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Sample records for fermentation colon cell

  1. Fermented wheat aleurone inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in human HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicki, Anke; Stein, Katrin; Scharlau, Daniel; Scheu, Kerstin; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Obst, Ursula; Hollmann, Jürgen; Lindhauer, Meinolf; Wachter, Norbert; Glei, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibre by the gut microflora may enhance levels of SCFA, which are potentially chemoprotective against colon cancer. Functional food containing wheat aleurone may prevent cancer by influencing cell cycle and cell death. We investigated effects of fermented wheat aleurone on growth and apoptosis of HT29 cells. Wheat aleurone, flour and bran were digested and fermented in vitro. The resulting fermentation supernatants (fs) were analysed for their major metabolites (SCFA, bile acids and ammonia). HT29 cells were treated for 24-72 h with the fs or synthetic mixtures mimicking the fs in SCFA, butyrate or deoxycholic acid (DCA) contents, and the influence on cell growth was determined. Fs aleurone was used to investigate the modulation of apoptosis and cell cycle. The fermented wheat samples contained two- to threefold higher amounts of SCFA than the faeces control (blank), but reduced levels of bile acids and increased concentrations of ammonia. Fs aleurone and flour equally reduced cell growth of HT29 more effectively than the corresponding blank and the SCFA mixtures. The EC(50) (48 h) ranged from 10 % (flour) to 19 % (blank). Markedly after 48 h, fs aleurone (10 %) significantly induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. In conclusion, fermentation of wheat aleurone results in a reduced level of tumour-promoting DCA, but higher levels of potentially chemopreventive SCFA. Fermented wheat aleurone is able to induce apoptosis and to block cell cycle - two essential markers of secondary chemoprevention.

  2. Fermented wheat aleurone enriched with probiotic strains LGG and Bb12 modulates markers of tumor progression in human colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicki, Anke; Michelmann, Anke; Stein, Katrin; Scharlau, Daniel; Scheu, Kerstin; Obst, Ursula; Glei, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fiber by the microflora enhances the levels of effective metabolites, which are potentially protective against colon cancer. The specific addition of probiotics may enhance the efficiency of fermentation of wheat aleurone, a source of dietary fiber. We investigated the effects of aleurone, fermented with fecal slurries with the addition of the probiotics LGG and Bb12 (aleurone(+)), on cell growth, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as expression of genes related to growth and apoptosis using two different human colon cell lines (HT29: adenocarcinoma cells; LT97: adenoma cells). The efficiency of fermentation of aleurone was only slightly enhanced by the addition of LGG/Bb12, resulting in an increased concentration of butyrate. In LT97 cells, the growth inhibition of aleurone(+) was stronger than in HT29 cells. In HT29 cells, a cell cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1) and the alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of differentiation, were enhanced by the fs aleurone(+). Treatment with all fermentation supernatants resulted in a significant increase in apoptosis and an upregulation of genes involved in cell growth and apoptosis (p21 and WNT2B). In conclusion, fs aleurone(+) modulated markers of cancer prevention, namely inhibition of cell growth and promotion of apoptosis as well as differentiation.

  3. Fermented wheat aleurone induces enzymes involved in detoxification of carcinogens and in antioxidative defence in human colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Katrin; Borowicki, Anke; Scharlau, Daniel; Glei, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dietary fibre is fermented by the human gut flora resulting mainly in the formation of SCFA, for example, acetate, propionate and butyrate. SCFA, in particular butyrate, may be important for secondary cancer prevention by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting cell growth of cancer cells, thereby inhibiting the promotion and/or progression of cancer. Furthermore, SCFA could also act on primary cancer prevention by activation of detoxifying and antioxidative enzymes. We investigated the effects of fermented wheat aleurone on the expression of genes involved in stress response and toxicity, activity of drug-metabolising enzymes and anti-genotoxic potential. Aleurone was digested and fermented in vitro to obtain samples that reflect the content of the colon. HT29 cells and colon epithelial stripes were incubated with the resulting fermentation supernatant fractions (fs) and effects on mRNA expression of CAT, GSTP1 and SULT2B1 and enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) were measured. Fermented aleurone was also used to study the protection against H2O2-induced DNA damage in HT29 cells. The fs of aleurone significantly induced the mRNA expression of CAT, GSTP1 and SULT2B1 (HT29) and GSTP1 (epithelial stripes), respectively. The enzyme activities of GST (HT29) and CAT (HT29, epithelial stripes) were also unambiguously increased (1.4- to 3.7-fold) by the fs of aleurone. DNA damage induced by H2O2 was significantly reduced by the fs of aleurone after 48 h, whereupon no difference was observed compared with the faeces control. In conclusion, fermented aleurone is able to act on primary prevention by inducing mRNA expression and the activity of enzymes involved in detoxification of carcinogens and antioxidative defence.

  4. Fermentable carbohydrate stimulates FFAR2-dependent colonic PYY cell expansion to increase satiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Brooks

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that FFAR2 is predominantly involved in regulating the effects of fermentable carbohydrate on metabolism and does so, in part, by enhancing PYY cell density and release. This highlights the potential for targeting enteroendocrine cell differentiation to treat obesity.

  5. Lactic acid fermentation of germinated barley fiber and proliferative function of colonic epithelial cells in loperamide-induced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jeong Ryae; Choi, Joon Hyuk

    2010-08-01

    To develop a functional food from the dietary fiber fraction of germinated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (GBF), lactic acid fermentation was attempted using Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Bifidobacterium bifidus. The quality characteristics of the lactic acid-fermented product and its effect on gastrointestinal function in an animal model were examined. The anaerobic fermentation of 1% and 2% GBF yielded lactic acid bacteria at 8.9 +/- 1.0 x 10(8) and 1.6 +/- 0.2 x 10(9) colony-forming units/mL, and it was considered acceptable for consumption by sensory assessment. To determine the effect on gastrointestinal function, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with three types of diets: a normal chow diet and chow diets supplemented with 10% lactic acid bacteria or a yogurt fermented with 2% GBF (GBFY). The rats fed GBFY for 6 weeks gained less body weight, excreted more fecal mass, and had improved gastrointestinal transit as examined with barium sulfate. The effect of GBFY on colonic epithelial proliferation was investigated through loperamide (LPM)-induced constipation in rats. The rats fed with GBFY for 6 weeks were intraperitoneally administered LPM twice daily for 7 days. GBFY supplementation decreased fecal excretion and moisture content in feces and depleted goblet cells as observed by hematoxylin and eosin stain. However, the rats supplemented with GBFY prior to the LPM administration had enhanced bowel movement, mucin secretion, and production of short-chain fatty acids compared with values for the LPM-alone group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the GBFY supplement increased the numbers of nuclei stained positively for Ki-67 and extended from the base to the middle zone of crypts. These results indicate that GBFY alleviates constipation via the proliferation of the colonic crypts in LPM-administered rats.

  6. Colonic Fermentation: A Neglected Topic in Human Physiology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeur, Jorgen; Berstad, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Human physiology textbooks tend to limit their discussion of colonic functions to those of absorbing water and electrolytes and storing waste material. However, the colon is a highly active metabolic organ, containing an exceedingly complex society of microbes. By means of fermentation, gastrointestinal microbes break down nutrients that cannot be…

  7. Colonic Fermentation: A Neglected Topic in Human Physiology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeur, Jorgen; Berstad, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Human physiology textbooks tend to limit their discussion of colonic functions to those of absorbing water and electrolytes and storing waste material. However, the colon is a highly active metabolic organ, containing an exceedingly complex society of microbes. By means of fermentation, gastrointestinal microbes break down nutrients that cannot be…

  8. Simulated colon fiber metabolome regulates genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, and energy metabolism in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, Heli; Mäkivuokko, Harri; Tiihonen, Kirsti; Rautonen, Nina

    2011-11-01

    High level of dietary fiber has been epidemiologically linked to protection against the risk for developing colon cancer. The mechanisms of this protection are not clear. Fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon results in production of for example butyrate that has drawn attention as a chemopreventive agent. Polydextrose, a soluble fiber that is only partially fermented in colon, was fermented in an in vitro colon simulator, in which the conditions mimic the human proximal, ascending, transverse, and distal colon in sequence. The subsequent fermentation metabolomes were applied on colon cancer cells, and the gene expression changes studied. Polydextrose fermentation down-regulated gene ontology classes linked with cell cycle, and affected number of metabolically active cells. Furthermore, up-regulated effects on classes linked with apoptosis, with increased caspase 2 and 3 activity, implicate that polydextrose fermentation plays a role in induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells. The up-regulated genes involved also key regulators of lipid metabolism, such as PPARα and PGC-1α. These results offer hypotheses for the mechanisms of two health benefits linked with consumption of dietary fiber, reducing risk of development of colon cancer, and dyslipidemia.

  9. The fate of chicory root pulp polysaccharides during fermentation in the TNO in vitro model of the colon (TIM-2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, U.; Venema, K.; Gruppen, H.; Schols, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor cell wall polysaccharide (CWPs) utilization during fermentation by the human colonic microbiota in the TNO in vitro model of the colon (TIM-2). Chicory root pulp (CRP) and treated (ensiled) CRP (ECRP) containing four times more soluble pectin than CRP, were ferme

  10. Fermented dairy products modulate Citrobacter rodentium-induced colonic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, James W; Chervaux, Christian; Raymond, Benoit; Derrien, Muriel; Brazeilles, Rémi; Kosta, Artemis; Chambaud, Isabelle; Crepin, Valerie F; Frankel, Gad

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the protective effects of fermented dairy products (FDPs) in an infection model, using the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium (CR). Treatment of mice with FDP formulas A, B, and C or a control product did not affect CR colonization, organ specificity, or attaching and effacing lesion formation. Fermented dairy product A (FDP-A), but neither the supernatant from FDP-A nor β-irradiated (IR) FDP-A, caused a significant reduction in colonic crypt hyperplasia and CR-associated pathology. Profiling the gut microbiota revealed that IR-FDP-A promoted higher levels of phylotypes belonging to Alcaligenaceae and a decrease in Lachnospiraceae (Ruminococcus) during CR infection. Conversely, FDP-A prevented a decrease in Ruminococcus and increased Turicibacteraceae (Turicibacter). Importantly, loss of Ruminococcus and Turicibacter has been associated with susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Our results demonstrate that viable bacteria in FDP-A reduced CR-induced colonic crypt hyperplasia and prevented the loss of key bacterial genera that may contribute to disease pathology.

  11. Grain-rich diets altered the colonic fermentation and mucosa-associated bacterial communities and induced mucosal injuries in goats.

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    Ye, Huimin; Liu, Junhua; Feng, Panfei; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2016-02-04

    Remarkably little information is available about the impact of high-grain (HG) feeding on colonic mucosa-associated bacteria and mucosal morphology. In the present study, 12 male goats were randomly assigned to either a hay diet (n = 6) or an HG diet (65% grain; n = 6) to characterise the changes in the composition of the bacterial community in colonic mucosa and the mucosal morphology of the colon. The results showed that HG feeding decreased the colonic pH and increased the concentrations of total short chain fatty acids and lipopolysaccharides in colonic digesta. The principal coordinate analysis results showed that the HG diet altered the colonic mucosal bacterial communities, with an increase in the abundance of genus Blautia and a decrease in the abundance of genera Bacillus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus. The HG-fed goats showed sloughing of the surface layer epithelium, intercellular tight junction erosion, cell mitochondrial damage, and upregulation of the relative mRNA expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ in colonic mucosa. Collectively, our data indicate that HG feeding induced changes in colonic mucosal morphology and cytokines expression that might be caused by excessive fermentation and dramatic shifts in the bacterial populations in the colon.

  12. Colonic fermentation may play a role in lactose intolerance in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T; Priebe, MG; Harmsen, HJM; Stellaard, F; Sun, XH; Welling, GW; Vonk, RJ

    2006-01-01

    The results of our previous study suggested that in addition to the small intestinal lactase activity and transit time, colonic processing of lactose may play a role in lactose intolerance. We investigated whether colonic fermentation of lactose is correlated with lactose intolerance. After 28 Chine

  13. Salmonella adhesion, invasion and cellular immune responses are differentially affected by iron concentrations in a combined in vitro gut fermentation-cell model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dostal, Alexandra; Gagnon, Mélanie; Chassard, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; O'Mahony, Liam; Lacroix, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    .... enterica Typhimurium with intestinal cells under different iron concentrations encountered in the gut lumen during iron deficiency and supplementation using an in vitro colonic fermentation system...

  14. Wheat bran extract alters colonic fermentation and microbial composition, but does not affect faecal water toxicity: a randomised controlled trial in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windey, Karen; De Preter, Vicky; Huys, Geert; Broekaert, Willem F; Delcour, Jan A; Louat, Thierry; Herman, Jean; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-01-28

    Wheat bran extract (WBE), containing arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides that are potential prebiotic substrates, has been shown to modify bacterial colonic fermentation in human subjects and to beneficially affect the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) in rats. However, it is unclear whether these changes in fermentation are able to reduce the risk of developing CRC in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of WBE on the markers of CRC risk in healthy volunteers, and to correlate these effects with colonic fermentation. A total of twenty healthy subjects were enrolled in a double-blind, cross-over, randomised, controlled trial in which the subjects ingested WBE (10 g/d) or placebo (maltodextrin, 10 g/d) for 3 weeks, separated by a 3-week washout period. At the end of each study period, colonic handling of NH3 was evaluated using the biomarker lactose[15N, 15N']ureide, colonic fermentation was characterised through a metabolomics approach, and the predominant microbial composition was analysed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. As markers of CRC risk, faecal water genotoxicity was determined using the comet assay and faecal water cytotoxicity using a colorimetric cell viability assay. Intake of WBE induced a shift from urinary to faecal 15N excretion, indicating a stimulation of colonic bacterial activity and/or growth. Microbial analysis revealed a selective stimulation of Bifidobacterium adolescentis. In addition, WBE altered the colonic fermentation pattern and significantly reduced colonic protein fermentation compared with the run-in period. However, faecal water cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were not affected. Although intake of WBE clearly affected colonic fermentation and changed the composition of the microbiota, these changes were not associated with the changes in the markers of CRC risk.

  15. The gut fermentation product butyrate, a chemopreventive agent, suppresses glutathione S-transferase theta (hGSTT1) and cell growth more in human colon adenoma (LT97) than tumor (HT29) cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kautenburger, T.; Beyer-Sehlmeyer, G.; Festag, G.; Haag, N.; Kuhler, S.; Kuchler, A.; Weise, A.; Marian, B.; Peters, W.H.M.; Liehr, T.; Claussen, U.; Pool-Zobel, B.L.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: The gut fermentation product of dietary fiber, butyrate, inhibits growth of HT29, an established tumor cell line. It also induces detoxifying enzymes belonging to the glutathione S-transferase family (GSTs), namely hGSTM2, hGSTP1, hGSTA4, but not of hGSTT1 . Here we investigated kinetics of

  16. Colonic hydrogen absorption: quantification of its effect on hydrogen accumulation caused by bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, H F

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess (quantitatively) colonic hydrogen absorption. Hydrogen volumes in flatus and breath were measured over periods of six hours in normal subjects during fasting and after ingestion of the non-absorbable carbohydrate lactulose to simulate the effect of fermentable dietary fibres. If less than 76 ml/6 h of hydrogen accumulated in the colon then all of it was absorbed, as suggested by the intercept of the regression line of the correlation between hydrogen volumes in flatus and breath after ingestion of lactulose. As total flatus volume increased, efficiency of colonic hydrogen absorption decreased from 90% to 20%. The positive correlation between hydrogen volumes of flatus and breath showed that the eightfold interindividual differences in flatus volume after ingestion of 12.5 g of lactulose were caused by differences in bacterial net gas production, not gas absorption. Differences in colonic gas emptying rate are the consequence rather than the cause of interindividual differences in flatus volume. In conclusion: (1) colonic hydrogen absorption is highly effective at low colonic hydrogen accumulation rates, but not at higher accumulation rates; (2) ineffective colonic gas absorption is the consequence and not the cause of high colonic gas accumulation rate after ingestion of non-absorbable carbohydrates; and (3) future therapeutic approaches to the large interindividual variability in colonic gas accumulation after ingestion of poorly absorbable fermentable carbohydrates, such as some kinds of dietary fibres, should be directed towards altering colonic bacterial metabolism. PMID:8314516

  17. Clostridium difficile colonization and antibiotics response in PolyFermS continuous model mimicking elderly intestinal fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Fehlbaum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile (CD, a spore-forming and toxin-producing bacterium, is the main cause for antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the elderly. Here we investigated CD colonization in novel in vitro fermentation models inoculated with immobilized elderly fecal microbiota and the effects of antibiotic treatments. Methods Two continuous intestinal PolyFermS models inoculated with different immobilized elder microbiota were used to investigate selected factors of colonization of CD in proximal (PC, model 1 and transverse-distal (TDC, model 1 and 2 colon conditions. Colonization of two CD strains of different PCR ribotypes, inoculated as vegetative cells (ribotype 001, model 1 or spores (ribotypes 001 and 012, model 2, was tested. Treatments with two antibiotics, ceftriaxone (daily 150 mg L−1 known to induce CD infection in vivo or metronidazole (twice daily 333 mg L−1 commonly used to treat CD, were investigated in TDC conditions (model 2 for their effects on gut microbiota composition (qPCR, 16S pyrosequencing and activity (HPLC, CD spore germination and colonization, and cytotoxin titer (Vero cell assay. Results CD remained undetected after inoculating vegetative cells in PC reactors of model 1, but was shown to colonize TDC reactors of both models, reaching copy numbers of up to log10 8 mL−1 effluent with stable production of toxin correlating with CD cell numbers. Ceftriaxone treatment in TDC reactors showed only small effects on microbiota composition and activity and did not promote CD colonization compared to antibiotic-free control reactor. In contrast, treatment with metronidazole after colonization of CD induced large modifications in the microbiota and decreased CD numbers below the detection limit of the specific qPCR. However, a fast CD recurrence was measured only 2 days after cessation of metronidazole treatment. Conclusions Using our in vitro fermentation models, we demonstrated that stable CD

  18. Altered Colonic Bacterial Fermentation as a Potential Pathophysiological Factor in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Choi, Chang Hwan; Temas, Daniel; Kim, Ari; Maier, Daniele M; Scott, Karen; Galanko, Joseph A; Ringel, Yehuda

    2015-09-01

    Dysbiosis leading to abnormal intestinal fermentation has been suggested as a possible etiological mechanism in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We aimed to investigate the location and magnitude of altered intestinal bacterial fermentation in IBS and its clinical subtypes. IBS patients who satisfied the Rome III criteria (114) and 33 healthy controls (HC) were investigated. Intestinal fermentation was assessed using two surrogate measures: intestinal intraluminal pH and fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Intraluminal pH and intestinal transit times were measured in the small and large bowel using a wireless motility capsule (SmartPill) in 47 IBS and 10 HC. Fecal SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate, and lactate were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography in all enrolled subjects. Correlations between intestinal pH, fecal SCFAs, intestinal transit time, and IBS symptom scores were analyzed. Colonic intraluminal pH levels were significantly lower in IBS patients compared with HC (total colonic pH, 6.8 for IBS vs. 7.3 for HC, P=0.042). There were no differences in total and segmental pH levels in the small bowel between IBS patients and HC (6.8 vs. 6.8, P=not significant). The intraluminal colonic pH differences were consistent in all IBS subtypes. Total SCFA level was significantly lower in C-IBS patients than in D-IBS and M-IBS patients and HC. The total SCFA level in all IBS subjects was similar with that of HC. Colonic pH levels correlated positively with colon transit time (CTT) and IBS symptoms severity. Total fecal SCFAs levels correlated negatively with CTT and positively with stool frequency. Colonic intraluminal pH is decreased, suggesting higher colonic fermentation, in IBS patients compared with HC. Fecal SCFAs are not a sensitive marker to estimate intraluminal bacterial fermentation.

  19. Metabolite production during in vitro colonic fermentation of dietary fiber: analysis and comparison of two European diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, Maria; Venema, Koen; Maathuis, Annet J H; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio D

    2011-08-24

    Metabolite production and antioxidant released during colonic fermentation of naturally occurring dietary fiber (DF) from two European diets (Mediterranean and Scandinavian) were determined. With this aim, DF and associated components were isolated from both whole diets, as well as from cereals and fruits and vegetables comprising the diets. DF was used as substrate for colonic fermentation in a dynamic in vitro model of the colon, samples were collected, and fermentation metabolites were analyzed. Statistical differences between samples were observed in the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids and ammonia and in the ratio acetate/propionate/butyrate. Whole grain cereal DF generated a larger amount of propionate than refined flour cereal DF. Fruit and vegetable DF generated higher amounts of butyrate than cereal DF. Most antioxidant compounds were released from DF during in vitro colonic fermentation. It is concluded that different sources of DF may play a specific role in health maintenance mediated by metabolites produced during colonic fermentation.

  20. Colonic hydrogen absorption: quantification of its effect on hydrogen accumulation caused by bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates.

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, H F

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess (quantitatively) colonic hydrogen absorption. Hydrogen volumes in flatus and breath were measured over periods of six hours in normal subjects during fasting and after ingestion of the non-absorbable carbohydrate lactulose to simulate the effect of fermentable dietary fibres. If less than 76 ml/6 h of hydrogen accumulated in the colon then all of it was absorbed, as suggested by the intercept of the regression line of the correlation between hydrogen volumes...

  1. Colonic hydrogen absorption: quantification of its effect on hydrogen accumulation caused by bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates.

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, H F

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess (quantitatively) colonic hydrogen absorption. Hydrogen volumes in flatus and breath were measured over periods of six hours in normal subjects during fasting and after ingestion of the non-absorbable carbohydrate lactulose to simulate the effect of fermentable dietary fibres. If less than 76 ml/6 h of hydrogen accumulated in the colon then all of it was absorbed, as suggested by the intercept of the regression line of the correlation between hydrogen volumes...

  2. In vitro degradation and fermentation of three dietary fiber sources by human colonic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend in part on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of the type of supplemented fiber on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a non-adapted human bacterial...

  3. Spent coffee grounds, an innovative source of colonic fermentable compounds, inhibit inflammatory mediators in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barrera, Dunia Maria; Vázquez-Sánchez, Kenia; Loarca-Piña, Ma Guadalupe Flavia; Campos-Vega, Rocio

    2016-12-01

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG), rich in dietary fiber can be fermented by colon microbiota producing short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) with the ability to prevent inflammation. We investigated SCG anti-inflammatory effects by evaluating its composition, phenolic compounds, and fermentability by the human gut flora, SCFAs production, nitric oxide and cytokine expression of the human gut fermented-unabsorbed-SCG (hgf-NDSCG) fraction in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. SCG had higher total fiber content compared with coffee beans. Roasting level/intensity reduced total phenolic contents of SCG that influenced its colonic fermentation. Medium roasted hgf-NDSCG produced elevated SCFAs (61:22:17, acetate, propionate and butyrate) after prolonged (24h) fermentation, suppressed NO production (55%) in macrophages primarily by modulating IL-10, CCL-17, CXCL9, IL-1β, and IL-5 cytokines. SCG exerts anti-inflammatory activity, mediated by SCFAs production from its dietary fiber, by reducing the release of inflammatory mediators, providing the basis for SCG use in the control/regulation of inflammatory disorders. The results support the use of SGC in the food industry as dietary fiber source with health benefits.

  4. Proanthocyanidin metabolites associated with dietary fibre from in vitro colonic fermentation and proanthocyanidin metabolites in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Touriño, Sonia; Serrano, José; Fuguet, Elisabet; Torres, Josep Lluis; Goñi, Isabel

    2010-07-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) or condensed tannins, a major group of dietary polyphenols, are oligomers and polymers of flavan-3-ol and flavan-3, 4-diols widely distributed in plant foods. Most literature data on PAs' metabolic fate deal with PAs that can be extracted from the food matrix by aqueous-organic solvents ( extractable proanthocyanidins). However, there are no data on colonic fermentation of non-extractable proanthocyanidins (NEPAs), which arrive almost intact to the colon, mostly associated to dietary fibre (DF). The aim of the present work was to examine colonic fermentation of NEPAs associated with DF, using a model of in vitro small intestine digestion and colonic fermentation. Two NEPA-rich materials obtained from carob pod (Ceratonia siliqua L. proanthocyanidin) and red grapes (grape antioxidant dietary fibre) were used as test samples. The colonic fermentation of these two products released hydroxyphenylacetic acid, hydroxyphenylvaleric acid and two isomers of hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, detected by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Differences between the two products indicate that DF may enhance the yield of metabolites. In addition, the main NEPA metabolite in human plasma was 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid. The presence in human plasma of the same metabolites as were detected after in vitro colonic fermentation of NEPAs suggests that dietary NEPAs would undergo colonic fermentation releasing absorbable metabolites with potential healthy effects.

  5. In vitro colonic fermentation and glycemic response of different kinds of unripe banana flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Elizabete Wenzel; Dan, Milana C T; Cardenette, Giselli H L; Goñi, Isabel; Bello-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Lajolo, Franco M

    2010-12-01

    This work aimed to study the in vitro colonic fermentation profile of unavailable carbohydrates of two different kinds of unripe banana flour and to evaluate their postprandial glycemic responses. The unripe banana mass (UBM), obtained from the cooked pulp of unripe bananas (Musa acuminata, Nanicão variety), and the unripe banana starch (UBS), obtained from isolated starch of unripe banana, plantain type (Musa paradisiaca) in natura, were studied. The fermentability of the flours was evaluated by different parameters, using rat inoculum, as well as the glycemic response produced after the ingestion by healthy volunteers. The flours presented high concentration of unavailable carbohydrates, which varied in the content of resistant starch, dietary fiber and indigestible fraction (IF). The in vitro colonic fermentation of the flours was high, 98% for the UBS and 75% for the UBM when expressed by the total amount of SCFA such as acetate, butyrate and propionate in relation to lactulose. The increase in the area under the glycemic curve after ingestion of the flours was 90% lower for the UBS and 40% lower for the UBM than the increase produced after bread intake. These characteristics highlight the potential of UBM and UBS as functional ingredients. However, in vivo studies are necessary in order to evaluate the possible benefit effects of the fermentation on intestinal health.

  6. Soluble fiber polysaccharides: effects on plasma cholesterol and colonic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, D L

    1991-07-01

    Many soluble-fiber polysaccharides, used as stabilizers and thickeners by the food industry, lower plasma cholesterol and slow small intestinal transit and nutrient absorption. Although nondigestible by human enzymes, these polysaccharides are fermented by the large-bowel microflora, yielding short-chain fatty acids that are absorbed and contribute to energy. The caloric yield from fiber polysaccharides needs to be quantified. Short-chain fatty acid production from soluble fibers is modified by the presence of insoluble fibers but, in total, is probably less than from other carbohydrates, e.g., resistant starch. Short-chain fatty acids do not seem to mediate effects of fiber on plasma cholesterol, but in the large bowel they exert the trophic and antineoplastic effects of dietary fiber. The mechanism for cholesterol reduction by soluble fibers relates to enhanced steroid excretion and altered fat absorption and may be a function of the viscosity of these fibers in solution. The relationships between the chemical structure of soluble polysaccharides and their documented physiologic effects are not yet clear. By using polysaccharides of defined structure and properties, it should be possible to identify those characteristics that predict physiologic actions.

  7. Colon cancer stem cells: implications in carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew A.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model was described for hematologic malignancies in 1997 and since then evidence has emerged to support it for many solid tumors as well, including colon cancer. This model proposes that certain cells within the tumor mass are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal and have an enhanced ability to initiate distant metastasis. The cancer stem cell model has important implications for cancer treatment, since most current therapies target actively proliferating cells and may not be effective against the cancer stem cells that are responsible for recurrence. In recent years great progress has been made in identifying markers of both normal and malignant colon stem cells. Proteins proposed as colon cancer stem cell markers include CD133, CD44, CD166, ALDH1A1, Lgr5, and several others. In this review we consider the evidence for these proteins as colon cancer stem cell markers and as prognostic indicators of colon cancer survival. Additionally, we discuss potential functions of these proteins and the implications this may have for development of therapies that target colon cancer stem cells. PMID:21196254

  8. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) Fruit Extracts Improve Colon Microflora and Exert Anti-Inflammatory Activities in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-Lun; Liu, Cheng-Tzu; Chou, Ming-Chih; Ko, Chien-Hui; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microflora and inflammation are associated with the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) has various bioactivities, but its effect on colon health remains unknown. This study focused on the effects of fermented noni fruit extracts on colon microflora and inflammation of colon epithelial cells. The anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts on Caco-2 cells were evaluated including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The growth of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species was promoted by ethanol extract. Ethyl acetate extract decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species and significantly suppressed COX-2, IL-8, and prostaglandin E2 production and neutrophil chemotaxis by suppressing the translocation of the p65 subunit. Quercetin was the main contributor to the anti-inflammatory activity. The fermented noni fruit promoted probiotic growths and downregulated the intracellular oxidation and inflammation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that fermented noni fruit might protect against inflammatory diseases of the colon.

  9. Contribution of Colonic Fermentation and Fecal Water Toxicity to the Pathophysiology of Lactose-Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windey, Karen; Houben, Els; Deroover, Lise; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-08

    Whether or not abdominal symptoms occur in subjects with small intestinal lactose malabsorption might depend on differences in colonic fermentation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we collected fecal samples from subjects with lactose malabsorption with abdominal complaints (LM-IT, n = 11) and without abdominal complaints (LM-T, n = 8) and subjects with normal lactose digestion (NLD, n = 15). Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed using a (13)C-lactose breath test. Colonic fermentation was characterized in fecal samples at baseline and after incubation with lactose for 3 h, 6 h and 24 h through a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fecal water cytotoxicity was analyzed using a colorimetric assay. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not different between the three groups (Kruskall-Wallis p = 0.164). Cluster analysis of the metabolite patterns revealed separate clusters for NLD, LM-T and LM-IT samples at baseline and after 24 h incubation with lactose. Levels of 5-methyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD whereas those of an unidentified aldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT compared to LM-T and NLD. Incubation with lactose increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations more in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD. In conclusion, fermentation patterns were clearly different in NLD, LM-IT and LM-T, but not related to differences in fecal water cytotoxicity.

  10. Contribution of Colonic Fermentation and Fecal Water Toxicity to the Pathophysiology of Lactose-Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Windey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Whether or not abdominal symptoms occur in subjects with small intestinal lactose malabsorption might depend on differences in colonic fermentation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we collected fecal samples from subjects with lactose malabsorption with abdominal complaints (LM-IT, n = 11 and without abdominal complaints (LM-T, n = 8 and subjects with normal lactose digestion (NLD, n = 15. Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed using a 13C-lactose breath test. Colonic fermentation was characterized in fecal samples at baseline and after incubation with lactose for 3 h, 6 h and 24 h through a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Fecal water cytotoxicity was analyzed using a colorimetric assay. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not different between the three groups (Kruskall-Wallis p = 0.164. Cluster analysis of the metabolite patterns revealed separate clusters for NLD, LM-T and LM-IT samples at baseline and after 24 h incubation with lactose. Levels of 5-methyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD whereas those of an unidentified aldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT compared to LM-T and NLD. Incubation with lactose increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA concentrations more in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD. In conclusion, fermentation patterns were clearly different in NLD, LM-IT and LM-T, but not related to differences in fecal water cytotoxicity.

  11. In Vitro Study of Caecal and Colon Microbial Fermentation Patterns in Wild Boar (Sus scrofa scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecka-Kiełb, Ewa; Bujok, Jolanta; Miśta, Dorota; Króliczewska, Bozena; Górecka, Justyna; Zawadzki, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) caecal and colon products of microbial activity including short chain fatty acids (SCFA), ammonia and methane concentrations. The in vitro method was applied to caecal and colon contents after 12 and 24-hour incubation with the substrate (wheat bran), or without any additive (control samples). The pH was also measured in each sample. In samples incubated with the substrate, a lower pH was noted as compared to the control (P < 0.001). In terms of the total SCFA concentration, the hindgut microbial fermentation pattern of wild boar was characterized by a high acetate level, followed by propionate and then butyrate at a ratio of 7:1.5:1. Substrate addition decreased acetate molar proportions (P < 0.001) and increased those of butyrate (P < 0.001) as well as propionate (P < 0.05). The total SCFA level in fresh, unincubated caecal samples (128 mmol/kg) was similar to that in the colon (111 mmol/kg). The ammonia concentrations were at the level of 0.8-1.5 mmol/kg of hindgut content and did not differ between the two investigated hindgut parts. Methanogenesis was also similar in the caecum and colon and after 24h was 2.69 mmol/kg and 2.27 for caecal colon control samples, respectively. The substrate increased total gas production and methane concentration (P < 0.001).

  12. Persistence of anticancer activity in berry extracts after simulated gastrointestinal digestion and colonic fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M Brown

    Full Text Available Fruit and vegetable consumption is associated at the population level with a protective effect against colorectal cancer. Phenolic compounds, especially abundant in berries, are of interest due to their putative anticancer activity. After consumption, however, phenolic compounds are subject to digestive conditions within the gastrointestinal tract that alter their structures and potentially their function. However, the majority of phenolic compounds are not efficiently absorbed in the small intestine and a substantial portion pass into the colon. We characterized berry extracts (raspberries, strawberries, blackcurrants produced by in vitro-simulated upper intestinal tract digestion and subsequent fecal fermentation. These extracts and selected individual colonic metabolites were then evaluated for their putative anticancer activities using in vitro models of colorectal cancer, representing the key stages of initiation, promotion and invasion. Over a physiologically-relevant dose range (0-50 µg/ml gallic acid equivalents, the digested and fermented extracts demonstrated significant anti-genotoxic, anti-mutagenic and anti-invasive activity on colonocytes. This work indicates that phenolic compounds from berries undergo considerable structural modifications during their passage through the gastrointestinal tract but their breakdown products and metabolites retain biological activity and can modulate cellular processes associated with colon cancer.

  13. Fermented nondigestible fraction from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar Negro 8025 modulates HT-29 cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Bravo, R K; Guevara-Gonzalez, R; Ramos-Gomez, M; Garcia-Gasca, T; Campos-Vega, R; Oomah, B D; Loarca-Piña, G

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of a fermented nondigestible fraction (FNDF) of cooked bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar Negro 8025 on human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell survival. Negro 8025 was chosen for in vitro fermentation based on comparison of chemical composition with 2 other cultivars: Azufrado Higuera and Pinto Durango. Negro 8025 had 58% total dietary fiber, 27% resistant starch, and 20 mg of (+)-catechin equivalents per gram of sample. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production and pH of the medium were measured after fermentation as indicators of colon protection through induced arrest on cell culture and apoptosis. Butyrate and pH of FNDF of Negro 8025 were higher than the control fermented raffinose extract. The FNDF inhibited HT-29 cell survival in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The lethal concentration 50 (LC(50)) was 13.63% FNDF (equivalent to 7.36, 0.33, and 3.31 mmol of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, respectively). DNA fragmentation, an apoptosis indicator, was detected by the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method in cells treated with the LC(50)-FNDF and a synthetic mixture of SCFAs mimicking LC(50)-FNDF. Our results suggest that common bean is a reliable source of fermentable substrates in colon, producing compounds with potential chemoprotective effect on HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells, so it may present an effective alternative to mitigate colon cancer development.

  14. Faster fermentation of cooked carrot cell clusters compared to cell wall fragments in vitro by porcine feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Li; Gomez, Justine; Øiseth, Sofia K; Gidley, Michael J; Williams, Barbara A

    2012-03-28

    Plant cell walls are the major structural component of fruits and vegetables, which break down to cell wall particles during ingestion (oral mastication) or food processing. The major health-promoting effect of cell walls occurs when they reach the colon and are fermented by the gut microbiota. In this study, the fermentation kinetics of carrot cell wall particle dispersions with different particle size and microstructure were investigated in vitro using porcine feces. The cumulative gas production and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced were measured at time intervals up to 48 h. The results show that larger cell clusters with an average particle size (d(0.5)) of 298 and 137 μm were more rapidly fermented and produced more SCFAs and gas than smaller single cells (75 μm) or cell fragments (50 μm), particularly between 8 and 20 h. Confocal microscopy suggests that the junctions between cells provides an environment that promotes bacterial growth, outweighing the greater specific surface area of smaller particles as a driver for more rapid fermentation. The study demonstrates that it may be possible, by controlling the size of cell wall particles, to design plant-based foods for fiber delivery and promotion of colon fermentation to maximize the potential for human health.

  15. Colonic fermentation influences lower esophageal sphincter function in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piche, Thierry; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Sacher-Huvelin, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    3 weeks. On day 7, esophageal motility and pH were recorded in fasting conditions and after a test meal containing 6.6 g of FOS or placebo. Breath hydrogen concentrations (reflecting colonic fermentation) and plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY, and cholecystokinin...... were monitored. RESULTS: Compared with placebo, FOS led to a significant increase in the number of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) and reflux episodes, esophageal acid exposure, and the symptom score for GERD. The integrated plasma response of GLP-1 was significantly higher...

  16. Fermentable fiber ameliorates fermentable protein-induced changes in microbial ecology, but not the mucosal response, in the colon of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Robert; Kröger, Susan; Richter, Jan F; Wang, Jing; Martin, Lena; Bindelle, Jérôme; Htoo, John K; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Vahjen, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen; Van Kessel, Andrew G

    2012-04-01

    Dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) is reported to reduce large intestinal formation of putatively toxic metabolites derived from fermentable proteins (fCP). However, the influence of diets high in fCP concentration on epithelial response and interaction with fCHO is still unclear. Thirty-two weaned piglets were fed 4 diets in a 2 × 2 factorial design with low fCP/low fCHO [14.5% crude protein (CP)/14.5% total dietary fiber (TDF)]; low fCP/high fCHO (14.8% CP/16.6% TDF); high fCP low fCHO (19.8% CP/14.5% TDF); and high fCP/high fCHO (20.1% CP/18.0% TDF) as dietary treatments. After 21-23 d, pigs were killed and colon digesta and tissue samples analyzed for indices of microbial ecology, tissue expression of genes for cell turnover, cytokines, mucus genes (MUC), and oxidative stress indices. Pig performance was unaffected by diet. fCP increased (P < 0.05) cell counts of clostridia in the Clostridium leptum group and total short and branched chain fatty acids, ammonia, putrescine, histamine, and spermidine concentrations, whereas high fCHO increased (P < 0.05) cell counts of clostridia in the C. leptum and C. coccoides groups, shifted the acetate to propionate ratio toward acetate (P < 0.05), and reduced ammonia and putrescine (P < 0.05). High dietary fCP increased (P < 0.05) expression of PCNA, IL1β, IL10, TGFβ, MUC1, MUC2, and MUC20, irrespective of fCHO concentration. The ratio of glutathione:glutathione disulfide was reduced (P < 0.05) by fCP and the expression of glutathione transferase was reduced by fCHO (P < 0.05). In conclusion, fermentable fiber ameliorates fermentable protein-induced changes in most measures of luminal microbial ecology but not the mucosal response in the large intestine of pigs.

  17. In Vitro Degradation and Fermentation of Three Dietary Fiber Sources by Human Colonic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Weimer, Paul J.; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Savik, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend partially on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of supplemental fiber type on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a non-adapted human bacterial population from three normal subjects, extent of in vitro fermentation was greater for gum arabic (GA) than for psyllium (PSY), which was greater than that for carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). In a separate experiment, in vitro incubation with feces from 52 subjects with fecal incontinence, before and after random assignment to and consumption of one of three fiber (GA, PSY, or CMC) supplements or a placebo for 20-21d, indicated that prior consumption of a specific fiber source did not increase its degradation by fecal bacteria. Results suggest that the colonic microbial community enriched on a particular fiber substrate can rapidly adapt to the presentation of a new fiber substrate. Clinical implications of the findings are that intake of a fiber source by humans is not expected to result in bacterial adaptation that would require continually larger and eventually intolerable amounts of fiber to achieve therapeutic benefits. PMID:23556460

  18. Carob fibre compounds modulate parameters of cell growth differently in human HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells than in LT97 colon adenoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenow, S; Glei, M; Haber, B; Owen, R; Pool-Zobel, B L

    2008-04-01

    An extract of the Mediterranean carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) pod (carob fibre extract), products formed after its fermentation by the gut flora and the major phenolic ingredient gallic acid (GA), were comparatively investigated for their influence on survival and growth parameters of colon adenocarcinoma HT29 cells and adenoma LT97 cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation in the cell culture media was quantified. After 1h 97+/-4 microM or 70+/-15 microM were found in HT29 medium and 6+/-1 microM or 3+/-3 microM in LT97 medium for carob fibre extract or GA, respectively. After 72 h carob fibre extract reduced survival of rapidly proliferating HT29 cells (by 76.4+/-12.9%) whereas metabolic activity and DNA-synthesis were only transiently impaired. Survival of slower growing LT97 cells was less decreased (by 21.5+/-12.9%), but there were marked effects on DNA-synthesis (reduction by 95.6+/-7%, 72 h). GA and fermented carob fibre did not have comparable effects. Thus, carob fibre extract resulted in H2O2 formation, which, however, could not explain impairment of cell growth. The differently modulated growth of human colon cell lines was more related to proliferation rates and impairment of DNA-synthesis than to H2O2 formation.

  19. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, M., E-mail: phyrenmq@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Rajendran, Reshmi [Lab of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consotium, 11 Biopolis Way, 02-02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Ng, Mary [Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Jenner, Andrew Michael [Illawara Health and Medical Research Institute (IHMRI), University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  20. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  1. Effects of disintegration on in vitro fermentation and conversion patterns of wheat aleurone in a metabolical colon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Natalia N; Aura, Anna-Marja; Saulnier, Luc; Holopainen-Mantila, Ulla; Poutanen, Kaisa; Micard, Valérie

    2013-06-19

    This work aimed to elucidate the effect of wheat aleurone integrity on its fermentability, i.e., the formation of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and microbial phenolic metabolites, in an in vitro model using human faecal microbiota as an inoculum. The structure of aleurone was modified by mechanical (dry grinding) or enzymatic (xylanase with or without feruloyl esterase) treatments in order to increase its physical accessibility and degrade its complex cell-wall network. The ground aleurone (smaller particle size) produced slightly more SCFA than the native aleurone during the first 8 h but a similar amount at 24 h (102.5 and 101 mmol/L, respectively). Similar colonic metabolism of ferulic acid (FA) was observed for native and ground aleurone. The enzymatic treatments of aleurone allowed a high solubilization of arabinoxylan (up to 82%) and a high release of FA in its conjugated and free forms (up to 87%). The enzymatic disintegration of aleurone's structure led to a higher concentration and formation rate of the colonic metabolites of FA (especially phenylpropionic acids) but did not change significantly the formation of SCFA (81 mmol/L for enzyme treated versus 101 mmol/L for the native aleurone).

  2. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  3. Milk fermented by Propionibacterium freudenreichii induces apoptosis of HGT-1 human gastric cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien J Cousin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. The "economically developed countries" life style, including diet, constitutes a risk factor favoring this cancer. Diet modulation may lower digestive cancer incidence. Among promising food components, dairy propionibacteria were shown to trigger apoptosis of human colon cancer cells, via the release of short-chain fatty acids acetate and propionate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A fermented milk, exclusively fermented by P. freudenreichii, was recently designed. In this work, the pro-apoptotic potential of this new fermented milk was demonstrated on HGT-1 human gastric cancer cells. Fermented milk supernatant induced typical features of apoptosis including chromatin condensation, formation of apoptotic bodies, DNA laddering, cell cycle arrest and emergence of a subG1 population, phosphatidylserine exposure at the plasma membrane outer leaflet, reactive oxygen species accumulation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential disruption, caspase activation and cytochrome c release. Remarkably, this new fermented milk containing P. freudenreichii enhanced the cytotoxicity of camptothecin, a drug used in gastric cancer chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Such new probiotic fermented milk may thus be useful as part of a preventive diet designed to prevent gastric cancer and/or as a food supplement to potentiate cancer therapeutic treatments.

  4. Immobilized yeast cell systems for continuous fermentation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Pieter J; De Schutter, David P; Delvaux, Filip; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2006-10-01

    In several yeast-related industries, continuous fermentation systems offer important economical advantages in comparison with traditional systems. Fermentation rates are significantly improved, especially when continuous fermentation is combined with cell immobilization techniques to increase the yeast concentration in the fermentor. Hence the technique holds a great promise for the efficient production of fermented beverages, such as beer, wine and cider as well as bio-ethanol. However, there are some important pitfalls, and few industrial-scale continuous systems have been implemented. Here, we first review the various cell immobilization techniques and reactor setups. Then, the impact of immobilization on cell physiology and fermentation performance is discussed. In a last part, we focus on the practical use of continuous fermentation and cell immobilization systems for beer production.

  5. Stability of high cell density brewery fermentations during serial repitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Pieter J; Dekoninck, Tinne M L; Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E; Saerens, Sofie M G; Delvaux, Filip; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2009-11-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e. higher inoculum size). However, the decreased yeast net growth observed in these high cell density brewery fermentations can adversely affect the physiological stability throughout subsequent yeast generations. Therefore, different O(2) conditions (wort aeration and yeast preoxygenation) were applied to high cell density fermentation and eight generations of fermentations were evaluated together with conventional fermentations. Freshly propagated high cell density populations adapted faster to the fermentative conditions than normal cell density populations. Preoxygenating the yeast was essential for the yeast physiological and beer flavor compound stability of high cell density fermentations during serial repitching. In contrast, the use of non-preoxygenated yeast resulted in inadequate growth which caused (1) insufficient yield of biomass to repitch all eight generations, (2) a 10% decrease in viability, (3) a moderate increase of yeast age, (4) and a dramatic increase of the unwanted flavor compounds acetaldehyde and total diacetyl during the sequence of fermentations. Therefore, to achieve sustainable high cell density fermentations throughout the economical valuable process of serial repitching, adequate yeast growth is essential.

  6. ARMc8 indicates aggressive colon cancers and promotes invasiveness and migration of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiupeng; Fan, Chuifeng; Wang, Liang; Xu, Hongtao; Yu, Juanhan; Wang, Enhua

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have implicated ARMc8 in promoting tumor formation in non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer; however, so far, no studies have revealed the expression pattern or cellular function of ARMc8 in colon cancer. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to measure ARMc8 expression in 206 cases of colon cancer and matched adjacent normal colon tissue. Clinically important behaviors of cells, including invasiveness and migration, were evaluated after upregulation of ARMc8 expression in HT29 cells through gene transfection or downregulation of expression in LoVo cells using RNAi. We found that ARMc8 was primarily located in the membrane and cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression level was significantly higher in colon cancer in comparison to that in the adjacent normal colon tissues (p TNM stage (p = 0.006), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.001), and poor prognosis (p = 0.002) of colon cancer. The invasiveness and migration capacity of HT29 cells transfected with ARMc8 were significantly greater than those of control cells (p colon cancer cells. ARMc8 is likely to become a potential therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  7. Effect of fermented oatmeal soup on the cholesterol level and the Lactobacillus colonization of rat intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, G; Andersson, R; Ahrné, S; Lönner, C; Marklinder, I; Johansson, M L; Jeppsson, B; Bengmark, S

    1992-04-01

    Rats were fed with freeze-dried oatmeal soup fermented by six different Lactobacillus strains from rat and man; the formula is intended for enteral feeding. The serum cholesterol levels after 10 d were lower for rats eating oatmeal as compared to a commercial product, Biosorb Sond. Colonizing ability of the administered strains were evaluated in vivo. Only Lactobacillus reuteri R21c were able to, effectively, colonizing the mucosa; it represented about 30% of the Lactobacillus population 24 d after termination of the administration. L. reuteri R21c was easily recognized by the ability to produce a yellow pigment on agar plates. The identity was confirmed by carbohydrate fermentations (API 50CH), plasmid pattern and endonuclease restriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA.

  8. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  9. Glycerol production by fermenting yeast cells is essential for optimal bread dough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Vervoort, Yannick; Courtin, Christophe M; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is the main compatible solute in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When faced with osmotic stress, for example during semi-solid state bread dough fermentation, yeast cells produce and accumulate glycerol in order to prevent dehydration by balancing the intracellular osmolarity with that of the environment. However, increased glycerol production also results in decreased CO2 production, which may reduce dough leavening. We investigated the effect of yeast glycerol production level on bread dough fermentation capacity of a commercial bakery strain and a laboratory strain. We find that Δgpd1 mutants that show decreased glycerol production show impaired dough fermentation. In contrast, overexpression of GPD1 in the laboratory strain results in increased fermentation rates in high-sugar dough and improved gas retention in the fermenting bread dough. Together, our results reveal the crucial role of glycerol production level by fermenting yeast cells in dough fermentation efficiency as well as gas retention in dough, thereby opening up new routes for the selection of improved commercial bakery yeasts.

  10. Expression and function of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Kenji; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kubo, Terufumi; Tamura, Yasuaki; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Takahashi, Akari; Nakazawa, Emiri; Saka, Eri; Ragnarsson, Charlotte; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Inoda, Satoko; Asanuma, Hiroko; Takasu, Hideo; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Yasoshima, Takahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Invasion into the matrix is one of hallmarks of malignant diseases and is the first step for tumor metastasis. Thus, analysis of the molecular mechanisms of invasion is essential to overcome tumor cell invasion. In the present study, we screened for colon carcinoma-specific genes using a cDNA microarray database of colon carcinoma tissues and normal colon tissues, and we found that fermitin family member-1 (FERMT1) is overexpressed in colon carcinoma cells. FRRMT1, FERMT2 and FERMT3 expression was investigated in colon carcinoma cells. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that only FERMT1 had cancer cell-specific expression. Protein expression of FERMT1 was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. To address the molecular functions of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells, we established FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. FERMT1-overexpressing cells exhibited greater invasive ability than did FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells exhibited enhancement of cell growth. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that FERMT1 is expressed specifically in colon carcinoma cells, and has roles in matrix invasion and cell growth. These findings indicate that FERMT1 is a potential molecular target for cancer therapy.

  11. EXPRESSION OF Fas LIGAND IN HUMAN COLON CANCER CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建军; 丁尔迅; 王强; 陈学云; 付志仁

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Fas ligand in human colon carcinoma cell lines. Methods: A total of six human colon cancer cell lines were examined for the expression of Fas ligand mRNA and cell surface protein by using RT-PCR and flow cytometry respectively. Results: The results showed that Fas ligand mRNA was expressed in all of the six cancer cell lines and Fas ligand cell surface protein was expressed in part of them. Conclusion: These data suggest that Fas ligand was expressed, at least in part, in human colon cancer cell lines and might facilitate to escape from immune surveillance of the host.

  12. Characterization of colonic dendritic cells in normal and colitic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheena M Cruickshank; Nicholas R English; Peter J Felsburg; Simon R Carding

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Recent studies demonstrating the direct involvement of dendritic cells (DC) in the activation of pathogenic T cells in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease identify DC as important antigen presenting cells in the colon. However, very little is known about the properties of colonic DC.METHODS: Using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and flow cytometry we have characterized and compared colonic DC in the colon of healthy animals and interleukin-2-deficient (IL2-/-) mice that develop colitis.RESULTS: In the healthy colon, DC resided within the lamina propria and in close association with the basement membrane of colonic villi. Type 1 myeloid (CD11c+, CD11b+,B220-, CD8α-) DC made up the largest (40-45%) population and all DC expressed low levels of CD80, CD86, and CD40,and had high endocytic activity consistent with an immature phenotype. In colitic IL2-/- mice, colonic DC numbers increased four- to five-fold and were localized within the epithelial layer and within aggregates of T and B cells. They were also many more DC in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN).The majority (>85%) of DC in the colon and MLN of IL2-/-mice were type 1 myeloid, and expressed high levels of MHC class Ⅱ, CD80, CD86, CD 40, DEC 205, and CCR5molecules and were of low endocytic activity consistent with mature DC.CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate striking changes in the number, distribution and phenotype of DC in the inflamed colon. Their intimate association with lymphocytes in the colon and draining lymph nodes suggest that they may contribute directly to the ongoing inflammation in the colon.

  13. Obesity promotes colonic stem cell expansion during cancer initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeClercq, V; McMurray, D N; Chapkin, R S

    2015-12-28

    There is an urgent need to elucidate the mechanistic links between obesity and colon cancer. Convincing evidence for the role of Lgr5(+) stem cells in colon tumorigenesis has been established; however, the influence of obesity on stem cell maintenance is unknown. We assessed the effects of high fat (HF) feeding on colonic stem cell maintenance during cancer initiation (AOM induced) and the responsiveness of stem cells to adipokine signaling pathways. The number of colonic GFP(+) stem cells was significantly higher in the AOM-injected HF group compared to the LF group. The Lgr5(+) stem cells of the HF fed mice exhibited statistically significant increases in cell proliferation and decreases in apoptosis in response to AOM injection compared to the LF group. Colonic organoid cultures from lean mice treated with an adiponectin receptor agonist exhibited a reduction in Lgr5-GPF(+) stem cell number and an increase in apoptosis; however, this response was diminished in the organoid cultures from obese mice. These results suggest that the responsiveness of colonic stem cells to adiponectin in diet-induced obesity is impaired and may contribute to the stem cell accumulation observed in obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ethanol fermentation in an immobilized cell reactor using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Ghasem; Younesi, Habibollah; Syahidah Ku Ismail, Ku

    2004-05-01

    Fermentation of sugar by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for production of ethanol in an immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was successfully carried out to improve the performance of the fermentation process. The fermentation set-up was comprised of a column packed with beads of immobilized cells. The immobilization of S. cerevisiae was simply performed by the enriched cells cultured media harvested at exponential growth phase. The fixed cell loaded ICR was carried out at initial stage of operation and the cell was entrapped by calcium alginate. The production of ethanol was steady after 24 h of operation. The concentration of ethanol was affected by the media flow rates and residence time distribution from 2 to 7 h. In addition, batch fermentation was carried out with 50 g/l glucose concentration. Subsequently, the ethanol productions and the reactor productivities of batch fermentation and immobilized cells were compared. In batch fermentation, sugar consumption and ethanol production obtained were 99.6% and 12.5% v/v after 27 h while in the ICR, 88.2% and 16.7% v/v were obtained with 6 h retention time. Nearly 5% ethanol production was achieved with high glucose concentration (150 g/l) at 6 h retention time. A yield of 38% was obtained with 150 g/l glucose. The yield was improved approximately 27% on ICR and a 24 h fermentation time was reduced to 7 h. The cell growth rate was based on the Monod rate equation. The kinetic constants (K(s) and mu(m)) of batch fermentation were 2.3 g/l and 0.35 g/lh, respectively. The maximum yield of biomass on substrate (Y(X-S)) and the maximum yield of product on substrate (Y(P-S)) in batch fermentations were 50.8% and 31.2% respectively. Productivity of the ICR were 1.3, 2.3, and 2.8 g/lh for 25, 35, 50 g/l of glucose concentration, respectively. The productivity of ethanol in batch fermentation with 50 g/l glucose was calculated as 0.29 g/lh. Maximum production of ethanol in ICR when compared to batch reactor has shown to increase

  15. Fiber fermentability effects on energy and macronutrient digestibility, fecal traits, postprandial metabolite responses, and colon histology of overweight cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M M; Kessler, A M; de Sá, L R M; Vasconcellos, R S; Filho, F O Roberti; Nogueira, S P; Oliveira, M C C; Carciofi, A C

    2012-07-01

    Considering the different potential benefits of divergent fiber ingredients, the effect of 3 fiber sources on energy and macronutrient digestibility, fermentation product formation, postprandial metabolite responses, and colon histology of overweight cats (Felis catus) fed kibble diets was compared. Twenty-four healthy adult cats were assigned in a complete randomized block design to 2 groups of 12 animals, and 3 animals from each group were fed 1 of 4 of the following kibble diets: control (CO; 11.5% dietary fiber), beet pulp (BP; 26% dietary fiber), wheat bran (WB; 24% dietary fiber), and sugarcane fiber (SF; 28% dietary fiber). Digestibility was measured by the total collection of feces. After 16 d of diet adaptation and an overnight period without food, blood glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride postprandial responses were evaluated for 16 h after continued exposure to food. On d 20, colon biopsies of the cats were collected under general anesthesia. Fiber addition reduced food energy and nutrient digestibility. Of all the fiber sources, SF had the least dietary fiber digestibility (P fiber solubility and fermentation rates, fiber sources can induce different physiological responses in cats, reduce energy digestibility, and favor glucose metabolism (SF), or improve gut health (BP).

