective in Influenza A virus infection. Hence, Rho is a key regulator of disease progression by maintaining neutrophil quiescence and suppressing hyperresponsiveness....

  18. Phagocytosis by neutrophils - studies on phagosome dynamics and membrane traffic modulation by Streptococcus pyogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Nordenfelt, Pontus

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils are our most numerous and deadly white blood cells and without them we would succumb quickly to infections by pathogens. The main mechanism that the neutrophils employ for our protection is phagocytosis, where they eat and enclose their target inside a membrane-bound organelle, the phagosome. Neutrophil phagosomes are highly dynamic entities, and a large amount of antimicrobial substances are released to their interior within seconds of formation. In most cases this wi...

  19. Strain-dependent induction of neutrophil histamine production and cell death by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Hong; Song, Yuanlin; Lynch, Susan V.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P.; Caughey, George H.

    2012-01-01

    Airway diseases often feature persistent neutrophilic inflammation and infection. In cystic fibrosis bronchitis, for example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is isolated frequently. Previously, this laboratory revealed that neutrophils become major sources of histamine in mice with tracheobronchitis caused by the wall-less bacterium Mycoplasma pulmonis. To test the hypothesis that more-broadly pathogenic P. aeruginosa (which expresses cell wall-associated LPS and novel toxins) has similar effects, we incubated naïve mouse neutrophils with two strains of P. aeruginosa. Strain PAO1 greatly increased neutrophil histamine content and secretion, whereas strain PA103 depressed histamine production by killing neutrophils. The histamine-stimulating capacity of PAO1, but not PA103-mediated toxicity, persisted in heat-killed organisms. In PAO1-infected mice, lung and neutrophil histamine content increased. However, PAO1 did not alter production by mast cells (classical histamine reservoirs), which also resisted PA103 toxicity. To explore mechanisms of neutrophil-selective induction, we measured changes in mRNA encoding histidine decarboxylase (rate-limiting for histamine synthesis), probed involvement of endotoxin-TLR pathways in Myd88-deficient neutrophils, and examined contributions of pyocyanin and exotoxins. Results revealed that PAO1 increased histamine production by up-regulating histidine decarboxylase mRNA via pathways largely independent of TLR, pyocyanin, and type III secretion system exotoxins. PAO1 also increased histidine decarboxylase mRNA in neutrophils purified from infected lung. Stimulation required direct contact with neutrophils and was blocked by phagocytosis inhibitor cytochalasin D. In summary, Pseudomonas-augmented histamine production by neutrophils is strain-dependent in vitro and likely mediated by up-regulation of histidine decarboxylase. These findings raise the possibility that Pseudomonas-stimulated neutrophils can enhance airway inflammation by

  20. Oral neutrophil transcriptome changes result in a pro-survival phenotype in periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakschevitz, Flavia S; Aboodi, Guy M; Glogauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are inflammatory processes that occur following the influx of neutrophils into the periodontal tissues in response to the subgingival bacterial biofilm. Current literature suggests that while neutrophils are protective and prevent bacterial infections, they also appear to contribute to damage of the periodontal tissues. In the present study we compare the gene expression profile changes in neutrophils as they migrate from the circulation into the oral tissues in patients with chronic periodontits and matched healthy subjects. We hypothesized that oral neutrophils in periodontal disease patients will display a disease specific transcriptome that differs from the oral neutrophil of healthy subjects. Venous blood and oral rinse samples were obtained from healthy subjects and chronic periodontitis patients for neutrophil isolation. mRNA was isolated from the neutrophils, and gene expression microarray analysis was completed. Results were confirmed for specific genes of interest by qRT-PCR and Western Blot analysis. Chronic periodontitis patients presented with increased recruitment of neutrophils to the oral cavity. Gene expression analysis revealed differences in the expression levels of genes from several biological pathways. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we found that the apoptosis network was significantly altered in patients with chronic inflammation in the oral cavity, with up-regulation of pro-survival members of the Bcl-2 family and down-regulation of pro-apoptosis members in the same compartment. Additional functional analysis confirmed that the percentages of viable neutrophils are significantly increased in the oral cavity of chronic periodontitis patients. Oral neutrophils from patients with periodontal disease displayed an altered transcriptome following migration into the oral tissues. This resulted in a pro-survival neutrophil phenotype in chronic periodontitis patients when compared with healthy subjects, resulting in a

  1. Deacylated lipopolysaccharide inhibits neutrophil adherence to endothelium induced by lipopolysaccharide in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Selective deacylation of the nonhydroxylated fatty acids from S. typhimurium LPS by an acyloxyacyl hydrolase isolated from leukocytes reduces toxic activity of LPS in vivo. We examined the effect of deacylated LPS on neutrophil adherence to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVE). Pretreatment of HUVE with LPS (13 ng/ml for 4 h) produced a marked increase in the adherence of subsequently added neutrophils. In contrast, there was no increase in the adherence of neutrophils to HUVE pretre...

  2. With Friends Like These: The Complex Role of Neutrophils in the Progression of Severe Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D. Pechous

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is a leading cause of death from infection in the United States and across the globe. During pulmonary infection, clear resolution of host inflammatory responses occurs in the absence of appreciable lung damage. Neutrophils are the first wave of leukocytes to arrive in the lung upon infection. After activation, neutrophils traffic from the vasculature via transendothelial migration through the lung interstitium and into the alveolar space. Successful pulmonary immunity requires neutrophil-mediated killing of invading pathogens by phagocytosis and release of a myriad of antimicrobial molecules, followed by resolution of inflammation, neutrophil apoptosis, and clearing of dead or dying neutrophils by macrophages. In addition to their antimicrobial role, it is becoming clear that neutrophils are also important modulators of innate and adaptive immune responses, primarily through the release of cytokines and recruitment of additional waves of neutrophils into the airways. Though typically essential to combating severe pneumonia, neutrophil influx into the airways is a double-edged sword: Overzealous neutrophil activation can cause severe tissue damage as a result of the release of toxic agents including proteases, cationic polypeptides, cytokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS aimed at killing invading microbes. In extreme cases, the damage caused by neutrophils and other innate immune mediators become the primary source of morbidity and mortality. Here, we review the complex role of neutrophils during severe pneumonia by highlighting specific molecules and processes that contribute to pulmonary immunity, but can also drive progression of severe disease. Depending on the identity of the infectious agent, enhancing or suppressing neutrophil-mediated responses may be key to effectively treating severe and typically lethal pneumonia.

  3. Neutrophil chemotactic responses induced by fresh and swollen Rhizopus oryzae spores and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

    OpenAIRE

    Waldorf, A R; Diamond, R D

    1985-01-01

    With the induction of germination, Rhizopus oryzae spores and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia activate the complement system and induce neutrophil chemotaxis. In contrast, freshly isolated R. oryzae spores did not induce neutrophil migration into lung tissue of mice after intranasal inoculation. Moreover, in microchemotaxis assays neither fresh R. oryzae spores nor A. fumigatus conidia activated sera to stimulate human neutrophil chemotaxis above control migration until at least 10(7) or 10(8) ...

  4. Chemoattractant concentration–dependent tuning of ERK signaling dynamics in migrating neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Elizabeth R.; Liu, Shanshan; Wu, Lani F.; Altschuler, Steven J.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2016-01-01

    The directed migration (chemotaxis) of neutrophils toward the bacterial peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) is a crucial process in immune defense against invading bacteria. While navigating through a gradient of increasing concentrations of fMLP, neutrophils and neutrophil-like HL-60 cells switch from exhibiting directional migration at low fMLP concentrations to exhibiting circuitous migration at high fMLP concentrations. The extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is implicated...

  5. Kinetics model development of cocoa bean fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresnowati, M. T. A. P.; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Muliyadini, Winny

    2015-12-01

    Although Indonesia is one of the biggest cocoa beans producers in the world, Indonesian cocoa beans are oftenly of low quality and thereby frequently priced low in the world market. In order to improve the quality, adequate post-harvest cocoa processing techniques are required. Fermentation is the vital stage in series of cocoa beans post harvest processing which could improve the quality of cocoa beans, in particular taste, aroma, and colours. During the fermentation process, combination of microbes grow producing metabolites that serve as the precursors for cocoa beans flavour. Microbial composition and thereby their activities will affect the fermentation performance and influence the properties of cocoa beans. The correlation could be reviewed using a kinetic model that includes unstructured microbial growth, substrate utilization and metabolic product formation. The developed kinetic model could be further used to design cocoa bean fermentation process to meet the expected quality. Further the development of kinetic model of cocoa bean fermentation also serve as a good case study of mixed culture solid state fermentation, that has rarely been studied. This paper presents the development of a kinetic model for solid-state cocoa beans fermentation using an empirical approach. Series of lab scale cocoa bean fermentations, either natural fermentations without starter addition or fermentations with mixed yeast and lactic acid bacteria starter addition, were used for model parameters estimation. The results showed that cocoa beans fermentation can be modelled mathematically and the best model included substrate utilization, microbial growth, metabolites production and its transport. Although the developed model still can not explain the dynamics in microbial population, this model can sufficiently explained the observed changes in sugar concentration as well as metabolic products in the cocoa bean pulp.

  6. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemokine receptor Ccr1 drives neutrophil-mediated kidney immunopathology and mortality in invasive candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S; Fischer, Brett G; Lim, Jean K; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Wan, Wuzhou; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Scheinberg, Phillip; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the 4(th) leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US with mortality that exceeds 40% despite administration of antifungal therapy; neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome after invasive candidiasis. In a fatal mouse model of invasive candidiasis that mimics human bloodstream-derived invasive candidiasis, the most highly infected organ is the kidney and neutrophils are the major cellular mediators of host defense; however, factors regulating neutrophil recruitment have not been previously defined. Here we show that mice lacking chemokine receptor Ccr1, which is widely expressed on leukocytes, had selectively impaired accumulation of neutrophils in the kidney limited to the late phase of the time course of the model; surprisingly, this was associated with improved renal function and survival without affecting tissue fungal burden. Consistent with this, neutrophils from wild-type mice in blood and kidney switched from Ccr1(lo) to Ccr1(high) at late time-points post-infection, when Ccr1 ligands were produced at high levels in the kidney and were chemotactic for kidney neutrophils ex vivo. Further, when a 1∶1 mixture of Ccr1(+/+) and Ccr1(-/-) donor neutrophils was adoptively transferred intravenously into Candida-infected Ccr1(+/+) recipient mice, neutrophil trafficking into the kidney was significantly skewed toward Ccr1(+/+) cells. Thus, neutrophil Ccr1 amplifies late renal immunopathology and increases mortality in invasive candidiasis by mediating excessive recruitment of neutrophils from the blood to the target organ.

  8. Involvement of p38MAPK in Impaired Neutrophil Bactericidal Activity of Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamikawa, Yasutaka; Sakai, Norihiko; Miyake, Taito; Sagara, Akihiro; Shinozaki, Yasuyuki; Kitajima, Shinji; Toyama, Tadashi; Hara, Akinori; Iwata, Yasunori; Shimizu, Miho; Furuichi, Kengo; Imamura, Ryu; Suda, Takashi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2018-01-10

    Mortality from infections has been reported to be higher in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Although dysfunction of neutrophils against bacterial infection was reported in HD patients, the precise mechanism remains to be clarified. We therefore examined the impacts of neutrophil inflammatory signaling on bactericidal activity in HD patients. Comprehensive analyses of intracellular signalings were performed in whole blood of HD patients and control using a microarray system. To confirm the contribution of the signaling to bactericidal activity in neutrophils, we examined the phosphorylation, bacterial killing function, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) release in neutrophils against Staphylococcus aureus. RNA microarray analysis showed the suppression of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in HD patients. Neutrophils in HD patients showed the impairment of bactericidal activity against S. aureus compared to healthy subjects. Phosphorylation rate of p38MAPK of neutrophils in response to S. aureus was lower in HD patients than healthy subjects. The levels of ROS produced by neutrophils after co-culture with S. aureus were lower in HD patients, on the other hand, there was no difference of MPO release between HD patients and healthy subjects. A selective pharmacological inhibitor of p38MAPK suppressed bacterial killing function as well as ROS production in neutrophils of healthy subjects. Impairment of p38MAPK signaling pathway might contribute to the suppression of neutrophil bactericidal activity in HD patients through less production of ROS. © 2018 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  9. Imaging neutrophil migration dynamics using micro-optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kengyeh K.; Yonker, Lael; Som, Avira; Pazos, Michael; Kusek, Mark E.; Hurley, Bryan P.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophils are immune cells that undergo chemotaxis, detecting and migrating towards a chemical signal gradient. Neutrophils actively migrate across epithelial boundaries, interacting with the epithelium to selectively permit passage without compromising the epithelial barrier. In many inflammatory disorders, excessive neutrophil migration can cause damage to the epithelium itself. The signaling pathways and mechanisms that facilitate trans-epithelial migration are not fully characterized. Our laboratory has developed micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT), which has 2 μm lateral resolution and 1 μm axial resolution. As a high-resolution native contrast modality, μOCT can directly visualize individual neutrophils as they interact with a cell layer cultured on a transwell filter. A chemoattractant can be applied to the apical side of inverted monolayer, and human neutrophils placed in the basolateral compartment, while μOCT captures 3D images of the chemotaxis. μOCT images can also generate quantitative metrics of migration volume to study the dependence of chemotaxis on monolayer cell type, chemoattractant type, and disease state of the neutrophils. For example, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) can be simulated by treating neutrophils with antibodies that interfere with the CD18 receptor, a facilitator of trans-epithelial migration. We conducted a migration study of anti-CD18 treated and control neutrophils using T84 intestinal epithelium as a barrier. After one hour, μOCT time-lapse imaging indicated a strong difference in the fraction of neutrophils that remain attached to the epithelium after migration (0.67 +/- 0.12 attached anti-CD18 neutrophils, 0.23 +/- 0.08 attached control neutrophils, n = 6, p < 0.05), as well as a modest but non-significant decrease in total migration volume for treated neutrophils. We can now integrate μOCT-derived migration metrics with simultaneously acquired measurements of transepithelial electrical

  10. The effect of midazolam on neutrophil mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ghori, Kamran

    2010-06-01

    Neutrophil p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a key enzyme in the intracellular signalling pathway that is responsible for many neutrophil functions, which are important in neutrophil-endothelial interaction. The imidazole compounds are inhibitors of this enzyme system. The objectives of this in-vitro investigation were to examine the effect of midazolam on neutrophil p38 MAPK activation (phosphorylation) following in-vitro ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and the expression of adhesion molecule CD11b\\/CD18.

  11. Neutrophils are dispensable in the modulation of T cell immunity against cutaneous HSV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor, Jyh Liang; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils rapidly infiltrate sites of inflammation during peripheral infection or tissue injury. In addition to their well described roles as pro-inflammatory phagocytes responsible for pathogen clearance, recent studies have demonstrated a broader functional repertoire including mediating crosstalk between innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Specifically, neutrophils have been proposed to mediate antigen transport to lymph nodes (LN) to modulate T cell priming and to influence T cell migration to infected tissues. Using a mouse model of cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection we explored potential contributions of neutrophils toward anti-viral immunity. While a transient, early influx of neutrophils was triggered by dermal scarification, we did not detect migration of neutrophils from the skin to LN. Furthermore, despite recruitment of neutrophils into LN from the blood, priming and expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was unaffected following neutrophil depletion. Finally, we found that neutrophils were dispensable for the migration of effector T cells into infected skin. Our study suggests that the immunomodulatory roles of neutrophils toward adaptive immunity may be context-dependent, and are likely determined by the type of pathogen and anatomical site of infection. PMID:28112242

  12. Leucine Rich α-2 Glycoprotein: A Novel Neutrophil Granule Protein and Modulator of Myelopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence J Druhan

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich α2 glycoprotein (LRG1, a serum protein produced by hepatocytes, has been implicated in angiogenesis and tumor promotion. Our laboratory previously reported the expression of LRG1 in murine myeloid cell lines undergoing neutrophilic granulocyte differentiation. However, the presence of LRG1 in primary human neutrophils and a role for LRG1 in regulation of hematopoiesis have not been previously described. Here we show that LRG1 is packaged into the granule compartment of human neutrophils and secreted upon neutrophil activation to modulate the microenvironment. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and direct biochemical measurements, we demonstrate that LRG1 is present in the peroxidase-negative granules of human neutrophils. Exocytosis assays indicate that LRG1 is differentially glycosylated in neutrophils, and co-released with the secondary granule protein lactoferrin. Like LRG1 purified from human serum, LRG1 secreted from activated neutrophils also binds cytochrome c. We also show that LRG1 antagonizes the inhibitory effects of TGFβ1 on colony growth of human CD34+ cells and myeloid progenitors. Collectively, these data invoke an additional role for neutrophils in innate immunity that has not previously been reported, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby neutrophils may modulate the microenvironment via extracellular release of LRG1.

  13. Microbiology of keribo fermentation: an Ethiopian traditional fermented beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abawari, Rashid Abafita

    2013-10-15

    Keribo is an indigenous traditional fermented beverage and is being served on holidays, wedding ceremony and also used as sources of income of many households in Jimma zone. The aim of this study was to document the microbiology of the product and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of LAB. Samples of Keribo were collected from Jimma town and four of its districts. Keribo was fermented in the laboratory following the traditional techniques for microbial succession monitored at 6 h intervals. Finally, dominant LAB was evaluated for their antibiotic susceptibility patterns against eight antibiotics. Samples of Keribo from open markets and households in Jimma zone showed average Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB), Aerobic Mesophilic Bacteria (AMB), Aerobic Spore-formers (ASF) and yeasts with mean counts of (log CFU mL(-1)) 2.70 +/- 2.07, 2.34 +/- 2.37, 4.96 +/- 2.80 and 2.01 +/- 0.60, respectively. The mean counts of Enterobacteriaceae, staphylococci and moulds were below detectable levels. The early stage was dominated by AMB and ASF. However, the mean counts of LAB increased exponentially for the first 30 h and remain constant thereafter. Leuconostoc mesenteroides, identified as the most dominant LAB, were found to be susceptible to penicillin G, gentamicin, ampicilin, chloramphenicol, amikacin, bacitracin and norfloxacin but resistant to vancomycin.

  14. Marine sponges as microbial fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Ute; Usher, Kayley M; Taylor, Michael W

    2006-02-01

    The discovery of phylogenetically complex, yet highly sponge-specific microbial communities in marine sponges, including novel lineages and even candidate phyla, came as a surprise. At the same time, unique research opportunities opened up, because the microorganisms of sponges are in many ways more accessible than those of seawater. Accordingly, we consider sponges as microbial fermenters that provide exciting new avenues in marine microbiology and biotechnology. This review covers recent findings regarding diversity, biogeography and population dynamics of sponge-associated microbiota, and the data are discussed within the larger context of the microbiology of the ocean.

  15. Sensory Properties of Traditionally-Fermented Buttermilk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was carried out to test the hypothesis that the main problems of traditionally-fermented milk products processed in the rural setup are based on variable sensory quality, hygiene and unattractive presentation to consumers. Sensory evaluation scores of 9 samples of traditional fermented buttermilk and control ...

  16. Composition, Acceptability and Efficacy of Fermented and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The main objective was to evaluate the efficacy of fermented and unfermented cereal-based-Oral Rehydration Solution (CB-ORS) for home management of diarrhoea in children. Materials and Methods: Local varieties of white maize (Zea mays) and rice (Oritz sativa) fermented (48h) and unfermented were ...

  17. Replacement Value of fermented millet ( Pennisetum americanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The replacement value of fermented millet for maize in the diets of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings reared in a recirculation system was determined. Five isonitrogenous diets were formulated to contain graded levels of fermented millet meal replacing 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% of maize and fed to triplicate groups of fingerlings ...

  18. Method for anaerobic fermentation and biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for biomass processing, anaerobic fermentation of the processed biomass, and the production biogas. In particular, the invention relates to a system and method for generating biogas from anaerobic fermentation of processed organic material that comprises...

  19. 7122 EFFECT OF FERMENTATION CONTAINERS ON THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MARIA

    2013-01-01

    Jan 1, 2013 ... effectively eliminating much of the heat-sensitive indigenous micro flora [19]. However, the protein loss was much more in samples fermented banana leaf compared to plastic bowl. This could be as a result of leaching of some proteins into the porous banana leaf. Further decrease as fermentation ...

  20. Physicochemical and textural properties of kombucha fermented ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possibility of kombucha application cultivated on two different tea types in combination with probiotics for milk fermentation at different temperatures, as well as the physicochemical and textural properties of manufactured fermented milk products were investigated. Combination of probiotic starter culture and kombucha ...

  1. Characterization of antimicrobial activity in Kombucha fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sreeramulu, G.; Zhu, Y.; Knol, W.

    2001-01-01

    Fermented tea drink, Kombucha, can inhibit the growth of Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium. Several metabolites were analyzed every two days during a 14-day Kombucha fermentation. Levels of acetic acid and gluconic acid were found to increase with

  2. Scleroglucan: Fermentative Production, Downstream Processing and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant A. Survase

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Exopolysaccharides produced by a variety of microorganisms find multifarious industrial applications in foods, pharmaceutical and other industries as emulsifiers, stabilizers, binders, gelling agents, lubricants, and thickening agents. One such exopolysaccharide is scleroglucan, produced by pure culture fermentation from filamentous fungi of genus Sclerotium. The review discusses the properties, fermentative production, downstream processing and applications of scleroglucan.

  3. Energy balance in solid state fermentation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, L.J.A.; Torres, A.; Echevarria, J.; Saura, G. (Instituto Cubano de Investigaciones de los Derivados de la Cana de Azucar (ICIDCA), La Habana (Cuba))

    1991-01-01

    It was applied a macroscopic energy balance to a solid state fermentation process and an electron balance in order to estimate the temperature and the heat evolved in the process. There were employed several equations that describe the development of the system and offer the possibility to design or control such fermentations. (orig.).

  4. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  5. Characteristics of fermentation yeast isolated from traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous honey wine, known locally as ogol, was collected in a village of the Majangir ethnic group in Southwest Ethiopia, and the procedure for ogol fermentation was investigated. A fermentation yeast was first isolated from ogol and identified as being a strain of the genus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Honey wine made ...

  6. Functional Properties of Microorganisms in Fermented Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Prakash Tamang; Dong Hwa Shin; Soo Wan eChae; Su-Jin eJung

    2016-01-01

    Fermented foods have unique functional properties imparting some health benefits to consumers due to presence of functional microorganisms, which possess probiotics properties, antimicrobial, antioxidant, peptide production, etc. Health benefits of some global fermented foods are synthesis of nutrients, prevention of cardiovascular disease, prevention of cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, allergic reactions, diabetes, among others. The present paper is aimed to review the information on some...

  7. Fermentation Studies on Roselle ( Hibiscus Sabdariffa ) Calyces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of trona on the fermentation of roselle calyces was evaluated. The addition of trona to the calyces raised the initial pH from 3.3 to 5.3. The important microorganisms of roselle calyces fermentation were enumerated, isolated and identified. The fungi isolated consist of one yeast identified as Saccharomyces ...

  8. co-fermentation of kocho with barley

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fermentation scheme was therefore developed for the production of injera with improved protein content in ... of more than one species of lactic acid bacteria has also been reported in the fermentation process of kocho ... cereals, liberation of amino acids, synthesis of certain vitamins and the availability of trace minerals ...

  9. Fermentation optimization and antioxidant activities of mycelia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uwerhiavwe

    2013-03-13

    Mar 13, 2013 ... esculenta mycelia made good use of soybean residues. The optimal media ... volume 10%, temperature 28°C, and fermentation time 56 h. ... seeding media. Soybean residues were used as the base for fermentation medium, with 20 g glucose, 1.5 g MgSO4, 1g KH2PO4 and 1000 ml of water. Soybean ...

  10. Handbook of Indigenous Foods Involving Alkaline Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkar, P.K.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2014-01-01

    This book details the basic approaches of alkaline fermentation, provides a brief history, and offers an overview of the subject. The book discusses the diversity of indigenous fermented foods involving an alkaline reaction, as well as the taxonomy, ecology, physiology, and genetics of predominant

  11. Characterization of carbohydrate fractions and fermentation quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of adding fast-sile (FS), previous fermented juice (PFJ), sucrose (S) or fast-sile + sucrose (FS + S) on the fermentation characteristics and carbohydrates fractions of alfalfa silages by the Cornell net carbohydrates and proteins systems (CNCPS). Silages quality were well ...

  12. Solid state fermentation for foods and beverages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.; Zhu, Y.; Nout, M.J.R.; Sarkar, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    The book systematically describes the production of solid-state fermented food and beverage in terms of the history and development of SSF technology and SSF foods, bio-reactor design, fermentation process, various substrate origins and sustainable development. It emphasizes Oriental traditional

  13. Physiochemical Properties and Antinutrient Content of Fermented ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Popcorn and groundnut composite flours were fermented using pure strains of Rhizopus nigricans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by solid substrate fermentation method. There was decrease in pH with increase in total titrable acidity in all the samples. The result of the proximate analysis revealed that there was an ...

