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Sample records for fennoscandian shield deep

  1. Hydrogeochemistry of deep groundwaters in the central part of the Fennoscandian Shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, R.

    1999-01-01

    Saline groundwaters are frequent in the central part of the Fennoscandian Shield. The results indicate large variations in groundwater chemistry and in the spatial distribution of saline groundwaters. The depths of the fresh/saline groundwater boundaries vary considerably but generally the boundary is located at 300-600 m. In some cases fresh bicarbonate groundwaters are encountered throughout the drill hole. More commonly, however, bicarbonate waters occur only as an upper layer, up to a few hundred metres in extent, overlying chloride waters of varying salinity. In coastal areas saline groundwaters are frequently found much closer to ground surface. Long-term water-rock interaction and incursions of present/ancient sea water are considered the main processes affecting the evolution of the saline groundwater bodies, while isolation from the surface-close hydrological cycle seems to be a prerequisite for the preservation of these waters. Ancient preferential leaching of low-Rb/Sr minerals (most likely plagioclase) and/or fluid inclusions are the main contribution for dissolved solids in water-rock interaction. The strontium isotope results imply that saline groundwaters in crystalline rocks do not evolve as isolated small pockets with a restricted volume of rock but may constitute more open systems in which lateral hydrogeochemical interaction extends over distances of at least hundreds of metres. One potential mechanism for formation of young calcites is related to glacial rebound where release of stress and increase in temperature in fractures make the groundwaters oversaturated with respect to calcite. Δ 18 depleted groundwaters have been observed from several sampling sites in Finland, indicative of glacial meltwater intrusion in the bedrock. As saline waters have been documented to have long residence times and are not associated with active meteoric water circulation, bedrock suites hosted by saline groundwaters could be considered as potential repository

  2. Taxonomically and functionally diverse microbial communities in deep crystalline rocks of the Fennoscandian shield.

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    Nyyssönen, Mari; Hultman, Jenni; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Paulin, Lars; Laine, Pia; Itävaara, Merja; Auvinen, Petri

    2014-01-01

    Microbial life in the nutrient-limited and low-permeability continental crystalline crust is abundant but remains relatively unexplored. Using high-throughput sequencing to assess the 16S rRNA gene diversity, we found diverse bacterial and archaeal communities along a 2516-m-deep drill hole in continental crystalline crust in Outokumpu, Finland. These communities varied at different sampling depths in response to prevailing lithology and hydrogeochemistry. Further analysis by shotgun metagenomic sequencing revealed variable carbon and nutrient utilization strategies as well as specific functional and physiological adaptations uniquely associated with specific environmental conditions. Altogether, our results show that predominant geological and hydrogeochemical conditions, including the existence and connectivity of fracture systems and the low amounts of available energy, have a key role in controlling microbial ecology and evolution in the nutrient and energy-poor deep crustal biosphere.

  3. Metallogeny of gold in the Fennoscandian Shield

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    Gaál, G.; Sundblad, K.

    1990-12-01

    Gold occurs in a number of different ore types in the Fennoscandian Shield ranging in age from Late Archean to Late Proterozoic. Until recently, the metal was exploited primarily as a byproduct in volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits but during the 1980s more gold mines have been opened than during any other episode in the mining history of northern Europe. The occurrence of gold in the Fennoscandian Shield is reviewed in the context of the major tectonostratigraphic units: 1. In the Karelian Province, gold is hosted by greenstone belts of the Archean basement complex e.g. at Ilomantsi, eastern Finland. Greenstone belts of the Nordkalott Province, which are interpreted as part of an Early Proterozoic cover sequence, contain gold deposits associated with copper (Bidjovagge, Saattopora and Pahtohavare). Gold is also associated with cobalt in the metasomatically altered Early Proterozoic cover in north-eastern Finland (Meurastuksenaho and Juomasuo). 2. In the Svecofennian Domain, the major gold deposits were generated during the emplacement of 1.92 1.87 Ga old accretional magmatism. These deposits occur in the northeastern part of the Svecofennian Domain, close to the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. They comprise two major types: (a) the porphyry-type and shear-zone gold hosted by tonalite at Tallberg, Laivakangas, Kopsa and Osikonmäki; (b) as a component of volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits (e.g. Holmtjärn, Boliden and Pyhäsalmi). Other types are: (c) gold-bearing quartz-alumina alteration zones formed during the 1.92 1.87 Ga magmatic period (Enåsen); (d) gold in massive sulphide and iron ore deposits in Bergslagen. 3. Gold associated with 1.84 1.54 Ga granites has been reported from several sites in the Shield, including quartz veins and contact-metasomatic deposits. In addition, shear-zone-related gold deposits post-dating these granites have been identified in southeastern Sweden (Ädelfors). 4. In the Sveconorwegian Domain, the gold deposits at Bleka

  4. Comparison of the Sr isotopic signatures in brines of the Canadian and Fennoscandian shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrel, Philippe; Casanova, Joel

    2005-01-01

    A synthesis of Sr isotope data from shallow and deep groundwaters, and brines from the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields is presented. A salinity gradient is evident in the water with concentrations varying from approximately 1-75 g L -1 below 1500 m depth in the Fennoscandian Shield and from 10 up to 300 g L -1 below 650 m depth in the Canadian Shield. Strontium isotope ratios were measured to assess the origin of the salinity and evaluate the degree of water-rock interaction in the systems. In both shields, the Sr concentrations are enriched relative to Cl, defining a positive trend parallel to the seawater dilution line and indicative of Sr addition through weathering processes. The depth distribution for Sr concentration increases strongly with increasing depth in both shields although the variation in Sr-isotope composition does not mirror that of Sr concentrations. Strontium-isotope compositions are presented for surface waters, and groundwaters in several sites in the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields. Numerous mixing lines can be drawn reflecting water-rock interaction. A series of calculated lines links the surface end-members (surface water and shallow groundwater) and the deep brines; these mixing lines define a range of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios for the deep brines in different selected sites. All sites show a specific 87 Sr/ 86 Sr signature and the occurrence of large 87 Sr/ 86 Sr variations is site specific in both shields. In Canadian Shield brines, the Sr isotope ratios clearly highlight large water rock interaction that increases the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio from water that could have been of marine origin. In contrast to the Canadian Shield, groundwater does not occur in closed pockets in the Fennoscandian, and the well-constrained 87 Sr/ 86 Sr signatures in deep brines should correspond to a large, well-mixed and homogeneous water reservoir, whose Sr isotope signature results from water-rock interaction

  5. Microbial metagenomes from three aquifers in the Fennoscandian shield terrestrial deep biosphere reveal metabolic partitioning among populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofen; Holmfeldt, Karin; Hubalek, Valerie; Lundin, Daniel; Åström, Mats; Bertilsson, Stefan; Dopson, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Microorganisms in the terrestrial deep biosphere host up to 20% of the earth's biomass and are suggested to be sustained by the gases hydrogen and carbon dioxide. A metagenome analysis of three deep subsurface water types of contrasting age (from 86% coverage. The populations were dominated by Proteobacteria, Candidate divisions, unclassified archaea and unclassified bacteria. The estimated genome sizes of the biosphere. The data were finally used to create a combined metabolic model of the deep terrestrial biosphere microbial community.

  6. Archaean TTG of Vodlozero Terrain, Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekulaev, Valery; Arestova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    The Vodlozero terrain is the largest (about 270*240 km) early Archaean fragment of Fennoscandian Shield and composes its eastern part. The granitoids of TTG suite are predominant component of the terrain. The greenstone belts are placed along the margins of the terrain. Several stages of TTG formation can be distinguished in Achaean crust history. (1) The oldest TTG are trondhjemites and tonalities with age of 3240 Ma. They contain rare and small amphibolite inclusions of the same age. These TTG are characterized by high Sr (av. 412 ppm), Sr/Y (70), (La/Yb)n (54) and low Y (av. 7 ppm), Yb (0.32 ppm) and Nb (4 ppm). It was shown (Lobach-Zhuchenko et al., 2000), that the source of these TTG could be basic rocks, having composition similar with TH1 by K.Condie. (2) The tonalities and granodiorites with age of 3150 Ma are disposed near greenstone belts and contain compared to TTG of the first group less Sr (av. 250 ppm), Sr/Y (22), (La/Yb)n (18) and more K, Rb (av. 70 ppm), Ba (470 ppm), Y (11 ppm),Yb (1.16 ppm). TTG of both groups have identical T(DM)Nd (3250-3400 Ma) and differences in composition is evidently connected with lower level of source melting of the second group and also with K-metasomatism. The volcanics of the greenstone belts have age 3020 - 2940 Ma. Dykes of gabbro-amphibolites and andesites with the same age and composition cut TTG of the first and the second groups. The age of the third TTG group is about 2900 Ma ago. These rocks form leucosoma of migmatites within TTG of the second group. The composition of the third TTG and Nd isotope data suppose their origin by the melting of ancient TTG crust simultaneously with greenstone belt emplacement. The fourth TTG group with age 2780-2850 Ma forms a small intrusions, cutting older TTG and greenstone rocks. Their composition is similar to 3150 Ma TTG. Nd isotope data indicate that these TTG have younger (about 2850 Ma) source. Thus there are four TTG groups formed into interval more 400 Ma. The age and

  7. Late Cenozoic deep weathering patterns on the Fennoscandian shield in northern Finland: A window on ice sheet bed conditions at the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation

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    Hall, Adrian M.; Sarala, Pertti; Ebert, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The nature of the regolith that existed on the shields of the Northern Hemisphere at the onset of ice sheet glaciation is poorly constrained. In this paper, we provide the first detailed account of an exceptionally preserved, deeply weathered late Neogene landscape in the ice sheet divide zone in northern Finland. We mine data sets of drilling and pitting records gathered by the Geological Survey of Finland to reconstruct regional preglacial deep weathering patterns within a GIS framework. Using a large geochemical data set, we give standardised descriptions of saprolite geochemistry using a variant of the Weathering Index of Parker (WIP) as a proxy to assess the intensity of weathering. We also focus on mineral prospects and mines with dense pit and borehole data coverage in order to identify links between geology, topography, and weathering. Geology is closely linked to topography on the preglacial shield landscape of northern Finland and both factors influence weathering patterns. Upstanding, resistant granulite, granite, gabbro, metabasalt, and quartzite rocks were associated with fresh rock outcrops, including tors, or with thin ( 50 m and included intensely weathered kaolinitic clays with WIPfines values below 1000. Late Neogene weathering profiles were varied in character. Tripartite clay-gruss-saprock profiles occur only in limited areas. Bipartite gruss-saprock profiles were widespread, with saprock thicknesses of > 10 m. Weathering profiles included two discontinuities in texture, materials and resistance to erosion, between saprolite and saprock and between saprock and rock. Limited core recovery when drilling below the soil base in mixed rocks of the Tana Belt indicates that weathering locally penetrated deep below upper fresh rock layers. Such deep-seated weathered bands in rock represent a third set of discontinuities. Incipient weathering and supergene mineralisation also extended to depths of > 100 m in mineralised fracture zones. The thin

  8. Abiotic and biotic controls on methane formation down to 2.5 km depth within the Precambrian Fennoscandian Shield

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    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Niinikoski, Paula; Nykänen, Hannu; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.

    2017-04-01

    Despite a geological history characterised by high temperature and pressure processes and organic carbon deprived crystalline bedrock, large amounts of hydrocarbons are found in deep groundwaters within Precambrian continental shields. In many sites, methane comprises more that 80% of the dissolved gas phase reaching concentrations of tens of mmol l-1. In this study, we used isotopic methods to study the carbon isotope systematics and sources of crustal methane within the Fennoscandian Shield. The main study sites were the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole and the Pyhäsalmi mine in Finland, both of which allow groundwater sampling down to 2.5 km depth and have been previously studied for their groundwater chemistry and microbiology. We show that the differences in the amount and isotopic composition of methane are related to the availability of carbon sources as well as processes behind the incorporation of hydrogen and carbon via abiotic and biotic pathways into hydrocarbon molecules. Supported by previously reported occurrences and isotopic data of deep groundwater methane in lithologically different locations in Finland and Sweden, we show that methane formation is controlled by microbial methanogenesis and abiotic reactions, as well as lithology with the metasedimentary environments being the most favourable for methane occurrence. Rather than a thermogenic relic, crustal methane within the Fennoscandian Shield is more likely the result of low temperature formation from ancient organic compounds or their inorganic intermediates such as graphite. Such crustal gases are characterised by the lack of major amounts of C2+ hydrocarbons and 13C-rich methane. Further, microbiological and isotopic geochemical evidence suggest that microbial methane is more common at depths shallower than 1.5 km.

  9. Quantitative assessment of deep gas migration in Fennoscandian sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delos, Anne; Trinchero, Paolo; Richard, Laurent; Molinero, Jorge; Dentz, Marco; Pitkaenen, Petteri

    2010-11-01

    The origin and migration of gases in the geosphere is of interest for performance assessment studies of deep geological repositories of nuclear waste. The presence of dissolved gases in groundwater relates with some safety issues linked to chemical processes. Noble gases, such as helium isotopes, are commonly used as a marker of the paleo hydrogeological evolution, and are good tracers to give information on hydrogeological conditions and groundwater residence time. There are also reactive (non-inert) gases CH 4 , H 2 O, CO 2 , H 2 S, NH 3 , H 2 , and N 2 dissolved in the groundwaters. CH 4 and H 2 are strong reducing agents that may consume oxygen and be involved in microbial sulphate reduction processes. The integrity of the copper canisters in the repository is one of the major issues to be analyzed in the framework of the Swedish program for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel and dissolved oxygen and sulphide in groundwater are the most damaging components for copper corrosion. Therefore, quantification of flow rates of both, inert and reactive gases, such as helium, methane and hydrogen, in the bedrock would be important for performance assessment calculations. Fluxes of Helium, Methane and Hydrogen at three Fennoscandian sites (Forsmark and Laxemar in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland) have been modelled using Fick's law and measured gradients of gas concentration. Under this hypothesis the concentration is a linear function of depth and hence the gradients can be easily inferred by linear regression. The uncertainty stemming from the scarcity of data and from the diffusivity value used in the analysis has been addressed by sensitivity analysis. Finally, estimates of steady-state gas fluxes of the three Fennoscandian sites are provided. The same data-set has been modelled using the analytical solution provided by Andrews et al. (1989). This solution requires gas production to be constant throughout the domain (which, strictly speaking, is infinite). It

  10. Andoma segment of southeastern margin of fennoscandian shield: Structure and evolution

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    Kolodyazhny, S. Yu.; Baluev, A. S.; Terekhov, E. N.

    2016-07-01

    The components of deformation related to endogenic (tectonic) and exogenic (glaciotectonic, gravitational sliding) factors are considered in the sedimentary platform cover by a study of Andoma dislocations in the Upper Devonian sedimentary rocks of the Lake Onega district. These structures are localized in the eponymous segment of the southeastern margin of the Fennoscandian (Baltic) Shield; indications of high tectonic activity are noted along this margin. As has been shown by a structural study, the development of the Andoma structure is caused by long-term (Late Devonian-Quaternary) multistage deformations related to tectonic factors and, to a lesser degree, glaciotectonics. The consecutive stages of synsedimentation normal faulting and landsliding, bedding-plane gliding, various forms of shear flow in a regime of transpression, glaciotectonic thrusting, and neotectonic transpression are recognized in the deformation history.

  11. Questions on geology in connection with final radioactive waste disposal in the Fennoscandian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerklund, A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of nuclear power involves handling and disposal of radioactive waste. A number of methods for disposal have been proposed, one of which is the construction of repositories in crystalline bedrock of old continental crust. This possibility is usually considered reliable because of the relative stability of such bedrock. The Fennoscandian area has repeatedly been glaciated during the past 3 mission years. The last glacial event terminated some 10 000 years ago. This glacial ''massage'' has maintained a dense network of fractures and faults open for circulating water and ascending gas. Blocks of relatively unfractured bedrock have been proposed as suitable sites for the disposal of nuclear waste. Such questions concern neotectonic activity, the movement, salt content and amount of water at a few hundred metres depth, the mobility of elements in the bedrock as well as the geological processes which might be active beneath any future ice cap. Deep groundwaters, dating of young fracture minerals and neotectonic movements have been studied during 1985 - 1989 in a Nordic reserach program sponsored by NKA, the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy. Deep saline groundwaters may have a negative effect on repositories of nuclear waste and the knowledge of the location of such waters may also give a hint as to the pattern of water movement in the bedrock. Therefore the composition, origin and location of deep groundwaters were studied. The development of faults in the bedrock through a site of waste disposal before the radioactivity in the waste has decayed to a safe level is considered a serious risk factor. Neotectonic movements have mostly followed old faults and fracture zones in the bedrock, which repeatedly have been reactivated during geological time, leaving blocks between the faults tectonically undisturbed. (CLS) 80 refs

  12. Depositional history and tectonic regimes within and in the margins of the Fennoscandian shield during the last 1300 million years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulamaeki, S.; Kuivamaeki, A.

    2006-05-01

    This report is a literature review, which describes the occurrences of Meso- and Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks in Finland and their depositional history The report also summarizes the tectonic and magmatic events within and in the margins of the Fennoscandian Shield during the last 1200 - 1300 million years. Mesoproterozoic (Middle Riphean) and Neoproterozoic (Late Vendian) sandstones and siltstones are presently found only in some tectonically protected basins, e.g., Satakunta and Muhos grabens, Bothnian Sea basin and Bothnian Bay basin, or in the impact structures, but they may have originally distributed over a much larger area. During the Lower and Middle Cambrian, arenaceous and argillaceous sediments were probably deposited in most of the western, southern and central Finland. During the Ordovician, carbonates were deposited in an epicontinental sea with repeated transgressions and regressions. In several occasions, the Bothnian Sea and Aaland Sea basins, as well as southern and south-western Finland were covered by the sea, and in the Middle Ordovician, the sea reached as far as central Finland. No Late Palaeozoic (Silurian to Permian) sedimentary rocks have been recognized. The apatite fission track studies indicate, however, that extensive Silurian to Devonian deposits most likely covered large parts of the Fennoscandian Shield, with an estimated thickness of 3 - 4 km in Sweden and ca. 1 km in Finland. In eastern Lapland, the clay bed of Akanvaara was deposited in early Tertiary (Eocene) under marine conditions. The Mesoproterozoic tectonics was dominated by the Sveconorwegian orogeny (ca. 1250 - 900 Ma), which mainly affected the present south-western Sweden and southern Norway. In Finland, the 'Postjotnian' olivine diabases, dated at 1270 - 1250 Ma, are considered to be connected to the initial rifting at the onset of the orogeny. After the Sveconorwegian orogeny, the Fennoscandian Shield was part of the worldwide supercontinent

  13. Geology and Geochemistry of the Early Proterozoic Kortejärvi and Laivajoki Carbonatites, Central Fennoscandian Shield, Finland

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    Nykänen, J.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides for the first time extensive petrological, mineralogical and geochemical data on the early Proterozoic Kortejärvi and Laivajoki carbonatites, northern Finland, which form metamorphosed and highly strained bodies 2 and 4 km long within a Svecokarelian shear zone in central Fennoscandian Shield. They are not exposed, but have been penetrated by a couple of deep drill holes. In terms of modal mineralogy, both intrusions contain calcite carbonatite and dolomite-calcite carbonatite as their main rock types, but Kortejärvi also contains dolomite carbonatite and calcite-dolomite carbonatite, some glimmerite and olivine-magnetite rock and Laivajärvi tremolite-calcite carbonatite, tremolite-dolomite carbonatite, serpentine-talc-dolomite rock and glimmerite. The main country rock is an amphibolite which is not fenitized. No alkaline rocks have been detected in these intrusions. Calcite is most common mineral in both occurrences. Other carbonate minerals include dolomite with minor ankerite and occassional siderite. In addition to low-Ti phlogopite, tetraferriphlogopite is also encountered. Fresh olivine is rare, and its alteration products include titaniferous clinohumite. The amphiboles are mainly calcic amphiboles, including actinolite, tremolite and edenite. The only sodic-calcic amphibole is accessory richterite. Other essential minerals are Ti-poor magnetite with ilmenite exsolutions, fluorapatite (3.95-4.89 wt. % F, monazite, and allanite-(Ce. Geochemically, the Kortejärvi rocks are mostly magnesiocarbonatites, whereas those of Laivajärvi, due to their higher magnetite content, are ferrocarbonatites. Of the trace elements, Nb is much lower (8-30 ppm in proper carbonatites than the average for carbonatites and U and Th (<0.9 ppm and<2.4 pm, respectively lower than average. Sr is typical, but not high (1830-3480 ppm, and Ba is rather low (27-348 ppm. The REEs are hosted by allanite and monazite and their concentrations in the

  14. Forests in the biogeographical corridors connecting the Fennoscandian shield and the Russian plain: natural features, contemporary status, environmental significance

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    A. N. Gromtsev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of long-term research on forests in natural biogeographical corridors (territories with forests, mires, inland lakes and other land categories connecting the largest bodies of water in Northern Europe (Baltic Sea-Gulf of Finland and lakes Ladoga and Onego to the White Sea are reported. These corridors link isolated pieces of the Eurasian taiga biome at the boundary between two of Europe’s physiographic divisions – Fennoscandian Shield and Russian Plain. They facilitate the dispersal and migration of plant and animal species. The straight-line terrestrial stretch between the Gulf of Finland and the White Sea is around 320 km, and it falls into three sections in the southern, middle and northern taiga subzones, respectively. The corridors were characterized and assessed as follows: 1 physiographic (landscape features; 2 key natural characteristics (typological structure, quantitative ratios, spatial arrangement, productivity, etc., present-day condition of forests, including data from forest management inventories of the past decade; 3 overall assessment of the forest cover transformation by human impact; 4 current system of protected areas and protective forests, and its capacity to fulfill the functions of the corridors (sufficiency.

  15. Palaeoclimatic controls on hydrological systems: Evidence from U-Th dated calcite veins in the Fennoscandian and Canadian shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, F.; Frape, S.K.; Hawkesworth, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present mass spectrometric U-Th age data for eleven weak acid leachates of calcite bearing fracture fillings from threes sites on the Fennoscandian and Canadian shields (Stripa, Sweden; the Underground Research Laboratory, Canada, and Olkiluoto, Finland). These age data define a bimodal distribution with ranges of 84-90 ka and 173-203 ka. In detail, four leachates from the Group I fractures at Stripa yield an age of 87.2 ± 3.2 ka, and three from open fractures (Group III) yield ages in the range 178 ± 8 to 201 ± 6 ka. The latter age range is identical to that defined by samples from the Canadian site (202.8 ± +6.4 -6.0 ka). Taken together, these ages coincide with the end of the interglacials of the marine oxygen isotope stages V and VII, and are interpreted as reflecting the shutoff of meteoric recharge due to the onset of permafrost at these high latitudes. Five leachates from another group of closed, fluorite bearing fractures at Stripa (Group II) are close to secular equilibrium but show evidence for U uptake during the last 1 Ma. (author). 29 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  16. Seismically-induced structures in the Quaternary sediments of the NE Fennoscandian Shield: Features and age

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    Nikolaeva S. B.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of studying secondary seismogenic deformations of the vibrational type (termed "seismites" in loose sediments of the north-eastern Baltic Shield (the Kola region have been provided. The features, types, formation patterns and age of seismites have been considered. On the basis of previous results the major periods of the region activation in the Holocene have been defined. Criteria of identifying similar structures with widely spread glaciodislocations have been suggested. Results of studying the sections with seismites in certain areas of the region have been provided

  17. Magmatic mineral assemblages of eclogitized and not eclogitized Paleoproterozoic gabbronorites from the Belomorian province, Eastern Fennoscandian shield

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    Egorova, S.