  16. Colon distention induces persistent visceral hypersensitivity by mechanotranscription of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, You-Min; Fu, Yu; Wu, Chester C; Xu, Guang-Yin; Huang, Li-Yen; Shi, Xuan-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal pain and distention are major complaints in irritable bowel syndrome. Abdominal distention is mainly attributed to intraluminal retention of gas or solid contents, which may cause mechanical stress to the gut wall. Visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) may account for abdominal pain. We sought to determine whether tonic colon distention causes persistent VHS and if so whether mechanical stress-induced expression (mechanotranscription) of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a role in VHS. Human colonic SMCs were isolated and stretched in vitro to investigate whether mechanical stress upregulates expression of the pain mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Rat colon was distended with a 5-cm-long balloon, and gene expression of COX-2, visceromotor response (VMR), and sensory neuron excitability were determined. Static stretch of colonic SMCs induced marked expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in a force- and time-dependent manner. Subnoxious tonic distention of the distal colon at ∼30-40 mmHg for 20 or 40 min induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in colonic smooth muscle, but not in the mucosa layer. Lumen distention also increased VMR in a force- and time-dependent manner. The increase of VMR persisted for at least 3 days. Patch-clamp experiments showed that the excitability of colon projecting sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia was markedly augmented, 24 h after lumen distention. Administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 partially but significantly attenuated distention-induced VHS. In conclusion, tonic lumen distention upregulates expression of COX-2 in colonic SMC, and COX-2 contributes to persistent VHS.

  17. EZH2 depletion blocks the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Fussbroich

    Full Text Available The Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2 protein has been reported to stimulate cell growth in some cancers and is therefore considered to represent an interesting new target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we investigated a possible role of EZH2 for the growth control of colon cancer cells. RNA interference (RNAi-mediated intracellular EZH2 depletion led to cell cycle arrest of colon carcinoma cells at the G1/S transition. This was associated with a reduction of cell numbers upon transient transfection of synthetic EZH2-targeting siRNAs and with inhibition of their colony formation capacity upon stable expression of vector-borne siRNAs. We furthermore tested whether EZH2 may repress the growth-inhibitory p27 gene, as reported for pancreatic cancer. However, expression analyses of colon cancer cell lines and colon cancer biopsies did not reveal a consistent correlation between EZH2 and p27 levels. Moreover, EZH2 depletion did not re-induce p27 expression in colon cancer cells, indicating that p27 repression by EZH2 may be cell- or tissue-specific. Whole genome transcriptome analyses identified cellular genes affected by EZH2 depletion in colon cancer cell lines. They included several cancer-associated genes linked to cellular proliferation or invasion, such as Dag1, MageD1, SDC1, Timp2, and Tob1. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that EZH2 depletion blocks the growth of colon cancer cells. These findings might provide benefits for the treatment of colon cancer.

  18. Fermentation of the endosperm cell walls of monocotyledon and dicotyledon plant species: The relationship between cell wall characteristics and fermentability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.; Tamminga, S.; Williams, B.A.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2000-01-01

    Cell walls from the endosperm of four monocotyledons (maize, wheat, rye, and rice) and four dicotyledons (soya bean, lupin, faba bean, and pea) seeds were studied to relate cell wall composition and structure with fermentation characteristics. Cell wall material was isolated from the endosperm of

  19. Fermentation of the endosperm cell walls of monocotyledon and dicotyledon plant species: The relationship between cell wall characteristics and fermentability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.; Tamminga, S.; Williams, B.A.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2000-01-01

    Cell walls from the endosperm of four monocotyledons (maize, wheat, rye, and rice) and four dicotyledons (soya bean, lupin, faba bean, and pea) seeds were studied to relate cell wall composition and structure with fermentation characteristics. Cell wall material was isolated from the endosperm of th

  20. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Expression of ICAM-1 in colon epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Sørensen, Susanne; Seidelin, Jakob;

    2003-01-01

    on monolayers of cancer cells. Conflicting results exist on epithelial ICAM-1 expression, and the aim of this study was to compare the expression in various models of colonic epithelium. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Colonic biopsies from four UC patients and four controls were examined by cryoimmuno......-electron microscopy using ICAM-1-antibodies. In four other controls, the epithelium was isolated from colonic biopsies, embedded in collagen, and evaluated similarly. Isolated crypts and cultured cancer cells were stimulated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). RESULTS: ICAM-1......, both colonocytes and HT29 cells were capable of expressing ICAM-1 on their apical membranes in response to supraphysiologic cytokine concentrations. These observations question the justification of extrapolating observations from colon cancer cell lines to in vivo inflammatory conditions....

  2. T-Cell Lymphomas Presenting as Colon Ulcers and Eosinophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hsiu Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphoma is an uncommon entity and primary colon T-cell lymphoma is even rarer. The majority of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphomas present predominantly as ulcers or strictures in the endoscopic examinations, while primary B-cell lymphomas commonly present as exophytic lesions. Ulcerative colon T-cell lymphoma may mimic Crohn's disease (CD, which is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines with ulcer and fistula formations difficult for clinicians to diagnose based on endoscopic observations alone. Like CD, T-cell lymphoma may be characterized by the presence of multiple skipped ulcers distributed from the terminal ileum to the descending colon. Furthermore, it is difficult to diagnose this unusual lymphoma by a single endoscopic biopsy. Typically, the histological composition of T-cell lymphoma is made of medium to large atypical cells located in the base of the ulcer with extension to the muscle layer and the adjacent mucosa. However, it is common that biopsy specimens show only mixed inflammatory changes where the lymphoma cells are hard to be identified. The differential diagnosis of malignant lymphoma must be considered when clinically diagnosed CD is refractory to the medical treatment or when its clinical behavior becomes aggressive. The current study presents a rare case of primary colon T-cell lymphoma in a 56-year-old male with marked recent weight loss, watery diarrhea and bilateral neck lymphadenopathy, who received a laboratory checkup and endoscopic workup for colon biopsy. The initial pathological report was consistent with mucosal inflammation and benign colon ulcers. Interestingly, the blood test showed a prominent eosinophilia. A biopsy of the enlarged neck lymph nodes done approximately 1 month after the colon biopsy unexpectedly showed T-cell lymphoma, which led to a review of the initial colonic biopsy specimens. Additional immunohistochemical stains were used accordingly, which

  3. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells in subserosa of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Hansen, Alastair;

    2013-01-01

    We studied the ultrastructure of interstitial cells in the subserosal/adventitial layer in human colon. An interstitial cell type with an ultrastructure intermediate between fibroblast-like cells (FLC) and interstitial cells of Cajal was identified (IC-SS). IC-SS had thin and flattened branching...

  4. Idelalisib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shida; Zhu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Ning; Yao, Zhicheng

    2017-01-24

    Idelalisib, a PI3K inhibitor, specifically targeting p110δ, has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. However, the mechanisms of action of idelalisib in colon cancer cells are not well understood. We investigated how idelalisib suppresses colon cancer cells growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we found that idelalisib treatment induces PUMA in colon cancer cells irrespective of p53 status through the p65 pathway following AKT inhibition and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation. PUMA is necessary for idelalisib-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Idelalisib also synergized with 5-FU or regorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and antitumor effect of idelalisib in xenograft model. These results demonstrate a critical role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of idelalisib in colon cancer cells and suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of idelalisib sensitivity, and also have important implications for it clinical applications.

  5. Expression of ICAM-1 in colon epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Sørensen, Susanne; Seidelin, Jakob;

    2003-01-01

    Studies have suggested that in ulcerative colitis (UC), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration of leukocytes toward the colonic epithelium. A suitable in vitro model of chronic colonic inflammation does not exist, and the role of the epithelium is based on monolayers ...... of cancer cells. Conflicting results exist on epithelial ICAM-1 expression, and the aim of this study was to compare the expression in various models of colonic epithelium.......Studies have suggested that in ulcerative colitis (UC), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration of leukocytes toward the colonic epithelium. A suitable in vitro model of chronic colonic inflammation does not exist, and the role of the epithelium is based on monolayers...

  6. Exploring the Colonic Metabolism of Grape and Strawberry Anthocyanins and Their in Vitro Apoptotic Effects in HT-29 Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Las Hazas, María-Carmen; Mosele, Juana I; Macià, Alba; Ludwig, Iziar A; Motilva, María-José

    2017-08-09

    Beneficial properties attributed to the intake of fruit and red wine have been associated with the presence of significant amounts of anthocyanins. However, their low absorption and consequent accumulation in the gut have generated the suspicion that colonic metabolites of anthocyanins are probably involved in these protective effects. Grape pomace and strawberry extracts, rich in malvidin- and pelargonidin-glucoside, respectively, were fermented in vitro using human feces as microbial inoculum. After 8 h of anaerobic incubation, the anthocyanins were almost completely degraded, whereas their microbial metabolite concentrations were highest at 24 h. Syringic acid and tyrosol were the main metabolites of grape and strawberry extracts, respectively. On the basis of the metabolites detected, metabolic pathways of malvidin- and pelargonidin-glucosides were proposed. Anthocyanin-rich grape and strawberry extracts and their generated metabolites such as hydroxyphenylacetic acid showed apoptotic effects in HT-29 colon cancer cells and may suggest their possible contribution as anticarcinogenic agents.

  7. Bioprocess Intensification of Beer Fermentation Using Immobilised Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Pieter J.; Nedović, Viktor A.; Manojlović, Verica; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Laskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Bugarski, Branko; Willaert, Ronnie

    Beer production with immobilised yeast has been the subject of research for approximately 30 years but has so far found limited application in the brewing industry, due to engineering problems, unrealised cost advantages, microbial contaminations and an unbalanced beer flavor (Linko et al. 1998; Brányik et al. 2005; Willaert and Nedović 2006). The ultimate aim of this research is the production of beer of desired quality within 1-3 days. Traditional beer fermentation systems use freely suspended yeast cells to ferment wort in an unstirred batch reactor. The primary fermentation takes approximately 7 days with a subsequent secondary fermentation (maturation) of several weeks. A batch culture system employing immobilization could benefit from an increased rate of fermentation. However, it appears that in terms of increasing productivity, a continuous fermentation system with immobilization would be the best method (Verbelen et al. 2006). An important issue of the research area is whether beer can be produced by immobilised yeast in continuous culture with the same characteristic as the traditional method.

  8. Microbial metabolites profile during in vitro human colonic fermentation of breakfast menus consumed by Mexican school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Gasga, Victor Manuel; Montalvo-González, Efigenia; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Vázquez-Landaverde, Pedro Alberto; Tovar, Juscelino; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G

    2017-07-01

    The nutrition transition promotes the development of childhood obesity. Currently, Mexico is affected by this serious public health problem. The nutritional and functional characterization of a whole menu has a number of advantages over the study of single nutrients. Since breakfast is considered the most important meal of the day, this study aimed to evaluate the metabolite profile produced by in vitro human colonic fermentation of the isolated indigestible fraction (IF) from three different Mexican breakfast (M-B) menus (Modified "MM-B", traditional "TM-B", and alternative "AM-B"), previously identified as commonly consumed by Mexican schoolchildren in Nayarit State, Mexico. The M-B's consist of egg, corn tortilla, beans (higher in TM-B), sugar and chocolate powder (higher in AM-B) and milk, combined in different proportions. The IF in all breakfasts was about 4.7-5.6g/100g FW, with a relatively high content of protein (≈21%), which might have negative physiological implications. Fermentation of IF from TM-B resulted in the largest pH decrease after 72h (pH=6.07), with a low short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production (0.75 to 47.23mmol/L), but greater relative concentration of other fatty acids (FA) (C7, C8, C9). Besides, 55 volatile compounds were detected in the fermentation media by SPME-GC-MS and three principal components (PC) were identified. PC1 was influenced by SCFA production, low FA esters production (<8C), and low volatile organic acids production. PC2 was influenced by the decrease in pH and an increase in antioxidant capacity (p<0.0001). These results suggest that the production of different metabolites in the luminal medium may affect the pH and antioxidant status in the colon. Fermentation of IF from TM-M, assessed after 48 and 72h, showed the highest correlation for PC2; the metabolic pattern registered for this IF maybe considered beneficial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors related to colonic fermentation of nondigestible carbohydrates of a previous evening meal increase tissue glucose uptake and moderate glucose-associated inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priebe, Marion G.; Wang, Hongwei; Weening, Desiree; Schepers, Marianne; Preston, Tom; Vonk, Roel J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Evening meals that are rich in nondigestible carbohydrates have been shown to lower postprandial glucose concentrations after ingestion of high-glycemic-index breakfasts. This phenomenon is linked to colonic fermentation of nondigestible carbohydrates, but the underlying mechanism is not

  10. Butyrate Inhibits Cancerous HCT116 Colon Cell Proliferation but to a Lesser Extent in Noncancerous NCM460 Colon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Zeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous cells through regulating apoptosis and cellular-signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by exposing cancerous HCT116 or non-cancerous NCM460 colon cells to physiologically relevant doses of butyrate. Cellular responses to butyrate were characterized by Western analysis, fluorescent microscopy, acetylation, and DNA fragmentation analyses. Butyrate inhibited cell proliferation, and led to an induction of apoptosis, genomic DNA fragmentation in HCT116 cells, but to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. Although butyrate increased H3 histone deacetylation and p21 tumor suppressor expression in both cell types, p21 protein level was greater with intense expression around the nuclei in HCT116 cells when compared with that in NCM460 cells. Furthermore, butyrate treatment increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2, a survival signal, in NCM460 cells while it decreased p-ERK1/2 in HCT116 cells. Taken together, the activation of survival signaling in NCM460 cells and apoptotic potential in HCT116 cells may confer the increased sensitivity of cancerous colon cells to butyrate in comparison with noncancerous colon cells.

  11. Butyrate Inhibits Cancerous HCT116 Colon Cell Proliferation but to a Lesser Extent in Noncancerous NCM460 Colon Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Taussig, David P; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, LuAnn K; Hakkak, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous cells through regulating apoptosis and cellular-signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by exposing cancerous HCT116 or non-cancerous NCM460 colon cells to physiologically relevant doses of butyrate. Cellular responses to butyrate were characterized by Western analysis, fluorescent microscopy, acetylation, and DNA fragmentation analyses. Butyrate inhibited cell proliferation, and led to an induction of apoptosis, genomic DNA fragmentation in HCT116 cells, but to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. Although butyrate increased H3 histone deacetylation and p21 tumor suppressor expression in both cell types, p21 protein level was greater with intense expression around the nuclei in HCT116 cells when compared with that in NCM460 cells. Furthermore, butyrate treatment increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2), a survival signal, in NCM460 cells while it decreased p-ERK1/2 in HCT116 cells. Taken together, the activation of survival signaling in NCM460 cells and apoptotic potential in HCT116 cells may confer the increased sensitivity of cancerous colon cells to butyrate in comparison with noncancerous colon cells.

  12. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry.

  13. Modelling the dynamics of stem cells in colonic crypts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirio, Orozco-Fuentes; Barrio, Rafael A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a theoretical and computational framework to model the colonic crypt organisation in the human intestine. We construct a theoretical and computational framework to model the colonic crypt behaviour, using a Voronoi tessellation to represent each cell and elastic forces between them we addressed how their dynamical disfunction can lead to tumour masses and cancer. Our results indicate that for certain parameters the crypt is in a homeostatic state, but slight changes on their values can disrupt this behaviour.

  14. FRAT1 expression regulates proliferation in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kongxi; Guo, Jianqiang; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Weihua

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common gastric malignancies worldwide. However, the underlying mechanism of colon cancer development and valuable indicators of the disease remain unclear. In this study, the expression of frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas 1 (FRAT1) in colon cancer was investigated and the association between FRAT1 expression and biological properties of tumors was analyzed. A total of 147 colon cancer tissue samples and adjacent normal tissues were collected between January 2013 and June 2014. The FRAT1 gene and protein expression levels were analyzed in tissues with different TNM and pathological stages. Small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) containing the human FRAT1 gene were constructed and transfected into colon cancer HT-29 cells. The proliferation and migration of the cells was also analyzed in relation to a reduction in FRAT1 expression. In colon cancer tissues, the expression of FRAT1 was significantly higher when compared with adjacent tissues. In addition, FRAT1 expression was found to positively correlate with the degree of tumor malignancy, and this difference was determined to be statistically significant (Pcolon cancer, FRAT1 may present a novel tool for analyzing the tumor progression and may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer.

  15. The influence of inulin on the absorption of nitrogen and the production of metabolites of protein fermentation in the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geboes, Karen P; De Hertogh, Gert; De Preter, Vicky; Luypaerts, Anja; Bammens, Bert; Evenepoel, Pieter; Ghoos, Yvo; Geboes, Karel; Rutgeerts, Paul; Verbeke, Kristin

    2006-12-01

    In the present study, the production and fate of bacterial metabolites in the colon were investigated in a direct way using two substrates labelled with stable isotopes: lactose [(15)N,(15)N]ureide as a source of labelled ammonia and egg proteins intrinsically labelled with [(2)H4]tyrosine as a precursor of [(2)H4]p-cresol. Both ammonia and phenolic compounds are believed to be carcinogenic. Stimulation of carbohydrate fermentation in order to prevent accumulation of these toxic metabolites was induced by inclusion of inulin in a test meal or by addition of inulin to the daily diet, allowing us to distinguish between changes induced by the actual presence of a fermentable carbohydrate and effects caused by a long-term dietary intervention. When a single dose of inulin was administered together with the labelled substrates, a significant increase in faecal (15)N excretion, accompanied by a proportional decrease in urinary (15)N excretion was observed, probably reflecting an enhanced uptake of ammonia for bacterial biosynthesis, since an increased concentration of labelled N in bacterial pellets was found. A statistically significant reduction of urinary [(2)H4]p-cresol excretion was also noted. Upon supplementation of inulin to the daily diet during 4 weeks, however, only a tendency towards decreased urinary excretion of both labelled and unlabelled p-cresol was noted. Further studies are warranted to confirm these results in a larger cohort.

  16. Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-10-14

    Stromal microenvironment influences tumor cell proliferation and migration. Fibroblasts represent the most abundant stromal constituents. Here, we established two pairs of normal fibroblast (NF) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts. The NFs and CAFs were stained positive for typical fibroblast markers and inhibited colon cancer (CC) cell proliferation in in vitro cocultures and in xenograft mouse models. The fibroblast conditioned media were analyzed using LC-MS and 227 proteins were identified at a false discovery rate of 1.3%, including 131 putative secretory and 20 plasma membrane proteins. These proteins were enriched for functional categories of extracellular matrix, adhesion, cell motion, inflammatory response, redox homeostasis and peptidase inhibitor. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, transgelin, follistatin-related protein 1 (FSTL1) and decorin was abundant in the fibroblast secretome as confirmed by Western blot. Silencing of FSTL1 and transgelin in colonic fibroblast cell line CCD-18Co induced an accelerated proliferation of CC cells in cocultures. Exogenous FSTL1 attenuates CC cell proliferation in a negative fashion. FSTL1 was upregulated in CC patient plasma and cancerous tissues but had no implication in prognosis. Our results provided novel insights into the molecular signatures and modulatory role of CC associated fibroblasts. In this study, a label-free LC-MS was performed to analyze the secretomes of two paired primary fibroblasts, which were isolated from fresh surgical specimen of colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal colonic tissues and exhibited negative modulatory activity for colon cancer cell growth in in vitro cocultures and in vivo xenograph mouse models. Follistatin-related protein 1 was further revealed to be one of the stroma-derived factors of potential suppression role for colon cancer cell proliferation. Our results provide novel

  17. Transient Behavior of Ethanol Fermentation in Immobilized Cell Bioreactors*

    OpenAIRE

    Tohru, KANNO; Yoshinori, FUJISHIGE; Hiroyuki, Ito; koichi, yamazaki; Masayoshi, KOBAYASHI

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of ethanol fermentation catalysed by an immobilized cell has been studied in batch and continuous stirred tank bioreactors, changing the operating conditions in a stepwise fashion. The rate of ethanol fermentation in the flow reactor reaches a new steady state within 60 min for the stepwise change in temperature or flow rate at 15〜30℃ and the residence time t_R=40 hr. The rate of fermentation obeys the Lineweaven-Burk plot and the Michaelis constant is calculated

  18. Mast Cells in Adjacent Normal Colon Mucosa rather than Those in Invasive Margin are Related to Progression of Colon Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Xia; Xiao-shi Zhang; Ying-bo Chen; Ya Ding; Xiao-jun Wu; Rui-qing Peng; Qiang Zhou; Jing Zeng; Jing-hui Hou; Xing Zhang; Yi-xin Zeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective:Mast cells (MC) reside in the mucosa of the digestive tract as the first line against bacteria and toxins.Clinical evidence has implied that the infiltration of mast cells in colorectal cancers is related to malignant phenotypes and a poor prognosis.This study compared the role of mast cells in adjacent normal colon mucosa and in the invasive margin during the progression of colon cancer.Methods:Specimens were obtained from 39 patients with colon adenomas and 155 patients with colon cancers treated at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between January 1999 and July 2004.The density of mast cells was scored by an immunohistochemical assay.The pattern of mast cell distribution and its relationship with dinicopathologic parameters and 5-year survival were analyzed.Results:The majority of mast cells were located in the adjacent normal colon mucosa,followed by the invasive margin and least in the cancer stroma.Mast cell count in adjacent normal colon mucosa (MCCadjacent) was associated with pathologic classification,distant metastases and hepatic metastases,although it was not a prognostic factor.In contrast,mast cell count in the invasive margin (MCCinvasive) was associated with neither the clinicopathlogic parameters nor overall survival.Conclusion:Mast cells in the adjacent normal colon mucosa were related to the progression of colon cancer,suggesting that mast cells might modulate tumor progression via a long-distance mechanism.

  19. Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borole, Abhijeet P [Knoxville, TN

    2012-06-05

    The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

  20. Expression of lactoperoxidase in differentiated mouse colon epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Wook; Esworthy, R Steven; Hahn, Maria A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2012-05-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is known to be present in secreted fluids, such as milk and saliva. Functionally, LPO teams up with dual oxidases (DUOXs) to generate bactericidal hypothiocyanite in the presence of thiocyanate. DUOX2 is expressed in intestinal epithelium, but there is little information on LPO expression in this tissue. To fill the gap of knowledge, we have analyzed Lpo gene expression and its regulation in mouse intestine. In wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (B6) mouse intestine, an appreciable level of mouse Lpo gene expression was detected in the colon, but not the ileum. However, in B6 mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 and -2, GPx1/2-double-knockout (DKO), which had intestinal pathology, the colon Lpo mRNA levels increased 5- to 12-fold depending on mouse age. The Lpo mRNA levels in WT and DKO 129S1/SvlmJ (129) colon were even higher, 9- and 5-fold, than in B6 DKO colon. Higher levels of Lpo protein and enzymatic activity were also detected in the 129 mouse colon compared to B6 colon. Lpo protein was expressed in the differentiated colon epithelial cells, away from the crypt base, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Similar to human LPO mRNA, mouse Lpo mRNA had multiple spliced forms, although only the full-length variant 1 was translated. Higher methylation was found in the 129 than in the B6 strain, in DKO than in control colon, and in older than in juvenile mice. However, methylation of the Lpo intragenic CpG island was not directly induced by inflammation, because dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis did not increase DNA methylation in B6 DKO colon. Also, Lpo DNA methylation is not correlated with gene expression.

  1. Crizotinib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xingnan; He, Kan; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Oncogenic alterations in MET or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified in a variety of human cancers. Crizotinib (PF02341066) is a dual MET and ALK inhibitor and approved for the treatment of a subset of non-small cell lung carcinoma and in clinical development for other malignancies. Crizotinib can induce apoptosis in cancer cells, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we found that crizotinib induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells through the BH3-only protein PUMA. In cells with wild-type p53, crizotinib induces rapid induction of PUMA and Bim accompanied by p53 stabilization and DNA damage response. The induction of PUMA and Bim is mediated largely by p53, and deficiency in PUMA or p53, but not Bim, blocks crizotinib-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, MET knockdown led to selective induction of PUMA, but not Bim or p53. Crizotinib also induced PUMA-dependent apoptosis in p53-deficient colon cancer cells and synergized with gefitinib or sorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and therapeutic responses to crizotinib in xenograft models. These results establish a critical role of PUMA in mediating apoptotic responses of colon cancer cells to crizotinib and suggest that mechanisms of oncogenic addiction to MET/ALK-mediated survival may be cell type-specific. These findings have important implications for future clinical development of crizotinib.

  2. Ethanol fermentation by immobilized cells of Zymomonas mobilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, W.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that immobilized yeast cell cultures have commercial potential for fuel ethanol production. In this study the suitability of strains of Z. mobilis for whole cell immobilization was investigated. Experiments revealed that immobilization in Ca-alginate or K-carrageenan gel or use of flocculating strains was effective for ethanol production at relatively high productivities. Two laboratory size reactors were designed and constructed. These were a compartmented multiple discshaft column and a tower fermentor. Results of this work supported other studies that established that growth and fermentation could be uncoupled. The data indicated that specific metabolic rates were dependent on the nature of the fermentation media. The addition of lactobacilli to Z. mobilis continuous fermentations had only a transient effect, and was unlikely to affect an immobilized Z. mobilis process. With 150 gl/sup -1/ glucose media and a Z. mobilis ZM4 immobilized cell reactor, a maximum volumetric ethanol productivity of 55 gl/sup -1/h/sup -1/ was obtained. The fermentation of sucrose media or sucrose-based raw materials (molasses, cane juice, synthetic mill liquor) by immobilized Z. mobilis ZM4 revealed a pattern of rapid sucrose hydrolysis, preferential glucose utilization and the conversion of fructose to the undesirable by-products levan and sorbitol.

  3. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, B. van

    2004-01-01

    Background. Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an a

  4. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: Towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.; Krul, C.A.M.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, van B.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived

  5. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Krul, C.A.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived

  6. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: Towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.; Krul, C.A.M.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, van B.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived fr

  7. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Krul, C.A.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived fr

  8. Enhancement of thermoalkaliphilic xylanase production by Pichia pastoris through novel fed-batch strategy in high cell-density fermentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shang, Tingting; Si, Dayong; Zhang, Dongyan; Liu, Xuhui; Zhao, Longmei; Hu, Cong; Fu, Yu; Zhang, Rijun

    2017-01-01

    .... This study aims to enhance thermoalkaliphilic xylanase production in Pichia pastoris through fermentation parameters optimization and novel efficient fed-batch strategy in high cell-density fermentation...

  9. Colon cancer stem cells: promise of targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro, Matilde; Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2010-06-01

    First developed for hematologic disorders, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) was expanded to solid tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The traditional model of colon carcinogenesis includes several steps that occur via mutational activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Intestinal epithelial cells exist for a shorter amount of time than that required to accumulate tumor-inducing genetic changes, so researchers have investigated the concept that CRC arises from the long-lived stem cells, rather than from the differentiated epithelial cells. Colon CSCs were originally identified through the expression of the CD133 glycoprotein using an antibody directed to its epitope AC133. It is not clear if CD133 is a marker of colon CSCs-other cell surface markers, such as epithelial-specific antigen, CD44, CD166, Musashi-1, CD29, CD24, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, have been proposed. In addition to initiating and sustaining tumor growth, CSCs are believed to mediate cancer relapse after chemotherapy. How can we identify and analyze colon CSCs and what agents are being designed to kill this chemotherapy-refractory population?

  10. Therapeutic implications of colon cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eros; Fabrizi; Simona; di; Martino; Federica; Pelacchi; Lucia; Ricci-Vitiani

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in many industrialized countries and is characterized by a heterogenic pool of cells with distinct differentiation patterns. Recently, the concept that cancer might arise from a rare population of cells with stem cell-like properties has received support with regard to several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, cancer can be considered a disease in which mutations either convert no...

  11. Liver X receptor ligand cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells and not in normal colon epithelial cells depends on LXRβ subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtaut, Flavie; Derangère, Valentin; Chevriaux, Angélique; Ladoire, Sylvain; Cotte, Alexia K; Arnould, Laurent; Boidot, Romain; Rialland, Mickaël; Ghiringhelli, François; Rébé, Cédric

    2015-09-29

    Increasing evidence indicates that Liver X Receptors (LXRs) have some anticancer properties. We recently demonstrated that LXR ligands induce colon cancer cell pyroptosis through an LXRβ-dependent pathway. In the present study, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines presented differential cytoplasmic localizations of LXRβ. This localization correlated with caspase-1 activation and cell death induction under treatment with LXR ligand. The association of LXRβ with the truncated form of RXRα (t-RXRα) was responsible for the sequestration of LXRβ in the cytoplasm in colon cancer cells. Moreover t-RXRα was not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. These cells presented a predominantly nuclear localization of LXRβ and were resistant to LXR ligand cytotoxicity. Our results showed that predominant cytoplasmic localization of LXRβ, which occurs in colon cancer cells but not in normal colon epithelial cells, allowed LXR ligand-induced pyroptosis. This study strengthens the hypothesis that LXRβ could be a promising target in cancer therapy.

  12. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  13. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in four colonic adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, S R; Wilkinson, J; Broitman, S A

    1995-12-01

    Colon tumor cells, unlike normal human fibroblasts, exhibited an uncoupling of low density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol from cellular growth, when endogenous cholesterol synthesis was inhibited by mevinolin, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoAR) competitive inhibitor [Fabricant, M., and Broitman, S.A. (1990) Cancer Res. 50, 632-636]. Further evaluation of cholesterol metabolism was conducted in two undifferentiated (SW480, SW1417) and two differentiated (HT29, CACO2) colonic adenocarcinoma (adeno-CA) cell lines and an untransformed human fibroblast, AG1519A. Cells grown in monolayer culture to near subconfluency were used to assess endogenous cholesterol synthesis by 14C-acetate incorporation, in response to the following treatments in lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS)-supplemented minimum essential medium (MEM): LPDS alone, LDL, mevinolin, mevinolin with LDL, and 25-hydroxy-cholesterol (25-OH-CH). Complete fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented MEM was used as control. All colon tumor lines exhibited similarly high endogenous cholesterol synthesis in both FBS and LPDS relative to the fibroblasts which demonstrated low basal levels in FBS and maximal synthesis in LPDS. LDL treatment did not inhibit cholesterol synthesis in colon tumor cells, but suppressed that in the fibroblast by 70%. Sterol repression of cholesterol synthesis mediated by 25-OH-CH occurred in all cells. Mevinolin caused a reduction in cholesterol synthesis in the colonic cancer cell lines, which was not further decreased by concurrent addition of LDL. In contrast, in mevinolin-treated fibroblasts, LDL further inhibited cholesterol synthesis. When the effect of cell density on cholesterol synthesis regulation was evaluated under conditions of sparse density in SW480 and SW147, results indicated that (i) basal rates of cholesterol synthesis were higher, (ii) LDL inhibited cholesterol synthesis more effectively, and (iii) mevinolin or 25-OH-CH had a more pronounced effect than in

  14. Low serum levels of short-chain fatty acids after lactulose ingestion may indicate impaired colonic fermentation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undseth R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ragnhild Undseth,1 Greta Jakobsdottir,2 Margareta Nyman,2 Arnold Berstad,3 Jørgen Valeur3 1Department of Radiology, Lovisenberg Diaconal Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 2Food for Health Science Centre, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 3Unger-Vetlesen Institute, Lovisenberg Diaconal Hospital, Oslo, Norway Background: Ingestion of low-digestible carbohydrates triggers symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. These carbohydrates become substrates for microbial fermentation in the colon, yielding short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs that are readily absorbed. Aiming to compare colonic fermentation in patients with IBS and healthy controls, we analyzed the concentrations of SCFA in serum at fasting and 90 minutes following ingestion of an unabsorbable, but fermentable carbohydrate, lactulose. Methods: Patients with IBS according to Rome III criteria (n=22 and healthy controls (n=20 ingested 10 g lactulose dissolved in water. Symptoms were graded by questionnaires and SCFA were analyzed using hollow fiber-supported liquid membrane extraction coupled with gas chromatography. Results: Lactulose induced more symptoms in patients with IBS than in healthy controls (P=0.0001. Fasting serum levels of SCFA did not differ between patients with IBS and controls. However, the postprandial levels of total SCFA (P=0.0002, acetic acid (P=0.005, propionic acid (P=0.0001, and butyric acid (P=0.01 were significantly lower in patients with IBS compared with healthy controls. There was no correlation between the levels of serum SCFA and symptom severity. Conclusion: Low-serum levels of SCFA after lactulose ingestion may indicate impaired colonic fermentation in patients with IBS. Conceivably, this disturbance is related to symptom generation, but the mechanism is not clear. Keywords: fermentation, FODMAP, irritable bowel syndrome, microbiota, short-chain fatty acids 

  15. Diffusion-driven proton exchange membrane fuel cell for converting fermenting biomass to electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malati, P; Mehrotra, P; Minoofar, P; Mackie, D M; Sumner, J J; Ganguli, R

    2015-10-01

    A membrane-integrated proton exchange membrane fuel cell that enables in situ fermentation of sugar to ethanol, diffusion-driven separation of ethanol, and its catalytic oxidation in a single continuous process is reported. The fuel cell consists of a fermentation chamber coupled to a direct ethanol fuel cell. The anode and fermentation chambers are separated by a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane. Ethanol generated from fermented biomass in the fermentation chamber diffuses through the RO membrane into a glucose solution contained in the DEFC anode chamber. The glucose solution is osmotically neutral to the biomass solution in the fermentation chamber preventing the anode chamber from drying out. The fuel cell sustains >1.3 mW cm(-2) at 47°C with high discharge capacity. No separate purification or dilution is necessary, resulting in an efficient and portable system for direct conversion of fermenting biomass to electricity.

  16. Cell Selection as Driving Force in Lung and Colon Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schöllnberger, Helmut; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Hoogenveen, Rudolf; Vineis, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is the result of mutations and subsequent clonal expansions of mutated, selectively advantageous cells. To investigate the relative contributions of mutation versus cell selection in tumorigenesis, we compared two mathematical models of carcinogenesis in two different cancer types: lung and colon. One approach is based on a population genetics model, the Wright-Fisher process, whereas the other approach is the two-stage clonal expansion model. We compared the dynamics of tumori...

  17. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212.

  18. Grape compounds suppress colon cancer stem cells in vitro and in a rodent model of colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddivari, Lavanya; Charepalli, Venkata; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Elias, Ryan J; Lambert, Joshua D; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2016-08-09

    We have previously shown that the grape bioactive compound resveratrol (RSV) potentiates grape seed extract (GSE)-induced colon cancer cell apoptosis at physiologically relevant concentrations. However, RSV-GSE combination efficacy against colon cancer stem cells (CSCs), which play a key role in chemotherapy and radiation resistance, is not known. We tested the anti-cancer efficacy of the RSV-GSE against colon CSCs using isolated human colon CSCs in vitro and an azoxymethane-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis in vivo. RSV-GSE suppressed tumor incidence similar to sulindac, without any gastrointestinal toxicity. Additionally, RSV-GSE treatment reduced the number of crypts containing cells with nuclear β-catenin (an indicator of colon CSCs) via induction of apoptosis. In vitro, RSV-GSE suppressed - proliferation, sphere formation, nuclear translocation of β-catenin (a critical regulator of CSC proliferation) similar to sulindac in isolated human colon CSCs. RSV-GSE, but not sulindac, suppressed downstream protein levels of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, c-Myc and cyclin D1. RSV-GSE also induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in colon CSCs characterized by elevated p53, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved PARP. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated knockdown of p53, a tumor suppressor gene, in colon CSCs did not alter efficacy of RSV-GSE. The suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and elevated mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in colon CSCs support potential clinical testing/application of grape bioactives for colon cancer prevention and/or therapy.

  19. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas with Colon Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Asayama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas with colon involvement that was difficult to distinguish from primary colon cancer. A 60-year-old man was admitted with a 1-month history of diarrhea. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT revealed a large tumor (10.6×11.6 cm at the splenic flexure of the colon. Colonoscopy showed completely round ulcerative lesions, and biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Left hemicolectomy, resection of the jejunum and pancreas body and tail, and splenectomy were performed based on a diagnosis of descending colon cancer (cT4N0M0, stage IIB, and surgery was considered to be curative. Diagnosis was subsequently confirmed as moderately differentiated acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas by immunohistochemical staining (pT3N0M0, stage IIA. Multiple liver metastases with portal thrombosis were found 8 weeks postoperatively. Despite combination chemotherapy with oral S-1 and gemcitabine, the patient died of hepatic failure with no effect of chemotherapy 14 weeks postoperatively. Correct diagnosis was difficult to determine preoperatively from the clinical, CT, and colonoscopy findings. Moreover, the disease was extremely aggressive even after curative resection. Physicians should consider pancreatic cancer in the differential diagnosis of similar cases.

  20. Cytolytic replication of echoviruses in colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullberg Maria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, killing nearly 50% of patients afflicted. Though progress is being made within surgery and other complementary treatments, there is still need for new and more effective treatments. Oncolytic virotherapy, meaning that a cancer is cured by viral infection, is a promising field for finding new and improved treatments. We have investigated the oncolytic potential of several low-pathogenic echoviruses with rare clinical occurrence. Echoviruses are members of the enterovirus genus within the family Picornaviridae. Methods Six colon cancer cell lines (CaCo-2, HT29, LoVo, SW480, SW620 and T84 were infected by the human enterovirus B species echovirus 12, 15, 17, 26 and 29, and cytopathic effects as well as viral replication efficacy were investigated. Infectivity was also tested in spheroids grown from HT29 cells. Results Echovirus 12, 17, 26 and 29 replicated efficiently in almost all cell lines and were considered highly cytolytic. The infectivity of these four viruses was further evaluated in artificial tumors (spheroids, where it was found that echovirus 12, 17 and 26 easily infected the spheroids. Conclusions We have found that echovirus 12, 17 and 26 have potential as oncolytic agents against colon cancer, by comparing the cytolytic capacity of five low-pathogenic echoviruses in six colon cancer cell lines and in artificial tumors.

  1. Fermentable fiber ameliorates fermentable protein-induced changes in microbial ecology, but not the mucosal response, in the colon of piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, R.; Kroger, S.; Richter, J.F.; Wang, J.; Martin, L.; Bindelle, J.; Htoo, J.K.; Smolinski, D. von; Vahjen, W.; Zentek, J.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) is reported to reduce large intestinal formation of putatively toxic metabolites derived from fermentable proteins (fCP). However, the influence of diets high in fCP concentration on epithelial response and interaction with fCHO is still unclear.

  2. Down-regulation of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) gene expression in the colon of piglets is linked to bacterial protein fermentation and pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villodre Tudela, Carmen; Boudry, Christelle; Stumpff, Friederike; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Vahjen, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen; Pieper, Robert

    2015-02-28

    The present study investigated the influence of bacterial metabolites on monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expression in pigs using in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro approaches. Piglets (n 24) were fed high-protein (26 %) or low-protein (18 %) diets with or without fermentable carbohydrates. Colonic digesta samples were analysed for a broad range of bacterial metabolites. The expression of MCT1, TNF-α, interferon γ (IFN-γ) and IL-8 was determined in colonic tissue. The expression of MCT1 was lower and of TNF-α and IL-8 was higher with high-protein diets (P< 0·05). MCT1 expression was positively correlated with l-lactate, whereas negatively correlated with NH₃ and putrescine (P< 0·05). The expression of IL-8 and TNF-α was negatively correlated with l-lactate and positively correlated with NH₃ and putrescine, whereas the expression of IFN-γ was positively correlated with histamine and 4-ethylphenol (P< 0·05). Subsequently, porcine colonic tissue and Caco-2 cells were incubated with Na-butyrate, NH₄Cl or TNF-α as selected bacterial metabolites or mediators of inflammation. Colonic MCT1 expression was higher after incubation with Na-butyrate (P< 0·05) and lower after incubation with NH₄Cl or TNF-α (P< 0·05). Incubation of Caco-2 cells with increasing concentrations of these metabolites confirmed the up-regulation of MCT1 expression by Na-butyrate (linear, P< 0·05) and down-regulation by TNF-α and NH₄Cl (linear, P< 0·05). The high-protein diet decreased the expression of MCT1 in the colon of pigs, which appears to be linked to NH₃- and TNF-α-mediated signalling.

  3. Diets high in fermentable protein and fibre alter tight junction protein composition with minor effects on barrier function in piglet colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jan F; Pieper, Robert; Zakrzewski, Silke S; Günzel, Dorothee; Schulzke, Joerg D; Van Kessel, Andrew G

    2014-03-28

    Protein fermentation end products may damage the colonic mucosa, which could be counteracted by dietary inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO). Although fermentable crude protein (fCP) and fCHO are known to affect microbial ecology, their interactive effects on epithelial barrier function are unknown. In the present study, in a 2 × 2 factorial experiment, thirty-two weaned piglets were fed low-fCP/low-fCHO (14·5 % crude protein (CP)/14·5 % total dietary fibre (TDF)), low-fCP/high-fCHO (14·8 % CP/16·6 % TDF), high-fCP/low-fCHO (19·8 % CP/14·5 % TDF) and high-fCP/high-fCHO (20·1 % CP/18·0 % TDF) diets. After 21-23 d, samples of proximal and distal colonic mucosae were investigated in Ussing chambers with respect to the paracellular and transcytotic passages of macromolecules and epithelial ion transport. The high-fCHO diets were found to reduce the permeability of the distal colon to the transcytotic marker horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa; P ion transport), transepithelial resistance (barrier function) and charge selectivity were largely unaffected in both the segments. However, the high-fCP diets were found to suppress the aldosterone-induced epithelial Na channel activity (P composition in a compensatory way, so that colonic transport and barrier properties were only marginally affected.

  4. Adipokine regulation of colon cancer: adiponectin attenuates interleukin-6-induced colon carcinoma cell proliferation via STAT-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Jenifer I; Birmingham, Janette M

    2010-07-01

    Obesity results in increased circulating levels of specific adipokines, which are associated with colon cancer risk. The disease state is associated with increased leptin, insulin, IGF-1, and IL-6. Conversely, adiponectin levels are decreased in obese individuals. Previously, we demonstrated adipokine-enhanced cell proliferation in preneoplastic, but not normal, colon epithelial cells, demonstrating a differential effect of adipokines on colon cancer progression in vitro. Using a model of late stage carcinoma cancer cell, namely murine MC-38 colon carcinoma cells, we compared the effect of obesity-associated adipokines (leptin, insulin, IGF-1, and IL-6) on MC-38 cell proliferation and determined whether adiponectin (full length or globular) could modulate adipokine-induced cell proliferation. We show that insulin and IL-6, but not leptin and IGF-1, induce proliferation in MC-38 cells. Adiponectin treatment of MC-38 cells did not inhibit insulin-induced cell proliferation but did inhibit IL-6-induced cell proliferation by decreasing STAT-3 phosphorylation and activation. Nitric oxide (NO) production was increased in MC-38 cells treated with IL-6; co-treatment with adiponectin blocked IL-6-induced iNOS and subsequent NO production. These data are compared to previously reported findings from our laboratory using the YAMC (model normal colon epithelial cells) and IMCE (model preneoplastic) cells. The cell lines are utilized to construct a model summarizing the hormonal consequences of obesity and the impact on the differential regulation of colon epithelial cells along the continuum to carcinoma. These data, taken together, highlight mechanisms involved in obesity-associated cancers and may lead to potential-targeted therapies.

  5. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the colon: A case report and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koichi Soga; Ken-Ichi Mukaisho; Takanori Hattori; Hideyuki Konishi; Natsuko Tatsumi; Chika Konishi; Keimei Nakano; Naold Wakabayashi; Shoji Mitsufuji; Keisho Kataoka; Takeshi Okanoue

    2008-01-01

    A primary clear cell adenocarcinoma of the colon is arare oncologic entity.We herein report a case of such atumor of the sigmoid colon in a 71-year-old woman whowas successfully treated by an endoscopic polypecLomy in our hospital.We also reviewed the published reports regarding cases of primary clear cell tumors in the colon.

  6. c-Myb is required for progenitor cell homeostasis in colonic crypts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malaterre, J.; Carpinelli, M.; Ernst, M.; Alexander, W.; Cooke, M.; Sutton, S.; Dworkin, S.; Heakth, J.K.; Frampton, J.; McArthur, G.; Clevers, J.C.; Hilton, D.; Mantamadiotis, Th.; Ramsay, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    The colonic crypt is the functional unit of the colon mucosa with a central role in ion and water reabsorption. Under steady-state conditions, the distal colonic crypt harbors a single stem cell at its base that gives rise to highly proliferative progenitor cells that differentiate into columnar, go

  7. SRPK2 promotes the growth and migration of the colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Hai-Feng; Shen, Wei; Xu, Dong-Yan; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Tao, Guo-Qing; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the world. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying this malignancy will facilitate the diagnosis and treatment. Serine-arginine protein kinase 2 (SRPK2) has been reported to be upregulated in several cancer types. However, its expression and functions in colon cancer remains unknown. In this study, it was found that the expression of SRPK2 was up-regulated in the clinical colon cancer samples. Overexpression of SRPK2 promoted the growth and migration of colon cancer cells, while knocking down the expression of SRPK2 inhibited the growth, migration and tumorigenecity of colon cancer cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that SRPK2 activated ERK signaling in colon cancer cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the tumor promoting roles of SRPK2 in colon cancer cells and SRPK2 might be a promising therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  8. Effect of NS-398 on colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qing Jia; Ning Zhong; Li-Hui Han; Jing-Hua Wang; Ming Yan; Fan-Li Meng; Shang-Zhong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of NS-398, a selective cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) inhibitor, on invasion of colon cancer cell line HT-29 in vitro and to explore its mechanisms.METHODS: Invasive behaviors of the malignant colon cancer cell line HT-29 were investigated in this study.Expressions of COX-2 and CD44v6 in HT-29 cells were detected by flow cytometry. Cellular survival rate was determined by MTT assay. The invasive capacity was quantified by a modified Boyden chamber model. Alterations of cytoskeleton component F-actin were observed by confocal laser scanning microscope.RESULTS: Flow cytometry analysis showed that COX-2was highly expressed in HT-29 cells. The invasive capability of HT-29 cells could be greatly inhibited by NS-398 at the experimental concentrations of 0.1, 1.0 and 10 μmol/L with an inhibitory rate of 22.74%, 42.35% and 58.61% (P<0.01),respectively. MTT assay showed that NS-398 at the experimental concentrations had no significant influence on cellular viability, indicating that such anti-invasive effects had no relationship with cytotoxicity. F-actin was mainly distributed around nuclei forming annular structure in HT-29cells. After exposure to NS-398 of 10 μmol/L, the annular structure around nuclei disappeared and the fluorescence intensity of F-actin decreased obviously. Treatment with NS-398 could down-regulate the expression of CD44v6 as well.CONCLUSION: NS-398 has anti-invasive effects on colon cancer HT-29 cells in vitro, which may be mediated by a novel mechanism of disruption of cytoskeleton. Downregulation of CD44v6 expression may be related to alterations of cytoskeleton.

  9. Cloning and expression of human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang-Quan Chen; Shao-Heng He

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and express the human colon mast cell METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from colon tissue, and the cDNA encoding human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase was amplified by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The product cDNA was subcloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pMAL-c2x and eukaryotic expression vector pPIC9K to conrtruct prokaryotic expression vector pMAL/human MC-CP (hMC-CP) and eukaryotic pPIC9K/hMC-CP. The recombinant fusion protein expressed in E.coli was induced with IPTG and purified by amylose affinity chromatography. After digestion with factor Xa, recombinant hMC-CP was purified by heparin agarose chromatography. The recombinant hMC-CP expressed in Pichia pastoris (P.pastoris) was induced with methanol and analyzed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot, N-terminal amino acid RESULTS: The cDNA encoding the human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase was cloned, which had five nucleotide variations compared with skin MC-CP cDNA. The recombinant hMC-CP protein expressed in E.coli was purified with amylose affinity chromatography and heparin agarose chromatogphy.SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant protein expressed by E. coli had a molecular weight of 36 kDa and reacted to the anti-native hMC-CP monoclonal antibody (CA5). The N-terminal amino acid sequence confirmed further the product was hMC-CP. E. coli generated hMC-CP showed a very low level of enzymatic activity, but P. pastoris produced hMC-CP had a relatively high enzymatic activity towards a synthetic substrate hippuryl-L-phenylalanine.carboxypeptidase can be successfully cloned and expressed in E.coli and P. pastoris, which will contribute greatly to the fonctional study on hMC-CP.

  10. Design and Investigation of PolyFermS In Vitro Continuous Fermentation Models Inoculated with Immobilized Fecal Microbiota Mimicking the Elderly Colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlbaum, Sophie; Chassard, Christophe; Haug, Martina C; Fourmestraux, Candice; Derrien, Muriel; Lacroix, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In vitro gut modeling is a useful approach to investigate some factors and mechanisms of the gut microbiota independent of the effects of the host. This study tested the use of immobilized fecal microbiota to develop different designs of continuous colonic fermentation models mimicking elderly gut fermentation. Model 1 was a three-stage fermentation mimicking the proximal, transverse and distal colon. Models 2 and 3 were based on the new PolyFermS platform composed of an inoculum reactor seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota and used to continuously inoculate with the same microbiota different second-stage reactors mounted in parallel. The main gut bacterial groups, microbial diversity and metabolite production were monitored in effluents of all reactors using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing, and HPLC, respectively. In all models, a diverse microbiota resembling the one tested in donor's fecal sample was established. Metabolic stability in inoculum reactors seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota was shown for operation times of up to 80 days. A high microbial and metabolic reproducibility was demonstrated for downstream control and experimental reactors of a PolyFermS model. The PolyFermS models tested here are particularly suited to investigate the effects of environmental factors, such as diet and drugs, in a controlled setting with the same microbiota source.

  11. Multiple Effects of Berberine Derivatives on Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Guamán Ortiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological use of the plant alkaloid berberine is based on its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; recently, anticancer activity has been attributed to this compound. To exploit this interesting feature, we synthesized three berberine derivatives, namely, NAX012, NAX014, and NAX018, and we tested their effects on two human colon carcinoma cell lines, that is, HCT116 and SW613-B3, which are characterized by wt and mutated p53, respectively. We observed that cell proliferation is more affected by cell treatment with the derivatives than with the lead compound; moreover, the derivatives proved to induce cell cycle arrest and cell death through apoptosis, thus suggesting that they could be promising anticancer drugs. Finally, we detected typical signs of autophagy in cells treated with berberine derivatives.

  12. High cell density fed-batch fermentations for lipase production: feeding strategies and oxygen transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehmin, M N I; Annuar, M S M; Chisti, Y

    2013-11-01

    This review is focused on the production of microbial lipases by high cell density fermentation. Lipases are among the most widely used of the enzyme catalysts. Although lipases are produced by animals and plants, industrial lipases are sourced almost exclusively from microorganisms. Many of the commercial lipases are produced using recombinant species. Microbial lipases are mostly produced by batch and fed-batch fermentation. Lipases are generally secreted by the cell into the extracellular environment. Thus, a crude preparation of lipases can be obtained by removing the microbial cells from the fermentation broth. This crude cell-free broth may be further concentrated and used as is, or lipases may be purified from it to various levels. For many large volume applications, lipases must be produced at extremely low cost. High cell density fermentation is a promising method for low-cost production: it allows a high concentration of the biomass and the enzyme to be attained rapidly and this eases the downstream recovery of the enzyme. High density fermentation enhances enzyme productivity compared with the traditional submerged culture batch fermentation. In production of enzymes, a high cell density is generally achieved through fed-batch operation, not through perfusion culture which is cumbersome. The feeding strategies used in fed-batch fermentations for producing lipases and the implications of these strategies are discussed. Most lipase-producing microbial fermentations require oxygen. Oxygen transfer in such fermentations is discussed.

  13. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment activates survival signaling in nontumorigenic NCM460 colon cells but apoptotic signaling in tumorigenic HCT116 colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Trujillo, Olivia N; Moyer, Mary P; Botnen, James H

    2011-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring chemopreventive agent; the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon cancer and normal cells. In this study, we demonstrated that SFN (15 μmol/L) exposure (72 h) inhibited cell proliferation by up to 95% in colon cancer cells (HCT116) and by 52% in normal colon mucosa-derived (NCM460) cells. Our data also showed that SFN exposure (5 and 10 μmol/L) led to the reduction of G1 phase cell distribution and an induction of apoptosis in HCT116 cells, but to a much lesser extent in NCM460 cells. Furthermore, the examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling status revealed that SFN upregulated the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in NCM460 cells but not in HCT116 cells. In contrast, SFN enhanced the phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and decreased cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) expression in HCT116 cells but not NCM460 cells. Taken together, the activation of survival signaling in NCM460 cells and apoptotic signaling in HCT116 cells may play a critical role in SFN's stronger potential of inhibiting cell proliferation in colon cancer cells than in normal colon cells.

  14. Crohn's disease: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in colonic myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri J; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), remains unclear. Ultrastructural alterations in ICC in the colonic myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) have been reported previously in UC, but descriptions of ICC...... were dilated and appeared to be empty. Lipid droplets and lipofuscin-bodies were prominent in glial cells and neurons. ICC-MP were scanty but, as in controls, had caveolae, prominent intermediate filaments, cytoplasmic dense bodies, and membrane-associated dense bands with a patchy basal lamina. ICC...