  14. Restraint stress alters neutrophil and macrophage phenotypes during wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymen, Stéphanie D.; Rojas, Isolde G.; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Fang, Zong Juan; Zhao, Yan; Marucha, Phillip T.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies reported that stress delays wound healing, impairs bacterial clearance, and elevates the risk for opportunistic infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are responsible for the removal of bacteria present at the wound site. The appropriate recruitment and functions of these cells are necessary for efficient bacterial clearance. In our current study we found that restraint stress induced an excessive recruitment of neutrophils extending the inflammatory phase of healing, and the gene expression of neutrophil attracting chemokines MIP-2 and KC. However, restraint stress did not affect macrophage infiltration. Stress decreased the phagocytic abilities of phagocytic cells ex vivo, yet it did not affect superoxide production. The cell surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11b and TLR4 were decreased in peripheral blood monocytes in stressed mice. The phenotype of macrophages present at the wound site was also altered. Gene expression of markers of pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages, CXCL10 and CCL5, were down-regulated; as were markers associated with wound healing macrophages, CCL22, IGF-1, RELMα; and the regulatory macrophage marker, chemokine CCL1. Restraint stress also induced up-regulation of IL10 gene expression. In summary, our study has shown that restraint stress suppresses the phenotype shift of the macrophage population, as compared to the changes observed during normal wound healing, while the number of macrophages remains constant. We also observed a general suppression of chemokine gene expression. Modulation of the macrophage phenotype could provide a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of wounds under stress conditions in the clinical setting. PMID:22884902

  15. The Effects of Exercise on Judoists’ Circulating Blood Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zar A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Type, intensity and duration of exercises exert pivotal effects on athletes’ immune system and probably athletes’ susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. In this study we examined the effects of one session of moderate-intensity exercise on male judoists’ circulating blood neutrophil counts (BNC and respiratory burst, and self-reported upper respiratory clinical infections 24 hours after the exercise and during the sport seasons.Methods: Ten male judoists after obtaining informed consent were included in the study. The athletes took part in a session of moderate-intensity exercise (60 minutes running on a treadmill at 60% of maximum heart rate. Blood samples were drawn at rest immediately after the exercise. Blood neutrophil count and percentage of Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA stimulated neutrophils in whole blood were assessed [as a marker of oxidative burst (OB quality]. Athletes were asked about any signs of upper respiratory infections 24 hours after the exercise and during sport seasons. Paired-t test was used for statistical analysis and statistical significance was set at p<0.05.Results: BNC were in normal range at rest, and meaningfully increased immediately after the exercise (p<0.05. At rest, the OB activity was in normal range, and increased immediately after the exercise (not significant. During 24 hours after the exercise, athletes showed no signs of upper respiratory system infections. Also they mentioned no history of increased susceptibility of upper respiratory infections during sport seasons. Conclusion: Continuous judo exercises have no negative effects on BNC and OB activity. This finding is in accordance with the absence of self-reported upper respiratory infections in judoists during sport seasons. Significant increase in BNC after a session of exercise was a predictable event as a normal response of immune system to exercise stress. Normal OB activity after the exercise was

  16. The effect of lipocortin 1 on neutrophil deformability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Drost

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocortn 1 (Lc1 is an anti-inflammatory protein, which, given systemically, inhibits polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN emigration from the circulation to sites of inflammation; delivery of Lc1 to the inflamed site is ineffective. We have examined the effect of Lc1 on changes in PMN deformability, and observed a consistent improvement in the deformability of unstimulated PMN; N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP-activated cell deformability was unaltered. A Lc1-induced increase in cell deformability may reduce PMN sequestration so contributing to the anti-migratory effects of systemic Lc1 previously demonstrated in vivo.

  17. ADAM9 Is a Novel Product of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roychaudhuri, Robin; Hergrueter, Anja H; Polverino, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    A disintegrin and a metalloproteinase domain (ADAM) 9 is known to be expressed by monocytes and macrophages. In this study, we report that ADAM9 is also a product of human and murine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). ADAM9 is not synthesized de novo by circulating PMNs. Rather, ADAM9 protein...... in the bleomycin-treated lung. Thus, ADAM9 is expressed in an inducible fashion on PMN surfaces where it degrades some ECM proteins, and it promotes alveolar-capillary barrier injury during ALI in mice....

  18. Naturally fermented ethnic soybean foods of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash Tamang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Kinema, hawaijar, tungrymbai, bekang, aakhone, and peruyaan are naturally fermented ethnic soybean foods of India; they are popular among the Mongolian-origin races in the Eastern Himalayas. Bacillus subtilis is the dominant functional bacterium in all naturally fermented soybean foods of these regions. Although there is a good demand for ethnic fermented soybean foods among local consumers in north-east India, the production is limited to household level. A ready-to-use pulverized starter culture for kinema production can be introduced to kinema-makers or similar sticky fermented soybean foods of north-east India and adapted to local conditions for additional income generation. Ethnic fermented soybeans are one of the major food resources in the Eastern Himalayas; they supplement inexpensive, high-digested plant protein in the local diet with low fat/cholesterol content and high nutritive value as well as antioxidant and other health-promoting properties.

  19. FERMENTED MILK AS A FUNCTIONAL FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Rogelj

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain foods have been associated with health benefits for many years; fermented milks and yoghurt are typical examples. The health properties of these dairy products were a part of folklore until the concept of probiotics emerged, and the study of fermented milks and yoghurt containing probiotic bacteria has become more systematic. Functional foods have thus developed as a food, or food ingredient, with positive effects on host health and/or well-being beyond their nutritional value, and fermented milk with probiotic bacteria has again become the prominent representative of this new category of food. Milk alone is much more than the sum of its nutrients. It contains an array of bioactivities: modulating digestive and gastrointestinal functions, haemodynamics, controlling probiotic microbial growth, and immunoregulation. When fermented milk is enriched with probiotic bacteria and prebiotics it meets all the requirements of functional food. The possible positive effects of enriched fermented milk on host health will be reviewed.

  20. Neutrophil trafficking into inflamed joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and the effects of methylprednisolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, P P; Cormack, J; Evill, C A; Peter, D T; Roberts-Thomson, P J; Ahern, M J; Smith, M D

    1996-02-01

    To investigate the trafficking of circulating blood neutrophils and synovial fluid neutrophils in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and the influence of a 1,000-mg intravenous pulse of methylprednisolone succinate (MP). Neutrophils were isolated from the circulation and from the knee synovial compartments of subjects with RA. Circulating neutrophils were labeled with technetium-99 hexametazime (99mTc-HMPAO) and reinjected intravenously. Synovial fluid neutrophils were labeled from indium-111 oxine and reinjected into the knee from which they were isolated. Gamma camera images were obtained at intervals up to 24 hours post MP. Each patient had a baseline study (no MP) and a study in which MP was administered either 4 hours before (2 patients), 10 minutes before (1 patient), or 30 minutes to 1.5 hours after (6 patients) injection of the radiolabeled neutrophils. Subsequent analysis allowed quantitation of the neutrophil uptake into and clearance from the knee as a function of time. Nine patients who had not received glucocorticoids in the previous 3 months were studied. MP significantly decreased neutrophil ingress in 13 of the 16 knees studied (almost total inhibition in 5 knees), and this occurred within 1.5 hours of MP administration in all except 1 knee. At 24 hours after MP administration, there was a significant increase in visual analog scale (VAS) scores for well-being and significant decreases in scores on the modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (PVAS for pain (p<0.005), and generalized stiffness (P<0.005), as well as a decrease in the C-reactive protein level (P<0.05). MP had no effect on neutrophil egress (2 patients). Two additional patients who were receiving oral glucocorticoids were studied. One of them was clinically unresponsive to oral prednisolone, and MP had no effect on neutrophil ingress. The other patient showed no neutrophil ingress during the baseline study. This was confirmed by the presence of a noninflammatory synovial fluid at

  1. Neutrophils are not less sensitive than other blood leukocytes to the genomic effects of glucocorticoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle Hirsch

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are generally considered less responsive to glucocorticoids compared to other inflammatory cells. The reported increase in human neutrophil survival mediated by these drugs partly supports this assertion. However, it was recently shown that dexamethasone exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in equine peripheral blood neutrophils. Few comparative studies of glucocorticoid effects in neutrophils and other leukocytes have been reported and a relative insensitivity of neutrophils to these drugs could not be ruled out.We assessed glucocorticoid-responsiveness in equine and human peripheral blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes.Blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes were isolated from 6 healthy horses and 4 human healthy subjects. Cells were incubated for 5 h with or without LPS (100 ng/mL alone or combined with hydrocortisone, prednisolone or dexamethasone (10(-8 M and 10(-6 M. IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, glutamine synthetase and GR-α mRNA expression was quantified by qPCR. Equine neutrophils were also incubated for 20 h with or without the three glucocorticoids and cell survival was assessed by flow cytometry and light microscopy on cytospin preparations.We found that glucocorticoids down-regulated LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mRNA expression in both cell populations and species. These drugs also significantly increased glutamine synthetase gene expression in both equine cell populations. The magnitude of glucocorticoid response between cell populations was generally similar in both species. We also showed that dexamethasone had a comparable inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory gene expression in both human and equine neutrophils. As reported in other species, glucocorticoids significantly increase the survival in equine neutrophils.Glucocorticoids exert genomic effects of similar magnitude on neutrophils and on other blood leukocytes. We speculate that the poor response to glucocorticoids observed in some

  2. Distinct Trypanosoma cruzi isolates induce activation and apoptosis of human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Luísa M. D.; Viana, Agostinho; de Jesus, Augusto C.; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia; Gomes, Juliana A.; Gollob, Kenneth J.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are critical players in the first line of defense against pathogens and in the activation of subsequent cellular responses. We aimed to determine the effects of the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with human neutrophils, using isolates of the two major discrete type units (DTUs) associated with Chagas’ disease in Latin America (clone Col1.7G2 and Y strain, DTU I and II, respectively). Thus, we used CFSE-stained trypomastigotes to measure neutrophil-T. cruzi interaction, neutrophil activation, cytokine expression and death, after infection with Col1.7G2 and Y strain. Our results show that the frequency of CFSE+ neutrophils, indicative of interaction, and CFSE intensity on a cell-per-cell basis were similar when comparing Col1.7G2 and Y strains. Interaction with T. cruzi increased neutrophil activation, as measured by CD282, CD284, TNF and IL-12 expression, although at different levels between the two strains. No change in IL-10 expression was observed after interaction of neutrophils with either strain. We observed that exposure to Y and Col1.7G2 caused marked neutrophil death. This was specific to neutrophils, since interaction of either strain with monocytes did not cause death. Our further analysis showed that neutrophil death was a result of apoptosis, which was associated with an upregulation of TNF-receptor, TNF and FasLigand, but not of Fas. Induction of TNF-associated neutrophil apoptosis by the different T. cruzi isolates may act as an effective common mechanism to decrease the host’s immune response and favor parasite survival. PMID:29176759

  3. Iodinated contrast media induce neutrophil apoptosis through a mitochondrial and caspase mediated pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, N F

    2012-02-03

    Iodinated contrast media (ICM) can induce apoptosis (programmed cell death) in renal, myocardial and endothelial cells. Following intravascular injection, circulating immune cells are exposed to high concentrations of ICM. As neutrophils constitutively undergo apoptosis we hypothesized that ICM may adversely affect neutrophil survival. Our aim was to investigate the effect of ICM on neutrophil apoptosis. Neutrophils were isolated from healthy subjects and cultured in vitro with ionic (diatrizoate and ioxaglate) and non-ionic (iohexol and iotrolan) ICM. The effect of ICM on neutrophil apoptosis in both unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated neutrophils was determined by annexin V flow cytometry. The influence of physicochemical properties of the different ICM on apoptosis of neutrophils was also studied. We further investigated the effects of ICM on key intracellular signal pathways, including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by Western blotting, and mitochondrial depolarization and caspase activity by flow cytometry. Isoiodine concentrations (20 mg ml(-1)) of ionic (diatrizoate 69.6+\\/-2.9%; ioxaglate 58.9+\\/-2.0%) and non-ionic (iohexol 57.3+\\/-2.9%; iotrolan 57.1+\\/-2.6%) ICM significantly induced neutrophil apoptosis over control levels (47.7+\\/-1.4%). The apoptotic effect of ICM was influenced by their chemical structure, with ionic ICM having a more significant (p<0.01) apoptotic effect than non-ionic ICM (p<0.05). Furthermore, ICM reversed the anti-apoptotic effect of lipopolysaccharide (1000 ng ml(-1)) treated neutrophils to control levels (23.0+\\/-3.5% to 61.2+\\/-5.3%; n=4; p<0.05). These agents induce apoptosis through a p38 MAPK independent pathway that results in mitochondrial depolarization, and is dependent on caspase activation. As neutrophils play a central role in host response to infection and injury, ICM, through induction of neutrophil apoptosis, could have a significant deleterious effect on host immune defence and

  4. Distinct Trypanosoma cruzi isolates induce activation and apoptosis of human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa M D Magalhães

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are critical players in the first line of defense against pathogens and in the activation of subsequent cellular responses. We aimed to determine the effects of the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with human neutrophils, using isolates of the two major discrete type units (DTUs associated with Chagas' disease in Latin America (clone Col1.7G2 and Y strain, DTU I and II, respectively. Thus, we used CFSE-stained trypomastigotes to measure neutrophil-T. cruzi interaction, neutrophil activation, cytokine expression and death, after infection with Col1.7G2 and Y strain. Our results show that the frequency of CFSE+ neutrophils, indicative of interaction, and CFSE intensity on a cell-per-cell basis were similar when comparing Col1.7G2 and Y strains. Interaction with T. cruzi increased neutrophil activation, as measured by CD282, CD284, TNF and IL-12 expression, although at different levels between the two strains. No change in IL-10 expression was observed after interaction of neutrophils with either strain. We observed that exposure to Y and Col1.7G2 caused marked neutrophil death. This was specific to neutrophils, since interaction of either strain with monocytes did not cause death. Our further analysis showed that neutrophil death was a result of apoptosis, which was associated with an upregulation of TNF-receptor, TNF and FasLigand, but not of Fas. Induction of TNF-associated neutrophil apoptosis by the different T. cruzi isolates may act as an effective common mechanism to decrease the host's immune response and favor parasite survival.

  5. Yersinia enterocolitica in fermented sausages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, R.; Janković, V.; Baltić, B.; Ivanović, J.

    2017-09-01

    Different types of food, among them meat, can be the cause of food-borne diseases, and infections are commonly caused by Campylobacter, Salmonella, Yersinia enterocolitica, verotoxic Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes. All these bacteria, depending on a number of factors, including animal species, geographical origin, climatic factors, methods of animal breeding and meat production, could cause disease. Here, we summarise results on production of different groups of sausages produced with or without added starter culture, and contaminated with Y.enterocolitica (control sausages were not contaminated). During the ripening, changes in the microbiological status of the fermented sausages and their physical and chemical properties were monitored. For all tests, standard methods were used. In these fermented sausages, the number of Y. enterocolitica decreased during ripening. The number of Y. enterocolitica was statistically significantly lower in sausages with added starter culture on all days of the study Zoonotic pathogens in meat should be controlled through the complete production chain, from the farms to consumers, in order to reduce the probability of disease in humans. However, the necessary controls in the production chain are not the same for all bacteria.

  6. Bid truncation, Bid/Bax targeting to the mitochondria, and caspase activation associated with neutrophil apoptosis are inhibited by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maianski, Nikolai A.; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2004-01-01

    Neutrophil apoptosis constitutes a way of managing neutrophil-mediated reactions. It allows coping with infections, but avoiding overt bystander tissue damage. Using digitonin-based subcellular fractionation and Western blotting, we found that spontaneous apoptosis of human neutrophils (after

  7. sup 111 Indium-labeled neutrophil migration into the lungs of bleomycin-treated rabbits assessed noninvasively by external scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslett, C.; Shen, A.S.; Feldsien, D.C.; Allen, D.; Henson, P.M.; Cherniack, R.M. (National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Factors controlling neutrophil migration into the lung are poorly understood, but their identification is important for our understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases. Pulmonary inflammation is difficult to quantify, and neutrophils in tissues and BAL may not accurately represent cell migration. In this study, intravenously delivered pulses of rabbit neutrophils labeled with Indium-111 (111In-neutrophils) were used to monitor neutrophil migration into the lungs. Radioactivity quantified in the lung region of interest (ROI) of external gamma camera scintigrams recorded 24 h after intravenous 111In-neutrophil injection accurately reflected the actual neutrophil-associated lung tissue radioactivity. ROI radioactivity at 24 h also correlated closely with the percent of 111In-neutrophils that had migrated into lavageable air spaces, and this parameter therefore provided an index of total lung 111In-neutrophil migration. Using 24-h ROI radioactivity and percent of injected 111In-neutrophils recovered in BAL at 24 h as indices of neutrophil migration into the lung, it was found that intratracheal saline caused only a transient neutrophil migration, whereas 10 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin induced migration that persisted for as long as 3 wk. 111In-neutrophil migration into the lung, assessed by external scintigraphy, correlated with total neutrophils quantified in histologic sections (r = 0.71, p = 0.006). The data suggest that this approach will be valuable in investigating mechanisms controlling neutrophil migration in lung inflammation, and that 111In-neutrophil scintigraphy may provide a noninvasive index of total lung neutrophil load that might be useful in staging inflammation in patchy diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  8. 111Indium-labeled neutrophil migration into the lungs of bleomycin-treated rabbits assessed noninvasively by external scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslett, C.; Shen, A.S.; Feldsien, D.C.; Allen, D.; Henson, P.M.; Cherniack, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Factors controlling neutrophil migration into the lung are poorly understood, but their identification is important for our understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases. Pulmonary inflammation is difficult to quantify, and neutrophils in tissues and BAL may not accurately represent cell migration. In this study, intravenously delivered pulses of rabbit neutrophils labeled with Indium-111 (111In-neutrophils) were used to monitor neutrophil migration into the lungs. Radioactivity quantified in the lung region of interest (ROI) of external gamma camera scintigrams recorded 24 h after intravenous 111In-neutrophil injection accurately reflected the actual neutrophil-associated lung tissue radioactivity. ROI radioactivity at 24 h also correlated closely with the percent of 111In-neutrophils that had migrated into lavageable air spaces, and this parameter therefore provided an index of total lung 111In-neutrophil migration. Using 24-h ROI radioactivity and percent of injected 111In-neutrophils recovered in BAL at 24 h as indices of neutrophil migration into the lung, it was found that intratracheal saline caused only a transient neutrophil migration, whereas 10 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin induced migration that persisted for as long as 3 wk. 111In-neutrophil migration into the lung, assessed by external scintigraphy, correlated with total neutrophils quantified in histologic sections (r = 0.71, p = 0.006). The data suggest that this approach will be valuable in investigating mechanisms controlling neutrophil migration in lung inflammation, and that 111In-neutrophil scintigraphy may provide a noninvasive index of total lung neutrophil load that might be useful in staging inflammation in patchy diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

  9. Mathematical modeling of thin-layer drying of fermented and non-fermented sugarcane bagasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazutti, Marcio A.; Zabot, Giovani; Boni, Gabriela; Skovronski, Aline; de Oliveira, Debora; Di Luccio, Marco; Oliveira, J. Vladimir; Treichel, Helen [Department of Food Engineering, URI - Campus de Erechim, P.O. Box 743, CEP 99700-000, Erechim - RS (Brazil); Rodrigues, Maria Isabel; Maugeri, Francisco [Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Food Engineering, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6121, CEP 13083-862, Campinas - SP (Brazil)

    2010-05-15

    This work reports hot-air convective drying of thin-layer fermented and non-fermented sugarcane bagasse. For this purpose, experiments were carried out in a laboratory-scale dryer assessing the effects of solid-state fermentation (SSF) on the drying kinetics of the processing material. The fermented sugarcane bagasse in SSF was obtained with the use of Kluyveromyces marxianus NRRL Y-7571. Drying experiments were carried out at 30, 35, 40 and 45 C, at volumetric air flow rates of 2 and 3 m{sup 3} h{sup -1}. The ability of ten different thin-layer mathematical models was evaluated towards representing the experimental drying profiles obtained. Results showed that the fermented sugarcane bagasse presents a distinct, faster drying, behavior from that verified for the non-fermented material at the same conditions of temperature and volumetric air flow rate. It is shown that the fermented sugarcane bagasse presented effective diffusion coefficient values of about 1.3 times higher than the non-fermented material. A satisfactory agreement between experimental data and model results of the thin-layer drying of fermented and non-fermented sugarcane bagasse was achieved at the evaluated experimental conditions. (author)

  10. Characterization of neutrophil subsets in healthy human pregnancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloysius Ssemaganda

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that in successful pregnancies increased arginase activity is a mechanism that contributes to the suppression of the maternal immune system. We identified the main type of arginase-expressing cells as a population of activated low-density granulocytes (LDGs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in term placentae. In the present study, we analyzed the phenotype of LDGs and compared it to the phenotype of normal density granulocytes (NDGs in maternal peripheral blood, placental biopsies and cord blood. Our data reveal that only LDGs but no NDGs could be detected in placental biopsies. Phenotypically, NDGs and LDGs from both maternal and cord blood expressed different levels of maturation, activation and degranulation markers. NDGs from the maternal and cord blood were phenotypically similar, while maternal, cord and placental LDGs showed different expression levels of CD66b. LDGs present in cord blood expressed higher levels of arginase compared to maternal and placental LDGs. In summary, our results show that in maternal and cord blood, two phenotypically different populations of neutrophils can be identified, whereas in term placentae, only activated neutrophils are present.

  11. Evasion of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Respiratory Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storisteanu, Daniel M L; Pocock, Joanna M; Cowburn, Andrew S; Juss, Jatinder K; Nadesalingam, Angalee; Nizet, Victor; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2017-04-01

    The release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) is a major immune mechanism intended to capture pathogens. These histone- and protease-coated DNA structures are released by neutrophils in response to a variety of stimuli, including respiratory pathogens, and have been identified in the airways of patients with respiratory infection, cystic fibrosis, acute lung injury, primary graft dysfunction, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. NET production has been demonstrated in the lungs of mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Since the discovery of NETs over a decade ago, evidence that "NET evasion" might act as an immune protection strategy among respiratory pathogens, including group A Streptococcus, Bordetella pertussis, and Haemophilus influenzae, has been growing, with the majority of these studies being published in the past 2 years. Evasion strategies fall into three main categories: inhibition of NET release by down-regulating host inflammatory responses; degradation of NETs using pathogen-derived DNases; and resistance to the microbicidal components of NETs, which involves a variety of mechanisms, including encapsulation. Hence, the evasion of NETs appears to be a widespread strategy to allow pathogen proliferation and dissemination, and is currently a topic of intense research interest. This article outlines the evidence supporting the three main strategies of NET evasion-inhibition, degradation, and resistance-with particular reference to common respiratory pathogens.

  12. Exercise before scuba diving ameliorates decompression-induced neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Dennis; Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena M; Ljubkovic, Marko; Dujic, Zeljko

    2014-10-01

    The goals of this study were to investigate the difference in responses between a scuba dive preceded by aerobic exercise (EX) and a nonexercise control dive (CON) and to further evaluate the potential relation between venous gas emboli (VGE) and microparticles (MP). We hypothesized that exercise would alter the quantity and subtype of annexin V-positive MP and VGE. Nineteen divers performed two dives to 18 m seawater for 41 min separated by at least 3 d, one of which was preceded by 60 min of treadmill interval exercise. Blood was obtained before exercise, before diving, and 15 min, 2 h, 4 h, and 24 h after surfacing. Intravascular bubbles were quantified by transthoracic echocardiography at 15, 40, 80, and 120 min. The median VGE remained unchanged between the two dives; however, there was a significant increase in VGE in the exercise dive at 40 and 80 min at rest. MP were significantly elevated by approximately 2 times at all time points after CON compared with those after EX. Markers of neutrophil and platelet activation were elevated by both dives, and these elevations were attenuated in the EX dive. We conclude that some of the differences observed between the EX and CON related to MP and platelet and neutrophil activation provide additional insight into the potential protective benefits of exercise; however, further study is needed to understand the mechanism and true potential of these benefits.

  13. A Neutrophil Proteomic Signature in Surgical Trauma Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Bekeschus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-healing wounds continue to be a clinical challenge for patients and medical staff. These wounds have a heterogeneous etiology, including diabetes and surgical trauma wounds. It is therefore important to decipher molecular signatures that reflect the macroscopic process of wound healing. To this end, we collected wound sponge dressings routinely used in vacuum assisted therapy after surgical trauma to generate wound-derived protein profiles via global mass spectrometry. We confidently identified 311 proteins in exudates. Among them were expected targets belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, complement, and skin-derived proteins, such as keratins. Next to several S100 proteins, chaperones, heat shock proteins, and immune modulators, the exudates presented a number of redox proteins as well as a discrete neutrophil proteomic signature, including for example cathepsin G, elastase, myeloperoxidase, CD66c, and lipocalin 2. We mapped over 200 post-translational modifications (PTMs; cysteine/methionine oxidation, tyrosine nitration, cysteine trioxidation to the proteomic profile, for example, in peroxiredoxin 1. Investigating manually collected exudates, we confirmed presence of neutrophils and their products, such as microparticles and fragments containing myeloperoxidase and DNA. These data confirmed known and identified less known wound proteins and their PTMs, which may serve as resource for future studies on human wound healing.