    2012-04-01

    Recognition of magmatic crystallization processes is problematic in high-grade metamorphic terrains. However, sometimes metamorphosed gabbro preserve relics of primary magmatic mineral assemblages that give valuable information about the time and conditions of melt crystallization. The Belomorian province of the eastern part of the Fennoscandian Shield is characterized by repeated high-pressure metamorphic events during Archean and Paleoproterozoic. Metagabbronorites of age ca. 2.4 Ga are widespread in the Belomorian province(Stepanova, Stepanov, 2010) and in spite of metamorphic alteration they retain relicts of primary igneous mineral assemblages. We have studied eclogitized gabbronorites, from the Gridino area (metamorphosed at P~19 kbar, T≤930°C, Volodichev, 2005) and metagabbronorites metamorphosed in amphibolite facies conditions (P corona textures on the boundary of plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Eclogitized gabbronorites contain also omphacite (up to Jd52), and plagioclase (An17). It was found that central parts of the both eclogitized and not eclogitized metagabbronorite bodies are well-preserved and retain magmatic textures and primary mineral assemblages that consist of Ol, Opx, Cpx and Pl. Magnesium olivine (Fo81-84) in these rocks is enclosed in euhedral bronzite that also may contain small inclusions of chromite. Rather more ferrous olivine (Fo75) occurs in association with augite, hypersthene and plagioclase (An70). The magmatic stage of crystallization in eclogized and not eclogized olivine gabbronorites is identical: (Ol1+Crt) → OPx → Ol2+Pl (An70) +Aug →Pl (An45). The microprobe data on the composition of rock-forming minerals were used to calculate the crystallization pressures and temperatures for the minerals equilibrium with the melt. Calculations of PT-conditions of magmatic mineral assemblage crystallization were carried out using several geotermobarometers (Nimis, 1996, Putirka,1996, 2008). Relict magmatic assemblages in the

  18. Crustal seismic structure and depth distribution of earthquakes in the Archean Kuusamo region, Fennoscandian Shield

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    Uski, Marja; Tiira, Timo; Grad, Marek; Yliniemi, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional crustal velocity models are derived from passive seismic observations for the Archean Karelian bedrock of north-eastern Finland. In addition, an updated Moho depth map is constructed by integrating the results of this study with previous data sets. The structural models image a typical three-layer Archean crust, with thickness varying between 40 and 52 km. P wave velocities within the 12-20 km thick upper crust range from 6.1 to 6.4 km/s. The relatively high velocities are related to layered mafic intrusive and volcanic rocks. The middle crust is a fairly homogeneous layer associated with velocities of 6.5-6.8 km/s. The boundary between middle and lower crust is located at depths between 28 and 38 km. The thickness of the lower crust increases from 5-15 km in the Archean part to 15-22 km in the Archean-Proterozoic transition zone. In the lower crust and uppermost mantle, P wave velocities vary between 6.9-7.3 km/s and 7.9-8.2 km/s. The average Vp/ Vs ratio increases from 1.71 in the upper crust to 1.76 in the lower crust. The crust attains its maximum thickness in the south-east, where the Archean crust is both over- and underthrust by the Proterozoic crust. A crustal depression bulging out from that zone to the N-NE towards Kuusamo is linked to a collision between major Archean blocks. Further north, crustal thickening under the Salla and Kittilä greenstone belts is tentatively associated with a NW-SE-oriented collision zone or major shear zone. Elevated Moho beneath the Pudasjärvi block is primarily explained with rift-related extension and crustal thinning at ˜2.4-2.1 Ga. The new crustal velocity models and synthetic waveform modelling are used to outline the thickness of the seismogenic layer beneath the temporary Kuusamo seismic network. Lack of seismic activity within the mafic high-velocity body in the uppermost 8 km of crust and relative abundance of mid-crustal, i.e., 14-30 km deep earthquakes are characteristic features of the Kuusamo

  19. COMPLEX GEOLOGICAL–GEOPHYSICAL 3D MODEL OF THE CRUST IN THE SOUTHEASTERN FENNOSCANDIAN SHIELD: NATURE OF DENSITY LAYERING OF THE CRUST AND THE CRUST–MANTLE BOUNDARY

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    V. N. Glaznev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex geophysical 3D model of the Earth's crust and the upper mantle is created for the Archaean Karelian Craton and the Late Palaeoproterozoic accretionary Svecofennian Orogen of the southeastern Fennoscandian Shield with the use of methods of complex inversion of geophysical data based on stochastic description of interrelations of physical properties of the medium (density, P-wave velocity, and heat generation. To develop the model, we use results of deep seismic studies, gravity and surficial heat flow data on the studied region. Numerical solutions of 3D problems are obtained in the spherical setting with an allowance for the Earth's surface topography. The geophysical model is correlated with the regional geological data on the surface and results of seismic CMP studies along 4B, FIRE-1 and FIRE-3-3A profiles. Based on results of complex geophysical simulation and geological interpretation of the 3D model, the following conclusions are drawn. (1 The nearly horizontal density layering of the continental crust is superimposed on the previously formed geological structure; rock differentiation by density is decreasing with depth; the density layering is controlled by the recent and near-recent state of the crust, but can be disturbed by the latest deformations. (2 Temperature variations at the Moho are partially determined by local variations of heat generation in the mantle, which, in turn, are related to local features of its origin and transformation. (3 The concept of the lower continental crust being a reflectivity zone and the concept of the lower continental crust being a layer of high density and velocity are not equivalent: the lower crust is the deepest, high-density element of near-horizontal layering, whereas the seismic image of the reflectivity zone is primarily related to transformation of the crust as a result of magmatic under- and intraplating under conditions of extension and mantle-plume activity. (4 At certain

  20. Boron isotope fractionation in groundwaters as an indicator of past permafrost conditions in the fractured crystalline bedrock of the fennoscandian shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Joël; Négrel, Philippe; Blomqvist, Runar

    2005-01-01

    The Fennoscandian Shield has been subjected to several glaciations over the past million years, the last of which (Weichselian Ice Age) ended only at about 10Ka. Here we used boron isotopes and B contents to (a) establish the degree of water-rock interaction (WRI) and (b) clarify freezing processes within groundwaters from the Aspo site in Sweden and from various sites in Finland. The high delta(11)B values recorded by all groundwaters (up to 51.9 per thousand) including diluted, boron-poor, inland groundwaters suggest selective uptake of (10)B into ice related to freezing processes under permafrost conditions. According to co-existing ice and residual brines in a Canadian frozen mine, this fractionation process, enhanced by Rayleigh fractionation, can generate a natural field of isotopic variation around 60 per thousand and provides a new application of B isotope that makes possible to easily characterise groundwaters that underwent past permafrost conditions.

  1. Two major types of transitional chambers of magmatic systems: Evidence from the Paleoproterozoic large igneous provinces from the eastern Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkov, Evgenii; Chistyakov, Alexey; Bogina, Maria

    2014-05-01

    During ascent to the surface, mantle-derived melts usually passed through a system of transitional magma chambers. One of best areas to study the structure of such systems occurred is the Precambrian shields which have undergone intense tectonic reworking and uneven erosion. As a result, the different parts of these systems became available for study by geological and petrological methods, which can help to reveal definite mechanisms for transformation of primary mantle-derived magmas. It is obviously that we can see such parts of different magmatic systems because lava plateaus above definiteconcrete deep-seated intrusion were annihilated by erosion and, usually we can judge about them only from geological, petrological and geochemical data. However, these pieces of data may compose a puzzle and a general picture will emerge. Of particular importance is the study of transitional magma chambers where such melts accumulated and experienced crystallization differentiation, mixing, and crustal contamination. The deepest of such solidified magma chambers survived as large layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions. We studied two examples of such intrusions from different Paleoproterozic large igneous provinces (LIPs) in the eastern Fennoscandian Shield (Sharkov, Bogina, 2006). The comparison of REE distribution in the lava series of the plateaus of these LIPs and cumulates in the layered intrusions allowed us to identify the two types of such intrusions. One of them was solidified practically without removal of evolved melts from solidified intrusive chamber and under conditions of limited replenishment of fresh magma portions. This type may be exemplified by the Monchegorsky layered mafic-ulramafic pluton (2.5 Ga) in the Kola Peninsula which belongs to the early Paleoproterozoic LIP of the siliceous high-Mg series. The second type of the layered intrusions represents transitional magma chamber sensu stricto, which was periodically replenished with new portions of magmas

  2. New zircon data supporting models of short-lived igneous activity at 1.89 Ga in the western Skellefte District, central Fennoscandian Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Skyttä

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available New U-Th-Pb zircon data (SIMS from three intrusive phases of the Palaeoproterozoic Viterliden intrusion in the western Skellefte District, central Fennoscandian Shield, dates igneous emplacement in a narrow time interval at about 1.89 Ga. A locally occurring quartz-plagioclase porphyritic tonalite, here dated at 1889 ± 3 Ma, is considered the youngest of the intrusive units, based on the new age data and field evidence. This supports an existing interpretation of its fault-controlled emplacement after intrusion of the dominating hornblende-tonalite units, in this study dated at 1892 ± 3 Ma. The Viterliden magmatism was synchronous with the oldest units of the Jörn type early-orogenic intrusions in the eastern part of the district (1.89–1.88 Ga; cf. Gonzàles Roldán, 2010. A U-Pb zircon age for a felsic metavolcanic rock from the hanging-wall to the Kristineberg VMS deposit, immediately south of the Viterliden intrusion, is constrained at 1883 ± 6 Ma in this study. It provides a minimum age for the Kristineberg ore deposit and suggests contemporaneous igneous/volcanic activity throughout the Skellefte District. Furthermore, it supports the view that the Skellefte Group defines a laterally continuous belt throughout this "ore district". Tentative correlation of the 1889 ± 3 Ma quartz-plagioclase porphyritic tonalite with the Kristineberg "mine porphyry" suggests that these units are coeval at about 1.89 Ga. Based on the new age determinations, the Viterliden intrusion may equally well have intruded into or locally acted as a basement for the ore-hosting Skellefte Group volcanic rocks.

  3. Multiscale, finite-frequency P and S tomography of the upper mantle in the southwestern Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolstrup, Marianne L.; Hung, Shu-Huei; Maupin, Valerie

    2015-07-01

    We image the P- and S-wave structure of the upper mantle in southwestern Scandinavia using a wavelet-based, multiscale parametrization and finite-frequency theory to model wave propagation. Relative traveltime residuals of direct P and S waves are measured in a high- and low-frequency band and are corrected for crustal structure using a detailed model for the study area. A range of resolution tests are used to find optimal damping values not only for variations in VP and VS separately, but also for perturbations in their ratio VP/VS. The tests show that features down to a size of 100 (150) km can be well resolved in the P (S) tomography. To ease comparison with previous studies we also perform ray-theoretical multiscale tomographies, and to test the degree of vertical smearing we evaluate different parametrizations in the vertical direction (wavelet-based multiscale and convolutional quelling). Our finite-frequency, multiscale images of variations in VP and VS confirm the existence of low velocities below southern Norway and Denmark and high velocities beneath the shield proper in Sweden, as seen in previous studies, but add more details to this simplified picture. The low velocities below southern Norway and Denmark are confined to a channel-like structure at about 100-200 km depth, and the lateral transition from low to high velocities follows zones of Carboniferous-Permian extension and magmatism very closely. A deeper low-velocity anomaly below central southern Norway emerges from the channel at 150 km depth and extends to a depth of 350 km. In the Swedish area we infer high-velocity anomalies in VP and VS, and negative anomalies in VP/VS that indicate a strongly depleted mantle. We propose that the episodic erosion and convective removal of an originally thick mantle lithosphere below southern Norway to its current thickness of about 100 km could have been a trigger for episodic uplift in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic.

  4. Trypanosomes of some Fennoscandian birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon F. Bennett

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Linear measurements and derived indices of trypanosomes from species of Fennoscandian birds were compared to those reported form Trypanosoma avium, T. everetti, T. ontarioensis and T. paddae. The trypanosomes encountered in the Fennoscandian birds were identified as T. avium from Tengmalm's owl Aegolius funereus and the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca, T. everetti from the great tit Parus major and collared flycatcher F. albicollis and T. ontarioensis from the collared flycatcher; T. paddae was not seen.

  5. Deep-penetration calculations in concrete and iron for shielding of proton therapy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Chen, Yen-Fu; Lin, Uei-Tyng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2012-01-01

    Proton accelerators in the energy range of approximately 200 MeV have become increasingly popular for cancer treatment in recent years. These proton therapy facilities usually involve bulky concrete or iron in their shielding design or accelerator structure. Simple shielding data, such as source terms or attenuation lengths for various proton energies and materials are useful in designing accelerator shielding. Understanding the appropriateness or uncertainties associated with these data, which are largely generated from Monte Carlo simulations, is critical to the quality of a shielding design. This study demonstrated and investigated the problems of deep-penetration calculations on the estimation of shielding parameters through an extensive comparison between the FLUKA and MCNPX calculations for shielding against a 200-MeV proton beam hitting an iron target. Simulations of double-differential neutron production from proton bombardment were validated by comparison with experimental data. For the concrete shielding, the FLUKA calculated depth–dose distributions were consistent with the MCNPX results, except for some discrepancies in backward directions. However, for the iron shielding, if FLUKA is used inappropriately then overestimation of neutron attenuation can be expected as shown by this work because of the multigroup treatment for low-energy neutrons in FLUKA. Two neutron energy group structures, three degrees of self-shielding correction, and two iron compositions were considered in this study. Significant variation of the resulting attenuation lengths indicated the importance of problem-dependent multigroup cross sections and proper modeling of iron composition in deep-penetration calculations.

  6. Effects of shield brine on the safe disposal of waste in deep geologic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y.-J.; Sudicky, E. A.; Sykes, J. F.

    2009-08-01

    The salinity of groundwater increases with depth in the Canadian Shield (up to 1.3 kg/L of density). The existence of brine can be critically important for the safe geologic disposal of radioactive wastes, as dense brine can significantly retard the upward migration of radionuclides released from repositories. Static and flushing conditions of the deep brine are analyzed using a U-tube analogy model. Velocity reduction due to the presence of dense brine is derived under flushing conditions. A set of illustrative numerical simulations in a two-dimensional cross section is presented to demonstrate that dense brine can significantly influence regional groundwater flow patterns in a shield environment. It is implied from the results that (1) the existence of Shield brine can be an indicator of a hydrogeologically stable environment, (2) activities near ground surface may not perturb the stable groundwater environment in the deep brine region, and thus, (3) the deep brine region can be considered as a candidate geologic site for the safe disposal of waste. In addition to brine, other issues associated with long-term waste disposal, such as geological, glacial and seismic events, may need to be considered for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel in a shield environment.

  7. Long term climate change and a deep geological repository in the Canadian Shield: issues and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    For the past million years of Earth history, the Canadian Shield has experienced a continuous process of glaciation and deglaciation, events that have significantly altered the landscape of the northern half of the North American continent. This sequence of events, ultimately due to small changes in received solar radiation due to the influence of gravitational many body effects upon the earths orbit around the sun, should they continue, constitute an important phenomena with respect to developing an understanding of groundwater flow system evolution in Shield terrain as it may influence the long-term performance of a Deep Geologic Repository for used nuclear fuel. In this paper a description is provided of the University of Toronto Glacial Systems Model, which is being applied to yield geophysically constrained predictions of the last Laurentide (North American) glacial event. In particular, the GSM is providing unique insight into the time rate of change, magnitude and uncertainty of surface boundary conditions and permafrost occurrence at a hypothetical Shield repository site. These predictive estimates of boreal, peri-glacial and ice-sheet history are offering an innovative and reasoned basis to explore flow system characteristics and attributes that govern hydrodynamic and geochemical stability within deep-seated Shield flow domains. (author)

  8. Deep-penetration calculation for the ISIS target station shielding using the MARS Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunomiya, Tomoya; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakao, Noriaki

    2002-03-01

    A calculation of neutron penetration through a thick shield was performed with a three-dimensional multi-layer technique using the MARS14(02) Monte Carlo code to compare with the experimental shielding data in 1998 at the ISIS spallation neutron source facility. In this calculation, secondary particles from a tantalum target bombarded by 800-MeV protons were transmitted through a bulk shield of approximately 3-m-thick iron and 1-m-thick concrete. To accomplish this deep-penetration calculation with good statistics, the following three techniques were used in this study. First, the geometry of the bulk shield was three-dimensionally divided into several layers of about 50-cm thickness, and a step-by-step calculation was carried out to multiply the number of penetrated particles at the boundaries between the layers. Second, the source particles in the layers were divided into two parts to maintain the statistical balance on the spatial-flux distribution. Third, only high-energy particles above 20 MeV were transported up to approximately 1 m before the region for benchmark calculation. Finally, the energy spectra of neutrons behind the very thick shield were calculated down to the thermal energy with good statistics, and typically agree well within a factor of two with the experimental data over a broad energy range. The 12 C(n,2n) 11 C reaction rates behind the bulk shield were also calculated, which agree with the experimental data typically within 60%. These results are quite impressive in calculation accuracy for deep-penetration problem. In this report, the calculation conditions, geometry and the variance reduction techniques used in the deep-penetration calculation with the MARS14 code are clarified, and several subroutines of MARS14 which were used in our calculation are also given in the appendix. The numerical data of the calculated neutron energy spectra, reaction rates, dose rates and their C/E (Calculation/Experiment) values are also summarized. The

  9. Evidence of terrestrial discharge of deep groundwater on the Canadian Shield from helium in soil gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascoyne, M.; Sheppard, M.I.

    1993-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel wastes at a site in the Canadian Shield requires knowledge of the location and size of areas of discharge of deep groundwater from the vicinity of the underground disposal vault. A strong He anomaly has been detected in soil gases in a 10 X 10 m area of wetland on the banks of Boggy Creek, near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba. The area has He concentrations in near-surface soils as high as 360 nL·L -1 and is assumed to indicate discharge of He-rich groundwater through a permeable subsurface bedrock fracture. Elevated Cl - concentrations in groundwater and its use as a open-quotes deer lickclose quotes support this interpretation. A He flux density of ∼ 2.1 L·m -2 ·a -1 is determined from a depth profile of He concentrations at one location in the site. A total He flux of 270 L·a -1 is determined for the entire site, which corresponds to a deep groundwater discharge of about 26 000 L·a -1 . This estimate is comparable with He fluxes and calculated groundwater discharges for two other lake-bottom locations on the Canadian Shield. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  10. Deep scientific drilling results from Koyna and Killari earthquake regions reveal why Indian shield lithosphere is unusual, thin and warm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.P. Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The nature of crustal and lithospheric mantle evolution of the Archean shields as well as their subsequent deformation due to recent plate motions and sustained intraplate geodynamic activity, has been a subject of considerable interest. In view of this, about three decades ago, a new idea was put forward suggesting that out of all shield terrains, the Indian shield has an extremely thin lithosphere (∼100 km, compared to 250–350 km, elsewhere, apart from being warm, non-rigid, sheared and deformed. As expected, it met with scepticism by heat flow and the emerging seismic tomographic study groups, who on the contrary suggested that the Indian shield has a cool crust, besides a coherent and thick lithosphere (as much as 300–400 km like any other shield. However, recently obtained integrated geological and geophysical findings from deep scientific drillings in 1993 Killari (Mw: 6.3 and 1967 Koyna (Mw: 6.3 earthquake zones, as well as newly acquired geophysical data over other parts of Indian shield terrain, have provided a totally new insight to this debate. Beneath Killari, the basement was found consisting of high density, high velocity mid crustal amphibolite to granulite facies rocks due to exhumation of the deeper crustal layers and sustained granitic upper crustal erosion. Similar type of basement appears to be present in Koyna region too, which is characterized by considerably high upper crustal temperatures. Since, such type of crust is depleted in radiogenic elements, it resulted into lowering of heat flow at the surface, increase in heat flow contribution from the mantle, and upwarping of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Consequently, the Indian shield lithosphere has become unusually thin and warm. This study highlights the need of an integrated geological, geochemical and geophysical approach in order to accurately determine deep crust-mantle thermal regime in continental areas.

  11. On the use of weight windows as an aid in solving deep penetration problems involving multiple shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, J.R.; Perry, R.T.; Crawford, A.B.; Griffin, M.A. [Radiation Protection Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This work describes a deep penetration problem where weight-windows in MCNP were used to reduce variances in dose planes far from the source. The problem at issue was a long hallway containing an X-Ray machine, and it was necessary to calculate the dose though several thick shields to insure a safe design. Several different approaches using weight windows were made to solve the problem. The final solution used weight windows to aid in calculating the current on a plane deep in the hallway past the shields. This current was then used as a source in a final calculation to obtain statistically valid results. The methodology developed may be used as a guide for future calculations of similar construction. (Author)

  12. Characterizing fractured plutonic rocks of the Canadian shield for deep geological disposal of Canada's radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodha, G.S.; Davison, C.C.; Gascoyne, M.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1978 AECL has been investigating plutonic rocks of the Canadian Shield as a potential medium for the disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. During the last two years this study has been continued as part of Ontario Hydro's used fuel disposal program. Methods have been developed for characterizing the geotechnical conditions at the regional scale of the Canadian Shield as well as for characterizing conditions at the site scale and the very near-field scale needed for locating and designing disposal vault rooms and waste emplacement areas. The Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) and the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in southeastern Manitoba have been extensively used to develop and demonstrate the different scales of characterization methods. At the regional scale, airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys combined with LANDSAT 5 and surface gravity survey data have been helpful in identifying boundaries of the plutonic rocks , overburden thicknesses, major lineaments that might be geological structures, lithological contacts and depths of the batholiths. Surface geological mapping of exposed rock outcrops, combined with surface VLF/EM, radar and seismic reflection surveys were useful in identifying the orientation and depth continuity of low-dipping fracture zones beneath rock outcrops to a depth of 500 to 1000 m. The surface time-domain EM method has provided encouraging results for identifying the depth of highly saline pore waters. The regional site scale investigations at the WRA included the drilling of twenty deep boreholes (> 500 m) at seven separate study areas. Geological core logging combined with borehole geophysical logging, TV/ATV logging, flowmeter logging and full waveform sonic logging in these boreholes helped to confirm the location of hydro geologically important fractures, orient cores and infer the relative permeability of some fracture zones. Single-hole radar and crosshole seismic tomography surveys were useful to establish the

  13. Structural setting and magnetic properties of pseudotachylyte in a deep crustal shear zone, western Canadian shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, O. F.; Mahan, K. H.; Brown, L. L.; Regan, S.; Williams, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic slip commonly produces pseudotachylytes, a glassy vein-filling substance that is typically interpreted as either a frictional melt or an ultra-triturated cataclasite. In either form, pseudotachylytes are commonly magnetite enriched, even in magnetite-free host rocks, and therefore are potentially useful as high fidelity recorders of natural magnetic fields at the time of slip in a wide array of lithologies. Pseudotachylytes generally have high magnetic susceptibility and thus should preserve the dominant field present as the material passes the Curie temperatures of magnetic minerals, primarily magnetite. Two potential sources have been proposed for the dominant magnetic field recorded: the earth's magnetic field at the time of slip or the temporary and orders of magnitude more intense field created by the presence of coseismic currents along the failure plane. Pseudotachylytes of the Cora Lake shear zone (CLsz) in the Athabasca Granulite Terrain, western Canadian shield, are consistently hosted in high strain ultramylonitic orthogneiss. Sinistral and extensional oblique-slip in the CLsz occurred at high-pressure granulite-grade conditions of ~1.0 GPa and >800°C and may have persisted to somewhat lower P-T conditions (~0.8 GPa, 700 °C) during ductile deformation. Pseudotachylyte-bearing slip surfaces have sinistral offset, matching the larger shear zone, and clasts of wall rock in the more brecciated veins display field evidence for ductile shear along the same plane prior to brittle failure. The presence of undeformed pseudotachylyte in kinematically compatible fracture arrays localized in ultramylonite indicates that brittle failure may have occurred in the waning stages of shear zone activity and at similar deep crustal conditions. Field-documented occurrences of pseudotachylyte include 2 cm-thick veins that run subparallel to mylonitic foliation and contain small flow-aligned clasts and large, heavily brecciated foliation-crosscutting zones up to

  14. Inner gorges cut by subglacial meltwater during Fennoscandian ice sheet decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, J. D.; Codilean, A. T.; Stroeven, A. P.; Fabel, D.; Hättestrand, C.; Kleman, J.; Harbor, J. M.; Heyman, J.; Kubik, P. W.; Xu, S.