  15. Radiosensitivity of human colon cancer cell enhanced by immunoliposomal docetaxel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Wei Wang; Hui-Lan Lü; Chang-Cheng Song; Hong Liu; Cong-Gao Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To enhance the radiosensitivity of human colon cancer cells by docetaxel.METHODS: Immunoliposomal docetaxel was prepared by coupling monodonal antibody against carcinoembryonic antigen to cyanuric chloride at the PEG terminus of liposome. LoVo adenocarcinoma cell line was treated with immunoliposomal docetaxel or/and irradiation. MTT colorimetric assay was used to estimate cytotoxicity of immunoliposomal docetaxel and radiotoxicity. Cell cycle redistribution and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry. Survivin expression in LoVo cells was verified by immunohistochemistry. D801 morphologic analysis system was used to semi-quantify immunohistochemical staining of survivin.RESULTS: Cytotoxicity was induced by immunoliposomal docetaxel alone in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoliposomal docetaxel yielded a cytotoxicity effect at a low dose of 2 nmol/L. With a single dose irradiation, the relative surviving fraction of LoVo cells showed a dosedependent response, but there were no significant changes as radiation delivered from 4 to 8 Gy. Compared with liposomal docetaxel or single dose irradiation,strongly radiopotentiating effects of immunoliposomal docetaxel on LoVo cells were observed. A low dose of immunoliposomal docetaxel could yield sufficient radiosensitivity. Immunoliposomal docetaxel were achieved both specificity of the conjugated antibody and drug radiosensitization. Combined with radiation,immunoliposomal docetaxel significantly increased the percentage of G2/M cells and induced apoptosis, but significantly decreased the percentage of cells in G2/G1 and S phase by comparison with liposomal docetaxel.Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the brown stained survivin was mainly in cytoplasm of LoVo cells.Semi-quantitative analysis of the survivin immunostaining showed that the expression of survivin in LoVo cells under irradiation with immunoliposomal docetaxel was significantly decreased.CONCLUSION: Immunoliposomal docetaxel is strongly effective

  16. Proteome of human colon cancer stem cells: A comparative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zou; Xiao-Feng Yu; Zhi-Jun Bao; Jie Dong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify the biological characteristics of human colon cancer stem cells (SW1116 cells) and further study their proteome. METHODS: SW1116 cells were isolated and cultured with a serum-free medium (SFM). Sphere formation was assayed to observe the formation of colon cancer stem cell spheres. SW1116 cells were inoculated into a serum-containing medium for observing their differentiation characteristics. Proliferation curve and cross-resistance of SW1116 cells to different drugs were detected by MTT. Percentage of SP cells in SW1116 cells was detected with Hoechst33342 staining. Telomerase activity in SW1116cells was checked by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Expressions of stem cell relevant genes and proteins were detected by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Total protein was isolated from SW1116 cells by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and differentially expressed proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). RESULTS: The isolated SW1116 cells presented as spheroid and suspension growths in SFM with a strong self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation and drug-resistance ability. The percentage of SP cells in SW1116 cells was 38.9%. The SW1116 cells co-expressed the CD133 and CD29 proteins. The telomerase activity in SW1116 cells was increased. The expressions of different stem cell relevant genes and proteins were detected. The proteomic analysis showed that the 26 protein spots were differently expressed in SW1116 cells and 10 protein spots were identified as ubiquitin fusiondegradation 1-like protein, nuclear chloride channel protein, tubulin b, Raichu404X, stratifin, F-actin capping protein a-1 subunit, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 delta isoform 2, hypothetical protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and guanine nucleotide binding protein b polypeptide 2-like 1, respectively. CONCLUSION: SW1116 cells are biologically

  17. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Stimulate Angiopoietin-Like 4 Synthesis in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells by Activating Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alex, Sheril; Lange, Katja; Amolo, Tom

    2013-01-01

    -chain fatty acids (SCFA). SCFA induce ANGPTL4 by activating the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), as demonstrated using PPARγ antagonist, PPARγ knockdown, and transactivation assays, which show activation of PPARγ but not PPARα and PPARδ by SCFA. At concentrations required...... for PPARγ activation and ANGPTL4 induction in colon adenocarcinoma cells, SCFA do not stimulate PPARγ in mouse 3T3-L1 and human SGBS adipocytes, suggesting that SCFA act as selective PPARγ modulators (SPPARM), which is supported by coactivator peptide recruitment assay and structural modeling. Consistent...... with the notion that fermentation leads to PPAR activation in vivo, feeding mice a diet rich in inulin induced PPAR target genes and pathways in the colon. We conclude that (i) SCFA potently stimulate ANGPTL4 synthesis in human colon adenocarcinoma cells and (ii) SCFA transactivate and bind to PPARγ. Our data...

  18. Coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by application of microbial fuel cell technology to vinegar fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Takanori; Nara, Youhei; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-08-01

    The coproduction of a useful material and electricity via a novel application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology to oxidative fermentation was investigated. We focused on vinegar production, i.e., acetic acid fermentation, as an initial and model useful material that can be produced by oxidative fermentation in combination with MFC technology. The coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by applying MFC technology was successfully demonstrated by the simultaneous progress of acetic acid fermentation and electricity generation through a series of repeated batch fermentations. Although the production rate of acetic acid was very small, it increased with the number of repeated batch fermentations that were conducted. We obtained nearly identical (73.1%) or larger (89.9%) acetic acid yields than that typically achieved by aerated fermentation (75.8%). The open-cycle voltages measured before and after fermentation increased with the total fermentation time and reached a maximum value of 0.521 V prior to the third batch fermentation. The maximum current and power densities measured in this study (19.1 μA/cm² and 2.47 μW/cm², respectively) were obtained after the second batch fermentation.

  19. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Nout, M.J.R.; Beumer, R.R.; Meulen, van der J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and

  20. Fermented red ginseng extract inhibits cancer cell proliferation and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jisun; Jeon, Seong Bin; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Hyeji; Kim, Ju; Kwon, Bo Ra; Yu, Kang-Yeol; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Hwang, Seung-Mi; Choi, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Yong-Seob

    2015-04-01

    Red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is the most widely recognized medicinal herb due to its remedial effects in various disorders, such as cancers, diabetes, and heart problems. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of fermented red ginseng extract (f-RGE; provided by Jeonju Biomaterials Institute, Jeonju, South Korea) in a parallel comparison with the effect of nonfermented red ginseng extract (nf-RGE; control) on several cancer cell lines--MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and reprogrammed MCF-7 cells (mimicking cancer stem cells). Cells were cultured at various concentrations of RGE (from 0.5 up to 5 mg/mL) and their viabilities and proliferative properties were examined. Our data demonstrate the following: (1) nf-RGE inhibited cell viability at ≥1 mg/mL for MCF-7 cells and ≥2 mg/mL for HepG2 cells, (2) in the presence of a carcinogenic agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), nf-RGE treatment in combination with paclitaxel synergistically decreased MCF-7 as well as HepG2 cell viability, (3) f-RGE (which contained a greater level of Rg3 content) more effectively decreased the viability of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to nf-RGE, and (4) f-RGE appeared more potent for inhibiting cancerous differentiation of reprogrammed MCF-7 cells in a synergistic fashion with paclitaxel, especially in the presence of TPA, compared to nf-RGE. These findings suggest that f-RGE treatment may be more effective for decreasing cancer cell survival by inducing apoptotic cell death and also presumably for preventing cancer stem cell differentiation compared to nf-RGE.

  1. Fermentable carbohydrates elevate plasma enteroglucagon but high viscosity is also necessary to stimulate small bowel mucosal cell proliferation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, J M; Lee-Finglas, W; Wortley, G W; Johnson, I T

    1996-02-01

    Enteroglucagon is a collective term for a small family of peptides derived from proglucagon by post-translational processing in the L-cells of the distal small intestine and colon. There is evidence that it inhibits gastric secretion, and high levels of enteroglucagon occur in plasma during intestinal adaptation, which suggests that it may also function as a trophic factor for the intestine. Certain types of soluble non-starch polysaccharide (dietary fiber) stimulate the release of enteroglucagon in rats but the mechanism is unknown. In this study we explored the importance of the viscosity and fermentability of nonabsorbed carbohydrates as determinants of plasma enteroglucagon and mucosal cell proliferation in the distal ileum of rats. Replacement of cellulose (10 g/kg) with guar gum in a semisynthetic diet led to a prompt and sustained rise in plasma enteroglucagon concentrations. Our initial hypothesis that this was a consequence of delayed nutrient absorption was disproven by the fact that hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), a viscous but nonfermentable polysaccharide, had no effect on plasma enteroglucagon under the same conditions. In contrast, the nondigestible disaccharide lactitol led to a prolonged rise in plasma enteroglucagon, similar to that observed with guar gum. Lactitol is nonviscous, but highly fermentable, and we conclude that fermentable carbohydrate is an important stimulus for the release of enteroglucagon under our experimental conditions. There was no evidence that enteroglucagon released by this mechanism exerted trophic effects on the distal small intestinal mucosa.

  2. Spatial colonization of microbial cells on the rhizoplane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Xavier; Eickhorst, Thilo; Nunan, Naoise; Kaiser, Christina; Woebken, Dagmar; Schmidt, Hannes

    2017-04-01

    The rhizoplane is the region where the root surface is in contact with soil and corresponds to the inner limit of the rhizosphere. At the rhizoplane level, plants exchange elements with the surrounding soil and the rhizoplane can therefore be considered as the region that drives nutrient movement and transformation in the rhizosphere. The rhizoplane differs in many respects from the bulk soil due to the far larger supply of substrates derived from the roots, with far greater microbial cell densities and reduced levels of diversity (Philippot et al., 2013). This is likely to result in completely different interaction profiles among microorganisms which may affect rhizosphere biogeochemistry. While the diversity of microorganisms associated with the rhizosphere and on the rhizoplane is getting increasing attention, knowledge on the spatial organisation of this diversity is still scarce. We therefore aimed at investigating the spatial arrangement of microbial rhizoplane colonization to increase our understanding of potential interaction dynamics within soil-microbe-plant interfaces. To study the spatial distribution of microbial cells on roots we cultivated rice plants in water-logged paddy soil. Root samples were taken three months after germination. After removing adhering rhizosphere soil the root samples were chemically fixed and prepared for CARD-FISH (Schmidt & Eickhorst, 2014). For hybridization, the oligonucleotide probes EUB I-III (Daims et al., 1999) were applied to cover the majority of bacteria colonizing the rhizoplane. Root segments were then subjected to confocal laser scanning microscopy where triplicate image stacks of 10 µm thickness (0.5 µm layer distance) were acquired per region of interest (ROI). ROIs were defined as distances from the root tip (0, 5, 10, 15 mm) and corresponded to the root tip, elongation zone, and zone of maturation. Image stacks were processed using ImageJ software to extract microbial cells spatial coordinates, as well as

  3. Continuous cytokine exposure of colonic epithelial cells induces DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2005-01-01

    . RESULTS: Continuously stimulated colonic cells had increased ROS production, especially those stimulated with TNF-alpha or IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha (Pproduction could be inhibited by L-NMMA co-incubation, indicating that iNOS is responsible for the up-regulation (P...OBJECTIVE: Chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. As an example ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with a production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including nitrogen monoxide (NO), which is produced in high amounts......-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or both and compared with unstimulated cells or cells stimulated for 48 h. Cells were co-incubated with a selective iNOS inhibitor (N-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA)) in some experiments. Viability was assessed by the dimethylthiazol diphenyl...

  4. Low zinc environment induces stress signaling, senescence and mixed cell death modalities in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Emil; Rudolf, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    Currently it is not clear what type of the final cellular response (i.e. cell death modality or senescence) is induced upon chronic intracellular zinc depletion in colon cancer cells. To address this question, isogenic colon cancer lines SW480 and SW620 exposed to low zinc environment were studied over the period of 6 weeks. Low zinc environment reduced total as well as free intracellular zinc content in both cell lines. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in changes in cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of stress signaling. In addition, colonocytes with low zinc content displayed increased levels of oxidative stress, changes in mitochondrial activity but in the absence of significant DNA damage. Towards the end of treatment (4th-6th week), exposed cells started to change morphologically, and typical markers of senescence as well as cell death appeared. Of two examined colon cancer cell lines, SW480 cells proved to activate predominantly senescent phenotype, with frequent form of demise being necrosis and mixed cell death modality but not apoptosis. Conversely, SW620 cells activated mostly cell death, with relatively equal distribution of apoptosis and mixed types, while senescent phenotypes and necrosis were present only in a small fraction of cell populations. Addition of zinc at the beginning of 4th week of treatment significantly suppressed cell death phenotypes in both cell lines but had no significant effect on senescence. In conclusion, presented results demonstrate variability of responses to chronic zinc depletion in colon cancer as modeled in vitro.

  5. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisoo Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE and its bioactive compounds, including (+-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133+CD44+ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs.

  6. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisoo; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, JaeHwan; Heo, Seung Chul; Lee, Kook Lae; Choi, Sang-Woon; Kim, Yuri

    2016-07-21

    Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs) which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE) and its bioactive compounds, including (+)-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133⁺CD44⁺ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133⁺CD44⁺ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs.

  7. Mitochondria sustain store-operated currents in colon cancer cells but not in normal colonic cells: reversal by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Valero, Ruth A; Muñoz, Eva; Ubierna, Daniel; Moyer, Mary P; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2017-08-15

    Tumor cells undergo a critical remodeling of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis that contribute to important cancer hallmarks. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a Ca(2+) entry pathway modulated by mitochondria, is dramatically enhanced in colon cancer cells. In addition, most cancer cells display the Warburg effect, a metabolic switch from mitochondrial metabolism to glycolysis that provides survival advantages. Accordingly, we investigated mitochondria control of store-operated currents (SOCs) in two cell lines previously selected for representing human normal colonic cells and colon cancer cells. We found that, in normal cells, mitochondria are important for SOCs activity but they are unable to prevent current inactivation. In contrast, in colon cancer cells, mitochondria are dispensable for SOCs activation but are able to prevent the slow, Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of SOCs. This effect is associated to increased ability of tumor cell mitochondria to take up Ca(2+) due to increased mitochondrial potential (ΔΨ) linked to the Warburg effect. Consistently with this view, selected non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) depolarize mitochondria, inhibit mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and promote SOC inactivation, leading to inhibition of both SOCE and cancer cell proliferation. Thus, mitochondria sustain store-operated currents in colon cancer cells but not in normal colonic cells and this effect is counteracted by selected NSAIDs providing a mechanism for cancer chemoprevention.

  8. Radiosensitization effects of sorafenib on colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Mi-Sook; Jung, Won-Gyun; Jeong, Youn Kyoung [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Radiotherapy is a standard therapy in the adjuvant treatment of resected colon and rectum cancers, and its combination with chemotherapy has been shown to reduce local failure and distant metastasis still further, thereby improving the outcome of treatment. One potential chemotherapeutic agent for this, sorafenib (Nexavar, BAY43-9006), is an oral multikinase inhibitor that blocks tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis, and induces tumor cell apoptosis by inhibiting serine/threonine kinases (c-RAF and mutant and wild-type BRAF) as well as the receptor tyrosine kinases vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (VEGFR2 and VEGFR3), platelet- derived growth factor receptor , FLT3, and c-KIT. Sorafenib is currently used in clinics to treat patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and thyroid cancer. These findings provide a molecular evidence base for the use of chemoradiation to treat colon cancer, and in vivo modeling should be used to further assess its suitability for clinical applications.

  9. Adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting as metachronous colonic polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloísio Felipe-Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease characterized by proliferation of Langerhans-type cells that express CD1a, Langerin (CD207 and S100 protein. Birbeck granules are a hallmark by ultrastructural examination. LCH presents with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from solitary lesions of a single site (usually bone or skin to multiple or disseminated multisystemic lesions, which can lead to severe organ dysfunction. Most cases occur in children. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is rare and has been associated with systemic illness and poor prognosis especially in children under the age of 2 years. Adult gastrointestinal LCH is very rare. We report a case of a previously healthy, nonsmoking 48-year-old male who was referred for routine screening colonoscopy. Two sessile, smooth, firm and yellowish LCH polyps measuring 0.2 cm and 0.3 cm were detected in the sigmoid colon. Fifteen months later a second colonoscopy found two histologically confirmed hyperplastic polyps at the sigmoid colon. No other LCH lesions were seen. A third colonoscopy after 28 months of follow-up found a submucosal 0.5 cm infiltrated and ulcerated LCH polyp in the cecum, close to the ostium of the appendix. The patient had been asymptomatic for all this period. Imaging investigation for systemic or multiorgan disease did not find any sign of extracolonic involvement. On histology all lesions showed typical LCH features and immunohistochemical analysis showed strong and diffuse staining for CD1a and CD207. This case illustrates two distinct clinicopathologic features not previously reported in this particular clinical setting: metachronous colonic involvement and positivity for CD207.

  10. Prolonged Sulforaphane Treatment Activates Extracellular-Regulated Kinase 1/2 Signaling in Nontumorigenic Colon Cells but not Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  11. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment activates survival signaling in nontumorigenic NCM460 colon cells but apoptotic signaling in tumorigenic HCT116 colon cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  12. Low-pressure airlift fermenter for single cell protein production: II. Continuous culture of Pichia yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N.Y.; Srinivasan, S.; Leavitt, R.I.; Coty, V.F.; Kondis, E.F.

    1987-03-01

    Experiments using Pichia yeast grown on n-paraffins have been conducted in laboratory 10-l airlift fermenters and in a 640-l module of commercial scale. Results confirmed the design concept with low-pressure air. However, in the absence of mass transport constraints, the build up of toxic factors in the fermenter appeared to a major variable limiting cell productivity. Foaming in the large fermenter also presented a serious problem, which must be solved before low-pressure airlift fermenters become practical. 14 references.

  13. Regulatory T cells with superior immunosuppressive capacity emigrate from the inflamed colon to draining lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Y; Ikebuchi, R; Chtanova, T; Kusumoto, Y; Okuyama, H; Moriya, T; Honda, T; Kabashima, K; Watanabe, T; Sakai, Y; Tomura, M

    2017-08-02

    Foxp3(+) Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of colon homeostasis. Here we utilized photoconvertible KikGR mice to track immune cells from the caecum and ascending (proximal) colon in the steady state and DSS-induced colitis. We found that Tregs from the proximal colon (colonic migratory Tregs) migrated exclusively to the distal part of mesenteric lymph nodes (dMLN) in an S1PR1-dependent process. In the steady state, colonic migratory CD25(+) Tregs expressed higher levels of CD103, ICOS, LAG3 and CTLA-4 in comparison with pre-existing LN Tregs. Intestinal inflammation led to accelerated Treg replacement in the colon, bidirectional Treg migration from the colon to dMLN and vice versa, as well as increases in Treg number, proliferation and expression of immunosuppressive molecules. This was especially apparent for CD25 very high Tregs induced in colitis. Furthermore, colonic migratory Tregs from the inflamed colon included more interleukin (IL)-10 producing cells, and demonstrated greater inhibition of T-cell proliferation in comparison with pre-existing LN Tregs. Thus, our results suggest that Tregs with superior immunosuppressive capacity are increased both in the colon and dMLN upon inflammation. These Tregs recirculate between the colon and dMLN, and are likely to contribute to the downregulation of intestinal inflammation.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 2 August 2017. doi:10.1038/mi.2017.64.

  14. Continuous alcoholic fermentation process: model considering loss of cell viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, S.C.; Paiva, T.C.B.; Visconti, A.E.S. [Departamento de Biotecnologia, Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica de Lorena, P.O. BOX 116, 12600-000, Lorena, SP (Brazil); Giudici, R. [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, P.O. BOX 61548, 05424-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1999-02-04

    The concept of loss of cell viability was introduced into a model previously developed for a continuous alcoholic fermentation process in a tower reactor with recycling of flocculating yeasts. The two models take into account substrate limitation and inhibition phenomena linked to ethanol and biomass. The kinetic parameters were estimated from steady-state data of several sugar concentrations in feeding stream and constant dilution rate, recycle ratio and temperature. Some parameters of the modified model (maximum specific rates) were significantly different from those estimated with the original model while others (inhibition parameters) remained practically unchanged. Both models provided similar predictions and were equally suitable for modelling of the process. (orig.) With 1 fig., 2 tabs., 11 refs.

  15. Detecting cell lysis using viscosity monitoring in E. coli fermentation to prevent product loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Joseph M; Schofield, Desmond; Vlahopoulou, Joanna; Zhou, Yuhong

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring the physical or chemical properties of cell broths to infer cell status is often challenging due to the complex nature of the broth. Key factors indicative of cell status include cell density, cell viability, product leakage, and DNA release to the fermentation broth. The rapid and accurate prediction of cell status for hosts with intracellular protein products can minimise product loss due to leakage at the onset of cell lysis in fermentation. This article reports the rheological examination of an industrially relevant E. coli fermentation producing antibody fragments (Fab'). Viscosity monitoring showed an increase in viscosity during the exponential phase in relation to the cell density increase, a relatively flat profile in the stationary phase, followed by a rapid increase which correlated well with product loss, DNA release and loss of cell viability. This phenomenon was observed over several fermentations that a 25% increase in broth viscosity (using induction-point viscosity as a reference) indicated 10% product loss. Our results suggest that viscosity can accurately detect cell lysis and product leakage in postinduction cell cultures, and can identify cell lysis earlier than several other common fermentation monitoring techniques. This work demonstrates the utility of rapidly monitoring the physical properties of fermentation broths, and that viscosity monitoring has the potential to be a tool for process development to determine the optimal harvest time and minimise product loss. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 32:1069-1076, 2016.

  16. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-19

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer initiation by performing gene set enrichment analysis on gene expression from human colon tissues. We find that KRASmut imposes the embryonic stem cell-like program during human colon cancer initiation from colon adenoma to stage I carcinoma. Expression of miR145, an embryonic SC program inhibitor, promotes cell lineage differentiation marker expression in KRASmut colon cancer cells and significantly suppresses their tumorigenicity. Our data support an in vivo plasticity model of human colon cancer initiation that merges the intrinsic stem cell properties of aberrant colon stem cells with the embryonic stem cell-like program induced by KRASmut to optimize malignant transformation. Inhibition of the embryonic SC-like program in KRASmut colon cancer cells reveals a novel therapeutic strategy to programmatically inhibit KRASmut tumors and prevent colon cancer.

  17. Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Niamh M. [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Joyce, Myles R. [Department of Colorectal Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Murphy, J. Mary; Barry, Frank P.; O’Brien, Timothy [Regenerative Medicine Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Kerin, Michael J. [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Dwyer, Roisin M., E-mail: roisin.dwyer@nuigalway.ie [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •MSCs were directly co-cultured with colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on 3D scaffolds. •MSCs influence CRC protein/gene expression, proliferation and migration. •We report a significant functional role of MSC-secreted PAI-1 in colon cancer. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs + antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67–88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the

  18. Argentatin B Inhibits Proliferation of Prostate and Colon Cancer Cells by Inducing Cell Senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ela Alcántara-Flores; Alicia Enriqueta Brechú-Franco; Patricia García-López; Leticia Rocha-Zavaleta; Rebeca López-Marure; Mariano Martínez-Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Argentatin B has been shown to inhibit the growth of colon HCT-15, and prostate PC-3 cancer cells. However, the mechanism by which argentatin B inhibits cell proliferation is still unknown. We aimed to investigate the mechanism by which argentatin B inhibits cell proliferation. The cell cycle was studied by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin-V-Fluos, and Hoechst 33342 dye staining. Cell senescence was evaluated by proliferation tests, and staining for SA-β-galactosidase. Senes...

  19. Soya beans and maize : the effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid prod

  20. Soya beans and maize : the effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid

  1. Soya beans and Maize : The effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van H.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid production) o

  2. Yeast-Derived β-1,3-Glucan Substrate Significantly Increased the Diversity of Methanogens DuringIn vitro Fermentation of Porcine Colonic Digesta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yu-heng; LI Hua; LUO Jun-qiu; ZHANG Ke-ying

    2013-01-01

    Theβ-1,3-glucan from yeast has been extensively examined for its immuno-enhancing effects in animals. However, investigation on the relationship amongβ-glucan, gut microbiota and immune-modulating effects remains limited particularly in pigs. Considering the critical roles of gut methanogens in the microbial fermentation, energy metabolism and disease resistance, we investigated the phylogenetic diversity of methanogens from fermented cultures of porcine colonic digesta with (G) or without (N) yeastβ-glucan based on sequences of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene. A total of 145 sequences in the G library were assigned into 8 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with the majority of sequences (114/145) related to strainsMethanobrevibactermillerae orMethanobrevibactergottschalkii with high identities ranging from 97.9 to 98.6%, followed by 23 sequences toMethanobrevibacter ruminantium, 2 sequences toMethanobrevibactersmithii and one sequence toMethanobrevibacter wolinii. The 142 sequences in the N library were assigned to 2 OTUs with most sequences (127/142) related to strainsM.millerae orM.gottschalkii with sequence identities ranging from 97.9 to 98.5%, and 15 sequences related toM.gottschalkiiwith 97.9% identity. Shannon diversity index showed that the G library exhibited signiifcantly higher archaeal diversity (P<0.05) and Libshuff analysis indicated the differences in the community structure between the two libraries were signiifcant (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the current study provides evidence that addition of yeast β-glucan signiifcantly increased the diversity of methanogens inin vitro fermented porcine colonic digesta.

  3. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  4. Natural grape extracts regulate colon cancer cells malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Paola; Fabiani, Carlotta; Brizzolari, Andrea; Paroni, Rita; Casas, Josefina; Fabriàs, Gemma; Rossi, Dario; Ghidoni, Riccardo; Caretti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Natural dietary components are evolutionary-selected molecules able to control inflammation and cancerous transformation and progression. Because many studies assessed the beneficial properties of key molecules extracted from grapes, we aimed at investigating the properties of Liofenol™, a natural red wine lyophilized extract, devoid of alcohol and composed by a miscellaneous of components (polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins). We proved that the colon cancer cell line HCT116 responded to Liofenol™ treatment by reducing their proliferation, in association with an increase of p53 and p21 cell cycle gate keepers. Liofenol™ increased dihydroceramides, sphingolipid mediators involved in cell cycle arrest and reduced proliferation rate. We observed a strong induction of antioxidant response, with the activation of the transcriptional factor Nrf2, involved in redox homeostasis and differentiation, without altering tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy. Liofenol™ induced an important morphology change in HCT116 cells, migration inhibition, undifferentiated stem/stem-like cells markers downregulation, and E-cadherin downregulation, interested in epithelia to mesenchymal malignant transition. We conclude that lyophilized grape extract, at dose comparable to putative dietary doses, can activate molecular pathways, involving Nrf2 signaling and the modulation of structural and signaling sphingolipid mediators that cooperate in promoting differentiation and reducing proliferation of digestive tract cancer cells.

  5. A CASE REPORT OF MULTIPLE PRIMARY SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS OF THE OVARY AND SIGMOID COLON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Villert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell ovarian and sigmoid colon carcinomas are extremely rare malignancies. Because of their rarity, it is difficult to investigate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of patients with theses malignancies, and therefore, the increased interest in each clinical case report is highly relevant. Multiple primary squamous cell ovarian and sigmoid colon carcinomas are the subject of discussion and differential diagnosis of sigmoid colon cancer with secondary ovarian cancer. Histopathological and clinical characteristics of the tumors were present and evidences in favor of the multiple primary malignancies were given. The association of squamous cell ovarian and sigmoid colon carcinomas with human papilloma virus type 16 was shown.

  6. Ciprofloxacin Affects Host Cells by Suppressing Expression of the Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides Cathelicidins and Beta-Defensin-3 in Colon Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protim Sarker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics exert several effects on host cells including regulation of immune components. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, e.g., cathelicidins and defensins display multiple functions in innate immunity. In colonic mucosa, cathelicidins are induced by butyrate, a bacterial fermentation product. Here, we investigated the effect of antibiotics on butyrate-induced expression of cathelicidins and beta-defensins in colon epithelial cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin and clindamycin reduce butyrate-induced transcription of the human cathelicidin LL-37 in the colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. Suppression of LL-37 peptide/protein by ciprofloxacin was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that ciprofloxacin suppresses the rabbit cathelicidin CAP-18 in rectal epithelia of healthy and butyrate-treated Shigella-infected rabbits. Ciprofloxacin also down-regulated butyrate-induced transcription of the human beta-defensin-3 in HT-29 cells. Microarray analysis of HT-29 cells revealed upregulation by butyrate with subsequent down-regulation by ciprofloxacin of additional genes encoding immune factors. Dephosphorylation of histone H3, an epigenetic event provided a possible mechanism of the suppressive effect of ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, LL-37 peptide inhibited Clostridium difficile growth in vitro. In conclusion, ciprofloxacin and clindamycin exert immunomodulatory function by down-regulating AMPs and other immune components in colonic epithelial cells. Suppression of AMPs may contribute to the overgrowth of C. difficile, causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

  7. Primary cell cultures of bovine colon epithelium: isolation and cell culture of colonocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föllmann, W; Weber, S; Birkner, S

    2000-10-01

    Epithelial cells from bovine colon were isolated by mechanical preparation combined with an enzymatic digestion from colon specimens derived from freshly slaughtered animals. After digestion with collagenase I, the isolated tissue was centrifuged on a 2% D-sorbitol gradient to separate epithelial crypts which were seeded in collagen I-coated culture flasks. By using colon crypts and omitting the seeding of single cells a contamination by fibroblasts was prevented. The cells proliferated under the chosen culture conditions and formed monolayer cultures which were maintained for several weeks, including subcultivation steps. A population doubling time of about 21 hr was estimated in the log phase of the corresponding growth curve. During the culture period the cells were characterized morphologically and enzymatically. By using antibodies against cytokeratine 7 and 13 the isolated cells were identified as cells of epithelial origin. Antibodies against vimentin served as negative control. Morphological features such as microvilli, desmosomes and tight junctions, which demonstrated the ability of the cultured cells to restore an epithelial like monolayer, were shown by ultrastructural investigations. The preservation of the secretory function of the cultured cells was demonstrated by mucine cytochemistry with alcian blue staining. A stable expression of enzyme activities over a period of 6 days in culture occurred for gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, acid phosphatase and NADH-dehydrogenase activity under the chosen culture conditions. Activity of alkaline phosphatase decreased to about 50% of basal value after 6 days in culture. Preliminary estimations of the metabolic competence of these cells revealed cytochrome P450 1A1-associated EROD activity in freshly isolated cells which was stable over 5 days in cultured cells. Then activity decreased completely. This culture system with primary epithelial cells from the colon will be used further as a model for the colon

  8. Soya beans and Maize : The effect of chemical and physical structure of cell wall polysaccharides on fermentation kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Laar, van de, P.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the relationship between cell wall composition and fermentation of endosperm cell walls of soya beans and maize was approached from three different angles. Firstly, the fermentation (rate and extent of fermentation, the sugar degradation pattern, and volatile fatty acid production) of soya bean and maize cell walls was analysed, both in situ and in vitro. This analysis revealed that the physical structure of the cell wall (particle size and cell wall thickness) influences cell...

  9. Single-cell level based approach to investigate acetate metabolism during batch industrial fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Larsen, Poul; Eriksen, Niels T.

    accumulation causes the decrease of productivity as it represents a waste of carbon source that would otherwise be converted to biomass and product. As the acetate accumulation problem is of the utmost importance in batch fermentation processes, various strategies have been developed to explain, understand...... on the sub-population level. We hypothesized that during the fermentation process, bacterial subpopulation exist, which exhibit different metabolic strategies towards the acetate. In this study, pure culture of Escherichia coli MG1655 was used to investigate in situ acetate metabolism at single-cell level...... during glucose fermentation. Batch fermentations were performed in order to examine consecutive stages of acetate metabolism during the fermentation process (production, co-consumption with glucose, consumption as single substrate). Uptake of glucose and acetate at single-cell level was observed...

  10. Induction of Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Colon Cancer Cells by Defined Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Oshima, Nobu

    2014-01-01

    Oshima N, Yamada Y, Nagayama S, Kawada K, Hasegawa S, et al. (2014) Induction of Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Colon Cancer Cells by Defined Factors. PLoS ONE 9(7): e101735. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101735

  11. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  12. Precision of pyrosequencing assay to measure LINE-1 methylation in colon cancer, normal colonic mucosa, and peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irahara, Natsumi; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Baba, Yoshifumi; Shima, Kaori; Lindeman, Neal I; Hazra, Aditi; Schernhammer, Eva S; Hunter, David J; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji

    2010-03-01

    Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation plays an important role in epigenomic and genomic instability and colorectal carcinogenesis. DNA methylation in the long interspersed nucleotide element-1, L1 (LINE-1) repetitive element is a good indicator of global DNA methylation level. In addition, LINE-1 hypomethylation in blood cells has been associated with colorectal adenoma risk, and LINE-1 hypomethylation in colorectal cancer is related with prognosis and linearly predicts shorter patient survival. However, no study has comprehensively evaluated the precision of sodium bisulfite conversion and PCR-pyrosequencing to measure LINE-1 methylation. Using 10 paraffin-embedded colon cancers, 5 matched normal colon mucosa, and 5 unrelated peripheral blood buffy coat leukocyte specimens, we enriched tumor DNA by macrodissection and laser capture microdissection. LINE-1 methylation was calculated as an average of 100 * C/(C + T) at 4 CpG sites after bisulfite-PCR-pyrosequencing. The LINE-1 methylation value in colon cancers varied, ranging approximately from 30 to 80. To measure assay precision, we performed bisulfite conversion on seven different DNA specimen aliquots and repeated PCR-pyrosequencing seven times. Run-to-run (between-run) SD ranged from 1.3 to 4.4 (median, 3.0) in macrodissected colon cancers; 1.1 to 10.5 (median, 3.8) in laser capture microdissection specimens; 1.3 to 2.5 (median, 1.9) in normal colon; and 1.5 to 3.4 (median, 1.9) in leukocyte DNA. In conclusion, bisulfite conversion and PCR-pyrosequencing assay can measure LINE-1 methylation in macrodissected colon cancer, normal colon, and blood DNA, and may be useful in clinical and research settings.

  13. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-03-31

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis.

  14. Crohn's disease of the colon: ultrastructural changes in submuscular interstitial cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri J; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) at the submuscular border of the human colon (ICC-SMP) are the proposed pacemaker cells of the musculature. In patients with Crohn's disease (CD) of the colon, ICC-SMP showed characteristic cytological changes from controls. The changes comprised secondary...

  15. Changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane components and promotion to ethanol tolerance during the bioethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Yi, Chen-Feng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    During bioethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane might provide main protection to tolerate accumulated ethanol, and S. cerevisiae cells might also remodel their membrane compositions or structure to try to adapt to or tolerate the ethanol stress. However, the exact changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation still remains poorly understood. This study was performed to clarify changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation. Both cell diameter and membrane integrity decreased as fermentation time lasting. Moreover, compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher contents of ergosterol and oleic acid (C18:1) but lower levels of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and palmitelaidic (C16:1) acids. Contents of most detected phospholipids presented an increase tendency during fermentation process. Increased contents of oleic acid and phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids might indicate enhanced cell membrane fluidity. Compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher expressions of ACC1 and HFA1. However, OLE1 expression underwent an evident increase at exponential phase but a decrease at following stationary phase. These results indicated that during bioethanol fermentation process, yeast cells remodeled membrane and more changeable cell membrane contributed to acquiring higher ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells. These results highlighted our knowledge about relationship between the variation of cell membrane structure and compositions and ethanol tolerance, and would contribute to a better understanding of bioethanol fermentation process and construction of industrial ethanologenic strains with higher ethanol tolerance.

  16. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2016-02-26

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer.

  17. Electricity and H2 generation from hemicellulose by sequential fermentation and microbial fuel/electrolysis cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Di; Yang, Xuewei; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2015-09-01

    Electricity and hydrogen generation by bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens in a dual-chamber microbial fuel/electrolysis cell following the fermentation of hemicellulose by bacteria Moorella thermoacetica was investigated. Experimental results showed that 10 g l-1 xylose under 60 °C was appropriate for the fermentation of xylose by M. thermoacetica, yielding 0.87 g-acetic acid per gram of xylose consumed. Corncob hydrolysate could also be fermented to produce acetic acid, but with lower yield (0.74 g-acid per g-xylose). The broths of xylose and corncob hydrolysate fermented by M. thermoacetica containing acetic acid were fed to G. sulfurreducens in a dual-chamber microbial fuel/electrolysis cell for electricity and hydrogen generation. The highest open-circuit cell voltages generated were 802 and 745 mV, and hydrogen yields were 41.7 and 23.3 mmol per mol-acetate, in xylose and corncob hydrolysate fermentation broth media, respectively. The internal resistance of the microbial fuel/electrolysis cell fed with corncob hydrolysate fermentation broth (3472 Ω) was much higher than that with xylose fermentation broth (1993 Ω) or sodium acetate medium (467 Ω), which was believed to be the main cause of the variation in hydrogen yield of the three feeding media.

  18. Isolation and characterization of alborixin from Streptomyces scabrisporus: A potent cytotoxic agent against human colon (HCT-116) cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Aabid Manzoor; Wani, Abubakar; Qazi, Parvaiz H; Rehman, Shakeel-U; Mushtaq, Saleem; Ali, Shiekh Abid; Hussain, Aehtesham; Shah, Aiyatullah; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Makhdoomi, Ubaid Sharif; Hamid, Abid; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-08-25

    The ethyl acetate extract from the fermentation broth of an actinomycete strain, identified as Streptomyces scabrisporus isolated from soil of Kashmir Himalayas - India, exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against a panel of human cancer cell lines. The active fraction subjected to column chromatography led to the isolation of pharmacologically potent anticancer compound whose structure was established to be alborixin on the basis of spectral data analysis. The compound exhibited antiproliferative activity against panel of cell lines N2a, MCF-7, MiaPaca-2, PC-3, HCT-116, MDA-MB-231, HL-60 and A-549 cells with IC50 of 9.7, 15.4, 7.2, 8.1, 3.2, 9.7, 7.5 and 11.5 μM respectively. Alborixin displayed the maximum cytotoxic activity against HCT-116 human colon carcinoma cells and therefore further studies were carried on this cell line. Alborixin decreased the clonogenic potential of HCT-116 cells in a dose dependent manner. It induced apoptotic cell death in HCT116 cells that were confirmed by Flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V/PI staining and microscopic examination of cellular morphology through DAPI-stained cells. Biochemical evidence of apoptosis came from elevating the intracellular ROS level that was accompanied by mitochondrial membrane potential loss, decreasing the expression profile of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, whereas it augments cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP-1, activates caspase-8 and 9 with concomitant increase in expression of proapoptotic protein Bax in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate that alborixin obtained from Streptomyces scabrisporus IIIM55 induces apoptotic cell death in colon cancer cells HCT-116 and can be further evaluated for its potential as an anticancer agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, M P; Reindl, K M

    2013-09-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 min) and prolonged (24h) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer.

  20. Time delay and noise explaining the behaviour of the cell growth in fermentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayuobi, Tawfiqullah; Rosli, Norhayati [Faculty of Industrial Sciences and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Lebuhraya Tun Razak, 26300 Gambang, Pahang (Malaysia); Bahar, Arifah [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Salleh, Madihah Md [Department of Biotechnology Industry, Faculty of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-02-03

    This paper proposes to investigate the interplay between time delay and external noise in explaining the behaviour of the microbial growth in batch fermentation process. Time delay and noise are modelled jointly via stochastic delay differential equations (SDDEs). The typical behaviour of cell concentration in batch fermentation process under this model is investigated. Milstein scheme is applied for solving this model numerically. Simulation results illustrate the effects of time delay and external noise in explaining the lag and stationary phases, respectively for the cell growth of fermentation process.

  1. Time delay and noise explaining the behaviour of the cell growth in fermentation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuobi, Tawfiqullah; Rosli, Norhayati; Bahar, Arifah; Salleh, Madihah Md

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes to investigate the interplay between time delay and external noise in explaining the behaviour of the microbial growth in batch fermentation process. Time delay and noise are modelled jointly via stochastic delay differential equations (SDDEs). The typical behaviour of cell concentration in batch fermentation process under this model is investigated. Milstein scheme is applied for solving this model numerically. Simulation results illustrate the effects of time delay and external noise in explaining the lag and stationary phases, respectively for the cell growth of fermentation process.

  2. Light- and electron microscopical studies of interstitial cells of Cajal and muscle cells at the submucosal border of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Peters, S; Thuneberg, L

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) at the submucosal border of the colonic circular muscle are pacemaker cells. We studied smooth muscle cells and ICC at the submucosal surface of the circular muscle layer of the normal human colon....

  3. Study of targeted-treatment on colon cancer cell via spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Da; Hsu, Hao Yun; Khaleel, Mai Ibrahim; Chan, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Yia-Chung; Wu, Chien-Hsun; Wu, Han-Chung

    2017-04-01

    We present the enhancement of targeted treatment on colon cancer cell via microscopic imaging ellipsometry (MIE). All spectroscopic MIE signals on 5μm×5μm area in visible range are captured within the modified Optrel MULTISKOP system. Colon cancer cells are cultured in Bottom-up Millicell EZ SLIDE 4-well structure under the environment (37°C, 10% CO2). Original single colon cancer cell, single colon cancer cell under untargeted-treatment, and single colon cancer cell under targeted-treatment are studied by specular-reflective mode and off-specular scattering mode in this experiment. Some polarization-related and phase-related MIE images are analyzed to reveal the improvement of targeted-treatment by observing changes in specular and off-specular reflectance and absorption.

  4. An integrated microfluidic system for screening of phage-displayed peptides specific to colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yu-Jui; Wu, Huei-Wen; Hung, Lien-Yu; Liu, Ching-Ann; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-09-01

    Affinity reagents recognizing biomarkers specifically are essential components of clinical diagnostics and target therapeutics. However, conventional methods for screening of these reagents often have drawbacks such as large reagent consumption, the labor-intensive or time-consuming procedures, and the involvement of bulky or expensive equipment. Alternatively, microfluidic platforms could potentially automate the screening process within a shorter period of time and reduce reagent and sample consumption dramatically. It has been demonstrated recently that a subpopulation of tumor cells known as cancer stem cells possess high drug resistance and proliferation potential and are regarded as the main cause of metastasis. Therefore, a peptide that recognizes cancer stem cells and differentiates them from other cancer cells will be extremely useful in early diagnosis and target therapy. This study utilized M13 phage display technology to identify peptides that bind, respectively, to colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells using an integrated microfluidic system. In addition to positive selection, a negative selection process was integrated on the chip to achieve the selection of peptides of high affinity and specificity. We successfully screened three peptides specific to colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells, namely, HOLC-1, HOLC-2, and COLC-1, respectively, and their specificity was measured by the capture rate between target, control, and other cell lines. The capture rates are 43.40 ± 7.23%, 45.16 ± 7.12%, and 49.79 ± 5.34% for colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells, respectively, showing a higher specificity on target cells than on control and other cell lines. The developed technique may be promising for early diagnosis of cancer cells and target therapeutics.

  5. Berberine induces caspase-independent cell death in colon tumor cells through activation of apoptosis-inducing factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Wang

    Full Text Available Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid derived from plants, is a traditional medicine for treating bacterial diarrhea and intestinal parasite infections. Although berberine has recently been shown to suppress growth of several tumor cell lines, information regarding the effect of berberine on colon tumor growth is limited. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of berberine on regulating the fate of colon tumor cells, specifically the mouse immorto-Min colonic epithelial (IMCE cells carrying the Apc(min mutation, and of normal colon epithelial cells, namely young adult mouse colonic epithelium (YAMC cells. Berberine decreased colon tumor colony formation in agar, and induced cell death and LDH release in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in IMCE cells. In contrast, YAMC cells were not sensitive to berberine-induced cell death. Berberine did not stimulate caspase activation, and PARP cleavage and berberine-induced cell death were not affected by a caspase inhibitor in IMCE cells. Rather, berberine stimulated a caspase-independent cell death mediator, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF release from mitochondria and nuclear translocation in a ROS production-dependent manner. Amelioration of berberine-stimulated ROS production or suppression of AIF expression blocked berberine-induced cell death and LDH release in IMCE cells. Furthermore, two targets of ROS production in cells, cathepsin B release from lysosomes and PARP activation were induced by berberine. Blockage of either of these pathways decreased berberine-induced AIF activation and cell death in IMCE cells. Thus, berberine-stimulated ROS production leads to cathepsin B release and PARP activation-dependent AIF activation, resulting in caspase-independent cell death in colon tumor cells. Notably, normal colon epithelial cells are less susceptible to berberine-induced cell death, which suggests the specific inhibitory effects of berberine on colon tumor cell growth.

  6. Activation of TIM1 induces colon cancer cell apoptosis via modulating Fas ligand expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zhang, Xueyan; Sun, Wenjing; Hu, Xiaocui; Li, Xiaolin; Fu, Songbin; Liu, Chen

    2016-04-29

    The pathogenesis of colon cancer is unclear. It is proposed that TIM1 has an association with human cancer. The present study aims to investigate the role of TIM1 activation in the inhibition of human colon cancer cells. In this study, human colon cancer cell line, HT29 and T84 cells were cultured. The expression of TIM1 was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The TIM1 on the cancer cells was activated in the culture by adding recombinant TIM4. The chromatin structure at the FasL promoter locus was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The apoptosis of the cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry. The results showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 cells and T84 cells, expressed TIM1. Activation of TIM1 by exposing the cells to TIM4 significantly increased the frequency of apoptotic colon cancer cells. The expression of FasL was increased in the cancer cells after treating by TIM4. Blocking Fas or FasL abolished the exposure to TIM4-induced T84 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, HT29 cells and T84 cells express TIM1; activation TIM1 can induce the cancer cell apoptosis. TIM1 may be a novel therapeutic target of colon cancer.

  7. Use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells immobilized on orange peel as biocatalyst for alcoholic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessas, S.; Bekatorou, A; Koutinas, A.A.; Soupioni, M. [University of Patras (Greece). Department of Chemistry, Food Biotechnology Group; Banat, I.M.; Marchant, R. [University of Ulster, Coleraine, N. Ireland (United Kingdom). School of Biomedical Sciences

    2007-03-15

    A biocatalyst was prepared by immobilizing a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (baker's yeast) on orange peel pieces for use in alcoholic fermentation and for fermented food applications. Cell immobilization was shown by electron microscopy and by the efficiency of the immobilized biocatalyst for alcoholic fermentation of various carbohydrate substrates (glucose, molasses, raisin extracts) and at various temperatures (30-15 {sup o}C). Fermentation times in all cases were low (5-15 h) and ethanol productivities were high (av. 150.6 g/ld) showing good operational stability of the biocatalyst and suitability for commercial applications. Reasonable amounts of volatile by-products were produced at all temperatures studied, revealing potential application of the proposed biocatalyst in fermented food applications, to improve productivities and quality. (author)

  8. In vitro antitumor immune response induced by fusion of dendritic cells and colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xu; Ying-Jiang Ye; Shan Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The prevention of recurrence of colon cancer (CC)after operation is very important for improvement of the prognosis of CC patients, especially those with micrometastasis. The generation of fused cells between dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cells maybe an effective approach for tumor antigen presentation in immunotherapy. In this study,we fused human colon caner SW480 cells and human peripheral blood - derived DCs to induce an antitumor activity against human CC.METHODS: CC SW480 cells and human peripheral blood derived DCs were fused with 500 mL/L polyethylene glycol (PEG).RESULTS: The specific T cell responses activated by fusion cells (FCs), were observed. About 100 mL/L to 160 mL/L of the PEG-treated non-adherent cells with fluorescences were considered to be dendritomas that highly expressed the key molecules for antigen presentation in our five cases. In vitro studies showed that fusions effectively activated CD8+ T lymphocytes to secrete interferon-γ. The early apoptotic ratio of the colon cancer SW480 cells was higher than that of controls, which was affected by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) stimulated by dendritomas.CONCLUSION: The data indicate that fusion of tumor cells with DCs is an attractive strategy to induce tumor rejection.

  9. Induction of cancer stem cell properties in colon cancer cells by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobu Oshima

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered to be responsible for the dismal prognosis of cancer patients. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition and maintenance of CSC properties in cancer cells because of their rarity in clinical samples. We herein induced CSC properties in cancer cells using defined factors. We retrovirally introduced a set of defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2 and KLF4 into human colon cancer cells, followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium, not human embryonic stem cell medium. We then evaluated the CSC properties in the cells. The colon cancer cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of the marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. We designated the cells with CSC properties induced by the factors, a subset of the transduced cells, as induced CSCs (iCSCs. Moreover, we established a novel technology to isolate and collect the iCSCs based on the differences in the degree of the dye-effluxing activity enhancement. The xenografts derived from our iCSCs were not teratomas. Notably, in contrast to the tumors from the parental cancer cells, the iCSC-based tumors mimicked actual human colon cancer tissues in terms of their immunohistological findings, which showed colonic lineage differentiation. In addition, we confirmed that the phenotypes of our iCSCs were reproducible in serial transplantation experiments. By introducing defined factors, we generated iCSCs with lineage specificity directly from cancer cells, not via an induced pluripotent stem cell state. The novel method enables us to obtain abundant materials of CSCs that not only have enhanced tumorigenicity, but also the ability to differentiate to recapitulate a specific type of cancer tissues. Our method can be of great value to fully understand CSCs and develop new therapies targeting CSCs.

  10. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  11. Src activity increases and Yes activity decreases during mitosis of human colon carcinoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, J.; Cartwright, C A

    1995-01-01

    Src and Yes protein-tyrosine kinase activities are elevated in malignant and premalignant tumors of the colon. To determine whether Src activity is elevated throughout the human colon carcinoma cell cycle as it is in polyomavirus middle T antigen- or F527 Src-transformed cells, and whether Yes activity, which is lower than that of Src in the carcinoma cells, is regulated differently, we measured their activities in cycling cells. We observed that the activities of both kinases were higher thr...

  12. The role of oxygen in yeast metabolism during high cell density brewery fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, P J; Saerens, S M G; Van Mulders, S E; Delvaux, F; Delvaux, F R

    2009-04-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e., higher inoculum size). However, the decreased yeast net growth observed in these high cell density fermentations can have a negative impact on the physiological stability throughout subsequent yeast generations. The use of different oxygen conditions (wort aeration, wort oxygenation, yeast preoxygenation) was investigated to improve the growth yield during high cell density fermentations and yeast metabolic and physiological parameters were assessed systematically. Together with a higher extent of growth (dependent on the applied oxygen conditions), the fermentation power and the formation of unsaturated fatty acids were also affected. Wort oxygenation had a significant decreasing effect on the formation of esters, which was caused by a decreased expression of the alcohol acetyl transferase gene ATF1, compared with the other conditions. Lower glycogen and trehalose levels at the end of fermentation were observed in case of the high cell density fermentations with oxygenated wort and the reference fermentation. The expression levels of BAP2 (encoding the branched chain amino acid permease), ERG1 (encoding squalene epoxidase), and the stress responsive gene HSP12 were predominantly influenced by the high cell concentrations, while OLE1 (encoding the fatty acid desaturase) and the oxidative stress responsive genes SOD1 and CTT1 were mainly affected by the oxygen availability per cell. These results demonstrate that optimisation of high cell density fermentations could be achieved by improving the oxygen conditions, without drastically affecting the physiological condition of the yeast and beer quality.

  13. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods: Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 proteins. Results: Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P < 0.01. Artesunate can effectively inhibit the expression of cancer cell ICAM-1 gene proteins, and was time- and concentration-dependant (P <0.01. Conclusion: Artesunate can significantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  14. Controlled malolactic fermentation in cider using Oenococcus oeni immobilized in alginate beads and comparison with free cell fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero; Laca; García; Díaz

    2001-01-02

    Cells of Oenococcus oeni (formerly Leuconostoc oenos) immobilized in alginate beads were used as starter culture to conduct malolactic fermentation in cider production. Concentrations of major organic acids and volatile compounds were monitored during the process, and results were compared to those obtained when using free cells in the same conditions. The rates of malic acid consumption were similar but lower ethanoic acid content and higher concentration of alcohols were detected with immobilized cells. These features have beneficial effects on the organoleptic properties of cider. A comparison between the kinetic behavior in immobilized and free cells, based on the data obtained for the malic acid consumption, has been developed solving the homogeneous diffusion model when it is applied to the system with immobilized cells.

  15. High cell density cultures produced by internal retention: application in continuous ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Carola Pérez

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol has provoked great interest due to its potential as an alternative fuel. Nevertheless, fermentation processes must be developed by increasing the low volumetric productivity achieved in conventional cultures (batch or continuous to make this product become economically competitive. This can be achieved by using techniques leading to high cell concentration and reducing inhibition by the end-product. One of the frequently employed methods involves cell recycling. This work thus developed a membrane reactor incorporating a filtration module with 5 u,m stainless steel tubular units inside a 3L stirred jar fermenter for investigating its application in continuous ethanol production. The effects of cell concentration and transmembrane pressure difference on permeate flux were evaluated for testing the filtration module's performance. The internal cell retention system was operated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae continuous culture derived from sucrose, once fermentation conditions had been selected (30 °C, 1.25 -1.75 vvm, pH 4.5. Filter unit permeability was maintained by applying pulses of air. More than 97% of the grown cells were retained in the fermenter, reaching 51 g/L cell concentration and 8.51 g/L.h average ethanol productivity in culture with internal cell retention; this was twice that obtained in a conventional continuous culture. Key words: Membrane reactor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alcoholic fermentation, cell recycling.

  16. Colonic mast cell infiltration in rats with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Katsuyo; Sato, Yasushi; Iwata, Hiroshi; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2007-12-01

    Colonic mucosal mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndromes. This study was designed to investigate the roles of mucosal mast cells in development of an experimental visceral hypersensitivity induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats. TNBS, when injected into the proximal colon through laparotomy, produced a significant decrease in pain threshold of the distal colon to mechanical distention, indicating a visceral hypersensitivity. In the proximal colon that was directly insulted by TNBS, mucosal necrosis and extensive inflammatory cell infiltration were observed with concomitant increase in tissue myeloperoxide (MPO) activity. In the distal colon where distention stimuli were applied, the number of mucosal mast cells significantly increased following TNBS treatment, although neither mucosal injury nor increase in tissue MPO activity was observed. In an organ culture, spontaneous release of a mucosal mast cell-specific protease (RMCP-2) from the distal colon tissue of TNBS-treated rats was significantly larger than that of sham animals. Furthermore, TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was significantly suppressed by subcutaneous pretreatment with a mast cell stabilizer doxantrazole in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that prominent colonic mast cell infiltration associated with an enhanced spontaneous mediator release is responsible, at least partly, for development of visceral hypersensitivity induced by TNBS in rats.