  14. Neutrophil depletion after subarachnoid hemorrhage improves memory via NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencio, Jose Javier; Swank, Valerie; Lu, Haiyan; Brunet, Sylvain; Baltan, Selva; Khapre, Rohini V; Seerapu, Himabindu; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive deficits after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common and disabling. Patients who experience delayed deterioration associated with vasospasm are likely to have cognitive deficits, particularly problems with executive function, verbal and spatial memory. Here, we report neurophysiological and pathological mechanisms underlying behavioral deficits in a murine model of SAH. On tests of spatial memory, animals with SAH performed worse than sham animals in the first week and one month after SAH suggesting a prolonged injury. Between three and six days after experimental hemorrhage, mice demonstrated loss of late long-term potentiation (L-LTP) due to dysfunction of the NMDA receptor. Suppression of innate immune cell activation prevents delayed vasospasm after murine SAH. We therefore explored the role of neutrophil-mediated innate inflammation on memory deficits after SAH. Depletion of neutrophils three days after SAH mitigates tissue inflammation, reverses cerebral vasoconstriction in the middle cerebral artery, and rescues L-LTP dysfunction at day 6. Spatial memory deficits in both the short and long-term are improved and associated with a shift of NMDA receptor subunit composition toward a memory sparing phenotype. This work supports further investigating suppression of innate immunity after SAH as a target for preventative therapies in SAH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Vitamin C: A Novel Regulator of Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Natarajan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation was recently identified as a novel mechanism to kill pathogens. However, excessive NET formation in sepsis can injure host tissues. We have recently shown that parenteral vitamin C (VitC is protective in sepsis. Whether VitC alters NETosis is unknown. Methods: We used Gulo−/− mice as they lack the ability to synthesize VitC. Sepsis was induced by intraperitoneal infusion of a fecal stem solution (abdominal peritonitis, FIP. Some VitC deficient Gulo−/− mice received an infusion of ascorbic acid (AscA, 200 mg/kg 30 min after induction of FIP. NETosis was assessed histologically and by quantification for circulating free DNA (cf-DNA in serum. Autophagy, histone citrullination, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, NFκB activation and apoptosis were investigated in peritoneal PMNs. Results: Sepsis produced significant NETs in the lungs of VitC deficient Gulo−/− mice and increased circulating cf-DNA. This was attenuated in the VitC sufficient Gulo−/− mice and in VitC deficient Gulo−/− mice infused with AscA. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs from VitC deficient Gulo−/− mice demonstrated increased activation of ER stress, autophagy, histone citrullination, and NFκB activation, while apoptosis was inhibited. VitC also significantly attenuated PMA induced NETosis in PMNs from healthy human volunteers.

  16. Treatment with Rutin - A Therapeutic Strategy for Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory and Autoimmune Diseases - Anti-inflammatory Effects of Rutin on Neutrophils -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Abd Nikfarjam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Neutrophils represent the front line of human defense against infections. Immediately after stimulation, neutrophilic enzymes are activated and produce toxic mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO and myeloperoxidase (MPO. These mediators can be toxic not only to infectious agents but also to host tissues. Because flavonoids exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, they are subjects of interest for pharmacological modulation of inflammation. In the present study, the effects of rutin on stimulus-induced NO and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α productions and MPO activity in human neutrophils were investigated. Methods: Human peripheral blood neutrophils were isolated using Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation coupled with dextran T500 sedimentation. The cell preparations containing > 98% granulocytes were determined by morphological examination through Giemsa staining. Neutrophils were cultured in complete Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI medium, pre-incubated with or without rutin (25 μM for 45 minutes, and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA. Then, the TNF-α, NO and MPO productions were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, Griess Reagent, and MPO assay kits, respectively. Also, the viability of human neutrophils was assessed using tetrazolium salt 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT, and neutrophils were treated with various concentrations of rutin (1 - 100 μM, after which MTT was appended and incubated at 37ºC for 4 hour. Results: Rutin at concentrations up to 100 μM did not affect neutrophil viability during the 4-hour incubation period. Rutin significantly decreased the NO and TNF-α productions in human peripheral blood neutrophils compared to PMA-control cells (P < 0.001. Also, MPO activity was significantly reduced by rutin (P < 0.001. Conclusion: In this in vitro study, rutin had an anti-inflammatory effect

  17. Biohydrogen production from soluble condensed molasses fermentation using anaerobic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lay, Chyi-How; Lin, Chiu-Yue [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724 (China); Wu, Jou-Hsien; Hsiao, Chin-Lang [Department of Water Resource Engineering, Feng Chia University (China); Chang, Jui-Jen [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University (China); Chen, Chin-Chao [Environmental Resources Laboratory, Department of Landscape Architecture, Chungchou Institute of Technology (China)

    2010-12-15

    Using anaerobic micro-organisms to convert organic waste to produce hydrogen gas gives the benefits of energy recovery and environmental protection. The objective of this study was to develop a biohydrogen production technology from food wastewater focusing on hydrogen production efficiency and micro-flora community at different hydraulic retention times. Soluble condensed molasses fermentation (CMS) was used as the substrate because it is sacchariferous and ideal for hydrogen production. CMS contains nutrient components that are necessary for bacterial growth: microbial protein, amino acids, organic acids, vitamins and coenzymes. The seed sludge was obtained from the waste activated sludge from a municipal sewage treatment plant in Central Taiwan. This seed sludge was rich in Clostridium sp. A CSTR (continuously stirred tank reactor) lab-scale hydrogen fermentor (working volume, 4.0 L) was operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3-24 h with an influent CMS concentration of 40 g COD/L. The results showed that the peak hydrogen production rate of 390 mmol H{sub 2}/L-d occurred at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 320 g COD/L-d at a HRT of 3 h. The peak hydrogen yield was obtained at an OLR of 80 g COD/L-d at a HRT of 12 h. At HRT 8 h, all hydrogenase mRNA detected were from Clostridium acetobutylicum-like and Clostridium pasteurianum-like hydrogen-producing bacteria by RT-PCR analysis. RNA based hydrogenase gene and 16S rRNA gene analysis suggests that Clostridium exists in the fermentative hydrogen-producing system and might be the dominant hydrogen-producing bacteria at tested HRTs (except 3 h). The hydrogen production feedstock from CMS is lower than that of sucrose and starch because CMS is a waste and has zero cost, requiring no added nutrients. Therefore, producing hydrogen from food wastewater is a more commercially feasible bioprocess. (author)

  18. Neutrophils Self-Regulate Immune Complex-Mediated Cutaneous Inflammation through CXCL2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jackson LiangYao; Lim, Chun Hwee; Tay, Fen Wei; Goh, Chi Ching; Devi, Sapna; Malleret, Benoit; Lee, Bernett; Bakocevic, Nadja; Chong, Shu Zhen; Evrard, Maximilien; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Lim, Hwee Ying; Russell, Bruce; Renia, Laurent; Zolezzi, Francesca; Poidinger, Michael; Angeli, Veronique; St John, Ashley L; Harris, John E; Tey, Hong Liang; Tan, Suet Mien; Kabashima, Kenji; Weninger, Wolfgang; Larbi, Anis; Ng, Lai Guan

    2016-02-01

    Deposition of immune complexes (ICs) in tissues triggers acute inflammatory pathology characterized by massive neutrophil influx leading to edema and hemorrhage, and is especially associated with vasculitis of the skin, but the mechanisms that regulate this type III hypersensitivity process remain poorly understood. Here, using a combination of multiphoton intravital microscopy and genomic approaches, we re-examined the cutaneous reverse passive Arthus reaction and observed that IC-activated neutrophils underwent transmigration, triggered further IC formation, and transported these ICs into the interstitium, whereas neutrophil depletion drastically reduced IC formation and ameliorated vascular leakage in vivo. Thereafter, we show that these neutrophils expressed high levels of CXCL2, which further amplified neutrophil recruitment and activation in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. Notably, CXCL1 expression was restricted to tissue-resident cell types, but IC-activated neutrophils may also indirectly, via soluble factors, modulate macrophage CXCL1 expression. Consistent with their distinct cellular origins and localization, only neutralization of CXCL2 but not CXCL1 in the interstitium effectively reduced neutrophil recruitment. In summary, our study establishes that neutrophils are able to self-regulate their own recruitment and responses during IC-mediated inflammation through a CXCL2-driven feed forward loop. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxidative metabolism of neutrophils in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demidchik Lyudmila Andreevna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, available views show our limited knowledge of the peculiarities of the functional status of neutrophils and their metabolism in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. The studying of changes of metabolic status of neutrophils can broaden our views about pneumonia pathogenesis and define datum points of therapeutic effect.

  20. The dynamics of neutrophils in zebrafish (Danio rerio) during infection with the parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff

    2016-01-01

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis is a ciliated protozoan parasite infecting the skin and gills of freshwater fish. Neutrophils are attracted to the infection sites, as a part of the innate immune response. In this study a transgenic line of zebrafish (Tg(MPO:GFP)i114) with GFP-tagged neutrophils was ...

  1. Mechanisms of cell death induced by the neutrophil antimicrobial peptides alpha-defensins and LL-37.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarbiou, J.; Tjabringa, G.S.; Verhoosel, R.M.; Ninaber, D.K.; White, S.R.; Peltenburg, L.T.; Rabe, K.F.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of cell death mediated by the antimicrobial peptides neutrophil defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1-3 [HNP1-3]) and LL-37. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HNP1-3- and LL-37-mediated cell death was assessed in human lung epithelial cells

  2. HMGB1 promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation through interactions with Toll-like receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadie, Jean-Marc; Bae, Hong-Beom; Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Bell, Celeste P.; Yang, Huan; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Tracey, Kevin; Thannickal, Victor J.; Abraham, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Although neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) form to prevent dissemination of pathogenic microorganisms, excessive release of DNA and DNA-associated proteins can also perpetuate sterile inflammation. In this study, we found that the danger-associated molecular pattern protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) can induce NET formation. NET formation was found after exposure of wild-type and receptor for advanced glycation end products-deficient neutrophil to HMGB1, whereas deficiency of Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 diminished the ability of neutrophils to produce NETs. Incubation of neutrophils with HMGB1 significantly increased the amount of DNA and histone 3 released as well as intracellular histone 3 citrullination, a signaling event that precedes chromatin decondensation. In vivo, neutrophils isolated from bronchoalveolar lavages of mice exposed to LPS and HMGB1 showed consistently greater ability to produce NETs compared with pulmonary neutrophils from mice that received LPS alone. In contrast, mice treated with LPS and neutralizing antibody to HMGB1 had decreased amounts of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, as well as of free DNA and histone 3 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Airway neutrophils from LPS-exposed mice that had been treated with anti-HMGB1 antibodies showed decreased citrullination of histone 3. These results demonstrate that interactions between HMGB1 and TLR4 enhance the formation of NETs and provide a novel mechanism through which HMGB1 may contribute to the severity of neutrophil-associated inflammatory conditions. PMID:23316068

  3. NEUTROPHILS PLAY A CRITICAL ROLE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF LPS-INDUCED AIRWAY DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ETD-02-045 (GAVETT) GPRA # 10108Neutrophils Play a Critical Role in the Development of LPS-Induced Airway Disease. Jordan D. Savov, Stephen H. Gavett*, David M. Brass, Daniel L. Costa*, and David A. SchwartzABSTRACTWe investigated the role of neutrophils...

  4. Synchronized integrin engagement and chemokine activation is crucial in neutrophil extracellular trap-mediated sterile inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossaint, Jan; Herter, Jan M.; van Aken, Hugo; Napirei, Markus; Döring, Yvonne; Weber, Christian; Soehnlein, Oliver; Zarbock, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play important roles in inflammatory processes. Here we report that neutrophils have to be simultaneously activated by integrin-mediated outside-in- and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to induce NET formation in acute

  5. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Mothes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment.

  6. Effects of areca nut extracts on the functions of human neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, S L; Chen, Y L; Wan, H C; Liu, T Y; Chen, Y T; Ling, L J

    2000-08-01

    Aqueous extracts of ripe areca nut without husk (ripe ANE) and fresh and tender areca nut with husk (tender ANE) were examined for their effects on the defensive functions of human neutrophils. Exposure of peripheral blood neutrophils to ripe ANE and tender ANE inhibited their bactericidal activity against oral pathogens, including Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans, in a dose-dependent manner. At the concentrations tested, ripe and tender ANEs did not significantly affect the viability of neutrophils as verified by their ability to exclude trypan blue dye. However, both ANEs inhibited the production of bactericidal superoxide anion by neutrophils as measured by cytochrome c reduction. Moreover, the ripe ANE inhibited neutrophils more effectively than did tender ANE. Arecoline, a major alkaloid of areca nut, only exhibited an inhibitory effect on the functions of neutrophils when high concentrations were used. Therefore, arecoline could not be used to explain the inhibitory effects observed for ANEs. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that ripe and tender ANEs reduced the antibacterial activity and the superoxide anion production of neutrophils. This effect may contribute to a less efficient elimination of bacteria from the periodontal environment. Inhibition of the antimicrobial functions of neutrophils may alter the microbial ecology of the oral cavity, and this may be one possible mechanism by which areca nut compromises the oral health of users of areca nut products.

  7. Sputum epithelial cell-derived neutrophil-activating peptide-78 (ENA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epithelial cell-derived neutrophil-activating peptide-78 (ENA-78) is a chemokine that recruits and activates neutrophils, possesses angiogenic properties and promotes connective tissue remodeling. Thus, it could play a pathogenic role in allergic airway inflammation. Eosinophils are the major source for this ...

  8. The beetroot component betanin modulates ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Kostrzewa, Artur; Łuczak, Michał; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of betanin, one of the beetroot major components, on ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human resting and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate polymorphonuclear neutrophils, one of the key elements of the inflammatory response. Incubation of neutrophils with betanin in the concentration range 2-500 µM resulted in significant inhibition of ROS production (by 15-46%, depending on the ROS detection assay). The antioxidant capacity of betanin was most prominently expressed in the chemiluminescence measurements. This compound decreased also the percentage of DNA in comet tails in stimulated neutrophils, but only at the 24 h time point. In resting neutrophils an increased level of DNA in comet tails was observed. Betanin did not affect the activity of caspase-3, in resting neutrophils, but significantly enhanced the enzyme activity in stimulated neutrophils. The western blot analysis showed, however, an increased level of caspase-3 cleavage products as a result of betanin treatment both in resting and stimulated neutrophils. The results indicate that betanin may be responsible for the effect of beetroot products on neutrophil oxidative metabolism and its consequences, DNA damage and apoptosis. The dose and time dependent effects on these processes require further studies. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Synchronisation of glycolytic oscillations in a suspension of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Poulsen, Allan K.; Olsen, Lars Folke

    Neutrophils are known to be able to synchronize their production of superoxide. We show that glycolysis is also synchronized in human neutrophils being in suspension and suggest that oscillations in glycolysis are driving the pulsatile production of superoxide. The synchronising agent remains so...... far unknown, however, much evident points to that it might be hydrogen peroxide or an intermediate in glycolysis....

  10. A convenient diagnostic function test of peripheral blood neutrophils in glycogen storage disease type Ib

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A.J.; Visser, G; Van Zwieten, R; Gruszczynska, B; Poll-The, DWEET; Smit, GPA

    Neutrophils from patients suffering from glycogen storage disease type To (GSD-Ib) show several defects, one of which is a decreased rate of glucose utilization. In this study, we established experimental conditions to show the stimulation of the neutrophil respiratory burst by extracellular

  11. Hematological indices, inflammatory markers and neutrophil CD64 expression: comparative trends during experimental human endotoxemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, W. van der; Pickkers, P.; Scott, C.S.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Gunnewiek, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    CD64 is a high-affinity Fc(gamma)RI receptor expressed by activated neutrophils that has been recently evaluated as a potential sepsis parameter. In the present study, the kinetics of neutrophil membrane CD64 expression were examined during a standardized inflammatory response, using a human

  12. Altered Innate Immune Responses in Neutrophils from Patients with Well- and Suboptimally Controlled Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca S. M. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Respiratory infections are a major cause of asthma exacerbations where neutrophilic inflammation dominates and is associated with steroid refractory asthma. Structural airway cells in asthma differ from nonasthmatics; however it is unknown if neutrophils differ. We investigated neutrophil immune responses in patients who have good (AGood and suboptimal (ASubopt asthma symptom control. Methods. Peripheral blood neutrophils from AGood (ACQ 0.75, n=7, and healthy controls (HC (n=9 were stimulated with bacterial (LPS (1 μg/mL, fMLF (100 nM, and viral (imiquimod (3 μg/mL, R848 (1.5 μg/mL, and poly I:C (10 μg/mL surrogates or live rhinovirus (RV 16 (MOI1. Cell-free supernatant was collected after 1 h for neutrophil elastase (NE and matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 measurements or after 24 h for CXCL8 release. Results. Constitutive NE was enhanced in AGood neutrophils compared to HC. fMLF stimulated neutrophils from ASubopt but not AGood produced 50% of HC levels. fMLF induced MMP-9 was impaired in ASubopt and AGood compared to HC. fMLF stimulated CXCL8 but not MMP-9 was positively correlated with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. ASubopt and AGood responded similarly to other stimuli. Conclusions. Circulating neutrophils are different in asthma; however, this is likely to be related to airflow limitation rather than asthma control.

  13. Pneumovirus-Induced Lung Disease in Mice Is Independent of Neutrophil-Driven Inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortjens, Bart; Lutter, René; Boon, Louis; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B. M.

    2016-01-01

    The human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common pathogen causing lower respiratory tract disease in young children worldwide. A hallmark of severe human RSV infection is the strong neutrophil recruitment to the airways and lungs. Massive neutrophil activation has been

  14. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1–3 as Gastric Cancer Tissue Markers Measured by MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Implications for Infiltrated Neutrophils as a Tumor Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chia Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs -1, -2 and -3 are significantly upregulated and were reported as biomarkers in gastric cancer (GC. However, the tissue location and function of HNPs 1-3 are still unclear in GC, and the spatial distribution of the triad needs to be disclosed. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution and relationships among HNPs-1, -2 and -3, and assess whether infiltrated neutrophils accumulate in gastric tumor.

  15. The clinical significance of neutrophilic pleocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid in patients with viral central nervous system infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siraya Jaijakul

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The results of a study exploring the association between CSF neutrophilic pleocytosis and clinical and prognostic significance are presented here. This study suggests that CSF neutrophilic pleocytosis is not associated with higher adverse clinical outcomes.

  16. Effects of submerged and anaerobic fermentations on cassava flour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava tubers for processing into cassava flour, Lafun a Nigerian locally fermented product was subjected to two different types of fermentations: submerged and anaerobic fermentation for 72 h. Physicochemical changes that occurred during fermentation and their influence on the functional, rheological and sensory ...

  17. Prebiotics in piglet nutrition? Fermentation kinetics along the GI tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Awati, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Keywords: fermentation, gas production, pigletsThe generalized theory behind the carbohydrate to protein fermentation in the GIT is that in presence of fermentable carbohydrate substrate, microbes prefer to ferment carbohydrate source to derive energy and use the nitrogen available for their own

  18. Discovery and History of Amino Acid Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi

    There has been a strong demand in Japan and East Asia for L-glutamic acid as a seasoning since monosodium glutamate was found to present umami taste in 1907. The discovery of glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum in 1956 enabled abundant and low-cost production of the amino acid, creating a large market. The discovery also prompted researchers to develop fermentative production processes for other L-amino acids, such as lysine. Currently, the amino acid fermentation industry is so huge that more than 5 million metric tons of amino acids are manufactured annually all over the world, and this number continues to grow. Research on amino acid fermentation fostered the notion and skills of metabolic engineering which has been applied for the production of other compounds from renewable resources. The discovery of glutamate fermentation has had revolutionary impacts on both the industry and science. In this chapter, the history and development of glutamate fermentation, including the very early stage of fermentation of other amino acids, are reviewed.

  19. Transcription profiling of sparkling wine second fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penacho, Vanessa; Valero, Eva; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2012-02-01

    There is a specific set of stress factors that yeast cells must overcome under second fermentation conditions, during the production of sparkling wines by the traditional (Champenoise) method. Some of them are the same as those of the primary fermentation of still wines, although perhaps with a different intensity (high ethanol concentration, low pH, nitrogen starvation) while others are more specific to second fermentation (low temperature, CO(2) overpressure). The transcription profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during primary wine fermentation has been studied by several research groups, but this is the first report on yeast transcriptome under second fermentation conditions. Our results indicate that the main pathways affected by these particular conditions are related to aerobic respiration, but genes related to vacuolar and peroxisomal functions were also highlighted in this study. A parallelism between the transcription profile of wine yeast during primary and second fermentation is appreciated, with ethanol appearing as the main factor driving gene transcription during second fermentation. Low temperature seems to also influence yeast transcription profile under these particular winemaking conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Microbial interactions associated with secondary cucumber fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, W; Pérez-Díaz, I M

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the interaction between selected yeasts and bacteria and associate their metabolic activity with secondary cucumber fermentation. Selected yeast and bacteria, isolated from cucumber secondary fermentations, were inoculated as single and mixed cultures in a cucumber juice model system. Our results confirmed that during storage of fermented cucumbers and in the presence of oxygen, spoilage yeasts are able to grow and utilize the lactic and acetic acids present in the medium, which results in increased brine pH and the chemical reduction in the environment. These conditions favour opportunistic bacteria that continue the degradation of lactic acid. Lactobacillus buchneri, Clostridium bifermentans and Enterobacter cloacae were able to produce acetic, butyric and propionic acids, respectively, when inoculated in the experimental medium at pH 4.6. Yeast and bacteria interactions favoured the survival of Cl. bifermentans and E. cloacae at the acidic pH typical of fermented cucumbers (3.2), but only E. cloacae was able to produce a secondary product. The methodology used in this study confirmed that a complex microbiota is responsible for the changes observed during fermented cucumber secondary fermentation and that certain microbial interactions may be essential for the production of propionic and butyric acids. Understanding the dynamics of the development of secondary cucumber fermentation aids in the identification of strategies to prevent its occurrence and economic losses for the pickling industry. © 2012 No claim to US Government works.

  1. Effects of Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells on neonatal neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan I

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Imteyaz Khan,1 Liying Zhang,2 Moiz Mohammed,1 Faith E Archer,1 Jehan Abukharmah,1 Zengrong Yuan,2 S Saif Rizvi,1 Michael G Melek,1 Arnold B Rabson,1,2 Yufang Shi,2 Barry Weinberger,1 Anna M Vetrano1,21Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 2Rutgers Child Health Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USABackground: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been proposed as autologous therapy for inflammatory diseases in neonates. MSCs from umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (WJ-MSCs are accessible, with high proliferative capacity. The effects of WJ-MSCs on neutrophil activity in neonates are not known. We compared the effects of WJ-MSCs on apoptosis and the expression of inflammatory, oxidant, and antioxidant mediators in adult and neonatal neutrophils.Methods: WJ-MSCs were isolated, and their purity and function were confirmed by flow cytometry. Neutrophils were isolated from cord and adult blood by density centrifugation. The effects of neutrophil/WJ-MSC co-culture on apoptosis and gene and protein expression were measured.Results: WJ-MSCs suppressed neutrophil apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. WJ-MSCs decreased gene expression of NADPH oxidase-1 in both adult and neonatal neutrophils, but decreased heme oxygenase-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor and increased catalase and cyclooxygenase-2 in the presence of lipopolysaccharide only in adult cells. Similarly, generation of interleukin-8 was suppressed in adult but not neonatal neutrophils. Thus, WJ-MSCs dampened oxidative, vascular, and inflammatory activity by adult neutrophils, but neonatal neutrophils were less responsive. Conversely, Toll-like receptor-4, and cyclooxygenase-2 were upregulated in WJ-MSCs only in the presence of adult neutrophils, suggesting an inflammatory MSC phenotype that is not induced by neonatal neutrophils.Conclusion: Whereas WJ-MSCs altered gene expression in adult neutrophils in ways suggesting anti

  2. Pathogen response-like recruitment and activation of neutrophils by sterile immunogenic dying cells drives neutrophil-mediated residual cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Abhishek D; Vandenberk, Lien; Fang, Shentong; Fasche, Tekele; Van Eygen, Sofie; Maes, Jan; Van Woensel, Matthias; Koks, Carolien; Vanthillo, Niels; Graf, Norbert; de Witte, Peter; Van Gool, Stefaan; Salven, Petri; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2017-05-01

    Innate immune sensing of dying cells is modulated by several signals. Inflammatory chemokines-guided early recruitment, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns-triggered activation, of major anti-pathogenic innate immune cells like neutrophils distinguishes pathogen-infected stressed/dying cells from sterile dying cells. However, whether certain sterile dying cells stimulate innate immunity by partially mimicking pathogen response-like recruitment/activation of neutrophils remains poorly understood. We reveal that sterile immunogenic dying cancer cells trigger (a cell autonomous) pathogen response-like chemokine (PARC) signature, hallmarked by co-release of CXCL1, CCL2 and CXCL10 (similar to cells infected with bacteria or viruses). This PARC signature recruits preferentially neutrophils as first innate immune responders in vivo (in a cross-species, evolutionarily conserved manner; in mice and zebrafish). Furthermore, key danger signals emanating from these dying cells, that is, surface calreticulin, ATP and nucleic acids stimulate phagocytosis, purinergic receptors and toll-like receptors (TLR) i.e. TLR7/8/9-MyD88 signaling on neutrophil level, respectively. Engagement of purinergic receptors and TLR7/8/9-MyD88 signaling evokes neutrophil activation, which culminates into H 2 O 2 and NO-driven respiratory burst-mediated killing of viable residual cancer cells. Thus sterile immunogenic dying cells perform 'altered-self mimicry' in certain contexts to exploit neutrophils for phagocytic targeting of dead/dying cancer cells and cytotoxic targeting of residual cancer cells.