    2014-05-01

    The century-long debate over the origins of inner gorges that were repeatedly covered by Quaternary glaciers hinges upon whether the gorges are fluvial forms eroded by subaerial rivers, or subglacial forms cut beneath ice. Here we apply cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating to seven inner gorges along ~500 km of the former Fennoscandian ice sheet margin in combination with a new deglaciation map. We show that the timing of exposure matches the advent of ice-free conditions, strongly suggesting that gorges were cut by channelized subglacial meltwater while simultaneously being shielded from cosmic rays by overlying ice. Given the exceptional hydraulic efficiency required for meltwater channels to erode bedrock and evacuate debris, we deduce that inner gorges are the product of ice sheets undergoing intense surface melting. The lack of postglacial river erosion in our seven gorges implicates subglacial meltwater as a key driver of valley deepening on the Baltic Shield over multiple glacial cycles.

  15. Evaluation of Multi-Functional Materials for Deep Space Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William; Wilkins, Richard; Gersey, Brad; Badavi, Francis F.

    2009-01-01

    Small scale trade study of materials for radiation shielding: a) High-hydrogen polymers; b) Z-graded materials; c) Fiber-reinforced polymer composites. Discussed multi-functionality of fiber-reinforced polymer composites. Preliminary results of ground testing data.

  16. Meeting the Grand Challenge of Protecting Astronauts Health: Electrostatic Active Space Radiation Shielding for Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ram K.

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the research completed during 2011 for the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) project. The research is motivated by the desire to safely send humans in deep space missions and to keep radiation exposures within permitted limits. To this end current material shielding, developed for low earth orbit missions, is not a viable option due to payload and cost penalties. The active radiation shielding is the path forward for such missions. To achieve active space radiation shielding innovative large lightweight gossamer space structures are used. The goal is to deflect enough positive ions without attracting negatively charged plasma and to investigate if a charged Gossamer structure can perform charge deflections without significant structural instabilities occurring. In this study different innovative configurations are explored to design an optimum active shielding. In addition, to establish technological feasibility experiments are performed with up to 10kV of membrane charging, and an electron flux source with up to 5keV of energy and 5mA of current. While these charge flux energy levels are much less than those encountered in space, the fundamental coupled interaction of charged Gossamer structures with the ambient charge flux can be experimentally investigated. Of interest are, will the EIMS remain inflated during the charge deflections, and are there visible charge flux interactions. Aluminum coated Mylar membrane prototype structures are created to test their inflation capability using electrostatic charging. To simulate the charge flux, a 5keV electron emitter is utilized. The remaining charge flux at the end of the test chamber is measured with a Faraday cup mounted on a movable boom. A range of experiments with this electron emitter and detector were performed within a 30x60cm vacuum chamber with vacuum environment capability of 10-7 Torr. Experiments are performed with the charge flux aimed at the electrostatically inflated

  17. Meeting the Grand Challenge of Protecting Astronaut's Health: Electrostatic Active Space Radiation Shielding for Deep Space Missions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study will seek to test and validate an electrostatic gossamer structure to provide radiation shielding. It will provide guidelines for energy requirements,...

  18. Unequal ice-sheet erosional impacts across low-relief shield terrain in northern Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Karin; Hall, Adrian M.; Kleman, Johan; Andersson, Jannike

    2015-03-01

    Much previous work on Late Cenozoic glacial erosion patterns in bedrock has focussed on mountain areas. Here we identify varying impacts of ice sheet erosion on the low-relief bedrock surface of the Fennoscandian shield, and examine the geological, topographical and glaciological controls on these patterns. We combine GIS-mapping of topographical, hydrological and weathering data with field observations. We identify and investigate areas with similar geology and general low relief that show different degrees of ice sheet erosional impact, despite similar ice cover histories. On two transects with a total area of ~ 84 000 km2 across the northern Fennoscandian shield, we first establish patterns of glacial erosion and then examine why glacially streamlined areas exist adjacent to areas of negligible glacial erosion. The northern transect includes two areas of exceptional glacial preservation, the Parkajoki area in Sweden and the so-called ice divide zone in Finland, each of which preserve tors and deep saprolite covers. The southern transect, overlapping in the northern part with the first transect, includes areas of well developed glacial streamlining, with bedrock areas stripped of loose material and barely any weathering remnants. For both areas, we firstly present contrasting indicators for ice sheet erosional impact: streamlined and non-streamlined inselbergs; parallel and dendritic/rectangular drainage patterns; and the absence and presence of Neogene weathering remnants. This is followed by an investigation of factors that possibly influence ice sheet erosional impact: ice cover history, ice cover duration and thickness, bedrock type and structure, and topography. We find that the erosional impact of the Fennoscandian ice sheet has varied across the study area. Distinct zones of ice sheet erosion are identified in which indicators of either low or high erosion coexist in the same parts of the transects. No direct impact of rock type on glacial erosion patterns

  19. Double-layer neutron shield design as neutron shielding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    The shield design in particle accelerators and other high energy facilities are mainly connected to the high-energy neutrons. The deep penetration of neutrons through massive shield has become a very serious problem. For shielding to be efficient, most of these neutrons should be confined to the shielding volume. If the interior space will become limited, the sufficient thickness of multilayer shield must be used. Concrete and iron are widely used as a multilayer shield material. Two layers shield material was selected to guarantee radiation safety outside of the shield against neutrons generated in the interaction of the different proton energies. One of them was one meter of concrete, the other was iron-contained material (FeB, Fe2B and stainless-steel) to be determined shield thicknesses. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used for shield design geometry and required neutron dose distributions. The resulting two layered shields are shown better performance than single used concrete, thus the shield design could leave more space in the interior shielded areas.

  20. Radiation shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Yasuaki

    1993-01-01

    In the present invention, the thickness of the radiation shields is minimized to save the quantity of shields thereby utilizing spaces in a facility effectively. That is, the radiation shields of the present invention comprise first and second shields forming stepwise gaps. They are disposed between a high dose region and a low dose region. The first and second shields have a feature in that the thickness thereof can be set to a size capable of shielding the gaps in accordance with the strength of the radiation source to be shielded. With such a constitution, the thickness of the shields of the radiation processing facility can be minimized. Accordingly, the quantity of the shields can be greatly saved. Spaces in the facility can be utilized effectively. (I.S.)

  1. Electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Shian V.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are well known in the art in forms such as gaskets, caulking compounds, adhesives, coatings and the like for a variety of EMI shielding purposes. In the past, where high shielding performance is necessary, EMI shielding has tended to use silver particles or silver coated copper particles dispersed in a resin binder. More recently, aluminum core silver coated particles have been used to reduce costs while maintaining good electrical and physical properties. (author). 8 figs

  2. Geothermal studies of the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland: Vertical variation in heat flow and palaeoclimatic implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kukkonen, I. T.; Rath, V.; Kivekäs, L.; Šafanda, Jan; Čermák, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 188, č. 1-2 (2011), s. 9-25 ISSN 0031-9201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : heat flow * geothermal gradient * thermal conductivity * paleoclimatology * Fennoscandian Shield Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2011

  3. Shielding container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, K.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    A shielding container incorporates a dense shield, for example of depleted uranium, cast around a tubular member of curvilinear configuration for accommodating a radiation source capsule. A lining for the tubular member, in the form of a close-coiled flexible guide, provides easy replaceability to counter wear while the container is in service. Container life is extended, and maintenance costs are reduced. (author)

  4. Shielding Effectiveness of Laminated Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Rao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Shielding prevents coupling of undesired radiated electromagnetic energy into equipment otherwise susceptible to it. In view of this, some studies on shielding effectiveness of laminated shields with conductors and conductive polymers using plane-wave theory are carried out in this paper. The plane wave shielding effectiveness of new combination of these materials is evaluated as a function of frequency and thickness of material. Conductivity of the polymers, measured in previous investigations by the cavity perturbation technique, is used to compute the overall reflection and transmission coefficients of single and multiple layers of the polymers. With recent advances in synthesizing stable highly conductive polymers these lightweight mechanically strong materials appear to be viable alternatives to metals for EM1 shielding.

  5. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  6. Nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, R.C.; Nienart, L.F.; Toelcke, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing melt-processable nuclear shielding compositions from chloro-fluoro substituted ethylene polymers, particularly PCTFE and E-CTFE, containing 1 to 75 percent by weight of a gadolinium compound. 13 claims, no drawings

  7. New borehole-derived results on temperatures at the base of the Fennoscandian ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Volker; Vogt, Christian; Mottaghy, Darius; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Tarasov, Lev

    2014-05-01

    During the last few years, a data base of deep boreholes (>1000 m )in the area of the Fennoscandian ice sheet has been collected, including boreholes from Russia, Poland, Finland, Sweden and Norway. All of these are supposed to have recorded local basal ice conditions during the last glacial cycle. However, at each of these sites we are confronted with particular problems of interpretation. Here, we will concentrate on two very deep boreholes, namely the Outokumpu ICDP borehole (OKU, ≡2500 m) and a set of boreholes of intermediate depth (up to 1300 m) in the immediate meighborhood of the Kola superdeep borehole SG3. In the first case, OKU, we have developed a strategy combining the use of a traditional variational inversion of thye Tikhonov type, with a MCMC approach for the exploration of the associated uncertainty. A wide distribution around the result of the variational approach was chosen, with a time dependent temporal correlation length reflecting the loss of resolution back in time. The results fit very well with region independent results from different proxies, multi-proxy reconstructions, and instrumental data. They also are consistent with surface temperatures derived from recent calibrated ice sheet models. The SAT-GST offset independently derived from shallow borehole observations in the area was a crucial step to obtain theses results. The second case, SG3, has been studied a long time, and no final result was obtained regarding the question whether the observed heat flow density profile is caused by paleoclimate, fluid flow, or both. Earlier studies, as well as forward modelling using the results of the aforementioned ice sheet model indicate that paleoclimate alone can not explain the observations. We tested the model derived from the set of shallow boreholes against the temperature log from the main superdeep SG3, which, in contrast to these, transects the main high-permeability zone. The comparison led to a favorable results, and is also

  8. Earthworm impacts on organo-mineral interactions and soil carbon inventories in Fennoscandian boreal and sub-arctic landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackett, Adrian; Yoo, Kyungsoo; Cameron, Erin; Klaminder, Jonatan

    2017-04-01

    Boreal and sub-arctic environments sustain some of the most pristine and fragile ecosystems in the world and house a disproportionate amount of the global soil carbon pool. Although the historical view of soil carbon turnover has focused on the intrinsic molecular structure of organic matter, recent work has highlighted the importance of stabilizing soil carbon on reactive mineral surfaces. However, the rates and mechanisms controlling these processes at high latitudes are poorly understood. Here we explored the biogeochemical impacts of deep-burrowing earthworm species on a range of Fennoscandian forest soils to investigate how earthworms impact soil carbon inventories and organo-mineral associations across boreal and sub-arctic landscapes. We sampled soils and earthworms at six sites spanning almost ten degrees latitude and encompassing a wide range of soil types and textures, permitting simultaneous consideration of how climate and mineralogy affect earthworm-mediated shifts in soil carbon dynamics. Across all sites, earthworms significantly decreased the carbon and nitrogen contents of the upper 10 cm, presumably through consumption of the humus layer and subsequent incorporation of the underlying mineral soil into upper organic horizons. Their mixing of humus and underlying soil also generally increased the proportion of mineral surface area occluded by organic matter, although the extent to which earthworms facilitate such organo-mineral interactions appears to be controlled by soil texture and mineralogy. This work indicates that quantitative measurements of mineral surface area and its extent of coverage by soil organic matter facilitate scaling up of molecular interactions between organic matter and minerals to the level of soil profiles and landscapes. Our preliminary data also strongly suggests that earthworms have profound effects on the fate of soil carbon and nitrogen in boreal and sub-arctic environments, highlighting the need for a better

  9. Geothermal evidence of very low glacial temperatures on a rim of the Fennoscandian ice sheet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafanda, Jan; Szewczyk, J.; Majorowicz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 7 (2004), s. L07211/1-4 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/03/0998; GA AV ČR IAA3012005; GA AV ČR KSK3012103 Grant - others:KBN(PL) 5 T12B 02122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : geothermal evidence * glacial temperatures * Fennoscandian ice sheet Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.378, year: 2004

  10. Physical properties and petrologic description of rock samples from an IOCG mineralized area in the northern Fennoscandian Shield, Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrin, Alessandro; Edfelt, Å.; Waight, Tod Earle

    2009-01-01

    magnetization, variation of magnetic susceptibility with temperature, Curie temperature and density). The major Cu-prospect in the area has been studied by magnetic and electron microprobe analyses of four selected rock samples. The samples are from an exploration well that intersects the main Cu mineralized......, microprobe observations indicate that Fe-sulfides are present in negligible amounts in the samples from the Tjårrojåkka area. The strong spatial relationship of Cu-minerals (e.g., chalcopyrite) and the oxidation of magnetite to hematite suggest that the presence of rocks with low magnetic susceptibility......The Tjårrojåkka Fe-Cu prospect in northern Sweden is considered an example of a Fe-oxide Cu-Au (IOCG) deposit and is hosted in metamorphosed Paleoproterozoic volcanic and intrusive rocks. Rock samples from 24 outcrops were collected for petrophysical analysis (magnetic susceptibility, remanent...

  11. Porphyry copper assessment of Europe, exclusive of the Fennoscandian Shield: Chapter K in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutphin, David M.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Large, Duncan E.; Berger, Byron R.; Dicken, Connie L.; DeMarr, Michael W.; with contributions from Billa, Mario; Briskey, Joseph A.; Cassard, Daniel; Lips, Andor; Pertold, Zdeněk; Roşu, Emilian

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collaborated with European geologists to assess resources in porphyry copper deposits in Europe, exclusive of Scandinavia (Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland) and Russia. Porphyry copper deposits in Europe are Paleozoic and Late Cretaceous to Miocene in age. A number of the 31 known Phanerozoic deposits contain more than 1 million metric tons of contained copper, including the Majdanpek deposit, Serbia; Assarel, Bulgaria; Skouries, Greece; and Rosia Poeni, Romania. Five geographic areas were delineated as permissive tracts for post-Paleozoic porphyry copper deposits. Two additional tracts were delineated to show the extent of permissive igneous rocks associated with porphyry copper mineralization related to the Paleozoic Caledonian and Variscan orogenies. The tracts are based on mapped and inferred subsurface distributions of igneous rocks of specific age ranges that define areas where the occurrence of porphyry copper deposits within 1 kilometer of the Earth’s surface is possible. These tracts range in area from about 4,000 to 93,000 square kilometers. Although maps at a variety of different scales were used in the assessment, the final tract boundaries are intended for use at a scale of 1:1,000,000.

  12. Studying local earthquakes in the northern Fennoscandian Shield using the data of the POLENET/LAPNET temporary array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoltseva, O. A.; Kozlovskaya, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes within areas inside continental plates are still not completely understood and the progress in understanding intraplate seismicity is slow due to short history of instrumental seismology and sparse regional seismic networks in seismically non-active areas. However, knowledge about position and depth of seismogenic structures in such areas is necessary, in order to estimate seismic hazard for such critical facilities as nuclear power plants and nuclear waste deposits. In the present paper we address the problem of seismicity in the intraplate area of northern Fennoscandia using the information on local events recorded by the POLENET/LAPNET temporary seismic array during the International Polar Year 2007-2009. We relocate the seismic events by the program HYPOELLIPS and grid search method. We use the first arrivals of P-waves of local events in order to calculate a 3-D tomographic P-wave velocity model of the uppermost crust (down to 20 km) for selected region inside the study area and show that the velocity heterogeneities in the upper crust correlate well with known tectonic units. We compare position of the velocity heterogeneities with the seismogenic structures delineated by epicentres of relocated events and demonstrate that these structures generally do not correlate with the crustal units formed as a result of crustal evolution in Archean and Paleoproterozoic. On the contrary, they correlate well with the post-glacial faults located in the area of the Baltic-Bothnia Megashear (BBMS). Hypocentres of local events have depths down to 30 km. We also obtain focal mechanisms of two selected events with good data quality. Both focal mechanisms are of strike-slip type in which shift prevails over uplift. Our results demonstrate that Baltic-Bothnia Megashear is an important large-scale, reactivated tectonic structure that has to be taken into account in estimating seismic hazard in northern Fennoscandia.

  13. About the Scythian Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    About the Scythian Shields

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shields played major role in the armament system of the Scythians. Made from organic materials, they are poorly traced on the materials of archaeological excavations. Besides, scaly surface of shields was often perceived in practice as the remnants of the scaly armor. E. V. Chernenko was able to discern the difference between shields’ scaly plates and armor scales. The top edge of the scales was bent inwards, and shield plates had a wire fixation. These observations let significantly increase the number of shields, found in the burial complexes of the Scythians. The comparison of archaeological materials and the images of Scythian warriors allow distinguishing the main forms of Scythian shields. All shields are divided into fencing shields and cover shields. The fencing shields include round wooden shields, reinforced with bronze sheet, and round moon-shaped shields with a notch at the top, with a metal scaly surface. They came to the Scythians under the Greek influence and are known in the monuments of the 4th century BC. Oval shields with scaly surface (back cover shields were used by the Scythian cavalry. They protected the rider in case of frontal attack, and moved back in case of maneuver or closein fighting. Scythian battle tactics were based on rapid approaching the enemy and throwing spears and further rapid withdrawal. Spears stuck in the shields of enemies, forcing them to drop the shields, uncover, and in this stage of the battle the archers attacked the disorganized ranks of the enemy. That was followed by the stage of close fight. Oval form of a wooden shield with leather covering was used by the Scythian infantry and spearmen. Rectangular shields, including wooden shields and the shields pleached from rods, represented a special category. The top of such shield was made of wood, and a pleached pad on leather basis was attached to it. This shield could be a reliable protection from arrows, but it could not protect against javelins

  14. Radiation shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Yamagami, Makoto.

    1996-01-01

    A fixed shielding member made of a radiation shielding material is constituted in perpendicular to an opening formed on radiation shielding walls. The fixed shielding member has one side opened and has other side, the upper portion and the lower portion disposed in close contact with the radiation shielding walls. Movable shielding members made of a radiation shielding material are each disposed openably on both side of the fixed shielding member. The movable shielding member has a shaft as a fulcrum on one side thereof for connecting it to the radiation shielding walls. The other side has a handle attached for opening/closing the movable shielding member. Upon access of an operator, when each one of the movable shielding members is opened/closed on every time, leakage of linear or scattered radiation can be prevented. Even when both of the movable shielding members are opened simultaneously, the fixed shielding member and the movable shielding members form labyrinth to prevent leakage of linear radioactivity. (I.N.)

  15. Characterisation of deep groundwaters at Olkiluoto and Haestholmen (Finland) - recent results with PAVE, a sampling equipment maintaining the in situ-pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruotsalainen, P.; Snellman, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish bedrock has been investigated since 1987 for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Saline groundwaters have been observed at Olkiluoto and Haestholmen, two of the presently studied four sites. The new sampling equipment, PAVE, keeps deep groundwater samples in the in situ-pressure. The pressure vessels of the PAVE sampling system are divided into two parts by a movable, o-ring sealed piston. As the pressure compartment of the pressure vessel is filled with argon gas, the piston moves up. Then the sample compartment of the pressure vessels is vacuumed. If a microbe sample is included in the sampling programme, the equipment is first sterilized and then vacuumed. So far the PAVE sampler has been used in studies for dissolved gases and microbes. The salinity of groundwaters at Olkiluoto and Haestholmen increases with increasing depth, suggesting longer residence times and enhanced water-rock interaction. The signs of the ancient Litorina seawater are most prominent at about 100-400 m. The deep, saline Ca-Na-Cl groundwaters at Olkiluoto have low Eh values, high amounts of S 2- and dissolved gases (mainly CH 4 and H 2 ) suggesting anaerobic microbiological activity. The deep, saline groundwaters at Haestholmen have much higher amounts of Fe and somewhat lower pH values compared to those at Olkiluoto. The high U contents of the rapakivi bedrock of Haestholmen are reflected in the high He contents of dissolved gases. At both sites the deep (below 500 m), saline groundwaters are mixtures of preglacial meteoric waters and some old, hydrothermal saline fluid. The relative enrichment of Br and Ca compared to Cl and Na in the most saline groundwaters corresponds to the brines from the Canadian and Fennoscandian shields

  16. Design of emergency shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Manufacturing of an emergency movable shield in the hot laboratories center is urgently needed for the safety of personnel in case of accidents or spilling of radioactive materials. In this report, a full design for an emergency shield is presented and the corresponding dose rates behind the shield for different activities (from 1 mCi to 5 Ci) was calculated by using micro shield computer code. 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Basic nuclear data and reactor shielding design formulaire PROPANE Do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estiot, J.C.; Salvatores, M.; Trapp, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a calculational scheme - formulaire PROPANE - to calculate the deep neutron penetration in the fast reactor shield. The emphasis is put on the multigroup data and method approximations. The performances of this formulaire are presented

  18. Electromagnetically shielded building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Nakamura, M.; Yabana, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagata, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs

  19. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  20. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  1. Open tundra persist, but arctic features decline-Vegetation changes in the warming Fennoscandian tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Katariina E M; Oksanen, Lauri; Oksanen, Tarja; Pyykönen, Anni; Olofsson, Johan; Virtanen, Risto

    2017-09-01

    In the forest-tundra ecotone of the North Fennoscandian inland, summer and winter temperatures have increased by two to three centigrades since 1965, which is expected to result in major vegetation changes. To document the expected expansion of woodlands and scrublands and its impact on the arctic vegetation, we repeated a vegetation transect study conducted in 1976 in the Darju, spanning from woodland to a summit, 200 m above the tree line. Contrary to our expectations, tree line movement was not detected, and there was no increase in willows or shrubby mountain birches, either. Nevertheless, the stability of tundra was apparent. Small-sized, poorly competing arctic species had declined, lichen cover had decreased, and vascular plants, especially evergreen ericoid dwarf shrubs, had gained ground. The novel climate seems to favour competitive clonal species and species thriving in closed vegetation, creating a community hostile for seedling establishment, but equally hostile for many arctic species, too. Preventing trees and shrubs from invading the tundra is thus not sufficient for conserving arctic biota in the changing climate. The only dependable cure is to stop the global warming. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  3. Structural Monitoring of Metro Infrastructure during Shield Tunneling Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shield tunneling construction of metro infrastructure will continuously disturb the soils. The ground surface will be subjected to uplift or subsidence due to the deep excavation and the extrusion and consolidation of the soils. Implementation of the simultaneous monitoring with the shield tunnel construction will provide an effective reference in controlling the shield driving, while how to design and implement a safe, economic, and effective structural monitoring system for metro infrastructure is of great importance and necessity. This paper presents the general architecture of the shield construction of metro tunnels as well as the procedure of the artificial ground freezing construction of the metro-tunnel cross-passages. The design principles for metro infrastructure monitoring of the shield tunnel intervals in the Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are introduced. The detailed monitoring items and the specified alarming indices for construction monitoring of the shield tunneling are addressed, and the measured settlement variations at different monitoring locations are also presented.