  17. CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiong; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Faming; Liu, Zhengxiong; Lei, Ting; Fan, Daiming

    2017-01-01

    CacyBP/SIP is a component of the ubiquitin pathway and is overexpressed in several transformed tumor tissues, including colon cancer, which is one of the most common cancers worldwide. It is unknown whether CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells. This study examined the expression level, subcellular localization, and binding activity of CacyBP/SIP in human colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of the hormone gastrin. We found that CacyBP/SIP was expressed in a high percentage of colon cancer cells, but not in normal colonic surface epithelium. CacyBP/SIP promoted the cell proliferation of colon cancer cells under both basal and gastrin stimulated conditions as shown by knockdown studies. Gastrin stimulation triggered the translocation of CacyBP/SIP to the nucleus, and enhanced interaction between CacyBP/SIP and SKP1, a key component of ubiquitination pathway which further mediated the proteasome-dependent degradation of p27kip1 protein. The gastrin induced reduction in p27kip1 was prevented when cells were treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. These results suggest that CacyBP/SIP may be promoting growth of colon cancer cells by enhancing ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p27kip1. PMID:28196083

  18. Sulforaphane plays common and different roles in tumorigenic and nontumorigenic colon cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  19. Efficient intracellular delivery of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine into colon cancer cells by targeted immunoliposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, GA; Kamps, JAAM; Scherphof, GL

    2002-01-01

    Immunoliposomes, liposomes with monoclonal antibodies attached, are being developed for targeting the anti-cancer drug 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUdR) to colon cancer cells. A monoclonal antibody against the rat colon carcinoma CC531 was covalently coupled to liposomes containing a dipalmitoylated d

  20. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yu; Zhang Youli; Yao Guangtao; Li Yikui

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods:Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) proteins. Results:Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P Conclusion:Artesunate can signiifcantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  1. Knockdown of Immature Colon Carcinoma Transcript 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiling; He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhiyu; Wu, Xintian

    2016-07-13

    Non-small cell lung cancer, as the most frequent type lung cancer, has lower survival rate of 5 years, despite improvements in surgery and chemotherapy. Previous studies showed immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 is closely related to tumorigenesis of human cancer cells. In the present study, we found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues using Oncomine database mining, and the biological effect of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was investigated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines 95D and A549. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference was used to knock down immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 expression in 95D and A549 cells in vitro, and the knockdown efficiency was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay. Knockdown of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 significantly suppressed non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and colony formation ability confirmed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assay. Flow cytometry was applied to measure cell cycle arrest, and the result showed the cell cycle arrested in G2/M phase in 95D cells and arrested in G0/G1 phase in A549 cells. Furthermore, we measured the levels of cell cycle-associated proteins by Western blot analysis and found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1-mediated cell proliferation inhibition appeared due to downregulation of cell cycle activator cyclin D1 and upregulation of cell cycle inhibitor p21. In addition, immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 silencing significantly induced non-small cell lung cancer cell apoptosis by annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin D double-staining assay. All our data suggest that immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 may play an important role for non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and could be a potential molecular target for diagnosing and treating human non-small cell lung cancer.

  2. Behaviour of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains during adaptation to unfavourable conditions of fermentation on synthetic medium: cell lipid composition, membrane integrity, viability and fermentative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannazzu, Ilaria; Angelozzi, Daniele; Belviso, Simona; Budroni, Marilena; Farris, Giovanni Antonio; Goffrini, Paola; Lodi, Tiziana; Marzona, Mario; Bardi, Laura

    2008-01-15

    During must fermentation wine strains are exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses which, when prevailing over the cellular defence systems, can affect cell viability with negative consequences on the progression of the fermentative process. To investigate the ability of wine strains to survive and adapt to unfavourable conditions of fermentation, the lipid composition, membrane integrity, cell viability and fermentative activity of three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analysed during hypoxic growth in a sugar-rich medium lacking lipid nutrients. These are stressful conditions, not unusual during must fermentation, which, by affecting lipid biosynthesis may exert a negative effect on yeast viability. The results obtained showed that the three strains were able to modulate cell lipid composition during fermentation. However, only two of them, which showed highest viability and membrane integrity at the end of the fermentation process, reached a fatty acid composition which seemed to be optimal for a successful adaptation. In particular, C16/TFA and UFA/TFA ratios, more than total lipid and ergosterol contents, seem to be involved in yeast adaptation.

  3. Effects of Lubiprostone on Pacemaker Activity of Interstitial Cells of Cajal from the Mouse Colon

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Han-Yi; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ki, Jung Suk; Ryu, Kwon Ho; Choi, Seok; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2014-01-01

    Lubiprostone is a chloride (Cl-) channel activator derived from prostaglandin E1 and used for managing constipation. In addition, lubiprostone affects the activity of gastrointestinal smooth muscles. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are pacemaker cells that generate slow-wave activity in smooth muscles. We studied the effects of lubiprostone on the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to determine the pacemaker activity in cultured colonic ICCs ...

  4. Overexpression of phosphoserine aminotransferase PSAT1 stimulates cell growth and increases chemoresistance of colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conseiller Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most common causes of cancer death throughout the world. In this work our aim was to study the role of the phosphoserine aminotransferase PSAT1 in colorectal cancer development. Results We first observed that PSAT1 is overexpressed in colon tumors. In addition, we showed that after drug treatment, PSAT1 expression level in hepatic metastases increased in non responder and decreased in responder patients. In experiments using human cell lines, we showed that ectopic PSAT1 overexpression in colon carcinoma SW480 cell line resulted in an increase in its growth rate and survival. In addition, SW480-PSAT1 cells presented a higher tumorigenic potential than SW480 control cells in xenografted mice. Moreover, the SW480-PSAT1 cell line was more resistant to oxaliplatin treatment than the non-transfected SW480 cell line. This resistance resulted from a decrease in the apoptotic response and in the mitotic catastrophes induced by the drug treatment. Conclusion These results show that an enzyme playing a role in the L-serine biosynthesis could be implicated in colon cancer progression and chemoresistance and indicate that PSAT1 represents a new interesting target for CRC therapy.

  5. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  6. Single-cell level based approach to investigate bacterial metabolism during batch industrial fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Larsen, Poul; Eriksen, Niels T.

    Escherichia coli fermentations have been studied for decades, but most results are based on average measurements of the whole populations of cells, whilst averaged data can mask the distribution of activities at the sub-population or single-cell level. A population of genetically identical cells ...

  7. γδ T cells as a potential tool in colon cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramutton, Thiranut; Buccheri, Simona; Dieli, Francesco; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Meraviglia, Serena

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are capable of recognizing tumor cells and exert potent cellular cytotoxicity against a large range of tumors, including colon cancer. However, tumors utilize numerous strategies to escape recognition or killing by patrolling γδ T cells, such a downregulation of NKG2D ligands, MICA/B and ULBPs. Therefore, the combined upregulation of T-cell receptorand NKG2D ligands on tumor cells and induction of NKG2D expression on γδ T cells may greatly enhance tumor killing and unlock the functions of γδ T cells. Here, we briefly review current data on the mechanisms of γδ T-cell recognition and killing of colon cancer cells and propose that γδ T cells may represent a promising target for the design of novel and highly innovative immunotherapy in patients with colon cancer.

  8. Inhibition of tryptase release from human colon mast cells by histamine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shao-Heng; Xie, Hua; Fu, Yi-Ling

    2005-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the ability of histamine receptor antagonists to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells induced by histamine. Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with histamine in the absence or presence of the histamine receptor antagonists, and the tryptase release was determined. It was found that histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 61.5% and 24% by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine and the H2 histamine receptor antagonist cimetidine, respectively, when histamine and its antagonists were added to cells at the same time. The H3 histamine receptor antagonist clobenpropit had no effect on histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells at all concentrations tested. Preincubation of terfenadine, cimetidine or clobenpropit with cells for 20 minutes before challenging with histamine did not enhance the ability of these antihistamines to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release. Apart from terfenadine at 100 microg/ml, the antagonists themselves did not stimulate tryptase release from colon mast cells following both 15 minutes and 35 minutes incubation periods. It was concluded that H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists were able to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells. This not only added some new data to our hypothesis of self-amplification mechanisms of mast cell degranulation, but also suggested that combining these two types of antihistamine drugs could be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  9. Deficiency in the 15 kDa Selenoprotein Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Tobe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals, and is thought to provide protection against some forms of cancer. These protective effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, through selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins. Recent studies in a mouse colon cancer cell line have shown that the 15 kDa selenoprotein (Sep15 may also play a role in promoting colon cancer. The current study investigated whether the effects of reversing the cancer phenotype observed when Sep15 was removed in mouse colon cancer cells, were recapitulated in HCT116 and HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. Targeted down-regulation of Sep15 using RNAi technology in these human colon cancer cell lines resulted in similarly decreased growth under anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent conditions. However, the magnitude of reduction in cell growth was much less than in the mouse colon cancer cell line investigated previously. Furthermore, changes in cell cycle distribution were observed, indicating a delayed release of Sep15 deficient cells from the G0/G1 phase after synchronization. The potential mechanism by which human colon cancer cells lacking Sep15 revert their cancer phenotype will need to be explored further.

  10. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in myenteric plexus of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Rasmussen, Helle

    2009-01-01

    The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) as regulators of the motility of the colonic external muscle remains unclear. Ultrastructural studies of myenteric interstitial cells are lacking in human colon. We therefore characterized the distinct......The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) as regulators of the motility of the colonic external muscle remains unclear. Ultrastructural studies of myenteric interstitial cells are lacking in human colon. We therefore characterized...... and had myoid features such as scattered caveolae, prominent intermediate filaments, and cytoplasmic dense bodies. We found characteristic dense membrane-associated bands with a patchy basal lamina, invaginating cellular protrusions (peg and socket junctions) between ICC and between ICC and muscle cells...

  11. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages.

  12. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research July 2017; 16 (7): 1529-1536 ... Conclusion: Capecitabine treatment causes inhibition of colon cancer growth via the mitochondrial pathway of ... Capecitabine was purchased from Roche.

  13. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays common and different roles in cancerous colon HCT116 cell and noncancerous NCM460 colon cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Briske-Anderson, Mary; Wu, Min; Moyer, Mary P

    2012-01-01

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer action, and differential chemopreventive effects of methylselenol on cancerous and noncancerous cells may play an important role. In this study, the submicromolar concentrations of methylselenol were generated by incubating methionase with seleno-L methionine, and colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colon NCM460 cells were exposed to methylselenol. Methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in S-phase and an induction of apoptosis in HCT116, but to a much lesser extent in NCM460 colon cells. Similarly, the examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) signaling status revealed that methylselenol inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and the expression of c-Myc in HCT116 cells, but also to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. The other finding is that methylselenol inhibits sarcoma kinase phosphorylation in HCT116 cells. In contrast, methylselenol upregulated the phosphorylation of sarcoma and focal adhesion kinase survival signals in the noncancerous NCM460 cells. Collectively, methylselenol's stronger potential of inhibiting cell proliferation/survival signals in the cancerous HCT116 cells when compared with that in noncancerous NCM460 cells may partly explain the potential of methylselenol's anticancer action.

  14. Cordyceps militaris and mycelial fermentation induced apoptosis and autophagy of human glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C-H; Kao, Y-H; Huang, K-S; Wang, C-Y; Lin, L-W

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first report that investigated the apoptosis-inducing effects of Cordyceps militaris (CM) and its mycelial fermentation in human glioblastoma cells. Both fractions arrested the GBM8401 cells in the G0/G1 phase, whereas the U-87MG cells were arrested at the G2/M transitional stage. Western blot data suggested that upregulation of p53 and p21 might be involved in the disruption of cell cycle progression. Induction of chromosomal condensation and the appearance of a sub-G1 hypodipoid population further supported the proapoptogenicity, possibly through the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8, and the downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and the upregulation of proapoptotic Bax protein expression. Downregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin and upregulation of Atg5 and LC3 II levels in GBM8401 cells implicated the involvement of autophagy. The signaling profiles with mycelial fermentation treatment indicated that mycelial fermentation triggered rapid phosphorylation of Akt, p38 MAPK, and JNK, but suppressed constitutively high levels of ERK1/2 in GBM8401 cells. Mycelial fermentation treatment only significantly increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but decreased constitutively high levels of Akt, ERK1/2, and JNK phosphorylation in U-87MG cells. Pretreatment with PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 prevented the mycelial fermentation-induced cytotoxicity in GBM8401 and U-87MG cells, suggesting the involvement of PI3K/Akt and MEK1 pathways in mycelial fermentation-driven glioblastoma cell apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23190603

  15. Differential expression of nanog1 and nanogp8 in colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Sato, Ai; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiroaki [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi, E-mail: hnakagam@ncc.go.jp [Division of Cancer Development System, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Okamoto, Koji, E-mail: kojokamo@ncc.go.jo [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in a majority of colon cancer cell lines examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both nanog1 and nanogp8 are expressed in colon cancer cells with varying ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog mediates cell proliferation of colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog predominantly localizes in cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Nanog, a homeodomain transcription factor, is an essential regulator for promotion of self-renewal of embryonic stem cells and inhibition of their differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nanog1 as well as nanogp8, a retrogene of nanog1, is preferentially expressed in advanced stages of several types of cancer, suggesting their involvement during cancer progression. Here, we investigated the expression of Nanog in well-characterized colon cancer cell lines. Expression of Nanog was detectable in 5 (HCT116, HT29, RKO, SW48, SW620) out of seven cell lines examined. RNA expression analyses of nanog1 and nanogp8 indicated that, while nanog1 was a major form in SW620 as well as in teratoma cells Tera-2, nanogp8 was preferentially expressed in HT29 and HCT116. In accordance with this, shRNA-mediated knockdown of nanog1 caused the reduction of Nanog in SW620 but not in HT29. Inhibition of Nanog in SW620 cells negatively affected cell proliferation and tumor formation in mouse xenograft. Biochemical subcellular fractionation and immunostaining analyses revealed predominant localization of Nanog in cytoplasm in SW620 and HT29, while it was mainly localized in nucleus in Tera-2. Our data indicate that nanog1 and nanogp8 are differentially expressed in colon cancer cells, and suggest that their expression contributes to proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  16. Cell growth behaviors of Clostridium acetobutylicum in a pervaporation membrane bioreactor for butanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peina; Xiao, Zeyi; Chen, Chunyan; Li, Weijia; Deng, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied in the continuous and closed-circulating fermentation (CCCF) system. The experiment lasting for 192 H was carried out by integrating fermentation with in situ pervaporation. In the entire process, the cell growth profile took place in the following two phases: the logarithmic phase during early 28 H and the linear phase from 130 to 150 H. This was a unique characteristic compared with the curve of traditional fermentation, and the fitting equations of two growth phases were obtained by Origin software according to the kinetic model of cell growth. Besides, the kinetic parameters that include the butanol yield, maximum specific growth rate, average specific formation rate, and volumetric productivity of butanol were measured as 0.19 g g(-1) , 0.345 H(-1) , 0.134 H(-1) and 0.23 g L(-1)  H(-1) , respectively. The C. acetobutylicum in the CCCF system showed good adaptability and fermentation performance, and the prolonged fermentation period and high production were also the main advantages of CCCF technology.

  17. Regulation of antiapoptotic and cytoprotective pathways in colonic epithelial cells in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease involving the colon resulting in bloody diarrhea and increased risk of colorectal cancer in certain patient subgroups. Increased apoptosis in the epithelial cell layer causes increased permeability, especially during flares; this leads...

  18. Secreted Human Adipose Leptin Decreases Mitochondrial Respiration in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, prespiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24073224

  19. Collagen-rich stroma in aggressive colon tumors induces mesenchymal gene expression and tumor cell invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, T T; den Uil, S; Rinkes, IHB; Marvin, D; Ponsioen, B; Alvarez-Varela, A; Fatrai, S; Scheele, C; Zwijnenburg, D A; Snippert, H; Vermeulen, L; Medema, J P; Stockmann, H B; Koster, J; Fijneman, R J A; de Rooij, J; Kranenburg, O

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression-based classification systems have identified an aggressive colon cancer subtype with mesenchymal features, possibly reflecting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. However, stromal fibroblasts contribute extensively to the mesenchymal phenotype of aggressive col

  20. Hydrogen sulfide lowers proliferation and induces protective autophagy in colon epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya C Wu

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S is a gaseous bacterial metabolite that reaches high levels in the large intestine. In the present study, the effect of H(2S on the proliferation of normal and cancerous colon epithelial cells was investigated. An immortalized colon epithelial cell line (YAMC and a panel of colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, SW1116, HCT116 were exposed to H(2S at concentrations similar to those found in the human colon. H(2S inhibited normal and cancerous colon epithelial cell proliferation as measured by MTT assay. The anti-mitogenic effect of H(2S was accompanied by G(1-phase cell cycle arrest and the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip. Moreover, exposure to H(2S led to features characteristic of autophagy, including increased formation of LC3B(+ autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles as determined by immunofluorescence and acridine orange staining, respectively. Abolition of autophagy by RNA interference targeting Vps34 or Atg7 enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of H(2S. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that H(2S stimulated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and S6 kinase. Inhibition of AMPK significantly reversed H(2S-induced autophagy and inhibition of cell proliferation. Collectively, we demonstrate that H(2S inhibits colon epithelial cell proliferation and induces protective autophagy via the AMPK pathway.

  1. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  2. PSF3 marks malignant colon cancer and has a role in cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahama, Yumi [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueno, Masaya [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Mori, Masaki [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 (Japan); Takakura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ntakaku@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-02-05

    PSF3 (partner of Sld five 3) is a member of the tetrameric complex termed GINS, composed of SLD5, PSF1, PSF2, and PSF3, and well-conserved evolutionarily. Previous studies suggested that some GINS complex members are upregulated in cancer, but PSF3 expression in colon carcinoma has not been investigated. Here, we established a mouse anti-PSF3 antibody, and examined PSF3 expression in human colon carcinoma cell lines and colon carcinoma specimens. We found that PSF3 is expressed in the crypt region in normal colonic mucosa and that many PSF3-positive cells co-expressed Ki-67. This suggests that PSF3-positivity of normal mucosa is associated with cell proliferation. Expression of the PSF3 protein was greater in carcinoma compared with the adjacent normal mucosa, and even stronger in high-grade malignancies, suggesting that it may be associated with colon cancer progression. PSF3 gene knock-down in human colon carcinoma cell lines resulted in growth inhibition characterized by delayed S-phase progression. These results suggest that PSF3 is a potential biomarker for diagnosis of progression in colon cancer and could be a new target for cancer therapy.

  3. Ultrastructural and histochemical study on the Paneth cells in the rat ascending colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantani, Youhei; Nishida, Miho; Yuasa, Hideto; Yamamoto, Kyouji; Takahara, Ei-Ichirou; Omotehara, Takuya; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Kawano, Junichi; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Paneth cells (PCs) contribute to the host defense against indigenous bacteria in the small intestine. We found Paneth cell-like cells (PLCs) in the rat ascending colon, but the nature of PLCs is never clarified. Therefore, the present study aimed to clarify the cytological characteristics of PLCs and discuss their cellular differentiation. PLCs were localized in the bases of intestinal crypts, especially follicle-associated intestinal crypts in proximal colonic lymphoid tissue, but were very seldom found in the ordinary intestinal crypts of the ascending colon. PLCs possessed specific granules with highly electron-dense cores and haloes, as well as PCs in the small intestine. The secretory granules of PLCs were positive for PAS reaction, lysozyme and soluble phospholipase A2, but negative for Alcian blue staining, β-defensin-1 and -2, as well as the ones of PCs. Furthermore, intermediate cells possessing both the PLC-specific granules and the mucus granules similar to those of goblet cells (GCs) were occasionally found in the vicinity of PLCs. Intermediate cells ranged from goblet cell-like cells rich in mucus granules to PLC-like cells with few mucus granules. The cellular condensation and fragmentation were exclusively found in PLCs but never seen in intermediate cells or GCs. The PLCs, which were identified as PC, were suggested to be transformed from GCs through intermediate cells and finally to die by apoptosis in intestinal crypts of proximal colonic lymphoid tissue in the rat ascending colon. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Biofuels for fuel cells: renewable energy from biomass fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, P.N.L.; Westermann, P.; Haberbauer, M.; Moreno, A.

    2005-01-01

    This book has been produced under the auspices of the Network ‘Biomass Fermentation Towards Usage in Fuel Cells’. The Network comprises nine partners from eight European countries and is funded by the European Science Foundation. This volume includes a chapter, from each of the member institutions,

  5. Anti-carcinogenic properties of omeprazole against human colon cancer cells and azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor, a widely used drug to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal refluxdisease. We have evaluated colon cancer chemopreventive properties of omeprazole using azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in male F344 rats and analyzed cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells. Five-week-old male F344 rats were fed a control or experimental diet containing two doses of omeprazole (200 and 400 ppm). After one week, all animals were s.c. injected with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for two weeks). Rats continued on experimental diets for seven more weeks before being sacrificed. Colons were histopathologically evaluated for ACF. Human colon cancer HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells treated with omeprazole were evaluated for different markers associated with proliferation and apoptotic markers using Western blot technique. Rats fed with 200 and 400 ppm of omeprazole significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation (~30%, Pcancer cell lines HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells resulted in induction of p21waf1/cip1 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and survivin in a dose-dependent manner. Anticancer properties observed in colon cancer cell lines suggest that omeprazole may induce key signaling molecules of antiproliferation and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins.

  6. Interferon-gamma sensitizes colonic epithelial cell lines to physiological and therapeutic inducers of colonocyte apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, J

    2012-02-03

    Homeostasis in the colonic epithelium is achieved by a continuous cycle of proliferation and apoptosis, in which imbalances are associated with disease. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colon cancer are associated with either excessive or insufficient apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, respectively. By using two colonic epithelial cell lines, HT29 and SW620, we investigated how the epithelial cell\\'s sensitivity to apoptosis was regulated by the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We found that IFN-gamma sensitized HT29 cells, and to a lesser extent SW620, to diverse inducers of apoptosis of physiologic or therapeutic relevance to the colon. These apoptosis inducers included Fas (CD95\\/APO-1) ligand (FasL), short-chain fatty acids, and chemotherapeutic drugs. The extent of IFN-gamma-mediated apoptosis sensitization in these two cell lines correlated well with the degree of IFN-gamma-mediated upregulation of the proapoptotic protease caspase-1. Although IFN-gamma alone effectively sensitized HT29 cells to apoptosis, inclusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor cyclohexamide (CHX) during apoptotic challenge was necessary for maximal sensitization of SW620. The requirement of CHX to sensitize SW620 cells to apoptosis implies a need to inhibit translation of antiapoptotic proteins absent from HT29. In particular, the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was strongly expressed in SW620 cells but absent from HT29. Our results indicate that IFN-gamma increases the sensitivity of colonic epithelial cells to diverse apoptotic stimuli in concert, via upregulation of caspase-1. Our findings implicate caspase-1 and Bcl-2 as important central points of control determining the general sensitivity of colonic epithelial cells to apoptosis.

  7. OPTIMATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL SUBSTANCE PRODUCTION IN CELL FREE EXTRACT FROM THERMOPHYLIC BACTERIA FERMENTATION AFTER MERAPI ERRUPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evy Yulianti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study was to investigate the effect of medium with different pH (6,7,9, salt concentration (0,5; 1; 2 % and fermentation periode (24 and 48 hr to the antimicrobial activity of cell free extract to three pathogens, Eschericia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albican. This study consists of antimicrobial compounds production with different medium and continued by antimicrobial tested to fungi and bacterial pathogens Eschericia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albican by Kirby Bauer  method with paper disk. Different salt concentration, pH and fermentation periode affected the  antimicrobial activity potency of cell free extract yielded by thermophylic bacteria. Treatment which yielded CFE with the best antimicrobial activity was treatment with 24 hr fermentation, pH 7 and salt concentration 2% to S aureus and pH 6 salt concentration 1% to E coli. Cell free extract had no potency as antifungi to Candida albicans except CFE yielded by thermophylic bacteria fermented in medium with pH 7 and salt concentration 1% in 24 hr with inhibition zone index 1,17.   Keywords: cell free extract, antimicrobial, pH, salt concentration, fermentation period

  8. Diet-Induced Obesity Is Associated with an Impaired NK Cell Function and an Increased Colon Cancer Incidence

    OpenAIRE

    Ina Bähr; Vincent Goritz; Henriette Doberstein; Grit Gesine Ruth Hiller; Philip Rosenstock; Janine Jahn; Ole Pörtner; Tobias Berreis; Thomas Mueller; Julia Spielmann; Heike Kielstein

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased colon cancer incidence, but underlying mechanisms remained unclear. Previous studies showed altered Natural killer (NK) cell functions in obese individuals. Therefore, we studied the impact of an impaired NK cell functionality on the increased colon cancer risk in obesity. In vitro investigations demonstrated a decreased IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxicity of human NK cells against colon tumor cells after NK cell preincubation with the adipokine leptin. In...

  9. Curcumin Sensitizes Silymarin to Exert Synergistic Anticancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Amanda; Adeyeni, Temitope; San, KayKay; Heuertz, Rita M.; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R.

    2016-01-01

    We studied combinatorial interactions of two phytochemicals, curcumin and silymarin, in their action against cancer cell proliferation. Curcumin is the major component of the spice turmeric. Silymarin is a bioactive component of milk thistle used as a protective supplement against liver disease. We studied antiproliferative effects of curcumin alone, silymarin alone and combinations of curcumin and silymarin using colon cancer cell lines (DLD-1, HCT116, LoVo). Curcumin inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas silymarin showed significant inhibition only at the highest concentrations assessed. We found synergistic effects when colon cancer cells were treated with curcumin and silymarin together. The combination treatment led to inhibition of colon cancer cell proliferation and increased apoptosis compared to single compound treated cells. Combination treated cells exhibited marked cell rounding and membrane blebbing of apoptotic cells. Curcumin treated cells showed 3-fold more caspase3/7 activity whereas combination treated cells showed 5-fold more activity compared to control and silymarin treated cells. When DLD-1 cells were pre-exposed to curcumin, followed by treatment with silymarin, the cells underwent a high amount of cell death. The pre-exposure studies indicated curcumin sensitization of silymarin effect. Our results indicate that combinatorial treatments using phytochemicals are effective against colorectal cancer. PMID:27390600

  10. CCR6 marks regulatory T cells as a colon-tropic, interleukin-10-producing phenotype1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Kazuya; Farber, Joshua M.; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of CCR6 and its ligand, CCL20, are increased in the colon of humans with inflammatory bowel diseases and mice with experimental colits, however their role in disease pathogenesis remains obscure. Here we demonstrate a role for CCR6 on regulatory T (Treg)3 cells in the T cell-transfer model of colitis. Rag2−/− mice given Ccr6−/− CD4+CD45RBhigh T cells had more severe colitis with increased IFN-γ-producing T cells, compared to the mice given WT cells. While equivalent frequency of induced/acquired Treg (iTreg) cells was observed in mesenteric lymph nodes and colon from both groups, the suppressive capacity of Ccr6−/− iTreg cells was impaired. Co-transfer studies of WT or Ccr6−/− Treg cells with CD4+CD45RBhigh T cells also showed the defect of Ccr6−/− Treg cell suppression. CCR6+ Treg cells were characterized as antigen-activated and IL-10-producing in the steady state, and preferentially migrated to the colon during inflammation. Thus, we concludes that CCR6 expression on Treg cells was required for the full function of Treg cell-mediated suppression in the T cell-transfer model of colitis. CCR6 may contribute to the regulation of colitis via the recruitment of antigen-specific, IL-10-producing iTreg cells to the inflamed colon. PMID:20720211

  11. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before...

  12. Microbiology and Epidemiology of Oral Yeast Colonization in Hemopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Steven D.; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Freytes, Cesar O.; Toro, Juan J.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Redding, Spencer W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We monitored the epidemiology and microbiology of oral yeast colonization in patients undergoing hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (HPCT) to examine associations between yeast colonization and oral mucositis. Study Design One hundred twenty-one consecutive HPCT patients were sampled for oral yeasts prior to fluconazole (FLC) prophylaxis, at transplant, and weekly until discharge. Clinical oral mucositis screenings were performed tri-weekly. Results Yeast colonization was evident at 216 of 510 total visits. Candida albicans and C. glabrata were the predominate organisms. Eight patients showed elevated MICs to FLC. One patient developed fungal septicemia. Patients with OMAS mucositis scores <20 had higher colonization rates than those with higher scores. Conclusions FLC is very effective in controlling a variety of oral yeasts in HPCT recipients. FLC resistant yeasts do emerge and can be the source of fungal sepsis. A positive association was not shown between yeast colonization and presence or severity of oral mucositis. PMID:23312542

  13. Magnesium homeostasis in colon carcinoma LoVo cells sensitive or resistant to doxorubicin

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic cells accumulate magnesium, an event which provides selective advantages and is frequently associated with TRPM7overexpression. Little is known about magnesium homeostasis in drug-resistant cancer cells. Therefore, we used the colon cancer LoVo cell model and compared doxorubicin-resistant to sensitive cells. In resistant cells the concentration of total magnesium is higher while its influx capacity is lower than in sensitive cells. Accordingly, resistant cells express lower amount...

  14. T cell precursor migration towards beta 2-microglobulin is involved in thymus colonization of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunon, D; Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J;

    1990-01-01

    beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) attracts hemopoietic precursors from chicken bone marrow cells in vitro. The cell population responding to beta 2m increases during the second period of thymus colonization, which takes place at days 12-14 of incubation. The precursors from 13.5 day old embryos were...... isolated after migration towards beta 2m in vitro and shown to be able to colonize a 13 day old thymus in ovo, where they subsequently acquire thymocyte markers. In contrast these beta 2m responsive precursors did not colonize embryonic bursa, i.e. differentiate into B lymphocytes. During chicken...... embryogenesis, peaks of beta 2m transcripts and of free beta 2m synthesis can only be detected in the thymus. The peak of free beta 2m synthesis in the thymus and the increase of beta 2m responding bone marrow cells both occur concomitantly with the second wave of thymus colonization in chicken embryo, facts...

  15. Granular cell tumor of colon:Report of a case and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dae-Kyung Sohn; Seung-Yong Jeong; Hyo-Seong Choi; Yeon-Soo Chang; Jin-Myeong Huh; Dae-Hyun Kim; Dae-Yong Kim; Young-Hoon Kim; Hee-Jin Chang; Kyung-Hae Jung

    2004-01-01

    Granular cell tumor (GCT) is uncommon in the colon and rectum. Here we report a case of GCT in the transverse colon. A 48-year-old male patient underwent a screening colonoscopy. A yellowish sessile lesion, about 4 mm in diameter, was found in the transverse colon. An endoscopic snare resection was performed without complication.Histological examination revealed the tumor consisted of plump neoplastic cells with abundant granular eosinophilic cytoplasm containing acidophilic periodic acid Schiffpositive, diastase-resistant granules. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the tumor cells expressed S-100 protein and neuron-specific enolase. Thus, the resected tumor was diagnosed as a GCT. Since GCTs are usually benign, endoscopic resection constitutes an easy and safe treatment.Colonoscopists should consider the possibility of GCT in the differential diagnosis of submucosal tumors of the colon.

  16. The inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in human colon cancer cells by sulindac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Wei-Ping; Hu, Pin-Jin; Wu, Jing; Lin, Xiang-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in the initial development of colon cancer. Sulindac is a commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. We demonstrated the effects of sulindac on growth inhibition, apoptosis induction, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling suppression in human colon cancer cells. Sulindac significantly inhibited proliferation of HT-29 colon cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sulindac was found to induce the apoptosis of HT-29 cells and inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition was further confirmed by the decreased protein levels of β-catenin. The results indicate that sulindac may play a beneficial role in the comprehensive treatment of colon cancer.

  17. PPARδ deficiency disrupts hypoxia-mediated tumorigenic potential of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eunshil; Koo, Jung Eun; Yeon, Sang Hyeon; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Hwang, Daniel H; Lee, Joo Young

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ is highly expressed in colon epithelial cells and closely linked to colon carcinogenesis. However, the role of PPARδ in colon cancer cells in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment is not fully understood. We found that expression of the tumor-promoting cytokines, IL-8 and VEGF, induced by hypoxia (colon cancer cells. Consequently, PPARδ-knockout colon cancer cells exposed to hypoxia and deferoxamine failed to stimulate endothelial cell vascularization and macrophage migration/proliferation, whereas wild-type cells were able to induce angiogenesis and macrophage activation in response to hypoxic stress. Hypoxic stress induced transcriptional activation of PPARδ, but not its protein expression, in HCT116 cells. Exogenous expression of p300 potentiated deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation, while siRNA knockdown of p300 abolished hypoxia- and deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation. PPARδ associated with p300 upon hypoxic stress as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation studies. PI3K inhibitors or siRNA knockdown of Akt suppressed the PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxia and deferoxamine in HCT116 cells, leading to decreased expression of IL-8 and VEGF. Collectively, these results reveal that PPARδ is required for hypoxic stress-mediated cytokine expression in colon cancer cells, resulting in promotion of angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and macrophage proliferation in the tumor microenvironment. p300 and the PI3K/Akt pathway play a role in the regulation of PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxic stress. Our results demonstrate the positive crosstalk between PPARδ in tumor cells and the hypoxic tumor microenvironment and provide potential therapeutic targets for colon cancer.

  18. Almond milk fermented with different potentially probiotic bacteria improves iron uptake by intestinal epithelial (Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Bernat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available New fermented almond milks were developed, using different potentially probiotic bacteria, in order to meet the current demand for healthy, versatile non-dairy products. An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model was used to evaluate the effect of both non-fermented and fermented almond milks on the mitochondrial enzymatic activities of enterocytes. Moreover, macrophages were challenged with the in-vitro digested samples and the production of pro-inflammatory biomarkers TNF-a and IL-6 was quantified. Enzymatic activities of cell cultures seemed to be stimulated by the exposure to both fermented and non-fermented almond milks. Both biomarkers decreased (p< 0.05 in fermented almond milks with either B. bifidum or B. longum. Results showed that fermented almond products favored the energetic metabolism of enterocytes and had a lower inflammatory response than non-fermented almond milk, suggesting its benefits for the management of allergies/intolerances. Moreover, the fermentation process enhanced the uptake of iron by Caco-2 cells, especially when using L. rhamnosus and either B. bifidum or B. longum as starters, thus improving the product bioactivity. Therefore, new non-dairy fermented products with functional properties were developed, which might be positioned as alternatives to cow-milk products for sensitized groups of population (allergic and/or intolerant to cow milk or anemic population, among others.

  19. Effect of soy saponin on the growth of human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Yu; Tsai; Yue-Hwa; Chen; Yi-Wen; Chien; Wen-Hsuan; Huang; Shyh-Hsiang; Lin

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of extracted soybean saponins on the growth of human colon cancer cells.METHODS:WiDr human colon cancer cells were treated with 150,300,600 or 1200 ppm of soy saponin to determine the effect on cell growth,cell morphology,alkaline phosphatase(AP) and protein kinase C(PKC) activities,and P53 protein,c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression.RESULTS:Soy saponin decreased the number of viable cells in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed 12-Otetradecanol-phorbol-13-acetate-stimulated PKC ...

  20. Fermentation pre-treatment of landfill leachate for enhanced electron recovery in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed; Parameswaran, Prathap; Torres, César I; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    Pre-fermentation of poorly biodegradable landfill leachate (BOD5/COD ratio of 0.32) was evaluated for enhanced current density (j), Coulombic efficiency (CE), Coulombic recovery (CR), and removal of organics (BOD5 and COD) in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). During fermentation, the complex organic matter in the leachate was transformed to simple volatile fatty acids, particularly succinate and acetate in batch tests, but mostly acetate in semi-continuous fermentation. Carbohydrate had the highest degree of fermentation, followed by protein and lipids. j, CE, CR, and BOD5 removal were much greater for an MEC fed with fermented leachate (23 A/m(3) or 16 mA/m(2), 68%, 17.3%, and 83%, respectively) compared to raw leachate (2.5 A/m(3) or 1.7 mA/m(2), 56%, 2.1%, and 5.6%, respectively). All differences support the value of pre-fermentation before an MEC for stabilization of BOD5 and enhanced electron recovery as current when treating a recalcitrant wastewater like landfill leachate.

  1. Galangin induces human colon cancer cell death via the mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae Kwun; Kim, Mi Eun; Yoon, Ju Hwa; Bae, Sung Jin; Yeom, Jihye; Lee, Jun Sik

    2013-09-01

    Galangin is a member of flavonols and found in Alpinia officinarum, galangal root, and propolis. Previous studies have demonstrated that galangin has anti-cancer effects on several cancers, including melanoma, hepatoma, and leukaemia cells. However, anti-cancer activity of galangin on human colon cancer has not been established yet. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of galangin on two types of human colon cancer cells (HCT-15 and HT-29). We found that galangin induced apoptosis and DNA condensation of human colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. We also determined that galangin increased the activation of caspase-3 and -9, and release of apoptosis inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm by Western blot analysis. In addition, galangin induced human colon cancer cell death through the alteration of mitochondria membrane potential and dysfunction. These results suggest that galangin induces apoptosis of HCT-15 and HT-29 human colon cancer cells and may prove useful in the development of therapeutic agents for human colon cancer.

  2. Innate lymphoid cells sustain colon cancer through production of interleukin-22 in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Stefanie; Royston, Daniel J; Boulard, Olivier; Thornton, Emily; Franchini, Fanny; Szabady, Rose L; Harrison, Oliver; Powrie, Fiona

    2013-05-06

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of colon cancer. However, the immune cells and cytokines that mediate the transition from intestinal inflammation to cancer are poorly understood. We show that bacteria-induced colon cancer is accompanied by differential accumulation of IL-17(+)IL-22(+) colonic innate lymphoid cells (cILCs), which are phenotypically distinct from LTi and NK-22 cells, and that their depletion in mice with dysplastic inflammation blocks the development of invasive colon cancer. Analysis of the functional role of distinct Type 17 cytokines shows that although blockade of IL-17 inhibits some parameters of intestinal inflammation, reduction in dysplasia and colorectal cancer (CRC) requires neutralization of IL-22 indicating a unique role for IL-22 in the maintenance of cancer in this model. Mechanistic analyses showed that IL-22 selectively acts on epithelial cells to induce Stat3 phosphorylation and proliferation. Importantly, we could detect IL-22(+)CD3(+) and IL-22(+)CD3(−) cells in human CRC. Our results describe a new activity of IL-22 in the colon as a nonredundant mediator of the inflammatory cascade required for perpetuation of CRC, highlighting the IL-22 axis as a novel therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  3. γ-Tocotrienol induces paraptosis-like cell death in human colon carcinoma SW620 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Shu Zhang

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most serious illnesses among diagnosed cancer. As a new type of anti-cancer composition from tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil, γ-tocotrienol is widely used in anti-cancer research. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of γ-tocotrienol on human colon cancer SW620 and HCT-8 cells. We showed that treatment with different concentrations of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a dose dependent inhibition of cell growth. Cell death induced by γ-tocotrienol was mediated by a paraptosis-like cell death in SW620 and HCT-8 cells. Real-time RT-PCR and western blot analyses showed that γ-tocotrienol inhibited the expression level of β-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-jun. These data suggest that a paraptosis-like cell death induced by γ-tocotrienol in SW620 cells is associated with the suppression of the Wnt signaling pathway, which offers a novel tool for treating apoptosis-resistance colon cancer.

  4. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hae-Jeong Park; Sung-Vin Yim; Joo-Ho Chung; Seon-Pyo Hong; Seo-Hyun Yoon; Long-Shan Han; Long-Tai Zheng; Kyung-Hee Jung; Yoon-Kyung Uhm; Je-Hyun Lee; Ji-Seon Jeong; Woo-Sang Joo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-reiated, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cyclerelated, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes.METHODS: We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL,24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE114), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells,and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  5. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Yoon, Seo-Hyun; Han, Long-Shan; Zheng, Long-Tai; Jung, Kyung-Hee; Uhm, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Joo, Woo-Sang; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2005-09-07

    The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-related, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cycle-related, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes. We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL, 24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE11A), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells. These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells, and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  6. Characteristics of an immobilized yeast cell system using very high gravity for the fermentation of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hairui; Yu, Jianliang; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics of ethanol production by immobilized yeast cells were investigated for both repeated batch fermentation and continuous fermentation. With an initial sugar concentration of 280 g/L during the repeated batch fermentation, more than 98% of total sugar was consumed in 65 h with an average ethanol concentration and ethanol yield of 130.12 g/L and 0.477 g ethanol/g consumed sugar, respectively. The immobilized yeast cell system was reliable for at least 10 batches and for a period of 28 days without accompanying the regeneration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inside the carriers. The multistage continuous fermentation was carried out in a five-stage column bioreactor with a total working volume of 3.75 L. The bioreactor was operated for 26 days at a dilution rate of 0.015 h(-1). The ethanol concentration of the effluent reached 130.77 g/L ethanol while an average 8.18 g/L residual sugar remained. Due to the high osmotic pressure and toxic ethanol, considerable yeast cells died without regeneration, especially in the last two stages, which led to the breakdown of the whole system of multistage continuous fermentation.

  7. Anti-tumor effects of VnA in in vitro cultured Colon26-L5 cells and in vivo Colon26-L5 cells planted mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Li; UENO Yu-ko; HAN Guo-zhu; ZHAO Wei-jie; LIU Ke-xin; SAKURAI Hiroaki; SAIKI Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antitumor effects of VnA, the total alkaloids isolated from Veratrum Nigrum L. var. ussuriense Nakai ("Wusuli Lilu" in Chinese), and the underlying mechanisms with emphasis on its anti-metastatic effects. Methods The effects of VnA on in vitro proliferation, invasion, migration and adhesion in Colon26-L5 cells were investigated. The effect of VnA on experimental lung metastasis of Colon26-L5 cells in mice was also be studied by means of measuring the numbers of tumor colonies in lungs after single i. v. administration of Colon26-L5 ceils to mice followed by q. d. i. p VnA for consecutive 14 days. The effect of VnA on the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) from Colon26-L5 cell in vitro was determined by means of gelatin zymography. Results In in vitro experiments, VnA was found to significantly reduce the number of tumor colonies at dosage of 20.0-40.0 μg·kg-1. In in vitro experiments, VnA inhibited the adhesion (at 1.6-12.5 μg·mL-1) and migration (at 3.1-50.0 μg·mL-1) of Colon26-L5 cell to extracellular matrix components and suppressed invasion into reconstituted basement membrane matrigel (at 3.1-50.0 μg·mL-1), meanwile cell proliferation (at 25.0-50.0 μg·mL-1) was attenuated. VnA also showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of MMP2 and MMP9 production (at 3.1-50.0 μg·mL-1). Conclusions VnA has anti-metastatic protential by decreasing invasiveness of cancer cells as one of its anti-tumor pharmacological effects.

  8. STUDY ON ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION IN A STATIONARY BASKET BIOREACTOR WITH IMMOBILIZED YEAST CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Caşcaval

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of a stationary basket bioreactor with immobilized S. cerevisiae cells indicated the possibility to extend the number of alcoholic fermentation cycles that can be carried out with the same biocatalysts to over nine. Although the rates of glucose consumption and ethanol production were lower than those recorded for the mobile beds of immobilized yeast cells, the mechanical lysis of the biocatalysts is avoided in the case of basket bed. Due to the substrate and product accumulation inside the basket bed, the fermentation process can be improved by washing out the biocatalysts bed over two or four cycles.

  9. Contribution of soft substrates to malignancy and tumor suppression during colon cancer cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Rabineau

    Full Text Available In colon cancer, a highly aggressive disease, progression through the malignant sequence is accompanied by increasingly numerous chromosomal rearrangements. To colonize target organs, invasive cells cross several tissues of various elastic moduli. Whether soft tissue increases malignancy or in contrast limits invasive colon cell spreading remains an open question. Using polyelectrolyte multilayer films mimicking microenvironments of various elastic moduli, we revealed that human SW480 colon cancer cells displayed increasing frequency in chromosomal segregation abnormalities when cultured on substrates with decreasing stiffness. Our results show that, although decreasing stiffness correlates with increased cell lethality, a significant proportion of SW480 cancer cells did escape from the very soft substrates, even when bearing abnormal chromosome segregation, achieve mitosis and undergo a new cycle of replication in contrast to human colonic HCoEpiC cells which died on soft substrates. This observation opens the possibility that the ability of cancer cells to overcome defects in chromosome segregation on very soft substrates could contribute to increasing chromosomal rearrangements and tumor cell aggressiveness.

  10. A Distinctive Pattern of Beauveria bassiana-biotransformed Ginsenoside Products Triggers Mitochondria/FasL-mediated Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Sang Il; Rahman, Md Khalilur; Won, Jong Soon; Cho, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng is one of the most commonly used adaptogens. Transformation into the minor ginsenosides produces compounds with more effective action. Beauveria bassiana, a teleomorph of Cordyceps bassiana, is a highly efficient producer of mammalian steroids and produces large amounts of sugar-utilizing enzymes. However, the fermentation of steroid glycosides in ginseng with B. bassiana has never been studied. Thus, we evaluated the bioconversion of the major ginsenosides in white ginseng by B. bassiana. Interestingly, B. bassiana increased the total amount of protopanaxadiols and hydrolyzed Rb1 into minor ginsenosides, exhibiting high levels of Rd and Rg3, as well as moderate levels of Rb2 and Rc analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light-scattering detection. The β-glucosidase activity was highly increased, which led to the selective elimination of sugar moiety at the 20-C position of Rb1 to Rd, followed by Rg3. Rb2 and Rc accumulated because of the minimal activities of α-L-arabinopyranosidase and α-L-arabinofuranosidase, respectively. The fermentation product exerted dose-dependent cytotoxicity in HCT-15 cells, which are resistant to ginseng. The product, but not white ginseng, exhibited apoptotic effects via the Fas ligand and caspase 8/9. This study demonstrates for the first time that the B. bassiana-fermented metabolites have potent apoptotic activity in colon cancer cells, linking to a therapeutic use. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The flavouring phytochemical 2-pentanone reduces prostaglandin production and COX-2 expression in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Jenny; Karlsson, Pernilla Christina; Göransson, Ulf; Rafter, Joseph James; Bohlin, Lars

    2008-03-01

    Many phytochemicals found in the diet may prevent colon carcinogenesis by affecting biochemical processes in the colonic mucosa. Inflammation and subsequent elevation of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are two such factors involved in the development of colon cancer, and inhibition of these processes could be important targets for chemoprevention. We have previously shown COX-2 inhibitory activity locally in the colon; e.g. in human fecal water from a group of vegetarians. In this study we focus on 2-pentanone, a frequently occurring compound in common foods such as banana and carrot. The aim was to study the inhibitory effects on prostaglandin production and COX-2 protein expression in tumour necrosis factor-alpha stimulated colon cancer cells (HT29) by radioimmunoassay and Western blotting. 2-Pentanone inhibited both prostaglandin production and COX-2 protein expression in human colon cancer cells. A concentration of 400 mumol/l 2-pentanone inhibited the prostaglandin production by 56.9+/-12.9% which is in the same range as the reference compound NS398 (59.8+/-7.6%). The two highest concentrations of 2-pentanone were further analyzed by Western blot, and 400 micromol/l and 200 micromol/l 2-pentanone resulted in a 53.3+/-9.6% and +/-27.1% reduction of the COX-2 protein levels respectively. Further studies on flavouring compounds, for example 2-pentanone, as colon cancer chemopreventives would be very valuable, and such results may contribute to future dietary recommendations.

  12. Identification and functional analysis of ligands for natural killer cell activating receptors in colon carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Su, Tao; He, Liang; Wang, Hongtao; Ji, Gang; Liu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yun; Dong, Guanglong

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in the immune defense against tumor cells. The function of NK cells is determined by a balance between activating and inhibitory signals. DNAX accessory molecule-1 (DNAM-1) and NK group 2 member D (NKG2D) are major NK cell activating receptors, which transduce activating signals after binding their ligands CD155, CD112 and major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains A and B (MICA/B). However, the expression and functions of these ligands in colon carcinoma are still elusive. Here, we show the higher expression of CD155, CD112 and MICA/B in colon carcinoma tissues, although no correlations between the ligands expression and patient clinicopathological parameters were found. The subsequent cytotoxicity assay indicated that NK cells effectively kill colon carcinoma cells. Functional blocking of these ligands and/or receptors with antibodies led to significant inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity. Importantly, expression of DNAM-1 and NKG2D was reduced in NK cells of colon cancer patients, and this reduction could directly suppress the activation of NK cells. Moreover, colon cancer patients have higher serum concentrations of sCD155 and sMICA/B (soluble ligands, secreted or shed from cells) than those in healthy donors (sCD155, 127.82 ± 44.12 vs. 63.67 ± 22.30 ng/ml; sMICA, 331.51 ± 65.23 vs. 246.74 ± 20.76 pg/ml; and sMICB, 349.42 ± 81.69 vs. 52.61 ± 17.56 pg/ml). The up-regulation of these soluble ligands may down-regulate DNAM-1 and NKG2D on NK cells, ultimately leading to the inhibition of NK cytotoxicity. Colon cancer might be a promising target for NK cell-based adoptive immunotherapy.

  13. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby

    2010-01-01

    in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed...

  14. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby;

    2010-01-01

    in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed...

  15. Rsf-1 overexpression correlates with poor prognosis and cell proliferation in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuli; Dong, Qianze; Wang, Enhua

    2012-10-01

    Rsf-1 (HBXAP) was recently reported to be overexpressed in various cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of Rsf-1 and its biological roles in colon cancer have not been reported. The molecular mechanism of Rsf-1 in cancer aggressiveness remains ambiguous. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of Rsf-1 in colon cancer tissues and found that Rsf-1 was overexpressed in 50.4 % of colon cancer specimens. There was a significant association between Rsf-1 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0205), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0025), and poor differentiation (p = 0.0235). Furthermore, Rsf-1 overexpression correlated with a poor prognosis in colon cancer patients (p = 0.0011). In addition, knockdown of Rsf-1 expression in HT29 and HCT116 cells with high endogenous Rsf-1 expression decrease cell proliferation and colony formation ability. Further analysis showed that Rsf-1 knockdown decreased cyclin E expression and phospho-Rb level. In conclusion, Rsf-1 is overexpressed in colon cancers and contributes to malignant cell growth by cyclin E and phospho-Rb modulation, which makes Rsf-1 a candidate therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  16. New Insights into the CD133 (Prominin-1) Expression in Mouse and Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgambato, Alessandro; Corbi, Maddalena; Svelto, Maria; Caredda, Emanuele; Cittadini, Achille

    2013-01-01

    Following its discovery as a cancer stem cell marker, CD133 has been widely studied for its role in colorectal tumorigenesis. Indeed, colon cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer-related disease and death worldwide, and there is a strong need for an improvement of current diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic strategies. Thus, efforts have been devoted to try to understand whether CD133 might play a role in human colorectal tumorigenesis and might contribute to a better management of colon cancer patients. This chapter reviews the current knowledge on CD133 expression in normal and cancer colon tissues, both in humans and mice, discussing apparently conflicting data reported in the two species. Moreover, a great attention is devoted to the available information regarding the functional role of CD133 in colon cancer cells. Finally, the proposed clinical applications of CD133, as a prognostic and/or predictive marker as well as a target for novel antineoplastic strategies in colorectal cancer, are discussed. Overall, the available data support a potential important role of CD133 as cancer stem cell marker in colon cancer cells and warrant future studies to verify its potential use in the routine clinical management of colon cancer patients.

  17. Production of biofuels from pretreated microalgae biomass by anaerobic fermentation with immobilized Clostridium acetobutylicum cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremenko, E N; Nikolskaya, A B; Lyagin, I V; Senko, O V; Makhlis, T A; Stepanov, N A; Maslova, O V; Mamedova, F; Varfolomeev, S D

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the possible use of pretreated biomass of various microalgae and cyanobacteria as substrates for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum cells immobilized into poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel. To this end, the biochemical composition of photosynthetic microorganisms cultivated under various conditions was studied. The most efficient technique for pretreating microalgal biomass for its subsequent conversion into biofuels appeared to be thermal decomposition at 108 °C. For the first time the maximum productivity of the ABE fermentation in terms of hydrogen (8.5 mmol/L medium/day) was obtained using pretreated biomass of Nannochloropsis sp. Maximum yields of butanol and ethanol were observed with Arthrospira platensis biomass used as the substrate. Immobilized Clostridium cells were demonstrated to be suitable for multiple reuses (for a minimum of five cycles) in ABE fermentation for producing biofuels from pretreated microalgal biomass.

  18. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  19. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Erk Marjan J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an anti-oxidant and it can act as an anti-inflammatory agent. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms and effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells using gene expression profiling. Methods Gene expression changes in response to curcumin exposure were studied in two human colon cancer cell lines, using cDNA microarrays with four thousand human genes. HT29 cells were exposed to two different concentrations of curcumin and gene expression changes were followed in time (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Gene expression changes after short-term exposure (3 or 6 hours to curcumin were also studied in a second cell type, Caco-2 cells. Results Gene expression changes (>1.5-fold were found at all time points. HT29 cells were more sensitive to curcumin than Caco-2 cells. Early response genes were involved in cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA repair, gene transcription, cell adhesion and xenobiotic metabolism. In HT29 cells curcumin modulated a number of cell cycle genes of which several have a role in transition through the G2/M phase. This corresponded to a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase as was observed by flow cytometry. Functional groups with a similar expression profile included genes involved in phase-II metabolism that were induced by curcumin after 12 and 24 hours. Expression of some cytochrome P450 genes was downregulated by curcumin in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. In addition, curcumin affected expression of metallothionein genes, tubulin genes, p53 and other genes involved in colon carcinogenesis. Conclusions This study has extended knowledge on pathways or processes already reported to be affected by curcumin (cell cycle arrest, phase

  20. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +} stem cell-like human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Li, E-mail: lin.796@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olson, Veronica [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Bekaii-Saab, Tanios [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lin, Jiayuh, E-mail: lin.674@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +}). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower

  1. Bacillus calmette-guerin cell wall cytoskeleton enhances colon cancer radiosensitivity through autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Shin, Dong-Min; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Lim, Kyu; Kim, Ki-Hye; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Ji-Sook; Paik, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Jun-Sang; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2010-01-01

    The cell wall skeleton of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG/CWS) is an effective antitumor immunotherapy agent. Here, we demonstrate that BCG/CWS has a radiosensitizing effect on colon cancer cells through the induction of autophagic cell death. Exposure of HCT116 colon cancer cells to BCG/CWS before ionizing radiation (IR) resulted in increased cell death in a caspase-independent manner. Treatment with BCG/CWS plus IR resulted in the induction of autophagy in colon cancer cells. Either the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or knockdown of beclin 1 or Atg7 significantly reduced tumor cell death induced by BCG/CWS plus IR, whereas the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk failed to do so. BCG/CWS plus IR-mediated autophagy and cell death was mediated predominantly by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase pathway functioned upstream of ROS generation in the induction of autophagy and cell death in HCT116 cells after co-treatment with BCG/CWS and IR. Furthermore, toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, and in part, TLR4, were responsible for BCG/CWS-induced radiosensitization. In vivo studies revealed that BCG/CWS-mediated radiosensitization of HCT116 xenograft growth is accompanied predominantly by autophagy. Our data suggest that BCG/CWS in combination with IR is a promising therapeutic strategy for enhancing radiation therapy in colon cancer cells through the induction of autophagy.