  3. Formylpeptide receptors are critical for rapid neutrophil mobilization in host defense against Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Keqiang; Yoshimura, Teizo; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Wang, Aimin; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M.; Wang, Ji Ming

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria) causes opportunistic infection in immunocompromised hosts with high mortality. Resistance to Listeria depends on immune responses and recruitment of neutrophils of the immune system into infected sites is an early and critical step. Mouse neutrophils express two G protein-coupled formylpeptide receptor subtypes Fpr1 and Fpr2 that recognize bacterial and host-derived chemotactic molecules including Listeria peptides for cell migration and activation. Here we report deficiency in Fprs exacerbated the severity of the infection and increased the mortality of infected mice. The mechanism involved impaired early neutrophil recruitment to the liver with Fpr1 and Fpr2 being sole receptors for neutrophils to sense Listeria chemoattractant signals and for production of bactericidal superoxide. Thus, Fprs are essential sentinels to guide the first wave of neutrophil infiltration in the liver of Listeria-infected mice for effective elimination of the invading pathogen. PMID:23139859

  4. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamding Wangdi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a and C5a receptor (C5aR. Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  5. New strategy for sepsis: Targeting a key role of platelet-neutrophil interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil and platelet are essential arms of the innate immune response. In sepsis, platelet abnormal activation as well as neutrophil paralysis are well recognized. For platelet, it is characterized by the contribution to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC and the enhanced inflammation response. In terms of neutrophil, its dysfunction is manifested by the impaired recruitment and migration to the infectious foci, abnormal sequestration in the remote organs, and the delayed clearance. More recently, it has been apparent that together platelet-neutrophil interaction can induce a faster and harder response during sepsis. This article focuses on the activation of platelet, dysfunction of neutrophil, and the interaction between them during sepsis and profiles some of the molecular mechanisms and outcomes in these cellular dialogues, providing a novel strategy for treatment of sepsis.

  6. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages...... and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and increasing evidence supports a role for EC-SOD in the development of an inflammatory response. Here we show that human EC-SOD is present at the cell surface of isolated neutrophils as well as stored within secretory vesicles. Interestingly, we find that EC-SOD m......RNA is absent throughout neutrophil maturation indicating that the protein is synthesized by other cells and subsequently endocytosed by the neutrophil. When secretory vesicles were mobilized by neutrophil stimulation using formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA...

  7. Reduced expression of C5a receptors on neutrophils from cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Sørensen, O; Leslie, R

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To describe further functional deficiencies of neonatal neutrophils by measuring the expression of C5a receptors. METHODS: C5a uptake was measured using flow cytometry with fluorescein isothiocynate labelled recombinant C5a. The response of neutrophils to stimulation with C5a and fMLP...... was tested by measuring migration and exocytosis of myeloperoxidase and lactoferrin. RESULTS: C5a mean fluorescence on neutrophils from neonates was significantly lower (22.4 (SD 3.5)) than in adult controls (31.5 (3.1)). Neutrophils from neonates migrated poorly towards both C5a and fMLP compared with those...... from adult controls. Exocytosis of myeloperoxidase, but not lactoferrin from neonatal neutrophils stimulated with C5a, was significantly lower than in adult controls. fMLP stimulation, on the other hand, resulted in significantly higher exocytosis in neonates. CONCLUSION: The lower expression of C5a...

  8. Preoperative neutrophil response as a predictive marker of clinical outcome following open heart surgery and the impact of leukocyte filtration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Soo, Alan W

    2010-11-01

    Open heart surgery is associated with a massive systemic inflammatory response. Neutrophils, are the main mediator of this response. We hypothesised that the degree of neutrophil activation and inflammatory response to open heart surgery varies individually and correlates with clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to determine if individual clinical outcome can be predicted preoperatively through assessment of in-vitro stimulated neutrophil responses. Following that, the effects of neutrophil depletion through leukocyte filters are examined.

  9. Histopathological and clinical evaluation of chronic spontaneous urticaria patients with neutrophilic and non-neutrophilic cutaneous infiltrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Cíntia Freitas; Morais, Karina Lopes; Figueroa, Pamela; Dias, Natasha Favoretto; Valente, Neusa Sakai; Maruta, Celina Wakisaba; Criado, Paulo Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Chronic urticaria has an expressive prevalence in general population, especially in adults, and is defined by the presence of intermittent hives for six weeks or longer. Our study aims to characterize the histological patterns of chronic spontaneous urticaria, based on the inflammatory cell infiltrate, and correlate them to laboratory exams. It was performed a retrospective analysis of laboratory, histopathology and direct immunofluorescence data of 93 patients with chronic urticaria. For histopathological analysis, cell count was performed in four fields at high magnification (×400) for each specimen. The resulting cell count medians were submitted to statistical analysis and, then, were correlated to laboratorial findings. We found a female predominance (76.34%) of chronic urticaria cases, and an average age of 42.5 years (SD ± 15). Two histological groups were distinctive: 1) chronic urticaria with predominance of neutrophils or eosinophils - N (%) = 39 (42.4%) - and 2) chronic urticaria with predominance of lymphocytes - N (%) = 53 (57.6%). There was not significant correlation between histological groups and laboratorial tests. Moreover, direct immunofluorescence was positive in 21 (33,87%) from 62 patients. There is not enough scientific evidence to support neutrophilic urticaria as a solid, separate entity. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Improved fermentative alcohol production. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, C.R.; Maiorella, B.L.; Blanch, H.W.; Cysewski, G.R.

    1980-11-26

    An improved fermentation process is described for producing alcohol which includes the combination of vacuum fermentation and vacuum distillation. Preferably, the vacuum distillation is carried out in two phases, one a fermentor proper operated at atmospheric pressure and a flash phase operated at reduced pressure with recycle of fermentation brew having a reduced alcohol content to the fermentor, using vapor recompression heating of the flash-pot recycle stream to heat the flash-pot or the distillation step, and using water load balancing (i.e., the molar ratio of water in the fermentor feed is the same as the molar ratio of water in the distillation overhead).

  11. Biotechnology of Flavor Generation in Fermented Meats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldrá, Fidel

    Traditionally, meat fermentation was based on the use of natural flora, including the “back-slopping”, or addition of a previous successful fermented sausage. However, these practices gave a great variability in the developed flora and affected the safety and quality of the sausages (Toldrá, 2002; Toldrá & Flores, 2007). The natural flora of fermented meat has been studied for many years (Leistner, 1992; Toldrá, 2006a), and more recently, these micro-organisms have been isolated and biochemically identified through molecular methods applied to extracted DNA and RNA (Cocolin, Manzano, Aggio, Cantoni, & Comi, 2001; Cocolin, Manzano, Cantoni, & Comi, 2001; Comi, Urso, Lacumin, Rantsiou, Cattaneo & Cantoni, 2005).

  12. Functional Properties of Microorganisms in Fermented Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Jyoti P.; Shin, Dong-Hwa; Jung, Su-Jin; Chae, Soo-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Fermented foods have unique functional properties imparting some health benefits to consumers due to presence of functional microorganisms, which possess probiotics properties, antimicrobial, antioxidant, peptide production, etc. Health benefits of some global fermented foods are synthesis of nutrients, prevention of cardiovascular disease, prevention of cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, allergic reactions, diabetes, among others. The present paper is aimed to review the information on some functional properties of the microorganisms associated with fermented foods and beverages, and their health-promoting benefits to consumers. PMID:27199913

  13. Researchers foment better ways to ferment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    Researchers in Australia and the US are experimenting with Zymomonas mobilis, the bacteria strain used to make tequila. It could reduce fermentation times because it can withstand substantially higher temperatures than yeast. MIT is experimenting with Clostridium thermocellum, a bacteria strain which has the ability to hydrolyze cellulose into glucose sugar and simultaneously ferment the glucose to ethanol. Purdue University is working with Rhizopus, used in the fermentation of certain Chinese wines where alcohol content approaches 18%. Other researchers are looking at enzyme-based processes to improve sugar yields from starch and cellulose, and Purdue is making a major effort to cut distillation energy consumption.

  14. Novel strategies for control of fermentation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mears, Lisa; Stocks, Stuart; Sin, Gürkan

    Bioprocesses are inherently sensitive to fluctuations in processing conditions and must be tightly regulated to maintain cellular productivity. Industrial fermentations are often difficult to replicate across production sites or between facilities as the small operating differences in the equipment...... of a fermentation. Industrial fermentation processes are typically operated in fed batch mode, which also poses specific challenges for process monitoring and control. This is due to many reasons including non-linear behaviour, and a relatively poor understanding of the system dynamics. It is therefore challenging...

  15. Induction of hyperresponsiveness in human airway tissue by neutrophils--mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevich, S Z; Hughes, J M; Black, J L; Armour, C L

    1996-05-01

    The two main features of asthma are bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. The inflammatory response in asthma consists of infiltration and activation of a variety of inflammatory cells including neutrophils. Our previous studies have shown that stimulated neutrophil supernatants cause hyperresponsiveness of human bronchial tissue in vitro. To investigate the effect of the sensitization status of the tissue and the albumin concentration used to prepare supernatants on the response of human bronchial tissue to stimulated neutrophil supernatants. Neutrophil supernatants were prepared from human isolated blood in the presence of varying concentrations of albumin (0%, 0.1% and 4%). Neutrophil supernatants were added to sensitized and non-sensitized human isolated bronchial tissue which was stimulated with electrical field stimulation (EFS) (20 s every 4 min). Receptor antagonists specific for the prostaglandin and thromboxane (10(-7) M GR32191), platelet activating factor (10(-6) M WEB 2086), leukotriene D4 (10(-6) M MK-679) and neurokinin A (10(-7) M SR48968) receptors were used to identify neutrophil products responsible for the effects observed in the bronchial tissue. In non-sensitized human bronchial tissue, stimulated neutrophil supernatants induced a direct contraction in the presence of 0% and 0.1% but not 4% albumin. This contraction was due to leukotriene D4 as MK-679 completely inhibited the contraction. In contrast, stimulated neutrophil supernatants increased responsiveness of sensitized human bronchial tissue to EFS. The increased responsiveness was observed only in the presence of 0.1% albumin, with the site of modulation likely to be prejunctional on the parasympathetic nerve. The increased responsiveness was not inhibited by any of the antagonists tested. Sensitization status of the tissue and albumin concentration effect the responsiveness of human bronchial tissue to stimulated neutrophil supernatant. Our results suggest a possible role for

  16. Sulforaphane restores cellular glutathione levels and reduces chronic periodontitis neutrophil hyperactivity in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irundika H K Dias

    Full Text Available The production of high levels of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils is associated with the local and systemic destructive phenotype found in the chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of sulforaphane (SFN to restore cellular glutathione levels and reduce the hyperactivity of circulating neutrophils associated with chronic periodontitis. Using differentiated HL60 cells as a neutrophil model, here we show that generation of extracellular O2 (. - by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH oxidase complex is increased by intracellular glutathione depletion. This may be attributed to the upregulation of thiol regulated acid sphingomyelinase driven lipid raft formation. Intracellular glutathione was also lower in primary neutrophils from periodontitis patients and, consistent with our previous findings, patients neutrophils were hyper-reactive to stimuli. The activity of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a master regulator of the antioxidant response, is impaired in circulating neutrophils from chronic periodontitis patients. Although patients' neutrophils exhibit a low reduced glutathione (GSH/oxidised glutathione (GSSG ratio and a higher total Nrf2 level, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear Nrf2 remained unchanged relative to healthy controls and had reduced expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC, and modifier (GCLM subunit mRNAs, compared to periodontally healthy subjects neutrophils. Pre-treatment with SFN increased expression of GCLC and GCM, improved intracellular GSH/GSSG ratios and reduced agonist-activated extracellular O2 (. - production in both dHL60 and primary neutrophils from patients with periodontitis and controls. These findings suggest that a deficiency in Nrf2-dependent pathways may underpin susceptibility to hyper-reactivity in circulating primary neutrophils during chronic periodontitis.

  17. Obesity is associated with more activated neutrophils in African American male youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X; Su, S; Wang, X; Barnes, V; De Miguel, C; Ownby, D; Pollock, J; Snieder, H; Chen, W; Wang, X

    2015-01-01

    There is emerging evidence suggesting the role of peripheral blood leukocytes in the pathogenesis of obesity and related diseases. However, few studies have taken a genome-wide approach to investigating gene expression profiles in peripheral leukocytes between obese and lean individuals with the consideration of obesity-related shifts in leukocyte types. We conducted this study in 95 African Americans (AAs) of both genders (age 14-20 years, 46 lean and 49 obese). Complete blood count with differential test (CBC) was performed in whole blood. Genome-wide gene expression analysis was obtained using the Illumina HumanHT-12 V4 Beadchip with RNA extracted from peripheral leukocytes. Out of the 95 participants, 64 had neutrophils stored. The validation study was based on real-time PCR with RNA extracted from purified neutrophils. CBC test suggested that, in males, obesity was associated with increased neutrophil percentage (P=0.03). Genome-wide gene expression analysis showed that, in males, the majority of the most differentially expressed genes were related to neutrophil activation. Validation of the gene expression levels of ELANE (neutrophil elastase) and MPO (myeloperoxidase) in purified neutrophils demonstrated that the expression of these two genes--important biomarkers of neutrophils activation--were significantly elevated in obese males (P=0.01 and P=0.02, respectively). The identification of increased neutrophil percentage and activation in obese AA males suggests that neutrophils have an essential role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disease. Further functional and mechanistic studies on neutrophils may contribute to the development of novel intervention strategies reducing the burden associated with obesity-related health problems.

  18. Quality and Flavor Profiles of Arabica Coffee Processed by Some Fermentation Treatments: Temperature, Containers, and Fermentation Agents Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee fermentation is a step of wet processing. In fact, some microorganisms naturally exist on the surface of coffee cherry. Using a starter culture of microorganisms may change equilibrium of microorganism population. Among some safe fermentation agents are present in “ragi tape” (yeast, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk. A fermentor machine equipped with eating-control and stirrer had been designed, and tested before. Some treatments investigated were fermentation containers (fermentor machine and plastic sacks; fermentation agents (fresh cage-luwakcoffee, “ragi tape”, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk; temperature of fermentation (room, 30 C, 35 C, and 40 C; and duration of fermentation (6, 12, and 18 hours. The experiment were replicated three times. Wet-coffee parchments were washed and sundried until moisture content reached 12%. The dried parchment was hulled and examined for the bean quality and flavors. The experiment indicated that 40 C fermentation in fermentor machine resulted in higher content of “full sour defect”. Fermentation agents significanly influenced bean size. Temperature treatment significanly influenced bulk density and bean size. The best flavor profile was obtained from fermentation in plastic sack at ambient temperature. Bacteria of fermented milk and “fresh luwak coffee” as fermentation agents resulted up to excellent flavor. Twelve hours fermentation produced best flavor of Arabica coffee compared to 6 and 18 hours. Key words: Arabica coffee, fermentation, flavour, fermentation agents

  19. Recruitment of classical monocytes can be inhibited by disturbing heteromers of neutrophil HNP1 and platelet CCL5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alard, Jean-Eric; Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Wichapong, Kanin; Bongiovanni, Dario; Horckmans, Michael; Megens, Remco T. A.; Leoni, Giovanna; Ferraro, Bartolo; Rossaint, Jan; Paulin, Nicole; Ng, Judy; Ippel, Hans; Suylen, Dennis; Hinkel, Rabea; Blanchet, Xavier; Gaillard, Fanny; D'Amico, Michele; von Hundelshausen, Phillipp; Zarbock, Alexander; Scheiermann, Christoph; Hackeng, Tilman M.; Steffens, Sabine; Kupatt, Christian; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F.; Weber, Christian; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    In acute and chronic inflammation, neutrophils and platelets, both of which promote monocyte recruitment, are often activated simultaneously. We investigated how secretory products of neutrophils and platelets synergize to enhance the recruitment of monocytes. We found that neutrophil-borne human

  20. Antimutagenicity of fermented milk with lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    細野, 明義; Akiyoshi, Hosono; 信州大学大学院農学研究科; Graduate School of Agriculture, Shinshu University

    2002-01-01

    Fermented milk and lactic acid bacteria have been considered to provide potential health benefits to human beings. Milk containing casein has been shown to be highly antimutagenic, and fermentation by lactic acid bacteria produces various hydrolytic peptides which contribute to the high antimutagenicity of fermented milk. The antimutagenic property of fermented milk was dependent on the strains of lactic acid bacteria and the fermentation time. Not only the proteolytic products of casein, but...

  1. The Effects of Exercise on Judoists’ Circulating Blood Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Type, intensity and duration of exercises exert pivotal effects on athletes’ immune system and probably athletes’ susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. In this study we examined the effects of one session of moderate-intensity exercise on male judoists’ circulating blood neutrophil counts (BNC and respiratory burst, and self-reported upper respiratory clinical infections 24 hours after the exercise and during the sport seasons. Methods: Ten male judoists after obtaining informed consent were included in the study. The athletes took part in a session of moderate-intensity exercise (60 minutes running on a treadmill at 60% of maximum heart rate. Blood samples were drawn at rest immediately after the exercise. Blood neutrophil count and percentage of Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA stimulated neutrophils in whole blood were assessed [as a marker of oxidative burst (OB quality]. Athletes were asked about any signs of upper respiratory infections 24 hours after the exercise and during sport seasons. Paired-t test was used for statistical analysis and statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: BNC were in normal range at rest, and meaningfully increased immediately after the exercise (p<0.05. At rest, the OB activity was in normal range, and increased immediately after the exercise (not significant. During 24 hours after the exercise, athletes showed no signs of upper respiratory system infections. Also they mentioned no history of increased susceptibility of upper respiratory infections during sport seasons. Conclusion: Continuous judo exercises have no negative effects on BNC and OB activity. This finding is in accordance with the absence of self-reported upper respiratory infections in judoists during sport seasons. Significant increase in BNC after a session of exercise was a

  2. FERMENTATION ACTIVITY OF LACTOSE-FERMENTATION YEAST IN WHEY-MALT WORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Greek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main parameters of fermentation of whey-malt wort with the use of different strains of lactose-fermentation yeast was investigated experimentally. According to the findings of investigation of fermentive activity for different types of lactose-fermentation microorganisms in whey-malt wort it was found that the most active spirituous fermentation for all parameters was in wort fermented by microorganisms Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K and Saccharomyces lactis 95. High capacity for utilization of malt carbohydrates represented by easily metabolized carbohydrates of malt extract was determined. Also organoleptic analysis of fermented whey drinks derived from the renewed mixtures of dry whey and fermented malt and yeast Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K and Saccharomyces lactis 95 was carried out. It was found that the drink fermented with yeast Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K had intense refreshing flavor of rye bread with fruit tones. Intensity growth of aromatization for complex of sample with microorganisms Saccharomyces lactis 95, indicating high organoleptic indexes of the drink was observed.

  3. The Role of Neutrophil Proteins on the Amyloid Beta-RAGE Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Amanda J.; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Wren, Jonathan D.; Sjoelund, Virginie H.; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed an elevated expression of the neutrophil protein, cationic antimicrobial protein of 37kDa (CAP37), in brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), suggesting that CAP37 could be involved in AD pathogenesis. The first step in determining how CAP37 might contribute to AD pathogenesis was to identify the receptor through which it induces cell responses. To identify a putative receptor, we performed GAMMA analysis to determine genes that positively correlated with CAP37 in terms of expression. Positive correlations with ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) were observed. Additionally, CAP37 expression positively correlated with two other neutrophil proteins, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) demonstrated an interaction between CAP37, neutrophil elastase, and cathepsin G with RAGE. Amyloid beta 1–42 (Aβ1–42), a known RAGE ligand, accumulates in AD brains and interacts with RAGE, contributing to Aβ1–42 neurotoxicity. We questioned whether the binding of CAP37, neutrophil elastase and/or cathepsin G to RAGE could interfere with Aβ1–42 binding to RAGE. Using ELISAs, we determined that CAP37 and neutrophil elastase inhibited binding of Aβ1–42 to RAGE, and this effect was reversed by protease inhibitors in the case of neutrophil elastase. Since neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G have enzymatic activity, mass spectrometry was performed to determine the proteolytic activity of all three neutrophil proteins on Aβ1–42. All three neutrophil proteins bound to Aβ1–42 with different affinities and cleaved Aβ1–42 with different kinetics and substrate specificities. We posit that these neutrophil proteins could modulate neurotoxicity in AD by cleaving Aβ1–42 and influencing the Aβ1–42 –RAGE interaction. Further studies will be required to determine the biological significance of these effects and their relevance in neurodegenerative diseases such as

  4. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of...

  5. Study on Incentive Price of Fermented Cocoa to Overcome Reluctance of Farmer to Apply Fermentation : Case Study in Jembrana Regency

    OpenAIRE

    Soemarno, Joko; Hariyanti, Yuli; Soeparto, Soetanto Abdoellah; Sophia Hartatri, Diany Faila

    2015-01-01

    Improving cocoa quality through encouraging farmers to do fermentation is one of the ways to increase the added value of cocoa. However, majority ofIndonesian farmers are reluctance to do fermentation. This research aimed to study factors causing farmers reluctant to do fermentation, weight differencebetween fermented and unfermented cocoa, cocoa processing time difference between fermented and unfermented cocoa, quality difference between fermentedand unfermented coco refers to cocoa bean st...

  6. Methane fermentation of regionally accrued wet biomass

    OpenAIRE

    浅野, 憲哉

    2017-01-01

    The methane fermentation of Japanese mushroom ligneous bed waste was conducted for estimate steam explosion as pretreatment. Methane yield was improved to 50-75% by pretreatment of mushroom bed with severity factor 2.1-3.2

  7. Pervaporation of ethanol from lignocellulosic fermentation broth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaykawad, S.S.; Zha, Y.; Punt, P.J.; Groenestijn, J.W. van; Wielen, L.A.M. van der; Straathof, A.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Pervaporation can be applied in ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Hydrophobic pervaporation, using a commercial PDMS membrane, was employed to concentrate the ethanol produced by fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing this.

  8. Nutraceutical impact of fermented products on human

    OpenAIRE

    KORANDOVÁ, Eliška

    2008-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with nutraceutical impact of fermented products on human immunity, on the state of oxidative stress and on the quality of life. It presents probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics and their expected influence on human health.

  9. [Fermentation transformed ginsenoside by Lactobacillus plantarum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Yi; Sun, Liang; Wang, Kang-Yu; Jiang, Shi-Cui; Sun, Chun-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Ping

    2014-04-01

    To explore ginseng fermentation process by Lactobacillus plantarum, and to make part of total saponins transformed into more reactive ginsenoside Rd. Microbial fermentation was carried out by still dark culture. Total saponins were extracted by Soxhlet extraction, and determined by UV visible spectrophotometry with colours reaction by vanillin-sulfuric acid. Ginsenoside Rd was determined by HPLC method. The fermentation process was: MRS medium, 35 degrees C, pH 5.0, cultured for 2 days. The content of total saponins was inhance 32%, and the content of ginsenoside Rd was increased 4.864 mg x g(-1). The fermentation system's process was reasonable, and it's suitable for mass production, important significance for ginsenoside microbial transformation.

  10. Phytosynthesized iron nanoparticles: effects on fermentative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Iron nanoparticles; green synthesis; Syzygium cumini; dark fermentation; biohydrogen production; Enterobacter cloacae. ... Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur 784 028, Assam, India; Department of Physics, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur 784 028, ...

  11. Exploiting the potential of gas fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redl, Stephanie Maria Anna; Diender, Martijn; Jensen, Torbjørn Ølshøj

    2017-01-01

    The use of gas fermentation for production of chemicals and fuels with lower environmental impact is a technology that is gaining increasing attention. Over 38 Gt of CO2 is annually being emitted from industrial processes, thereby contributing significantly to the concentration of greenhouse gases...... in the atmosphere. Together with the gasification of biomass and different waste streams, these gases have the potential for being utilized for production of chemicals through fermentation processes. Acetogens are among the most studied organisms capable of utilizing waste gases. Although engineering...... focus on the advantages of alternative fermentation scenarios, including thermophilic production strains, multi-stage fermentations, mixed cultures, as well as mixotrophy. Such processes have the potential to significantly broaden the product portfolio, increase the product concentrations and yields...