  4. Thermal shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Takenori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the amount of heat released from a pressure vessel and reliably shield neutron fluxes and gamma rays from a reactor core by the addition of cooling ducts in a thermal shielding wall provided with a blower and an air cooling cooler. Constitution: A thermal shielding wall is located on a pedestal so as to surround a pressure vessel and the pressure vessel is located by way of a skirt in the same manner. Heat insulators are disposed between the pressure vessel and the shielding wall while closer to the skirt in the skirt portion and closer to the shielding wall in the vessel body portion. A plurality of cooling ducts are arranged side by side at the inner side in the shielding wall. A through-duct radially passing through the wall is provided in the lower portion thereof and a blower fan for cooling air and a cooler for cooling returned air are connected by way of a communication duct to the other end of the through-duct. This enables to provide a shielding wall capable of suppressing the amount of heat released from the pressure vessel as much as possible and giving more effective cooling. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Shielding high energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    After introducing the subject of shielding high energy accelerators, point source, line-of-sight models, and in particular the Moyer model. are discussed. Their use in the shielding of proton and electron accelerators is demonstrated and their limitations noted. especially in relation to shielding in the forward direction provided by large, flat walls. The limitations of reducing problems to those using it cylindrical geometry description are stressed. Finally the use of different estimators for predicting dose is discussed. It is suggested that dose calculated from track-length estimators will generally give the most satisfactory estimate. (9 refs).

  6. Twisting of post-glacial Fennoscandian shorelines requires a low-viscosity asthenosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeldskaar, Willy; Amantov, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    The Fennoscandian uplift has been intensely studied and discussed since the 18th century and it is now widely accepted to be an isostatic response to the recent deglaciation. Our knowledge of the ?uid properties of the Earth comes largely from its uplift response to load redistributions that occurred over the last ice age. The elevation of past shorelines and the present rate of land uplift constrain the ?uid properties of the mantle and the elastic rigidity of the lithosphere. The post-glacial uplift in Fennoscandia has been mapped by the following means: 1. Shorelevel displacement curves, showing the vertical displacement at a certain location, 2. Shoreline diagrams, showing the displacement and tilting of palaeo shorelines, 3. Present-day uplift monitored by tide gauge, old water marks, GPS observations and by satellite missions. The Earth rheology is best constrained by the peripheral response of the former glaciated area. The Norwegian west coast has experienced significant transgression in Younger Dryas (YD). Both north of this area and south of this area the relative sea level fell during YD. In the area of transgression the 60 m YD isobase crosses the 60 m Allerød isobase. This twisting of the shorelines happens between Bergen and Stavanger. There has been no change in the shoreline tilts between Allerød and Younger Dryas in this area. The same section of the coast that was transgressed during the YD also experienced a major YD ice-sheet re-advance. In part of this area the ice sheet re-advanced by at least 40 km. It seems likely that there is a causal connection between the ice-advance and the shoreline transgression. The Earth's response to glaciers and sediments has been modeled by using a layered viscous model overlain by an elastic lithosphere. In the calculations we have used the lack of tilting of the palaeo shorelines and twisting of shorelines as to constrain the Earth rheology. We will show that this data is very sensitive to the mantle

  7. Secondary gamma-ray data for shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Sunichi

    1979-01-01

    In deep penetration transport calculations, the integral design parameters is determined mainly by secondary particles which are produced by interactions of the primary radiation with materials. The shield thickness and the biological dose rate at a given point of a bulk shield are determined from the contribution from secondary gamma rays. The heat generation and the radiation damage in the structural and shield materials depend strongly on the secondary gamma rays. In this paper, the status of the secondary gamma ray data and its further problems are described from the viewpoint of shield design. The secondary gamma-ray data in ENDF/B-IV and POPOP4 are also discussed based on the test calculations made for several shield assemblies. (author)

  8. Scintillation counter, segmented shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  9. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  10. Grounding, shielding, and bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrysse, J.

    1991-06-01

    In the electromagnetic compatibility design (EMC) of systems and circuits, both grounding and shielding are related to the coupling mechanisms of the system with (radiated) electromagnetic fields. Grounding is more related to the source or victim circuit (or system) and determines the characteristic of the coupling mechanism between fields and currents/voltages. Shielding is a way of interacting in the radiation path of an electromagnetic field. The basic principles and practical design rules are discussed.

  11. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuochi, Akira; Narita, Takuya; Omori, Tetsu; Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Kunihiro.

    1997-01-01

    A radiation shielding member comprising a lead plate or a lead fabrication product is covered integrally with a rubber, a synthetic resin or a flame retardant fabric having a thickness greater than that of an oxidation preventive membrane made of a copper material. Radiation rays are shielded by the lead material, and not only oxidation but also failure of the lead material and generation of lead pieces or powder can be prevented by the coating of the rubber, the synthetic resin or the flame retardant fabric. The shape of the radiation shielding member can be conformed to constitutional products, a reinforcing frame or plate is formed integrally with the radiation shielding plate, alternatively, lowering of strength of the structure by fabrication of the shape is reinforced by the reinforcing frame or plate. The radiation shielding member is suspended by hanging a rope on a grommet, or disposed on constitutional products, or adjacent radiation shielding members are combined with each other by fixing metals. The thickness of the coating made of rubber, synthetic rubber or flame retardant fabric is determined to 0.1mm or greater to prevent failures of the lead material or formation of lead powder. (N.H.)

  12. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodaka, M.; Iida, T.; Taniuchi, H.; Yosimura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    1993-01-01

    From among the neutron shielding materials of the 'kobesh' series developed by Kobe Steel, Ltd. for transport and storage packagings, silicon rubber base type material has been tested for several items with a view to practical application and official authorization, and in order to determine its adaptability to actual vessels. Silicon rubber base type 'kobesh SR-T01' is a material in which, from among the silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials, the hydrogen content is highest and the boron content is most optimized. Its neutron shielding capability has been already described in the previous report (Taniuchi, 1986). The following tests were carried out to determine suitability for practical application; 1) Long-term thermal stability test 2) Pouring test on an actual-scale model 3) Fire test The experimental results showed that the silicone rubber based neutron shielding material has good neutron shielding capability and high long-term fire resistance, and that it can be applied to the advanced transport packaging. (author)

  13. Method for dismantling shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Rokuro; Kondo, Nobuhiro; Kamiyama, Yoshinori; Kawasato, Ken; Hiraga, Tomoaki.

    1990-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to enable operators to dismantle shieldings contaminated by radioactivity easily and in a short period of time without danger of radiation exposure. A plurality of introduction pipes are embedded previously to the shielding walls of shielding members which contain a reactor core in a state where both ends of the introduction pipes are in communication with the outside. A wire saw is inserted into the introduction pipes to cut the shieldings upon dismantling. Then, shieldings can be dismantled easily in a short period of time with no radiation exposure to operator's. Further, according to the present invention, since the wire saw can be set easily and a large area can be cut at once, operation efficiency is improved. Further, since remote control is possible, cutting can be conducted in water and complicated places of the reactor. Biting upon starting the wire saw in the introduction pipe is reduced to facilitate startup for the rotation. (I.S.)

  14. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Isobe, Eiji.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the shielding capacity of the radiation shielding material having an abundant flexibility. Constitution: A mat consisting of a lead or lead alloy fibrous material is covered with a cloth, and the two are made integral by sewing in a kilted fashion by using a yarn. Thereafter, the system is covered with a gas-tight film or sheet. The shielding material obtained in this way has, in addition to the above merits, advantages in that (1) it is free from restoration due to elasticity so that it can readily seal contaminants, (2) it can be used in a state consisting of a number of overlapped layers, (3) it fits the shoulder well and is readily portable and (4) it permits attachment of fasteners or the like. (Ikeda, J.)

  15. Hybrid Active-Passive Radiation Shielding System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A radiation shielding system is proposed that integrates active magnetic fields with passive shielding materials. The objective is to increase the shielding...

  16. Glove box shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  17. Radiation production and absorption in human spacecraft shielding systems under high charge and energy Galactic Cosmic Rays: Material medium, shielding depth, and byproduct aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Joseph; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    2018-03-01

    Deep space missions such as the planned 2025 mission to asteroids require spacecraft shields to protect electronics and humans from adverse effects caused by the space radiation environment, primarily Galactic Cosmic Rays. This paper first reviews the theory on how these rays of charged particles interact with matter, and then presents a simulation for a 500 day Mars flyby mission using a deterministic based computer code. High density polyethylene and aluminum shielding materials at a solar minimum are considered. Plots of effective dose with varying shield depth, charged particle flux, and dose in silicon and human tissue behind shielding are presented.

  18. Methodology of shielding calculation for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, J.R.; Mendonca, A.G.; Otto, A.C.; Yamaguchi, Mitsuo

    1982-01-01

    A methodology of calculation that coupling a serie of computer codes in a net that make the possibility to calculate the radiation, neutron and gamma transport, is described, for deep penetration problems, typical of nuclear reactor shielding. This net of calculation begining with the generation of constant multigroups, for neutrons and gamma, by the AMPX system, coupled to ENDF/B-IV data library, the transport calculation of these radiations by ANISN, DOT 3.5 and Morse computer codes, up to the calculation of absorbed doses and/or equivalents buy SPACETRAN code. As examples of the calculation method, results from benchmark n 0 6 of Shielding Benchmark Problems - ORNL - RSIC - 25, namely Neutron and Secondary Gamma Ray fluence transmitted through a Slab of Borated Polyethylene, are presented. (Author) [pt

  19. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  20. Electrostatic shielding of transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leon, Francisco

    2017-11-28

    Toroidal transformers are currently used only in low-voltage applications. There is no published experience for toroidal transformer design at distribution-level voltages. Toroidal transformers are provided with electrostatic shielding to make possible high voltage applications and withstand the impulse test.

  1. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Nobuo; Ito, Masato; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Takeshi, Tetsu

    1998-01-01

    A radiation shielding member comprises a metal vessel and a liquid therein, and is disposed to the upper surface of a lower flange of a reactor core shroud. Waterproof hot wires are contained in the liquid and are connected to a power source disposed at the outside. Electric current is supplied to the hot wires to elevate the temperature of the liquid, and the temperature of the vessel is kept higher than an atmospheric temperature thereby suppressing generation of dew condensation or water droplets. In addition, a water repellent coating is applied to the shielding member itself to prevent deposition of water droplets. Further, the bottom of the shielding member is inclined, and a water droplet-recovering vessel is disposed at the lower portion of the shielding member, so that the water droplets collected by the inclination of the bottom are recovered to the water droplet recovering vessel. With such a constitution, access of an operator to the inside of a reactor pressure vessel is facilitated, and at the same time, the working circumstance at the reactor bottom can be improved. (I.N.)

  2. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  3. Heat shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatabe, Hiroshi; Motoya, Koji; Kodama, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    Panel-like water cooling tubes are disposed on a shielding concrete wall as a floor surface on which a reactor pressure vessel of a HTGR type reactor is settled. The panel like water cooling tube comprises a large number of water cooling tubes and fin plates connecting them with each other. A heat shielding device is disposed to the opening of an air vent hole on the shielding concrete wall. The heat shielding device has a plurality of supports are disposed between a disk-like upper support plate larger than the opening of the vent hole and covered with a heat insulation material and a lower support plate having a vent hole at the center. The lower support plate is connected with the fin plate. A portion between the supports is formed as pressure releasing channels. Radiation heat from the reactor pressure vessel is transferred to the fin plate by way of the upper support plate, support and a lower support plate and transferred to cooling water of a water-cooling pipeline. Accordingly, radiation heat of the reactor pressure vessel is not transferred to the vent holes. (I.N.)

  4. Future intrusion of oxygenated glacial meltwaters into the Fennoscandian shield: a possibility to consider in performance assessments for nuclear-waste disposal sites?: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Provost et al. (1998) and Glynn and Voss (1999; also published in Glynn et al., 1999) considered the possibility that during future glaciations, oxygenated glacial meltwaters from two- to three-kilometer thick ice sheets could potentially intrude to the 500 m depth of planned nuclear-waste repositories. This possibility has been of concern because of potential negative effects on the stability of the repository engineered environment, and because of the potential mobilization of radionuclides should the oxygenated waters come into contact with the radioactive waste. The above reports argued that given the current state of knowledge, it was hard to discount the possibility that oxygenated waters could penetrate to repository level depth. The reports also suggested that oxidizing conditions might be present in the fractured rock environment for significant amounts of time, on the order of thousands to tens of thousands of years. In some earlier reports, Swedish and Finnish governmental agencies in charge of nuclear-waste disposal had considered the possibility that oxygenated meltwaters might intrude to the repository depth (SKI: 1992; Martinerie et al, 1992; Ahonen and Vieno, 1994). Subsequent to the publication of Provost et al. (1998), Glynn et al. (1999) and Glynn and Voss (1999), the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Handling Company (SKB) commissioned efforts to examine more thoroughly the possibilities that oxygenated meltwaters might occur under ice-sheet conditions and intrude to the repository depth.

  5. Future intrusion of oxygenated glacial meltwaters into the Fennoscandian shield: a possibility to consider in performance assessments for nuclear-waste disposal sites?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glynn, Pierre [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA 20192 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    The SKB analyses conducted in the Guimera et al. (2006) and Auque et al. (2006) reports do not provide sufficient evidence to discount the possibility that during glacial cycles over the next 120,000 to 1,000,000 years, oxygenated glacial meltwaters could intrude to repository depths (500m) and could stay in contact with the near-field environment of a nuclear-waste repository for 10,000 years or more. The performance analyses and calculations conducted by SKB seem optimistic, rather than conservative with respect to the possibility of oxygen intrusion for the following reasons. 1) The studies minimize the dissolved oxygen concentrations likely to occur in the intruding waters; they do not consider the physical differences between small alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in waters exiting atmospherically equilibrated channels in these small glaciers are a fraction of those likely to occur in meltwater beneath an ice sheet. 2) The calculations do not consider the physical processes that could be responsible for significant and enduring meltwater intrusion over large warm-based areas of the advancing ice sheets (as argued by Provost et al., 1998). 3) The calculations overestimate the reaction potential and reaction rates for ferrous silicate minerals with the dissolved oxygen in the intruding glacial meltwaters.

  6. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  7. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-06-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  8. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio

    2000-01-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  9. Radiation shielding calculations for the vista spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Suemer; Sahin, Haci Mehmet; Acir, Adem

    2005-01-01

    The VISTA spacecraft design concept has been proposed for manned or heavy cargo deep space missions beyond earth orbit with inertial fusion energy propulsion. Rocket propulsion is provided by fusion power deposited in the inertial confined fuel pellet debris and with the help of a magnetic nozzle. The calculations for the radiation shielding have been revised under the fact that the highest jet efficiency of the vehicle could be attained only if the propelling plasma would have a narrow temperature distribution. The shield mass could be reduced from 600 tons in the original design to 62 tons. Natural and enriched lithium were the principle shielding materials. The allowable nuclear heating in the superconducting magnet coils (up to 5 mW/cm 3 ) is taken as the crucial criterion for dimensioning the radiation shielding structure of the spacecraft. The space craft mass is 6000 tons. Total peak nuclear power density in the coils is calculated as ∼5.0 mW/cm 3 for a fusion power output of 17 500 MW. The peak neutron heating density is ∼2.0 mW/cm 3 , and the peak γ-ray heating density is ∼3.0 mW/cm 3 (on different points) using natural lithium in the shielding. However, the volume averaged heat generation in the coils is much lower, namely 0.21, 0.71 and 0.92 mW/cm 3 for the neutron, γ-ray and total nuclear heating, respectively. The coil heating will be slightly lower if highly enriched 6 Li (90%) is used instead of natural lithium. Peak values are then calculated as 2.05, 2.15 and 4.2 mW/cm 3 for the neutron, γ-ray and total nuclear heating, respectively. The corresponding volume averaged heat generation in the coils became 0.19, 0.58 and 0.77 mW/cm 3

  10. Tidal control on gas flux from the Precambrian continental bedrock revealed by gas monitoring at the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Wiersberg, Thomas; Korhonen, Kimmo; Pullinen, Arto

    2017-04-01

    Deep groundwaters within Precambrian shields are characteristically enriched in non-atmospheric gases. High concentrations of methane are frequently observed especially in graphite bearing metasedimentary rocks and accumulation of hydrogen and noble gases due to water-rock interaction and radioactive decay within the U, Th and K containing bedrock takes place. These gases can migrate not only through fractures and faults, but also through tunnels and boreholes, thereby potentially mobilizing hazardous compounds for example from underground nuclear waste repositories. Better understanding on fluid migration may also provide tools to monitor changes in bedrock properties such as fracture density or deterioration and failure of engineered barriers. In order to study gas migration mechanisms and variations with time, we conducted a gas monitoring campaign in eastern Finland within the Precambrian Fennoscandian Shield. At the study site, the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole (2516 m), spontaneous bubbling of gases at the well head has been on-going since the drilling was completed in 2005, i.e. over a decade. The drill hole is open below 39 m. In the experiment an inflatable packer was placed 15 cm above the water table inside the collar (Ø 32.4 cm), gas from below the packer was collected and the gas flow in the pipe line carefully assisted by pumping (130 ml/min). Composition of gas was monitored on-line for one month using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with measurement interval of one minute. Changes in the hydraulic head and in situ temperature were simultaneously recorded with two pressure sensors which were placed 1 m apart from each other below the packer such that they remained above and below the water table. In addition, data was compared with atmospheric pressure data and theoretical effect of Earth tides at the study site. Methane was the dominant gas emanating from the bedrock, however, relative gas composition fluctuated with time. Subsurface derived gases

  11. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2015-01-01

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm

  12. Shielding container for radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Tosa, Masayoshi; Hatogai, Tatsuaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effect opening and closing bidirectional radiation used particularly for a gamma densimeter or the like by one operation. Structure: This device comprises a rotatable shielding body for receiving radioactive isotope in the central portion thereof and having at least two radiation openings through which radiation is taken out of the isotope, and a shielding container having openings corresponding to the first mentioned radiation openings, respectively. The radioactive isotope is secured to a rotational shaft of the shielding body, and the shielding body is rotated to register the openings of the shielding container with the openings of the shielding body or to shield the openings, thereby effecting radiation and cut off of gamma ray in the bidirection by one operation. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Primary shield displacement and bowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, K.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor primary shield is constructed of high density concrete and surrounds the reactor core. The inlet, outlet and side primary shields were constructed in-place using 2.54 cm (1 in) thick steel plates as the forms. The plates remained as an integral part of the shields. The elongation of the pressure tubes due to thermal expansion and pressurization is not moving through the inlet nozzle hardware as designed but is accommodated by outward displacement and bowing of the inlet and outlet shields. Excessive distortion of the shields may result in gas seal failures, intolerable helium gas leaks, increased argon-41 emissions, and shield cooling tube failures. The shield surveillance and testing results are presented

  14. Light shielding apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Richard Dean; Thom, Robert Anthony

    2017-10-10

    A light shielding apparatus for blocking light from reaching an electronic device, the light shielding apparatus including left and right support assemblies, a cross member, and an opaque shroud. The support assemblies each include primary support structure, a mounting element for removably connecting the apparatus to the electronic device, and a support member depending from the primary support structure for retaining the apparatus in an upright orientation. The cross member couples the left and right support assemblies together and spaces them apart according to the size and shape of the electronic device. The shroud may be removably and adjustably connectable to the left and right support assemblies and configured to take a cylindrical dome shape so as to form a central space covered from above. The opaque shroud prevents light from entering the central space and contacting sensitive elements of the electronic device.

  15. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  16. Neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoshige, Toru; Fujii, Yasumasa; Nifuku, Masataka.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain shielding materials excellent in heat and radiation resistance, as well as having mechanical strength in a reduced weight. Constitution: A mixture comprising from 30 to 80 % by weight of epoxy resin, from 5 to 50 % by weight of polyethylene and from 1 to 50 % by weight of inorganic boron compound is cured to prepare a neutron shielding material. The epoxy resin used herein is a compound having more than 18 epoxy groups per one molecule. Polyethylene is a polyethylene homopolymer or a copolymer of ethylene and less than 10 % of other copolymerizable monomer which is preferably powdery and in the grain size of from 10 to 200 μm. The inorganic boric compound can include, for example, boron carbide, boron nitride and anhydrous boric acid. As the curing agent, all sorts of compounds known as the curing agent for epoxy resins can be used. The shielding material is excellent in heat resistance, particularly, in the strength, thermal deformation temperature and the bondability at high temperature and also satisfactory in compression strength and bondability. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Particle Tracing Modeling with SHIELDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroffe, J. R.; Brito, T. V.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2017-12-01

    The near-Earth inner magnetosphere, where most of the nation's civilian and military space assets operate, is an extremely hazardous region of the space environment which poses major risks to our space infrastructure. Failure of satellite subsystems or even total failure of a spacecraft can arise for a variety of reasons, some of which are related to the space environment: space weather events like single-event-upsets and deep dielectric charging caused by high energy particles, or surface charging caused by low to medium energy particles; other space hazards are collisions with natural or man-made space debris, or intentional hostile acts. A recently funded project through the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program aims at developing a new capability to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. The project goals are to understand the dynamics of the surface charging environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons on both macro- and microscale. These challenging problems are addressed using a team of world-class experts and state-of-the-art physics-based models and computational facilities. We present first results of a coupled BATS-R-US/RAM-SCB/Particle Tracing Model to evaluate particle fluxes in the inner magnetosphere. We demonstrate that this setup is capable of capturing the earthward particle acceleration process resulting from dipolarization events in the tail region of the magnetosphere.

  18. Review of geoscientific data of relevance to disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsic, Nico; Grundfelt, Bertil

    2013-09-01

    In this report a compilation of recent geoscientific data of relevance to disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes in Sweden is presented. The goal of the study has been limited to identifying and briefly describing such geoscientific information of relevance to disposal in deep boreholes that was not available at the time when previous compilations were made. Hence, the study is not to be regarded as a general up-date of new geoscientific information. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes has been studied in Sweden since the second half of the 1980s. The currently studied concept has been proposed by Sandia National Laboratories in the USA. In this concept the spent fuel elements are encapsulated in cylindrical steel canisters that are joined together in strings of 40 canisters and lowered into five kilometres deep boreholes. Ten such strings are stacked between three and five kilometres depth separated from each other by concrete plugs. The study started with a review of boreholes that have been reported after the previous reviews that were published in 1998 and 2004. A total of 12 boreholes of potential relevance were identified. Further study showed that only four out of these holes penetrated into crystalline rock. Two of these were deemed to be less relevant because they were drilled in areas with much higher geothermal gradient than in the parts of the Fennoscandian shield that realistically could host a Swedish deep borehole repository. Of the two remaining boreholes, only one, a geoscientific hole drilled at Outokumpu in Finland, is associated with a reasonably complete geoscientific data set. It is worth mentioning that a large part of this hole is drilled through meta sedimentary rock (mica schist) rather than granitic rock. The information collected and reviewed has been gathered under the headings hydraulic conditions, geothermal conditions, hydrogeochemical conditions, bacteriological activity and rock mechanical properties. Only

  19. Review of geoscientific data of relevance to disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes in crystalline rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsic, Nico; Grundfelt, Bertil [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    In this report a compilation of recent geoscientific data of relevance to disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes in Sweden is presented. The goal of the study has been limited to identifying and briefly describing such geoscientific information of relevance to disposal in deep boreholes that was not available at the time when previous compilations were made. Hence, the study is not to be regarded as a general up-date of new geoscientific information. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes has been studied in Sweden since the second half of the 1980s. The currently studied concept has been proposed by Sandia National Laboratories in the USA. In this concept the spent fuel elements are encapsulated in cylindrical steel canisters that are joined together in strings of 40 canisters and lowered into five kilometres deep boreholes. Ten such strings are stacked between three and five kilometres depth separated from each other by concrete plugs. The study started with a review of boreholes that have been reported after the previous reviews that were published in 1998 and 2004. A total of 12 boreholes of potential relevance were identified. Further study showed that only four out of these holes penetrated into crystalline rock. Two of these were deemed to be less relevant because they were drilled in areas with much higher geothermal gradient than in the parts of the Fennoscandian shield that realistically could host a Swedish deep borehole repository. Of the two remaining boreholes, only one, a geoscientific hole drilled at Outokumpu in Finland, is associated with a reasonably complete geoscientific data set. It is worth mentioning that a large part of this hole is drilled through meta sedimentary rock (mica schist) rather than granitic rock. The information collected and reviewed has been gathered under the headings hydraulic conditions, geothermal conditions, hydrogeochemical conditions, bacteriological activity and rock mechanical properties. Only

  20. Managing Sustainability of Fennoscandian Forests and Their Use by Law and/or Agreement: For Whom and Which Purpose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Tuomasjukka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability and sustainable behaviour is of crucial importance in the management of Fennoscandian forests and forest-related industries. This paper reviews a number of voluntary instruments, which aim at promoting or assessing sustainability impacts at different levels. The multitude of available instruments brings confusion in practice, where companies, consumers and investors meet legal and different voluntary regulatory and non-regulatory instruments. The practical suitability and covered sustainability dimension for each instrument is reviewed with an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, actors and purposes for assessing different aspects of sustainability. Each of them is compared against the other in an overview about which sustainability dimensions they cover (workplace, human rights, community, market place, environment, economy. Results highlight covered, overlapping and missing aspects for each approach and how they can support or reinforce each other. Special attention is given to current approaches in impact assessment, particularly on their areas of application (companies, NGOs, products, operations, production practices, etc., and recommendations for supplementing it with sustainability impact assessment.