  2. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-il Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation.

  3. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates.

  4. Administration of different Lactobacillus strains in fermented oatmeal soup: in vivo colonization of human intestinal mucosa and effect on the indigenous flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M L; Molin, G; Jeppsson, B; Nobaek, S; Ahrné, S; Bengmark, S

    1993-01-01

    In vivo colonization by different Lactobacillus strains on human intestinal mucosa of healthy volunteers was studied together with the effect of Lactobacillus administration on different groups of indigenous bacteria. A total of 19 test strains were administered in fermented oatmeal soup containing 5 x 10(6) CFU of each strain per ml by using a dose of 100 ml of soup per day for 10 days. Biopsies were taken from both the upper jejunum and the rectum 1 day before administration was started and 1 and 11 days after administration was terminated. The administration significantly increased the Lactobacillus counts on the jejunum mucosa, and high levels remained 11 days after administration was terminated. The levels of streptococci increased by 10- to 100-fold in two persons, and the levels of sulfite-reducing clostridia in the jejunum decreased by 10- to 100-fold in three of the volunteers 1 day after administration was terminated. In recta, the anaerobic bacterium counts and the gram-negative anaerobic bacterium counts decreased significantly by the end of administration. Furthermore, a decrease in the number of members of the Enterobacteriaceae by 1,000-fold was observed on the rectal mucosa of two persons. Randomly picked Lactobacillus isolates were identified phenotypically by API 50CH tests and genotypically by the plasmid profiles of strains and by restriction endonuclease analysis of chromosomal DNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Fermented Asterina pectinifera with Cordyceps militaris Mycelia Induced Apoptosis in B16F10 Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yon-Suk; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hakju; Dong, Xin; Natarajan, Sithranga Boopathy; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2017-01-01

    This prime objective of this study was to explore the anti-cancer activity of fermented Asterina pectinifera with Cordyceps militaris mycelia (FACM) in B16F10 murine melanoma cells. The effect of FACM on cell viability was assessed using MTT assay. Furthermore, the effect of FACM was compared with unfermented A. pectinifera on cell viability. The results demonstrated that the fermented FACM extract has a higher inhibitory activity on the proliferation of B16F10 murine melanoma cells than unfermented A. pectinifera. In addition, FACM also promoted the expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax leading to stimulate apoptosis in B16F10 cells. Therefore the present study demonstrates that the FACM might be a potential effective anti-cancer agent, as a result of its stronger anti-proliferative effect and apoptosis inducing effect than A. pectinifera or C. militaris on melanoma cells.

  6. Reg4+ deep crypt secretory cells function as epithelial niche for Lgr5+ stem cells in colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Sachs, Norman; Wiebrands, Kay; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; Fumagalli, Arianna; Lyubimova, Anna; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; van Es, Johan H; Karthaus, Wouter R; Li, Vivian S W; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peters, Peter J; van Rheenen, Jacco; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5(+)) stem cells reside at crypt bottoms of the small and large intestine. Small intestinal Paneth cells supply Wnt3, EGF, and Notch signals to neighboring Lgr5(+) stem cells. Whereas the colon lacks Paneth cells, deep crypt

  7. Tussilagone suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation by promoting the degradation of β-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hua [College of Pharmacy and Research Center for Cell Fate Control, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 Hyochangwon-Gil, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hwa Jin [Department of Natural Medicine Resources, Semyung University, 65 Semyung-ro, Jecheon, Chungbuk 390-711 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yeon Hwa; Kwon, Hye Jin; Jang, Chang-Young; Kim, Woo-Young [College of Pharmacy and Research Center for Cell Fate Control, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 Hyochangwon-Gil, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae-Ha, E-mail: ryuha@sookmyung.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Research Center for Cell Fate Control, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 Hyochangwon-Gil, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Tussilagone (TSL) was purified from plant as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. •TSL suppressed the β-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity. •The proteasomal degradation of β-catenin was induced by TSL. •TSL suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin target genes, cyclin D1 and c-myc. •TSL inhibit the proliferation of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway frequently induces colon cancer progression. In the present study, we identified tussilagone (TSL), a compound isolated from the flower buds of Tussilago farfara, as an inhibitor on β-catenin dependent Wnt pathway. TSL suppressed β-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity and down-regulated β-catenin level both in cytoplasm and nuclei of HEK293 reporter cells when they were stimulated by Wnt3a or activated by an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Since the mRNA level was not changed by TSL, proteasomal degradation might be responsible for the decreased level of β-catenin. In SW480 and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines, TSL suppressed the β-catenin activity and also decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, representative target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and consequently inhibited the proliferation of colon cancer cells. Taken together, TSL might be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of human colon cancer.

  8. Effect of hydroxyapatite particle size, morphology and crystallinity on proliferation of colon cancer HCT116 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sangeeta; Das, Mitun, E-mail: mitun@cgcri.res.in; Balla, Vamsi Krishna

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to chemically and physically characterize the synthesized Hydroxyapatite (HAp) micro and nanoparticles and to explore the inhibitory effect of nano-HAps on the in vitro growth of human colon cancerous cells HCT116. HAp powder was synthesized using three different routes to achieve micro and nanosized powders, with different morphologies and crystallinity. The synthesized powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the average crystallite size of HAp powder varies from 11 nm to 177 nm and respective crystallinity of powder found to be in the range of 0.12 and 0.92. The effect of these physico-chemical properties of HAp powders on human colon cancer HCT116 cells inhibition was determined in vitro. It was found that decreasing the HAp powder crystallite size between 11 nm and 22 nm significantly increases the HCT116 cell inhibition. Our results demonstrate that apart from HAp powder size their crystallinity and morphology also play an important role in cellular inhibition of human colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesized hydroxyapatite micro and nano-particles with different morphologies and crystallinity. • In vitro cell–material interaction showed that hydroxyapatite nano-particles inhibit colon cancer cells. • Human colon cancer cell inhibition also depends on crystallinity and morphology of HAp powder.

  9. Gef gene therapy enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cytotoxics in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Raúl; Prados, Jose; Melguizo, Consolación; Rama, Ana R; Alvarez, Pablo J; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando; Caba, Octavio; Boulaiz, Houria; Aranega, Antonia

    2012-10-01

    The potential use of gene therapy to improve the response of patients with advanced cancer is being intensively analyzed. We evaluated the cytotoxic impact of the gef gene, a suicide gene, which has a demonstrated antiproliferative activity in tumor cells, in colon carcinoma cells in order to improve the antitumour effect of chemotherapeutic drugs used as first line treatment in the management of advanced colon cancer. We found that the gef gene induced a marked decrease in cell viability (50% in 24h) in T-84 cells through cell death by apoptosis. Interestingly, when gef gene expression was combined with drugs of choice in the clinical treatment of colon cancer (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan), a strong synergistic effect was observed with approximately a 15-20% enhancement of the antiproliferative effect. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that gef gene expression induces significant growth arrest in colon cancer cells and that it is able to enhance the effect of some cytotoxic drugs compared with a single therapeutic approach. These results indicate the potential therapeutic value of the gef gene in colon cancer combination therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated...... by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results...... showed comparable amounts of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartments of the mixed-culture and 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentations containing L. thermotolerans after 4 days of fermentation, but a lower death rate of L. thermotolerans in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture...

  11. Simultaneous inhibition of ATR and PARP sensitizes colon cancer cell lines to irinotecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atlal eAbu-Sanad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced DNA damage repair is one mechanism involved in colon cancer drug resistance. Thus, targeting molecular components of repair pathways with specific small molecule inhibitors may improve the efficacy of chemotherapy. ABT-888 and VE-821, inhibitors of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP and the serine/threonine-kinase Ataxia telangiectasia related (ATR, respectively, were used to treat colon cancer cell lines in combination with the topoisomerase-I inhibitor irinotecan (SN38. Our findings show that each of these DNA repair inhibitors utilized alone at nontoxic single agent concentrations resulted in sensitization to SN38 producing a 1.4 to 3 fold reduction in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 of SN38 in three colon cancer cell lines. When combined together, nontoxic concentrations of ABT-888 and VE-821 produced a 4.5 to 27 fold reduction in the IC50 of SN38 with the HCT-116 colon cancer cells demonstrating the highest sensitization as compared to LoVo and HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the combination of all three agents was associated with maximal G2-M arrest and enhanced DNA-damage (γH2AX in all three colon cancer cell lines. The mechanism of this enhanced sensitization was associated with: (a maximal suppression of SN38 induced PARP activity in the presence of both inhibitors and (b ABT-888 producing partial abrogation of the VE-821 enhancement of SN38 induced DNA-PK phosphorylation, resulting in more unrepaired DNA damage; these alterations were only present in the HCT-116 cells which have reduced levels of ATM. This novel combination of DNA repair inhibitors may be useful to enhance the activity of DNA damaging chemotherapies such as irinotecan and help produce sensitization to this drug in colon cancer.

  12. Evaluation and SAR analysis of the cytotoxicity of tanshinones in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Liu, An; Zhang, Fei-Long; Yeung, John H K; Li, Xu-Qin; Cho, Chi-Hin

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the anti-cancer actions of tanshinone I and tanshinone IIA, and six derivatives of tanshinone IIA on normal and cancerous colon cells. Structure activity relationship (SAR) analysis was conducted to delineate the significance of the structural modifications of tanshinones for improved anti-cancer action. Tanshinone derivatives were designed and synthesized according to the literature. The cytotoxicity of different compounds on colon cancer cells was determined by the MTT assay. Apoptotic activity of the tanshinones was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). Tanshinone I and tanshinone IIA both exhibited significant cytotoxicity on colon cancer cells. They are more effective in p53(+/+) colon cancer cell line. It was also noted that the anti-cancer activity of tanshinone I was more potent and selective. Two of the derivatives of tanshinone IIA (N1 and N2) also exhibited cytotoxicity on colon cancer cells. The anti-colon cancer activity of tanshinone I was more potent and selective than tanshinone IIA, and is p53 dependent. The derivatives obtained by structural modifications of tanshinone IIA exhibited lower cytotoxicity on both normal and colon cancer cells. From steric and electronic characteristics point of view, it was concluded that structural modifications of ring A and furan or dihydrofuran ring D on the basic structure of tanshinones influences the activity. An increase of the delocalization of the A and B rings could enhance the cytotoxicity of such compounds, while a non-planar and small sized D ring region would provide improved anti-cancer activity. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Calpains are involved in Entamoeba histolytica-induced death of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yun Soo; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Lee, Sang Kyou; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2011-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that can cause amebic colitis and liver abscess in humans. E. histolytica has the capability to kill colon epithelial cells in vitro; however, information regarding the role of calpain in colon cell death induced by ameba is limited. In this study, we investigated whether calpains are involved in the E. histolytica-induced cell death of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells. When HT-29 cells were co-incubated with E. histolytica, the propidium iodide stained dead cells markedly increased compared to that in HT-29 cells incubated with medium alone. This pro-death effect induced by ameba was effectively blocked by pretreatment of HT-29 cells with the calpain inhibitor, calpeptin. Moreover, knockdown of m- and µ-calpain by siRNA significantly reduced E. histolytica-induced HT-29 cell death. These results suggest that m- and µ-calpain may be involved in colon epithelial cell death induced by E. histolytica.

  14. Fermentation, gasification and pyrolysis of carbonaceous residues towards usage in fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sequeira, C.A.C.; Santos, D.M.F. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal); Brito, P.S.D.; Mota, A.F.; Carvalho, J.L.; Rodrigues, L.F.F.T.T.G. [Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestao de Portalegre, Apartado 148, 7300-901 Portalegre (Portugal); Barrio, D.B.; Justo, D.M. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, c/Real de Burgos sin, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-07-15

    In this paper, the technologies of fermentation, gasification and pyrolysis of carbonaceous residues for the production of biohydrogen and other gaseous, liquid or solid fuels, are analysed. The energetic, economic and environmental advantages of linking these energy areas with the fuel cell engines are stressed. In addition, the current status of fuel cell technologies, namely their historic trends, basic electrode mechanisms, cell types, market drivers and leading issues, are reviewed. (author)

  15. High cell density propionic acid fermentation with an acid tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongqiang; Jin, Ying; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-03-01

    Propionic acid is an important chemical with wide applications and its production via fermentation is of great interest. However, economic production of bio-based propionic acid requires high product titer, yield, and productivity in the fermentation. A highly efficient and stable high cell density (HCD) fermentation process with cell recycle by centrifugation was developed for propionic acid production from glucose using an acid-tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici, which had a higher specific growth rate, productivity, and acid tolerance compared to the wild type ATCC 4875. The sequential batch HCD fermentation at pH 6.5 produced propionic acid at a high titer of ∼40 g/L and productivity of 2.98 g/L h, with a yield of ∼0.44 g/g. The product yield increased to 0.53-0.62 g/g at a lower pH of 5.0-5.5, which, however, decreased the productivity to 1.28 g/L h. A higher final propionic acid titer of >55 g/L with a productivity of 2.23 g/L h was obtained in fed-batch HCD fermentation at pH 6.5. A 3-stage simulated fed-batch process in serum bottles produced 49.2 g/L propionic acid with a yield of 0.53 g/g and productivity of 0.66 g/L h. These productivities, yields and propionic acid titers were among the highest ever obtained in free-cell propionic acid fermentation.

  16. Differential localization of LGR5 and Nanog in clusters of colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Freyhan, Ora; Fabrikant, Yakov; Melzer, Ehud; Givol, David

    2013-05-01

    One paradigm of cancer development claims that cancer emerges at the niche of tissue stem cells and these cells continue to proliferate in the tumor as cancer stem cells. LGR5, a membrane receptor, was recently found to be a marker of normal colon stem cells in colon polyps and is also expressed in colon cancer stem cells. Nanog, an embryonic stem cell nuclear factor, is expressed in several embryonic tissues, but Nanog expression is not well documented in cancerous stem cells. Our aim was to examine whether both LGR5 and Nanog are expressed in the same clusters of colon stem cells or cancer stem cells, using immunocytochemistry with specific antibodies to each antigen. We analyzed this aspect using paraffin embedded tumor tissue sections obtained from 18 polyps and 36 colon cancer specimens at stages I-IV. Antibodies to LGR5 revealed membrane and cytoplasm immunostaining of scattered labeled cells in normal crypts, with no labeling of Nanog. However, in close proximity to the tumors, staining to LGR5 was much more intensive in the crypts, including that of the epithelial cells. In cancer tissue, positive LGR5 clusters of stem cells were observed mainly in poorly differentiated tumors and in only a few scattered cells in the highly differentiated tumors. In contrast, antibodies to Nanog mainly stained the growing edges of carcinoma cells, leaving the poorly differentiated tumor cells unlabeled, including the clustered stem cells that could be detected even by direct morphological examination. In polyp tissues, scattered labeled cells were immunostained with antibodies to Nanog and to a much lesser extent with antibodies to LGR5. We conclude that expression of LGR5 is probably specific to stem cells of poorly differentiated tumors, whereas Nanog is mainly expressed at the edges of highly differentiated tumors. However, some of the cell layers adjacent to the carcinoma cell layers that still remained undifferentiated, expressed mainly Nanog with only a few cells

  17. Quercetin induces human colon cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting the nuclear factor-kappa B Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-An; Zhang, Shuangxi; Yin, Qing; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells with the ability to act as chemopreventers. Its cancer-preventive effect has been attributed to various mechanisms, including the induction of cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis as well as the antioxidant functions. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Inhibitors of NF-κB pathway have shown potential anti-tumor activities. However, it is not fully elucidated in colon cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer CACO-2 and SW-620 cells through inhibiting NF-κB pathway, as well as down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 and up-regulation of Bax, thus providing basis for clinical application of quercetin in colon cancer cases.

  18. Recognition and classification of colon cells applying the ensemble of classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, M; Osowski, S; Koktysz, R

    2009-02-01

    The paper presents the application of an ensemble of classifiers for the recognition of colon cells on the basis of the microscope colon image. The solved task include: segmentation of the individual cells from the image using the morphological operations, the preprocessing stages, leading to the extraction of features, selection of the most important features, and the classification stage applying the classifiers arranged in the form of ensemble. The paper presents and discusses the results concerning the recognition of four most important colon cell types: eosinophylic granulocyte, neutrophilic granulocyte, lymphocyte and plasmocyte. The proposed system is able to recognize the cells with the accuracy comparable to the human expert (around 5% of discrepancy of both results).

  19. Primary NK/T cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Chirife

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type are rare diseases, colonic involvement has seldom been seen. We report a case of a patient with a primary NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon. The patient had no history of malignant diseases and was diagnosed after exhaustive study in the context of fever of unknown origin. The first therapeutic approach followed the DAEPOCH-protocol: etoposide, prednisone, doxor-rubicin, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The persistence of constitutional symptoms after the first treatment course motivated the switch to a second line following the SMILE-protocol: dexamethasone, metotrexate, ifosfamide, E.coli L-asparaginase, and etoposide. Despite intensive chemotherapy, the patient died 2 months after the diagnose of an extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma of the colon and 4 months after the first symptomatic appearance of disease.

  20. Process-Induced Cell Injury in Laser Direct Writing of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yafu; Huang, Guohui; Huang, Yong; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong J; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2010-03-19

    Matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct-write has emerged as a promising technique for biological construct fabrication. The posttransfer cell viability in matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct-write depends on various operating conditions such as the applied laser fluence. To date, the effects of operating conditions such as laser fluence, direct-writing height, and cell density on the posttransfer cell viability have not been well elucidated. This study investigates the effects of operating conditions on the posttransfer cell viability in laser direct writing of human colon cancer HT-29 cells. It has been observed that (1) the HT-29 cell viability decreases from 95% to 78% as the laser fluence increases from 258 to 1482 mJ/cm(2), and the posttransfer cell proliferation capacity does not vary significantly as the laser fluence changes; (2) the direct-writing height does not have noticeable effect on the posttransfer cell viability under low laser fluences (258 and 869 mJ/cm(2)). However, a larger height (such as 29.3 mm) led to an almost 8% viability improvement compared with that of 16.6 mm under a high laser fluence (1482 mJ/cm(2)); and (3) the posttransfer cell viability is not dependent on the cell density for a range from 1 × 10(6) to 1 × 10(7) cells/mL.

  1. Survivin promotes the invasion of human colon carcinoma cells by regulating the expression of MMP‑7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Yuqin; Yang, Feng; Wang, Peng; Wang, Wenjun; Su, Yan; Luo, Weiren

    2014-03-01

    Increased expression levels of survivin are crucial for invasion activity in several types of human cancer, including colon carcinoma. However, the molecular mechanisms whereby survivin regulates cancer invasion have not been completely elucidated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the role of matrix metalloprotease‑7 (MMP‑7) in cell invasion that is induced by survivin by using in vitro assays, including western blot, immunofluorescence and qPCR analyses. The results demonstrated that the ectopic expression of survivin significantly promoted the invasive activity of colon carcinoma cells (SW620 and HCT‑116) and resulted in increased levels of MMP‑7 activation. By contrast, the small interfering RNA (siRNA)‑based knockdown of survivin markedly reduced cell migration and led to a dose‑dependent decrease in MMP‑7 expression levels. Compared with the controls, knockdown of MMP‑7 by siRNA in colon carcinoma cells led to reduced invasion ability, whereas no obvious changes were observed when MMP‑7 expression was silenced in survivin‑overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. These findings demonstrate that MMP‑7 is crucial for survivin‑mediated invasiveness, suggesting that the survivin‑mediated MMP‑7 signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colon carcinoma.

  2. Review article: The role of butyrate on colonic function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, H.M.; Jonkers, D.; Venema, K.; Vanhoutvin, S.; Troost, F.J.; Brummer, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, is a main end-product of intestinal microbial fermentation of mainly dietary fibre. Butyrate is an important energy source for intestinal epithelial cells and plays a role in the maintenance of colonic homeostasis. Aim: To provide an overview on the pr

  3. Reduced expression of β-catenin inhibitor Chibby in colon carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marion M Schuierer; Elisabeth Graf; Ken-Ichi Takemaru; Wolfgang Dietmaier; Anja-Katrin Bosserhoff

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the Chibby expression and its function in colon carcinoma cell lines and colorectal carcinoma (CRC).METHODS: Chibby expression levels were investigated by quantitative RT-PCR in a panel of seven different colon carcinoma cell lines. By sequencing, we analysed mutational status of Chibby. To test whether Chibby exhibited effects on β-catenin signalling in colon carcinoma cells, we transfected SW480 cells with Chibby expression plasmid and, subsequently, analysed activity of β-catenin and tested for alterations in cellular phenotype. In addition, we examined Chibby mRNA levels in samples of colorectal carcinomas and adjacent normal tissues by using quantitative RT-PCR and hybridised gene chips with samples from CRC and normal tissues.RESULTS: Chibby mRNA expression was strongly downregulated in colon carcinoma cell lines in comparison to normal colon epithelial cells and no mutation in any of the examined colon carcinoma cell lines was found. Further, we could show that Chibby inhibited β-catenin activity in TOPflash assays when over-expressed in SW480 cells. Proliferation and invasion assays with Chibby transfected SW480 cells did not reveal profound differences compared to control cells. In contrast to these in vitro data, quantitative RT-PCR analyses of Chibby mRNA levels in CRC tumor samples did not show significant differences to specimens in adjacent non-cancerous tissue.Consistent with these findings, gene chips analysing tissue samples of tumors and corresponding normal tissue did not show altered Chibby expressionCONCLUSION: Altered Chibby expression might beobserved in vitro in different colon carcinoma cell lines.However, this finding could not be confirmed in vitro in CRC tumors, indicating that Chibby is not likely to promote CRC tumor development or progression. As Chibby is an important inhibitor of β-catenin signalling, our data implicate that the usability of colon carcinoma cell lines for in vitro studies analysing the Wnt

  4. Application of HPLC for determination of phytic acid in the colonic epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglarz, Ludmiła; Parfiniewicz, Beata; Bat, Beata; Orchel, Arkadiusz; Dzierzewicz, Zofia; Wilczok, Tadeusz

    2004-12-01

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol hexaphosphate, IP6) is currently receiving a considerable interest because of its anticancer (preventive and therapeutic) potential against colon tumors and the need for methods of its determination. The aim of this study was to analyze the uptake of IP6 by human colon adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2 cell line) and to evaluate the method of its intracellular quantification with the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. Chromatographic analysis revealed a rapid uptake of IP6 by cells. The intracellular accumulation of IP6 was saturable at 0.5 h and it did not change with the prolongation of incubation up to 72 h.

  5. β-Catenin promotes colitis and colon cancer through imprinting of proinflammatory properties in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthivasan, Shilpa; Aghajani, Katayoun; Dose, Marei; Molinero, Luciana; Khan, Mohammad W; Venkateswaran, Vysak; Weber, Christopher; Emmanuel, Akinola Olumide; Sun, Tianjao; Bentrem, David J; Mulcahy, Mary; Keshavarzian, Ali; Ramos, Elena M; Blatner, Nichole; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Gounari, Fotini

    2014-02-26

    The density and type of lymphocytes that infiltrate colon tumors are predictive of the clinical outcome of colon cancer. High densities of T helper 17 (T(H)17) cells and inflammation predict poor outcome, whereas infiltration by T regulatory cells (Tregs) that naturally suppress inflammation is associated with longer patient survival. However, the role of Tregs in cancer remains controversial. We recently reported that Tregs in colon cancer patients can become proinflammatory and tumor-promoting. These properties were directly linked with their expression of RORγt (retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt), the signature transcription factor of T(H)17 cells. We report that Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T cells promotes expression of RORγt. Expression of β-catenin was elevated in T cells, including Tregs, of patients with colon cancer. Genetically engineered activation of β-catenin in mouse T cells resulted in enhanced chromatin accessibility in the proximity of T cell factor-1 (Tcf-1) binding sites genome-wide, induced expression of T(H)17 signature genes including RORγt, and promoted T(H)17-mediated inflammation. Strikingly, the mice had inflammation of small intestine and colon and developed lesions indistinguishable from colitis-induced cancer. Activation of β-catenin only in Tregs was sufficient to produce inflammation and initiate cancer. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in effector T cells and/or Tregs is causatively linked with the imprinting of proinflammatory properties and the promotion of colon cancer.

  6. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Claycombe, Kate J; Reindl, Katie M

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk, while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer-preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and butyrate (two major metabolites in colon lumen), we examined the effects of physiologically relevant doses of butyrate (0.5-2 mmol/l) and DCA (0.05-0.3 mmol/l) on colon cell proliferation. We hypothesize that butyrate and DCA each modulates the cell cycle and apoptosis via common and distinct cellular signaling targets. In this study, we demonstrated that both butyrate and DCA inhibited cell proliferation by up to 89% and 92% and increased cell apoptosis rate by up to 3.1- and 4.5-fold, respectively. Cell cycle analyses revealed that butyrate led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction, but DCA induced an increase in only G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction when compared with the untreated cells. The examination of early cellular signaling revealed that DCA but not butyrate increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, genomic DNA breakage, the activation of ERK1/2, caspase-3 and PARP. In contrast, DCA decreased activated Rb protein level, and butyrate but not DCA increased p21 expression. Collectively, although both butyrate and DCA inhibit colonic cell proliferation, butyrate increases tumor suppressor gene expression, whereas DCA decreases tumor suppressor activation in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways.

  7. Tumor cell lysate-pulsed dendritic cells induce a T cell response against colon cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-gang; Wu, Guang-zhou; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Yan-Yun; Li, Zhong; Li, De-Chun

    2010-09-01

    To investigate whether tumor cell lysate-pulsed (TP) dendritic cells (DCs) induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Hematopoietic progenitor cells were magnetically isolated from BALB/c mice bone marrow cells. These cells were cultured with cytokines GM-CSF, IL-4, and TNFalpha to induce their maturation. They were analyzed by morphological observation and phenotype analysis. DCs were pulsed with tumor cell lysate obtained by rapid freezing and thawing at a 1:3 DC:tumor cell ratio. CTL activity and interferon gamma (IFNgamma) secretion was evaluated ex vivo. In order to determine whether or not vaccination with CT26 TP DCs induce the therapeutic potential in the established colon tumor model, CT26 colon tumor cells were implanted subcutaneously (s.c.) in the midflank of naïve BALB/c mice. Tumor-bearing mice were injected with vaccination with CT26 TP DCs on days 3 and 10. Tumor growth was assessed every 2-3 days. Finally, CTL activity and IFNgamma secretion were evaluated in immunized mice. Hematopoietic progenitor cells from mice bone marrow cells cultured with cytokines for 8 days showed the character of typical mature DCs. Morphologically, these cells were large with oval or irregularly shaped nuclei and with many small dendrites. Phenotypically, FACS analysis showed that they expressed high levels of MHC II, CD11b, CD80, and CD86 antigen, and were negative for CD8alpha. However, immature DCs cultured with cytokines for 5 days did not have typical DCs phenotypic markers. Ex vivo primed T cells with CT26 TP DCs were able to induce effective CTL activity against CT26 tumor cells, but not B16 tumor cells (E:T = 100:1, 60.36 +/- 7.11% specific lysis in CT26 group vs. 17.36 +/- 4.10% specific lysis in B16 group), and produced higher levels of IFNgamma when stimulated with CT26 tumor cells but not when stimulated with B16 tumor cells (1210.33 +/- 72.15 pg/ml in CT26 group vs. 182.25 +/- 25.51 pg/ml in B16 group, P models

  8. HMGA1 induces intestinal polyposis in transgenic mice and drives tumor progression and stem cell properties in colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Belton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although metastatic colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, the molecular mechanisms that enable colon cancer cells to metastasize remain unclear. Emerging evidence suggests that metastatic cells develop by usurping transcriptional networks from embryonic stem (ES cells to facilitate an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, invasion, and metastatic progression. Previous studies identified HMGA1 as a key transcription factor enriched in ES cells, colon cancer, and other aggressive tumors, although its role in these settings is poorly understood. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine how HMGA1 functions in metastatic colon cancer, we manipulated HMGA1 expression in transgenic mice and colon cancer cells. We discovered that HMGA1 drives proliferative changes, aberrant crypt formation, and intestinal polyposis in transgenic mice. In colon cancer cell lines from poorly differentiated, metastatic tumors, knock-down of HMGA1 blocks anchorage-independent cell growth, migration, invasion, xenograft tumorigenesis and three-dimensional colonosphere formation. Inhibiting HMGA1 expression blocks tumorigenesis at limiting dilutions, consistent with depletion of tumor-initiator cells in the knock-down cells. Knock-down of HMGA1 also inhibits metastatic progression to the liver in vivo. In metastatic colon cancer cells, HMGA1 induces expression of Twist1, a gene involved in embryogenesis, EMT, and tumor progression, while HMGA1 represses E-cadherin, a gene that is down-regulated during EMT and metastatic progression. In addition, HMGA1 is among the most enriched genes in colon cancer compared to normal mucosa. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate for the first time that HMGA1 drives proliferative changes and polyp formation in the intestines of transgenic mice and induces metastatic progression and stem-like properties in colon cancer cells. These findings indicate that HMGA1 is a key regulator, both in metastatic

  9. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring and control of cell culture and fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera Padrell, Albert Emili; Petersen, Nanna; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy can potentially provide on-line information on substrate, biomass, product, and metabolite concentrations in fermentation processes, which could be useful for improved monitoring or control. However, several factors can negatively influence the quality...... fusion), and the description of process trajectories. On the basis of the review, we conclude that acceptance of NIR spectroscopy as a standard monitoring tool by the fermentation industry will necessitate considerably more on-line studies using industrially relevant—and highly challenging...... of chemometric models built for interpretation of the spectra, thus impairing the analyte concentration predictions. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of necessary conditions and challenges that one has to face when developing a NIR application for monitoring of cell culture or fermentation...

  10. Changes of Constituents and Activity to Apoptosis and Cell Cycle During Fermentation of Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tea is believed to be beneficial for health, and the effects of the fermentation process on its contributions to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of gastric cancer cells have not been completely investigated. In this study, the chemical components in green tea, black tea and pu-erh tea aqueous extracts were analyzed and compared. The polysaccharide and caffeine levels were substantially higher in the fermented black tea and pu-erh tea, while the polyphenol level was higher in the unfermented green tea. Hence, a treatment of tea aqueous extract and the components, which are emerging as promising anticancer agents, were pursued to determine whether this treatment could lead to enhance apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. In the human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901, the cell viability and flow cytometry analysis for apoptotic cells indicated effects in a dose-dependent inhibition manner for the three tea treatment groups. The apoptosis rates were found to be elevated after 48 h of treatment with 31.2, 125, and 500 μg/mL of green tea extract, the higher catechins content may be involved in the mechanism. Cell cycle was arrested in S phase in the fermented black tea and pu-erh tea, and the populations were significantly decreased in G2/M phases, possibly due to the oxidation of tea polyphenols, which causes an increase of theabrownins. CCC-HEL-1 normal cells were not sensitive to tea extract. These findings suggest that the fermentation process causes changes of the compounds which might be involved in the changes of cell proliferation inhibition, apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest.

  11. Colon cancer and the immune system: The role of tumor invading T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maximilian Waldner; Carl C Schimanski; Markus F Neurath

    2006-01-01

    Colon cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Although the host immune system has been shown to react against tumor cells, mainly through tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and NK cells, tumor cells may utilize different ways to escape anti-tumor immune response. Tumor infiltration of CD8+ and CD4+ (T-bet+)effector T cells has been attributed to a beneficial outcome, and the enhancement of T cell activation through T cell receptor stimulation and co-stimulatory signals provides promising strategies for immunotherapy of colon cancer. Growing evidence supports a role for the Fas/FasL system in tumor immunology, although the mechanisms and consequences of FasL activation in colon cancer are not completely understood. In animal models, depletion of regulatory T cells (CD4+ CD25+T cells) can enhance the anti-tumor immune response under certain conditions. Taken together, recent insights in the immune reaction against colon carcinoma have provided new approaches to immunotherapy,although much remains to be learned about the exact mechanisms.

  12. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2012-05-11

    Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC(50)=75 μM). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  13. Modulation of histamine release from human colon mast cells by protease inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of protease inhibitors to modulate histamine release from human colon mast cells.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 in the absence or presence of tryptase and chymase inhibitors, and histamine release was determined.RESULTS: IgE dependent histamine release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 37%, 26% and 36.8% by chymase inhibitors Z-Ile-Glu-Pro-Phe-CO2Me (ZIGPFM), N-Tosyl-L-phenylalanyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), and α1-antitrypsin, respectively. Similarly, inhibitors of tryptase leupeptin, N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), lactoferrin and protamine were also able to inhibit anti-IgE induced histamine release by a maximum of some 48%, 37%, 40% and 34%, respectively. Preincubation of these inhibitors with cells for 20 min before challenged with anti-IgE had small effect on the inhibitory actions of these inhibitors on colon mast cells. A specific inhibitor of aminopeptidase amastatin had no effect on anti-IgE induced histamine release. The significant inhibition of calcium ionophore induced histamine release was also observed with the inhibitors of tryptase and chymase examined. Apart from leupeptin and protamine, the inhibitors tested by themselves did not stimulate colon mast cells.CONCLUSION: It was demonstrated that both tryptase and chymase inhibitors could inhibit IgE dependent and calcium ionophore induced histamine release from dispersed colon mast cells in a concentration dependent of manner, which suggest that they are likely to be developed as a novel class of anti-inflammatory drugs to treat chronic of colitis in man.

  14. Inhibition of tryptase release from human colon mast cells by protease inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of protease inhibitors to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 in the absence or presence of tryptase and chymase inhibitors,and tryptase release was determined.RESULTS: IgE dependent tryptase release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 37%, 40% and 36.6% by chymase inhibitors Z-Ile-Glu-Pro-Phe-CO2Me (ZIGPFM), N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), and α1-antitrypsin, respectively. Similarly, the inhibitors of tryptase leupeptin, N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and lactoferrin were also able to inhibit anti-IgE induced tryptase release by a maximum of 39.4%,47.6% and 36.6%, respectively. The inhibitory actions of chymase inhibitors, but not tryptase inhibitors on colon mast cells were enhanced by preincubation of them with cells for 20 min before challenged with anti-IgE. At a concentration of 10 μg/mL, protamine was able to inhibit anti-IgE and calcium ionophore induced tryptase release. However, at 100 μg/mL, protamine elevated tryptase levels in supernatants.A specific inhibitor of aminopeptidase amastatin had no effect on anti-IgE induced tryptase release. The significant inhibition of calcium ionophore induced tryptase release was also observed with the inhibitors of tryptase and chymase examined. The inhibitors tested by themselves did not stimulate tryptase release from colon mast cells.CONCLUSION: It was demonstrated for the first time that both tryptase and chymase inhibitors could inhibit IgE dependent and calcium ionophore induced tryptase release from dispersed colon mast cells in a concentration dependent of manner, which suggest that they are likely to be developed as a novel class of anti-inflammatory drugs to treat chronic of colitis in man.

  15. HDAC inhibitors induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Meiying; Lee, Eun Jeoung; Kim, Ki Bae; Kim, Yangmi; Sung, Rohyun; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Kim, Don Soo; Park, Seon Mee

    2015-05-01

    The effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) differ in various types of cancers. We investigated the EMT phenotype in four colon cancer cell lines when challenged with HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A (TSA) and valproic acid (VPA) with or without transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) treatment. Four colon cancer cell lines with different phenotypes in regards to tumorigenicity, microsatellite stability and DNA mutation were used. EMT phenotypes were assessed by the expression of E-cadherin and vimentin using western blot analysis, immunofluorescence, quantitative real-time RT-PCR following treatment with TSA (100 or 200 nM) or VPA (0.5 mM) with or without TGF-β1 (5 ng/ml) for 24 h. Biological EMT phenotypes were also evaluated by cell morphology, migration and invasion assays. TSA or VPA induced mesenchymal features in the colon carcinoma cells by a decrease in E-cadherin and an increase in vimentin expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Confocal microscopy revealed membranous attenuation or nuclear translocation of E-cadherin and enhanced expression of vimentin. These responses occurred after 6 h and increased until 24 h. Colon cancer cells changed from a round or rectangular shape to a spindle shape with increased migration and invasion ability following TSA or VPA treatment. The susceptibility to EMT changes induced by TSA or VPA was comparable in microsatellite stable (SW480 and HT29) and microsatellite unstable cells (DLD1 and HCT116). TSA or VPA induced a mesenchymal phenotype in the colon carcinoma cells and these effects were augmented in the presence of TGF-β1. HDAC inhibitors require careful caution before their application as new anticancer drugs for colon cancers.

  16. A Stochastic Model for Cancer Stem Cell Origin in Metastatic Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoux, Christine; Fohrer, Helene; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Guzik, Lynda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Lewis, Dale W.; Gollin, Susanne M.; Gamblin, T. Clark; Geller, David A.; Lagasse, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Human cancers have been found to include transformed stem cells that may drive cancer progression to metastasis. Here we report that metastatic colon cancer contains clonally derived tumor cells with all of the critical properties expected of stem cells, including self-renewal and to the ability to differentiate into mature colon cells. Additionally, when injected into mice, these cells initiated tumors that closely resemble human cancer. Karyotype analyses of parental and clonally-derived tumor cells expressed many consistent (clonal), along with unique chromosomal aberrations, suggesting the presence of chromosomal instability in the cancer stem cells. Thus, this new model for cancer origin and metastatic progression includes features of both the hierarchical model for cancerous stem cells and the stochastic model, driven by the observation of chromosomal instability. PMID:18757407

  17. Ethanol fermentation of molasses by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells immobilized onto sugar beet pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučurović Vesna M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae onto sugar beet pulp (SBP is a very simple and cheap immobilization method for retaining high cells density in the ethanol fermentation system. In the present study, yeast cells were immobilized by adhesion onto SBP suspended in the synthetic culture media under different conditions such as: glucose concentration (100, 120 and 150 g/l, inoculum concentration (5, 10 and 15 g/l dry mass and temperature (25, 30, 35 and 40°C. In order to estimate the optimal immobilization conditions the yeast cells retention (R, after each immobilization experiment was analyzed. The highest R value of 0.486 g dry mass yeast /g dry mass SBP was obtained at 30°C, glucose concentration of 150 g/l, and inoculum concentration of 15 g/l. The yeast immobilized under these conditions was used for ethanol fermentation of sugar beet molasses containing 150.2 g/l of reducing sugar. Efficient ethanol fermentation (ethanol concentration of 70.57 g/l, fermentation efficiency 93.98% of sugar beet molasses was achieved using S. cerevisiae immobilized by natural adhesion on SBP. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-31002

  18. Fuel cell-based instrumentation for ethanol determination in alcoholic beverages, fermentations, and biofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    The main aim of this project was to devise an alternative method for ethanol assay, employing an electrochemical fuel cell sensor. Thus, the early part of this thesis describes the work carried out in the development of a new analytical technique for this purpose. This work resulted in the production of a successful prototype unit which has led to the development of a commercial instrument, vis., the Lion Drinks Alcolmeter (DA-1) available from Lion Laboratories Ltd. The problem of determining the ethanol content of a fermenting liquor at any point during a fermentation process was also broached and a novel technique combining a flow dilution system, dynamic headspace analysis and a fuel cell sensor was developed. This procedure, suitably automated, will enable the ethanolic content of a fermenting beverage to be determined at any stage during a fermentation, the results obtained in this manner being in excellent agreement with those obtained gas chromatographically. Methods of extending the linear working range of a fuel cell-based sampling system are reported in the hope that the encouraging results obtained may initiate further progress in this field. Finally, the sensing system used in this work has also been utilized with an alternative sampling procedure for the determination of ethanol in biological fluids, mainly for clinical and forensic applications. This work has also led to the production of a commercial instrument, viz. the Lion AE-D3 Alcolmeter.

  19. Immobilization of Microbial Cells for Alcoholic and Malolactic Fermentation of Wine and Cider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Manojlović, Verica; Nedović, Viktor A.

    Wine- or cider-making is highly associated with biotechnology owing to the traditional nature of must fermentation.. Nowadays, there have been considerable developments in wine- or cider-making techniques affecting all phases of wine or cider production, but more importantly, the fermentation process. It is well-known that the transformation of grape must by microbial activity results in the production of wine, and the fermentation of apples (or sometimes pears) in the production of cider. In this process, a variety of compounds affecting the organoleptic profile of wine or cider are synthesized. It is also common sense that in wine- or cider-making, the main objective is to achieve an adequate quality of the product. The technological progress and the improved quality of the wines or ciders have been associated with the control of technical parameters. Herein, cell immobilization offers numerous advantages, such as enhanced fermentation productivity, ability for cell recycling, application of continuous configurations, enhanced cell stability and viability, and improvement of quality (Margaritis and Merchant 1984; Stewart and Russel 1986; Kourkoutas et al. 2004a).

  20. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina [Laboratorio de Fisiología y Biología Molecular, Departamento de Fisiología, Biología Molecular y Celular, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Redal, María Ana [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas y Medicina Experimental, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alghamdi, Mansour A. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Khoder, Mamdouh I. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence in Environmental Studies, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Shamy, Magdy [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Muñoz, Manuel J., E-mail: mmunoz@fbmc.fcen.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Fisiología y Biología Molecular, Departamento de Fisiología, Biología Molecular y Celular, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  1. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2. PMID:27588115

  2. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2.

  3. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of cancer stem-like side population cells in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Long; Wu, Jian-Bing; Yi, Feng-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies in cancer biology suggest that chemotherapeutic drug resistance and tumor relapse are driven by cells within a tumor termed 'cancer stem cells'. In the present study, a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique was used to identify cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells in colon carcinoma, which accounted for 3.4% of the total cell population. Following treatment with verapamil, the population of SP cells was reduced to 0.6%. In addition, the sorted SP cells exhibited marked multidrug resistance and enhanced cell survival rates compared with non‑SP cells. The SP cells were able to generate more tumor spheres and were CD133 positive. Subsequent biochemical analysis revealed that the levels of the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette sub‑family G member 2 transporter protein, B‑cell lymphoma anti‑apoptotic factor and autocrine production of interleukin‑4 were significantly enhanced in the colon cancer SP cells, which contributed to drug resistance, protection of the cells from apoptosis and tumor recurrence. Therefore, the findings suggested that treatment failure and colon tumorigenesis is dictated by a small population of SP cells, which indicate a potential target in future therapies.

  4. Colonic smooth muscle cells and colonic motility patterns as a target for irritable bowel syndrome therapy: mechanisms of action of otilonium bromide

    OpenAIRE

    Rychter, Jakub; Espín, Francisco; Gallego, Diana; Vergara, Patri; Jiménez, Marcel; Clavé, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a spasmolytic compound of the family of quaternary ammonium derivatives and has been successfully used in the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) due to its specific pharmacodynamic effects on motility patterns in the human colon and the contractility of colonic smooth muscle cells. This article examines how. OB inhibits the main patterns of human sigmoid motility in vitro, which are spontaneous rhythmic phasic contractions, smooth muscle tone, ...

  5. CELLULAR BASIS FOR DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY TO CISPLATIN IN HUMAN GERM-CELL TUMOR AND COLON-CARCINOMA CELL-LINES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARK, MWJ; TIMMERBOSSCHA, H; MEIJER, C; UGES, DRA; SLUITER, WJ; PETERS, WHM; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE

    1995-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance mechanisms were studied in a model of three germ cell tumour and three colon carcinoma cell lines representing intrinsically CDDP-sensitive and -resistant tumours respectively. The CDDP sensitivity of the cell lines mimicked the clinical situation. The glutathione levels

  6. CELLULAR BASIS FOR DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY TO CISPLATIN IN HUMAN GERM-CELL TUMOR AND COLON-CARCINOMA CELL-LINES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARK, MWJ; TIMMERBOSSCHA, H; MEIJER, C; UGES, DRA; SLUITER, WJ; PETERS, WHM; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE

    Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance mechanisms were studied in a model of three germ cell tumour and three colon carcinoma cell lines representing intrinsically CDDP-sensitive and -resistant tumours respectively. The CDDP sensitivity of the cell lines mimicked the clinical situation. The glutathione levels

  7. Anti-proliferative action of silibinin on human colon adenomatous cancer HT-29 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reyhan Akhtar; Mohd Ali; Safrannisa Mahmood; Sankar Nath Sanyal

    2014-01-01

    Background: Silibinin a flavonoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) exhibit a variety of pharmacological actions, including anti-proliferative and apoptotic activities against various types of cancers in intact animals and cancer cell lines. In the present study, the effect of silibinin on human colon cancer HT-29 cells was studied. Method: Incubations of cells with different silibinin concentrations (0.783-1,600 μg/ml) for 24, 48 or 72 h showed a progressive decline in cell viability. Res...

  8. Ethanol production potential from fermented rice noodle wastewater treatment using entrapped yeast cell sequencing batch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripattanakul-Ratpukdi, Sumana

    2012-03-01

    Fermented rice noodle production generates a large volume of starch-based wastewater. This study investigated the treatment of the fermented rice noodle wastewater using entrapped cell sequencing batch reactor (ECSBR) compared to traditional sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The yeast cells were applied because of their potential to convert reducing sugar in the wastewater to ethanol. In present study, preliminary treatment by acid hydrolysis was performed. A yeast culture, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with calcium alginate cell entrapment was used. Optimum yeast cell loading in batch experiment and fermented rice noodle treatment performances using ECSBR and SBR systems were examined. In the first part, it was found that the cell loadings (0.6-2.7 × 108 cells/mL) did not play an important role in this study. Treatment reactions followed the second-order kinetics with the treatment efficiencies of 92-95%. In the second part, the result showed that ECSBR performed better than SBR in both treatment efficiency and system stability perspectives. ECSBR maintained glucose removal of 82.5 ± 10% for 5-cycle treatment while glucose removal by SBR declined from 96 to 40% within the 5-cycle treatment. Scanning electron microscopic images supported the treatment results. A number of yeast cells entrapped and attached onto the matrix grew in the entrapment matrix.

  9. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P J; Nout, M J R; Beumer, R R; van der Meulen, J; Zwietering, M H

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and to clarify the mechanism of action. Tempe was prepared at controlled laboratory scale using Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus as the inoculum. Extracts of raw, soaked and cooked soya beans reduced ETEC adhesion to brush border cells by 40%. Tempe extracts reduced adhesion by 80% or more. ETEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells reduced by 50% in the presence of tempe extracts. ETEC K88 bacteria were found to interact with soya bean extracts, and this may contribute to the observed decrease of ETEC adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. Fermented soya beans (tempe) reduce the adhesion of ETEC to intestinal epithelial cells of pig and human origin. This reduced adhesion is caused by an interaction between ETEC K88 bacteria and soya bean compounds. The results strengthen previous observations on the anti-diarrhoeal effect of tempe. This effect indicates that soya-derived compounds may reduce adhesion of ETEC to intestinal cells in pigs as well as in humans and prevent against diarrhoeal diseases.

  10. Depletion of mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 causes increased apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue-Yamauchi, Akane, E-mail: ainoyama@research.twmu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan); Oda, Hideaki [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 is required for mitochondrial fission in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 participates in inhibition of colon cancer cell apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 can inhibit apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release. -- Abstract: Mitochondria play a critical role in regulation of apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, by releasing apoptogenic factors including cytochrome c. Growing evidence suggests that dynamic changes in mitochondrial morphology are involved in cellular apoptotic response. However, whether DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission is required for induction of apoptosis remains speculative. Here, we show that siRNA-mediated DRP1 knockdown promoted accumulation of elongated mitochondria in HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells. Surprisingly, DRP1 down-regulation led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells. A higher rate of cytochrome c release and reductions in mitochondrial membrane potential were also revealed in DRP1-depleted cells. Taken together, our present findings suggest that mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 inhibits colon cancer cell apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release and mitochondrial membrane integrity.

  11. Effects of low-dose radiation on adaptive response in colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Cui, J-W; Hu, J-H; Gao, S-J; Liu, X-L

    2017-07-01

    Biological effects of low-dose radiation (LDR) are distinguishable from those of high-dose radiation. Adaptive response is an important biological effect following low-dose radiation. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have self-renewal and multidirectional differentiation potency which results in relapse and metastasis of cancer. In this study, we aimed to examine whether adaptive response could be induced in CSCs by LDR. Parental cells of three colon cancer cell lines (HRT18, HT29, and HCT116) and CSCs of these three cell lines were irradiated with LDR (i.e., D1) and then high-dose radiation (HDR) of X-rays (i.e., D1 + D2) or only HDR (D2 alone), followed by examination of adaptive response. Adaptive response was not observed either in the three tumor parental cells lines or in three CSCs lines following LDR, due to the lack of resistance to subsequent D2-induced cell growth inhibition. These results suggested that LDR may not induce adaptive response in colon cancer cells or colon CSCs under in vitro conditions. Our study provided experimental and clinical foundations for the application of LDR in the treatment of colon cancers.

  12. Proteins that interact with calgranulin B in the human colon cancer cell line HCT-116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Shin, Daye; Kim, Jong Heon; Cho, Jae Youl; Yoo, Byong Chul

    2017-01-01

    Calgranulin B is released from immune cells and can be internalized into colon cancer cells to prevent proliferation. The present study aimed to identify proteins that interact with calgranulin B to suppress the proliferation of colon cancer cells, and to obtain information on the underlying anti-tumor mechanism(s) of calgranulin B. Calgranulin B expression was induced in colon cancer cell line HCT-116 by infection with calgranulin B-FLAG expressing lentivirus, and it led to a significant suppression of cell proliferation. Proteins that interacted with calgranulin B were obtained by immunoprecipitation using whole homogenate of lentivirus-infected HCT-116 cells which expressing calgranulin B-FLAG, and identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 454 proteins were identified that potentially interact with calgranulin B, and most identified proteins were associated with RNA processing, post-transcriptional modifications and the EIF2 signaling pathway. Direct interaction of calgranulin B with flotillin-1, dynein intermediate chain 1, and CD59 glycoprotein has been confirmed, and the molecules N-myc proto-oncogene protein, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, and myc proto-oncogene protein were shown to regulate calgranulin B-interacting proteins. Our results provide new insight and useful information to explain the possible mechanism(s) underlying the role of calgranulin B as an anti-tumor effector in colon cancer cells. PMID:28036279

  13. Signal pathways involved in emodin-induced contraction of smooth muscle cells from rat colon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Ma; Qing-Hui Qi; Jian Xu; Zuo-Liang Dong; Wen-Xiu Yang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects induced by emodin on single smooth muscle cells from rat colon in vitro, and to determine the signal pathways involved.METHODS: Cells were isolated from the muscle layers of Wistar rat colon by enzymatic digestion. Cell length was measured by computerized image micrometry. Intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) signals were studied using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 and confocal microscopy. PKCα distribution at rest state or after stimulation was measured with immunofluorescence confocal microscopy.RESULTS: (1) Emodin dose-dependently caused colonic smooth muscle cells contraction; (2) emodin induced an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration; (3) the contractile responses induced by emodin were respectively inhibited by preincubation of the cells with ML-7 (an inhibitorof MLCK)and calphostin C (an inhibitor of PKC); (4) Incubation of cells with emodin caused translocation of PKCα from cytosolic area to the membrane.CONCLUSION: Emodin has a direct contractile effect on colonic smooth muscle cell. This signal cascade induced by emodin is initiated by increased [Ca2+]i and PKCα translocation,which in turn lead to the activation of MLCK and the suppression of MLCP. Both of them contribute to the emodininduced contraction.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma overexpression suppresses proliferation of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu, E-mail: ttamotsu@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Integrative Physiology and Bio-System Control, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Haniu, Hisao [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the correlation between PPAR{gamma} expression and cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} overexpression reduces cell viability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show the synergistic effect of cell growth inhibition by a PPAR{gamma} agonist. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) plays an important role in the differentiation of intestinal cells and tissues. Our previous reports indicate that PPAR{gamma} is expressed at considerable levels in human colon cancer cells. This suggests that PPAR{gamma} expression may be an important factor for cell growth regulation in colon cancer. In this study, we investigated PPAR{gamma} expression in 4 human colon cancer cell lines, HT-29, LOVO, DLD-1, and Caco-2. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis revealed that the relative levels of PPAR{gamma} mRNA and protein in these cells were in the order HT-29 > LOVO > Caco-2 > DLD-1. We also found that PPAR{gamma} overexpression promoted cell growth inhibition in PPAR{gamma} lower-expressing cell lines (Caco-2 and DLD-1), but not in higher-expressing cells (HT-29 and LOVO). We observed a correlation between the level of PPAR{gamma} expression and the cells' sensitivity for proliferation.

  15. Krüppel-Like Factor 4 Acts as an Oncogene in Colon Cancer Stem Cell-Enriched Spheroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qinghua; Tan, Jun; Yue, Zhongyi; Chen, Jinhuang; Xi, Hailin; Li, Jie; Zheng, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a rare population in any type of cancers, including colon cancer, are tumorigenic. It has been thought that CSCs are responsible for cancer recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance. Isolating CSCs in colon cancers is challenging, and thus the molecular mechanism regulating the self-renewing and differentiation of CSCs remains unknown. We cultured DLD-1 cells, one of types of cells derived from colon cancers, in serum-free medium to obtain spheroid cells. These cells possessed the characteristics of CSCs, with the expression of CD133, CD166, Lgr5, and ALDH1, higher capacities of chemo-resistance, migration, invasion, and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo than the adherent DLD-1 cells. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is essential factor for maintaining self-renewal of adult and embryonic stem cells. It has been used to induce pluripotent stem cells (iPS) from somatic cells. Since KLF4 is expressed in colon cancer cells, we investigated its role in spheroid cells isolated from DLD-1 cells and found that KLF4 was overexpressed only in spheroid cells and reducing the expression of KLF4 by short-hairpin RNA significantly decreased the capacities of these cells to resist the chemicals, migrate, invade, and generate tumors in vitro and in vivo. The spheroid cells with reduced KLF4 expression also had decreased expression of CSCs markers and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, culturing DLD-1 cells in serum-free medium enriches CSCs and the expression of KLF4 is essential for the characteristics of CSCs in DLD-1; thus KLF4 can be a potential therapeutic target for treating colon cancer. PMID:23418515

  16. Kruppel-like factor 4 acts as an oncogene in colon cancer stem cell-enriched spheroid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwei Leng

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs, a rare population in any type of cancers, including colon cancer, are tumorigenic. It has been thought that CSCs are responsible for cancer recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance. Isolating CSCs in colon cancers is challenging, and thus the molecular mechanism regulating the self-renewing and differentiation of CSCs remains unknown. We cultured DLD-1 cells, one of types of cells derived from colon cancers, in serum-free medium to obtain spheroid cells. These cells possessed the characteristics of CSCs, with the expression of CD133, CD166, Lgr5, and ALDH1, higher capacities of chemo-resistance, migration, invasion, and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo than the adherent DLD-1 cells. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4 is essential factor for maintaining self-renewal of adult and embryonic stem cells. It has been used to induce pluripotent stem cells (iPS from somatic cells. Since KLF4 is expressed in colon cancer cells, we investigated its role in spheroid cells isolated from DLD-1 cells and found that KLF4 was overexpressed only in spheroid cells and reducing the expression of KLF4 by short-hairpin RNA significantly decreased the capacities of these cells to resist the chemicals, migrate, invade, and generate tumors in vitro and in vivo. The spheroid cells with reduced KLF4 expression also had decreased expression of CSCs markers and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, culturing DLD-1 cells in serum-free medium enriches CSCs and the expression of KLF4 is essential for the characteristics of CSCs in DLD-1; thus KLF4 can be a potential therapeutic target for treating colon cancer.