  12. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) impact on deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Tobias A; Brill, Alexander; Wagner, Denisa D

    2012-08-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major health problem that requires improved prophylaxis and treatment. Inflammatory conditions such as infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases are risk factors for DVT. We and others have recently shown that extracellular DNA fibers produced in inflammation and known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contribute to experimental DVT. NETs stimulate thrombus formation and coagulation and are abundant in thrombi in animal models of DVT. It appears that, in addition to fibrin and von Willebrand factor, NETs represent a third thrombus scaffold. Here, we review how NETs stimulate thrombosis and discuss known and potential interactions of NETs with endothelium, platelets, red blood cells, and coagulation factors and how NETs could influence thrombolysis. We propose that drugs that inhibit NET formation or facilitate NET degradation may prevent or treat DVT.

  13. Neutrophil chemotaxis by Propionibacterium acnes lipase and its inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W L; Shalita, A R; Suntharalingam, K; Fikrig, S M

    1982-01-01

    The chemoattraction of Propionibacterium acnes lipase for neutrophils and the effect of lipase inhibitor and two antibiotic agents on the chemotaxis were evaluated. Of the various fractions tested, partially purified lipase (fraction 2c) was the most active cytotaxin produced by P. acnes. Serum mediators were not required for the generation of chemotaxis by lipase in vitro. Diisopropyl phosphofluoridate at low concentration (10(-4) mM) completely inhibited lipase activity as well as polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis generated by lipase. Tetracycline hydrochloride and erythromycin base at concentrations of 10(-1) mM and 1 mM, respectively, caused 100% inhibition of PMN migration toward lipase or zymosan-activated serum. The inhibiting activity of the antibiotics was directed against cells independently of any effect on lipase. Chemotaxis by P. acnes lipase suggests a wider role for this enzyme in the inflammatory process and the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

  14. Fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates: Inhibition and detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmqvist, E.

    1998-02-01

    The ethanol yield and productivity obtained during fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates is decreased due to the presence of inhibiting compounds, such as weak acids, furans and phenolic compounds produced during hydrolysis. Evaluation of the effect of various biological, physical and chemical detoxification treatments by fermentation assays using Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to characterise inhibitors. Inhibition of fermentation was decreased after removal of the non-volatile compounds, pre-fermentation by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei, treatment with the lignolytic enzyme laccase, extraction with ether, and treatment with alkali. Yeast growth in lignocellulosic hydrolysates was inhibited below a certain fermentation pH, most likely due to high concentrations of undissociated weak acids. The effect of individual compounds were studied in model fermentations. Furfural is reduced to furfuryl alcohol by yeast dehydrogenases, thereby affecting the intracellular redox balance. As a result, acetaldehyde accumulated during furfural reduction, which most likely contributed to inhibition of growth. Acetic acid (10 g 1{sup -1}) and furfural (3 g 1{sup -1}) interacted antagonistically causing decreased specific growth rate, whereas no significant individual or interaction effects were detected by the lignin-derived compound 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (2 g 1{sup -1}). By maintaining a high cell mass density in the fermentor, the process was less sensitive to inhibitors affecting growth and to fluctuations in fermentation pH, and in addition the depletion rate of bioconvertible inhibitors was increased. A theoretical ethanol yield and high productivity was obtained in continuous fermentation of spruce hydrolysate when the cell mass concentration was maintained at a high level by applying cell recirculation 164 refs, 16 figs, 5 tabs

  15. Fermentation based carbon nanotube bionic functional composites

    OpenAIRE

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique mechanical and physical properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Based on grape must and bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at r...

  16. Mechanisms of loss of human neutrophil chemotaxis following thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R D; Hasslen, S R; Ahrenholz, D H; Solem, L D

    1987-01-01

    The increased susceptibility to infection of patients with thermal injury is related to loss of host defense, which is reflected, in part, by the temporal loss of chemotactic function of leukocytic phagocytes. Our studies of patient neutrophils to define the mechanism of this phenomenon involved evaluation of both random and chemotactic migratory functions of patient neutrophils, measurement of receptors for chemotactic ligands, and measurement of receptors mediating substrate adherence of the cells. Measurements of migratory functions were made using the under-agarose technique and measurements of receptor expression were accomplished by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labeled ligand or receptor-specific antibody. We conclude that loss of chemotaxis in response to C5a/C5adesArg is the results of down-regulation of receptors for C5a and of reduced motility, and that loss of chemotaxis in response to the tripeptide FMLP is the result of reduced motility alone. Measurements of changes in the expression of "adherence" (iC3b) receptors revealed that up-regulation occurs early and can be sustained for weeks after injury. These results are taken to suggest that either hyper- or hypo-adherence could explain the loss of random migratory function observed for patient cells. Evidence of auto-oxidative alteration of cytoskeletal elements, to produce loss of random migratory function, also is reviewed. Considering the evidence for activation of the complement cascade after thermal injury C5a and C5adesArg are likely primary factors in effecting the down-regulation of C5a receptors, stimulation of secretion to mobilize iC3b receptors, and stimulation of respiration to auto-oxidize cell components. Such evidence of injury-mediated complement activation included data derived from application of a novel immunoassay for iC3b.

  17. Fermented dairy products: knowledge and consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, Sharareh; Koba, Lesia

    2006-01-01

    Much has been published on the nutritional and health benefits of fermented dairy products, especially those containing probiotic microorganisms. However, consumers may not be familiar with the term "fermented dairy products," and therefore may not take full advantage of them. University students' knowledge and consumption patterns of fermented dairy products were assessed. University students (n=223) completed a survey consisting of a section on demographics and another on knowledge and consumption patterns. The majority of respondents (62%) were not familiar with the term "fermented dairy products." Most respondents consumed yogourt a few times a week (40%) or a few times a month (30%). Almost all respondents (92%) were unable to identify the difference between regular and probiotic yogourt. Most respondents (93%) had not heard of acidophilus milk, but the majority (65%) would be willing to try it. Most respondents were unsure whether sour cream (65%), yogourt beverages (74%), and cheddar cheese (61%) were fermented dairy products. Sixty percent of respondents never consumed yogourt drinks. Education is needed about fermented dairy products, especially probiotics, and their nutritional and health benefits. Such education may increase their acceptability and consumption.

  18. Fermented dairy food and CVD risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsell, Linda C

    2015-04-01

    Fermented dairy foods such as yoghurt and cheese are commonly found in the Mediterranean diet. Recent landmark research has confirmed the effect of the Mediterranean diet on reducing the CVD risk, but the relative contributions of fermented dairy foods have not been fully articulated. The present study provides a review of the relationship between fermented dairy foods consumption and CVD risk in the context of the whole diet. Studies show that people who eat healthier diets may be more likely to consume yoghurt, so there is a challenge in attributing separate effects to yoghurt. Analyses from large population studies list yoghurt as the food most negatively associated with the risk of weight gain (a problem that may lead to CVD). There is some suggestion that fermented dairy foods consumption (yoghurt or cheese) may be associated with reduced inflammatory biomarkers associated with the development of CVD. Dietary trials suggest that cheese may not have the same effect on raising LDL-cholesterol levels as butter with the same saturated fat content. The same might be stated for yoghurt. The use of different probiotic cultures and other aspects of study design remain a problem for research. Nevertheless, population studies from a range of countries have shown that a reduced risk of CVD occurs with the consumption of fermented dairy foods. A combination of evidence is necessary, and more research is always valuable, but indications remain that fermented dairy foods such as cheese and yoghurt are integral to diets that are protective against CVD.

  19. Acetone-butanol Fermentation of Marine Macroalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Urquhart, Lindsay A.; Gill, Gary A.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-03-01

    Mannitol and laminarin, which are present at high concentrations in the brown macroalga Saccharina spp., a type of kelp, are potential biochemical feedstocks for butanol production. To test their bioconversion potential, aqueous extracts of the kelp Saccharina spp., mannitol, and glucose (a product of laminarin hydrolysis) were subjected to acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum (ATCC 824). Both mannitol and glucose were readily fermented. Mixed substrate fermentations with glucose and mannitol resulted in diauxic growth of C. acetobutylicum with glucose depletion preceding mannitol utilization. Fermentation of kelp extract exhibited triauxic growth, with an order of utilization of free glucose, mannitol, and bound glucose, presumably laminarin. The lag in laminarin utilization reflected the need for enzymatic hydrolysis of this polysaccharide into fermentable sugars. The butanol and total solvent yields were 0.12 g/g and 0.16 g/g, respectively, indicating that significant improvements are still needed to make industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentations of seaweed economically feasible.

  20. Nutritional Guidelines and Fermented Food Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Victoria; Ferrão, Jorge; Fernandes, Tito

    2017-08-07

    This review examines different nutritional guidelines, some case studies, and provides insights and discrepancies, in the regulatory framework of Food Safety Management of some of the world's economies. There are thousands of fermented foods and beverages, although the intention was not to review them but check their traditional and cultural value, and if they are still lacking to be classed as a category on different national food guides. For understanding the inconsistencies in claims of concerning fermented foods among various regulatory systems, each legal system should be considered unique. Fermented foods and beverages have long been a part of the human diet, and with further supplementation of probiotic microbes, in some cases, they offer nutritional and health attributes worthy of recommendation of regular consumption. Despite the impact of fermented foods and beverages on gastro-intestinal wellbeing and diseases, their many health benefits or recommended consumption has not been widely translated to global inclusion in world food guidelines. In general, the approach of the legal systems is broadly consistent and their structures may be presented under different formats. African traditional fermented products are briefly mentioned enhancing some recorded adverse effects. Knowing the general benefits of traditional and supplemented fermented foods, they should be a daily item on most national food guides.

  1. Activated Protein C Attenuates Severe Inflammation by Targeting VLA-3high Neutrophil Subpopulation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Pranita P; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Lerman, Yelena V; Trzeciak, Alissa; Harrower, Eric J; Rezaie, Alireza R; Kim, Minsoo

    2017-10-15

    The host injury involved in multiorgan system failure during severe inflammation is mediated, in part, by massive infiltration and sequestration of hyperactive neutrophils in the visceral organ. A recombinant form of human activated protein C (rhAPC) has shown cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory functions in some clinical and animal studies, but the direct mechanism is not fully understood. Recently, we reported that, during endotoxemia and severe polymicrobial peritonitis, integrin VLA-3 (CD49c/CD29) is specifically upregulated on hyperinflammatory neutrophils and that targeting the VLA-3 high neutrophil subpopulation improved survival in mice. In this article, we report that rhAPC binds to human neutrophils via integrin VLA-3 (CD49c/CD29) with a higher affinity compared with other Arg-Gly-Asp binding integrins. Similarly, there is preferential binding of activated protein C (PC) to Gr1 high CD11b high VLA-3 high cells isolated from the bone marrow of septic mice. Furthermore, specific binding of rhAPC to human neutrophils via VLA-3 was inhibited by an antagonistic peptide (LXY2). In addition, genetically modified mutant activated PC, with a high affinity for VLA-3, shows significantly improved binding to neutrophils compared with wild-type activated PC and significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration into the lungs of septic mice. These data indicate that variants of activated PC have a stronger affinity for integrin VLA-3, which reveals novel therapeutic possibilities. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Rapid Sequestration of Leishmania mexicana by Neutrophils Contributes to the Development of Chronic Lesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Hurrell

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan Leishmania mexicana parasite causes chronic non-healing cutaneous lesions in humans and mice with poor parasite control. The mechanisms preventing the development of a protective immune response against this parasite are unclear. Here we provide data demonstrating that parasite sequestration by neutrophils is responsible for disease progression in mice. Within hours of infection L. mexicana induced the local recruitment of neutrophils, which ingested parasites and formed extracellular traps without markedly impairing parasite survival. We further showed that the L. mexicana-induced recruitment of neutrophils impaired the early recruitment of dendritic cells at the site of infection as observed by intravital 2-photon microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. Indeed, infection of neutropenic Genista mice and of mice depleted of neutrophils at the onset of infection demonstrated a prominent role for neutrophils in this process. Furthermore, an increase in monocyte-derived dendritic cells was also observed in draining lymph nodes of neutropenic mice, correlating with subsequent increased frequency of IFNγ-secreting T helper cells, and better parasite control leading ultimately to complete healing of the lesion. Altogether, these findings show that L. mexicana exploits neutrophils to block the induction of a protective immune response and impairs the control of lesion development. Our data thus demonstrate an unanticipated negative role for these innate immune cells in host defense, suggesting that in certain forms of cutaneous leishmaniasis, regulating neutrophil recruitment could be a strategy to promote lesion healing.

  3. α-1 Antitrypsin regulates human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by soluble immune complexes and IL-8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the protein α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) causes a chronic lung disease in humans that is characterized by excessive mobilization of neutrophils into the lung. However, the reason for the increased neutrophil burden has not been fully elucidated. In this study we have demonstrated using human neutrophils that serum AAT coordinates both CXCR1- and soluble immune complex (sIC) receptor-mediated chemotaxis by divergent pathways. We demonstrated that glycosylated AAT can bind to IL-8 (a ligand for CXCR1) and that AAT-IL-8 complex formation prevented IL-8 interaction with CXCR1. Second, AAT modulated neutrophil chemotaxis in response to sIC by controlling membrane expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) Fc receptor FcγRIIIb. This process was mediated through inhibition of ADAM-17 enzymatic activity. Neutrophils isolated from clinically stable AAT-deficient patients were characterized by low membrane expression of FcγRIIIb and increased chemotaxis in response to IL-8 and sIC. Treatment of AAT-deficient individuals with AAT augmentation therapy resulted in increased AAT binding to IL-8, increased AAT binding to the neutrophil membrane, decreased FcγRIIIb release from the neutrophil membrane, and normalization of chemotaxis. These results provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the effect of AAT augmentation therapy in the pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency.

  4. Acinetobacter baumannii phenylacetic acid metabolism influences infection outcome through a direct effect on neutrophil chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Saruar; Ellett, Felix; Murray, Gerald L.; Kostoulias, Xenia; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Schulze, Keith E.; Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Li, Jian; Creek, Darren J.; Lieschke, Graham J.; Peleg, Anton Y.

    2016-01-01

    Innate cellular immune responses are a critical first-line defense against invading bacterial pathogens. Leukocyte migration from the bloodstream to a site of infection is mediated by chemotactic factors that are often host-derived. More recently, there has been a greater appreciation of the importance of bacterial factors driving neutrophil movement during infection. Here, we describe the development of a zebrafish infection model to study Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. By using isogenic A. baumannii mutants lacking expression of virulence effector proteins, we demonstrated that bacterial drivers of disease severity are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. By using transgenic zebrafish with fluorescent phagocytes, we showed that a mutation of an established A. baumannii global virulence regulator led to marked changes in neutrophil behavior involving rapid neutrophil influx to a localized site of infection, followed by prolonged neutrophil dwelling. This neutrophilic response augmented bacterial clearance and was secondary to an impaired A. baumannii phenylacetic acid catabolism pathway, which led to accumulation of phenylacetate. Purified phenylacetate was confirmed to be a neutrophil chemoattractant. These data identify a previously unknown mechanism of bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis in vivo, providing insight into the role of bacterial metabolism in host innate immune evasion. Furthermore, the work provides a potentially new therapeutic paradigm of targeting a bacterial metabolic pathway to augment host innate immune responses and attenuate disease. PMID:27506797

  5. Extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation enhances neutrophil response to particulate agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Gusev, Alexandr A; Balabushevich, Nadezhda G; Gusev, Sergey A; Kazarinov, Konstantin D

    2018-02-01

    The growing use of extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EHF EMR) in information and communication technology and in biomedical applications has raised concerns regarding the potential biological impact of millimeter waves (MMWs). Here, we elucidated the effects of MMW radiation on neutrophil activation induced by opsonized zymosan or E. coli in whole blood ex vivo. After agonist addition to blood, two samples were prepared. A control sample was incubated at ambient conditions without any treatment, and a test sample was exposed to EHF EMR (32.9-39.6 GHz, 100 W/m 2 ). We used methods that allowed us to assess the functional status of neutrophils immediately after exposure: oxidant production levels were measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence, and morphofunctional changes to neutrophils were observed in blood smears. Results revealed that the response of neutrophils to both agonists was intensified if blood was exposed to MMW radiation for 15 min. Neutrophils were intact in both the control and irradiated samples if no agonist was added to blood before incubation. Similarly, exposing suspensions of isolated neutrophils in plasma to MMW radiation enhanced cell response to both zymosan and E. coli. Heating blood samples was shown to be the primary mechanism underlying enhanced EHF EMR-induced oxidant production by neutrophils in response to particulate agonists. Bioelectromagnetics. 39:144-155, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Human mesenchymal stem cells protect neutrophils from serum-deprived cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Maryam; Vidyadaran, Sharmili; George, Elizabeth; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2011-12-01

    We have previously shown that human MSC (mesenchymal stem cells) inhibit the proliferation of most of the immune cells. However, there are innate immune cells such as neutrophils and other PMN (polymorphonuclear) cells that do not require an extensive proliferation prior to their effector function. In this study, the effect of MSC on neutrophils in the presence of complete and serum-deprived culture media was investigated. In the presence of MSC, the viability of neutrophils increase as measured in 24 h of incubation at various supplementation of serum concentration. We have utilized Annexin V and PI (propidium iodide) staining to confirm whether the enhancement of neutrophil's viability is due to a reduction in PCD (programmed cell death). MSC significantly rescue neutrophils from apoptosis at 1, 5 and 10% of FBS (fetal bovine serum) supplementation. The fractions of viable and dead cells were increased and decreased respectively in the presence of MSC. Our results indicate MSC rescue neutrophils from nutrient- or serum-deprived cell death. However, whether this effect is exerted through a specific signalling pathway or confining neutrophils in resting state by MSC requires further investigation.

  7. Pathogen induced chemo-attractant hepoxilin A3 drives neutrophils, but not eosinophils across epithelial barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, S A; Patil, S U; Shreffler, W G; Hurley, B P

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen induced migration of neutrophils across mucosal epithelial barriers requires epithelial production of the chemotactic lipid mediator, hepoxilin A3 (HXA3). HXA3 is an eicosanoid derived from arachidonic acid. Although eosinophils are also capable of penetrating mucosal surfaces, eosinophilic infiltration occurs mainly during allergic processes whereas neutrophils dominate mucosal infection. Both neutrophils and eosinophils can respond to chemotactic gradients of certain eicosanoids, however, it is not known whether eosinophils respond to pathogen induced lipid mediators such as HXA3. In this study, neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from human blood and placed on the basolateral side of polarized epithelial monolayers grown on permeable Transwell filters and challenged by various chemotactic gradients of distinct lipid mediators. We observed that both cell populations migrated across epithelial monolayers in response to a leukotriene B4 (LTB4) gradient, whereas only eosinophils migrated toward a prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) gradient. Interestingly, while pathogen induced neutrophil trans-epithelial migration was substantial, pathogen induced eosinophil trans-epithelial migration was not observed. Further, gradients of chemotactic lipids derived from pathogen infected epithelial cells known to be enriched for HXA3 as well as purified HXA3 drove significant numbers of neutrophils across epithelial barriers, whereas eosinophils failed to respond to these gradients. These data suggest that although the eicosanoid HXA3 serves as an important neutrophil chemo-attractant at mucosal surfaces during pathogenic infection, HXA3 does not appear to exhibit chemotactic activity toward eosinophils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of neutrophil dysfunction in glycogen storage disease type Ib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Hyun Sik; Weinstein, David A.; Lee, Young Mok; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib) is an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by neutropenia and impaired glucose homeostasis resulting from a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) transporter (G6PT). The underlying cause of GSD-Ib neutropenia is an enhanced neutrophil apoptosis, but patients also manifest neutrophil dysfunction of unknown etiology. Previously, we showed G6PT interacts with the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase-β (G6Pase-β) to regulate the availability of G6P/glucose in neutrophils. A deficiency in G6Pase-β activity in neutrophils impairs both their energy homeostasis and function. We now show that G6PT-deficient neutrophils from GSD-Ib patients are similarly impaired. Their energy impairment is characterized by decreased glucose uptake and reduced levels of intracellular G6P, lactate, adenosine triphosphate, and reduced NAD phosphate, whereas functional impairment is reflected in reduced neutrophil respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and calcium mobilization. We further show that the mechanism of neutrophil dysfunction in GSD-Ib arises from activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/peroxisome-proliferators–activated receptor-γ pathway. PMID:24565827

  9. Partial correction of neutrophil dysfunction by oral galactose therapy in glycogen storage disease type Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letkemann, Rudolf; Wittkowski, Helmut; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Podskabi, Teodor; Haslam, Stuart M; Föll, Dirk; Dell, Anne; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2017-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib) is characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. Mass spectrometric glycomic profiling of GSD-Ib neutrophils showed severely truncated N-glycans, lacking galactose. Experiments indicated the hypoglycosylation of the electron transporting subunit of NADPH oxidase, which is crucial for the defense against bacterial infections. In phosphoglucomutase 1 (PGM1) deficiency, an inherited disorder with an enzymatic defect just one metabolic step ahead, hypogalactosylation can be successfully treated by dietary galactose. We hypothesized the same pathomechanism in GSD-Ib and started a therapeutic trial with oral galactose and uridine. The aim was to improve neutrophil dysfunction through the correction of hypoglycosylation in neutrophils. The GSD-Ib patient was treated for 29weeks. Monitoring included glycomics analysis of the patient's neutrophils and neutrophil function tests including respiratory burst activity, phagocytosis and migration. Although no substantial restoration of neutrophil glycosylation was found, there was partial improvement of respiratory burst activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii phenylacetic acid metabolism influences infection outcome through a direct effect on neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Saruar; Ellett, Felix; Murray, Gerald L; Kostoulias, Xenia; Cerqueira, Gustavo M; Schulze, Keith E; Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Li, Jian; Creek, Darren J; Lieschke, Graham J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2016-08-23

    Innate cellular immune responses are a critical first-line defense against invading bacterial pathogens. Leukocyte migration from the bloodstream to a site of infection is mediated by chemotactic factors that are often host-derived. More recently, there has been a greater appreciation of the importance of bacterial factors driving neutrophil movement during infection. Here, we describe the development of a zebrafish infection model to study Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. By using isogenic A. baumannii mutants lacking expression of virulence effector proteins, we demonstrated that bacterial drivers of disease severity are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. By using transgenic zebrafish with fluorescent phagocytes, we showed that a mutation of an established A. baumannii global virulence regulator led to marked changes in neutrophil behavior involving rapid neutrophil influx to a localized site of infection, followed by prolonged neutrophil dwelling. This neutrophilic response augmented bacterial clearance and was secondary to an impaired A. baumannii phenylacetic acid catabolism pathway, which led to accumulation of phenylacetate. Purified phenylacetate was confirmed to be a neutrophil chemoattractant. These data identify a previously unknown mechanism of bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis in vivo, providing insight into the role of bacterial metabolism in host innate immune evasion. Furthermore, the work provides a potentially new therapeutic paradigm of targeting a bacterial metabolic pathway to augment host innate immune responses and attenuate disease.

  11. CARD9-Dependent Neutrophil Recruitment Protects against Fungal Invasion of the Central Nervous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Drummond

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Candida is the most common human fungal pathogen and causes systemic infections that require neutrophils for effective host defense. Humans deficient in the C-type lectin pathway adaptor protein CARD9 develop spontaneous fungal disease that targets the central nervous system (CNS. However, how CARD9 promotes protective antifungal immunity in the CNS remains unclear. Here, we show that a patient with CARD9 deficiency had impaired neutrophil accumulation and induction of neutrophil-recruiting CXC chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid despite uncontrolled CNS Candida infection. We phenocopied the human susceptibility in Card9-/- mice, which develop uncontrolled brain candidiasis with diminished neutrophil accumulation. The induction of neutrophil-recruiting CXC chemokines is significantly impaired in infected Card9-/- brains, from both myeloid and resident glial cellular sources, whereas cell-intrinsic neutrophil chemotaxis is Card9-independent. Taken together, our data highlight the critical role of CARD9-dependent neutrophil trafficking into the CNS and provide novel insight into the CNS fungal susceptibility of CARD9-deficient humans.

  12. Toll-Like Receptor-2 and -4 Expression by Maternal Neutrophils in Preterm Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prearo Moço, Natália; Camargo Batista, Renata Aparecida; Fernandes Martin, Laura; de Oliveira, Leandro Gustavo; Garcia de Lima Parada, Cristina Maria; Alarcão Dias-Melicio, Luciane; de Assis Golim, Marjorie; Guimarães da Silva, Márcia

    2018-01-01

    The inflammatory response in preterm parturition is regulated by the innate immune system. Toll-like receptors (TLR)-2 and TLR-4 are innate immune receptors that recognize the microorganisms most frequently involved in amniotic cavity infections, which are associated with activating the inflammatory response at the maternal-fetal interface during preterm labor. This study aimed to evaluate the expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in maternal neutrophils in preterm labor. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Obstetrics Care Unit of Botucatu Medical School, UNESP, Brazil. The preterm group was composed of 20 pregnant women who presented preterm labor and preterm delivery. The control group was composed of 20 nonlaboring pregnant women matched to the preterm group by gestational age. Neutrophils were isolated from peripheral blood and TLR expressions were performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. Gene expressions of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in neutrophils from the preterm group were statistically higher than expressions in neutrophils from the matched control group. The percentage of TLR-4+ neutrophils was higher in the preterm group than the matched control group, while the percentage of TLR-2+ neutrophils did not differ between groups. TLR-4 expression in maternal neutrophils is associated with spontaneous preterm labor. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Cathepsin G-dependent modulation of platelet thrombus formation in vivo by blood neutrophils.