  1. A contribution to shielding effectiveness analysis of shielded tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranić Zoran M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of shielding effectiveness (SE of the shielded tents made of the metallised fabrics is given. First, two electromagnetic characteristic fundamental for coupling through electrically thin shield, the skin depth break frequency and the surface resistance or transfer impedance, is defined and analyzed. Then, the transfer function and the SE are analyzed regarding to the frequency range of interest to the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC Community.

  2. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005. Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  3. Neutron Shielding composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Kiiro; Okuda, Hisashi; Harada, Yoshihisa.

    1994-01-01

    1, 3-bis (N, N-diglycidyl aminomethyl) cyclohexane as a specific epoxy resin is used together with a usual epoxy resin. A polyamine mixture and an imidazole type compound are used as a hardening agent. Further, a boron compound and an inorganic filler are added. Such a neutron shielding composition is hardened at a normal temperature without requiring heating, and mechanical strength, especially, compression strength can be kept over a wide range from low temperature to high temperature after the hardening. (T.M.)

  4. A shield against distraction

    OpenAIRE

    Halin, N.; Marsh, J.E.; Hellman, A.; Hellstrom, I.; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the basic idea of a trade-off between the level of concentration and distractibility to test whether a manipulation of task difficulty can shield against distraction. Participants read, either in quiet or with a speech noise background, texts that were displayed either in an easy-to-read or a hard-to-read font. Background speech impaired prose recall, but only when the text was displayed in the easy-to-read font. Most importantly, recall was better in the background sp...

  5. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A shield for a nuclear reactor includes at least two layers of alternating wide and narrow rectangular blocks so arranged that the spaces between blocks in adjacent layers are out of registry, each block having an opening therein equally spaced from the sides of the blocks and nearer the top of the block than the bottom, the distance from the top of the block to the opening in one layer being different from this distance in adjacent layers, openings in blocks in adjacent layers being in registry. 1 claim, 7 drawing figures

  6. Selective shielding device for scintiphotography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.W.; Kay, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    A selective shielding device to be used in combination with a scintillation camera is described. The shielding device is a substantially oval-shaped configuration removably secured to the scintillation camera. As a result of this combination scanning of preselected areas of a patient can be rapidly and accurately performed without the requirement of mounting any type of shielding paraphernalia on the patient. 1 claim, 2 drawing figures

  7. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadori Amir; Semones Edward; Ewert Michael; Broyan James; Walker Steven

    2017-01-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles ...

  8. Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is performing preliminary development of a Multifunctional Hot Structure (HOST) heat shield for planetary entry. Results of this development will...

  9. Evaluation of the usefulness of bismuth shields in PET/CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Lee, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Kung, Sik Nam; Lee, Tae Soo

    2014-01-01

    Recently with CT developed, various studies for reduction of exposure dose is underway. Study of bismuth shields in these studies is actively underway, and has already been applied in the clinical. However, the application of the PET/CT examination was not activated. Therefore, through this study, depending on the application of bismuth shields in the PET/CT examination, we identify the quality of the image and the impact on the Standard Uptake Value (SUV). In this study, to apply to the shielding of the breast, by using the bismuth shields that contains 0.06 mm Pb ingredients, was applied to the PET/CT GEMINI TF 64 (Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, USA). Phantom experiments using the NEMA IEC Body Phantom, images were acquired according to the presence or absence of bismuth shields apply. Also, When applying, images were obtained by varying the spacing 0, 1, 2 cm each image set to the interest range in the depth of the phantom by using EBW-NM ver.1.0. When image of the PET Emission acquires, the SUV was in increased depending on the use of bismuth shields, difference in the depth to the surface from deep in the phantom increasingly SUV increased (P<0.005). Also, when using shields, as the more gab decreased, SUV is more increased (P<0.005). Through this study, PET/CT examination by using of bismuth shields which is used as purpose of reduction dose. When using shields, the difference of SUV resulting from the application of bismuth shields exist and that difference when gab is decrease and surface is wider. Therefore, setting spacing of shield should be considered, if considering the reduction of the variation of SUV and image quality, disease of deep organs should be a priority rather than superficial organ disease. Use of bismuth shielding factor considering the standard clinical examination, decrease unnecessary exposure can be expected to be considered

  10. SHIELDS Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania Koleva [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-03

    Predicting variations in the near-Earth space environment that can lead to spacecraft damage and failure, i.e. “space weather”, remains a big space physics challenge. A new capability was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. This framework simulates the dynamics of the Surface Charging Environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons representing the source and seed populations for the radiation belts, on both macro- and micro-scale. In addition to using physics-based models (like RAM-SCB, BATS-R-US, and iPIC3D), new data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites were developed. An order of magnitude improvement in the accuracy in the simulation of the spacecraft surface charging environment was thus obtained. SHIELDS also includes a post-processing tool designed to calculate the surface charging for specific spacecraft geometry using the Curvilinear Particle-In-Cell (CPIC) code and to evaluate anomalies' relation to SCE dynamics. Such diagnostics is critically important when performing forensic analyses of space-system failures.

  11. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  12. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-01-01

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  13. Radiation shield for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esenov, Amra; Pustovgar, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    One of the chief structures of a reactor pit is a 'dry' shield. Setting up a 'dry' shield includes the technologically complex process of thermal processing of serpentinite concrete. Modern advances in the area of materials technology permit avoiding this complex and demanding procedure, and this significantly decreases the duration, labor intensity, and cost of setting it up. (orig.)

  14. Human-animal agency in reindeer management: Sami herders' perspectives on Fennoscandian tundra vegetation dynamics under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, B. C.; Horstkotte, T.; Utsi, T. A.; Larsson-Blind, Å.; Burgess, P.; Käyhkö, J.; Oksanen, L.; Johansen, B.

    2016-12-01

    Many primary livelihoods in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions are increasingly faced with accelerating effects of climate change and resource exploitation. The often close connection between indigenous populations and the dynamics of their respective territories allows them to make detailed observations of how these changes transform the landscapes where they practice their daily activities. Here, we report Sami reindeer herders' observations based on their long-term occupancy and use of contrasting pastoral landscapes in northern Fennoscandia. In particular, we focus on the capacity for various herd management regimes to prevent a potential transformation of open tundra vegetation to shrubland or woodland. Fennoscandian Sami herders did not confirm a substantial, rapid or large-scale transformation of treeless arctic-alpine areas into shrub- and/or woodlands as a consequence of climate change. However, where encroachment of open tundra landscapes has been observed, a range of drivers were deemed responsible. These included abiotic conditions, anthropogenic influences and the direct and indirect effects of reindeer. Mountain birch tree line advances were in some cases associated with reduced or discontinued grazing, depending on the seasonal significance of these particular areas. In the many places where tree line has risen, herding practices have by necessity adapted to these changes. Exploiting the capacity of reindeer grazing/browsing as a conservation tool offers new adaptive strategies of ecosystem management to counteract a potential encroachment of the tundra by woody plants. However, such novel solutions in environmental governance are confronted with difficult trade-offs involved in ecosystem management for ecologically reasonable, economically viable and socially desirable management strategies.

  15. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  16. Shield calculations, optimization vs. paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo D, N.; Hernandez S, A.; Martinez G, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many shieldings have been designed under the criteria of 'Maximum dose rates of project'. It has created the paradigm of those 'low dose rates', for the one which not few specialists would consider unacceptable levels of dose rate superior to the units of μSv.h -1 , independently of the exposure times. At the present time numerous shieldings are being designed considering dose restrictions in real times of exposure. After these new shieldings, the dose rates could be notably superior to those after traditional shieldings, without it implies inadequate designs or constructive errors. In the work significant differences in levels of dose rates and thickness of shieldings estimated by both methods for some typical facilities. It was concluded that the use of real times of exposure is more adequate for the optimization of the Radiological Protection, although this method demands bigger care in its application. (Author)

  17. Parameters calculation of shielding experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavazza, S.

    1986-02-01

    The radiation transport methodology comparing the calculated reactions and dose rates for neutrons and gama-rays, with experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in the YAYOI reactor is evaluated. The ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system, for cross sections generation collapsed by the ANISN code were used. The transport calculations were made using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the boundary iron shield source spectrum to the reactions and dose rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The neutron and gamma ray distributions calculated on the iron shield presented reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. An experimental arrangement using the IEA-R1 reactor to determine a shielding benchmark is proposed. (Author) [pt

  18. Socket Shield Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, João Eduardo Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Nos dias atuais, é cada vez mais comum a realização de extrações de dentes que estejam severamente comprometidos e substituí-los por implantes dentários. Após extração, existe uma reabsorção de osso alveolar que vai resultar numa perda de osso vertical e horizontal, tornando-se um dos fatores que subsequentemente se vai colocar como uma das maiores dificuldades na colocação de implantes. A técnica Socket Shield é uma técnica de preservação de osso alveolar em situações de implantes imediatos,...

  19. Shielded Canister Transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB

  20. Computational shielding benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society Standards Committee 6.2.1 is engaged in the documentation of radiation transport problems and their solutions. The primary objective of this effort is to test computational methods used within the international shielding community. Dissemination of benchmarks will, it is hoped, accomplish several goals: (1) Focus attention on problems whose solutions represent state-of-the-art methodology for representative transport problems of generic interest; (2) Specification of standard problems makes comparisons of alternate computational methods, including use of approximate vs. ''exact'' computer codes, more meaningful; (3) Comparison with experimental data may suggest improvements in computer codes and/or associated data sets; (4) Test reliability of new methods as they are introduced for the solution of specific problems; (5) Verify user ability to apply a given computational method; and (6) Verify status of a computer program being converted for use on a different computer (e.g., CDC vs IBM) or facility

  1. Tectonic regimes in the Baltic Shield during the last 1200 Ma - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, S.Aa.; Tullborg, E.L. and

    1993-11-01

    This report is a review about tectonic regimes in the Baltic (Fennoscandian) Shield from the Sveconorwegian (1.2 Ga ago) to the present. It also covers what is known about palaeostress during this period, which was chosen to include both orogenic and anorogenic events. A summery is given in table form, and a litho-stratigraphic map of Baltica including adjacent sea areas is enclosed. Plate movements are the ultimate reason for stress build-up in the crust. It is concluded that continental drift and rotation velocity have changed during the Earth's history. Periods of convergence and collision between continents are succeeded by periods of continental break-up. The different stress regimes, which prevailed during fracturing, produced specific fracture patterns on different scales. These fractures were reactivated during later favourable stress regimes. Within the next 100 000 years the stress situation of the Baltica crust will not change, except for the effects imposed by the growth and melting of an ice cover. 214 refs

  2. Radiation shielding for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. (author)

  3. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable

  4. Radiation shielding in dental radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenström, B; Rehnmark-Larsson, S; Julin, P; Richter, S

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shielding at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shielding tested were the different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure times corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shielding reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 microGy compared with 18 microGy (parallelling) and 31 microGy (bisecting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained, but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 microGy per single intraoral exposure.

  5. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 ..mu..Gy compared with 18 ..mu..Gy (parallelling) and 31 ..mu..Gy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 ..mu..Gy per single intraoral exposure.

  6. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1984-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey. In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 ..mu..Gy compared with 18 ..mu..Gy (parallelling) and 31 ..mu..Gy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 ..mu..Gy per single intraoral exposure.

  7. Morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2018-03-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low-angle edifices built primarily by the accumulation of successive lava flows. This generic view of shield volcano morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galápagos). Here, the morphometry of 158 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes is analyzed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution SRTM DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 24 lava-dominated 'shield-like' volcanoes, considered so far as stratovolcanoes, are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes from 0.1 to > 1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width (H/WB) ratios mostly from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients (average slopes mostly from 1° to 15°), elongation and summit truncation. Although there is no clear-cut morphometric difference between shield volcanoes and stratovolcanoes, an approximate threshold can be drawn at 12° average slope and 0.10 H/WB ratio. Principal component analysis of the obtained database enables to identify four key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Hierarchical cluster analysis of these descriptors results in 12 end-member shield types, with intermediate cases defining a continuum of morphologies. The shield types can be linked in terms of growth stages and shape evolution, related to (1) magma composition and rheology, effusion rate and lava/pyroclast ratio, which will condition edifice steepness; (2) spatial distribution of vents, in turn related to the magmatic feeding system and the tectonic framework, which will control edifice plan shape; and (3) caldera formation, which will condition edifice truncation.

  8. Shielding around spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragopoulou, M; Manolopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Brandt, R; Westmeier, W; Krivopustov, M; Sosnin, A; Golovatyuk, S; Zamani, M

    2006-01-01

    Spallation neutron sources provide more intense and harder neutron spectrum than nuclear reactors for which a substantial amount of shielding measurements have been performed. Although the main part of the cost for a spallation station is the cost of the shielding, measurements regarding shielding for the high energy neutron region are still very scarce. In this work calculation of the neutron interaction length in polyethylene moderator for different neutron energies is presented. Measurements which were carried out in Nuclotron accelerator at the Laboratory of High Energies (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna) and comparison with calculation are also presented. The measurements were performed with Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs)

  9. Radiation protection/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. In the following discussion, the system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection will be described, and the program developed to implement this approach will be defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems of LMFBR nuclear reactor systems will be discussed in realtion to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. Shielding benchmark tests of JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Hasegawa, Akira; Ueki, Kohtaro; Yamano, Naoki; Sasaki, Kenji; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Morio; Ohtani, Nobuo; Sakurai, Kiyoshi.

    1994-03-01

    The integral test of neutron cross sections for major shielding materials in JENDL-3 has been performed by analyzing various shielding benchmark experiments. For the fission-like neutron source problem, the following experiments are analyzed: (1) ORNL Broomstick experiments for oxygen, iron and sodium, (2) ASPIS deep penetration experiments for iron, (3) ORNL neutron transmission experiments for iron, stainless steel, sodium and graphite, (4) KfK leakage spectrum measurements from iron spheres, (5) RPI angular neutron spectrum measurements in a graphite block. For D-T neutron source problem, the following two experiments are analyzed: (6) LLNL leakage spectrum measurements from spheres of iron and graphite, and (7) JAERI-FNS angular neutron spectrum measurements on beryllium and graphite slabs. Analyses have been performed using the radiation transport codes: ANISN(1D Sn), DIAC(1D Sn), DOT3.5(2D Sn) and MCNP(3D point Monte Carlo). The group cross sections for Sn transport calculations are generated with the code systems PROF-GROUCH-G/B and RADHEAT-V4. The point-wise cross sections for MCNP are produced with NJOY. For comparison, the analyses with JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV have been also carried out. The calculations using JENDL-3 show overall agreement with the experimental data as well as those with ENDF/B-IV. Particularly, JENDL-3 gives better results than JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV for sodium. It has been concluded that JENDL-3 is very applicable for fission and fusion reactor shielding analyses. (author)

  11. Survivor shielding. Part C. Improvements in terrain shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.; Kaul, Dean C.; Roberts, James A.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    A number of atomic-bomb survivors were affected by shielding provided by terrain features. These terrain features can be a small hill, affecting one or two houses, or a high mountain that shields large neighborhoods. In the survivor dosimetry system, terrain shielding can be described by a transmission factor (TF), which is the ratio between the dose with and without the terrain present. The terrain TF typically ranges between 0.1 and 1.0. After DS86 was implemented at RERF, the terrain shielding categories were examined and found to either have a bias or an excessive uncertainty that could readily be removed. In 1989, an improvement in the terrain model was implemented at RERF in the revised DS86 code, but the documentation was not published. It is now presented in this section. The solution to the terrain shielding in front of a house is described in this section. The problem of terrain shielding of survivors behind Hijiyama mountain at Hiroshima and Konpirasan mountain at Nagasaki has also been recognized, and a solution to this problem has been included in DS02. (author)

  12. Self-shielding factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Throughout the last two decades many efforts have been made to estimate the effect of body self-shielding on organ doses from externally incident neutrons and gamma rays. These began with the use of simple geometry phantoms and have culminated in the use of detailed anthropomorphic phantoms. In a recent effort, adjoint Monte Carlo analysis techniques have been used to determine dose and dose equivalent to the active marrow as a function of energy and angle of neutron fluence externally incident on an anthropomorphic phantom. When combined with fluences from actual nuclear devices, these dose-to-fluence factors result in marrow dose values that demonstrate great sensitivity to variations in device type, range, and body orientation. Under a state-of-the-art radiation transport analysis demonstration program for the Japanese cities, sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency at the request of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the marrow dose study referred to above is being repeated to obtain spectral distributions within the marrow for externally incident neutrons and gamma rays of arbitrary energy and angle. This is intended to allow radiobiologists and epidemiologists to select and to modify numbers of merit for correlation with health effects and to permit a greater understanding of the relationship between human and laboratory subject dosimetry

  13. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Tadahiro; Mizuochi, Akira; Omori, Tetsu

    1998-01-01

    A single body of a radiation shield comprises a bag prepared by welding or bonding a polyurethane sheet which is made flat while interposing metal plates at the upper and the lower portion of the bag. Eyelet fittings are disposed to the upper and the lower portions of the bag passing through the metal plates and the flat portion of the bag. Water supplying/draining ports are disposed to two upper and lower places of the bag at a height where the metal plates are disposed. Reinforcing walls welded or bonded to the inner wall surface of the bag are elongated in vertical direction to divide the inside of the bag to a plurality of cells. The bag is suspended and supported from a frame with S-shaped hooks inserted into the eyelet fittings as connecting means. A plurality of bags are suspended and supported from the frame at a required height by way of the eyelets at the lower portion of the suspended and supported bag and the eyelet fittings at the upper portion of the bag below the intermediate connection means. (I.N.)

  14. Study on Load-displacement Test of Rubber Pads of Coal Mine Roadway Constructed by Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Chen, Xiaoguo; Yang, Liyun

    2017-12-01

    Shield method construction of coal mine roadway is the future trend of the development of deep coal mining. The main shaft supporting is the segment. There is rubber pads between segment and segment. The performance of compression deformation of rubber pad is essential for the overall stability of lining. Through load test, displacement of the rubber pad under load, the thrust force law of the rubber pad deformation, and provide a theoretical basis for the stability analysis of coal mine tunnel shield construction.

  15. Active Radiation Shield, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DEC-Shield technology offers the means to generate electric power from cosmic radiation sources and fuse dissimilar systems and functionality into a structural...

  16. Shielding calculations. Optimization vs. Paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo Diaz, Nestor; Hernandez Saiz, Alejandro; Martinez Gonzalez, Alina

    2005-01-01

    Many radiation shielding barriers in Cuba have been designed according to the criterion of Maxi-mum Projected Dose Rates. This fact has created the paradigm of low dose rates. Because of this, dose rate levels greater than units of Sv.h-1 would be considered unacceptable by many specialists, regardless of the real exposure times. Nowadays many shielding barriers are being designed using dose constraints in real exposure times. Behind the new barriers, dose rates could be notably greater than those behind the traditional ones, and it does not imply inadequate designs or constructive errors. In this work were obtained significant differences in dose rate levels and shield-ing thicknesses calculated by both methods for some typical installations. The work concludes that real exposure time approach is more adequate in order to optimise Radiation Protection, although this method should be carefully applied

  17. Erosion by pleistocene continental ice sheets in the area of the Canadian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutter, N.W.

    The principles, theory and knowledge on the behaviour of glaciers indicate that only confined glacier flow is a major erosional agent. Unconfined, areally flowing ice sheets such as those present over the Canadian Shield during the Pleistocene Period modified the landscape very little. The potential for deep glacial erosion in future glaciations over the Canadian Shield area is low. Nuclear waste disposal sites, based only upon potential glacial erosion, should be located a few hundred meters below the surface in competent, fractureless crystalline shield bedrock, in relatively reliefless terrain, a few hundred kilometers away from the Paleozoic boundary. (auth)

  18. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadori Amir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  19. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  20. Performances of Kevlar and Polyethylene as radiation shielding on-board the International Space Station in high latitude radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Larosa, Marianna; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Rizzo, Alessandro; Zaconte, Veronica

    2017-05-10

    Passive radiation shielding is a mandatory element in the design of an integrated solution to mitigate the effects of radiation during long deep space voyages for human exploration. Understanding and exploiting the characteristics of materials suitable for radiation shielding in space flights is, therefore, of primary importance. We present here the results of the first space-test on Kevlar and Polyethylene radiation shielding capabilities including direct measurements of the background baseline (no shield). Measurements are performed on-board of the International Space Station (Columbus modulus) during the ALTEA-shield ESA sponsored program. For the first time the shielding capability of such materials has been tested in a radiation environment similar to the deep-space one, thanks to the feature of the ALTEA system, which allows to select only high latitude orbital tracts of the International Space Station. Polyethylene is widely used for radiation shielding in space and therefore it is an excellent benchmark material to be used in comparative investigations. In this work we show that Kevlar has radiation shielding performances comparable to the Polyethylene ones, reaching a dose rate reduction of 32 ± 2% and a dose equivalent rate reduction of 55 ± 4% (for a shield of 10 g/cm 2 ).

  1. An adaptive sampling scheme for deep-penetration calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ruihong; Ji, Zhicheng; Pei, Lucheng

    2013-01-01

    As we know, the deep-penetration problem has been one of the important and difficult problems in shielding calculation with Monte Carlo Method for several decades. In this paper, an adaptive Monte Carlo method under the emission point as a sampling station for shielding calculation is investigated. The numerical results show that the adaptive method may improve the efficiency of the calculation of shielding and might overcome the under-estimation problem easy to happen in deep-penetration calculation in some degree

  2. The Dalkon Shield in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, P; Hirsh, H L

    1986-01-01

    When the Dalkon Shield IUD became clinically available in the early 1970s, it appeared that an ideal contraceptive had been developed, with essentially no adverse effects (very safe) and a very high degree of efficacy. Within a few years, however, it became apparent that the Dalkon Shield had not lived up to expectations. In fact, it caused very severe complications, not infrequently resulting in the loss of reproductive ability and in 17 cases, death. In addition, the pregnancy rate among women using this IUD was significantly high, with many resulting in mid-trimester abortion when the IUD remained in-place. The authors trace the legal consequences of this medical disaster, which has resulted in both the development of new and the extension of old legal theories and doctrines involving negligence and product liability. Dalkon Shield litigation is most likely to continue. Many women are assumed to wear the shield still, and neither the FDA or A.H. Robins, manufacturer of the shield, has issued a formal recall.

  3. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  4. MMW [multimegawatt] shielding design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Reactor shielding for multimegawatt (MMW) space power must satisfy a mass constraint as well as performance specifications for neutron fluence and gamma dose. A minimum mass shield is helpful in attaining the launch mass goal for the entire vehicle, because the shield comprises about 1% to 2% of the total vehicle mass. In addition, the shield internal heating must produce tolerable temperatures. The analysis of shield performance for neutrons and gamma rays is emphasized. Topics addressed include cross section preparation for multigroup 2D S/sub n/-transport analyses, and the results of parametric design studies on shadow shield performance and mass versus key shield design variables such as cone angle, number, placement, and thickness of layers of tungsten, and shield top radius. Finally, adjoint methods are applied to the shield in order to spatially map its relative contribution to dose reduction, and to provide insight into further design optimization. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization.