  17. Treatment of established colon carcinoma-bearing mice by dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING MinGang; ZHEN QiuHong; LIU Sheng; GONG FuSheng; XIE YunQing

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated CT26 colon carcinoma cells. Bone marrow-derived DCs were pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells and were used to immunize BALB/c mice with established colon carcinoma. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was detected. The therapeutic effect induced by DCs was observed by tumor weight and survival time. DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells markedly induced specific cytotoxic activity of CTLs. Tumor growth in the immunized BALB/c mice was significantly inhibited and the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice was prolonged, DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells have an observable therapeutic effect on established colon carcinoma-bearing mice.

  18. Treatment of established colon carcinoma-bearing mice by dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated CT26 colon carcinoma cells. Bone marrow-derived DCs were pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells and were used to immunize BALB/c mice with established colon carcinoma. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was detected. The therapeutic effect induced by DCs was observed by tumor weight and survival time. DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells markedly induced specific cytotoxic activity of CTLs. Tumor growth in the immunized BALB/c mice was significantly inhibited and the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice was prolonged. DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells have an observable therapeutic effect on established colon carcinoma-bearing mice.

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of the ERβ Gene on the Estrogen Signal Transfection Pathway in Colon Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟荣林; 王国斌; 蔡开琳; 陶凯雄; 许飞; 张万里; 王智勇

    2010-01-01

    We studied the regulatory effects of the estragen receptorβ(ERβ)gene on the downstream estrogen signal transfection pathway in colon cancer cells and the possible mechanisms involved.A human ERβ gene recombinant expression plasmid,pEGFP-C1-ERβ,was constructed and transfected into the Caco-2 colon cancer cell line,a line with low ERβ gene expression.The expression of ERβ mRNA and protein was detected 72h after transfection.RT-PCR was used to examine the expression levels of the progesterone recepror(PR)gene ...

  20. Baculovirus vector-mediated transfer of NIS gene into colon tumor cells for radionuclide therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the feasibility of radionuclide therapy of colon tumor cells by baculovirus vector-mediated transfer of the sodium/iodide symporter(NIS) gene.METHODS:A recombinant baculovirus plasmid carrying the NIS gene was constructed,and the viruses(BacNIS) were prepared using the Bac-to-Bac system.The infection efficiency in the colon cancer cell line SW1116 of a green fluorescent protein(GFP) expressing baculovirus(Bac-GFP) at different multiplicities of infection(MOI) with various concentrations o...

  1. Increasing ethanol productivity during xylose fermentation by cell recycling of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    The influence of cell recycling of xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae TMB3001 was investigated during continuous cultivation on a xylose-glucose mixture. By using cell recycling at the dilution rate (D) of 0.05 h(-1), the cell-mass concentration could be increased from 2.2 g l(-1) to 22 g l...... ethanol productivity was in the range of 0.23-0.26 g g(-1) h(-1) with or without cell recycling, showing that an increased cell-mass concentration did not influence the efficiency of the yeast....

  2. Polystyrene nanoparticles facilitate the internalization of impermeable biomolecules in non-tumour and tumour cells from colon epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabeza, Laura [University of Granada, Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER) (Spain); Cano-Cortés, Victoria; Rodríguez, María J. [University of Granada, Department of Pharmaceutical and Organic Chemistry (Spain); Vélez, Celia; Melguizo, Consolación, E-mail: melguizo@ugr.es [University of Granada, Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER) (Spain); Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M., E-mail: rmsanchez@ugr.es [University of Granada, Department of Pharmaceutical and Organic Chemistry (Spain); Prados, Jose [University of Granada, Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER) (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    Advanced colon cancer has a poor prognosis due to the limited effectiveness of current chemotherapies. Treatment failures may be avoided by the utilization of nanoparticles, which can enhance the effects of antitumor drugs, reduce their side effects and increase their directionality. Polystyrene nanoparticles have shown high biocompatibility and appropriate physicochemical properties and may represent a novel and more effective approach against colon cancer. In the present study, polystyrene nanoparticles were synthesized and fluorescently labelled, analyzing their cell internalization, intracellular localization and capacity to release transported molecules in tumour and non-tumour human colon cell lines (T84 and CCD-18). Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy studies demonstrated that polystyrene nanoparticles are an effective vehicle for the intracellular delivery of small molecules into colon epithelium cells. The percentage cell uptake was around 100 % in both T84 and CCD-18 cell lines after only 24 h of exposure and was cell confluence-independent. The polystyrene nanoparticles showed no cytotoxicity in either colon cell line. It was found that small molecules can be efficiently delivered into colon cells by using a disulphide bridge as release strategy. Analysis of the influence of the functionalization of the polystyrene nanoparticles surface on the internalization efficiency revealed some morphological changes in these cells. These results demonstrate that polystyrene nanoparticles may improve the transport of biomolecules into colon cells which could have a potential application in chemotherapeutic treatment against colon cancer.

  3. Polystyrene nanoparticles facilitate the internalization of impermeable biomolecules in non-tumour and tumour cells from colon epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Laura; Cano-Cortés, Victoria; Rodríguez, María J.; Vélez, Celia; Melguizo, Consolación; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M.; Prados, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Advanced colon cancer has a poor prognosis due to the limited effectiveness of current chemotherapies. Treatment failures may be avoided by the utilization of nanoparticles, which can enhance the effects of antitumor drugs, reduce their side effects and increase their directionality. Polystyrene nanoparticles have shown high biocompatibility and appropriate physicochemical properties and may represent a novel and more effective approach against colon cancer. In the present study, polystyrene nanoparticles were synthesized and fluorescently labelled, analyzing their cell internalization, intracellular localization and capacity to release transported molecules in tumour and non-tumour human colon cell lines (T84 and CCD-18). Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy studies demonstrated that polystyrene nanoparticles are an effective vehicle for the intracellular delivery of small molecules into colon epithelium cells. The percentage cell uptake was around 100 % in both T84 and CCD-18 cell lines after only 24 h of exposure and was cell confluence-independent. The polystyrene nanoparticles showed no cytotoxicity in either colon cell line. It was found that small molecules can be efficiently delivered into colon cells by using a disulphide bridge as release strategy. Analysis of the influence of the functionalization of the polystyrene nanoparticles surface on the internalization efficiency revealed some morphological changes in these cells. These results demonstrate that polystyrene nanoparticles may improve the transport of biomolecules into colon cells which could have a potential application in chemotherapeutic treatment against colon cancer.

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid sensitizes colon cancer cells to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Eunmyong; Lee, Eun-Hye; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Cha, Jun Hyung; Choi, Hwanho; Park, Wanseo; Choi, Hyeon Kyeom; Ko, Seong-Hee; Kim, So Hee

    2012-06-01

    Sulindac analogs represent one of the most efficacious groups of NSAIDs reducing the risk of colon cancer. Recent studies have shown that sulindac sulfide, a sulindac analog effective at lower doses compared to its parent compound, triggers the death receptor (DR)5-dependent extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Induction of apoptosis via activation of the DR-mediated pathway would be an ideal therapeutic strategy to eliminate cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the possibility that colon cancer cells are sensitized to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), via activation of the DR/extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Our data demonstrated that DHA combination sensitized colon cancer cells to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis, leading to enhanced growth suppression of human colon cancer xenografts. The combination effect was primarily attributed to increased cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-8 activation. Moreover, pretreatment with z-IETD-FMK (caspase-8 inhibitor) or stable expression of dominant negative caspase-8 genes blocked DHA/sulindac sulfide cotreatment-induced apoptosis. In view of the finding that DR5 silencing abrogated the combination-stimulated apoptosis, we propose that apoptotic synergy induced by sulindac sulfide plus DHA is mediated via DR5. Our findings collectively support the utility of a combination of sulindac sulfide and DHA in the effective prevention and treatment of colon cancer.

  5. Colon Cancer Chemoprevention by Sage Tea Drinking: Decreased DNA Damage and Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Dalila F N; Ramos, Alice A; Lima, Cristovao F; Baltazar, Fatima; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Salvia officinalis and some of its isolated compounds have been found to be preventive of DNA damage and increased proliferation in vitro in colon cells. In the present study, we used the azoxymethane model to test effects of S. officinalis on colon cancer prevention in vivo. The results showed that sage treatment reduced the number of ACF formed only if administered before azoxymethane injection, demonstrating that sage tea drinking has a chemopreventive effect on colorectal cancer. A decrease in the proliferation marker Ki67 and in H2 O2 -induced and azoxymethane-induced DNA damage to colonocytes and lymphocytes were found with sage treatment. This confirms in vivo the chemopreventive effects of S. officinalis. Taken together, our results show that sage treatment prevented initiation phases of colon carcinogenesis, an effect due, at least in part, to DNA protection, and reduced proliferation rates of colon epithelial cell that prevent mutations and their fixation through cell replication. These chemopreventive effects of S. officinalis on colon cancer add to the many health benefits attributed to sage and encourage its consumption.

  6. Production of proteinase A by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a cell-recycling fermentation system: Experiments and computer simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, S.; Biedermann, K.; Emborg, Claus

    1996-01-01

    Overproduction of proteinase A by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated by cultivations in a cell-recycling bioreactor. Membrane filtration was used to separate cells from the broth. Recycling ratios and dilution rates were varied and the effect on enzyme production was studied both...... productivities were at high dilution rates just below washout and at high ratios of recycling. Cell-recycling fermentation gave much higher volumetric productivities and stable product concentrations in contrast to simple continuous fermentation....

  7. Modulation of tryptase secretion from human colon mast cells by histamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of histamine to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells and the potential mechanisms.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colons were challenged with histamine, anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 (CI), and the cell supernatants after challenge were collected. Tryptase release was determined with a sandwich ELISA procedure.able to induce a "bell" shape dose related release of tryptase from colon mast cells. The maximum release of tryptase was approximately 3.5 fold more than spontaneous release. As little as 10 ng/mL histamine showed a similar potency to 10 μg/mL anti-IgE in induction of tryptase release. Histamine induced release of tryptase initiated at 10 s when histamine (100 ng/mL) was added to cells, gradually increased thereafter, and completed at 5 min, Both pertussis toxin or metabolic inhibitors were able to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release. When histamine and anti-IgE were added to colon mast cells at the same time, the quantity of tryptase released was similar to that induced by anti-IgE alone. The similar results were observed with CI. However, when various concentrations of histamine were incubated with cells for 20 min before adding anti-IgE or CI, the quantity of tryptase released was similar to that was induced by histamine alone.CONCLUSION: Histamine is a potent activator of human colon mast cells, which represents a novel and pivotal selfamplification mechanism of mast cell degranulation.

  8. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China); Dong, Wei-Guo, E-mail: dongwg1966@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine inhibited cell viability of colon cancer in a time- and dose- dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine promoted apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorigenicity was inhibited by noscapine. -- Abstract: Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC{sub 50} = 75 {mu}M). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G{sub 2}/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  9. The calcium-sensing receptor--a driver of colon cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, J F

    2009-04-01

    Dietary Ca(2+) reduces colon cell proliferation and carcinogenesis, but it becomes ineffective or even tumor-promoting during carcinogenesis. It appears that Ca(2+) and the colon cell CaSR together brake the massive cell production in normal colon crypts. The rapid proliferation of the transit-amplifying (TA) progeny of the colon stem cells at the bases of the crypts is driven by the "Wnt" signaling mechanism that stimulates proliferogenic genes and prevents apoptogenesis. It appears that TA cell cycling stops and terminal differentiation starts when the cells reach a higher level in the crypt where there is enough external Ca(2+) to stimulate the expression of CaSRs, the signals from which stimulate the expression of E-cadherin. At this point the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) protein appears and some of it enters the nucleus. There it removes the apoptogenesis shield and stops the beta-cateninTcf-4 complex from driving further TA cell proliferation by releasing beta-catenin from the nucleus, and delivering it to cytoplasmic APCaxinGSK-3beta complexes for ultimate proteasomal destruction. Cytoplasmic beta-catenin is prevented from returning to the nucleus by destruction in APCaxinGSK-3beta complexes or locked by the emerging E-cadherin into adherens junctions which link the cell to proliferatively shut-down functioning cells with APC-dependent cytoskeletons moving up and out of the crypt. A common first step in colon carcinogenesis is the loss of functional APC which results in the retention of proliferogenic nuclear beta-cateninTcf-4. This drives the eventual appearance of mutation accumulating, apoptosis-resistant clones the proliferation of which cannot be inhibited by external Ca(2+) because of CaSR-disabling gene mutations.

  10. The anti-cancer effects of poi (Colocasia esculenta) on colonic adenocarcinoma cells In vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy C; Reitzenstein, Jonathan E; Liu, Jessie; Jadus, Martin R

    2005-09-01

    Hawaiians tend to have lower incidence rates of colorectal cancer and it was hypothesized that this may be due to ethnic differences in diet, specifically, their consumption of poi, a starchy paste made from the taro (Colocasia esulenta L.) plant corm. Soluble extracts of poi were incubated at 100 mg/mL in vitro for antiproliferative activity against the rat YYT colon cancer cell line. (3)H-thymidine incorporation studies were conducted to demonstrate that the poi inhibited the proliferation of these cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. The greatest suppression of YYT colon cancer growth occurred when 25% concentration was used. When poi was incubated with the YYT cells after 2 days, the YYT cells underwent apoptotic changes as evidenced by a positive terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) stain. Poi enhanced the proliferation of normal mouse splenocyte control cells, suggesting that poi is not simply toxic to all cells but even has a positive immunostimulatory role. By flow cytometry, T cells (CD4+ and CD8+) were predominantly activated by the poi. Although numerous factors can contribute to the risk of colon cancer, perhaps poi consumption may contribute to the lower colon cancer rates among Hawaiians by two distinct mechanisms. First, by inducing apoptosis within colon cancer cells; second, by non-specifically activating lymphocytes, which in turn can lyse cancerous cells. Our results suggest for the first time that poi may have novel tumor specific anti-cancer activities and future research is suggested with animal studies and human clinical trials.

  11. Assessment of the manufacturability of Escherichia coli high cell density fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Pardo, M A; Ali, S; Balasundaram, B; Mannall, G J; Baganz, F; Bracewell, D G

    2011-01-01

    The physical and biological conditions of the host cell obtained at the end of fermentation influences subsequent downstream processing unit operations. The ability to monitor these characteristics is central to the improvement of biopharmaceutical manufacture. In this study, we have used a combination of techniques such as adaptive focus acoustics (AFA) and ultra scale-down (USD) centrifugation that utilize milliliter quantities of sample to obtain an insight into the interaction between cells from the upstream process and initial downstream unit operations. This is achieved primarily through an assessment of cell strength and its impact on large-scale disc stack centrifugation performance, measuring critical attributes such as viscosity and particle size distribution. An Escherichia coli fed-batch fermentation expressing antibody fragments in the periplasm was used as a model system representative of current manufacturing challenges. The weakening of cell strength during cultivation time, detected through increased micronization and viscosity, resulted in a 2.6-fold increase in product release rates from the cell (as measured by AFA) and approximately fourfold decrease in clarification performance (as measured by USD centrifugation). The information obtained allows for informed harvest point decisions accounting for both product leakages during fermentation and potential losses during primary recovery. The clarification performance results were verified at pilot scale. The use of these technologies forms a route to the process understanding needed to tailor the host cell and upstream process to the product and downstream process, critical to the implementation of quality-by-design principles.

  12. Continuous gas fermentation by Acetobacterium woodii in a submerged membrane reactor with full cell retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzow, Christina; Mayer, Alexander; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-10-20

    Acetogenic bacteria like Acetobacterium woodii represent an ancient group of anaerobic microorganisms which use hydrogen and carbon dioxide to produce acetate. Cell concentrations and space-time yields are usually low in gas fermentations. A standard stirred‑tank bioreactor with continuous gas supply was equipped with a customized submerged microfiltration unit. A. woodii showed similar growth behavior with an initial maximal growth rate of 1.2 d(-1) in continuous gas fermentations with full cell retention and varying dilution rates. A steady increase of cell mass concentrations was observed with the highest biomass formation at the highest dilution rate. By contrast the final acetate concentrations were lowest at the highest dilution rate. The highest final acetate space-time yield of 148 g l(-1) d(-1) was measured at the highest dilution rate (increase by factor 8 compared to a standard batch process or by factor 37 compared to published data). The highest reported cell concentration of A. woodii in gas fermentations of nearly 14 g l(-1) cell dry weight was achieved in the submerged membrane bioreactor with increased yeast extract concentrations in the feed medium. Product inhibition was observed when acetate concentrations exceeded 8-12 g l(-1) causing a steady decrease in cell mass specific acetate production rates.

  13. Variation of fermentation redox potential during cell-recycling continuous ethanol operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thani, Arthit; Lin, Yen-Han; Laopaiboon, Pattana; Laopaiboon, Lakkana

    2016-12-10

    Fermentation redox potential was monitored during cell-recycling continuous ethanol operation. The cell-recycling system (CRS) was operated using two hollow fibre (HF) membranes (pore sizes 0.20 and 0.65μm) at three dilution rates (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08h(-1)). Saccharomyces cerevisiae NP 01 were recycled in the fermenter at a recycle ratio of 0.625. Aeration was provided at 2.5vvm for the first 4h and then further supplied continuously at 0.25vvm. As steady state was established, results showed that the fermentation redox potential was lower for processes employing CRS than those without. At the same dilution rates, the sugar utilization and ethanol production with CRS were higher than those without CRS. The highest fermentation efficiency (87.94g/l of ethanol, ∼90% of theoretical yield) was achieved using a 0.2-μm HF membrane CRS at a dilution rate of 0.02h(-1). It was found that 7.53-10.07% of the carbon derived from glucose was incorporated into the yeast. Further, at the same dilution rates, yeast in the processes with CRS incorporated less carbon into ethanol than in those grown without CRS. This result suggests that processes involving CRS utilize more carbon for metabolite synthesis than biomass formation. This indicated that the processes with CRS could utilize more carbon for metabolite synthesis than biomass formation.

  14. Monitoring of probiotic bacterial cells Lactobacillus casei in dry fermented sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Burdychová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination of microbiology cultivation methods and methods of molecular biology is the best way how to achieve correct qualitative and quantitative probiotic analysis. The aim of this study was mo­ni­to­ring of amounts of different starter bacteria supplemented with probiotic bacterial cells Lactobacillus casei (Chr. Hansen during fermentation and ripening of fermented sausages. Two starter cultures, one consisted of Pediococcus pentosaceus and Staphylococcus xylosus, the second of Pediococcus pentosaceus and Staphylococcus carnosus, were used for the production of sausages. As a detection method of starter and probiotic cell counts, the cultivation on MRS –IM – sorbitol agar was used. Furthermore, the confirmation of L. casei was carried out using species specific PCR. The counts of probiotic L. casei in both probiotic sausages were 106/g and stayed at this level during the whole ripening period (100 days. The counts of starter bacteria were 107/g after the 7 days of fermentation and stayed at this level during the whole fermentation period. PCR from one bacterial colony confirmed the identity of L. casei in 80% of analysed colonies.

  15. Improvement of a continuous ethanol fermentation from sweet sorghum stem juice using a cell recycling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thani, Arthit; Laopaiboon, Pattana; Laopaiboon, Lakkana

    2017-06-10

    The process variables (aeration rate and recycle ratio) of a continuous ethanol fermentation with a cell recycling system (CRS) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NP 01 from sweet sorghum stem juice were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The relationship between intracellular composition and fermentation efficiency was also investigated. RSM results revealed that the optimum aeration rate and recycle ratio were 0.25vvm and 0.625, respectively. The validation experiment under the optimum conditions indicated high precision and reliability of the experiment, achieving an actual ethanol concentration (PE) of 99.28g/l, which was very close to the predicted value (98.01g/l), and a very high ethanol productivity (QP) of 7.94g/lh. The intracellular composition of the yeast cells (i.e., unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), total fatty acids (TFAs), ergosterol and trehalose) was positively related to the fermentation efficiency and yeast adaptive response under ethanol stress. A higher ratio of UFAs/TFAs and ergosterol strongly promoted yeast viability and ethanol fermentation. Additionally, high trehalose content was observed when the yeast was subjected to stress conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Secreted human adipose leptin decreases mitochondrial respiration in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einav Yehuda-Shnaidman

    Full Text Available Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese subjects decreased basal (40%, p<0.05 and maximal (50%, p<0.05 OCR and gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and Bax without affecting cell viability or expression of glycolytic enzymes. Similar changes could be recapitulated by incubating cells with leptin, whereas, leptin-receptor specific antagonist inhibited the reduced OCR induced by conditioned media from obese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues.

  17. The flavonol isorhamnetin exhibits cytotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Sara; Lopez, Sergio; Varela, Lourdes M; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Jimenez, Ana; Abia, Rocio; Guillen, Rafael; Muriana, Francisco J G

    2010-10-27

    The aim of this study was to determine whether isorhamnetin, an immediate 3'-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, affects proliferation, cell death, and the cell cycle of human colon carcinoma (HCT-116) cells. Isorhamnetin was found to be a potent antiproliferative agent in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 72 μM after 48 h of incubation as estimated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that isorhamnetin exerted a stimulatory effect on apoptosis and necrosis. Isorhamnetin also increased the number of cells in G2/M phase. Serum deprivation appeared to potentiate the effects of isorhamnetin on cell death and facilitated cell cycle progression to G0/G1 phase. These results suggest that isorhamnetin might mediate inhibition of HCT-116 cell growth through the perturbation of cell cycle progression and are consistent with the notion that G2/M checkpoints could be a conserved target for flavonoids in human colon cancer cells, leading to apoptotic and necrotic death. These antiproliferative, apoptotic, necrotic, and cell cycle effects suggest that isorhamnetin may have clinically significant therapeutic and chemopreventive capabilities. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of isorhamnetin on human colon cancer cells.

  18. Stimulation of electro-fermentation in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells driven by genetically engineered anode biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awate, Bhushan; Steidl, Rebecca J.; Hamlischer, Thilo; Reguera, Gemma

    2017-07-01

    Unwanted metabolites produced during fermentations reduce titers and productivity and increase the cost of downstream purification of the targeted product. As a result, the economic feasibility of otherwise attractive fermentations is low. Using ethanol fermentation by the consolidated bioprocessing cellulolytic bacterium Cellulomonas uda, we demonstrate the effectiveness of anodic electro-fermentations at maximizing titers and productivity in a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (SCMEC) without the need for metabolic engineering of the fermentative microbe. The performance of the SCMEC platform relied on the genetic improvements of anode biofilms of the exoelectrogen Geobacter sulfurreducens that prevented the oxidation of cathodic hydrogen and improved lactate oxidation. Furthermore, a hybrid bioanode was designed that maximized the removal of organic acids in the fermentation broth. The targeted approach increased cellobiose consumption rates and ethanol titers, yields, and productivity three-fold or more, prevented pH imbalances and reduced batch-to-batch variability. In addition, the sugar substrate was fully consumed and ethanol was enriched in the broth during the electro-fermentation, simplifying its downstream purification. Such improvements and the possibility of scaling up SCMEC configurations highlight the potential of anodic electro-fermentations to stimulate fermentative bacteria beyond their natural capacity and to levels required for industrial implementation.

  19. [Phenotypic analysis of Th cells in colon and peripheral blood in patients with irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Tong, Jing-Jing; Pan, Qi; Wang, Wen-Feng; Zou, Kai-Fang; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiao-Hua

    2009-08-11

    OBJECTIVE; To analyze the change of Th1/Th2/Th17 in colonic mucosa and peripheral blood in diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) to uncover the underlying mechanism for the activation of mucosal immune system. Colonic biopsy specimens and peripheral blood were obtained from patients with D-IBS (n = 27) and controls (n = 16). Two different groups were classified on the basis of histological assessment of biopsy specimens from D-IBS patients. One group (14 of 27) had normal conventional histology (IBS), while another group (13 of 27) had nonspecific microscopic inflammation (IBS-A). Flow cytometric detection of intracellular IFN-gamma/IL-4/IL-17 cytokine production was employed to investigate Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells in colonic lamina propria and peripheral blood. Western blot was used to determine the expressions of IL-12, IL-4 and IL-17 in colonic mucosa. The levels of IL-12, IL-4 and IL-17 in peripheral blood were detected by ELISA. In colonic mucosa, the proportion of Th17 increased in IBS-A group as compared with controls [3.60 (4.05) vs 1.25 (3.70), P = 0.045], but not in IBS group. No difference could be observed in the frequencies of Th1 and Th2 in colonic mucosa and peripheral blood. The levels of IL-12, IL4 and IL-17 in IBS and IBS-A showed no difference in either colonic mucosa or peripheral blood. Subgroup of D-IBS showed abnormal conventional histology, implicating the activation of mucosal immune system in pathogenesis. The shift of Th1/Th2/Th17 balance in colonic mucosa showed the enhanced Th17 activity.

  20. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie, E-mail: tongrensj163@163.com [Department of Administrative, Tongren Hospital, No. 786 Yuyuan Road, Changning District, Shanghai (China)

    2015-08-07

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions. - Highlights: • AR-42 is anti-proliferative against primary/established colon cancer cells. • AR-42 induces significant apoptotic death in primary/established colon cancer cells. • Ceramide production mediates AR-42-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells. • AR-42 oral administration potently inhibits SW-620 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  1. Effect of dissolved oxygen, temperature, initial cell count, and sugar concentration on the viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in rapid fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagodawithana, T W; Castellano, C; Steinkraus, K H

    1974-09-01

    By using 7 x 10(8) cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae per ml with which 25 degrees Brix honey solutions were fermented to 9.5% (wt/vol; 12% vol/vol) ethanol in 2.5 to 3 h at 30 C, i.e., rapid fermentation, the death rate was found to be high, with only 2.1% of the yeast cells surviving at the end of 3 h under anaerobic conditions. As the dissolved oxygen in the medium was increased from 0 to 13 to 20 to 100% in rapid fermentations at 30 C, there was a progressive increase in the percentage of cells surviving. The ethanol production rate and total were not seriously affected by a dissolved oxygen concentration of 13%, but fermentation was retarded by 20% dissolved oxygen and still further decreased as the dissolved oxygen content reached 100%. When the fermentation temperature was decreased to 15 C (at 13% dissolved oxygen), the rate of fermentation decreased, and the fermentation time to 9.5% ethanol (wt/vol) increased to 6 h. It was found that the higher the temperature between 15 and 30 C, the greater the rate of death as initial cell counts were increased from 1.1 x 10(7) to 7.8 x 10(8) cells per ml. At the lowest level of inoculum, 1.1 x 10(7) cells per ml, there was actual multiplication, even at 30 C; however, the fermentation was no longer rapid. The addition of 15% sugar, initially followed after an hour by the remaining 10%, or addition of the sugar in increments of 2.5 or 5% yielded a better survival rate of yeast cells than when the fermentation was initiated with 25% sugar.

  2. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  3. Hydrogen production from continuous flow, microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Valerie J; Hatzell, Marta; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-11-01

    A microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC) was used to produce hydrogen gas from fermentation wastewater without the need for additional electrical energy. Increasing the number of cell pairs in the reverse electrodialysis stack from 5 to 10 doubled the maximum current produced from 60 A/m(3) to 120 A/m(3) using acetate. However, more rapid COD removal required a decrease in the anolyte hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 24 to 12 h to stabilize anode potentials. Hydrogen production using a fermentation wastewater (10 cell pairs, HRT=8 h) reached 0.9±0.1 L H2/Lreactor/d (1.1±0.1 L H2/g-COD), with 58±5% COD removal and a coulombic efficiency of 74±5%. These results demonstrated that consistent rates of hydrogen gas production could be achieved using an MREC if effluent anolyte COD concentrations are sufficient to produce stable anode potentials.

  4. Effect of sulindac sulfide on metallohydrolases in the human colon cancer cell line HT-29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen-Ahlers, Hector; Tan, Jiangning; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7), a metallohydrolase involved in the development of several cancers, is downregulated in the Apc(Min/+) colon cancer mouse model following sulindac treatment. To determine whether this effect is relevant to the human condition, HT-29 human colon cancer cells were treated with sulindac and its metabolites, and compared to results obtained from in vivo mouse studies. The expression of MMP7 was monitored. The results demonstrated that sulindac sulfide effectively downregulated both MMP7 expression and activity. Furthermore, activity-based proteomics demonstrated that sulindac sulfide dramatically decreased the activity of leukotriene A4 hydrolase in HT-29 cells as reflected by a decrease in the level of its product, leukotriene B4. This study demonstrates that the effect of sulindac treatment in a mouse model of colon cancer may be relevant to the human counterpart and highlights the effect of sulindac treatment on metallohydrolases.

  5. Diagnosis of colonic amebiasis and coexisting signet-ring cell carcinoma in intestinal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Alexandra

    2016-09-28

    Amebiasis is uncommon in developed countries. Several case reports in the literature emphasize that both the presenting symptoms and the radiological findings of colonic amebiasis closely resemble more common conditions, such as idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease and gastro-intestinal malignancy. We describe a unique case of colonic amebiasis (amebomas) coexisting with signet-ring cell carcinoma of the ileocecal valve, the cecum and the appendix. Endoscopically, the ulcerated tumor was indistinguishable from the ulcerations and pseudotumors (amebomas) detected in the ascending colon. Histological examination of biopsy specimens revealed the pathognomonic features of protozoa with ingested erythrocytes in combination with signet-ring cell infiltration. The author concludes that amebiasis may not only mimic carcinoma but, rarely, may coexist with carcinoma in the same patient. Clinicians and pathologists should be aware of this possibility in order not to delay diagnosis and treatment of malignant disease.

  6. Effect of sulindac sulfide on metallohydrolases in the human colon cancer cell line HT-29.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Guillen-Ahlers

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7, a metallohydrolase involved in the development of several cancers, is downregulated in the Apc(Min/+ colon cancer mouse model following sulindac treatment. To determine whether this effect is relevant to the human condition, HT-29 human colon cancer cells were treated with sulindac and its metabolites, and compared to results obtained from in vivo mouse studies. The expression of MMP7 was monitored. The results demonstrated that sulindac sulfide effectively downregulated both MMP7 expression and activity. Furthermore, activity-based proteomics demonstrated that sulindac sulfide dramatically decreased the activity of leukotriene A4 hydrolase in HT-29 cells as reflected by a decrease in the level of its product, leukotriene B4. This study demonstrates that the effect of sulindac treatment in a mouse model of colon cancer may be relevant to the human counterpart and highlights the effect of sulindac treatment on metallohydrolases.

  7. Physiological and pathological role of local and immigrating colonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferenc Sipos; Gábor Valcz; Béla Molnár

    2012-01-01

    The latest avenue of research is revealing the existence of and role for the colonic stem cells in the physiological renewal of the mucosa and in pathological circumstances where they have both positive and negative effects. In the case of human colon, different levels of stem cell compartments exist. First, the crypt epithelial stem cells, which have a role in the normal crypt epithelial cell dynamics and in colorectal carcinogenesis. Close to the crypts, the second layer of stem cells can be found; the local subepithelial stem cell niche, including the pericryptic subepithelial myofibroblasts that regulate the epithelial cell differentiation and have a crucial role in cancer progression and chronic inflammation-related fibrosis. The third level of stem cell compartment is the immigrating bone-marrow-derived stem cells, which have an important role in wound healing after severe mucosal inflammation, but are also involved in cancer invasion. This paper focuses on stem cell biology in the context of physiological and pathological processes in the human colon.

  8. Arctigenin induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells through ROS/p38MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-chun; Liang, Yun; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Guang-rui

    2016-01-01

    In the current study the antiproliferative effect of arctigenin, plant lignin, was evaluated on human colon cancer cell line HT-29. Furthermore, attempts were made to explore the signaling mechanism which may be responsible for its effect. Cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT and LDH assays. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to determine cell arrest in the cell cycle phase and apoptosis. Furthermore, to confirm the apoptotic activity of arctigenin, caspase-9 and -3 activities analysis was performed. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) were investigated to determine their role in inducing apoptosis in arctigenin-treated HT-29 colon cancer cell line. MTT and LDH results demonstrated significant cell growth inhibitory effect of arctigenin on HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, increase in cell number arrested at G2/M phase was observed in flow cytometric analysis upon arctigenin treatment. In addition, arctigenin increased the apoptotic ratio in a dose-dependent manner. The involvement of intrinsic apoptotic pathway was indicated by the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Moreover, increased ROS production, activation of p38 MAPK and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) also revealed the role of intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway in cell growth inhibition after arctigenin exposure. Arctigenin induces apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells by regulating ROS and p38 MAPK pathways.

  9. High densities of serotonin and peptide YY cells in the colon of patients with lymphocytic colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdy El-Salhy; Doris Gundersen; Jan Gunnar Hatlebakk; Trygve Hausken

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate colonic endocrine cells in lymphocytic colitis (LC) patients.METHODS:Fifty-seven patients with LC were included.These patients were 41 females and 16 males,with an average age of 49 years (range 19-84 years).Twenty-seven subjects that underwent colonoscopy with biopsies were used as controls.These subjects underwent colonoscopy because of gastrointestinal bleeding or health worries,where the source of bleeding was identified as haemorrhoids or angiodysplasia.They were 19 females and 8 males with an average age of 49 years (range 18-67 years).Biopsies from the right and left colon were obtained from both patients and controls during colonoscopy.Biopsies were fixed in 4% buffered paraformaldehyde,embedded in paraffin and cut into 5 μm-thick sections.The sections immunostained by the avidin-biotin-complex method for serotonin,peptide YY (PYY),pancreatic polypeptide (pP)enteroglucagon and somatostatin cells.The cell densities were quantified by computerised image analysis using Olympus software.RESULTS:The colon of both the patient and the control subjects were macroscopically normal.Histopathological examination of colon biopsies from controis revealed normal histology.All patients fulfilled the diagnosis criteria required for of LC:an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes (> 20 lymphocytes/100 epithelial cells) and surface epithelial damage with increased lamina propria plasma cells and absent or minimal crypt architectural distribution.In the colon of both patients and control subjects,serotonin-,PYY-,PP-,enteroglucagon-and somatostatin-immunoreactive cells were primarily located in the upper part of the crypts of Lieberkühn.These cells were basket-or flask-shaped.There was no statistically significant difference between the right and left colon in controls with regards to the densities of serotonin-and PYY-immunoreactive cells (P =0.9 and 0.1,respectively).Serotonin cell density in the right colon in controls was 28.9 ± 1.8 and in LC

  10. Caveolin-1-Mediated Expression and Secretion of Kallikrein 6 in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Henkhaus

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Kallikreins are secreted proteases that may play a functional role and/or serve as a serum biomarker for the presence or progression of certain types of cancers. Kallikrein 6 (KLK6 has been shown to be upregulated in several types of cancers, including colon. The aims of this study were to elucidate pathways that influence KLK6 gene expression and KLK6 protein secretion in the HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Our data indicate a central role for caveolin-1 (CAV-1, the main structural protein of caveolae, in both KLK6 gene expression and protein secretion. Sucrose gradient subcellular fractionation reveals that CAV-1 and KLK6 colocalize to lipid raft domains in the plasma membrane of HCT116 cells. Furthermore, we show that CAV-1, although it does not directly interact with the KLK6 molecule, enhances KLK6 secretion from the cells. Deactivation of CAV-1, through SRC-mediated phosphorylation, decreased KLK6 secretion. We also demonstrate that, in colon cancer cells, CAV-1 increased the amount of phosphorylated AKT in cells by inhibiting the activity of the AKT-negative regulators PP1 and PP2A. This study demonstrates that proteins such as CAV-1 and AKT, which are known to be altered in colon cancer, affect KLK6 expression and KLK6 secretion.

  11. Antitumor Effects of Fucoidan on Human Colon Cancer Cells via Activation of Akt Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-Seok; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-05-01

    We identified a novel Akt signaling mechanism that mediates fucoidan-induced suppression of human colon cancer cell (HT29) proliferation and anticancer effects. Fucoidan treatment significantly inhibited growth, induced G1-phase-associated upregulation of p21WAF1 expression, and suppressed cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase expression in HT29 colon cancer cells. Additionally, fucoidan treatment activated the Akt signaling pathway, which was inhibited by treatment with an Akt inhibitor. The inhibition of Akt activation reversed the fucoidan-induced decrease in cell proliferation, the induction of G1-phase-associated p21WAF1 expression, and the reduction in cell cycle regulatory protein expression. Intraperitoneal injection of fucoidan reduced tumor volume; this enhanced antitumor efficacy was associated with induction of apoptosis and decreased angiogenesis. These data suggest that the activation of Akt signaling is involved in the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells treated with fucoidan. Thus, fucoidan may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for colon cancer.

  12. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates Fas ligand expression via the EP1 receptor in colon cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Callaghan, G

    2012-02-03

    Fas ligand (FasL\\/CD95L) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor superfamily that triggers apoptosis following crosslinking of the Fas receptor. Despite studies strongly implicating tumour-expressed FasL as a major inhibitor of the anti-tumour immune response, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate FasL expression in tumours. In this study, we show that the cyclooxygenase (COX) signalling pathway, and in particular prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), plays a role in the upregulation of FasL expression in colon cancer. Suppression of either COX-2 or COX-1 by RNA interference in HCA-7 and HT29 colon tumour cells reduced FasL expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Conversely, stimulation with PGE(2) increased FasL expression and these cells showed increased cytotoxicity against Fas-sensitive Jurkat T cells. Prostaglandin E(2)-induced FasL expression was mediated by signalling via the EP1 receptor. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis using serial sections of human colon adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between COX-2 and FasL (r=0.722; P<0.0001) expression, and between EP1 receptor and FasL (r=0.740; P<0.0001) expression, in the tumour cells. Thus, these findings indicate that PGE(2) positively regulates FasL expression in colon tumour cells, adding another pro-neoplastic activity to PGE(2).

  13. Expression pattern of epithelial cell adhesion molecule on normal and malignant colon tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Xie; Chun-Yan Wang; Yun-Xin Cao; Wei Wang; Ran Zhuang; Li-Hua Chen; Na-Na Dang; Liang Fang; Bo-Quan Jin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression pattern of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) on normal and malignant colon tissues to evaluate its diagnostic and therapeutic significance.METHODS: cDNA encoding Ep-CAv extracellular domain was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from excised malignant colon tissues and inserted into a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged vector. EpCAM-GST fusion protein was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and purified with glutathionesepharose. The Ep-CAM-GST fusion protein was mixed with Freund's adjuvant and Balb/c mice were immunized with it. Sp2/0 myeloma cells were fused with the spleen cells of the immunized mice. After having selected by indirect ELISA, the anti-Ep-CAM monoclonal antibodies (NAbs) were generated and the corresponding ascites were obtained.Finally, the human colon carcinoma tissue array prepared from seventy individual patients was stained with the antiEp-CAM NAbs.RESULTS: The isolated Ep-CAM cDNA sequence was identical to the data in GenBank. The expressed fusion protein was almost soluble and had a molecular weight (NW) of 53 ku.Four NAbs against Ep-CAM were obtained and designated as FMU-Ep1, FMU-Ep2, FMU-Ep3 and FMU-Ep4 respectively.Among them, FMU-Ep4 could recognize the natural EpCAM on Colo205 and SW480 cells, and all of them could be used for immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections.It was found that Ep-CAM was distributed differently in normal and various malignant colon tissues, including squamous cell carcinoma, signet-ring cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma.In normal colon gland epithelia, Ep-CAM antigen was mainly distributed on the basolateral membrane and in the region between the basolateral membrane and the cytoplastic part near the nuclei, whereas the expression pattern of colon malignancies was mainly on the whole surface of epithelia and the expression was much higher than the normal colon tissues. The staining pattern of tissue array

  14. Enterotoxin preconditioning restores calcium-sensing receptor-mediated cytostasis in colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pitari, Giovanni M.; Lin, Jieru E.; Shah, Fawad J.; Lubbe, Wilhelm J.; Zuzga, David S.; Li, Peng; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), the receptor for diarrheagenic bacterial heat-stable enterotoxins (STs), inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation by co-opting Ca2+ as the intracellular messenger. Similarly, extracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+o) opposes proliferation and induces terminal differentiation in intestinal epithelial cells. In that context, human colon cancer cells develop a phenotype characterized by insensitivity to cytostasis imposed by Ca2+o. Here, preconditioning with ST, mediated by GCC s...

  15. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik, E-mail: henrik.thorlacius@med.lu.se

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  16. Inhibition of JNK Sensitizes Hypoxic Colon Cancer Cells to DNA Damaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevskaya, Irina A.; Selvakumaran, Muthu; Hierro, Lucia Cabal; Goldstein, Sara R.; Winkler, Jeffrey D.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We showed previously that in HT29 colon cancer cells, modulation of hypoxia-induced stress signaling affects oxaliplatin cytotoxicity. To further study the significance of hypoxia-induced signaling through JNK, we set out to investigate how modulation of kinase activities influences cellular responses of hypoxic colon cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. Experimental design In a panel of cell lines we investigated effects of pharmacological and molecular inhibition of JNK on sensitivity to oxaliplatin, SN-38 and 5-FU. Combination studies for the drugs and JNK inhibitor CC-401 were carried out in vitro and in vivo. Results Hypoxia-induced JNK activation was associated with resistance to oxaliplatin. CC-401 in combination with chemotherapy demonstrates synergism in colon cancer cell lines, though synergy is not always hypoxia-specific. A more detailed analysis focused on HT29 and SW620 (responsive), and HCT116 (non-responsive) lines. In HT29 and SW620 cells CC-401 treatment results in greater DNA damage in the sensitive cells. In vivo, potentiation of bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and the combination by JNK inhibition was confirmed in HT29-derived mouse xenografts, where tumor growth delay was greater in the presence of CC-401. Finally, stable introduction of a dominant negative JNK1, but not JNK2, construct into HT29 cells rendered them more sensitive to oxaliplatin under hypoxia, suggesting differing input of JNK isoforms in cellular responses to chemotherapy. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that signaling through JNK is a determinant of response to therapy in colon cancer models, and support the testing of JNK inhibition to sensitize colon tumors in the clinic. PMID:26023085

  17. Induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a novel topoisomerase I inhibitor TopIn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Soo Kyung [College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon 420-743 (Korea, Republic of); Gwak, Jungsug [Department of Advanced Fermentation Fusion Science and Technology, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Im-Sook [PharmcoGenomics Research Center, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyung-Soon [Probiond Co., Ltd., Seoul 143-834 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sangtaek, E-mail: ohsa@kookmin.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Fermentation Fusion Science and Technology, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} TopIn activates p53-dependent transcription in colon cancer cells. {yields} TopIn induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells. {yields} TopIn selectively inhibits topoisomerase I activity. {yields} TopIn does not affect the activity of BCRP and MDR-1. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor p53 plays an important role in cellular emergency mechanisms through regulating the genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. To identify small molecules that can activate p53-responsive transcription, we performed chemical screening using genetically engineered HCT116 reporter cells. We found that TopIn (7-phenyl-6H-[1,2,5]oxadiazolo[3,4-e]indole 3-oxide) efficiently activated p53-mediated transcriptional activity and induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15, thereby stabilizing the p53 protein. Furthermore, TopIn upregulated the expression of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}, a downstream target of p53, and suppressed cellular proliferation in various colon cancer cells. Additionally, TopIn induced DNA fragmentation, caspase-3/7 activation and poly ADP ribose polymerase cleavage, typical biochemical markers of apoptosis, in p53 wild-type and mutated colon cancer cells. Finally, we found that TopIn inhibited topoisomerase I activity, but not topoisomerase II, in vitro and induced the formation of the topoisomerase I-DNA complex in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Unlike camptothecin (CPT) and its derivative SN38, TopIn did not affect the activity of the ATP-binding cassette transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) or multidrug-resistant protein-1 (MDR-1). These results suggest that TopIn may present a promising new topoisomerase I-targeting anti-tumor therapeutics.

  18. Data for comparative proteomics analysis of the antitumor effect of CIGB-552 peptide in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Núñez de Villavicencio-Díaz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available CIGB-552 is a second generation antitumor peptide that displays potent cytotoxicity in lung and colon cancer cells. The nuclear subproteome of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells treated with CIGB-552 peptide was identified and analyzed [1]. This data article provides supporting evidence for the above analysis.

  19. Targeting FLIP and Mcl-1 using a combination of aspirin and sorafenib sensitizes colon cancer cells to TRAIL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennarun, Bodvael; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Hollema, Harry; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is highly effective against certain types of cancer in the clinic and prevents colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), have shown activity against colon cancer cells. The aims of this

  20. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays a critical role in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. In this study, submicromolar methylselenol was generated by incubating methionase with seleno-L methionine, and both colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colon NCM460 cells were exposed to...

  1. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Caldeira, Jorge; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-07-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results showed comparable amounts of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartments of the mixed-culture and 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentations containing L. thermotolerans after 4 days of fermentation, but a lower death rate of L. thermotolerans in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation than in the mixed-culture fermentation. Furthermore, L. thermotolerans died off even more slowly in the 3.5-5 kDa than in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation, which coincided with the presence of less of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartment of that fermentation than of the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation. Taken together, these results indicate that the death of L. thermotolerans in mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae is caused by a combination of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effect of leptin on cell proliferation and apoptosis of gastric adenocarcinoma cell line-SGC7901 and colon cancer cell line-HT-29

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Wen Yu; Bi-Sheng Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore effect of leptin on cell proliferation and apoptosis of gastric adenocarcinoma cell line-SGC7901 and colon cancer cell line-HT-29.Methods: MTT and flow cytometry were adopted for detecting the effect of exogenous leptin on cell cycle of gastric adenocarcinoma cell line-SGC7901 and colon cancer cell line-HT-29.Results: Leptin with mass concentration (0 ng/mL, 5 ng/mL, 50 ng/mL, 100 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL) could stimulate the growth of gastric adenocarcinoma cell line-SGC7901 and colon cancer cell line-HT-29; exogenous leptin with mass concentration (5 ng/mL, 50 ng/mL, 100 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL) could inhibit cell growth of gastric adenocarcinoma cell line-SGC7901 and colon cancer cell line-HT-29 after 72 h; among which, inhibiting effects of cell line-SGC7901 and cell line-HT-29 were the most significant under the effect of exogenous leptin with mass concentration-200 ng/mL.Conclusion:Within a certain concentration and action time, exogenous leptin can stimulate the growth of gastric adenocarcinoma cell line and colon cancer cell line, and then promot the tumor cell proliferation and/or inhibit the tumor cell apoptosis.

  3. Bioethanol production from starchy biomass by direct fermentation using saccharomyces diastaticus in batch free and immobilized cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilonzo, P.M.; Margaritis, A. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering; Yu, J.; Ye, Q. [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). Biochemical Engineering Research Inst. and State Key Lab

    2006-07-01

    The feasibility of using amylolytic yeasts for the direct fermentation of starchy biomass to ethanol was discussed. Although amylolytic yeasts such as Saccharomycopsis, Lipomyces, and Schwaniomyces secrete both {alpha}-amylase and glucoamylase enzymes that synergistically enhance starch degradation, they are not suitable for industrial bio-ethanol production because of low tolerance for ethanol and slow fermentation rate. For that reason, this study examined the direct ethanol fermentation of soluble starch or dextrin with the amylolytic yeast Saccharomyces diastaticus in batch free and immobilized cells systems. Saccharomyces diastaticus secretes glucoamylase and can therefore assimilate and ferment starch and starch-like biomass. The main focus of the study was on parameters leading to higher ethanol yields from high concentration of dextrin and soluble starch using batch cultures. A natural attachment method was proposed in which polyurethane foam sheets were used as the carrier for amylolytic yeasts immobilization in ethanol fermentations. The support was chosen because it was inexpensive, autoclavable, pliable and could be tailored to suit process requirements regarding net surface charge, shape and size. It was found that Saccharomyces diastaticus was very efficient in terms of fermentation of high initial concentrations of dextrin or soluble starch. Higher concentrations of ethanol were produced. In batch fermentations, the cells fermented high dextrin concentrations more efficiently. In particular, in batch fermentation, more than 92 g-L of ethanol was produced from 240 g-L of dextrin, at conversion efficiency of 90 per cent. The conversion efficiency decreased to 60 per cent but a higher final ethanol concentration of 147 g/L was attained with a medium containing 500 g/L of dextrin. In an immobilized cell bioreactor, Saccharomyces diastaticus produced 83 g/L of ethanol from 240 g/L of dextrin, corresponding to ethanol volumetric productivity of 9.1 g

  4. Cigarette smoke extracts induced the colon cancer migration via regulating epithelial mesenchymal transition and metastatic genes in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cho-Won; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Lee, Hae-Miru; Hwang, Kyung-A; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Bumseok; Lee, Moo-Yeol; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2017-02-01

    There was considerable evidence that exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with an increased risk for colon cancer. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the relationship between cigarette smoking and colon cancer remains unclear. Moreover, there were only a few studies on effects of complexing substance contained in cigarette smoke on colon cancer. Thus, we further investigated whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affects the cell cycle, apoptosis and migration of human metastatic colon cancer cells, SW-620. MTT assay revealed that SW-620 cell proliferation was significantly inhibited following treatments with all CSEs, 3R4F, and two-domestic cigarettes, for 9 days in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, CSE treatments decreased cyclin D1 and E1, and increased p21 and p27 proteins by Western blot analysis in SW-620 cells. Additionally, the treatment of the cells with CSE contributed to these effects expressing by apoptosis-related proteins. An increased migration or invasion ability of SW-620 cells following CSE treatment was also confirmed by a scratch or fibronectin invasion assay in vitro. In addition, the protein levels of E-cadherin as an epithelial maker were down-regulated, while the mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin, snail, and slug, were up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. A metastatic marker, cathepsin D, was also down-regulated by CSE treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that CSE exposure in colon cancer cells may deregulate the cell growth by altering the expression of cell cycle-related proteins and pro-apoptotic protein, and stimulate cell metastatic ability by altering epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and cathepsin D expression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 690-704, 2017.

  5. Phloroglucinol induces apoptosis via apoptotic signaling pathways in HT-29 colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    KANG, MI-HYE; KIM, IN-HYE; NAM, TAEK-JEO NG

    2014-01-01

    Phloroglucinol is a polyphenolic compound that is used to treat and prevent several human diseases, as it exerts beneficial biological activities, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of phloroglucinol on apoptotic signaling pathways in HT-29 colon cancer cells. The results indicated that phloroglucinol suppressed cell viability and induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Phloroglucinol treatment of HT-29 cells resulted in characteristic apoptosis-related changes: altered Bcl-2 family proteins, cytochrome c release, and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8. This study also showed that proteins involved in apoptosis were stimulated by treatment with phloroglucinol. These findings demonstrated that phloroglucinol exerts anticancer activity in HT-29 colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. PMID:25070748

  6. Fermentation of glycerol into ethanol in a microbial electrolysis cell driven by a customized consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, Allison M; Young, Jenna M; Reguera, Gemma

    2014-06-03

    The in situ generation of ethanol from glycerol-containing wastewater shows promise to improve the economics of the biodiesel industry. Consequently, we developed a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) driven by the synergistic metabolisms of the exoelectrogen Geobacter sulfurreducens and the bacterium Clostridium cellobioparum, which fermented glycerol into ethanol in high yields (90%) and produced fermentative byproducts that served as electron donors for G. sulfurreducens. Syntrophic cooperation stimulated glycerol consumption, ethanol production, and the conversion of fermentation byproducts into cathodic H2 in the MEC. The platform was further improved by adaptively evolving glycerol-tolerant strains with robust growth at glycerol loadings typical of biodiesel wastewater and by increasing the buffering capacity of the anode medium. This resulted in additional increases in glycerol consumption (up to 50 g/L) and ethanol production (up to 10 g/L) at rates that greatly exceeded the capacity of the anode biofilms to concomitantly remove the fermentation byproducts. As a result, 1,3-propanediol was generated as a metabolic sink for electrons not converted into electricity syntrophically. The results highlight the potential of consortia to process glycerol in MECs and provide insights into genetic engineering and system design approaches that can be implemented to further improve MEC performance to satisfy industrial needs.

  7. Electricity generation from fermented primary sludge using single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to generate electricity from fermented primary sludge. Fermentation (30°C, 9days) decreased total suspended solids (26.1-16.5g/L), volatile suspended solids (24.1-15.3g/L) and pH (5.7-4.5), and increased conductivity (2.4-4.7mS/cm), soluble COD (2.66-15.5g/L), and volatile fatty acids (1.9-10.1g/L). To lower the COD and increase pH, fermentation supernatant was diluted with primary effluent before being used in the MFCs. The maximum power density was 0.32±0.01W/m2, compared to 0.24±0.03W/m2 with only primary effluent. Power densities were higher with phosphate buffer added to the supernatant (1.03±0.06W/m2) or the solution (0.87±0.05W/m2). Coulombic efficiencies ranged from 18% to 57%, and sCOD removals from 84% to 94%. These results demonstrated that sludge can effectively be used for power generation when fermented and then diluted with only primary effluent. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Pathogenesis of Human Enterovirulent Bacteria: Lessons from Cultured, Fully Differentiated Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts are protected from attack by potentially harmful enteric microorganisms, viruses, and parasites by the polarized fully differentiated epithelial cells that make up the epithelium, providing a physical and functional barrier. Enterovirulent bacteria interact with the epithelial polarized cells lining the intestinal barrier, and some invade the cells. A better understanding of the cross talk between enterovirulent bacteria and the polarized intestinal cells has resulted in the identification of essential enterovirulent bacterial structures and virulence gene products playing pivotal roles in pathogenesis. Cultured animal cell lines and cultured human nonintestinal, undifferentiated epithelial cells have been extensively used for understanding the mechanisms by which some human enterovirulent bacteria induce intestinal disorders. Human colon carcinoma cell lines which are able to express in culture the functional and structural characteristics of mature enterocytes and goblet cells have been established, mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal epithelial barrier. Moreover, Caco-2-derived M-like cells have been established, mimicking the bacterial capture property of M cells of Peyer's patches. This review intends to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of human enterovirulent bacteria observed in infected cultured human colon carcinoma enterocyte-like HT-29 subpopulations, enterocyte-like Caco-2 and clone cells, the colonic T84 cell line, HT-29 mucus-secreting cell subpopulations, and Caco-2-derived M-like cells, including cell association, cell entry, intracellular lifestyle, structural lesions at the brush border, functional lesions in enterocytes and goblet cells, functional and structural lesions at the junctional domain, and host cellular defense responses. PMID:24006470

  9. Cell Volume Regulation and Apoptotic Volume Decrease in Rat Distal Colon Superficial Enterocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Antico

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The colon epithelium is physiologically exposed to osmotic stress, and the activation of cell volume regulation mechanisms is essential in colonocyte physiology. Moreover, colon is characterized by a high apoptotic rate of mature cells balancing the high division rate of stem cells. Aim: The aim of the present work was to investigate the main cell volume regulation mechanisms in rat colon surface colonocytes and their role in apoptosis. Methods: Cell volume changes were measured by light microscopy and video imaging on colon explants; apoptosis sign appearance was monitored by confocal microscopy on annexin V/propidium iodide labeled explants. Results: Superficial colonocytes showed a dynamic regulation of their cell volume during anisosmotic conditions with a Regulatory Volume Increase (RVI response following hypertonic shrinkage and Regulatory Volume Decrease (RVD response following hypotonic swelling. RVI was completely inhibited by bumetanide, while RVD was completely abolished by high K+ or iberiotoxin treatment and by extracellular Ca2+ removal. DIDS incubation was also able to affect the RVD response. When colon explants were exposed to H2O2 as apoptotic inducer, colonocytes underwent an isotonic volume decrease ascribable to Apoptotic Volume Decrease (AVD within about four hours of exposure. AVD was shown to precede annexin V positivity. It was also inhibited by high K+ or iberiotoxin treatment. Interestingly, treatment with iberiotoxin significantly inhibited apoptosis progression. Conclusions: In rat superficial colonocytes K+ efflux through high conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK channels was demonstrated to be the main mechanism of RVD and to plays also a crucial role in the AVD process and in the progression of apoptosis.