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    Nauder Faraday

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are consistently associated with arterial thrombotic morbidity in human clinical studies but the causal basis for this association is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that neutrophils modulate platelet activation and thrombus formation in vivo in a cathepsin G-dependent manner. Neutrophils enhanced aggregation of human platelets in vitro in dose-dependent fashion and this effect was diminished by pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G activity and knockdown of cathepsin G expression. Tail bleeding time in the mouse was prolonged by a cathepsin G inhibitor and in cathepsin G knockout mice, and formation of neutrophil-platelet conjugates in blood that was shed from transected tails was reduced in the absence of cathepsin G. Bleeding time was highly correlated with blood neutrophil count in wildtype but not cathepsin G deficient mice. In the presence of elevated blood neutrophil counts, the anti-thrombotic effect of cathepsin G inhibition was greater than that of aspirin and additive to it when administered in combination. Both pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence prolonged the time for platelet thrombus to form in ferric chloride-injured mouse mesenteric arterioles. In a vaso-occlusive model of ischemic stroke, inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence improved cerebral blood flow, reduced histologic brain injury, and improved neurobehavioral outcome. These experiments demonstrate that neutrophil cathepsin G is a physiologic modulator of platelet thrombus formation in vivo and has potential as a target for novel anti-thrombotic therapies.

  14. Effects of chronic occupational exposure to anaesthetic gases on the rate of neutrophil apoptosis among anaesthetists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tyther, R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Volatile anaesthetic agents are known to influence neutrophil function. The aim was to determine the effect of chronic occupational exposure to volatile anaesthetic agents on the rate of neutrophil apoptosis among anaesthetists. To test this hypothesis, we compared the rate of neutrophil apoptosis in anaesthetists who had been chronically exposed to volatile anaesthetic agents with that in unexposed volunteers. METHODS: Venous blood (20 mL) was withdrawn from 24 ASA I-II volunteers, from which neutrophils were isolated, and maintained in culture. At 1, 12 and 24 h in culture, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was assessed by dual staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. RESULTS: At 1 h (but not at 12 and 24 h) in culture, the rate of neutrophil apoptosis was significantly less in the anaesthetists--13.8 (12.9%) versus 34.4 (12.1%) (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Chronic occupational exposure to volatile anaesthetic agents may inhibit neutrophil apoptosis. This may have implications for anaesthetists and similarly exposed healthcare workers in terms of the adequacy of their inflammatory response.

  15. Thermal injury, the inflammatory process, and wound dressing reduce human neutrophil chemotaxis to four attractants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasslen, S R; Nelson, R D; Ahrenholz, D H; Solem, L D

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of thermal injury and the inflammatory process on chemotactic responses of neutrophils to four attractants (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the complement fragment C5a, interleukin-8, and leukotriene B4) under agarose, expression of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) adherence receptors on the cell surface, and polymerization of actin in the cell cytoplasm. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from peripheral blood, and exudate neutrophils from fluid collecting under two different wound dressings applied to abrasion sites of healthy subjects and to skin graft donor sites of patients with burns. Burn injury reduced the chemotactic responses of circulating neutrophils to all four attractants, suggesting a "global" defect in chemotactic function. Patient-exudate neutrophils collected under Tegaderm exhibited further decrements in all chemotactic responses, and patient-exudate neutrophils collected under Biobrane were nonmotile. The exudate neutrophils collected under Biobrane expressed high levels of Mac-1 receptors and irreversibly polymerized actin, which may contribute to the nonmotility of these exudate cells.

  16. Fermentation performance of lager yeast in high gravity beer fermentations with different sugar supplementations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hongjie; Xu, Huaide; Feng, Li; Yu, Zhimin; Zhao, Haifeng; Zhao, Mouming

    2016-11-01

    The effects of glucose, sucrose and maltose supplementations on the fermentation performance and stress tolerance of lager yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) during high gravity (18°P) and very high gravity (24°P) fermentations were studied. Results showed that throughout 18°P wort fermentation, fermentation performance of lager yeast was significantly improved by glucose or sucrose supplementation, compared with maltose supplementation, especially for sucrose supplementation increasing wort fermentability and ethanol production by 6% and 8%, respectively. However, in the later stage of 24°P wort fermentation, fermentation performance of lager yeast was dramatically improved by maltose supplementation, which increased wort fermentability and ethanol production by 14% and 10%, respectively, compared with sucrose supplementation. Furthermore, higher HSP12 expression level and more intracellular trehalose accumulation in yeast cells were observed by maltose supplementation with increase of the wort gravity from 18°P to 24°P, indicating higher stress response of yeast cells. The excretion of Gly and Ala, and the absorption of Pro in the later stage of fermentation were promoted by maltose supplementation. In addition, with increase of the wort gravity from 18°P to 24°P, higher alcohols level was decreased with maltose supplementation, while esters formation was increased significantly with glucose supplementation. This study suggested that the choice of optimal fermentable sugars maintaining better fermentation performance of lager yeast should be based on not only strain specificity, but also wort gravity. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G; Enghild, Jan J; Praetorius, Jeppe; Borregaard, Niels; Petersen, Steen V

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and increasing evidence supports a role for EC-SOD in the development of an inflammatory response. Here we show that human EC-SOD is present at the cell surface of isolated neutrophils as well as stored within secretory vesicles. Interestingly, we find that EC-SOD mRNA is absent throughout neutrophil maturation indicating that the protein is synthesized by other cells and subsequently endocytosed by the neutrophil. When secretory vesicles were mobilized by neutrophil stimulation using formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolated from wild-type and EC-SOD KO mice, and showed that EC-SOD release significantly reduce the level of superoxide in the extracellular space, but does not affect the capacity to generate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Consequently, our data signifies that EC-SOD released from activated neutrophils affects the redox conditions of the extracellular space and may offer protection against highly reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radicals otherwise generated as a result of respiratory burst activity of activated neutrophils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Olfactomedin-4 Is a Candidate Marker for a Pathogenic Neutrophil Subset in Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, Matthew N; Opoka, Amy M; Lahni, Patrick; Hildeman, David A; Wong, Hector R

    2017-04-01

    Heterogeneity in sepsis-related pathobiology presents a significant challenge. Resolving this heterogeneity presents an opportunity to understand pathobiology and improve patient care. Olfactomedin-4 is a neutrophil subset marker and may contribute to sepsis heterogeneity. Our objective was to evaluate the expression of olfactomedin-4 and characterize neutrophil heterogeneity in children with septic shock. Single-center, prospective cohort, as well as secondary analysis of existing transcriptomic and proteomic databases. Tertiary care PICU. Patients from 5 days to 18 years old with septic shock were enrolled. Data collected included the expression of olfactomedin-4 messenger RNA, serum protein concentrations, and percentage of neutrophils that express olfactomedin-4. None. Secondary analysis of existing transcriptomic data demonstrated that olfactomedin-4 is the most highly expressed gene in nonsurvivors of pediatric septic shock, compared with survivors. Secondary analysis of an existing proteomic database corroborated these observations. In a prospectively enrolled cohort, we quantified the percentage of olfactomedin-4+ neutrophils in patients with septic shock. Patients with a complicated course, defined as greater than or equal to two organ failures at day 7 of septic shock or 28-day mortality, had a higher percentage of olfactomedin-4+ neutrophils, compared with those without a complicated course. By logistic regression, the percentage of olfactomedin-4+ neutrophils was independently associated with increased risk of a complicated course (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17; p = 0.024). Olfactomedin-4 identifies a subpopulation of neutrophils in patients with septic shock, and those with a high percentage of olfactomedin-4+ neutrophils are at higher risk for greater organ failure burden and death. Olfactomedin-4 might serve as a marker of a pathogenic neutrophil subset in patients with septic shock.

  19. LYSOSOMAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES IN HUMAN "TOXIC" NEUTROPHILS DURING BACTERIAL INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Charles E.; Katayama, Isao; Cotran, Ramzi S.; Finland, Maxwell

    1969-01-01

    "Toxic" neutrophils from humans with severe bacterial infections, identified by the presence of Döhle bodies, "toxic" granules, and vacuoles were shown to differ from normal neutrophils both in ultrastructure and in lysosome activity. Döhle bodies were identified as lamellar aggregates of rough endoplasmic reticulum. Toxic granules corresponded to the azurophilic granules usually identified by Romanowsky stains only in neutrophil precursors. By electron microscopy such granules were large, electron-dense, and peroxidase positive; they could usually be distinguished from the smaller, less dense, "specific" granules also present in control neutrophils, but in the latter they became visible by light microscopy only after prolonged staining or following fixation with glutaraldehyde. These observations suggest that toxic granules represent an abnormal staining reaction of the large dense granules in the toxic cells, and not phagocytized material, newly formed abnormal granules or autophagic bodies. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly greater in toxic neutrophils than in normal ones; 80% of the activity of both was located in the lysosome fraction. Beta glucuronidase was normal. Total acid phosphatase was normal, but the percentage located in the nonlysosome fraction of toxic neutrophils was increased, suggesting that lysosomes were "labilized." Formation of neutral red vacuoles in supravitally stained preparations, an index of lysosome activity, occurred more rapidly in toxic neutrophils. This reaction paralleled degranulation and the formation of clear vacuoles in unstained wet mounts and could be blocked by colchicine, a lysosome stabilizer, or enhanced by procedures which activate lysosomes. "Autophagic" vacuoles were observed by electron microscopy in some toxic neutrophils. These observations are discussed in relation to the concept that the "toxic" neutrophils in severe bacterial infection reflect cellular immaturity and/or stimulation or

  20. The effect of lidocaine on neutrophil respiratory burst during induction of general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Swanton, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Respiratory burst is an essential component of the neutrophil\\'s biocidal function. In vitro, sodium thiopental, isoflurane and lidocaine each inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. The objectives of this study were (a) to determine the effect of a standard clinical induction\\/tracheal intubation sequence on neutrophil respiratory burst and (b) to determine the effect of intravenous lidocaine administration during induction of anaesthesia on neutrophil respiratory burst. METHODS: Twenty ASA I and II patients, aged 18-60 years, undergoing elective surgery were studied. After induction of anaesthesia [fentanyl (2 microg kg-1), thiopental (4-6 mg kg-1), isoflurane (end-tidal concentration 0.5-1.5%) in nitrous oxide (66%) and oxygen], patients randomly received either lidocaine 1.5 mg kg-1 (group L) or 0.9% saline (group S) prior to tracheal intubation. Neutrophil respiratory burst was measured immediately prior to induction of anaesthesia, immediately before and 1 and 5 min after lidocaine\\/saline. RESULTS: Neutrophil respiratory burst decreased significantly after induction of anaesthesia in both groups [87.4 +\\/- 8.2% (group L) and 88.5 +\\/- 13.4% (group S) of preinduction level (P < 0.01 both groups)]. After intravenous lidocaine (but not saline) administration, neutrophil respiratory burst returned towards preinduction levels, both before (97.1 +\\/- 23.6%) and after (94.4 +\\/- 16.6%) tracheal intubation. CONCLUSION: Induction of anaesthesia and tracheal intubation using thiopentone and isoflurane, inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. This effect may be diminished by the administration of lidocaine.

  1. The effect of cigarette smoking on neutrophil kinetics in human lungs [see comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacNee, W.; Wiggs, B.; Belzberg, A.S.; Hogg, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Neutrophils may play a part in the pathogenesis of the centrilobular emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. The capillary bed of the lungs concentrates neutrophils approximately 100-fold with respect to erythrocytes, producing a large pool of marginated cells. We examined the effect of cigarette smoking on the kinetics of this pool of cells, using 99mTc-labeled erythrocytes to measure regional blood velocity and 111In-labeled neutrophils to measure the removal of neutrophils during the first passage through the pulmonary circulation, their subsequent washout from the lungs, and the effect of local blood velocity on the number of neutrophils retained in each lung region. We observed no difference in these measurements between subjects who had never smoked (n = 6) and smokers who did not smoke during the study (n = 12). However, subjects who did smoke during the study (n = 12) had a significantly slower rate of washout of radiolabeled neutrophils from the lung (0.08 +/- 0.04 of the total per minute, as compared with 0.13 +/- 0.06 in smokers who did not smoke during the experiment and 0.14 +/- 0.08 in non-smokers) (P = 0.02). We also observed an increase in the regional retention of labeled neutrophils with respect to blood velocity in 5 of the 12 subjects who smoked during the study, but in none of the other subjects. We conclude that the presence of cigarette smoke in the lungs of some subjects increases the local concentration of neutrophils, and suggest that the lesions that characterize emphysema may be a result of the destruction of lung tissue by neutrophils that remain within pulmonary microvessels

  2. N-Formyl-Perosamine Surface Homopolysaccharides Hinder the Recognition of Brucella abortus by Mouse Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Cristina; Gurdián-Murillo, Stephany; Lomonte, Bruno; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Moreno, Edgardo

    2016-06-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen of monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and placental trophoblasts. This bacterium causes a chronic disease in bovines and in humans. In these hosts, the bacterium also invades neutrophils; however, it fails to replicate and just resists the killing action of these leukocytes without inducing significant activation or neutrophilia. Moreover, B. abortus causes the premature cell death of human neutrophils. In the murine model, the bacterium is found within macrophages and dendritic cells at early times of infection but seldom in neutrophils. Based on this observation, we explored the interaction of mouse neutrophils with B. abortus In contrast to human, dog, and bovine neutrophils, naive mouse neutrophils fail to recognize smooth B. abortus bacteria at early stages of infection. Murine normal serum components do not opsonize smooth Brucella strains, and neutrophil phagocytosis is achieved only after the appearance of antibodies. Alternatively, mouse normal serum is capable of opsonizing rough Brucella mutants. Despite this, neutrophils still fail to kill Brucella, and the bacterium induces cell death of murine leukocytes. In addition, mouse serum does not opsonize Yersinia enterocolitica O:9, a bacterium displaying the same surface polysaccharide antigen as smooth B. abortus Therefore, the lack of murine serum opsonization and absence of murine neutrophil recognition are specific, and the molecules responsible for the Brucella camouflage are N-formyl-perosamine surface homopolysaccharides. Although the mouse is a valuable model for understanding the immunobiology of brucellosis, direct extrapolation from one animal system to another has to be undertaken with caution. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Sharpe, Matthew R. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); McGill, Mitchell R. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Farhood, Anwar [Department of Pathology, St. David' s North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  4. Coffee fermentation and flavor--An intricate and delicate relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2015-10-15

    The relationship between coffee fermentation and coffee aroma is intricate and delicate at which the coffee aroma profile is easily impacted by the fermentation process during coffee processing. However, as the fermentation process in coffee processing is conducted mainly for mucilage removal, its impacts on coffee aroma profile are usually neglected. Therefore, this review serves to summarize the available literature on the impacts of fermentation in coffee processing on coffee aroma as well as other unconventional avenues where fermentation is employed for coffee aroma modulation. Studies have noted that proper control over the fermentation process imparts desirable attributes and prevents undesirable fermentation which generates off-flavors. Other unconventional avenues in which fermentation is employed for aroma modulation include digestive bioprocessing and the fermentation of coffee extracts and green coffee beans. The latter is an area that should be explored further with appropriate microorganisms given its potential for coffee aroma modulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of 51 Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of 51 Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers

  6. Cigarette smoke-induced damage-associated molecular pattern release from necrotic neutrophils triggers proinflammatory mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Irene H; Pouwels, Simon D; Leijendekker, Carin; de Bruin, Harold G; Zijlstra, G Jan; van der Vaart, Hester; ten Hacken, Nick H T; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Nawijn, Martijn C; van der Toorn, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major causative factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with neutrophilic airway inflammation. Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure can induce a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in airway epithelium. Therefore, we hypothesized that CS promotes neutrophil necrosis with subsequent release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), alarming the innate immune system. We studied the effect of smoking two cigarettes on sputum neutrophils in healthy individuals and of 5-day CS or air exposure on neutrophil counts, myeloperoxidase, and HMGB1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of BALB/c mice. In human peripheral blood neutrophils, mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis/necrosis markers, caspase activity, and DAMP release were studied after CS exposure. Finally, we assessed the effect of neutrophil-derived supernatants on the release of chemoattractant CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in sputum neutrophil numbers after 3 hours. In mice, neutrophil counts were significantly increased 16 hours after repeated CS exposure but reduced 2 hours after an additional exposure. In vitro, CS induced necrotic neutrophil cell death, as indicated by mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of apoptosis, and DAMP release. Supernatants from CS-treated neutrophils significantly increased the release of CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Together, these observations show, for the first time, that CS exposure induces neutrophil necrosis, leading to DAMP release, which may amplify CS-induced airway inflammation by promoting airway epithelial proinflammatory responses.

  7. Involvement of neutrophil hyporesponse and the role of Toll-like receptors in human immunodeficiency virus 1 protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Hernandez

    Full Text Available Neutrophils contribute to pathogen clearance through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs activation. However, the role of PRRs in neutrophils in both HIV-1-infected [HIV-1(+] and HIV-1-exposed seronegative individuals (HESN is unknown. Here, a study was carried out to evaluate the level of PRR mRNAs and cytokines produced after activation of neutrophils from HIV-1(+, HESN and healthy donors.The neutrophils were stimulated with specific agonists for TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 in the presence of HIV-1 particles. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production, expression of neutrophil activation markers and reactive oxygen species (ROS production were analyzed in neutrophils from HESN, HIV-1(+ and healthy donors (controls.We found that neutrophils from HESN presented reduced expression of PRR mRNAs (TLR4, TLR9, NOD1, NOD2, NLRC4 and RIG-I and reduced expression of cytokine mRNAs (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α and TGF-β. Moreover, neutrophils from HESN were less sensitive to stimulation through TLR4. Furthermore, neutrophils from HESN challenged with HIV-1 and stimulated with TLR2 and TLR4 agonists, produced significantly lower levels of reactive oxygen species, versus HIV-1(+.A differential pattern of PRR expression and release of innate immune factors in neutrophils from HESN is evident. Our results suggest that lower neutrophil activation can be involved in protection against HIV-1 infection.

  8. NEUTROPHILIC MYOSITIS ASSOCIATED WITH PYODERMA GANGRENOSUM IN A BREAK-DANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisashi Tamiya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophilic myositis is an extremely rare condition, cases of which have been reported in association with neutrophilic dermatosis, inflammatory bowel disease and malignant hematological disease. The disorder is histologically characterized by a sterile infiltration of neutrophils throughout muscle, with necrosis of muscle fibres. We here report the case of a young male who also had associated pyoderma gangrenosum, and who presented with necrotizing fasciitis-like manifestations. In this case, although there were no other underlying disorders, compulsive exertional stress due to break-dancing was thought to be a precipitant. Debridement of the necrotic tissues combined with oral corticosteroid treatment was effective.

  9. Targeted mass spectrometry analysis of neutrophil-derived proteins released during sepsis progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, E; Davidova, A; Mörgelin, M

    2014-01-01

    systemic stimulation an immediate increase of neutrophil-borne proteins can be observed into the circulation of sepsis patients. We applied a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) based approaches, LC-MS/MS and selected reaction monitoring (SRM), to characterise and quantify the neutrophil proteome......Early diagnosis of severe infectious diseases is essential for timely implementation of lifesaving therapies. In a search for novel biomarkers in sepsis diagnosis we focused on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Notably, PMNs have their protein cargo readily stored in granules and following...

  10. Giant Neutrophil Granules in the Chediak-Higashi Syndrome of Man, Mink, Cattle and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, R. S.; Padgett, G. A.; Wolff, S. M.; Bennett, J. M.

    1969-01-01

    The percent of conventionally stained circulating neutrophils containing abnormal giant granules in Chediak-Higashi mink, cattle and mice is highly variable and strikingly less than the 100% found in neutrophils from similarly affected humans. In contrast, using either peroxidase or Sudan Black, it can be demonstrated that 100% of circulating neutrophils in all affected individuals of the four species studied contain the abnormal granules. Minor species differences in the shape of the granules were noted. The significance of these findings as well as the variations in granular staining by the several techniques employed are discussed. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4187790

  11. Impact of microRNA-130a on the neutrophil proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Corinna Cavan; Refsgaard, Jan Christian; Østergaard, Ole

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important for the development and function of neutrophils. miR-130a is highly expressed during early neutrophil development and regulates target proteins important for this process. miRNA targets are often identified by validating putative targets found...... proteins MPO and PRTN3 and other proteins differentially expressed following miR-130a inhibition in the 32Dcl3 clone. CONCLUSION: We have experimentally identified miR-130a-regulated proteins within the neutrophil proteome. Linking these to putative miR-130a targets, we provide an association network...

  12. Interdependency of CEACAM-1, -3, -6, and -8 induced human neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skubitz Amy PN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family (CEACAMs are widely expressed, and, depending on the tissue, capable of regulating diverse functions including tumor promotion, tumor suppression, angiogenesis, and neutrophil activation. Four members of this family, CEACAM1, CEACAM8, CEACAM6, and CEACAM3 (recognized by CD66a, CD66b, CD66c, and CD66d mAbs, respectively, are expressed on human neutrophils. CD66a, CD66b, CD66c, and CD66d antibodies each increase neutrophil adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers. This increase in neutrophil adhesion caused by CD66 antibodies is blocked by CD18 mAbs and is associated with upregulation of CD11/CD18 on the neutrophil surface. To examine potential interactions of CEACAMs in neutrophil signaling, the effects on neutrophil adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells of a set of CD66 mAbs was tested following desensitization to stimulation by various combinations of these mAbs. Addition of a CD66 mAb in the absence of calcium results in desensitization of neutrophils to stimulation by that CD66 mAb. The current data show that desensitization of neutrophils to any two CEACAMs results in selective desensitization to those two CEACAMs, while the cells remain responsive to the other two neutrophil CEACAMs. In addition, cells desensitized to CEACAM-3, -6, and -8 were still responsive to stimulation of CEACAM1 by CD66a mAbs. In contrast, desensitization of cells to CEACAM1 and any two of the other CEACAMs left the cells unresponsive to all CD66 mAbs. Cells desensitized to any combination of CEACAMs remained responsive to the unrelated control protein CD63. Thus, while there is significant independence of the four neutrophil CEACAMs in signaling, CEACAM1 appears to play a unique role among the neutrophil CEACAMs. A model in which CEACAMs dimerize to form signaling complexes could accommodate the observations. Similar interactions may occur in other cells expressing CEACAMs.

  13. Pulmonary endothelial activation caused by extracellular histones contributes to neutrophil activation in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanlin; Guan, Li; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Zanmei; Mao, Lijun; Li, Shuqiang; Zhao, Jinyuan

    2016-11-21

    During the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), neutrophils play a central role in the pathogenesis, and their activation requires interaction with the endothelium. Extracellular histones have been recognized as pivotal inflammatory mediators. This study was to investigate the role of pulmonary endothelial activation during the extracellular histone-induced inflammatory response in ARDS. ARDS was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by intravenous injection with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or exogenous histones. Concurrent with LPS administration, anti-histone H4 antibody (anti-H4) or non-specific IgG was administered to study the role of extracellular histones. The circulating von Willebrand factor (vWF) and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) were measured with ELISA kits at the preset time points. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in lung tissue was measured with a MPO detection kit. The translocation of P-selectin and neutrophil infiltration were measured by immunohistochemical detection. For in vitro studies, histone H4 in the supernatant of mouse lung vascular endothelial cells (MLVECs) was measured by Western blot. The binding of extracellular histones with endothelial membrane was examined by confocal laser microscopy. Endothelial P-selectin translocation was measured by cell surface ELISA. Adhesion of neutrophils to MLVECs was assessed with a color video digital camera. The results showed that during LPS-induced ARDS extracellular histones caused endothelial and neutrophil activation, as seen by P-selectin translocation, release of vWF, an increase of circulating sTM, lung neutrophil infiltration and increased MPO activity. Extracellular histones directly bound and activated MLVECs in a dose-dependent manner. On the contrary, the direct stimulatory effect of exogenous histones on neutrophils was very limited, as measured by neutrophil adhesion and MPO activity. With the contribution of activated endothelium, extracellular histones could effectively activating

  14. Neutrophil-Mediated Regulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity: The Role of Myeloperoxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Odobasic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are no longer seen as leukocytes with a sole function of being the essential first responders in the removal of pathogens at sites of infection. Being armed with numerous pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, these phagocytes can also contribute to the development of various autoimmune diseases and can positively or negatively regulate the generation of adaptive immune responses. In this review, we will discuss how myeloperoxidase, the most abundant neutrophil granule protein, plays a key role in the various functions of neutrophils in innate and adaptive immunity.

  15. Neutrophil chemotactic activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with AIDS-associated Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Kharazmi, A; Larsen, C G

    1997-01-01

    been shown to confer a poor prognosis in PCP. We therefore investigated the potential of BAL fluid from 17 patients with PCP to induce neutrophil chemotaxis. BAL fluid from patients induced considerable neutrophil chemotactic activity compared to normal controls. Elevated levels of IL-8 were detected...... in patient samples as compared to controls. A specific anti-IL-8 antibody significantly reduced chemotactic activity of patient samples by more than 50%. In conclusion, IL-8 appears to be a significant participant of neutrophil chemotaxis in AIDS-associated PCP, and may participate in the recruitment...