  6. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization

  7. A Novel Radiation Shielding Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding simulations showed that epoxy loaded with 10-70% polyethylene would be an excellent shielding material against GCRs and SEPs. Milling produced an...

  8. Simulation of a Shielded Thermocouple

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    performance of shielded thermocouple designs. A mathematical model of the thermocouple is obtained by derivation of the heat propagation equation in cylindrical coordinates and by considering the ... Here k is the thermal conductivity, p c is the specific heat capacity, ρ is the density,. ∞. T is the ambient temperature, and μ ...

  9. Orion Heat Shield Manufacturing Producibility Improvements for the EM-1 Flight Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, William J.; Stewart, Michael; Harris, Richard F.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes how the ORION program is incorporating improvements in the heat shield design and manufacturing processes reducing programmatic risk and ensuring crew safety in support of NASA's Exploration missions. The approach for the EFT-1 heat shield utilized a low risk Apollo heritage design and manufacturing process using an Avcoat TPS ablator with a honeycomb substrate to provide a one piece heat shield to meet the mission re-entry heating environments. The EM-1 mission will have additional flight systems installed to fly to the moon and return to Earth. Heat shield design and producibility improvements have been incorporated in the EM-1 vehicle to meet deep space mission requirements. The design continues to use the Avcoat material, but in a block configuration to enable improvements in consistant and repeatable application processes using tile bonding experience developed on the Space Shuttle Transportation System Program.

  10. Dimmuborgir: a rootless shield complex in northern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Alasdair; Sturkell, Erik; Jakobsson, Martin; Einarsson, Draupnir; Tollefsen, Elin; Orr, Tim R.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of Dimmuborgir, a shield-like volcanic structure within the Younger Laxá lava flow field near Lake Mývatn, in northern Iceland, has long been questioned. New airborne laser mapping (light detection and ranging (LiDAR)), combined with ground-penetrating radar results and a detailed field study, suggests that Dimmuborgir is a complex of at least two overlapping rootless shields fed by lava erupting from the nearby Lúdentarborgir crater row. This model builds upon previous explanations for the formation of Dimmuborgir and is consistent with observations of rootless shield development at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii. The larger rootless shields at Dimmuborgir, 1–1.5 km in diameter, elliptical in plan view, ∼30 m in height, and each with a 500-m-wide summit depression, were capable of storing as much as 2–3 × 106 m3 of lava. They were fed by lava which descended 30–60 m in lava tubes along a distance of 3 km from the crater row. The height difference generated pressure sufficient to build rootless shields at Dimmuborgir in a timescale of weeks. The main summit depressions, inferred to be drained lava ponds, could have emptied via a 30-m-wide × 5-m-deep channel, with estimated effusion rates of 0.7–7 m3 s−1 and minimum flow durations of 5–50 days. We argue that the pillars for which Dimmuborgir is famed are remnants of lava pond rims, at various stages of disintegration that formed during pond drainage.

  11. Heat flow and thermal structure of the lithosphere across the Baltic Shield and northern Tornquist Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balling, Niels

    1995-04-01

    Terrestrial heat-flow data from Archean and Proterozoic Provinces of the Baltic Shield, its southwestern margin, and the tectonic transition to the younger tectonic units of Central Europe (northern segment of the European Geotraverse) are compiled and examined for local and regional variations. A 2-D numerical lithospheric temperature and heat-flux model is presented covering 1800 km of the deep seismic FENNOLORA profile across the Baltic Shield and 500 km of EUGENO-S/ northern EUGEMI seismic lines across the northern Tornquist Zone and the Danish and North German basins. Thermal lithosphere, defined as the outer layer with relatively low temperatures ( T Earthquake focal depth data and information on crustal strength show Baltic Shield seismicity to be limited generally to the upper 20-25 km brittle part of the crust at temperatures less than 300-400°C. Maximum source depth of magnetic anomalies at temperatures near 600°C is in the deepest part of the crust near the crust-mantle boundary in the southern region (about 25 km depth along the Tornquist Zone and about 35-40 km in southern shield areas) and in the uppermost mantle (60-70 km depth) in the northern shield areas. Some petrologic implications are discussed. The present deep crust is supposed to be at lower temperature-pressure conditions than at early stages of formation. However, also the present deepest parts of the shield crust (> 35-40 km) are within the stability field of eclogites. The general absence of significant gravity anomalies in areas of marked crustal thickness variations indicate high-density eclogites to be present in significant amounts in the deep shield crust.

  12. Analytical model for relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Rodolfo H.; Gomez, Sergio S.

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple analytical model for calculating and rationalizing the main relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms. It provides good estimates for those corrections and their trends, in reasonable agreement with accurate four-component calculations and perturbation methods. The origin of the effects in deep core atomic orbitals is manifestly shown

  13. Analytical model for relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Rodolfo H. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)]. E-mail: rhromero@exa.unne.edu.ar; Gomez, Sergio S. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)

    2006-04-24

    We present a simple analytical model for calculating and rationalizing the main relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms. It provides good estimates for those corrections and their trends, in reasonable agreement with accurate four-component calculations and perturbation methods. The origin of the effects in deep core atomic orbitals is manifestly shown.

  14. Survivor shielding. Part A. Nagasaki factory worker shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Robert T.; Barnes, John M.; Azmy, Yousry Y.; Kerr, George D.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Cullings, Harry M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent investigations based on conventional chromosome aberration data by the RERF suggest that the DS86 doses received by many Nagasaki factory workers may have been overestimated by as much as 40% relative to those for other survivors in Japanese-type houses and other shielding configurations (Kodama et al. 2001). Since the factory workers represent about 25% of the Nagasaki survivors with DS86 doses in excess of 0.5 Gy (50 rad), systematic errors in their dose estimates can have a major impact on the risk coefficients from RERF studies. The factory worker doses may have been overestimated for a number of reasons. The calculation techniques, including the factory building modeling, weapon source spectra and cross-section data used in the DS86 shielding calculations were not detailed enough to replicate actual conditions. The models used did not take into account local shielding provided by machinery, tools, and the internal structure in the buildings. In addition, changes in the disposition of shielding following collapse of the building by the blast wave were not considered. The location of large factory complexes may be uncertain, causing large numbers of factory survivors, correctly located relative to each other, to be uniformly too close to the hypocenter. Any or all of these reasons are sufficient to result in an overestimate of the factory worker doses. During the DS02 studies, factory worker doses have been reassessed by more carefully modeling the factory buildings, incorporating improved radiation transport methods and cross-section data and using the most recent bomb leakage spectra (Chapter 2). Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations were carried out initially to estimate the effects of workbenches and tools on worker doses to determine if the inclusion of these components would, in fact, reduce the dose by amounts consistent with the RERF observations (Kodama et al. 2001). (author)

  15. Neutronic design of MYRRHA reactor hall shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celik Yurdunaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral shielding of a 600 MeV proton linear accelerator beam line in the MYRRHA reactor hall has been assessed using neutronic calculations by the MCNPX code complemented with analytical predictions. Continuous beam losses were considered to define the required shielding thickness that meets the requirements for the dose rate limits. Required shielding thicknesses were investigated from the viewpoint of accidental full beam loss as well as beam loss on collimator. The results confirm that the required shielding thicknesses are highly sensitive to the spatial shape of the beam and strongly divergent beam losses. Therefore shielding barrier should be designed according to the more conservative assumptions.

  16. Seismic analysis of the mirror fusion test facility shielding vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielsen, B.L.; Tsai, K.

    1981-04-01

    This report presents a seismic analysis of the vault in Building 431 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which houses the mirror Fusion Test Facility. The shielding vault structure is approximately 120 ft long by 80 ft wide and is constructed of concrete blocks approximately 7 x 7 x 7 ft. The north and south walls are approximately 53 ft high and the east wall is approximately 29 ft high. These walls are supported on a monolithic concrete foundation that surrounds a 21-ft deep open pit. Since the 53-ft walls appeared to present the greatest seismic problem they were the first investigated

  17. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  18. Radiation shield vest and skirt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maine, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    A two-piece garment is described which provides shielding for female workers exposed to radiation. The upper part is a vest, overlapping and secured in the front by adjustable closures. The bottom part is a wraparound skirt, also secured by adjustable closures. The two parts overlap, thus providing continuous protection from shoulder to knee and ensuring that the back part of the body is protected as well as the front

  19. Handbook of radiation shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1976-07-01

    This handbook is a compilation of data on units, conversion factors, geometric considerations, sources of radiation, and the attenuation of photons, neutrons, and charged particles. It also includes related topics in health physics. Data are presented in tabular and graphical form with sufficient narrative for a least first-approximation solutions to a variety of problems in nuclear radiation protection. Members of the radiation shielding community contributed the information in this document from unclassified and uncopyrighted sources, as referenced

  20. Shielding Idiosyncrasy from Isomorphic Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, José Luis; Mazza, Carmelo; Strandgaard Pedersen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    with legitimacyin the field. Our theory of creative actionfor optimal distinctiveness suggests thatfilm directors increase their control bypersonally consolidating artistic andproduction roles, by forming closepartnership with committed producer, andby establishing own production company.Ironically, to escape......Abstract. This paper advances a microtheory of creative action by examining howdistinctive artists shield their idiosyncraticstyles from the isomorphic pressures of afield. It draws on the cases of threeinternationally recognized, distinctiveEuropean film directors - Pedro Almodóvar(Spain), Nanni...

  1. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  2. Shielding wall for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Takaho.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns shielding walls opposing to plasmas of a thermonuclear device and it is an object thereof to conduct reactor operation with no troubles even if a portion of shielding wall tiles should be damaged. That is, the shielding wall tiles are constituted as a dual layer structure in which the lower base tiles are connected by means of bolts to first walls. Further, the upper surface tiles are bolt-connected to the layer base tiles. In this structure, the plasma thermal loads are directly received by the surface layer tiles and heat is conducted by means of conduction and radiation to the underlying base tiles and the first walls. Even upon occurrence of destruction accidents to the surface layer tiles caused by incident heat or electromagnetic force upon elimination of plasmas, since the underlying base tiles remain as they are, the first walls constituted with stainless steels, etc. are not directly exposed to the plasmas. Accordingly, the integrity of the first walls having cooling channels can be maintained and sputtering intrusion of atoms of high atom number into the plasmas can be prevented. (I.S.)

  3. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  4. The Modified Socket Shield Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang-Hun; Park, Kwang-Bum; Mangano, Francesco Guido

    2018-03-20

    In the anterior regions, the resorption of the buccal bone after tooth extraction leads to a contraction of the overlying soft tissues, resulting in an esthetic problem, particularly with immediate implant placement. In the socket shield technique, the buccal root section of the tooth is maintained, to preserve the buccal bone for immediate implant placement. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the survival, stability, and complication rates of implants placed using a "modified" socket shield technique. Over a 2-year period, all patients referred to a dental clinic for treatment with oral implants were considered for inclusion in this study. Inclusion criteria were healthy adult patients who presented nonrestorable single teeth with intact buccal periodontal tissues in the anterior regions of both jaws. Exclusion criteria were teeth with present/past periodontal disease, vertical root fractures on the buccal aspect, horizontal fractures below bone level, and external/internal resorptions. The buccal portion of the root was retained to prevent the resorption of the buccal bone; the shield was 1.5 mm thick with the most coronal portion at the bone crest level. All patients then underwent immediate implants. In the patient with a gap between the implant and shield, no graft material was placed. All implants were immediately restored with single crowns and followed for 1 year. The main outcomes were implant survival, stability, and complications. Thirty patients (15 males, 15 females; mean age was 48.2 ± 15.0 years) were enrolled in the study and installed with 40 immediate implants. After 1 year, all implants were functioning, for a survival rate of 100%; excellent implant stability was reported (mean implant stability quotient at placement: 72.9 ± 5.9; after 1 year: 74.6 ± 2.7). No biologic complications were reported, and the incidence of prosthetic complications was low (2.5%). The "modified" socket shield technique seems to be a

  5. Preparation of a basic data base for shielding design. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemura, Morio

    1998-03-01

    With use of a standard groupwise shielding design library JSSTDL produced from the latest evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.2, experimental analyses for the In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVS) Experiment and the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) Experiment were performed. The results were compared with those obtained by the same analysis method and input data using the JSDJ2 library that had been applied consistently to the JASPER experiment analyses. In general, the results obtained with JSSTDL are higher than those with JSDJ2 as were found in analyses in last two years for the Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment and the Special Materials Experiment and also the Axial Shield Experiment. The calculation-to-experiment ratios of the fast neutron flux just behind deep penetration in sodium were obtained first by these IVS and IHX experimental analyses with the JSSTDL library. However, it was confirmed not to be easy to evaluate the accuracy of sodium cross section because of its dependency on how to model the swelled sodium slabs and tanks. The analyses with JSSTDL library were verified by comparison with other analyses with another library based on JENDL-3.2. Compilation of the input data necessary for future reanalyses of important configurations in JASPER experiments, that were selected at the first stage of this study, were continued and new data were added into the computer disk holding previously accumulated data. (author)

  6. The influence of shielding gas in hybrid LASER MIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Giovanni; Campana, Giampaolo; Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro

    2007-07-01

    Hybrid LASER-GMAW welding technique has been recently studied and developed in order to meet the needs of modern welding industries. The two sources involved in this process play, in fact, a complementary role: fast welding speed, deep bead penetration and high energy concentration can be achieved through the LASER beam, while gap bridgeability and cost-effectiveness are typical of the GMAW process. Particularly interesting, in this context, is the CO 2 LASER-MIG welding which differs from the Nd:YAG LASER-MIG technique for the high powers that can be exploited and for the good power/cost ratio of the process. This paper is a part of a wide study on the hybrid CO 2 LASER-MIG welding and investigates the influence of the shielding gas both on the stability of the process and on the dimensional characteristics of the weld bead. Two different parameters have been taken into consideration in order to develop this analysis: the shielding gas composition and the shielding gas flow. The experiment, performed on AISI 304 stainless steel plates, has been planned exploiting design of experiment techniques. The results have been analyzed through a statistical approach in order to determine the real influence of each parameter on the overall process.

  7. Deep Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asness, Clifford S.; Liew, John M.; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    We define "deep value" as episodes where the valuation spread between cheap and expensive securities is wide relative to its history. Examining deep value across global individual equities, equity index futures, currencies, and global bonds provides new evidence on competing theories for the valu....... Lastly, we find that deep value episodes tend to cluster and a deep value trading strategy generates excess returns not explained by traditional risk factors.......We define "deep value" as episodes where the valuation spread between cheap and expensive securities is wide relative to its history. Examining deep value across global individual equities, equity index futures, currencies, and global bonds provides new evidence on competing theories for the value...... premium. Following these episodes, the value strategy has (1) high average returns; (2) low market betas, but high betas to a global value factor; (3) deteriorating fundamentals; (4) negative news sentiment; (5) selling pressure; (6) increased limits to arbitrage; and (7) increased arbitrage activity...

  8. Radiation Exposure Analyses Supporting the Development of Solar Particle Event Shielding Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Abston, H. Lee; Simon, Hatthew A.; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA has plans for long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Outside of LEO, large solar particle events (SPEs), which occur sporadically, can deliver a very large dose in a short amount of time. The relatively low proton energies make SPE shielding practical, and the possibility of the occurrence of a large event drives the need for SPE shielding for all deep space missions. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) RadWorks Storm Shelter Team was charged with developing minimal mass SPE storm shelter concepts for missions beyond LEO. The concepts developed included "wearable" shields, shelters that could be deployed at the onset of an event, and augmentations to the crew quarters. The radiation transport codes, human body models, and vehicle geometry tools contained in the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation In Space (OLTARIS) were used to evaluate the protection provided by each concept within a realistic space habitat and provide the concept designers with shield thickness requirements. Several different SPE models were utilized to examine the dependence of the shield requirements on the event spectrum. This paper describes the radiation analysis methods and the results of these analyses for several of the shielding concepts.

  9. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora

    2017-01-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  10. Shielded room measurements, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, J.S.

    1949-02-22

    The attenuation of electro-statically and electro-magnetically shielded rooms in the ``E,`` ``R,`` ``I,`` and ``T`` Buildings was measured so that corrective measure could be taken if the attenuation was found to be low. If remedial measures could not be taken, the shortcomings of the rooms would be known. Also, the men making the measurements should oversee construction and correct errors at the time. The work was performed by measuring the attenuation at spot frequencies over the range of from 150 kilocycles to 1280 megacycles with suitable equipment mounted in small rubber-tried trucks. The attenuation was determined by ``before and after`` shielding and/or ``door open and door closed`` measurements after installation of copper shielding. In general, attenuation in the frequency range of approximately 10 to 150 mc. was good and was of the order expected. At frequencies in the range of 150 mc. to 1280 mc., the attenuation curve was more erratic; that is, at certain frequencies a severe loss of attenuation was noted, while at others, the attenuation was very good. This was mainly due to poor or faulty seals around doors and pass windows. These poor seals existed in the ``T,`` ``E,`` and ``I`` Buildings because the doors were fitted improperly and somewhat inferior material was used. By experience from these difficulties, both causes were corrected in the ``R`` Building, which resulted in the improvement of the very high frequency (v.h.f.) range in this building. In some specific cases, however, the results were about the same. For the range of frequencies below approximately 10 mc., the attenuation, in almost all cases, gradually decreased as the frequency decreased and reached a minimum at .3 to 1.0 mc. This loss of attenuation was attributed to multiple grounding caused by moisture in the insulating timbers and will gradually decrease as the wood dries out.

  11. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora, E-mail: cesar.hueso@idom.com [IDOM, Consulting, Engineering and Architecture, S.A.U, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  12. Magnetic shielding of a limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevnov, N.N.; Stepanov, S.B.; Khimchenko, L.N.; Matthews, G.F.; Goodal, D.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Localization of plasma interaction with material surfaces in a separate chamber, from where the escape of impurities is hardly realized, i.e. application of magnetic divertors or pump limiters, is the main technique for reduction of the impurity content in a plasma. In this case, the production of a divertor configuration requires a considerable power consumption and results in a less effective utilization of the magnetic field volume. Utilization of a pump limiter, for example the ICL-type, under tokamak-reactor conditions would result in the extremely high and forbidden local heat loadings onto the limiter surface. Moreover, the magnetically-shielded pump limiter (MSL) was proposed to combine positive properties of the divertor and the pump limiter. The idea of magnetic shielding is to locate the winding with current inside the limiter head so that the field lines of the resultant magnetic field do not intercept the limiter surface. In this case the plasma flows around the limiter leading edges and penetrates into the space under the limiter. The shielding magnetic field can be directed either counter the toroidal field or counter the poloidal one of a tokamak, dependent on the concrete diagram of the device. Such a limiter has a number of advantages: -opportunity to control over the particle and impurity recycling without practical influence upon the plasma column geometry, - perturbation of a plasma column magnetic configuration from the side of such a limiter is less than that from the side of the divertor coils. The main deficiency is the necessity to locate active windings inside the discharge chamber. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs

  13. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  14. Irrigoscopy - irrigography method, dosimetry and radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubanov, Z.; Kolarevic, G.

    1999-01-01

    Use of patient's radiation shielding during radiology diagnostic procedures in our country is insufficiently represent, so patients needlessly receive very high entrance skin doses in body areas which are not in direct x-ray beam. During irrigoscopy, patient's radiation shielding is very complex problem, because of the organs position. In the future that problem must be solved. We hope that some of our suggestions about patient's radiation shielding during irrigoscopy, can be a small step in that way. (author)

  15. Isotopic age of enderbites of Ukrainian shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartnitskij, E.N.; Bojko, V.L.; Levkovskaya, N.Yu.; Lesnaya, I.M.; Siroshtan, R.I.; Sharkin, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of determining U-Pb isotopic age of accessory zircons from enderbites of Azov, Dniestrovo-Bug and Ingulo-Ingultsk regions of the Ukrainian shield are presented. The isotopic age values obtained make up from 3400 millions of years for enderbites of Novo-Pavlovsk complex of the Ukrainian shield up to 2100 millions of years for enderbites and charnockites of Berdichev complex. So, enderbites of both Archean and Proterozoic age are found in the Ukrainian shield area which points out to diversification of granulites metamorphism manifestation in various blocks of the Ukrainian shield

  16. Problems of the power plant shield optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagyan, A.A.; Dubinin, A.A.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.; Petrov, Eh.E.

    1981-01-01

    General approaches to the solution of problems on the nuclear power plant radiation shield optimization are considered. The requirements to the shield parameters are formulated in a form of restrictions on a number of functionals, determined by the solution of γ quantum and neutron transport equations or dimensional and weight characteristics of shield components. Functional determined by weight-dimensional parameters (shield cost, mass and thickness) and functionals, determined by radiation fields (equivalent dose rate, produced by neutrons and γ quanta, activation functional, radiation functional, heat flux, integral heat flux in a particular part of the shield volume, total energy flux through a particular shield surface are considered. The following methods of numerical solution of simplified optimization problems are discussed: semiempirical methods using radiation transport physical leaks, numerical solution of approximate transport equations, numerical solution of transport equations for the simplest configurations making possible to decrease essentially a number of variables in the problem. The conclusion is drawn that the attained level of investigations on the problem of nuclear power plant shield optimization gives the possibility to pass on at present to the solution of problems with a more detailed account of the real shield operating conditions (shield temperature field account, its strength and other characteristics) [ru

  17. Radiation dose reduction by water shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, J.; Arshed, W.; Ahmad, S.S.

    2007-06-01

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software W-Shielder, developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The software estimates shielding thickness for photons having their energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. Water is used as a shielding material in this software. The software is helpful in estimating the water thickness for safe handling, storage of gamma emitting radionuclide. (author)

  18. Optimization of the CMS forward shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Huhtinen, Mika

    2000-01-01

    A first realistic version of the CMS forward shielding was presented in the 1999 Engineering Design Review. It was discovered that the background increased by a factor of 2 with respect to the TDR where an idealized shielding had been assumed. This note describes the optimizations implemented in the realistic shielding with the aim to recover the TDR performance. An optimization of the shielding geometry, the beam pipe and a filling of major cracks has allowed to achieve the goal. Although the differences to the TDR are very minor, these new calculations should be understood as an update to those presented in the TDR.