  10. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. Submicromolar methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase, and an induction of apoptosis in cancerous colon HCT11...

  11. Secreted human adipose leptin decreases mitochondrial respiration in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, pobese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues.

  12. Serum obtained from rats after partial hepatectomy enhances growth of cultured colon carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, KP; Brouwers, MAM; van Veen, ML; Brinker, M; de Vries, EGE; Daemen, T; Scherphof, GL; Slooff, MJH

    1999-01-01

    Tumour-bearing rats were randomized to a 70% partial hepatectomy or a sham operation. At days 1, 3 or 14, portal and systemic serum was obtained and colon carcinoma cells were cultured in the presence of 5, 10, 20 or 50% serum. Proliferation and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) expression was

  13. Gemifloxacin, a Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobial Drug, Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemifloxacin (GMF is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT. In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF-κB and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF-α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer.

  14. Low Number of Detectable Circulating Tumor Cells in Non-metastatic Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Söletormos, György; Jess, Per

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of patients with non-metastatic colon cancer and to evaluate whether there is a diurnal variation in the CTC counts. Furthermore, the study aimed to examine the correlation between CTCs and TNM stage...

  15. Apoptotic effect of quercetin on HT-29 colon cancer cells via the AMPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong-Jin; Kim, Sang-Ki; Kim, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Seung-Ho; Park, Young-Seok; Park, Byung-Kwon; Kim, So-Jung; Kim, Jin; Choi, Changsun; Kim, Jong-Suk; Cho, Sung-Dae; Jung, Ji-Won; Roh, Kyong-Hwan; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Jung, Ji-Youn

    2010-08-11

    Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a physiological cellular energy sensor, strongly suppresses cell proliferation in both nonmalignant and tumor cells. This study demonstrates the mechanism of quercetin-induced apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Treatment of cells with quercetin significantly decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, quercetin increased cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase and up-regulated apoptosis-related proteins, such as AMPK, p53, and p21, within 48 h. Furthermore, in vivo experiments showed that quercetin treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumor volume over 6 weeks, and apoptosis-related protein induction by quercetin was significantly higher in the 100 mg/kg treated group compared to the control group. All of these results indicate that quercetin induces apoptosis via AMPK activation and p53-dependent apoptotic cell death in HT-29 colon cancer cells and that it may be a potential chemopreventive or therapeutic agent against HT-29 colon cancer.

  16. Apigenin sensitizes colon cancer cells to anti-tumor activity of ABT-263

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huanjie; Jing, Kai; Mahmoud, Esraa; Huang, Haihong; Fang, Xianjun; Yu, Chunrong

    2013-01-01

    Apigenin is an edible plant-derived flavonoid that shows modest anti-tumor activities in vitro and in vivo. Apigenin treatment resulted in cell growth arrest and apoptosis in various types of tumors by modulating several signaling pathways. In the present study, we evaluated interactions between apigenin and ABT-263 in colon cancer cells. We observed a synergistic effect between apigenin and ABT-263 on apoptosis of colon cancer cells. ABT-263 alone induced limited cell death while upregulating expression of Mcl-1, a potential mechanism for the acquired resistance to ABT-263. The presence of apigenin antagonized ABT-263-induced Mcl-1 upregulation and dramatically enhanced ABT-263-induced cell death. Meanwhile, apigenin suppressed AKT and ERK activation. Inactivation of either AKT or ERK by lentivirus-transduced shRNA or treatment with specific small molecule inhibitors of these pathways enhanced ABT-263-induced cell death, mirroring the effect of apigenin. Moreover, the combination response was associated with upregulation of Bim and activation of Bax. Downregulation of Bax eliminated the synergistic effect of apigenin and ABT-263 on cell death. Xenograft studies in SCID mice showed that the combined treatment with apigenin and ABT-263 inhibited tumor growth by up to 70% without obvious adverse effects, while either agent only inhibited around 30%. Our results demonstrate a novel strategy to enhance ABT-263 induced anti-tumor activity in human colon cancer cells by apigenin via inhibition of the Mcl-1, AKT and ERK pro-survival regulators. PMID:24126433

  17. Doublecortin-like kinase 1 exhibits cancer stem cell-like characteristics in a human colon cancer cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianna Li; Charles F.Bellows

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) are implicated in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis,metastasis,and therapeutic resistance.The identification of these cells could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies.Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) has been viewed as a marker for gastrointestinal stem cells that fuel the self-renewal process,however others view them as a marker of Tuft cells or as an enteroendocrine subtype.The purpose of this study was to use a colon cancer cell line to identify and characterize the stem-like characteristics of the DCLK1+ cell population.Methods:To enrich stem-like cells,HCT116 cells (derived from colon adenocarcinomas) were cultured using serum-free media to form spheres under both normal oxygen and hypoxia condition.DCLK1 transcript expression in the adherent parental cells and spheroids was quantified using quantitative real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [(q)RT-PCR].DCLK1 protein expression was determined using flow cytometry.Self-renewal capability from adherent parental cells and spheroids was determined using extreme limiting dilution analysis (ELDA).Results:Under both normal oxygen and hypoxia condition,the adherent parental cells were composed of cells that express low levels of DCLK1.However,spheroids exhibited an increased frequency of cells expressing DCLK1 on both mRNA and protein levels.Cells derived from spheroids also possess stronger self-renewal capability.Conclusions:The higher fraction of DCLK1+ cells exhibited by spheroids and hypoxia reflects the stemlike characteristics of these cells.DCLK1 may represent an ideal marker to study and develop effective strategies to overcome chemo-resistance and relapse of colon cancer.

  18. Colonization and osteogenic differentiation of different stem cell sources on electrospun nanofiber meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolambkar, Yash M; Peister, Alexandra; Ekaputra, Andrew K; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Guldberg, Robert E

    2010-10-01

    Numerous challenges remain in the successful clinical translation of cell-based therapies for musculoskeletal tissue repair, including the identification of an appropriate cell source and a viable cell delivery system. The aim of this study was to investigate the attachment, colonization, and osteogenic differentiation of two stem cell types, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human amniotic fluid stem (hAFS) cells, on electrospun nanofiber meshes. We demonstrate that nanofiber meshes are able to support these cell functions robustly, with both cell types demonstrating strong osteogenic potential. Differences in the kinetics of osteogenic differentiation were observed between hMSCs and hAFS cells, with the hAFS cells displaying a delayed alkaline phosphatase peak, but elevated mineral deposition, compared to hMSCs. We also compared the cell behavior on nanofiber meshes to that on tissue culture plastic, and observed that there is delayed initial attachment and proliferation on meshes, but enhanced mineralization at a later time point. Finally, cell-seeded nanofiber meshes were found to be effective in colonizing three-dimensional scaffolds in an in vitro system. This study provides support for the use of the nanofiber mesh as a model surface for cell culture in vitro, and a cell delivery vehicle for the repair of bone defects in vivo.

  19. Colonic inflammation in mice is improved by cigarette smoke through iNKT cells recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Montbarbon

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS protects against intestinal inflammation during ulcerative colitis. Immunoregulatory mechanisms sustaining this effect remain unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of CS on experimental colitis and to characterize the intestinal inflammatory response at the cellular and molecular levels. Using the InExpose® System, a smoking device accurately reproducing human smoking habit, we pre-exposed C57BL/6 mice for 2 weeks to CS, and then we induced colitis by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS. This system allowed us to demonstrate that CS exposure improved colonic inflammation (significant decrease in clinical score, body weight loss and weight/length colonic ratio. This improvement was associated with a significant decrease in colonic proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cytokine expression, as compared to unexposed mice (TNF (p=0.0169, IFNγ (p<0.0001, and IL-17 (p=0.0008. Smoke exposure also induced an increased expression of IL-10 mRNA (p=0.0035 and a marked recruitment of iNKT (invariant Natural Killer T; CD45+ TCRβ+ CD1d tetramer+ cells in the colon of DSS-untreated mice. Demonstration of the role of iNKT cells in CS-dependent colitis improvement was performed using two different strains of NKT cells deficient mice. Indeed, in Jα18KO and CD1dKO animals, CS exposure failed to induce significant regulation of DSS-induced colitis both at the clinical and molecular levels. Thus, our study demonstrates that iNKT cells are pivotal actors in the CS-dependent protection of the colon. These results highlight the role of intestinal iNKT lymphocytes and their responsiveness to environmental stimuli. Targeting iNKT cells would represent a new therapeutic way for inflammatory bowel diseases.

  20. Reduction of Orc6 expression sensitizes human colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine J Gavin

    Full Text Available Previous studies from our group have shown that the expression levels of Orc6 were highly elevated in colorectal cancer patient specimens and the induction of Orc6 was associated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment. The goal of this study was to investigate the molecular and cellular impact of Orc6 in colon cancer. In this study, we use HCT116 (wt-p53 and HCT116 (null-p53 colon cancer cell lines as a model system to investigate the impact of Orc6 on cell proliferation, chemosensitivity and pathways involved with Orc6. We demonstrated that the down regulation of Orc6 sensitizes colon cancer cells to both 5-FU and cisplatin (cis-pt treatment. Decreased Orc6 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells by RNA interference triggered cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Prolonged inhibition of Orc6 expression resulted in multinucleated cells in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cell line. Western immunoblot analysis showed that down regulation of Orc6 induced p21 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells. The induction of p21 was mediated by increased level of phosphorylated p53 at ser-15. By contrast, there is no elevated expression of p21 in HCT-116 (null-p53 cells. Orc6 down regulation also increased the expression of DNA damaging repair protein GADD45beta and reduced the expression level of JNK1. Orc6 may be a potential novel target for future anti cancer therapeutic development in colon cancer.

  1. Conversion of waste plastics to single-cell protein by means of pyrolysis followed by fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlhigesan, J.; Brown, B.S.

    Waste plastics (e.g. polyethylene, polystyrene and polypropylene) have been converted to single-cell protein using pyrolysis followed by fermentation. Conversion efficiencies of plastics to pyrolysate were 75-90% for polyethylene, 10-56% for polystyrene and 40-50% for polypropylene. Unpyrolyzed residues were formed with polystyrene (6-14%) and polypropylene (14-30%), but not with polyethylene. Polyvinyl chloride produced hydrogen chloride fumes, together with 33-39% unpyrolyzed residue, no fermentable pyrolysis products being formed. Polyethylene pyrolysate was fermented by the yeast, Candida tropicalis. Batch fermentation was carried out at 31 degrees Centigrade and pH 5.5 on polyethylene pyrolysate in shaken flasks (100 cubic centimetre culture) and in an aerated fermenter (500 cubic centimetre culture). Maximum growth rate was 0.168/hour, cell yield was 0.47 plus or minus 0.02 g g/1 pyrolysate used (n equals 3) and doubling time was 4-5 hours, after 72 hours growth on 1.0 g pyrolysate 100 centimetres-3 culture. Continuous culture (dilution rate 0.10/hour) gave a dry cell yield of 0.39 g/g pyrolysate utilized. Utilization of pyrolysate was 49.0% in batch culture and 33.0% in continuous culture. The efficiency of conversion to polyethylene to biomass was 34-42% in batch culture. Emulsification and pristane-solubilization were studied as a means of dispersing waxy pyrolysates in culture media. Pristane did not support growth whereas the emulsifier (lecithin, Tween 85 and sodium glycocholate (1:2:2 by weight)) could support up to 27% of the growth observed on polyethylene pyrolysate. Crude protein content of cells cultured on polyethylene pyrolysate was 46.7 plus or minus 2.4% (n equals 3) for batch culture cells, and 43.8 plus or minus 0.3% (n equals 4) for continuous culture cells. The true protein content of Candida cells was about 17%. The protein had a favourable nutritional quality as judged by in-vitro chemical tests.

  2. Analysis of the expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor in five colon cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and adenovirus-mediated reporter gene transfer in five human colon cancer cell lines.METHODS: Expression of CAR-specific mRNA and protein was analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Adenovirusbased gene delivery was evaluated by infection of cells with adenoviral vector carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene.RESULTS: All the colon cancer cell lines examined (HT29,LS180, SW480, SW948 and SW1116) expressed CAR full-length mRNA and an alternatively-spliced variant that lacks the transmembrane coding exon. All cell lines were detected as CAR-positive by Western blot analysis.Further, all cells we examined were efficiently infected with adenoviral vector-GFP.CONCLUSION: The data indicated that the five colon cancer cell lines tested expressed adenovirus primary receptor and could be efficiently infected by adenoviral vectors. Therefore, these cell lines will be useful for adenovirus-based gene transfer and research.

  3. Decorin in Human Colon Cancer: Localization In Vivo and Effect on Cancer Cell Behavior In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Marie C; Sainio, Annele O; Pennanen, Mirka M; Lund, Riikka J; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Sundström, Jari T T; Järveläinen, Hannu T

    2015-09-01

    Decorin is generally recognized as a tumor suppressing molecule. Nevertheless, although decorin has been shown to be differentially expressed in malignant tissues, it has often remained unclear whether, in addition to non-malignant stromal cells, cancer cells also express it. Here, we first used two publicly available databases to analyze the current information about decorin expression and immunoreactivity in normal and malignant human colorectal tissue samples. The analyses demonstrated that decorin expression and immunoreactivity may vary in cancer cells of human colorectal tissues. Therefore, we next examined decorin expression in normal, premalignant and malignant human colorectal tissues in more detail using both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for decorin. Our results invariably demonstrate that malignant cells within human colorectal cancer tissues are devoid of both decorin mRNA and immunoreactivity. Identical results were obtained for cells of neuroendocrine tumors of human colon. Using RT-qPCR, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines are also decorin negative, in accordance with the above in vivo results. Finally, we demonstrate that decorin transduction of human colon cancer cell lines causes a significant reduction in their colony forming capability. Thus, strategies to develop decorin-based adjuvant therapies for human colorectal malignancies are highly rational. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Sodium Butyrate Induces Apoptosis of Human Colon Cancer Cells by Modulating ERK and Sphingosine Kinase 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Min; LIU Yun Gang; ZOU Meng Chen; ZOU Fei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in apoptosis of human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. Methods After the HCT116 cells were pretreated with specific ERK inhibitor (U0126) or specific siRNA and exposed to 10 mmol/L sodium butyrate (NaBT) for 24 h, their apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, levels of SphK2 and ERK protein were measured by Western blot, and translocation of SphK2 was assayed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results The U0126 and siRNAs specific for SphK2 blocked the export of SphK2 from nuclei to cytoplasm and increased the apoptosis of HCT116 cells following NaBT exposure. Over-expression of PKD decreased NaBT-induced apoptosis of HCT116 cells, which was reversed by U0126. Furthermore, transfection of HCT116 cells with constitutively activated PKD plasmids recovered the U0126-blocked export of SphK2. Conclusion ERK regulates the export of SphK2 and apoptosis of HCT116 cells by modulating PKD. Modulation of these molecules may help increase the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to the physiologic anti-colon cancer agent, NaBT.

  5. Structural environment built by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells drives M2 macrophages during inflammation recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Hye Shin; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Gelman, Irwin H.; Lo, Eng H.; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic plasticity, as they have the ability to switch their functional phenotypes during inflammation and recovery. Simultaneously, the mechanical environment actively changes. However, how these dynamic alterations affect the macrophage phenotype is unknown. Here, we observed that the extracellular matrix (ECM) constructed by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells (CMCs) generated M2 macrophages by regulating their shape during recovery. Notably, rounded macrophages were present in the linear and loose ECM of inflamed colons and polarized to the M1 phenotype. In contrast, ramified macrophages emerged in the contracted ECM of recovering colons and mainly expressed M2 macrophage markers. These contracted structures were not observed in the inflamed colons of AKAP12 knockout (KO) mice. Consequently, the proportion of M2 macrophages in inflamed colons was lower in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, clinical symptoms and histological damage were more severe in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In experimentally remodeled collagen gels, WT CMCs drove the formation of a more compacted structure than AKAP12 KO CMCs, which promoted the polarization of macrophages toward an M2 phenotype. These results demonstrated that tissue contraction during recovery provides macrophages with the physical cues that drive M2 polarization. PMID:28205544

  6. Magnetic immobilization of Bacillus subtilis natto cells for menaquinone-7 fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Varma, Vikas; Yang, Shuyi; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Production of menaquinone-7 (MK-7) by Bacillus subtilis natto is associated with major drawbacks. To address the current challenges in MK-7 fermentation, studying the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the bacterial cells can open up a new domain for intensified bioprocesses. This article introduces the new concept of application of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) as a pioneer tool for MK-7 process intensification. In this order, IONs with the average size of 11 nm were successfully fabricated and characterized for possible in situ removal of target substances from the fermentation media. The prepared particles were used for decoration and immobilization of B. subtilis natto cells. Presence of iron oxide nanoparticles significantly enhanced the MK-7 specific yield (15 %) as compared to the control samples. In addition, fabricated IONs showed a promising ability for in situ recovery of bacterial cells from the fermentation media with more than 95 % capture efficiency. Based on the results, IONs can be implemented successfully as a novel tool for MK-7 production. This study provides a considerable interest for industrial application of magnetic nanoparticles and their future role in designing an intensified biological process.

  7. The Effect of Initial Cell Concentration on Xylose Fermentation by Pichia stipitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbogbo, Frank K.; Coward-Kelly, Guillermo; Torry-Smith, Mads; Wenger, Kevin; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    Xylose was fermented using Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 at different initial cell concentrations. A high initial cell concentration increased the rate of xylose utilization, ethanol formation, and the ethanol yield. The highest ethanol concentration of 41.0 g/L and a yield of 0.38 g/g was obtained using an initial cell concentration of 6.5 g/L. Even though more xylitol was produced when the initial cell concentrations were high, cell density had no effect on the final ethanol yield. A two-parameter mathematical model was used to predict the cell population dynamics at the different initial cell concentrations. The model parameters, a and b correlate with the initial cell concentrations used with an R 2 of 0.99.

  8. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldanha, Sabita N., E-mail: sabivan@uab.edu [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104 (United States); Kala, Rishabh [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Tollefsbol, Trygve O., E-mail: trygve@uab.edu [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Center for Healthy Aging, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Nutrition Obesity Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Diabetes Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer (CRC) cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with the combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in CRC cells. - Highlights: • EGCG and NaB as a combination inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation. • The combination treatment induces DNA damage, G2/M and G1 arrest and apoptosis. • Survivin is effectively down-regulated by the combination treatment. • p21 and p53 expressions are induced by the combination treatment. • Epigenetic proteins DNMT1 and HDAC1 are

  9. Smad3 contributes to positioning of proliferating cells in colonic crypts by inducing EphB receptor protein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Kiyoshi [Department of Clinical Cell Biology (F5), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260-8670 (Japan); Sato, Toru [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology (K1), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260-8670 (Japan); Katsuno, Tatsuro, E-mail: katsuno@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology (K1), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260-8670 (Japan); Nakagawa, Tomoo; Noguchi, Yoshiko [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology (K1), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260-8670 (Japan); Tokumasa, Atsuko; Yokote, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Cell Biology (F5), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260-8670 (Japan); Yokosuka, Osamu [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology (K1), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260-8670 (Japan); Saito, Yasushi [Department of Clinical Cell Biology (F5), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260-8670 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Smad3{sup -/-} mice showed an increased number of proliferating epithelial cells in colonic crypts. {yields} Proliferating epithelial cells showed activated Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. {yields} Smad3{sup -/-} mice also showed intermingling of proliferating cells with differentiated cells. {yields} Loss of EphB receptor expression was observed in the colonic crypts of Smad3{sup -/-} mice. {yields} Loss of EphB receptor expression is likely responsible for cell intermingling. -- Abstract: Deficiency of Smad3, an intracellular mediator of TGF-{beta}, was shown to significantly accelerate re-epithelialization of the colonic mucosa. This study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which Smad3 controls colonic epithelial cell proliferation and crypt formation. Smad3{sup ex8/ex8} C57BL/6 mice were used in this study and wild-type littermates served as controls. The number of proliferating cells in the isolated colonic epithelium of Smad3{sup -/-} mice was significantly increased compared to that in wild-type littermates. Protein levels of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27 were significantly decreased, while that of c-Myc was increased in the isolated colonic epithelium from Smad3{sup -/-} mice. In the colonic tissue of wild-type mice, cell proliferation was restricted to the bottom of the crypts in accordance with nuclear {beta}-catenin staining, whereas proliferating cells were located throughout the crypts in Smad3{sup -/-} mice in accordance with nuclear {beta}-catenin staining, suggesting that Smad3 is essential for locating proliferating cells at the bottom of the colonic crypts. Notably, in Smad3{sup -/-} mice, there was loss of EphB2 and EphB3 receptor protein expression, critical regulators of proliferating cell positioning, while EphB receptor protein expression was confirmed at the bottom of the colonic crypts in wild-type mice. These observations indicated that disturbance of the EphB/ephrin B system brings

  10. RNA interference-mediated gene silencing of vascular endothelial growth factor in colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To inhibit the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in colon cancer cell line by RNA interference (RNAi). METHODS: Followed the service of E-RNAi, we designed and constructed two kinds of shRNA expression vectors aiming at the VEGF gene, then transfected them into colon cancer HT29 cells by lipofectamineTM 2000. The level of VEGF mRNA was investigated by RT-PCR and Northern blotting. The protein expression of VEGF was observed by immunofluoresence staining and Western blotting. RESULTS: We got two kinds of VEGF specific shRNA expression vectors which could efficiently inhibit the expression of VEGF in HT29 cells. RT-PCR, Northern blotting, immunofluoresence staining and Western blotting showed that inhibition rate for VEGF expression was up to 42%, 89%, 73% and 82%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The expression of VEGF can be inhibited by RNA interference in HT29 cells.

  11. Natural variation in populations of persistently colonizing bacteria affect human host cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rahul A; Lee, Yongchan; Kim, Sung-Kook; Israel, Dawn; Peek, Richard M; Blaser, Martin J

    2003-08-15

    The highly diverse bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which persistently colonizes the human stomach, provides models to study the role of genome plasticity in host adaptation. Within H. pylori populations from 2 colonized individuals, intragenomic recombination between cagA DNA repeat sequences leads to deletion or duplication of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the CagA protein, which is injected by a type IV secretion system into host cells. Experimental coculture of gastric epithelial cells with the strains containing these naturally occurring CagA phosphorylation site variants induced markedly divergent host cell morphologic responses. Mutants were constructed in which a phosphorylation site was either added or deleted in the expressed CagA protein; coculture studies confirmed that the naturally occurring differences in CagA phosphorylation are responsible for the observed phenotypic variation. These findings indicate that within an individual host, intragenomic recombination between H. pylori repetitive DNA produces strain variants differing in their signals to host cells.

  12. microRNA-143 down-regulates Hexokinase 2 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea Haarup; Jacobsen, Anders; Frankel, Lisa;

    2012-01-01

    -regulated in several cancers including colon cancer. METHODS: To gain insight into the role of miR-143 in colon cancer, we used a microarray-based approach in combination with seed site enrichment analysis to identify miR-143 targets. RESULTS: As expected, transcripts down-regulated upon miR-143 overexpression had...... a significant enrichment of miR-143 seed sites in their 3' UTRs. Here we report the identification of Hexokinase 2 (HK2) as a direct target of miR-143. We show that re-introduction of miR-143 in the colon cancer cell line DLD-1 results in a decreased lactate secretion. CONCLUSION: We have identified...... and validated HK2 as a miR-143 target. Furthermore, our results indicate that miR-143 mediated down-regulation of HK2 affects glucose metabolism in colon cancer cells. We hypothesize that loss of miR-143-mediated repression of HK2 can promote glucose metabolism in cancer cells, contributing to the shift towards...

  13. [Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the ascending colon: report of a case and Korean literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dong Keun; Kim, Sang Hun; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Wan Sik; Joo, Young Eun

    2014-08-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the colon is an extremely rare malignancy. A 48-year-old male visited our hospital for screening colonoscopy. Colonoscopic examination showed a 1 cm sized sessile polyp in the ascending colon. The patient underwent endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) without any complication. The pathologic findings were compatible with squamous differentiation of tumor cells in inflammatory colonic mucosa. The tumor was confined to the mucosa and the margins of the excised tissue were found to be free of the tumor. There were no other primary sites and no distant metastases in the extensive evaluation using a whole body CT scan and PET-CT. Additional surgical resection was not done. Follow-up colonoscopy performed eight month later showed a whitish scar without evidence of local recurrence and follow-up PET-CT demonstrated no evidence of recurrence. Herein, we report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the ascending colon presenting as a sessile polyp which was removed by EMR.

  14. In vivo regulation of colonic cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and P27Kip1 by dietary fish oil and butyrate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mee Young; Turner, Nancy D; Murphy, Mary E; Carroll, Raymond J; Chapkin, Robert S; Lupton, Joanne R

    2015-11-01

    We have shown that dietary fish oil is protective against experimentally induced colon cancer, and the protective effect is enhanced by coadministration of pectin. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that fish oil with butyrate, a pectin fermentation product, protects against colon cancer initiation by decreasing cell proliferation and increasing differentiation and apoptosis through a p27(Kip1)-mediated mechanism. Rats were provided diets of corn or fish oil, with/without butyrate, and terminated 12, 24, or 48 hours after azoxymethane (AOM) injection. Proliferation (Ki-67), differentiation (Dolichos Biflorus Agglutinin), apoptosis (TUNEL), and p27(Kip1) (cell-cycle mediator) were measured in the same cell within crypts in order to examine the coordination of cell cycle as a function of diet. DNA damage (N(7)-methylguanine) was determined by quantitative IHC analysis. Dietary fish oil decreased DNA damage by 19% (P = 0.001) and proliferation by 50% (P = 0.003) and increased differentiation by 56% (P = 0.039) compared with corn oil. When combined with butyrate, fish oil enhanced apoptosis 24 hours after AOM injection compared with a corn oil/butyrate diet (P = 0.039). There was an inverse relationship between crypt height and apoptosis in the fish oil/butyrate group (r = -0.53, P = 0.040). The corn oil/butyrate group showed a positive correlation between p27(Kip1) expression and proliferation (r = 0.61, P = 0.035). These results indicate the in vivo effect of butyrate on apoptosis and proliferation is dependent on dietary lipid source. These results demonstrate the presence of an early coordinated colonocyte response by which fish oil and butyrate protects against colon tumorigenesis.

  15. Evaluation of non-thermal plasma-induced anticancer effects on human colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jeongho; Hong, Young-Jun; Bae, Woom-Yee; Choi, Eun Ha; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma has been introduced in various applications such as sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and other biomedical applications. The most attractive application of non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is in cancer treatment, where the plasma is used to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to facilitate cell apoptosis. We investigate the effects of different durations of exposure to dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on colon cancer cells using measurement of cell viability and ROS levels, western blot, immunocytochemistry, and Raman spectroscopy. Our results suggest that different kinds of plasma-treated cells can be differentiated from control cells using the Raman data. PMID:28663896

  16. Loss of CD103~+ intestinal dendritic cells during colonic inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulrike; G; Strauch; Nicole; Grunwald; Florian; Obermeier; Sonja; Gürster; Heiko; C; Rath

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate possible differences in dendritic cells(DC)within intestinal tissue of mice before and after induction of colitis. METHODS:Mucosal DC derived from intestinal tissue,as well as from mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen,were analyzed by fluorescence activated cell sorting(FACS) analysis.Supernatants of these cells were analyzed for secretion of different pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were performed on cryosections of mucosal tissue derived fro...

  17. Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid-induced colonic crypt cell proliferation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Yong Ma; Kate E Williamson; Brian J Rowlands

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) on proliferation of rat colonic cells.METHODS: EDTA was administered into Wistar rats,carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats was studied with immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Marked regional differences in cell proliferation were found in all groups. In EDTA-treated animals, total labelling indexes in both proximal (10.00±0.44 VS7.20±-0.45)and distal (11.05±0.45 vs8.65±0.34) colon and proliferative zone size (21.67±1.13 vs 16.75±1.45, 27.73±1.46 vs 21.74±1.07) were significantly higher than that in normal controls (P<0.05) and lower than that in DMH group (10.00±0.44 vs 11.54±0.45, 11.05±0.45 vs 13.13±0.46,21.67±1.13 vs 35.52±1.58, 27.73±1.46 vs 39.61±1.32,P<0.05). Cumulative frequency distributions showed a shift of the EDTA distal curve to the right (P<0.05) while the EDTA proximal curve did not change compared to normal controls. Despite the changes of proliferative parameters,tumours did not develop in EDTA treated animals.CONCLUSION: Hyperproliferation appears to be more easily induced by EDTA in distal colon than in proximal colon.Hyperproliferation may need to exceed a threshold to develop colonic tumours. EDTA may work as a co-factor in colonic tumorigenesis.

  18. The cardiac glycoside oleandrin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Li; Zhang, Yuming; Zhao, Wanlu; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Chunxia; Deng, Fan

    2017-07-01

    Evidence indicates that the cardiac glycoside oleandrin exhibits cytotoxic activity against several different types of cancer. However, the specific mechanisms underlying oleandrin-induced anti-tumor effects remain largely unknown. The present study examined the anti-cancer effect and underlying mechanism of oleandrin on human colon cancer cells. The cytotoxicity and IC50 of five small molecule compounds (oleandrin, neriifolin, strophanthidin, gitoxigenin, and convallatoxin) in human colon cancer cell line SW480 cells and normal human colon cell line NCM460 cells were determined by cell counting and MTT assays, respectively. Apoptosis was determined by staining cells with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometry. Intracellular Ca(2+) was determined using Fluo-3 AM,glutathione (GSH) levels were measured using a GSH detection kit,and the activity of caspase-3, -9 was measured using a peptide substrate. BAX, pro-caspase-3, -9, cytochrome C and BCL-2 expression were determined by Western blotting. Oleandrin significantly decreased cell viabilities in SW480, HCT116 and RKO cells. The IC50 for SW480 cells was 0.02 µM, whereas for NCM460 cells 0.56 µM. More interestingly, the results of flow cytometry showed that oleandrin potently induced apoptosis in SW480 and RKO cells. Oleandrin downregulated protein expression of pro-caspase-3, -9, but enhanced caspase-3, -9 activities. These effects were accompanied by upregulation of protein expression of cytochrome C and BAX, and downregulation of BCL-2 protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, oleandrin increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, but decreased GSH concentration in the cells. The present results suggest that oleandrin induces apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism of anti-cancer property of oleandrin.

  19. Superoxide production and expression of NAD(P)H oxidases by transformed and primary human colonic epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Andresen, L; Pedersen, G

    2003-01-01

    Superoxide (O(2)(-)) generation through the activity of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) or reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases has been demonstrated in a variety of cell types, but not in human colonic epithelial cells.......Superoxide (O(2)(-)) generation through the activity of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) or reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases has been demonstrated in a variety of cell types, but not in human colonic epithelial cells....

  20. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Aijie

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs (each 25mL) connected in series to an MEC (72mL) produced a maximum of 0.43V using fermentation effluent as a feed, achieving a hydrogen production rate from the MEC of 0.48m 3 H 2/m 3/d (based on the MEC volume), and a yield of 33.2mmol H 2/g COD removed in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production for the integrated system (fermentation, MFC and MEC) was increased by 41% compared with fermentation alone to 14.3mmol H 2/g cellulose, with a total hydrogen production rate of 0.24m 3 H 2/m 3/d and an overall energy recovery efficiency of 23% (based on cellulose removed) without the need for any external electrical energy input. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aijie; Sun, Dan; Cao, Guangli; Wang, Haoyu; Ren, Nanqi; Wu, Wei-Min; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs (each 25 mL) connected in series to an MEC (72 mL) produced a maximum of 0.43 V using fermentation effluent as a feed, achieving a hydrogen production rate from the MEC of 0.48 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d (based on the MEC volume), and a yield of 33.2 mmol H(2)/g COD removed in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production for the integrated system (fermentation, MFC and MEC) was increased by 41% compared with fermentation alone to 14.3 mmol H(2)/g cellulose, with a total hydrogen production rate of 0.24 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d and an overall energy recovery efficiency of 23% (based on cellulose removed) without the need for any external electrical energy input.

  2. Sulindac sulfide inhibits colon cancer cell growth and downregulates specificity protein transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xi; Pathi, Satya S.; Safe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background Specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors play pivotal roles in maintaining the phenotypes of many cancers. We hypothesized that the antineoplastic effects of sulindac and its metabolites were due, in part, to targeting downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Methods The functional effects of sulindac, sulindac sulfone and sulindac sulfide on colon cancer cell proliferation were determined by cell counting. Effects of these compounds on expression of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and pro-...

  3. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie M Erzinger

    Full Text Available The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF, derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3, bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues.

  4. Simultaneous Alcoholic and Malolactic Fermentations by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni Cells Co-immobilized in Alginate Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleve, Gianluca; Tufariello, Maria; Vetrano, Cosimo; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF) usually takes place after the end of alcoholic fermentation (AF). However, the inoculation of lactic acid bacteria together with yeast starter cultures is a promising system to enhance the quality and safety of wine. In recent years, the use of immobilized cell systems has been investigated, with interesting results, for the production of different fermented foods and beverages. In this study we have carried out the simultaneous immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni in alginate beads and used them in microvinifications tests to produce Negroamaro wine. The process was monitored by chemical and sensorial analyses and dominance of starters and cell leaking from beads were also checked. Co-immobilization of S. cerevisiae and O. oeni allowed to perform an efficient fermentation process, producing low volatile acidity levels and ethanol and glycerol concentrations comparable with those obtained by cell sequential inoculum and co-inoculum of yeast and bacteria cells in free form. More importantly, co-immobilization strategy produced a significant decrease of the time requested to complete AF and MLF. The immobilized cells could be efficiently reused for the wine fermentation at least three times without any apparent loss of cell metabolic activities. This integrated biocatalytic system is able to perform simultaneously AF and MLF, producing wines similar in organoleptic traits in comparison with wines fermented following traditional sequential AF and MLF with free cell starters. The immobilized-cell system, that we here describe for the first time in our knowledge, offers many advantages over conventional free cell fermentations, including: (i) elimination of non-productive cell growth phases; (ii) feasibility of continuous processing; (iii) re-use of the biocatalyst. PMID:27379072

  5. Hemoglobin induces colon cancer cell proliferation by release of reactive oxygen species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryung-Ah Lee; Hyun-Ah Kim; Bo-Young Kang; Kwang-Ho Kim

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study whether hemoglobin could amplify colon cancer cell proliferation via reactive oxygen species (ROS)production.METHODS: Colon cancer cell line HT-29 was grown in the conventional method using RPMI1640 media. The viability of the cells was measured using the colorimetric MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay after adding hemoglobin. We determined reactive oxygen species levels to be indicators of oxidative stress in HT 29 cell lines with and without hemoglobin and/or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5-DFUR) using fluorometric dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay.RESULTS: Cellular proliferation was increased with hemoglobin in a concentration-dependent manner. A significant increment on ROS levels was found in HT 29 cells following hemoglobin incubation. The cytotoxic effects of 5-FU and 5-DFUR were significantly blunted by administration of hemoglobin. There was a slight increase of peroxiredoxin 1, superoxide dismutase 1 concentration according to different hemoglobin concentrations.CONCLUSION: Hemoglobin has a cellular proliferative effect on HT-29 colon cancer cell line by production of ROS. Also, hemoglobin abates cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents such as 5-FU and 5-DFUR.

  6. Retroviral endostatin gene transfer inhibits human colon cancer cell growth in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卫昌; 傅建新; 刘强; 阮长耿; 萧树东

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect of retroviral endostatin gene transfer on the human colon cancer cell line, LoVo.Methods A retroviral vector pLESSN expressing secretable endostatin was constructed and packaged with a titer of 8.2×105 CFU/ml. A LoVo cell line was subjected to retrovirus-mediated endostatin gene transfer. The proviral integration of endostatin was analyzed with PCR. The function of endostatin was tested by MTT assay in vitro and a mouse xenograft model in vivo.Results After transfection and superinfection, amphotropic retrovirus was collected, and transduction with amphotropic retroviruses resulted in endostatin proviral integration. The endostatin secreted by transduced LoVo cells markedly inhibited endothelial cell growth up to 67% (P<0.001), compared with the control cells. The gene expression of endostatin in LoVo colon tumor cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. There was an 86% reduction in tumor size in the endostatin-transduced group, accompanied by a reduction in vessels, compared with the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion Retroviruses can allow functional expression of the endostatin gene in human colon tumors, showing promise for an antitumor strategy using antiangiogenesis.

  7. Critical analysis of data concerning Saccharomyces cerevisiae free-cell proliferations and fermentations assisted by magnetic and electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hristov, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    The review analyses studies on magnetically assisted proliferations and batch fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. The results available in the literature are contradictory and show two tendencies: magnetic field suppression of the cell growth and positive effects in batch fermentation with increasing both biomass and metabolite production. The amount of data analyzed allows several concepts existing in the literature to be outlined and critically commented. Further, a new concept of magnetically induced micro-dynamos, recently conceived, is developed towards a unified explanation of the results provided by proliferation and batch fermentation experiments

  8. Recent insights into the cell immobilization technology applied for dark fermentative hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Mudhoo, Ackmez; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Nagarajan, Dillirani; Ghimire, Anish; Lay, Chyi-How; Lin, Chiu-Yue; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2016-11-01

    The contribution and insights of the immobilization technology in the recent years with regards to the generation of (bio)hydrogen via dark fermentation have been reviewed. The types of immobilization practices, such as entrapment, encapsulation and adsorption, are discussed. Materials and carriers used for cell immobilization are also comprehensively surveyed. New development of nano-based immobilization and nano-materials has been highlighted pertaining to the specific subject of this review. The microorganisms and the type of carbon sources applied in the dark hydrogen fermentation are also discussed and summarized. In addition, the essential components of process operation and reactor configuration using immobilized microbial cultures in the design of varieties of bioreactors (such as fixed bed reactor, CSTR and UASB) are spotlighted. Finally, suggestions and future directions of this field are provided to assist the development of efficient, economical and sustainable hydrogen production technologies.

  9. Reactor design for the ABE fermentation using cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum immobilized by adsorption onto bonechar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, N.; Maddox, I.S.

    1988-03-07

    Cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum were immobilized by adsorption onto bonechar, and used for the production of solvents (ABE fermentation) from whey permeate. When the process was performed in packed bed reactors operated in a vertical or inclined mode, solvent productivities approximating 6kg/(m/sup 3/h) were obtained. However, the systems suffered from blockage due to excess biomass production and gas hold-up. These problems were less apparent when a partially-packed bed reactor was operated in the horizontal mode. A fluidized bed reactor proved to be the most stable of the systems investigated, and a productivity of 4.8 kg/(m/sup 3/h) was maintained over a period of 2000 h of operation. The results demonstrate that this type of reactor may have a useful future role in the ABE fermentation.

  10. Coexistence of a colon carcinoma with two distinct renal cell carcinomas: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannopoulos Lambros A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present the case of a patient with two tumors in his left kidney and a synchronous colon cancer. While coexisting tumors have been previously described in the same kidney or the kidney and other organs, or the colon and other organs, to the best of our knowledge no such concurrency of three primary tumors has been reported in the literature to date. Case presentation A 72-year-old man of Greek nationality presenting with pain in the right hypochondrium underwent a series of examinations that revealed gallstones, a tumor in the hepatic flexure of the colon and an additional tumor in the upper pole of the left kidney. He was subjected to a right hemicolectomy, left nephrectomy and cholecystectomy, and his postoperative course was uneventful. Histopathology examinations showed a mucinous colon adenocarcinoma, plus two tumors in the left kidney, a papillary renal cell carcinoma and a chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. Conclusion This case underlines the need to routinely scan patients pre-operatively in order to exclude coexisting tumors, especially asymptomatic renal tumors in patients with colorectal cancer, and additionally to screen concurrent tumors genetically in order to detect putative common genetic alterations.

  11. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Pathi

    Full Text Available Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB. Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite.

  12. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C H; Okos, M R; Wankat, P C

    1989-06-05

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was successfully carried out in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor. The reactor was composed of two serial columns packed with Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 entrapped on the surface of natural sponge segments at a cell loading in the range of 2.03-5.56 g dry cells/g sponge. The average cell loading was 3.58 g dry cells/g sponge. Batch experiments indicated that a critical pH above 4.2 is necessary for the initiation of cell growth. One of the media used during continuous experiments consisted of a salt mixture alone and the other a nutrient medium containing a salt mixture with yeast extract and peptone. Effluent pH was controlled by supplying various fractions of the two different types of media. A nutrient medium fraction above 0.6 was crucial for successful fermentation in a trickle bed reactor. The nutrient medium fraction is the ratio of the volume of the nutrient medium to the total volume of nutrient plus salt medium. Supplying nutrient medium to both columns continuously was an effective way to meet both pH and nutrient requirement. A 257-mL reactor could ferment 45 g/L glucose from an initial concentration of 60 g/L glucose at a rate of 70 mL/h. Butanol, acetone, and ethanol concentrations were 8.82, 5.22, and 1.45 g/L, respectively, with a butanol and total solvent yield of 19.4 and 34.1 wt %. Solvent productivity in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor was 4.2 g/L h, which was 10 times higher than that obtained in a batch fermentation using free cells and 2.76 times higher than that of an immobilized CSTR. If the nutrient medium fraction was below 0.6 and the pH was below 4.2, the system degenerated. Oxygen also contributed to the system degeneration. Upon degeneration, glucose consumption and solvent yield decreased to 30.9 g/L and 23.0 wt %, respectively. The yield of total liquid product (40.0 wt %) and butanol selectivity (60.0 wt %) remained almost constant. Once the cells were degenerated

  13. Docosahexaenoic acid suppresses arachidonic acid-induced proliferation of LS-174T human colon carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piet Habbel; Karsten H Weylandt; Katja Lichopoj; Johannes Nowak; Martin Purschke; Jing-Dong Wang; Cheng-Wei He; Daniel C Baumgart; Jing X Kang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and their combination on colon cancer cell growth.METHODS: The LS-174T colon cancer cell line was used to study the role of the prostaglandin precursor AA and the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA on cell growth. Cell viability was assessed in XTT assays. For analysis of cell cycle and cell death, flow cytometry and DAPI staining were applied. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), p21 and bcl-2 in cells incubated with AA or DHA was examined by real-time RT-PCR. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation in the presence of AA and DHA was measured using a PGE2ELISA.RESULTS: AA increased cell growth, whereas DHA reduced viability of LS 174T cells in a time- and dosedependent manner. Furthermore, DHA down- regulated mRNA of bcl-2 and up-regulated p21. Interestingly,DHA was able to suppress AA-induced cell proliferation and significantly lowered AA-derived PGE2 formation.DHA also down-regulated COX-2 expression. In addition to the effect on PGE2 formation, DHA directly reduced PGE2-induced cell proliferation in a dosedependent manner.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that DHA can inhibit the pro-proliferative effect of abundant AA or PGE2.

  14. The role of STAT1 for crosstalk between fibroblasts and colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan eKaler

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signaling between tumor cells and the associated stroma has an important impact on cancer initiation and progression. The tumor microenvironment has a paradoxical role in tumor progression and fibroblasts, a major component of the tumor stroma, have been shown to either inhibit or promote cancer development. In this study we established that normal intestinal fibroblasts activate STAT1 signaling in colon cancer cells and, in contrast to cancer- associated fibroblasts, inhibit growth of tumor cells. Treatment of 18Co fibroblasts with the proinflammatory cytokine TNF interfered with their ability to trigger STAT1 signaling in cancer cells. Accordingly, intestinal myofibroblasts isolated from patients with Ulcerative colitis (UC or Crohn’s disease (CD, which are activated and produce high levels of TNF, failed to stimulate STAT1 signaling in tumor cells, demonstrating that activated myofibroblasts lose the ability to trigger growth-inhibitory STAT1 signaling in tumor cells. Finally, we confirmed that silencing of STAT1 in tumor cells alters the crosstalk between tumor cells and fibroblasts, suggesting STAT1 as a novel link between intestinal inflammation and colon cancer. We demonstrated that normal fibroblasts restrain the growth of carcinoma cells, at least in part, through the induction of STAT1 signaling in cancer cells. We showed that changes in the microenvironment, as they occur in inflammatory bowel disease, alter the crosstalk between carcinoma cells and fibroblasts, perturb the homeostasis of intestinal tissue and thereby contribute to tumor progression.

  15. MicroRNA-145 targets YES and STAT1 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea H; Jacobsen, Anders B; Frankel, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    miRNA overexpression. Gene Ontology analysis showed an overrepresentation of genes involved in cell death, cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle, gene expression and cancer. A number of the identified miRNA targets have previously been implicated in cancer, including YES, FSCN1, ADAM17, BIRC2......, VANGL1 as well as the transcription factor STAT1. Both YES and STAT1 were verified as direct miR-145 targets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study identifies and validates new cancer-relevant direct targets of miR-145 in colon cancer cells and hereby adds important mechanistic understanding of the tumor......BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important gene regulators and are recognized as key players in tumorigenesis. miR-145 is reported to be down-regulated in several cancers, but knowledge of its targets in colon cancer remains limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate...

  16. Bile acid deoxycholate induces differential subcellular localisation of the PKC isoenzymes beta 1, epsilon and delta in colonic epithelial cells in a sodium butyrate insensitive manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looby, Eileen; Long, Aideen; Kelleher, Dermot; Volkov, Yuri

    2005-05-10

    Elevated levels of bile acids have been implicated in the abnormal morphogenesis of the colonic epithelium thus contributing to colorectal cancer (CRC). Alternatively sodium butyrate (NaB) produced by anaerobic fermentation of dietary fibre is regarded as being protective against colon cancer. Bile acids such as deoxycholic acid (DCA) are thought to mediate some of their actions by differentially activating protein kinase C (PKC). We examined the effects of DCA on the subcellular localisation of PKC-beta(1), -epsilon and -delta and whether these responses could be modulated by NaB. HCT116 cells endogenously express PKC-epsilon and -delta but not PKC-beta. DCA treatment results in endogenous PKC-epsilon translocation but not PKC-delta after 1 hr. To study the subcellular localisation of PKC isoforms in response to DCA in real time, PKC-beta(1), PKC-epsilon and PKC-delta functionally intact green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion constructs were used. Stimulation with 300 microM DCA induces rapid translocation of PKC-beta(1)-GFP and PKC-epsilon-GFP but not PKC-delta-GFP from the cytosol to the plasma membrane in 15 min. Interestingly, pretreatment with 4mM NaB does not modify the response of the PKC isoenzymes to DCA as PKC-beta(1)-GFP and PKC-epsilon-GFP translocates to the plasma membrane in 15 min whereas PKC-delta-GFP localisation remains unaltered. Immunofluorescence shows that PKC-beta(1)-GFP and PKC-epsilon-GFP cells treated with DCA colocalise with the cytoskeletal elements actin and tubulin adjacent to the plasma membrane. Our findings demonstrate that the differential activation of the PKC isoenzymes by DCA may be of critical importance for the functional responses of colonic epithelial cells. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the International Journal of Cancer website at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0020-7136/suppmat/index.html.

  17. Cytotoxicity and Apoptotic Effects of Polyphenols from Sugar Beet Molasses on Colon Carcinoma Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingshun Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Three polyphenols were isolated and purified from sugar beet molasses by ultrasonic-aid extraction and various chromatographic techniques, and their structures were elucidated by spectral analysis. Cytotoxicity and the molecular mechanism were measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT assay, flow cytometry, caspase-3 activity assay and Western blot assay. The results showed that gallic acid, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride and epicatechin have cytotoxicity to the human colon, hepatocellular and breast cancer cells. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride showed its cytotoxicity against various tumor cell lines, particularly against colon cancer Caco-2 cells with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 value of 23.21 ± 0.14 μg/mL in vitro. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride may be a potential candidate for the treatment of colon cancer. In the mechanism study, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride increased the ratio of cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and reduced cyclin D1 expression on Caco-2 cells. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride decreased mutant p21 expression, and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and the activation of caspase-3 to induce apoptosis.

  18. Demethylation effect of the antineoplaston AS2-1 on genes in colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    USHIJIMA, MASATAKA; OGATA, YUTAKA; TSUDA, HIDEAKI; AKAGI, YOSHITO; MATONO, KEIKO; SHIROUZU, KAZUO

    2014-01-01

    Antineoplastons are naturally occurring peptides and amino acid derivatives found in human blood and urine. Antineoplastons have been shown to control neoplastic growth. In the present study, we investigated demethylation effect of the antineoplaston AS2-1 (a mixture of phenylacetylglutamine and phenylacetate in the ratio of 1:4) on various genes in colon cancer cells. An HpaII-MspI methylation microarray was used to investigate the methylation status of 51 genes at the promoter region in HCT116 and KM12SM human colon cancer cells before and after treatment of AS2-1. The expression of protein and mRNA of the demethylated genes by AS2-1 in HCT116 cells was evaluated. In 19 of the 34 methylated genes in HCT116 and in 7 of the 8 methylated genes in KM12SM, the methylation status was downregulated after treatment with 2 mg/ml of AS2-1 for 24 h. AS2-1 dramatically downregulated the methylation status of p15 and ESR1 in HCT116 cells and of MTHFR and MUC2 in KM12SM cells. Both mRNA and protein expression of p15 increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with AS2-1. The antineoplaston AS2-1 may normalize the hypermethylation status at the promoter region in various genes including tumor suppressor genes, resulting in activation of the transcription and translation in colon cancer. PMID:24213840

  19. Evidence for the involvement of NOD2 in regulating colonic epithelial cell growth and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheena M Cruickshank; Louise Wakenshaw; John Cardone; Peter D Howdle; Peter J Murray; Simon R Carding

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the function of NOD2 in colonic epithelial cells (CEC).METHODS: A combination of in vivo and in vitro analyses of epithelial cell turnover in the presence and absence of a functional NOD2 protein and, in response to enteric Salmonella typhimurium infection, were used. shRNA interference was also used to investigate the consequences of knocking down NOD2 gene expression on the growth and survival of colorectal carcinoma cell lines.RESULTS: In the colonic mucosa the highest levels of NOD2 expression were in proliferating crypt epithelial cells. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP), that is recognized by NOD2, promoted CEC growth in vitro. By contrast, the growth of NOD2-deficient CECs was impaired. In vivo CEC proliferation was also reduced and apoptosis increased in Nod2-/- mice, which were also evident following enteric Salmonella infection. Furthermore, neutralization of NOD2 mRNA expression in human colonic carcinoma cells by shRNA interference resulted in decreased survival due to increased levels of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: These findings are consistent with the involvement of NOD2 protein in promoting CEC growth and survival. Defects in proliferation by CECs in cases of CD may contribute to the underlying pathology of disrupted intestinal homeostasis and excessive inflammation.

  20. Capsaicin Modulates the Immune Cross Talk Between Human Mononuclears and Cells from Two Colon Carcinoma Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Hanna; Djaldetti, Meir

    2017-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent alkaloid of the chili peppers, has gained a worldwide reputation. In addition to its culinary assets, capsaicin possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and even carcinopreventive properties. Considering the linkage between chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis, the aim of the study was to evaluate the role of capsaicin in the immune interplay between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and HT-29 or RKO cells from human colon carcinoma lines. PBMCs were incubated for 24 hours with either HT-29 or RKO cells and concentrations of capsaicin ranging between 10 and 200 µM. Subsequently, the generation of the following cytokines was examined: tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-1ra, and IL-10. Capsaicin caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of colon cancer cells proliferation but had no effect on PBMC viability. 200 µM of capsaicin suppressed the production of all cytokines tested. At lower concentrations, the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-1ra was inhibited concentration-dependently, whereas that of IL-6 was stimulated. Capsaicin causes a concentration-dependent alteration of the immune balance between PBMC and colon carcinoma cells expressed as an inhibited generation of inflammatory cytokines. These findings indicate the existence of an additional immunomodulatory mechanism by which this alkaloid may prevent tumor development.

  1. Effect of immobilized cells in calcium alginate beads in alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Juliana C; Rodrigues, J Augusto R; Moran, Paulo J S; Valença, Gustavo P; Nunhez, José R

    2013-05-30

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized in calcium alginate and chitosan-covered calcium alginate beads and studied in the fermentation of glucose and sucrose for ethanol production. The batch fermentations were carried out in an orbital shaker and assessed by monitoring the concentration of substrate and product with HPLC. Cell immobilization in calcium alginate beads and chitosan-covered calcium alginate beads allowed reuse of the beads in eight sequential fermentation cycles of 10 h each. The final concentration of ethanol using free cells was 40 g L-1 and the yields using glucose and sucrose as carbon sources were 78% and 74.3%, respectively. For immobilized cells in calcium alginate beads, the final ethanol concentration from glucose was 32.9 ± 1.7 g L-1 with a 64.5 ± 3.4% yield, while the final ethanol concentration from sucrose was 33.5 ± 4.6 g L-1 with a 64.5 ± 8.6% yield. For immobilized cells in chitosan-covered calcium alginate beads, the ethanol concentration from glucose was 30.7 ± 1.4 g L-1 with a 61.1 ± 2.8% yield, while the final ethanol concentration from sucrose was 31.8 ± 6.9 g L-1 with a 62.1 ± 12.8% yield. The immobilized cells allowed eight 10 h sequential reuse cycles to be carried out with stable final ethanol concentrations. In addition, there was no need to use antibiotics and no contamination was observed. After the eighth cycle, there was a significant rupture of the beads making them inappropriate for reuse.