  16. Abnormal neutrophil-pulmonary interaction in the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of pulmonary neutrophil kinetics in humans with in vivo 111indium neutrophil scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warshawski, F.J.; Sibbald, W.J.; Driedger, A.A.; Cheung, H.

    1986-01-01

    In the absence of direct toxins, the majority of evidence from animal models suggests that neutrophils (PMN) are necessary for the full expression of the abnormal pulmonary permeability accompanying acute microvascular lung injury. We therefore studied the role of the PMN in the human correlate of this disease, the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), by assessing the pulmonary retention of infused autologous 111 Indium-labeled PMN (PMN-In). We evaluated 79 patients, prospectively categorized as: active ARDS (Aa; n = 30), active ARDS and concurrent corticosteroid therapy (As; n = 11), resolving ARDS (Ar; n = 13), sepsis without pulmonary edema (S; n = 7), and cardiac pulmonary edema (C; n = 18). This clinical separation was confirmed by retrospective analysis of associated measures of hemodynamic and respiratory dysfunction. We found that both analog scintigrams (positive/negative for diffuse pulmonary PMN-In sequestration) and computer-assisted quantitative analysis in 46 patients (T 1/2 of first hour demargination and percentage of peak activity/pixel/second remaining at 17 to 20 h) showed a significant rank order decrease in the pulmonary retention of labeled PMN-In through the Groups Aa----As----S----Ar----C. Our findings recognized aspects of in vivo PMN-In behavior that implied pathophysiologic differences between groups of critically ill patients in either the PMN themselves or in PMN-pulmonary endothelial interaction. This demonstrates the possibility of abnormal in vivo PMN-endothelial interaction in ARDS by virtue of the greater pulmonary localization of PMN in active ARDS versus resolving disease, septic non-ARDS states, and cardiac pulmonary edema

  17. Improved fermentation performance in an expanded ectopic fermentation system inoculated with thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui; Zhu, Changxiong; Geng, Bing; Liu, Xue; Ye, Jing; Tian, Yunlong; Peng, Xiawei

    2015-12-01

    Previous research showed that ectopic fermentation system (EFS) inoculated with thermophilic bacteria is an excellent alternative for cow wastewater treatment. In this study, the effects of thermophilic bacterial consortium on the efficiency and quality of the fermentation process in EFS were evaluated by measuring physicochemical and environmental factors and the changes in organic matter composition. In parallel, the microbial communities correlated with fermentation performance were identified. Inoculation of EFS with thermophilic bacterial consortium led to higher temperatures, increased wastewater requirements for continuous fermentation, and improved quality of the litters in terms of physicochemical factors, security test, functional group analysis, and bacterial community composition. The relationship between the transformation of organic component and the dominant bacteria species indicated that environmental factors contributed to strain growth, which subsequently promoted the fermentation process. The results highlight the great potential of EFS model for wide application in cow wastewater treatment and re-utilization as bio-fertilizer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Importance of lactic acid bacteria in Asian fermented foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Sook Jong; Lee, Jang-Eun; Lee, Cherl-Ho

    2011-08-30

    Lactic acid bacteria play important roles in various fermented foods in Asia. Besides being the main component in kimchi and other fermented foods, they are used to preserve edible food materials through fermentation of other raw-materials such as rice wine/beer, rice cakes, and fish by producing organic acids to control putrefactive microorganisms and pathogens. These bacteria also provide a selective environment favoring fermentative microorganisms and produce desirable flavors in various fermented foods. This paper discusses the role of lactic acid bacteria in various non-dairy fermented food products in Asia and their nutritional and physiological functions in the Asian diet.

  19. Relationship between fermentation index and other biochemical changes evaluated during the fermentation of Mexican cocoa (Theobroma cacao) beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Cortes, Teresa; Salgado-Cervantes, Marco Antonio; García-Alamilla, Pedro; García-Alvarado, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez-Jimenes, Guadalupe del C; Hidalgo-Morales, Madeleine; Robles-Olvera, Víctor

    2013-08-15

    During traditional cocoa processing, the end of fermentation is empirically determined by the workers; consequently, a high variability on the quality of fermented cocoa beans is observed. Some physicochemical properties (such as fermentation index) have been used to measure the degree of fermentation and changes in quality, but only after the fermentation process has concluded, using dried cocoa beans. This would suggest that it is necessary to establish a relationship between the chemical changes inside the cocoa bean and the fermentation conditions during the fermentation in order to standardize the process. Cocoa beans were traditionally fermented inside wooden boxes, sampled every 24 h and analyzed to evaluate fermentation changes in complete bean, cotyledon and dried beans. The value of the fermentation index suggested as the minimal adequate (≥1) was observed at 72 h in all bean parts analyzed. At this time, values of pH, spectral absorption, total protein hydrolysis and vicilin-class globulins of fermented beans suggested that they were well fermented. Since no difference was found between the types of samples, the pH value could be used as a first indicator of the end of the fermentation and confirmed by evaluation of the fermentation index using undried samples, during the process. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Hybridization of halotolerant yeast for alcohol fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limtong, S.

    1991-01-01

    Attempt have been made to construct a new yeast strain from alcohol fermenting strains and salt tolerant strains. It is anticipated that the new yeast strain will be able to ferment alcohol in molasses mash with high salinity, up to 3% of NaCl. Another characteristics is its ability to tolerate up to 40 C temperature which is desirable for alcohol fermentation in tropical countries. Commercial and wild strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were screened for their fermenting ability and strain SC90, 191 TJ3, and AM12 were selected as parental strains for fusion among themselves and with other halo tolerant species. Halo tolerant strains selected at 5% NaCl in molasses mash were tentatively identified as Torulopsis grabrata, T. candida, T. Bovina and S. Rouxii whereas all of those strains selected at 17% NaCl were Citeromyces sp. It was found that fusant TA73 derived from wild strain and sake fermenting strain performed best among 4,087 fusants investigated. This fusant fermented much better than their parental strains when salt concentrations were increased to 5 and 7% NaCl. Experiment was carried out in fermentor, 1.5 liter working volume using molasses mash with 3% NaCl and temperature was controlled at 35 degree C. Fermentation rate of TA73, TJ3 and AM12 were 2.17, 1.50 and 1.87 g/L/hr respectively, Maximum ethanol concentration obtained were 7.6, 6.7 and 7.4% by weight after 60 and 78 hours respectively. Other fusants derived from fusion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with other halo tolerant species were mostly inferior to their parental strains and only 7 fusants were slightly better than parental strains. (author)

  1. Defective quiescence entry promotes the fermentation performance of bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomuro, Mayu; Kato, Taku; Zhou, Yan; Watanabe, Daisuke; Motoyama, Yasuo; Yamagishi, Hiromi; Akao, Takeshi; Aizawa, Masayuki

    2016-11-01

    One of the key processes in making beer is fermentation. In the fermentation process, brewer's yeast plays an essential role in both the production of ethanol and the flavor profile of beer. Therefore, the mechanism of ethanol fermentation by of brewer's yeast is attracting much attention. The high ethanol productivity of sake yeast has provided a good basis from which to investigate the factors that regulate the fermentation rates of brewer's yeast. Recent studies found that the elevated fermentation rate of sake Saccharomyces cerevisiae species is closely related to a defective transition from vegetative growth to the quiescent (G 0 ) state. In the present study, to clarify the relationship between the fermentation rate of brewer's yeast and entry into G 0 , we constructed two types of mutant of the bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus Weihenstephan 34/70: a RIM15 gene disruptant that was defective in entry into G 0 ; and a CLN3ΔPEST mutant, in which the G 1 cyclin Cln3p accumulated at high levels. Both strains exhibited higher fermentation rates under high-maltose medium or high-gravity wort conditions (20° Plato) as compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, G 1 arrest and/or G 0 entry were defective in both the RIM15 disruptant and the CLN3ΔPEST mutant as compared with the wild-type strain. Taken together, these results indicate that regulation of the G 0 /G 1 transition might govern the fermentation rate of bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast in high-gravity wort. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [The significances of peripheral neutrophils CD(55) and myeloperoxidase expression in patients with myeloperoxidase-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X L; Zheng, M J; Shuai, Z W; Zhang, L; Zhang, M M; Chen, S Y

    2017-06-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of CD(55) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) on neutrophils in patients with MPO-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis(MPO-AAV), and analyze the relationship between the expression and clinical manifestation. Methods: Forty untreated patients with active MPO-AAV (patient group) and 30 healthy volunteers (control group) were enrolled in this study. The CD(55) on neutrophils and both membrane and cytoplasmic MPO were detected by flow cytometry. Serum fragment-from the activated complement factor B(Ba) and MPO were measured by ELISA. The clinical activity of vasculitis was valued by Birmingham vasculitis activity score-version 3(BVAS-V3). The significance of laboratory data was evaluated by Spearman correlation test and multivariate linear regression analysis. Results: (1)The mean fluorescence intensity(MFI) of CD(55) expressed on neutrophils was significantly higher than that in control group[4 068.6±2 306.0 vs 2 999.5±1 504.9, P =0.033]. Similar results of serum MPO and Ba in patient group were found compared to controls [500.0(381.0, 612.7) IU/L vs 286.9(225.5, 329.1) IU/L, P <0.001; 35.2(25.2, 79.5) ng/L vs 18.0(15.0, 28.0) ng/L, P <0.001], respectively. However, MIF of cytoplasmic MPO in patients was significantly lower than that of control group(1 577.1±1 175.9 vs 3 105.3±2 323.0, P =0.003) . (2) In patient group, cytoplasmic intensity of MPO was negatively associated with the serum levels of MPO( r =-0.710, P <0.001) and Ba ( r =-0.589, P =0.001). Moreover, serum MPO was positively associated with serum Ba( r =0.691, P <0.001). Membrane intensity of CD(55) on neutrophils was positively correlated with patient age ( r =0.514, P =0.001), C reactive protein ( r =0.376, P =0.018), peripheral neutrophils count ( r =0.485, P =0.001) and BVAS-V3 ( r =0.484, P =0.002), whereas negative correlation between membrane CD(55) and disease duration was seen ( r =-0.403, P =0.01). (3) The result of multiple

  3. Neutrophil trails guide influenza-specific CD8⁺ T cells in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kihong; Hyun, Young-Min; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Capece, Tara; Bae, Seyeon; Miller, Richard; Topham, David J; Kim, Minsoo

    2015-09-04

    During viral infections, chemokines guide activated effector T cells to infection sites. However, the cells responsible for producing these chemokines and how such chemokines recruit T cells are unknown. Here, we show that the early recruitment of neutrophils into influenza-infected trachea is essential for CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune protection in mice. We observed that migrating neutrophils leave behind long-lasting trails that are enriched in the chemokine CXCL12. Experiments with granulocyte-specific CXCL12 conditionally depleted mice and a CXCR4 antagonist revealed that CXCL12 derived from neutrophil trails is critical for virus-specific CD8(+) T cell recruitment and effector functions. Collectively, these results suggest that neutrophils deposit long-lasting, chemokine-containing trails, which may provide both chemotactic and haptotactic cues for efficient CD8(+) T cell migration and localization in influenza-infected tissues. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Neutrophil trails guide influenza-specific CD8+ T cells in the airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kihong; Hyun, Young-Min; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Capece, Tara; Bae, Seyeon; Miller, Richard; Topham, David J.; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    During viral infections, chemokines guide activated effector T cells to infection sites. However, the cells responsible for producing these chemokines and how such chemokines recruit T cells is unknown. Here, we show that the early recruitment of neutrophils into influenza-infected trachea is essential for CD8+ T cell-mediated immune protection in mice. We observed that migrating neutrophils leave behind long-lasting trails that are enriched in the chemokine CXCL12. Experiments with granulocyte-specific CXCL12 conditional knock-out mice and a CXCR4 antagonist revealed that CXCL12 derived from neutrophil trails is critical for virus-specific CD8+ T cell recruitment and effector functions. Collectively, these results suggest neutrophils deposit long-lasting, chemokine-containing trails, which may provide both chemotactic and haptotactic cues for efficient CD8+ T cell migration and localization in influenza-infected tissues. PMID:26339033

  5. In vivo imaging reveals an essential role for neutrophils in Leishmaniasis transmitted by sand flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nathan C.; Egen, Jackson G.; Secundino, Nagila; Debrabant, Alain; Kimblin, Nicola; Kamhawi, Shaden; Lawyer, Phillip; Fay, Michael P.; Germain, Ronald N.; Sacks, David

    2008-01-01

    Infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Leishmania is thought to be initiated by direct parasitization of macrophages, but the early events following transmission to the skin by vector sand flies have been difficult to examine directly. Using dynamic intravital microscopy and flow cytometry, we observed a rapid and sustained neutrophilic infiltrate at localized sand fly bite sites. Invading neutrophils efficiently captured Leishmania major (L.m.) parasites early after sand fly transmission or needle inoculation, but phagocytosed L.m. remained viable and infected neutrophils efficiently initiated infection. Furthermore, neutrophil depletion reduced, rather than enhanced, the ability of parasites to establish productive infections. Thus, L.m. appears to have evolved to both evade and exploit the innate host response to sand fly bite in order to establish and promote disease. PMID:18703742

  6. Neutrophils and the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 mediate carrageenan-induced antinociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana L. Pagano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously shown that the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 secreted by neutrophils mediates the antinociceptive response in an acute inflammatory model induced by the intraperitoneal injection of glycogen in mice.

  7. MiR-125a Is a critical modulator for neutrophil development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Qin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are universal post-transcriptional regulators in genomes. They have the ability of buffering gene expressional programs, contributing to robustness of biological systems and playing important roles in development, physiology and diseases. Here, we identified a microRNA, miR-125a, as a positive regulator of granulopoiesis. MiR125a knockout mice show reduced infiltration of neutrophils in the lung and alleviated tissue destruction after endotoxin challenge as a consequence of decreased neutrophil numbers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this significant reduction of neutrophils was due to impaired development of granulocyte precursors to mature neutrophils in an intrinsic manner. We showed that Socs3, a critical repressor for granulopoiesis, was a target of miR-125a. Overall, our study revealed a new microRNA regulating granulocyte development and supported a model in which miR-125a acted as a fine-tuner of granulopoiesis.

  8. Simultaneous occurrence of foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and neonatal neutropenia due to maternal neutrophilic autoantibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling Taaning, Ellen Birkerod; Jensen, Lise; Varming, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and neonatal neutropenia caused by maternal autoantibodies against neutrophils are rare disorders. We describe a newborn with severe thrombocytopenia and intracerebral bleeding caused by maternal anti-HPA-3a alloantibodies and mild neutropenia...

  9. Neutrophils and Snail Orchestrate the Establishment of a Pro-tumor Microenvironment in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faget, Julien; Groeneveld, Svenja; Boivin, Gael; Sankar, Martial; Zangger, Nadine; Garcia, Miguel; Guex, Nicolas; Zlobec, Inti; Steiner, Loïc; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Xenarios, Ioannis; Meylan, Etienne

    2017-12-12

    Understanding the immune compartment of tumors facilitates the development of revolutionary new therapies. We used a Kras(G12D)-driven mouse model of lung cancer to establish an immune signature and identified a contribution of Gr1 + neutrophils to disease progression. Depletion experiments showed that Gr1 + cells (1) favor tumor growth, (2) reduce T cell homing and prevent successful anti-PD1 immunotherapy, and (3) alter angiogenesis, leading to hypoxia and sustained Snail expression in lung cancer cells. In turn, Snail accelerated disease progression and increased intratumoral Cxcl2 secretion and neutrophil infiltration. Cxcl2 was produced mainly by neutrophils themselves in response to a factor secreted by Snail-expressing tumor cells. We therefore propose a vicious cycle encompassing neutrophils and Snail to maintain a deleterious tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neutrophil chemotactic activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with AIDS-associated Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Kharazmi, A; Larsen, C G

    1997-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is accompanied by an acute inflammatory infiltration of the lung parenchyma. The cellular infiltrate is characterized by inflammatory cells including neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, neutrophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid has...

  11. Neutrophils and Snail Orchestrate the Establishment of a Pro-tumor Microenvironment in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Faget

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the immune compartment of tumors facilitates the development of revolutionary new therapies. We used a Kras(G12D-driven mouse model of lung cancer to establish an immune signature and identified a contribution of Gr1+ neutrophils to disease progression. Depletion experiments showed that Gr1+ cells (1 favor tumor growth, (2 reduce T cell homing and prevent successful anti-PD1 immunotherapy, and (3 alter angiogenesis, leading to hypoxia and sustained Snail expression in lung cancer cells. In turn, Snail accelerated disease progression and increased intratumoral Cxcl2 secretion and neutrophil infiltration. Cxcl2 was produced mainly by neutrophils themselves in response to a factor secreted by Snail-expressing tumor cells. We therefore propose a vicious cycle encompassing neutrophils and Snail to maintain a deleterious tumor microenvironment.

  12. Redox modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent neutrophil adherence to endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibodeau, Paul A.; Gozin, Alexia; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Pasquier, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now well known to be involved in an increased interaction between neutrophils and endothelial cells. Previously, we have shown that the increased adhesion of neutrophils to ROS-stimulated endothelial cells involves an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase, p125 FAK , and several cytoskeleton proteins. This review article focuses on the involvement of adhesion molecules in the increased adhesion of neutrophils to ROS-stimulated endothelial cells, on the oxygen species responsible for this adhesion, and on the intracellular signaling pathway leading to the modification of the cytoskeleton by ROS. The evidence from our laboratory and others describing these events is summarized. Finally, the future perspectives that need to be explored in order to inhibit or reduce the ROS-mediated adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells are addressed

  13. CD14-DEPENDENT AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS: ROLE OF ATOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Inhaled endotoxin (LPS) is associated with airway neutrophilic (PMN) inflammation in both asthmatic and control subjects, with asthmatic subjects demonstrating possibly higher sensitivity. CD14 is the principal receptor mediating LPS responses in vivo. It is unkown ...

  14. Fusion expression of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein in E.coli

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Qiao-Zhen; Duan, Guang-Cai; Fan, Qing-Tang; Xi, Yuan-Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To produce a recombinant protein rMBP-NAP, which was fusionally expressed by Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) neutrophil-activating protein (NAP) and E. coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) and to evaluate its immunoreactivity and immunogenicity.

  15. Significant difference of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio between colorectal cancer, adenomatous polyp and healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W-W; Chu, Y-P; An, G-Y

    2017-12-01

    Tumor was reported to correlate with inflammation and the host's inflammatory response to tumor has been shown to independently predict the outcome. Many measures of the systemic inflammatory response have been studied in recent years. In the present study the full blood count (leukocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte) of colorectal cancers (CRCs) adenomatous polyps, and healthy people were collected, and the difference of ratios was studied. A total of 752 individuals (242 colorectal cancers, 248 adenomatous polyps, and 262 healthy people) were randomized enrolled in the present study. The full blood counts (leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte) of each individual were collected and the NLRs were calculated. The leukocyte count, neutrophil ratio and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio were the highest in colorectal cancer group, the second in adenomatous polyp group, and the lowest in healthy control (p ratio was in the reverse order (p ratio and NLR may provide available information in the differential diagnosis of CRC, adenomatous polyp and healthy people.

  16. Local anesthetic-induced inhibition of human neutrophil priming: the influence of structure, lipophilicity, and charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picardi, Susanne; Cartellieri, Sibylle; Groves, Danja; Hahnenekamp, Klaus; Gerner, Peter; Durieux, Marcel E.; Stevens, Markus F.; Lirk, Philipp; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2013-01-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) are widely known for inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels underlying their antiarrhythmic and antinociceptive effects. However, LAs have significant immunomodulatory properties and were shown to affect human neutrophil functions independent of sodium-channel blockade.

  17. Effect of Legionella pneumophila cytotoxic protease on human neutrophil and monocyte function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Kharazmi, A

    1992-01-01

    -dependent and heat-labile manner, the binding of F-Met-Leu-Phe to both cell types. Neutrophil and monocyte oxidative burst response, as measured by superoxide release and chemiluminescence response, was not significantly affected by the enzyme. A slight enhancement of PMA-stimulated superoxide release was induced...... infection, we investigated the effect of this protease on the function of human neutrophils and monocytes. L. pneumophila protease inhibited the chemotactic response of neutrophils to F-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan-activated serum in a concentration-dependent and heat-labile manner. A direct effect...... by the protease in both cell types. Lastly, the protease inhibited the killing of Listeria monocytogenes by neutrophils or monocytes. Inhibition of Listeria killing was concentration-dependent, heat-labile, and did not require the presence of the enzyme in the bactericidal assay. The inhibitory activity of L...

  18. Respiratory innate immune proteins differentially modulate the neutrophil respiratory burst response to influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Mitchell R; Crouch, Erika; Vesona, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    Oxidants and neutrophils contribute to lung injury during influenza A virus (IAV) infection. Surfactant protein (SP)-D plays a pivotal role in restricting IAV replication and inflammation in the first several days after infection. Despite its potent anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, preincubation...... of IAV with SP-D in vitro strongly increases neutrophil respiratory burst responses to the virus. Several factors are shown to modify this apparent proinflammatory effect of SP-D. Although multimeric forms of SP-D show dose-dependent augmentation of respiratory burst responses, trimeric, single-arm forms...... either show no effect or inhibit these responses. Furthermore, if neutrophils are preincubated with multimeric SP-D before IAV is added, oxidant responses to the virus are significantly reduced. The ability of SP-D to increase neutrophil uptake of IAV can be dissociated from enhancement of oxidant...

  19. Protective effects of an aptamer inhibitor of neutrophil elastase in lung inflammatory injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bless, N M; Smith, D; Charlton, J

    1997-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important part in the development of acute inflammatory injury. Human neutrophils contain high levels of the serine protease elastase, which is stored in azurophilic granules and is secreted in response to inflammatory stimuli. Elastase is capable of degrading many components...... of extracellular matrix [1-4] and has cytotoxic effects on endothelial cells [5-7] and airway epithelial cells. Three types of endogenous protease inhibitors control the activity of neutrophil elastase, including alpha-1 protease inhibitor (alpha-1PI), alpha-2 macroglobulin and secreted leukoproteinase inhibitor...... (SLPI) [8-10]. A disturbed balance between neutrophil elastase and these inhibitors has been found in various acute clinical conditions (such as adult respiratory syndrome and ischemia-reperfusion injury) and in chronic diseases. We investigated the effect of NX21909, a selected oligonucleotide (aptamer...

  20. The role of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and neutrophil extracellular traps in the interaction between neutrophils and the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, K; Demirel, I; Khalaf, H; Bengtsson, T

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophils are regarded as the sentinel cells of innate immunity and are found in abundance within the gingival crevice. Discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) within the gingival pockets prompted us to probe the nature of the interactions of neutrophils with the prominent periopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Some of the noted virulence factors of this Gram-negative anaerobe are gingipains: arginine gingipains (RgpA/B) and lysine gingipain (Kgp). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of gingipains in phagocytosis, formation of reactive oxygen species, NETs and CXCL8 modulation by using wild-type strains and isogenic gingipain mutants. Confocal imaging showed that gingipain mutants K1A (Kgp) and E8 (RgpA/B) induced extracellular traps in neutrophils, whereas ATCC33277 and W50 were phagocytosed. The viability of both ATCC33277 and W50 dwindled as the result of phagocytosis and could be salvaged by cytochalasin D, and the bacteria released high levels of lipopolysaccharide in the culture supernatant. Porphyromonas gingivalis induced reactive oxygen species and CXCL8 with the most prominent effect being that of the wild-type strain ATCC33277, whereas the other wild-type strain W50 was less effective. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed a significant CXCL8 expression by E8. All the tested P. gingivalis strains increased cytosolic free calcium. In conclusion, phagocytosis is the primary neutrophil response to P. gingivalis, although NETs could play an accessory role in infection control. Although gingipains do not seem to directly regulate phagocytosis, NETs or oxidative burst in neutrophils, their proteolytic properties could modulate the subsequent outcomes such as nutrition acquisition and survival by the bacteria. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Xylose fermentation to ethanol. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J D

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  2. Understanding Kombucha Tea Fermentation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Soto, Silvia Alejandra; Beaufort, Sandra; Bouajila, Jalloul; Souchard, Jean-Pierre; Taillandier, Patricia

    2018-03-01

    Kombucha is a beverage of probable Manchurian origins obtained from fermented tea by a microbial consortium composed of several bacteria and yeasts. This mixed consortium forms a powerful symbiosis capable of inhibiting the growth of potentially contaminating bacteria. The fermentation process also leads to the formation of a polymeric cellulose pellicle due to the activity of certain strains of Acetobacter sp. The tea fermentation process by the microbial consortium was able to show an increase in certain biological activities which have been already studied; however, little information is available on the characterization of its active components and their evolution during fermentation. Studies have also reported that the use of infusions from other plants may be a promising alternative. Kombucha is a traditional fermented tea whose consumption has increased in the recent years due to its multiple functional properties such as anti-inflammatory potential and antioxidant activity. The microbiological composition of this beverage is quite complex and still more research is needed in order to fully understand its behavior. This study comprises the chemical and microbiological composition of the tea and the main factors that may affect its production. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  3. Deterioration and fermentability of energy cane juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina Ceccato-Antonini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The main interest in the energy cane is the bioenergy production from the bagasse. The juice obtained after the cane milling may constitute a feedstock for the first-generation ethanol units; however, little attention has been dedicated to this issue. In order to verify the feasibility of the energy cane juice as substrate for ethanol production, the objectives of this research were first to determine the microbiological characteristics and deterioration along the time of the juices from two clones of energy cane (Type I and second, their fermentability as feedstock for utilization in ethanol distilleries. There was a clear differentiation in the bacterial and yeast development of the sugarcane juices assayed, being much faster in the energy canes than in sugarcane. The storage of juice for 8 hours at 30oC did not cause impact in alcoholic fermentation for any sample analyzed, although a significant bacterial growth was detected in this period. A decrease of approximately seven percentage points in the fermentative efficiency was observed for energy cane juice in relation to sugarcane in a 24-hour fermentation cycle with the baking yeast. Despite the faster deterioration, the present research demonstrated that the energy cane juice has potential to be used as feedstock in ethanol-producing industries. As far as we know, it is the first research to deal with the characteristics of deterioration and fermentability of energy cane juices.