  19. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ''hands-on'' procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment

  20. Channels in tokamak reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchipakin, O.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of calculations of neutron transport through the channels in the tokamak reactor radiation shields, obtained by the Monte Carlo method and by the method of discrete ordinates, are considered. The given data show that the structural materials of the channel and that of the blanket and shields in the regions close to it are subjected to almost the same irradiation as the first wall and therefore they should satisfy the technical requirements. The radiation energy release in the injector channel wall, caused by neutron shooting, substantially depends on the channel dimensions. At the channel large diameter (0.7-10 m) this dependence noticeably decreases. The investigation of the effect of the injector channel cross section form on the neutron flux density through the channel, testifies to weak dependence of shooting radiation intensity on the form of the channel cross section. It is concluded that measures to decrease unfavourable effect of the channels on the safety of the power tokamak reactor operation and maintenance cause substantial changes in reactor design due to which the channel protection must be developed at first stages. The Monte Carlo method is recommended to be used for variant calculations and when calculating the neutron flux functionals in specific points of the system the discrete ordinate method is preferred [ru

  1. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  2. Continuous electrodeionization through electrostatic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermentzis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    We report a new continuous electrodeionization cell with electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments or electrochemical Faraday cages formed by porous electronically and ionically conductive media, instead of permselective ion exchange membranes. Due to local elimination of the applied electric field within the compartments, they electrostatically retain the incoming ions and act as 'electrostatic ion pumps' or 'ion traps' and therefore concentrate compartments. The porous media are chemically and thermally stable. Electrodeionization or electrodialysis cells containing such concentrate compartments in place of ion exchange membranes can be used to regenerate ion exchange resins and produce deionized water, to purify industrial effluents and desalinate brackish or seawater. The cells can work by polarity reversal without any negative impact to the deionization process. Because the electronically and ionically active media constituting the electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments are not permselective and coions are not repelled but can be swept by the migrating counterions, the cells are not affected by the known membrane associated limitations, such as concentration polarization or scaling and show an increased current efficiency

  3. Deep frying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, van K.N.

    2016-01-01

    Deep frying is one of the most used methods in the food processing industry. Though practically any food can be fried, French fries are probably the most well-known deep fried products. The popularity of French fries stems from their unique taste and texture, a crispy outside with a mealy soft

  4. Deep learning

    CERN Document Server

    Goodfellow, Ian; Courville, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Deep learning is a form of machine learning that enables computers to learn from experience and understand the world in terms of a hierarchy of concepts. Because the computer gathers knowledge from experience, there is no need for a human computer operator to formally specify all the knowledge that the computer needs. The hierarchy of concepts allows the computer to learn complicated concepts by building them out of simpler ones; a graph of these hierarchies would be many layers deep. This book introduces a broad range of topics in deep learning. The text offers mathematical and conceptual background, covering relevant concepts in linear algebra, probability theory and information theory, numerical computation, and machine learning. It describes deep learning techniques used by practitioners in industry, including deep feedforward networks, regularization, optimization algorithms, convolutional networks, sequence modeling, and practical methodology; and it surveys such applications as natural language proces...

  5. Optically-transparent radiation-shielding composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolles, T.F.; Fleming, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    An optically transparent, essentially colorless radiation shielding material for high energy radiation contains a combination of lead or thallium salts of C 1 to C 5 organic acids and may contain lead or thallium salts of mineral acids. Shields of complex shapes are easily constructed

  6. Improvements in or relating to nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.J.; Riley, K.; Powell, C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear radiation shield comprises two pieces of steel held together edge to edge by a weld, the depth of which is less than the thickness of either of the edges. As the radiaion shielding effect of the weld will be less than the steel, an insert is bolted or welded over the weld. (U.K.)

  7. Several problems in accelerator shielding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Hirayama, Hideo; Ban, Shuichi.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, the utilization of accelerators has increased rapidly, and the increase of accelerating energy and beam intensity is also remarkable. The studies on accelerator shielding have become important, because the amount of radiation emitted from accelerators increased, the regulation of the dose of environmental radiation was tightened, and the cost of constructing shielding rose. As the plans of constructing large accelerators have been made successively, the survey on the present state and the problems of the studies on accelerator shielding was carried out. Accelerators are classified into electron accelerators and proton accelerators in view of the studies on shielding. In order to start the studies on accelerator shielding, first, the preparation of the cross section data is indispensable. The cross sections for generating Bremsstrahlung, photonuclear reactions generating neutrons, generation of neutrons by hadrons, nuclear reaction of neutrons and generation of gamma-ray by hadrons are described. The generation of neutrons and gamma-ray as the problems of thick targets is explained. The shielding problems are complex and diversified, but in this paper, the studies on the shielding, by which basic data are obtainable, are taken up, such as beam damping and side wall shielding. As for residual radioactivity, main nuclides and the difference of residual radioactivity according to substances have been studied. (J.P.N.)

  8. Actively shielded low level gamma - spectrometric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrdja, D.; Bikit, I.; Forkapic, S.; Slivka, J.; Veskovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The results of the adjusting and testing of the actively shielded low level gamma-spectrometry system are presented. The veto action of the shield reduces the background in the energy region of 50 keV to the 2800 keV for about 3 times. (author) [sr

  9. Fundamental Parameters of the SHIELD II Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, John

    2014-10-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" ("SHIELD") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in early Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Cycle 19 HST observations of the 12 SHIELD galaxies have allowed us to determine their TRGB distances, thus anchoring the physical scales on which our ongoing analysis is based. Since the inception of SHIELD, the ALFALFA survey has completed data acquisition, thereby populating the faint end of the HI mass function with dozens of SHIELD analogs. In this proposal we request ACS imaging of 18 of these "SHIELD II" galaxies that have already been imaged in the HI spectral line with the WSRT. These data will enable a holistic HST imaging study of the fundamental parameters and characteristics of a statistically robust sample of 30 extremely low-mass galaxies (including 12 SHIELD and 18 SHIELD II systems). The primary science goal is the derivation of TRGB distances; the distance dependence of many fundamental parameters makes HST observations critical for the success of SHIELD II. Additional science goals include an accurate census of the dark matter contents of these galaxies, a spatial and temporal study of star formation within them, and a characterization of the fundamental parameters that change as galaxy masses range from "mini-halo" to star-forming dwarf.

  10. Shielding effectiveness of superconductive particles in plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pienkowski, T.; Kincaid, J.; Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.; Shi, D.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-09-01

    The ability to cool superconductors with liquid nitrogen instead of liquid helium has opened the door to a wide range of research. The well known Meissner effect, which states superconductors are perfectly diamagnetic, suggests shielding applications. One of the drawbacks to the new ceramic superconductors is the brittleness of the finished material. Because of this drawback, any application which required flexibility (e.g., wire and cable) would be impractical. Therefore, this paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation into the shielding effectiveness of YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-x/ both as a composite and as a monolithic material. Shielding effectiveness was measured using two separate test methods. One tested the magnetic (near field) shielding, and the other tested the electromagnetic (far field) shielding. No shielding was seen in the near field measurements on the composite samples, and only one heavily loaded sample showed some shielding in the far field. The monolithic samples showed a large amount of magnetic shielding. 5 refs., 5 figs

  11. Infrared shield facilitates optical pyrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Illg, W.

    1965-01-01

    Water-cooled shield facilitates optical pyrometer high temperature measurements of small sheet metal specimens subjected to tensile stress in fatigue tests. The shield excludes direct or reflected radiation from one face of the specimen and permits viewing of the infrared radiation only.

  12. A Monte Carlo study for the shielding of γ backgrounds induced by radionuclides for CDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lei; Tang Changjian; Yue Qian; Cheng Jianping; Kang Kejun; Li Jianmin; Li Jin; Li Yulan; Li Yuanjing; Ma Hao; Xue Tao; Zeng Zhi; Wong, H.T.

    2011-01-01

    The CDEX (China Dark matter EXperiment) Collaboration will carry out a direct search for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) using an Ultra-Low Energy Threshold High Purity Germanium (ULE-HPGe) detector at the CJPL (China JinPing deep underground Laboratory). A complex shielding system was designed to reduce backgrounds and a detailed GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation was performed to study the achievable reduction of γ rays induced by radionuclides and neutron backgrounds by D(γ,n)p reaction. Furthermore, the upper level of allowed radio purity of shielding materials was estimated under the constraint of the expected goal. Compared with the radio purity reported by other low-background rare-event experiments, it indicates that the shielding used in the CDEX can be made out of materials with obtainable radiopurity. (authors)

  13. Deep Habits

    OpenAIRE

    Morten O. Ravn; Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe

    2004-01-01

    This paper generalizes the standard habit formation model to an environment in which agents form habits over individual varieties of goods as opposed to over a composite consumption good. We refer to this preference specification as ‘deep habit formation’. Under deep habits, the demand function faced by individual producers depends on past sales. This feature is typically assumed ad-hoc in customer market and brand switching cost models. A central result of the paper is that deep habits giv...

  14. PC based temporary shielding administrative procedure (TSAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.E.; Pederson, G.E. [Sargent & Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States); Hamby, P.N. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A completely new Administrative Procedure for temporary shielding was developed for use at Commonwealth Edison`s six nuclear stations. This procedure promotes the use of shielding, and addresses industry requirements for the use and control of temporary shielding. The importance of an effective procedure has increased since more temporary shielding is being used as ALARA goals become more ambitious. To help implement the administrative procedure, a personal computer software program was written to incorporate the procedural requirements. This software incorporates the useability of a Windows graphical user interface with extensive help and database features. This combination of a comprehensive administrative procedure and user friendly software promotes the effective use and management of temporary shielding while ensuring that industry requirements are met.

  15. Technology development for radiation shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jung Woo; Lee, Jae Kee; Kim, Jong Kyung

    1986-12-01

    Radiation shielding analysis in nuclear engineering fields is an important technology which is needed for the calculation of reactor shielding as well as radiation related safety problems in nuclear facilities. Moreover, the design technology required in high level radioactive waste management and disposal facilities is faced on serious problems with rapidly glowing nuclear industry development, and more advanced technology has to be developed for tomorrow. The main purpose of this study is therefore to build up the self supporting ability of technology development for the radiation shielding analysis in order to achieve successive development of nuclear industry. It is concluded that basic shielding calculations are possible to handle and analyze by using our current technology, but more advanced technology is still needed and has to be learned for the degree of accuracy in two-dimensional shielding calculation. (Author)

  16. GFR Sub-Assembly Shielding Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. R. Parry

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the methodology and results for a preliminary study for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) subassembly fast neutron shielding configurations. The purpose of the shielding in the subassembly is to protect reactor components from fast (E>0.1 MeV) neutrons. The subassembly is modeled in MCNP version 5 release 1.30. Parametric studies were performed varying the thickness of the shielding and calculating the fast neutron flux at the vessel head and the core grid plate. This data was used to determine the minimum thickness needed to protect the vessel head and the core grid plate. These thicknesses were used to analyze different shielding configurations incorporating coolant passages and also to estimate the neutron and photon energy deposition in the shielding material.

  17. PC based temporary shielding administrative procedure (TSAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.E.; Pederson, G.E.; Hamby, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    A completely new Administrative Procedure for temporary shielding was developed for use at Commonwealth Edison's six nuclear stations. This procedure promotes the use of shielding, and addresses industry requirements for the use and control of temporary shielding. The importance of an effective procedure has increased since more temporary shielding is being used as ALARA goals become more ambitious. To help implement the administrative procedure, a personal computer software program was written to incorporate the procedural requirements. This software incorporates the useability of a Windows graphical user interface with extensive help and database features. This combination of a comprehensive administrative procedure and user friendly software promotes the effective use and management of temporary shielding while ensuring that industry requirements are met

  18. Practical radiation shielding for biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.C.; Reginatto, M.; Party, E.; Gershey, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on calculations which exist for estimating shielding required for radioactivity; however, they are often not applicable for the radionuclides and activities common in biomedical research. A variety of commercially available Lucite shields are being marketed to the biomedical community. Their advertisements may lead laboratory workers to expect better radiation protection than these shields can provide or to assume erroneously that very weak beta emitters require extensive shielding. The authors have conducted a series of shielding experiments designed to simulate exposures from the amounts of 32 P, 51 Cr and 125 I typically used in biomedical laboratories. For most routine work, ≥0.64 cm of Lucite covered with various thicknesses of lead will reduce whole-body occupational exposure rates of < 1mR/hr at the point of contact

  19. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  20. Neutron shielding heat insulation material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Susumu; Asaumi, Hiroshi; Take, Shigeo; Miyakoshi, Jun-ichi; Takemoto, Hiroshi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve decceleration and absorption of neutrons by incorporating neutron moderators and neutron absorbers in asbestos to thereby increase hydrogen concentration. Constitution: A mixture consisting of crysotile asbestos, surface active agent and water is well stirred and compounded to open the crysotile asbestos filaments and prepare a high viscosity slurry. After adding hydroxides such as magnesium hydroxide, hydrated salts such as magnesium borate hydrate or water containing minerals such as alumina cement hydrate, or boron compound to the slurry, the slurry is charged in a predetermined die, and dried and compressed to prepare shielding heat insulation products. The crysotile asbestos has 18 - 15 wt.% of water of crystallinity in the structure and contains a considerably high hydrogen concentration that acts as neutron moderators. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Early and Middle Jurassic mires of Bornholm and the Fennoscandian Border Zone: a comparison of depositional environments and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppelhus, Eva B.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Suitable climatic conditions for peat formation existed during Early–Middle Jurassic times in the Fennoscandian Border Zone. Autochthonous peat and allochthonous organic matter were depositedfrom north Jylland, south-east through the Kattegat and Øresund area, to Skåne and Bornholm. The increase in coal seam abundance and thickness from north Jylland to Bornholm indicates that the most favourable peat-forming conditions were present towards the south-east. Peat formation and deposition of organic-rich muds in the Early Jurassic coastal mires were mainly controlled by a continuous rise of relative sea level governed by subsidence and an overall eustatic rise. Watertable rise repeatedly outpaced the rate of accumulation of organic matter and terminated peat formationby lacustrine or lagoonal flooding. Organic matter accumulated in open-water mires and in continuously waterlogged, anoxic and periodically marine-influenced mires. The latter conditionsresulted in huminite-rich coals containing framboidal pyrite. The investigated Lower Jurassic seams correspond to peat and peaty mud deposits that ranged from 0.5–5.7 m in thickness, but were generallyless than 3 m thick. It is estimated that on Bornholm, the mires existed on average for c. 1200 years in the Hettangian–Sinemurian and for c. 2300 years in the Late Pliensbachian; the Early Jurassic(Hettangian–Sinemurian mires in the Øresund area existed for c. 1850 years. Aalenian uplift of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High and major parts of the Danish Basin caused a significant change in the basinconfiguration and much reduced subsidence in the Fennoscandian Border Zone during the Middle Jurassic. This resulted in a more inland position for the Middle Jurassic mires which on occasionenabled peat accumulation to keep pace with, or temporarily outpace, watertable rise. Thus, peat formation was sometimes sustained for relatively long periods, and the mires may have existed for up to 7000 years in the

  2. The use of nipple shields: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Chow

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A nipple shield is a breastfeeding aid with a nipple-shaped shield that is positioned over the nipple and areola prior to nursing. Nipple shields are usually recommended to mothers with flat nipples or in cases in which there is a failure of the baby to effectively latch onto the breast within the first two days postpartum. The use of nipple shields is a controversial topic in the field of lactation. Its use has been an issue in the clinical literature since some older studies discovered reduced breast milk transfer when using nipple shields, while more recent studies reported successful breastfeeding outcomes. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence and outcomes with nipple shield use. Methods: A literature search was conducted in Ovid MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE, EMBASE Classic, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and CINAHL. The primary endpoint was any breastfeeding outcome following nipple shield use. Secondary endpoints included the reasons for nipple shield use and the average/median length of use. For the analysis, we examined the effect of nipple shield use on physiological responses, premature infants, mothers’ experiences, and health professionals’ experiences. Results: The literature search yielded 261 articles, 14 of which were included in this review. Of these 14 articles, three reported on physiological responses, two reported on premature infants, eight reported on mothers’ experiences, and one reported on health professionals’ experiences. Conclusion: Through examining the use of nipple shields, further insight is provided on the advantages and disadvantages of this practice, thus allowing clinicians and researchers to address improvements on areas that will benefit mothers and infants the most.

  3. The taxonomy, life cycle and pathology of Sarcoptes scabiei and Notoedres cati (Acarina, Sarcoptidae: A review in a Fennoscandian wildlife perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Kraabøl

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mites constitute an old cosmopolitan group, abundant in various terrestrial and aquatic habitats of considerable environmental variations. The majority of mites are free-living, whereas some have evolved parasitic relationships with a variety of animals either as endo- or ectoparasites. The ectoparasitic and skin burrowing Sarcoptes scabiei and Notoedres cati, cause sarcoptic and notoedric mange among a variety of mammalian species, including humans. In a non-adequate host these mites lead to pseudo-scabies which is often self-curable. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of recent knowledge on the taxonomy, life cycles and pathology of these two mites, which are of relevance to Fennoscandian wildlife, by considering knowledge on transmission vectors, host immunology, and some documented outbreaks. These mites affect the health and survival of mammals in four ways; 1 skin tissue damages, 2 loss of body fluids, 3 allergic reactions and 4 secondary bacterial infections. A short-term effect of outbreaks is usually high mortality, and long-term effects vary from extinction to biased population structure to no effect at all. Red foxes are generalist predators that are important end-hosts for mites that develop disease depending on their immunity status, and transmit mites to other hosts. Outbreaks of mange may possibly have ecological consequences on a wider scale. In an endangered species, like the arctic fox or Eurasian lynx, loss of only a few individuals can be critical. It might be wise for management authorities to develop emergency plans to minimize consequences of outbreaks of sarcoptic or notoedric mange in threatened species such as the arctic fox and the lynx.

  4. Global W`o'rming and Darwin Revisited: Quantifying Soil Mixing Rates by Non-native Earthworms in Fennoscandian Boreal and Arctic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackett, A. A.; Yoo, K.; Cameron, E. K.; Olid, C.; Klaminder, J.

    2017-12-01

    Fennoscandian boreal and arctic ecosystems represent some of the most pristine environments in Europe and store sizeable quantities of soil carbon. Both ecosystems may have evolved without native earthworms since the last glaciation, but are now increasingly subject to arrivals of novel geoengineering earthworm species due to human activities. As a result, invaded areas are devoid of the typical thick organic horizon present in earthworm free forest soils and instead contain carbon-rich mineral (A-horizon) soils at the surface. How rapidly this transition occurs and how it affects the fate of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools is not well known. In this study, we quantify the rates at which earthworm-mediated mixing of forest soils proceeds in these formerly glaciated landscapes. We infer soil mass fluxes using the vertical distribution of 210Pb in soils from Fennoscandia (N=4) and North America (N=1) and quantify annual mixing velocities as well as vertical fluxes of organic and mineral matter throughout the upper soil profiles. Across the sites, mixing velocities generally increase with increasing earthworm biomass and functional group diversity, and our annual mixing rates closely align with those predicted by Darwin for earthworm-engineered ecosystems in the UK 130 years earlier. Reduction of the O-horizon is concomitant with a decrease in surface SOC contents. However, we observe minimal changes to SOC inventories with earthworm invasion across the sites, reflecting the upward translocation of mineral soil and accompanying increase in soil bulk densities. Thus, the reduction or depletion of organic horizon by exotic earthworms does not necessarily involve loss of SOC via earthworm-accelerated decomposition, but is rather compensated for by physical mixing of organic matter and minerals, which may facilitate stabilizing organo-mineral interactions. This work constitutes an important step to elucidate how non-native earthworms impact SOC inventories and potentially

  5. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase I program, a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite will be developed and fabricated. This structural radiation shielding will...

  6. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  7. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  8. Isotope age of the rare metal pegmatite formation in the Kolmozero-Voron'ya greenstone belt (Kola region of the Fennoscandian shield): U-Pb (TIMS) microlite and tourmaline dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, Nikolay; Lyalina, Ludmila; Mokrushin, Artem; Zozulya, Dmitry; Groshev, Nikolay; Steshenko, Ekaterina; Kunakkuzin, Evgeniy

    2016-04-01

    The Kolmozero-Voron'ya greenstone belt is located in the central suture zone, which separates the Murmansk block from the Central-Kola and the Keivy blocks. The belt is represented by volcano-sedimentary rocks of Archaean age of 2.9-2.5 Ga. Rare metal pegmatites (Li, Cs with accessory Nb, Ta, and Be) occur among amphibolite and gabbroid intrusions in the northwestern and southeastern parts of the belt. According to the Rb-Sr data, the age of pegmatites was considered to be 2.7 Ga. Until recently there was no generally accepted point of view on the origin of pegmatites. Now we have isotopic data for a range of rock complexes that could pretend to be parental granites for the rare metal pegmatites. These are granodiorites with the zircon age of 2733±Ma, and microcline and tourmaline granites, which Pb-Pb isochronal age on tourmaline from the tourmaline granite located near the deposit is estimated to be 2520±70 Ma. The pegmatite field of the Vasin Myl'k deposit with the lepidolite--albite--microcline--spodumene--pollucite association is located among amphibolites in the northwestern part of the belt. The deposit is represented by subparallel low-angle zoned veins up to 220 m long and 5 m thick dipping in the southeastern direction at an angle of 10° too 30°. The minerals of the columbite--tonalite group from Vasin Myl'k deposit include microlite, simpsonite, and torolite, and are the oldest among different minerals represented by several generations in pegmatites under consideration. Zircons from the pegmatites are mostly represented by crystals with the structure affected by the action of fluids that put certain restrictions on its use as a geochronometer of the crystallization process. Microlite from the pegmatite taken from the dump of a prospecting drill hole was used for U--Pb (TIMS). The mineral is represented by 0.5--1.0 mm long euhedral octahedral crystals. It is brown in color, and transparent. The microlite crystals were preliminarily cleaned from surface contamination being placed the ultrasonic bath with the 7N HNO3 solution. The discordia constructed for seven measured microlite weights is characterized by upper intercepts with concordia at 2454±8 Ma, which probably reflects the time of rare metal pegmatite crystallization, coeval with the age of tourmaline granites. Taking into consideration the obtained U--Pb age of microlite, it may be assumed that the tourmaline granites dated back to 2520±70 Ma served as the most probable parental rocks for rare metal pegmatites of the Vasin-Myl'k deposit. The work is supported by RFBR No 16-05-00367, No 16-05-00427 and project No 0231-2015-0005

  9. Development of neutron shielding material for cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najima, K.; Ohta, H.; Ishihara, N.; Matsuoka, T.; Kuri, S.; Ohsono, K.; Hode, S.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd (MHI) has established transport and storage cask design 'MSF series' which makes higher payload and reliability for long term storage. MSF series transport and storage cask uses new-developed neutron shielding material. This neutron shielding material has been developed for improving durability under high condition for long term. Since epoxy resin contains a lot of hydrogen and is comparatively resistant to heat, many casks employ epoxy base neutron shielding material. However, if the epoxy base neutron shielding material is used under high temperature condition for a long time, the material deteriorates and the moisture contained in it is released. The loss of moisture is in the range of several percents under more than 150 C. For this reason, our purpose was to develop a high durability epoxy base neutron shielding material which has the same self-fire-extinction property, high hydrogen content and so on as conventional. According to the long-time heating test, the weight loss of this new neutron shielding material after 5000 hours heating has been lower than 0.04% at 150 C and 0.35% at 170 C. A thermal test was also performed: a specimen of neutron shielding material covered with stainless steel was inserted in a furnace under condition of 800 C temperature for 30 minutes then was left to cool down in ambient conditions. The external view of the test piece shows that only a thin layer was carbonized

  10. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800 degree C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280 degree F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found

  11. Shielding concerns at a spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Robinson, H.; Legate, G.L.; Woods, R.

    1989-01-01

    Neutrons produced by 800-MeV proton reactions at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center spallation neutron source cause a variety of challenging shielding problems. We identify several characteristics distinctly different from reactor shielding and compute the dose attenuation through an infinite slab/shield composed of iron (100 cm) and borated polyethylene (15 cm). Our calculations show that (for an incident spallation spectrum characteristic of neutrons leaking from a tungsten target at 90/degree/) the dose through the shield is a complex mixture of neutrons and gamma rays. High-energy (> 20 MeV) neutron production from the target is ≅5% of the total, yet causes ≅68% of the dose at the shield surface. Primary low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutrons from the target contribute negligibly (≅0.5%) to the dose at the shield surface yet cause gamma rays, which contribute ≅31% to the total dose at the shield surface. Low-energy neutrons from spallation reactions behave similarly to neutrons with a fission spectrum distribution. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. Development of simplified methods and data bases for radiation shielding calculations for concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Roussin, R.W.; Lucius, J.L.; Marable, J.H.; Bartine, D.A.