  2. Influence of inorganic and organic iron compounds on parameters of cell growth and survival in human colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenow, Stefanie; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L; Glei, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Increased risk for development of colon cancer is associated with red meat intake and iron toxicity is discussed for one underlying mechanism. Anyhow, for iron itself only limited evidence is found. In this study, effects of different iron compounds on proliferation of HT29 carcinoma and LT97 adenoma human colon cells were investigated. After treatment of cells with inorganic (ferrous sulfate: FeSO4 and ferric nitrilotriacetate: FeNTA) and organic (hemoglobin and hemin) iron sources (24-72 h), number of cells and metabolic activity were measured. Under normal cell culture conditions, neither iron compound elevated cell growth in either cell line with the exception of FeNTA which induced LT97 cell growth significantly. Distinct inhibition of cell proliferation was measured for organic iron. Serum-free incubation of HT29 cells revealed growth promoting properties of iron under deficiency. Even though organic iron, especially hemin, was a potent growth factor, both substances showed also dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. In conclusion, these data emphasize that not iron itself, but merely organic iron may promote carcinogenic events. Since promotion of proliferation was only detectable under deficiency, cytotoxic properties of organic iron may be of more importance in colon carcinogenesis.

  3. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth and cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data indicate that methylselenol is a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo but its role in colon cancer prevention remains to be characterized. This study tested the hypothesis that methylselenol inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells and tumors. We found that submicr...

  4. Study on the Inhibition of Fermented Soybean to Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yan; WANG Wei; SHAN Yi; E Zhiqiang; WANG Liqun

    2009-01-01

    In the experiment, the inhibition of isoflavones extracted from soybean and tempe to SP2/0 and Hela cells was studied,and the inhibition rate of each unit for cancer cells was also studied. The results showed that the inhibition rate of tempe isoflavones to SP2/0 was 96.9% and to Hela cells was 69.5% when the concentration was 20 μg·mL-1. In the same condition, the inhibition rate of soybean isoflavones was 83.16% and 60.5%. With the decline of concentration, the inhibition rate decreased. The inhibition of isoflavones to SP2/0 did not exist when the concentration was 5-1.25 μg·mL-1.

  5. Honokiol in combination with radiation targets notch signaling to inhibit colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnurangam, Sivapriya; Mammen, Joshua M V; Ramalingam, Satish; He, Zhiyun; Zhang, Youcheng; Umar, Shahid; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Anant, Shrikant

    2012-04-01

    Cancer stem cells are implicated in resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapy. Honokiol, a biphenolic compound has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating various ailments. In this study, we determined the ability of honokiol to enhance the sensitivity of colon cancer stem cells to IR. The combination of honokiol and IR suppressed proliferation and colony formation while inducing apoptosis of colon cancer cells in culture. There were also reduced numbers and size of spheroids, which was coupled with reduced expression of cancer stem cell marker protein DCLK1. Flow cytometry studies confirmed that the honokiol-IR combination reduced the number of DCLK1+ cells. In addition, there were reduced levels of activated Notch-1, its ligand Jagged-1, and the downstream target gene Hes-1. Furthermore, expression of components of the Notch-1 activating γ-secretase complex, presenilin 1, nicastrin, Pen2, and APH-1 was also suppressed. On the other hand, the honokiol effects were mitigated when the Notch intracellular domain was expressed. To determine the effect of honokiol-IR combination on tumor growth in vivo, nude mice tumor xenografts were administered honokiol intraperitoneally and exposed to IR. The honokiol-IR combination significantly inhibited tumor xenograft growth. In addition, there were reduced levels of DCLK1 and the Notch signaling-related proteins in the xenograft tissues. Together, these data suggest that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer growth that targets the stem cells by inhibiting the γ-secretase complex and the Notch signaling pathway. These studies warrant further clinical evaluation for the combination of honokiol and IR for treating colon cancers.

  6. Fermented Chinese Formula Shuan-Tong-Ling Protects Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjing Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermented Chinese formula Shuan-Tong-Ling (STL, composed of fourteen medicinal herbs, was an experiential formula by Dr. Zhigang Mei for treating vascular encephalopathy, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of fermented STL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- induced injury in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs and the possible mechanisms. Cultured BMECs were treated with H2O2, STL, or nicotinamide (NAM, a SIRT1 inhibitor. Then, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay was employed to detect cell proliferation and senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal was used to examine cell senescence. Cell nuclei were observed by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Additionally, changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione (GSH levels were measured. Expression of SIRT1, p21, and PGC-1α was determined by western blot. Cell proliferation significantly increased with STL treatment in a dose-dependent manner. H2O2 treatment could intensify cell senescence and nuclei splitting or pyknosis. With STL treatment, the reduced ROS level was accompanied by increased SOD and GSH activity. Further assays showed upregulation of SIRT1 and PGC-1α and downregulation of p21 after STL treatment. The results revealed that STL could protect BMECs against oxidative stress injury at least partially through the SIRT1 pathway.

  7. Mechanisms underlying 3-bromopyruvate-induced cell death in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiming; Liu, Zhe; Zou, Xue; Lan, Yadong; Sun, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiu; Zhao, Surong; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is an energy-depleting drug that inhibits Hexokinase II activity by alkylation during glycolysis, thereby suppressing the production of ATP and inducing cell death. As such, 3BP can potentially serve as an anti-tumorigenic agent. Our previous research showed that 3BP can induce apoptosis via AKT /protein Kinase B signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we found that 3BP can also induce colon cancer cell death by necroptosis and apoptosis at the same time and concentration in the SW480 and HT29 cell lines; in the latter, autophagy was also found to be a mechanism of cell death. In HT29 cells, combined treatment with 3BP and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) exacerbated cell death, while viability in 3BP-treated cells was enhanced by concomitant treatment with the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk) and the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin (Nec)-1. Moreover, 3BP inhibited tumor growth in a SW480 xenograft mouse model. These results indicate that 3BP can suppress tumor growth and induce cell death by multiple mechanisms at the same time and concentration in different types of colon cancer cell by depleting cellular energy stores.

  8. Visualization of N-acylhomoserine lactone-mediated cell-cell communication between bacteria colonizing the tomato rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steidle, A.; Sigl, K.; Schuhegger, R.

    2001-01-01

    Given that a large proportion of the bacteria colonizing the roots of plants is capable of producing N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules, it appears likely that these bacterial pheromones may serve as signals for communication between cells of different species. In this study, we have...

  9. Measurement of the cell membrane capacitance and conductance of colonic crypt cells of the rat using the patch clamp technique

    CERN Document Server

    Schill, C

    2005-01-01

    Using the patch clamp technique the membrane capacitance and membrane conductance of colonic crypt cells of the rat was measured. The influence of the intracellular agonists Ca++, cAMP and of osmotic changes on the membrane capacitance and conductance was studied.

  10. Butyrate inhibits cancerous HCT116 cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser...

  11. Production of carboxylic acids from hydrolyzed corn meal by immobilized cell fermentation in a fibrous-bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu Liang; Wu, Zetang; Zhang, Likun; Cheung, Chun Ming; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2002-03-01

    Corn meal hydrolyzed with amylases was used as the carbon source for producing acetic, propionic, and butyric acids via anaerobic fermentations. In this study, corn meal, containing 75% (w/w) starch, 20% (w/w) fibers, and 1.5% (w/w) protein, was first hydrolyzed using amylases at 60 degrees C. The hydrolysis yielded approximately 100% recovery of starch converted to glucose and 17.9% recovery of protein. The resulting corn meal hydrolyzate was then used, after sterilization, for fermentation studies. A co-culture of Lactococcus lactis and Clostridium formicoaceticum was used to produce acetic acid from glucose. Propionibacterium acidipropionici was used for propionic acid fermentation, and Clostridium tyrobutylicum was used for butyric acid production. These cells were immobilized on a spirally wound fibrous matrix packed in a fibrous-bed bioreactor (FBB) developed for multi-phase biological reactions or fermentation. The bioreactor was connected to a stirred-tank fermentor that provided pH and temperature controls via medium circulation. The fermentation system was operated at the recycle batch mode. Temperature and pH were controlled at 37 degrees C and 7.6, respectively, for acetic acid fermentation, 32 degrees C and 6.0, respectively, for propionic acid fermentation, and 37 degrees C and 6.0, respectively, for butyric acid production. The fermentation demonstrated a yield of approximately 100% and a volumetric productivity of approximately 1 g/(1 h) for acetic acid production. The propionic acid fermentation achieved an approximately 60% yield and a productivity of 2.12 g/(1 h), whereas the butyric acid fermentation obtained an approximately 50% yield and a productivity of 6.78 g/(1 h). These results were comparable to, or better than those fermentations using chemically defined media containing glucose as the substrate, suggesting that these carboxylic acids can be efficiently produced from direct fermentation of corn meal hydrolyzate. The corn fiber present

  12. Tumor-associated macrophages favor C26 murine colon carcinoma cell proliferation in an oxidative stress-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luput, Lavinia; Licarete, Emilia; Sesarman, Alina; Laura, Patras; Alupei, Marius Costel; Banciu, Manuela

    2017-02-17

    The role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in the development of colon carcinoma is still controversial. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the TAM‑driven processes that may affect colon cancer cell proliferation. To achieve this purpose, murine macrophages were co-cultured with C26 murine colon carcinoma cells at a cell density ratio that approximates physiological conditions for colon carcinoma development in vivo. In this respect, the effects of TAM-mediated angiogenesis, inflammation and oxidative stress on the proliferative capacity of C26 murine colon carcinoma cells were studied. To gain insight into the TAM-driven oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase, the main pro-oxidant enzyme in macrophages, was inhibited. Our data revealed that the stimulatory effects of TAMs on C26 cell proliferation may be related mainly to their pro-oxidant actions exerted by NADPH oxidase activity, which maintains the redox status and the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic effects of TAMs on tumor cells were found to create a favorable microenvironment for C26 colon carcinoma development and progression. In conclusion, our data confirmed the protumor role of TAMs in the development of colon carcinoma in an oxidative stress-dependent manner that potentiates the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. These data may offer valuable information for future tumor-targeted therapies based on TAM 're-education' strategies.

  13. Effect of light irradiation by light emitting diode on colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Noriko; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kurita, Nobuhiro; Sato, Hirohiko; Iwata, Takashi; Higashijima, Jun; Chikakiyo, Motoya; Nishi, Masaaki; Kashihara, Hideya; Takasu, Chie; Eto, Shohei; Takahashi, Akira; Akutagawa, Masatake; Emoto, Takahiro

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of irradiation from light emitting diodes (LED) for wound healing, anti-inflammation and anticancer therapies. However, little is known about the effects of visible light in colon cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological response (including gene expression changes) of human colon cancer cells to different wavelengths of LED irradiation. Human colon cancer cells (HT29 or HCT116) were seeded onto laboratory dishes that were then put on LED irradiation equipment with a 465 nm-, 525 nm-, or 635 nm-LED. Irradiation at 15 or 30 mW was performed 10 min/day, each day for 5 days. The cell counting kit8 was then used to measure cell viability. Apoptosis and expression of several mRNAs (caspase, MAPK and autophagy pathway) in HT29 cultures irradiated with 465 nm LED were evaluated via AnnexinV/PI and RT-PCR, respectively. Viability of HT29 and HCT116 cells was lower in 465 nm-LED irradiated cultures than in control cultures, but viability of HT29 cells did not differ between control cultures and 525 nm-LED or 635 nm-LED irradiated cultures. Moreover, the expression of FAS, caspase-3, capase-8, and JUK were significantly higher in 465 nm-LED irradiated cultures than in control cultures, and expression of ERK1/2 and LC3 was lower in blue-irradiated cells. LED irradiation at 465 nm inhibited the proliferation of HT29 cells and of HCT116 cells. Notably, LED irradiation at 465 nm promoted apoptosis inHT29 cultures via the extrinsic apoptosis pathway and the MAPK pathway. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Optogenetic Demonstration of Functional Innervation of Mouse Colon by Neurons Derived From Transplanted Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Lincon A; Gwynne, Rachel M; Foong, Jaime P P; Lomax, Alan E; Hao, Marlene M; Kaplan, David I; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven; Allen, Andrew M; Bornstein, Joel C; Young, Heather M

    2017-05-01

    Cell therapy offers the potential to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders caused by diseased or absent enteric neurons. We examined whether neurons generated from transplanted enteric neural cells provide a functional innervation of bowel smooth muscle in mice. Enteric neural cells expressing the light-sensitive ion channel, channelrhodopsin, were isolated from the fetal or postnatal mouse bowel and transplanted into the distal colon of 3- to 4-week-old wild-type recipient mice. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings of responses to light stimulation of the transplanted cells were made from colonic smooth muscle cells in recipient mice. Electrical stimulation of endogenous enteric neurons was used as a control. The axons of graft-derived neurons formed a plexus in the circular muscle layer. Selective stimulation of graft-derived cells by light resulted in excitatory and inhibitory junction potentials, the electrical events underlying contraction and relaxation, respectively, in colonic muscle cells. Graft-derived excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons released the same neurotransmitters as endogenous motor neurons-acetylcholine and a combination of adenosine triphosphate and nitric oxide, respectively. Graft-derived neurons also included interneurons that provided synaptic inputs to motor neurons, but the pharmacologic properties of interneurons varied with the age of the donors from which enteric neural cells were obtained. Enteric neural cells transplanted into the bowel give rise to multiple functional types of neurons that integrate and provide a functional innervation of the smooth muscle of the bowel wall. Circuits composed of both motor neurons and interneurons were established, but the age at which cells are isolated influences the neurotransmitter phenotype of interneurons that are generated. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Histone acetylation regulates p21WAF1 expression in human colon cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Xuan Chen; Jing-Yuan Fang; Hong-Yin Zhu; Rong Lu; Zhong-Hua Cheng; De-Kai Qiu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of histone acetylation on regulation of p21WAF1 gene expression in human colon cancer cell lines.METHODS: Two cell lines, Colo-320 and SW1116 were treated with either trichostatin or sodium butyrate. Expressions of p21WAF1 mRNA and protein were detected by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Acetylation of two regions of p21WAF1 gene-associated histones and total cellular histones were examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and Western blotting. RESULTS: Trichostatin or sodium butyrate re-activated p21WAF1 transcription resulted in up-regulated p21WF1 protein level in colon cancer cell lines. Those effects were accompanied by an accumulation of acetylated histones in total cellular chromatin and p21WAF1 gene-associated region of chromatin.CONCLUSION: Histone acetylation regulates p21WAF1 expression in human colon cancer cell lines, Colo-320 and SW1116.

  16. TGFβ/Smad3 regulates proliferation and apoptosis through IRS-1 inhibition in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Katie L; Agarwal, Ekta; Chowdhury, Sanjib; Luo, Jiangtao; Brattain, Michael G; Black, Jennifer D; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we have uncovered a novel crosstalk between TGFβ and IGF-1R signaling pathways. We show for the first time that expression and activation of IRS-1, an IGF-1R adaptor protein, is decreased by TGFβ/Smad3 signaling. Loss or attenuation of TGFβ activation leads to elevated expression and phosphorylation of IRS-1 in colon cancer cells, resulting in enhanced cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis and increased tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of IRS-1 expression reversed Smad3 knockdown-mediated oncogenic phenotypes, indicating that TGFβ/Smad3 signaling inhibits cell proliferation and increases apoptosis at least partially through the inhibition of IRS-1 expression and activation. Additionally, the TGFβ/Smad3/IRS-1 signaling axis regulates expression of cyclin D1 and XIAP, which may contribute to TGFβ/Smad3/IRS-1-mediated cell cycle progression and survival. Given that loss of TGFβ signaling occurs frequently in colon cancer, an important implication of our study is that IRS-1 could be a potential therapeutic target for colon cancer treatment.

  17. Influence of race on microsatellite instability and CD8+ T cell infiltration in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Carethers

    Full Text Available African American patients with colorectal cancer show higher mortality than their Caucasian counterparts. Biology might play a partial role, and prior studies suggest a higher prevalence for microsatellite instability (MSI among cancers from African Americans, albeit patients with MSI cancers have improved survival over patients with non-MSI cancers, counter to the outcome observed for African American patients. CD8+ T cell infiltration of colon cancer is postively correlated with MSI tumors, and is also related to improved outcome. Here, we utilized a 503-person, population-based colon cancer cohort comprising 45% African Americans to determine, under blinded conditions from all epidemiological data, the prevalence of MSI and associated CD8+ T cell infiltration within the cancers. Among Caucasian cancers, 14% were MSI, whereas African American cancers demonstrated 7% MSI (P = 0.009. Clinically, MSI cancers between races were similar; among microsatellite stable cancers, African American patients were younger, female, and with proximal cancers. CD8+ T cells were higher in MSI cancers (88.0 vs 30.4/hpf, P<0.0001, but was not different between races. Utilizing this population-based cohort, African American cancers show half the MSI prevalence of Caucasians without change in CD8+ T cell infiltration which may contribute towards their higher mortality from colon cancer.

  18. Colonization of Fiber Cells by Colletotrichum graminicola in Wounded Maize Stalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venard, C; Vaillancourt, L

    2007-04-01

    ABSTRACT Colonization of wounded maize stalks by a wild-type strain of Colletotrichum graminicola was compared with colonization by a C. graminicola mutant that is avirulent on maize leaves, and by a wild-type strain of C. sublineolum that is normally a pathogen of sorghum but not maize. Local infection by all strains at the wound site resulted in formation of primary lesions consisting of disintegrated parenchyma cells beneath an intact rind and epidermis. However, subsequent rapid longitudinal expansion of the primary lesion occurred only in infections with the wild-type C. graminicola strain, and proceeded specifically through the fiber cells associated with the vascular bundles and the rind. Hyphae emerged from the fiber cells to produce discontinuous secondary lesions. There was no evidence that C. graminicola is a vascular wilt pathogen. Resistance of wounded cv. Jubilee maize stalks to the mutant strain of C. graminicola and to C. sublineolum was associated with restriction of colonization and spread of the pathogen through the fibers, as well as with the limitation of localized destruction of parenchyma cells at the wound site.

  19. Prognostic value of stem cell quantification in stage II colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Vaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a subset of tumor cells with capacity to self-renew and generate the diverse cells that make up the tumor. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of CSCs in a highly homogeneous population of stage II colon cancer. METHODS: One hundred stage II colon cancer patients treated by the same surgical team between 1977 and 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. None of the patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Inmunohistochemistry expression of CD133, NANOG and CK20 was scored, using four levels: 50% positivity. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log rank test were used to compare survival. RESULTS: The average patient age was 68 years (patients were between 45-92 years of age and median follow up was 5.8 years. There was recurrent disease in 17 (17%; CD133 expression (defined by >10% positivity was shown in 60% of the tumors, in 95% for NANOG and 78% for CK20. No correlation was found among expression levels of CD133, NANOG or CK20 and relapse-free survival (RFS or overall survival (OS. However, a statistical significant correlation was found between established pathological prognostic factors and RFS and OS. CONCLUSIONS: Stem Cell quantification defined by CD133 and NANOG expression has no correlation with RFS or OS in this cohort of Stage II colon cancer.

  20. Diet-Induced Obesity Is Associated with an Impaired NK Cell Function and an Increased Colon Cancer Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähr, Ina; Goritz, Vincent; Doberstein, Henriette; Hiller, Grit Gesine Ruth; Rosenstock, Philip; Jahn, Janine; Pörtner, Ole; Berreis, Tobias; Mueller, Thomas; Spielmann, Julia; Kielstein, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased colon cancer incidence, but underlying mechanisms remained unclear. Previous studies showed altered Natural killer (NK) cell functions in obese individuals. Therefore, we studied the impact of an impaired NK cell functionality on the increased colon cancer risk in obesity. In vitro investigations demonstrated a decreased IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxicity of human NK cells against colon tumor cells after NK cell preincubation with the adipokine leptin. In addition, leptin incubation decreased the expression of activating NK cell receptors. In animal studies, colon cancer growth was induced by injection of azoxymethane (AOM) in normal weight and diet-induced obese rats. Body weight and visceral fat mass were increased in obese animals compared to normal weight rats. AOM-treated obese rats showed an increased quantity, size, and weight of colon tumors compared to the normal weight tumor group. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a decreased number of NK cells in spleen and liver in obesity. Additionally, the expression levels of activating NK cell receptors were lower in spleen and liver of obese rats. The results show for the first time that the decreased number and impaired NK cell function may be one cause for the higher colon cancer risk in obesity.

  1. Diet-Induced Obesity Is Associated with an Impaired NK Cell Function and an Increased Colon Cancer Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Bähr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with an increased colon cancer incidence, but underlying mechanisms remained unclear. Previous studies showed altered Natural killer (NK cell functions in obese individuals. Therefore, we studied the impact of an impaired NK cell functionality on the increased colon cancer risk in obesity. In vitro investigations demonstrated a decreased IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxicity of human NK cells against colon tumor cells after NK cell preincubation with the adipokine leptin. In addition, leptin incubation decreased the expression of activating NK cell receptors. In animal studies, colon cancer growth was induced by injection of azoxymethane (AOM in normal weight and diet-induced obese rats. Body weight and visceral fat mass were increased in obese animals compared to normal weight rats. AOM-treated obese rats showed an increased quantity, size, and weight of colon tumors compared to the normal weight tumor group. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a decreased number of NK cells in spleen and liver in obesity. Additionally, the expression levels of activating NK cell receptors were lower in spleen and liver of obese rats. The results show for the first time that the decreased number and impaired NK cell function may be one cause for the higher colon cancer risk in obesity.

  2. Intact cell mass spectrometry as a progress tracking tool for batch and fed-batch fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmel, Michaela; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Raus, Martin; Posch, Andreas E; Herwig, Christoph; Šebela, Marek; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-02-01

    Penicillin production during a fermentation process using industrial strains of Penicillium chrysogenum is a research topic permanently discussed since the accidental discovery of the antibiotic. Intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) can be a fast and novel monitoring tool for the fermentation progress during penicillin V production in a nearly real-time fashion. This method is already used for the characterization of microorganisms and the differentiation of fungal strains; therefore, the application of ICMS to samples directly harvested from a fermenter is a promising possibility to get fast information about the progress of fungal growth. After the optimization of the ICMS method to penicillin V fermentation broth samples, the obtained ICMS data were evaluated by hierarchical cluster analysis or an in-house software solution written especially for ICMS data comparison. Growth stages of a batch and fed-batch fermentation of Penicillium chrysogenum are differentiated by one of those statistical approaches. The application of two matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) instruments in the linear positive ion mode from different vendors demonstrated the universal applicability of the developed ICMS method. The base for a fast and easy-to-use method for monitoring the fermentation progress of P. chrysogenum is created with this ICMS method developed especially for fermentation broth samples.

  3. Novel fermented chickpea milk with enhanced level of γ-aminobutyric acid and neuroprotective effect on PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, novel fermented chickpea milk with high γ -aminobutyric acid (GABA content and potential neuroprotective activity was developed. Fermentation starter that can produce GABA was selected from 377 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Chinese fermented foods. Among the screened strains, strain M-6 showed the highest GABA-producing capacity in De Man–Rogosa and Sharp (MRS broth and chickpea milk. M-6 was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum based on Gram staining, API carbohydrate fermentation pattern testing, and 16s rDNA sequencing. The complete gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase was cloned to confirm the presence of the gene in L. plantarum M-6. The fermentation condition was optimized by response surface methodology. Results demonstrated that L. plantarum M-6 produced the highest GABA content of 537.23 mg/L. The optimal condition included an inoculum concentration of 7%, presence of 0.2% (m/v monosodium glutamate and 55 µ M pyridoxal-5-phosphate, incubation temperature of 39 °C and fermentation time of 48 h . GABA-enriched chickpea milk exerted protective effects on PC12 cells against MnCl2 -induced injury. GABA-enriched chickpea milk improved cell viability and markedly attenuated the release of lactate dehydrogenase compared with the impaired cells.

  4. Effects of inositol hexaphosphate on proliferation of HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Song, Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) on proliferation of HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line. METHODS: Cells were exposed to various concen-trations (0, 1.8, 3.3, 5.0, 8.0, 13.0 mmol/L) of IP6 for a certain period of time. Its effect on growth of HT-29 cells was measured by MTT assay. The expressions of cell cycle regulators treated with IP6 for 2 d were detected by immunocytochemistry. RESULTS: IP6 inhibited the HT-29 cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Analysis of cell cycle regulator expression revealed that IP6 reduced the abnormal expression of P53 and PCNA and induced the expression of P21. CONCLUSION: IP6 has potent inhibitory effect on proliferation of HT-29 cells by modulating the expression of special cell cycle regulators. PMID:16830361

  5. Effects of inositol hexaphosphate on proliferation of HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Tian; Yang Song

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) on proliferation of HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line.METHODS: Cells were exposed to various concentrations (0, 1.8, 3.3, 5.0, 8.0, 13.0 mmol/L) of IP6 for a certain period of time. Its effect on growth of HT-29 cells was measured by MTT assay. The expressions of cell cycle regulators treated with IP6 for 2 d were detected by immunocytochemistry.RESULTS: IP6 inhibited the HT-29 cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Analysis of cell cycle regulator expression revealed that IP6 reduced the abnormal expression of P53 and PCNA and induced the expression of P21.CONCLUSION: IP6 has potent inhibitory effect on proliferation of HT-29 cells by modulating the expression of special cell cycle regulators.

  6. Combination of gefitinib and DNA methylation inhibitor decitabine exerts synergistic anti-cancer activity in colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-feng Lou

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the treatment of human colon cancer, the chemotherapy efficacy against colon cancer is still unsatisfactory. In the present study, effects of concomitant inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and DNA methyltransferase were examined in human colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that decitabine (a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor synergized with gefitinib (an EGFR inhibitor to reduce cell viability and colony formation in SW1116 and LOVO cells. However, the combination of the two compounds displayed minimal toxicity to NCM460 cells, a normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line. The combination was also more effective at inhibiting the AKT/mTOR/S6 kinase pathway. In addition, the combination of decitabine with gefitinib markedly inhibited colon cancer cell migration. Furthermore, gefitinib synergistically enhanced decitabine-induced cytotoxicity was primarily due to apoptosis as shown by Annexin V labeling that was attenuated by z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor. Concomitantly, cell apoptosis resulting from the co-treatment of gefitinib and decitabine was accompanied by induction of BAX, cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved PARP, along with reduction of Bcl-2 compared to treatment with either drug alone. Interestingly, combined treatment with these two drugs increased the expression of XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1 which play an important role in cell apoptosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA (siRNA depletion of XAF1 significantly attenuated colon cancer cells apoptosis induced by the combination of the two drugs. Our findings suggested that gefitinib in combination with decitabine exerted enhanced cell apoptosis in colon cancer cells were involved in mitochondrial-mediated pathway and induction of XAF1 expression. In conclusion, based on the observations from our study, we suggested that the combined administration of these two drugs might be considered as a novel therapeutic regimen for treating colon

  7. Continuous cytokine exposure of colonic epithelial cells induces DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2005-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. As an example ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with a production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including nitrogen monoxide (NO), which is produced in high amounts by inducibl...... nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS). NO as well as other ROS are potential DNA damaging agents. The aim was to determine the effect of long-term cytokine exposure on NO formation and DNA damage in epithelial cells....

  8. Hydrogen sulfide protects colon cancer cells from chemopreventative agent β-phenylethyl isothiocyanate induced apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Rose; Philip K Moore; Shen Han Ming; Ong Choon Nam; Jeffrey S Armstrong; Matt Whiteman

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a prominent gaseous constituent of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract with known cytotoxic properties. Endogenous concentrations of H2S are reported to range between 0.2-3.4 mmol/L in the GI tract of mice and humans. Considering such high levels we speculate that, at non-toxic concentrations, H2S may interact with chemical agents and alter the response of colonic epithelium cells to such compounds. The GI tract is a major site for the absorption of phytochemical constituents such as isothiocyanates, flavonoids, and carotenoids, with each group having a role in the prevention of human diseases such as colon cancer. The chemopreventative properties of the phytochemical agent β-phenyethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) are well recognized. However, little is currently known about the physiological or biochemical factors present in the GI tract that may influence the biological properties of ITCs. The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of H2S on PEITC mediated apoptosis in colon cancer cells.METHODS: Induction of apoptosis by PEITC in human colon cancer HCT116 cells was assessed using classic apoptotic markers namely SubG1 population analysis,caspase-3 like activity and nuclear fragmentation and condensation coupled with the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrasodium bromide) viability assay and LDH leakage.RESULTS: PEITC significantly induced apoptosis in HGT116cells as assessed by SubG1 population formation, nuclear condensation, LDH leakage and caspase-3 activity after 24 h, these data being significant from control groups (P<0.01). In contrast, co-treatment of cells with physiological concentrations of H2S (0.1-1 mmol/L) prevented PEITC mediated apoptosis as assessed using the parameters described.CONCLUSION: PEITC effectively induced cell death in the human adenocarcinoma cell line HCT116 in vitro through classic apoptotic mechanisms. However, in the presence of H2S, apoptosis was abolished. These data

  9. Tart cherry anthocyanins inhibit tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and reduce proliferation of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Soo-Young; Seeram, Navindra P; Nair, Muraleedharan G; Bourquin, Leslie D

    2003-05-08

    Anthocyanins, which are bioactive phytochemicals, are widely distributed in plants and especially enriched in tart cherries. Based on previous observations that tart cherry anthocyanins and their respective aglycone, cyanidin, can inhibit cyclooxygenase enzymes, we conducted experiments to test the potential of anthocyanins to inhibit intestinal tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and growth of human colon cancer cell lines. Mice consuming the cherry diet, anthocyanins, or cyanidin had significantly fewer and smaller cecal adenomas than mice consuming the control diet or sulindac. Colonic tumor numbers and volume were not significantly influenced by treatment. Anthocyanins and cyanidin also reduced cell growth of human colon cancer cell lines HT 29 and HCT 116. The IC(50) of anthocyanins and cyanidin was 780 and 63 microM for HT 29 cells, respectively and 285 and 85 microM for HCT 116 cells, respectively. These results suggest that tart cherry anthocyanins and cyanidin may reduce the risk of colon cancer.

  10. Orexin A induces autophagy in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells through the ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Zhao, Yuyan; Guo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Orexins are a class of peptides which have a potent influence on a broad variety of cancer cells. Autophagy is closely associated with tumors; however, its function is not yet completely understood. In this study, we aimed to determine whether orexin A induces autophagy in HCT‑116 human colon cancer cells and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. For this purpose, HCT‑116 cells were treated with orexin A, and cell viability was then measured by MTT assay, and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. The expression levels of autophagy‑related proteins were measured by western blot analysis. Quantitative analysis of autophagy following acridine orange (AO) staining was performed using fluorescence microscopy, and cellular morphology was observed under a transmission electron microscope. In addition, the HCT‑116 cells were treated with the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, U0126, or the autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, in combination with orexin A in order to examine the activation of ERK. We found that orexin A significantly inhibited the viability of the HCT‑116 cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis were activated during the orexin A‑induced death of HCT‑116 cells. When the HCT‑116 cells were treated with orexin A for 24 h, an accumulation of punctate microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3) and an increase in LC3‑Ⅱ protein levels were also detected, indicating the activation of autophagy. Moreover, orexin A upregulated ERK phosphorylation; however, U0126 or chloroquine abrogated ERK phosphorylation and decreased autophagy, compared to treatment with orexin A alone. Therefore, our findings demonstratedm that orexin A induced autophagy through the ERK pathway in HCT‑116 human colon cancer cells. The inhibition of autophagy may thus prove to be an effective strategy for enhancing the antitumor potential of orexin A as a treatment for colon cancer.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of interaction of peripheral blood lymphocytes from colonic cancer patients with human colonic cancer-derived cells; P-4788.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugihara,Mutsuto

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood lymphocytes and the various lymphocyte fractions from patients with cancer of the colon were cultivated with target cells (P-4788 derived from the colon cancer. Changes in the surface ultrastructure during tumor cell destruction were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. P-4788 cells adhering to the coverslip showed various surface activity. The surfaces of some cells were relatively flat; others were smooth or had fine granules. Still other cells were villous, round or had marked blebs. When host lymphocytes were added to the target cells, adhesion of the two cell groups began by many fine projections. After incubation for 6 h, some lymphocytes had adhered to the target cells. Many lymphocytes had adhered to the target tumor cells by 24--48 h incubation. Ultimately the tumor cells became swollen and disrupted. Most lymphocytes adherent to the target cells had few microvilli. Lymphocytes after elimination of phagocytes by carbonyl iron treatment also adhered readily. Some target cells showed adhesion with lymphocytes passed through nylon-wool columns, although the number of lymphocytes adhering was fewer than in the case of lymphocytes not passed through nylon-wool columns. T cells were collected from lymphocytes that form rosettes with SRBC by isolation with NH4Cl. They had markedly elongated microvilli which in places were sparsely scattered and tended to be localized on the side, a finding which suggests loss of cell activity by the time of SEM. Only a few T cells adhered to target cells and they seemed to be T cells without activity. It was thought that there are cytotoxic cells among T cells and that the co-existence of T cells, non-T cells and monocytes caused target cell destruction.

  12. Enhanced bioelectricity harvesting in microbial fuel cells treating food waste leachate produced from biohydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongdong; Ahn, Youngho

    2015-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) treating the food waste leachate produced from biohydrogen fermentation were examined to enhance power generation and energy recovery. In batch mode, the maximum voltage production was 0.56 V and the power density reached 1540 mW/m(2). The maximum Coulombic efficiency (CEmax) and energy efficiency (EE) in the batch mode were calculated to be 88.8% and 18.8%, respectively. When the organic loading rate in sequencing batch mode varied from 0.75 to 6.2 g COD/L-d (under CEmax), the maximum power density reached 769.2 mW/m(2) in OLR of 3.1 g COD/L-d, whereas higher energy recovery (CE=52.6%, 0.346 Wh/g CODrem) was achieved at 1.51 g COD/L-d. The results demonstrate that readily biodegradable substrates in biohydrogen fermentation can be effectively used for the enhanced bioelectricity harvesting of MFCs and a MFC coupled with biohydrogen fermentation is of great benefit on higher electricity generation and energy efficiency.

  13. Oestrogen inhibits human colonic motility by a non-genomic cell membrane receptor-dependent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Classical effects of oestrogen involve activation of target genes after binding nuclear receptors. Oestrogenic effects too rapid for DNA transcription (non-genomic) are known to occur. The effect of oestrogen on colonic motility is unknown despite the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in pregnant and premenopausal women. METHODS: Histologically normal colon was obtained from proximal resection margins of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended in organ baths under 1 g of tension. After equilibration, they were exposed to 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8) or bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8). Fulvestrant, an oestrogen receptor antagonist, was added to some baths (n = 8). Other strips were exposed to calphostin C or cycloheximide. Carbachol was added in increasing concentrations and contractile activity was recorded isometrically. RESULTS: Oestrogen inhibited colonic contractility (mean difference 19.7 per cent; n = 8, P < 0.001). In keeping with non-genomic, rapid-onset steroid action, the effect was apparent within minutes and reversible. It was observed with both 17beta-oestradiol and BSA-conjugated oestrogen, and was not altered by cycloheximide. Effects were inhibited by fulvestrant, suggesting receptor mediation. CONCLUSION: Oestrogen decreases contractility in human colonic smooth muscle by a non-genomic mechanism involving cell membrane coupling.

  14. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jian-Yong [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Huang, Yi [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Li, Ji-Peng [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Meng, Yan-Ling [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Yan, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Bian, Yong-Qian [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhao, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Wang, Wei-Zhong, E-mail: weichang@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  15. Phospholipid remodeling and eicosanoid signaling in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siddhartha; Martinez, Leobarda Robles; Ray, Suparna

    2014-12-01

    Phospholipid remodeling and eicosanoid synthesis are central to lipid-based inflammatory reactions. Studies have revealed that membrane phospholipid remodeling by fatty acids through deacylation/reacylation reactions increases the risk of colorectal cancers (CRC) by allowing the cells to produce excess inflammatory eicosanoids, such as prostaglandins, thromboxanes and leukotrienes. Over the years, efforts have been made to understand the lipid remodeling pathways and to design anti-cancer drugs targeting the enzymes of eicosanoid biosynthesis. Here, we discuss the recent progress in phospholipid remodeling and eicosanoid biosynthesis in CRC.

  16. The Microbial Metabolites, Short-Chain Fatty Acids, Regulate Colonic Treg Cell Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Patrick M.; Howitt, Michael; Panikov, Nicolai; Michaud, Monia; Gallini, Carey Ann; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Glickman, Jonathan Neil; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are critical for regulating intestinal inflammation. Candidate microbe approaches have identified bacterial species and strain-specific molecules that can affect intestinal immune responses, including species that modulate Treg responses. Because neither all humans nor mice harbor the same bacterial strains, we posited that more prevalent factors exist that regulate the number and function of colonic Tregs. We determined t...

  17. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; ZENG, ZHAOSHI; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut ) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer i...

  18. Nutrient Availability Alters the Effect of Autophagy on Sulindac Sulfide-Induced Colon Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiun-Kwei Chiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a catabolic process by which a cell degrades its intracellular materials to replenish itself. Induction of autophagy under various cellular stress stimuli can lead to either cell survival or cell death via apoptotic and/or autophagic (nonapoptotic pathways. The NSAID sulindac sulfide induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Here, we show that inhibition of autophagy under serum-deprived conditions resulted in significant reductions of sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells. In contrast, inhibition of autophagy under conditions where serum is available significantly increased sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells. We previously showed that the apoptosis inhibitor, survivin, plays a role in regulating NSAID-induced apoptosis and autophagic cell death. Here, we show that survivin protein half-life is increased in the presence of autophagy inhibitors under serum-deprived conditions, but not under conditions when serum is available. Thus, the increased levels of survivin may be a factor contributing to inhibition of sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis under serum-deprived conditions. These results suggest that whether a cell lives or dies due to autophagy induction depends on the balance of factors that regulate both autophagic and apoptotic processes.

  19. Mechanism of Alternariol monomethyl ether-induced mitochondrial apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensassi, Fatma; Gallerne, Cindy; el Dein, Ossama Sharaf; Hajlaoui, Mohamed Rabeh; Bacha, Hassen; Lemaire, Christophe

    2011-12-18

    Alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) is a major mycotoxin produced by fungi of the genus Alternaria and a common contaminant of food products such as fruits and cereals worldwide. AME can cause serious health problems for animals as well as for humans. In this study, human colon carcinoma cells (HCT116) were used to explore the mechanisms of cell death induced by AME. Exposure of HCT116 cells to AME resulted in significant cytotoxicity manifested by a loss in cell viability mainly mediated by activation of apoptotic process. AME activated the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway evidenced by the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) downstream generation of O(2)(-), cytochrome c release and caspase 9 and 3 activation. Experiments conducted on isolated organelles indicated that AME does not directly target mitochondria to induce PTP-dependent permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes. Moreover, no difference was observed in Bax-KO cells in comparison to parental cells, suggesting that the pro-apoptotic protein Bax is not involved in AME-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that AME induces cell death in human colon carcinoma cells by activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis.

  20. Role of cytokines in promoting immune escape of FasL-expressing human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Xu; Bao-Cun Sun; Qiang Li; Xi-Shan Hao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential role of cytokines in promoting Fas ligand (FasL)-expressing colon cancer cells.METHODS: Immunohistochemical SABC method was used to observe the expression of Fas receptor and ligand in SW620 colon cancer cell line and Jurkat T cells in order to provide the morphological evidence for the functions of Fas receptor and ligand. To examine the cytotoxicity of effector cells, CytoTox96(R) non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay was adopted to measure the lactate dehydrogenase-releasing value after SW620 cells were co-cultured with Jurkat T lymphocytes.RESULTS: The FasL of colon cancer SW620 cells was positive. The positive substances were distributed in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. The Fas receptor of colon cancer SW620 cells was negative. The Fas receptor and ligand of Jurkat T lymphocytes tumed out to be positive. The positive substances were distributed in the cell membrane.After phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated Jurkat T lymphocytes were co-cultured with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-plus-ionomycin-stimulated (for 48 h) SW620ceils or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated (for 48 h) SW620 cells or unstimulated SW620 cells for 4 h,the cytotoxicity of SW620 cells to PHA-stimulated Jurkat cells at effector-to-target ratios of 10:1, 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1was 74.6%, 40.8%, 32.4%, and 10.9% (F= 8.19, P<0.05);or 54.9%, 35.3%, 22.0%, and 10.3% (F= 11.12, P<0.05);or 14.9%, 10.5%, 6.9%, and 5.8% (F= 3.45, P<0.05).After PHA-stimulated Jurkat T lymphocytes were co-cultured with unstimulated SW620 cells for 8 h, the cytotoxicity of SW620 cells to PHA-stimulated Jurkat cells at effector-totarget ratios of 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1 from the experiment was 83.9%, 74.1%, and 28.5% (F= 137.04, P<0.05)respectively. Non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay showed that the apoptotic rate of Jurkat cells remarkably increased with the increase of planting concentration of SW620 cells and co-culture time after the SW620 cells were co

  1. Evodiamine induces caspase-dependent apoptosis and S phase arrest in human colon lovo cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Xu, Xiang; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xi; Liang, Hua-Ping

    2010-09-01

    Evodiamine, one of the major bioactive components derived from Wu-Chu-Yu, a long-standing Chinese herb, was reported to possess anticancer activity. In this study, we investigated the in-vitro and in-vivo anticancer effects of evodiamine on human colon lovo cells and their potential mechanisms. The 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that the in-vitro proliferation of lovo cells was inhibited by evodiamine of various concentrations. Flow cytometry showed a time-dependent increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and cells arrested in the S phase after treatment with 60 micromol/l evodiamine. Western blot indicated that evodiamine treatment decreased the expression of procaspase-8, procaspase-9, and procaspase-3 in lovo cells, accompanied by the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3. However, the translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G was not affected by evodiamine. Moreover, western blot assay also suggested that evodiamine-induced S phase arrest in lovo cells was associated with a marked decrease in the protein expression of cyclinA, cyclinA-dependent kinase 2, and cdc25c. In-vivo antineoplastic characteristics of evodiamine were examined in a human colon carcinoma lovo xenograft model and results showed that evodiamine increased the number of TUNEL-positive cells accompanied by the downregulated expression of procaspase-8, procaspase-9, and procaspase-3. In conclusion, these findings indicated that evodiamine could inhibit the in-vitro and in-vivo proliferation of human colon lovo cells by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis and S phase arrest.

  2. Thermotherapy enhances oxaliplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human colon carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Liang Zhang; An-Bin Hu; Shu-Zhong Cui; Hong-Bo Wei

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To observe the synergistic effects of hyperthermia in oxaliplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human colon adenocarcinoma Lovo cells.METHODS:The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Lovo was obtained from Sun Yat-Sen University.Cells were sealed with parafilm and placed in a circulating water bath,and was maintained within 0.01 ℃ of the desired temperature (37 ℃,39 ℃,41 ℃,43 ℃ and 45 ℃).Thermal therapy was given alone to the negarive control group while oxaliplatin was administered to the treatment group at doses of 12.5 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL.Identification of morphological changes,3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay,flow cytometry and Western blotting were used to investigate the effect of thermochemotherapy on human colon adenocarcinoma Lovo cells,including changes in the signal pathway related to apoptosis.RESULTS:A temperature-dependent inhibition of cell growth was observed after oxaliplatin exposure,while a synergistic interaction was detected preferentially with sequential combination.Thermochemotherapy changed the morphology of Lovo cells,increased the inhibition rate of the Lovo cells (P < 0.05) and enhanced cellular population in the G0/G1 phase (16.7%± 4.8 % in phase S plus 3.7% ± 2.4 % in phase G2/M,P < 0.05).Thermochemotherapy increased apoptosis through upregulating p53,Bax and downregulating Bcl-2.Protein levels were elevated in p53,Bax/Bcl-2in thermochemotherapy group as compared with the control group (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION:Thermochemotherapy may play an important role in apoptosis via the activation of p53,Bax and the repression of Bcl-2 in Lovo cells.

  3. Growth Inhibition Effect of DL-Lysine Acetylalicylate on sw480 Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu; TIAN Xiao-feng; WANG Li-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of DL-lysine acetylsalicylate on proliferation of colon carcinoma cells line sw480. Methods: After treatment of DL-lysine acetylsalicylate, the study was performed by observing sw480 colorectal cancer cells with phase contrast microscope, making growth curve, and examining the inhibition rate of sw480 cells with MTT assay. Results: The morphology of sw480 cells showed characteristics of apoptosis, the cell growth curve showed inhibited proliferation of sw480 cells when treated with DL-lysine acetylsalicylate (P<0.05). The rate of inhibition was upward when the drug concentration increased. Conclusion: DL-lysine acetylsalicylate for injection can inhibit the growth of sw480 colorectal cancer cells obviously in a dose dependent manner.

  4. Resveratrol potentiates grape seed extract induced human colon cancer cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Reddivari, Lavanya; Sclafani, Robert; Das, Undurti N; Vanamala, Jairam

    2011-06-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in men and women. Grape seed extract (GSE) and resveratrol (RSV) are potent chemopreventive agents against colon cancer both in vitro and in vivo, at relatively high concentrations. We hypothesized that RSV and GSE may act in concert with each other in potentiating their anti-cancer properties at sub-optimal doses, because they occur as complex mixtures in grapes. In this study, we showed that RSV (~25 micromolar) potentiated GSE (≤ 35 microg/mL) induced colon cancer cell apoptosis via activation of p53 dependent pathways. Elevation of apoptosis was much more pronounced in p53 +/+ cells compared to p53 -/- cells. Apoptosis was strongly correlated with pp53 levels and Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, key players in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Caspase-3 inhibition and reactive oxygen species suppression attenuated apoptosis induced by the combination. RSV-GSE combination suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis even in the presence of mitogenic growth factor IGF-1, suggesting the importance of understanding the potentiating effects of phytonutrients in combination as they would occur in nature rather than individually.

  5. Magnolol inhibits colonic motility through down-regulation of voltage-sensitive L-type Ca2+ channels of colonic smooth muscle cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man; Zang, Kai-Hong; Luo, Jia-Lie; Leung, Fung-Ping; Huang, Yu; Lin, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Ai-Ping; Tang, Xu-Dong; Xu, Hong-Xi; Sung, Joseph Jao-yiu; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2013-11-15

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of magnolol (5,5'-diallyl-2,2'-biphenyldiol) on contraction in distal colonic segments of rats and the underlying mechanisms. Colonic segments were mounted in organ baths for isometric force measurement. Whole-cell voltage-sensitive L-type Ca(2+) currents were recorded on isolated single colonic smooth muscle cells using patch-clamp technique. The spontaneous contractions and acetylcholine (ACh)- and Bay K 8644-induced contractions were inhibited by magnolol (3-100 μM). In the presence of Bay K8644 (100 nM), magnolol (10-100 μM) inhibited the contraction induced by 10 μM ACh. By contrast, tetrodotoxin (100 nM) and Nώ-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME 100 μM) did not change the inhibitory effect of magnolol (10 μM). In addition, magnolol (3-100 μM) inhibited the L-type Ca(2+) currents. The present results suggest that magnolol inhibits colonic smooth muscle contraction through downregulating L-type Ca(2+) channel activity.

  6. Effects of in vitro fermentation of barley β-glucan and sugar beet pectin using human fecal inocula on cytokine expression by dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosch, Christiane; Taverne, Nico; Venema, Koen; Gruppen, Harry; Wells, Jerry M.; Schols, Henk A.

    2016-01-01

    Scope: This study simulates the fermentation process of barley β-glucan and sugar beet pectin in the human colon and monitors the degradation products formed. Additionally, immune effects of the degradation products were investigated. Methods and results: Immunostimulatory activity of fermentatio

  7. Bacterial colonization of host cells in the absence of cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey D Gilk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports implicating important roles for cholesterol and cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in host-pathogen interactions have largely employed sterol sequestering agents and biosynthesis inhibitors. Because the pleiotropic effects of these compounds can complicate experimental interpretation, we developed a new model system to investigate cholesterol requirements in pathogen infection utilizing DHCR24(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. DHCR24(-/- MEFs lack the Δ24 sterol reductase required for the final enzymatic step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and consequently accumulate desmosterol into cellular membranes. Defective lipid raft function by DHCR24(-/- MEFs adapted to growth in cholesterol-free medium was confirmed by showing deficient uptake of cholera-toxin B and impaired signaling by epidermal growth factor. Infection in the absence of cholesterol was then investigated for three intracellular bacterial pathogens: Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Invasion by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis was unaltered in DHCR24(-/- MEFs. In contrast, C. burnetii entry was significantly decreased in -cholesterol MEFs, and also in +cholesterol MEFs when lipid raft-associated α(Vβ(3 integrin was blocked, suggesting a role for lipid rafts in C. burnetii uptake. Once internalized, all three pathogens established their respective vacuolar niches and replicated normally. However, the C. burnetii-occupied vacuole within DHCR24(-/- MEFs lacked the CD63-positive material and multilamellar membranes typical of vacuoles formed in wild type cells, indicating cholesterol functions in trafficking of multivesicular bodies to the pathogen vacuole. These data demonstrate that cholesterol is not essential for invasion and intracellular replication by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis, but plays a role in C. burnetii-host cell interactions.

  8. Bacterial Colonization of Host Cells in the Absence of Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilk, Stacey D.; Cockrell, Diane C.; Luterbach, Courtney; Hansen, Bryan; Knodler, Leigh A.; Ibarra, J. Antonio; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Reports implicating important roles for cholesterol and cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in host-pathogen interactions have largely employed sterol sequestering agents and biosynthesis inhibitors. Because the pleiotropic effects of these compounds can complicate experimental interpretation, we developed a new model system to investigate cholesterol requirements in pathogen infection utilizing DHCR24−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). DHCR24−/− MEFs lack the Δ24 sterol reductase required for the final enzymatic step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and consequently accumulate desmosterol into cellular membranes. Defective lipid raft function by DHCR24−/− MEFs adapted to growth in cholesterol-free medium was confirmed by showing deficient uptake of cholera-toxin B and impaired signaling by epidermal growth factor. Infection in the absence of cholesterol was then investigated for three intracellular bacterial pathogens: Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Invasion by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis was unaltered in DHCR24−/− MEFs. In contrast, C. burnetii entry was significantly decreased in −cholesterol MEFs, and also in +cholesterol MEFs when lipid raft-associated αVβ3 integrin was blocked, suggesting a role for lipid rafts in C. burnetii uptake. Once internalized, all three pathogens established their respective vacuolar niches and replicated normally. However, the C. burnetii-occupied vacuole within DHCR24−/− MEFs lacked the CD63-postive material and multilamellar membranes typical of vacuoles formed in wild type cells, indicating cholesterol functions in trafficking of multivesicular bodies to the pathogen vacuole. These data demonstrate that cholesterol is not essential for invasion and intracellular replication by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis, but plays a role in C. burnetii-host cell interactions. PMID:23358892

  9. Regulation of cell proliferation and malignant potential by irisin in endometrial, colon, thyroid and esophageal cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyun-Seuk; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2014-02-01

    Irisin is a novel hormone that has been proposed to mediate the beneficial effects of exercise on metabolism, including body weight regulation and insulin resistance. No previous studies have evaluated whether irisin may regulate cell proliferation and malignant potential of obesity-related cancer cell lines. Cell proliferation and malignant potential i.e. cell adhesion and colony formation were studied in vitro using human and mouse obesity-related cancer cell lines i.e. endometrial (KLE and RL95-2), colon (HT29 and MCA38), thyroid (SW579 and BHP7) and esophageal (OE13 and OE33). We observed that, in contrast to metformin, cell proliferation is not regulated by irisin in a dose-dependent manner in human and mouse obesity-related cancer cell lines. Specifically, physiological (5 to 10 nmol/L) and high physiological/pharmacological (50 to 100 nmol/L) concentrations of irisin had no effect on cell proliferation when compared to control in human and mouse endometrial, colon, thyroid and esophageal cancer cell lines. Also, we observed that, in contrast to metformin, neither physiological nor high physiological/pharmacological concentrations of irisin regulate cell adhesion and/or colony formation in human and mouse endometrial, colon, thyroid and esophageal cancer cell lines. Our data suggest that irisin, in physiological and high physiological/pharmacological concentrations, has no in vitro effect on cell proliferation and malignant potential of obesity-related cancer cell lines. Future work is needed to determine the regulation of irisin levels and any physiological effects it may have on obesity-related cancers in vivo in animals and humans. © 2013.

  10. Hydrogen production from sugar beet juice using an integrated biohydrogen process of dark fermentation and microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-12-01

    An integrated dark fermentation and microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) process was evaluated for hydrogen production from sugar beet juice. Different substrate to inoculum (S/X) ratios were tested for dark fermentation, and the maximum hydrogen yield was 13% of initial COD at the S/X ratio of 2 and 4 for dark fermentation. Hydrogen yield was 12% of initial COD in the MEC using fermentation liquid end products as substrate, and butyrate only accumulated in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production from the integrated biohydrogen process was 25% of initial COD (equivalent to 6 mol H2/mol hexoseadded), and the energy recovery from sugar beet juice was 57% using the combined biohydrogen.

  11. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leve, Fernanda; Peres-Moreira, Rubem J.; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana; Morgado-Díaz, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR). Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways involved in cell

  12. Sensitivity of nuclear c-myc levels and induction to differentiation-inducing agents in human colon tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C W; Kim, Y S; Childress-Fields, K E; Yeoman, L C

    1992-02-29

    Six human colon tumor cell lines were analyzed for their constitutive levels of the c-myc protein. The nuclear proto-oncogene, c-myc, was detected as an expressed product in all of the human colon tumor cell lines analyzed. The poorly differentiated cell lines HCT116, RKO and C showed c-myc levels that averaged 2-fold greater than their well-differentiated counterparts, i.e., GEO, CBS and FET. When c-myc levels and responses to serum induction were analyzed in the presence of inducers of differentiation, i.e., dimethylformamide, retinoic acid, sodium butyrate and TGF-beta, distinct patterns of sensitivity and resistance emerged. Nuclear c-myc levels were reduced in all the colon cell phenotypes treated with dimethylformamide or sodium butyrate. Only the well-differentiated human colon tumor cell lines were responsive to transforming growth factor-beta. Only one of the human colon tumor cell lines (GEO) responded to retinoic acid. Increased levels of c-myc protein were found to correlate well with greater growth rates and with poor differentiation class. Similarly, a parallel sensitivity to down-regulation of c-myc levels and attenuation of c-myc induction curves for inducers of differentiation were observed in growth sensitive human colon tumor cell lines.

  13. Involvement of promoter methylation in