  4. One hundred years of clostridial butanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyeon Gi; Jang, Yu-Sin; Cho, Changhee; Lee, Joungmin; Binkley, Robert; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-02-01

    Butanol has been widely used as an important industrial solvent and feedstock for chemical production. Also, its superior fuel properties compared with ethanol make butanol a good substitute for gasoline. Butanol can be efficiently produced by the genus Clostridium through the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, one of the oldest industrial fermentation processes. Butanol production via industrial fermentation has recently gained renewed interests as a potential solution to increasing pressure of climate change and environmental problems by moving away from fossil fuel consumption and moving toward renewable raw materials. Great advances over the last 100 years are now reviving interest in bio-based butanol production. However, several challenges to industrial production of butanol still need to be overcome, such as overall cost competitiveness and development of higher performance strains with greater butanol tolerance. This minireview revisits the past 100 years of remarkable achievements made in fermentation technologies, product recovery processes, and strain development in clostridial butanol fermentation through overcoming major technical hurdles. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Quality and Composition of Red Wine Fermented with Schizosaccharomyces pombe as Sole Fermentative Yeast, and in Mixed and Sequential Fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Palomero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the physiology of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (represented by strain 938 in the production of red wine, as the sole fermentative yeast, and in mixed and sequential fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae 796. For further comparison, fermentations in which Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the sole fermentative yeast were also performed; in these fermentations a commercial lactic acid bacterium was used to perform malolactic fermentation once alcoholic fermentation was complete (unlike S. cerevisiae, the Sc. pombe performs maloalcoholic fermentation and therefore removes malic acid without such help. Relative density, acetic, malic and pyruvic acid concentrations, primary amino nitrogen and urea concentrations, and pH of the musts were measured over the entire fermentation period. In all fermentations in which Sc. pombe 938 was involved, nearly all the malic acid was consumed from an initial concentration of 5.5 g/L, and moderate acetic acid concentrations below 0.4 g/L were formed. The urea content of these wines was notably lower, showing a tenfold reduction when compared with those that were made with S. cerevisiae 796 alone. The sensorial properties of the different final wines varied widely. The wines fermented with Sc. pombe 938 had maximum aroma intensity and quality, and they were preferred by the tasters.

  6. Myeloperoxidase activity and the oxidized proteins in blood neutrophils of patients with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravlyova, Larissa; Molotov-Luchanskiy, Vilen; Bakirova, Ryszhan; Klyuyev, Dmitriy; Demidchik, Ludmila; Kolesnikova, Yevgeniya

    2014-10-01

    The main purpose of our investigation was to study myeloperoxidase activity and concentration of oxidized proteins in blood neutrophils of patients with ambulant pneumonia and secondary pneumonia which has arisen on a background of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients were divided into 2 groups. 17 patients with ambulant pneumonia moderate severity and respiratory insufficiency of grade 2 were included in the 1-st group. 20 COPD patients with secondary pneumonia moderate severity and with respiratory insufficiency of grade 2 were included in the 2-nd group. The control group consisted of 15 healthy subjects. The reactive protein carbonyl derivates, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and myeloperoxidase activity were detected in neutrophils. In neutrophils of 1-st group patients the augmentation of reactive protein carbonyl derivates was observed in comparison with healthy ones. In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients the slight decrease of reactive protein carbonyl derivates was observed in comparison with healthy ones (by 17%). In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients the significant increasing AOPP in comparison with healthy ones (p <0.01) and 1 group patients (p <0.05) was fixed. Myeloperoxidase activity was higher in neutrophils of 1-th group patients in comparison with healthy ones. In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients myeloperoxidase activity was higher in comparison with the same of 1 group patients (by 67%, p <0.05). Our results showed the different direction of oxidized proteins formation neutrophils of patients with primary and secondary pneumonia. Besides that the varied degree of myeloperoxidase activity was fixed. Our results require more detailed understanding because they can reflect peculiar mechanisms of pneumonia development and determine the characteristics of their progression. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Comparable Neutrophil Responses for Arm and Intensity-matched Leg Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, Christof A; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Bishop, Nicolette C

    2017-08-01

    Arm exercise is performed at lower absolute intensities than lower body exercise. This may impact on intensity-dependent neutrophil responses, and it is unknown whether individuals restricted to arm exercise experience the same changes in the neutrophil response as found for lower body exercise. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the importance of exercise modality and relative exercise intensity on the neutrophil response. Twelve moderately trained men performed three 45-min constant load exercise trials after determination of peak oxygen uptake for arm exercise (V˙O2peak arms) and cycling (V˙O2peak legs): 1) arm cranking exercise at 60% V˙O2peak arms, 2) moderate cycling at 60% V˙O2peak legs, and 3) easy cycling at 60% V˙O2peak arms. Neutrophil numbers in the circulation increased for all exercise trials, but were significantly lower for easy cycling when compared with arm exercise (P = 0.009), mirroring the blunted increase in HR and epinephrine during easy cycling. For all trials, exercising HR explained some of the variation of the neutrophil number 2 h postexercise (R = 0.51-0.69), epinephrine explaining less of this variation (R = 0.21-0.34). The number of neutrophils expressing CXCR2 decreased in the recovery from exercise in all trials (P Arm and leg exercise elicits the same neutrophil response when performed at the same relative intensity, implying that populations restricted to arm exercise might achieve a similar exercise induced neutrophil response as those performing lower body exercise. A likely explanation for this is the higher sympathetic activation and cardiac output for arm and relative intensity-matched leg exercise when compared with easy cycling, which is partly reflected in HR. This study further shows that the downregulation of CXCR2 may be implicated in exercise-induced neutrophilia.

  8. Quantification of neutrophil migration into the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruparelia, Prina; Summers, Charlotte; Chilvers, Edwin R. [University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Szczepura, Katherine R. [University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Solanki, Chandra K.; Balan, Kottekkattu [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Newbold, Paul [AstraZeneca R and D Charnwood, Loughborough (United Kingdom); Bilton, Diana [Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cystic Fibrosis and Lung Defence Unit, Papworth Everard (United Kingdom); Peters, A.M. [University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Brighton Sussex Medical School, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    To quantify neutrophil migration into the lungs of patients with chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD). Neutrophil loss via airways was assessed by dedicated whole-body counting 45 min, 24 h and 2, 4, 7 and 10 days after injection of very small activities of {sup 111}In-labelled neutrophils in 12 healthy nonsmokers, 5 healthy smokers, 16 patients with COPD (of whom 7 were ex-smokers) and 10 patients with bronchiectasis. Lung accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-labelled neutrophils was assessed by sequential SPECT and Patlak analysis in six COPD patients and three healthy nonsmoking subjects. Whole body {sup 111}In counts, expressed as percentages of 24 h counts, decreased in all subjects. Losses at 7 days (mean {+-} SD) were similar in healthy nonsmoking subjects (5.5 {+-} 1.5%), smoking subjects (6.5 {+-} 4.4%) and ex-smoking COPD patients (5.8 {+-} 1.5%). In contrast, currently smoking COPD patients showed higher losses (8.0 {+-} 3.0%) than healthy nonsmokers (p = 0.03). Two bronchiectatic patients lost 25% and 26%, indicating active disease; mean loss in the remaining eight was 6.9 {+-} 2.5%. The rate of accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-neutrophils in the lungs, determined by sequential SPECT, was increased in COPD patients (0.030-0.073 min{sup -1}) compared with healthy nonsmokers (0-0.002 min{sup -1}; p = 0.02). In patients with COPD, sequential SPECT showed increased lung accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-labelled neutrophils, while whole-body counting demonstrated subsequent higher losses of {sup 111}In-labelled neutrophils in patients who continued to smoke. Sequential SPECT as a means of quantifying neutrophil migration deserves further evaluation. (orig.)

  9. Epigenome profiling reveals significant DNA demethylation of interferon signature genes in lupus neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Coit, Patrick; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Ognenovski, Mikhail; Zhao, Wenpu; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Wren, Jonathan D.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus. The goal of this study was to characterize the epigenetic architecture, by studying the DNA methylome, of neutrophils and low density granulocytes (LDGs) in lupus patients. We studied 15 lupus patients and 15 healthy age, sex, and ethnicity matched controls. Genome-wide DNA methylation was assessed using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip array, which includes over 485,000 methylation sites ...

  10. Epigenome profiling reveals significant DNA demethylation of interferon signature genes in lupus neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coit, Patrick; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Ognenovski, Mikhail; Zhao, Wenpu; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Wren, Jonathan D; Kaplan, Mariana J; Sawalha, Amr H

    2015-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus. The goal of this study was to characterize the epigenetic architecture, by studying the DNA methylome, of neutrophils and low density granulocytes (LDGs) in lupus patients. We studied 15 lupus patients and 15 healthy age, sex, and ethnicity matched controls. Genome-wide DNA methylation was assessed using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip array, which includes over 485,000 methylation sites across the entire genome. Bisulfite DNA sequencing was used to validate the array results. Statistical and bioinformatic analysis was performed to identify and characterize differentially methylated loci and genes. We identified 293 differentially methylated CG sites in neutrophils between lupus patients and controls. The majority (68%) of differentially methylated CG sites were hypomethylated in lupus neutrophils compared to controls, suggesting overall hypomethylation. We found a robust and consistent demethylation of interferon signature genes in lupus neutrophils, and similar demethylation in the same genes in autologous LDGs. Indeed, the DNA methylome in lupus neutrophils and LDGs was almost identical, suggesting similar chromatin architecture in the two granulocyte subsets. A notable exception was the hypomethylation of a CG site in the promoter region of the cytoskeleton-regulating gene RAC1 in LDGs. Our findings demonstrate a pattern of robust demethylation of interferon signature genes in lupus patients supporting a pathogenic role for neutrophils in lupus. We suggest a model whereby DNA from lupus neutrophils and LDGs externalized by NETosis enhance type-I IFN production via TLR-9 stimulation by hypomethylated DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modulation of oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent metabolism of neutrophilic granulocytes by quantum points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleskova, S N; Mikheeva, E R

    2011-08-01

    Inhibition of neutrophilic granulocyte metabolism under the effect of semiconductor quantum points was demonstrated. The status of the oxidative system was evaluated by the NBT test, nonoxidative status by the lysosomal cationic test. It was found that quantum points in a dose of 0.1 mg/ml irrespective of their core and composition of coating significantly inhibited oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent metabolism of neutrophilic granulocytes.

  12. Glycogen storage disease type Ib neutrophils exhibit impaired cell adhesion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Goo-Young; Lee, Young Mok; Kwon, Joon Hyun; Jun, Hyun Sik; Chou, Janice

    2017-01-22

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis, neutropenia, and neutrophil dysfunction, is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT). Neutrophils play an essential role in the defense against invading pathogens. The recruitment of neutrophils towards the inflammation sites in response to inflammatory stimuli is a tightly regulated process involving rolling, adhesion, and transmigration. In this study, we investigated the role of G6PT in neutrophil adhesion and migration using in vivo and in vitro models. We showed that the GSD-Ib (G6pt -/- ) mice manifested severe neutropenia in both blood and bone marrow, and treating G6pt -/- mice with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) corrected neutropenia. However, upon thioglycolate challenge, neutrophils from both untreated and G-CSF-treated G6pt -/- mice exhibited decreased ability to migrate to the peritoneal cavity. In vitro migration and cell adhesion of G6PT-deficient neutrophils were also significantly impaired. Defects in cell migration were not due to enhanced apoptosis or altered fMLP receptor expression. Remarkably, the expression of the β2 integrins CD11a and CD11b, which are critical for cell adhesion, was greatly decreased in G6PT-deficient neutrophils. This study suggests that deficiencies in G6PT cause impairment in neutrophil adhesion and migration via aberrant expression of β2 integrins, and our finding should facilitate the development of novel therapies for GSD-Ib. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interleukin-17A and Neutrophils in a Murine Model of Bird-Related Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ishizuka

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP is an immune mediated lung disease induced by the repeated inhalation of a wide variety of antigens. Bird-related hypersensitivity pneumonitis (BRHP is one of the most common forms of HP in human and results from the inhalation of avian antigens. The findings of a recent clinical analysis suggest that in addition to Th1 factors, the levels of interleukin(IL-17 and IL-17-associated transcripts are increased in the setting of HP, and that both IL-17A and neutrophils are crucial for the development of pulmonary inflammation in murine models of HP. Our objectives were to investigate the roles of IL-17A and neutrophils in granuloma-forming inflammation in an acute HP model. We developed a mouse model of acute BRHP using pigeon dropping extract. We evaluated the process of granuloma formation and the roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in a model. We found that the neutralization of IL-17A by the antibody attenuated granuloma formation and the recruitment of neutrophils, and also decreased the expression level of chemokine(C-X-C motif ligand 5 (CXCL5 in the acute HP model. We confirmed that most of the neutrophils in the acute HP model exhibited immunoreactivity to the anti-IL-17 antibody. We have identified the central roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of granuloma formation in acute HP. We have also assumed that neutrophils are an important source of IL-17A in an acute HP model, and that the IL-17A-CXCL5 pathway may be responsible for the recruitment of neutrophils.

  14. Neutrophils reduce the parasite burden in Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis-infected macrophages.

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    Erico Vinícius de Souza Carmo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the role of neutrophils in Leishmania infection were mainly performed with L. (L major, whereas less information is available for L. (L amazonensis. Previous results from our laboratory showed a large infiltrate of neutrophils in the site of infection in a mouse strain resistant to L. (L. amazonensis (C3H/HePas. In contrast, the susceptible strain (BALB/c displayed a predominance of macrophages harboring a high number of amastigotes and very few neutrophils. These findings led us to investigate the interaction of inflammatory neutrophils with L. (L. amazonensis-infected macrophages in vitro.Mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with L. (L. amazonensis were co-cultured with inflammatory neutrophils, and after four days, the infection was quantified microscopically. Data are representative of three experiments with similar results. The main findings were 1 intracellular parasites were efficiently destroyed in the co-cultures; 2 the leishmanicidal effect was similar when cells were obtained from mouse strains resistant (C3H/HePas or susceptible (BALB/c to L. (L. amazonensis; 3 parasite destruction did not require contact between infected macrophages and neutrophils; 4 tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, neutrophil elastase and platelet activating factor (PAF were involved with the leishmanicidal activity, and 5 destruction of the parasites did not depend on generation of oxygen or nitrogen radicals, indicating that parasite clearance did not involve the classical pathway of macrophage activation by TNF-α, as reported for other Leishmania species.The present results provide evidence that neutrophils in concert with macrophages play a previously unrecognized leishmanicidal effect on L. (L. amazonensis. We believe these findings may help to understand the mechanisms involved in innate immunity in cutaneous infection by this Leishmania species.

  15. Neutrophil killing ofStaphylococcus aureusin diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome: a prospective cellular surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Ingrid Lea; McNeil, Lisa Kristin; Pathirana, Sudam; Singer, Christine Lee; Liu, Yongdong; Mullen, Stanley; Girgenti, Douglas; Gurtman, Alejandra; Pride, Michael W; Jansen, Kathrin Ute; Huang, Paul L; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2017-01-01

    Obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes are frequent in surgical populations and can enhance susceptibility to postoperative surgical site infections. Reduced neutrophil function has been linked with diabetes and risk of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Therefore, neutrophil function in diabetic and obese subjects (± MetS) was assessed in this prospective serological and cellular surveillance study to determine whether vaccines administered to protect against infections after surgery could be effective in these populations. Neutrophil function (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus ) was assessed in subjects classified according to diabetes status, body mass index, and presence/absence of MetS. Neutrophils were characterized within functional subsets by flow cytometry. A serologic assay was used to measure baseline antibody presence to each antigen in SA4Ag: capsular polysaccharide (CP) type 5, CP8, recombinant mutant Clumping factor A (rmClfA), and recombinant Manganese transport protein C (rMntC). Neutrophil function was similar for comorbid and healthy cohorts, with no significant between-group differences in cell counts, migration, phagocytosis ability, neutrophil subset proportions, and S. aureus killing ability when neutrophils were isolated 3-6 months apart (Visit 1 [n = 90] and Visit 2 [n = 70]) and assessed. Median pre-existing antibody titers to CP5, CP8, and rmClfA were comparable for all cohorts (insufficient subjects with rMntC titers for determination). MetS, diabetes, and obesity do not impact in vitro neutrophil function with regard to S. aureus killing, suggesting that if an effective S. aureus vaccine is developed it may be effective in individuals with these comorbidities.

  16. Coccidioides Endospores and Spherules Draw Strong Chemotactic, Adhesive, and Phagocytic Responses by Individual Human Neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuk Lee

    Full Text Available Coccidioides spp. are dimorphic pathogenic fungi whose parasitic forms cause coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever in mammalian hosts. We use an innovative interdisciplinary approach to analyze one-on-one encounters between human neutrophils and two forms of Coccidioides posadasii. To examine the mechanisms by which the innate immune system coordinates different stages of the host response to fungal pathogens, we dissect the immune-cell response into chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Our single-cell technique reveals a surprisingly strong response by initially quiescent neutrophils to close encounters with C. posadasii, both from a distance (by complement-mediated chemotaxis as well as upon contact (by serum-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis. This response closely resembles neutrophil interactions with Candida albicans and zymosan particles, and is significantly stronger than the neutrophil responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Rhizopus oryzae under identical conditions. The vigorous in vitro neutrophil response suggests that C. posadasii evades in vivo recognition by neutrophils through suppression of long-range mobilization and recruitment of the immune cells. This observation elucidates an important paradigm of the recognition of microbes, i.e., that intact immunotaxis comprises an intricate spatiotemporal hierarchy of distinct chemotactic processes. Moreover, in contrast to earlier reports, human neutrophils exhibit vigorous chemotaxis toward, and frustrated phagocytosis of, the large spherules of C. posadasii under physiological-like conditions. Finally, neutrophils from healthy donors and patients with chronic coccidioidomycosis display subtle differences in their responses to antibody-coated beads, even though the patient cells appear to interact normally with C. posadasii endospores.

  17. MEK-independent ERK activation in human neutrophils and its impact on functional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, François A; Cloutier, Alexandre; Ear, Thornin; Vardhan, Harsh; McDonald, Patrick P

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophils influence innate and adaptative immunity, notably through the generation of numerous cytokines and chemokines and through the modulation of their constitutive apoptosis. Several signaling cascades are known to control neutrophil responses, including the MEK pathway, which is normally coupled to ERK. However, we show here that in human neutrophils stimulated with cytokines or TLR ligands, MEK and ERK are activated independently of each other. Pharmacological blockade of MEK had no effect on the induction of ERK kinase activity and vice versa. In autologous PBMC exposed to the same stimuli or in neutrophils exposed to chemoattractants, this uncoupling of MEK and ERK was not observed. Whereas we had shown before that MEK inhibition impairs cytokine generation translationally in LPS- or TNF-stimulated neutrophils, ERK inhibition affected this response transcriptionally and translationally. Transcriptional targets or ERK include the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK-1) and its substrates, C/EBPβ and CREB, whereas translational targets include the S6 kinase and its substrate, the S6 ribosomal protein. In addition to affecting cytokine production, ERK inhibition interfered with how LPS or TNF promotes neutrophil survival and levels of the myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) antiapoptotic protein. Whereas the ERK-activating kinase was not identified, we found that the MAP3K, TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), acts upstream of ERK and MEK in neutrophils. Our results document a functional uncoupling of the MEK/ERK module under certain stimulatory conditions and suggest that therapeutic strategies based on MEK inhibition might benefit from being complemented by ERK inhibition, particularly in chronic inflammatory conditions featuring a strong neutrophilic component. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Targeting prolyl endopeptidase with valproic acid as a potential modulator of neutrophilic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Roda, Mojtaba; Sadik, Mariam; Gaggar, Amit; Hardison, Matthew T; Jablonsky, Michael J; Braber, Saskia; Blalock, James Edwin; Redegeld, Frank A; Folkerts, Gert; Jackson, Patricia L

    2014-01-01

    A novel neutrophil chemoattractant derived from collagen, proline-glycine-proline (PGP), has been recently characterized in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This peptide is derived via the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteases (MMP's)-8/9 and PE, enzymes produced by neutrophils and present in COPD serum and sputum. Valproic acid (VPA) is an inhibitor of PE and could possibly have an effect on the severity of chronic inflammation. Here the interaction site of VPA to PE a...

  19. Neutrophils Promote Mycobacterial Trehalose Dimycolate-Induced Lung Inflammation via the Mincle Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook-Bin Lee

    Full Text Available Trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM, a cord factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, is an important regulator of immune responses during Mtb infections. Macrophages recognize TDM through the Mincle receptor and initiate TDM-induced inflammatory responses, leading to lung granuloma formation. Although various immune cells are recruited to lung granulomas, the roles of other immune cells, especially during the initial process of TDM-induced inflammation, are not clear. In this study, Mincle signaling on neutrophils played an important role in TDM-induced lung inflammation by promoting adhesion and innate immune responses. Neutrophils were recruited during the early stage of lung inflammation following TDM-induced granuloma formation. Mincle expression on neutrophils was required for infiltration of TDM-challenged sites in a granuloma model induced by TDM-coated-beads. TDM-induced Mincle signaling on neutrophils increased cell adherence by enhancing F-actin polymerization and CD11b/CD18 surface expression. The TDM-induced effects were dependent on Src, Syk, and MAPK/ERK kinases (MEK. Moreover, coactivation of the Mincle and TLR2 pathways by TDM and Pam3CSK4 treatment synergistically induced CD11b/CD18 surface expression, reactive oxygen species, and TNFα production by neutrophils. These synergistically-enhanced immune responses correlated with the degree of Mincle expression on neutrophil surfaces. The physiological relevance of the Mincle-mediated anti-TDM immune response was confirmed by defective immune responses in Mincle⁻/⁻ mice upon aerosol infections with Mtb. Mincle-mutant mice had higher inflammation levels and mycobacterial loads than WT mice. Neutrophil depletion with anti-Ly6G antibody caused a reduction in IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression upon TDM treatment, and reduced levels of immune cell recruitment during the initial stage of infection. These findings suggest a new role of Mincle signaling on neutrophils

  20. Influence of minor thermal injury on expression of complement receptor CR3 on human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R D; Hasslen, S R; Ahrenholz, D H; Haus, E; Solem, L D

    1986-12-01

    Thermal injury is well known to inhibit functions of the circulating neutrophil related to its role in host defense against infection, but the mechanism(s) of this phenomenon are not fully understood. To gain further clues to these mechanisms, the authors have studied patients with thermal injury in terms of altered expression of neutrophil cell membrane receptors for the opsonic complement-derived ligand C3bi--complement receptor Type 3, or CR3. CR3 expression was selected for study because an increase in the number of receptors on the cell surface can be stimulated by products of complement activation known to accumulate after thermal injury and because of the role of CR3 in phagocytic and adherence functions of the neutrophil. Expression of CR3 was monitored semiquantitatively by flow cytometry with the use of a murine monoclonal antibody (OKM1) specific for an antigen (CD11) associated with this receptor. Patients evaluated were limited in this study to those with minor degrees of thermal injury (second-degree burn involving less than 20% of total body surface area) so that possible confounding effects of major injury and its complications could be eliminated. It was observed that patient neutrophil CR3 becomes significantly up-regulated during the first week, as early as 1 day after injury. The maximum level of expression of CR3 averaged greater than 150% (range, 70-314%) of the respective minimum level observed for each patient. The minimum levels of expression of CR3 on patient neutrophils, reached 11-37 days after injury for 7 of 8 patients, were comparable to the level of expression of CR3 on unstimulated control neutrophils. Such temporal up-regulation of patient neutrophil CR3 suggests the early generation of stimuli of CR3 mobilization in response to thermal injury. Increased numbers of CR3 on patient neutrophils may augment microbicidal function and enhance or inhibit delivery of cells to the burn site.