    1986-06-01

    Two simplified methods have been developed which allow rapid and accurate calculations of the attenuation of neutrons and gamma rays through concrete shields. One method, called the BEST method, uses sensitivity coefficients to predict changes in the transmitted dose from a fission source that are due to changes in the composition of the shield. The other method uses transmission factors based on adjoint calculations to predict the transmitted dose from an arbitrary source incident on a given shield. The BEST method, utilizing an exponential molecule that is shown to be a significant improvement over the traditional linear model, has been successfully applied to slab shields of standard concrete and rebar concrete. It has also been tested for a special concrete that has been used in many shielding experiments at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility, as well as for a deep-penetration sodium problem. A comprehensive data base of concrete sensitivity coefficients generated as part of this study is available for use in the BEST model. For problems in which the changes are energy independent, application of the model and data base can be accomplished with a desk calculator. Larger-scale calculations required for problems that are energy dependent are facilitated by employing a simple computer code, which is included, together with the data base and other calculational aids, in a data package that can be obtained from the ORNL Radiation Shielding Information Center (request DLC-102/CONSENT). The transmission factors used by the second method are a byproduct of the sensitivity calculations and are mathematically equivalent to the surface adjoint function phi*, which gives the dose equivalent transmitted through a slab of thickness T due to one particle incident on the surface in the gth energy group and jth direction. 18 refs., 1 fig., 50 tabs.

  13. PWR upper/lower internals shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homyk, W.A. [Indian Point Station, Buchanan, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    During refueling of a nuclear power plant, the reactor upper internals must be removed from the reactor vessel to permit transfer of the fuel. The upper internals are stored in the flooded reactor cavity. Refueling personnel working in containment at a number of nuclear stations typically receive radiation exposure from a portion of the highly contaminated upper intervals package which extends above the normal water level of the refueling pool. This same issue exists with reactor lower internals withdrawn for inservice inspection activities. One solution to this problem is to provide adequate shielding of the unimmersed portion. The use of lead sheets or blankets for shielding of the protruding components would be time consuming and require more effort for installation since the shielding mass would need to be transported to a support structure over the refueling pool. A preferable approach is to use the existing shielding mass of the refueling pool water. A method of shielding was devised which would use a vacuum pump to draw refueling pool water into an inverted canister suspended over the upper internals to provide shielding from the normally exposed components. During the Spring 1993 refueling of Indian Point 2 (IP2), a prototype shield device was demonstrated. This shield consists of a cylindrical tank open at the bottom that is suspended over the refueling pool with I-beams. The lower lip of the tank is two feet below normal pool level. After installation, the air width of the natural shielding provided by the existing pool water. This paper describes the design, development, testing and demonstration of the prototype device.

  14. Seismic proof test of shielding block walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohte, Yukio; Watanabe, Takahide; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Kazuhide

    1989-01-01

    Most of the shielding block walls used for building nuclear facilities are built by dry process. When a nuclear facility is designed, seismic waves specific at each site are set as input seismic motions and they are adopted in the design. Therefore, it is necessary to assure safety of the shielding block walls for earthquake by performing anti-seismic experiments under the conditions at each site. In order to establish the normal form that can be applied to various seismic conditions in various areas, Shimizu Corp. made an actual-size test samples for the shielding block wall and confirmed the safety for earthquake and validity of normalization. (author)

  15. Comparison of MCNP5 and experimental results on neutron shielding effects for materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D. A. (Daniel A.); Mosteller, R. D. (Russell D.); Sweezy, J. E. (Jeremy E.)

    2004-01-01

    The MCNP Radiation-Shielding Validation Suite was created to assess the impact on dose rates and attenuation factors of future improvements in the MCNP Monte Carlo code or its nuclear data libraries. However, it does not currently contain any deep-penetration cases. For this reason, a set of deep-penetration benchmarks has been investigated for possible inclusion in the Suite. Overall, the MCNP5 results match the measured values quite well. Furthermore, with the exception of Resin-F, there is no systematic trend in the ratio of calculated to measured results.

  16. REPOSITORY RADIATION SHIELDING DESIGN GUIDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Haas; E.M. Fortsch

    1997-01-01

    The scope of this document includes radiation safety considerations used in the design of facilities for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of the Repository Radiation Shielding Design Guide is to document the approach used in the radiological design of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) surface and subsurface facilities for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This document is intended to ensure that a common methodology is used by all groups that may be involved with Radiological Design. This document will also assist in ensuring the long term survivability of the information basis used for radiological safety design and will assist in satisfying the documentation requirements of the licensing body, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This design guide provides referenceable information that is current and maintained under the YMP Quality Assurance (QA) Program. Furthermore, this approach is consistent with maintaining continuity in spite of a changing design environment. This approach also serves to ensure common inter-disciplinary interpretation and application of data

  17. REPOSITORY RADIATION SHIELDING DESIGN GUIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Haas; E.M. Fortsch

    1997-09-12

    The scope of this document includes radiation safety considerations used in the design of facilities for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of the Repository Radiation Shielding Design Guide is to document the approach used in the radiological design of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) surface and subsurface facilities for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This document is intended to ensure that a common methodology is used by all groups that may be involved with Radiological Design. This document will also assist in ensuring the long term survivability of the information basis used for radiological safety design and will assist in satisfying the documentation requirements of the licensing body, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This design guide provides referenceable information that is current and maintained under the YMP Quality Assurance (QA) Program. Furthermore, this approach is consistent with maintaining continuity in spite of a changing design environment. This approach also serves to ensure common inter-disciplinary interpretation and application of data.

  18. Shielding Calculations for PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) Fuel Transfer Cask with Micro shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurhayati Ramli; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Ariff Shah Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The shielding calculations for RTP fuel transfer cask was performed by using computer code Micro shield 7.02. Micro shield is a computer code designed to provide a model to be used for shielding calculations. The results of the calculations can be obtained fast but the code is not suitable for complex geometries with a shielding composed of more than one material. Nevertheless, the program is sufficient for As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) optimization calculations. In this calculation, a geometry based on the conceptual design of RTP fuel transfer cask was modeled. Shielding material used in the calculations were lead (Pb) and stainless steel 304 (SS304). The results obtained from these calculations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  19. Shielding properties of fibre cement wallboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, D L; Godwin, G A; Coakley, K S

    1998-09-01

    Transmission data for a fibre cement wallboard (villaboard) are determined for use in diagnostic shielding designs. Villaboard is found to be more attenuating than plasterboard e.g. 9 mm of villaboard is equivalent to 16 mm of plasterboard.

  20. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  1. Multifunctional BHL Radiation Shield, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in radiation shielding technology remain an important challenge for NASA in order to protect their astronauts, particularly as NASA grows closer to manned...

  2. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  3. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed fiber reinforced ceramic composites for radiation shielding that can be used for external walls in long duration manned...

  4. Radiation shielding method for pipes, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Shuichi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To constitute shielding walls of a dense structure around pipes and enable to reduce the wall thickness thereof upon periodical inspection, etc. for nuclear power plants. Constitution: For those portions of pipes requring shieldings, cylindrical vessels surrounding the portions are disposed and connected to a mercury supply system, a mercury discharge system and a freezing system for solidifying mercury. After charging mercury in a tank by way of a supply hose to the cylindrical vessels, the temperature of the mercury is lowered below the freezing point thereof to solidify the mercury while circulating cooling medium, to thereby form dense cylindrical radioactive-ray shielding walls. The specific gravity of mercury is greater than that of lead and, accordingly, the thickness of the shielding walls can be reduced as compared with the conventional wall thickness of the entire laminates. (Takahashi, M.)

  5. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed a ceramic composite material system that is more effective for shielding both GCR and SPE than aluminum. The composite...

  6. Shielding design for better plant availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, G.G.

    1975-01-01

    Design methods are described for providing a shield system for nuclear power plants that will facilitate maintenance and inspection, increase overall plant availability, and ensure that man-rem exposures are as low as practicable

  7. Radiation shielding structure for concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Crack inducing members for inducing cracks in a predetermined manner are buried in a concrete structure. Namely, a crack-inducing member comprises integrally a shielding plate and extended plates situated at the center of a wall and inducing plates vertically disposed to the boundary portion between them with the inducing plates being disposed each in a direction perforating the wall. There are disposed integrally a pair of the inducing plate spaced at a predetermined horizontal distance on both sides of the shielding plate so as to form a substantially crank-shaped cross section and extended plates formed in the extending direction of the shielding plate, and the inducing plates are disposed each in a direction perforating the wall. Then, cracks generated when stresses are exerted can be controlled, and generation of cracks passing through the concrete structure can be prevented reliably. The reliability of a radiation shielding effect can be enhanced remarkably. (N.H.)

  8. Technical specifications for the bulk shielding reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This report provides information concerning the technical specifications for the Bulk Shielding Reactor. Areas covered include: safety limits and limiting safety settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; administrative controls; and monitoring of airborne effluents. 10 refs

  9. Passive Shielding for Low Frequency Magnetic Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damaskos, Nickander

    1997-01-01

    Report developed under SBIR Contract. An approach to low frequency shielding is shown with application to suppression of electromagnetic fields emanating from rail gun barrels and power cable busses. Damaskos, Inc...

  10. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber epoxy composite hybridized with Gadolinium and Boron nanoparticles for radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Venkat; Prasad, Narasimha S.; Kelkar, Ajit

    2016-09-01

    Deep space radiations pose a major threat to the astronauts and their spacecraft during long duration space exploration missions. The two sources of radiation that are of concern are the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and the short lived secondary neutron radiations that are generated as a result of fragmentation that occurs when GCR strikes target nuclei in a spacecraft. Energy loss, during the interaction of GCR and the shielding material, increases with the charge to mass ratio of the shielding material. Hydrogen with no neutron in its nucleus has the highest charge to mass ratio and is the element which is the most effective shield against GCR. Some of the polymers because of their higher hydrogen content also serve as radiation shield materials. Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers, apart from possessing radiation shielding properties by the virtue of the high hydrogen content, are known for extraordinary properties. An effective radiation shielding material is the one that will offer protection from GCR and impede the secondary neutron radiations resulting from the fragmentation process. Neutrons, which result from fragmentation, do not respond to the Coulombic interaction that shield against GCR. To prevent the deleterious effects of secondary neutrons, targets such as Gadolinium are required. In this paper, the radiation shielding studies that were carried out on the fabricated sandwich panels by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process are presented. VARTM is a manufacturing process used for making large composite structures by infusing resin into base materials formed with woven fabric or fiber using vacuum pressure. Using the VARTM process, the hybridization of Epoxy/UHMWPE composites with Gadolinium nanoparticles, Boron, and Boron carbide nanoparticles in the form of sandwich panels were successfully carried out. The preliminary results from neutron radiation tests show that greater than 99% shielding performance was

  11. Method to produce a neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    The neutron shielding for armoured vehicles consists of preshaped plastic plates which are coated on the armoured vehicle walls by conversion of the thermoplast. Suitable plastics or thermoplasts are PVC, PVC acetate, or mixtures of these, into which more than 50% B, B 4 C, or BN is embedded. The colour of the shielding may be determined by the choice of the neutron absorber, e.g. a white colour for BN. The plates are produced using an extruder or calender. (DG) [de

  12. Shield structure for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shield structure is described for use where there are significant amounts of fast neutron flux above an energy level of approximately 70 keV. The shield includes structural supports and neutron moderator and absorber systems. A portion at least of the neutron moderator material is magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron. (U.K.)

  13. ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizul Khakim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI. Bulk shielding merupakan fasilitas yang terintegrasi dengan reaktor Kartini yang berfungsi sebagai penyimpanan sementara bahan bakar bekas. Fasilitas ini merupakan fasilitas yang termasuk dalam struktur, sistem dan komponen (SSK yang penting bagi keselamatan. Salah satu fungsi keselamatan dari sistem penanganan dan penyimpanan bahan bakar adalah mencegah kecelakaan kekritisan yang tak terkendali dan membatasi naiknya temperatur bahan bakar. Analisis keselamatan paling kurang harus mencakup analisis keselamatan dari sisi neutronik dan termo hidrolik Bulk shielding. Analisis termo hidrolik ditujukan untuk memastikan perpindahan panas dan proses pendinginan bahan bakar bekas berjalan baik dan tidak terjadi akumulasi panas yang mengancam integritas bahan bakar. Code tervalidasi PARET/ANL digunakan untuk analisis pendinginan dengan mode konveksi alam. Hasil perhitungan menunjukkan bahwa mode pendinginan konvekasi alam cukup memadai dalam mendinginkan panas sisa tanpa mengakibatkan kenaikan temperatur bahan bakar yang signifikan. Kata kunci: Bulk shielding, bahan bakar bekas, konveksi alam, PARET.   ABSTRACT THERMAL HYDRAULIC SAFETY ANALYSIS OF BULK SHIELDING KARTINI REACTOR. Bulk shielding is an integrated facility to Kartini reactor which is used for temporary spent fuels storage. The facility is one of the structures, systems and components (SSCs important to safety. Among the safety functions of fuel handling and storage are to prevent any uncontrolable criticality accidents and to limit the fuel temperature increase. Safety analyses should, at least, cover neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations of the bulk shielding. Thermal hydraulic analyses were intended to ensure that heat removal and the process of the spent fuels cooling takes place adequately and no heat accumulation that challenges the fuel integrity. Validated code, PARET/ANL was used for analysing the

  14. Radiation shielding of the main injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.M.; Martin, P.S.

    1995-05-01

    The radiation shielding in the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) complex has been carried out by adopting a number of prescribed stringent guidelines established by a previous safety analysis. Determination of the required amount of radiation shielding at various locations of the FMI has been done using Monte Carlo computations. A three dimensional ray tracing code as well as a code based upon empirical observations have been employed in certain cases

  15. The Absolute Shielding Constants of Heavy Nuclei: Resolving the Enigma of the (119)Sn Absolute Shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Elena; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2013-02-07

    We demonstrate that the apparent disagreement between experimental determinations and four-component relativistic calculations of the absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei is due to the breakdown of the commonly assumed relation between the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the NMR shielding constants. We demonstrate that this breakdown has significant consequences for the absolute shielding constant of (119)Sn, leading to errors of about 1000 ppm. As a consequence, we expect that many absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei will be in need of revision.

  16. Reactor shielding. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Reactor shielding is necessary that people may work and live in the vicinity of reactors without receiving detrimental biological effects and that the necessary materials and instrumentation for reactor operation may function properly. Much of the necessary theoretical work and experimental measurement has been accomplished in recent years. Scientists have developed some very sophisticated methods which have contributed to a more thorough understanding of the problems involved and have produced some very reliable results leading to significant reductions in shield configurations. A panel of experts was convened from 9 to 13 March 1964 in Vienna at the Headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency to discuss the present status of reactor shielding. The participants were prominent shielding experts from most of the laboratories engaged in this field throughout the world. They presented status reports describing the past history and plans for further development of reactor shielding in their countries and much valuable discussion took place on some of the most relevant aspects of reactor shielding. All this material is presented in this report, together with abstracts of the supporting papers read to the Panel

  17. Shielding requirements for particle bed propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruneisen, S. J.

    1991-06-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems present unique challenges in reliability and safety. Due to the radiation incident upon all components of the propulsion system, shielding must be used to keep nuclear heating in the materials within limits; in addition, electronic control systems must be protected. This report analyzes the nuclear heating due to the radiation and the shielding required to meet the established criteria while also minimizing the shield mass. Heating rates were determined in a 2000 MWt Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) system for all materials in the interstage region, between the reactor vessel and the propellant tank, with special emphasis on meeting the silicon dose criteria. Using a Lithium Hydride/Tungsten shield, the optimum shield design was found to be: 50 cm LiH/2 cm W on the axial reflector in the reactor vessel and 50 cm LiH/2 cm W in a collar extension of the inside shield outside of the pressure vessel. Within these parameters, the radiation doses in all of the components in the interstage and lower tank regions would be within acceptable limits for mission requirements.

  18. Innovative technologies for Faraday shield cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, J.H.; Lindemuth, J.E.; North, M.T.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative advanced technologies are being evaluated for use in cooling the Faraday shields used for protection of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICR) antennae in Tokamaks. Two approaches currently under evaluation include heat pipe cooling and gas cooling. A Monel/water heat pipe cooled Faraday shield has been successfully demonstrated. Heat pipe cooling offers the advantage of reducing the amount of water discharged into the Tokamak in the event of a tube weld failure. The device was recently tested on an antenna at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The heat pipe design uses inclined water heat pipes with warm water condensers located outside of the plasma chamber. This approach can passively remove absorbed heat fluxes in excess of 200 W/cm 2 ;. Helium-cooled Faraday shields are also being evaluated. This approach offers the advantage of no liquid discharge into the Tokamak in the event of a tube failure. Innovative internal cooling structures based on porous metal cooling are being used to develop a helium-cooled Faraday shield structure. This approach can dissipate the high heat fluxes typical of Faraday shield applications while minimizing the required helium blower power. Preliminary analysis shows that nominal helium flow and pressure drop can sufficiently cool a Faraday shield in typical applications. Plans are in progress to fabricate and test prototype hardware based on this approach

  19. Potential of Nanocellulose Composite for Electromagnetic Shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Yah Nurul Fatihah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, most people rely on the electronic devices for work, communicating with friends and family, school and personal enjoyment. As a result, more new equipment or devices operates in higher frequency were rapidly developed to accommodate the consumers need. However, the demand of using wireless technology and higher frequency in new devices also brings the need to shield the unwanted electromagnetic signals from those devices for both proper operation and human health concerns. This paper highlights the potential of nanocellulose for electromagnetic shielding using the organic environmental nanocellulose composite materials. In addition, the theory of electromagnetic shielding and recent development of green and organic material in electromagnetic shielding application has also been reviewed in this paper. The use of the natural fibers which is nanocelllose instead of traditional reinforcement materials provides several advantages including the natural fibers are renewable, abundant and low cost. Furthermore, added with other advantages such as lightweight and high electromagnetic shielding ability, nanocellulose has a great potential as an alternative material for electromagnetic shielding application.

  20. Deep Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Omer; Sadanandan, Sajith Kecheril; Wählby, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism in biomedical research, especially suitable for morphological screening due to its transparent body during early development. Deep learning has emerged as a dominant paradigm for data analysis and found a number of applications in computer vision and image analysis. Here we demonstrate the potential of a deep learning approach for accurate high-throughput classification of whole-body zebrafish deformations in multifish microwell plates. Deep learning uses the raw image data as an input, without the need of expert knowledge for feature design or optimization of the segmentation parameters. We trained the deep learning classifier on as few as 84 images (before data augmentation) and achieved a classification accuracy of 92.8% on an unseen test data set that is comparable to the previous state of the art (95%) based on user-specified segmentation and deformation metrics. Ablation studies by digitally removing whole fish or parts of the fish from the images revealed that the classifier learned discriminative features from the image foreground, and we observed that the deformations of the head region, rather than the visually apparent bent tail, were more important for good classification performance.

  1. Validity of the Aluminum Equivalent Approximation in Space Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Adams, Daniel O.; Wilson, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the aluminum equivalent shield approximation in space radiation analysis can be traced back to its roots in the early years of the NASA space programs (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo) wherein the primary radiobiological concern was the intense sources of ionizing radiation causing short term effects which was thought to jeopardize the safety of the crew and hence the mission. Herein, it is shown that the aluminum equivalent shield approximation, although reasonably well suited for that time period and to the application for which it was developed, is of questionable usefulness to the radiobiological concerns of routine space operations of the 21 st century which will include long stays onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and perhaps the moon. This is especially true for a risk based protection system, as appears imminent for deep space exploration where the long-term effects of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) exposure is of primary concern. The present analysis demonstrates that sufficiently large errors in the interior particle environment of a spacecraft result from the use of the aluminum equivalent approximation, and such approximations should be avoided in future astronaut risk estimates. In this study, the aluminum equivalent approximation is evaluated as a means for estimating the particle environment within a spacecraft structure induced by the GCR radiation field. For comparison, the two extremes of the GCR environment, the 1977 solar minimum and the 2001 solar maximum, are considered. These environments are coupled to the Langley Research Center (LaRC) deterministic ionized particle transport code High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN), which propagates the GCR spectra for elements with charges (Z) in the range I aluminum equivalent approximation for a good polymeric shield material such as genetic polyethylene (PE). The shield thickness is represented by a 25 g/cm spherical shell. Although one could imagine the progression to greater

  2. Numerical Models for the Study of Electromagnetic Shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA Monica

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents 2D and 3D models for the study of electromagnetic shielding of a coil. The magnetic fields are computed for defining the shielding effectiveness. Parametrized numerical studies were performed in order to established the influence of shield thickness and height on magnetic field in certain points located in the exterior of coil – shield setup and on induced power within the shield.

  3. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and

  4. Shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Heon Il

    2004-06-01

    In order to develop shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility, references and data for high energy neutron shielding are searched and collected, and calculations to obtain the characteristics of neutron shield materials are performed. For the evaluation of characteristics of neutron shield material, it is chosen not only general shield materials such as concrete, polyethylene, etc., but also KAERI developed neutron shields of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) mixed with boron compound (B 2 O 3 , H 2 BO 3 , Borax). Neutron attenuation coefficients for these materials are obtained for later use in shielding design. The effect of source shape and source angular distribution on the shielding characteristics for several shield materials is examined. This effect can contribute to create shielding concept in case of no detail source information. It is also evaluated the effect of the arrangement of shield materials using current shield materials. With these results, conceptual shielding design for PET cyclotron is performed. The shielding composite using HDPE and concrete is selected to meet the target dose rate outside the composite, and the dose evaluation is performed by configuring the facility room conceptually. From the result, the proper shield configuration for this PET cyclotron is proposed

  5. Shielding design for positron emission tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    With the recent advent of readily available tracer isotopes, there has been marked increase in the number of hospital-based and free-standing positron emission tomography (PET) clinics. PET facilities employ relatively large activities of high-energy photon emitting isotopes, which can be dangerous to the health of humans and animals. This coupled with the current dose limits for radiation worker and members of the public can result in shielding requirements. This research contributes to the calculation of the appropriate shielding to keep the level of radiation within an acceptable recommended limit. Two different methods were used including measurements made at selected points of an operating PET facility and computer simulations by using Monte Carlo Transport Code. The measurements mainly concerned the radiation exposure at different points around facility using the survey meter detectors and Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLD). Then the set of manual calculation procedures were used to estimate the shielding requirements for a newly built PEF facility. The results from the measurement and the computer simulation were compared to the results obtained from the set manual calculation procedure. In general, the estimated weekly dose at the points of interest is lower than the regulatory limits for the little company of Mary Hospital. Furthermore, the density and the HVL for normal strength concrete and clay bricks are almost similar. In conclusion, PET facilities present somewhat different design requirements and are more likely to require additional radiation shielding. Therefore, existing shields at the little Company of Mary Hospital are in general found to be adequate and satisfactory and additional shielding was found necessary at the new PET facility in the department of Nuclear Medicine of the Dr. George Mukhari Hospital. By use of appropriate design, by implying specific shielding requirements and by maintaining good operating practices, radiation doses to

  6. Application of ceramics for neutron shielding. Proposal of multi-functional shielding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senda, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Kazuyoshi; Ueki, Kohtaro; Ohashi, Atsuto [Ship Research Inst., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Amada, Shigeyasu [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Radiation shielding is one of the fundamental technologies to ensure the safety of the nuclear plants. Particularly for the nuclear systems as the power plants of ships and undersea vehicles, radiation shielding should be achieved within limited space and weight. Ceramics are of great interest as shielding components, because they can be composed with a wide variation of elements that have different shielding specifications. They are also known as good structural materials at high temperatures. Therefore, ceramics may be promising as 'multi-functional' shielding materials. In the present study, neutron shielding effects are first investigated by a series of the experiments using a {sup 252}Cf neutron source and simulated by using Monte Carlo Code MCNP 4A. The role of each ceramics is discussed particularly in terms of the 'enhancement effect' by medium-heavy elements, such as chromium and titanium. As an advanced technique to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of the materials, a laser irradiation method is proposed and applied to those ceramics that are expected to be neutron shielding components. Detailed discussion is made on the effects of porosity and multiple irradiation resulting in a fatigue-like behavior. Based on the results of these experiments and simulations, a three-layered arrangement, consisting of chromium carbide, titanium boride and boron nitride, is proposed as a multi-functional shielding material that minimizes the dose-equivalent rate and also exhibits good thermal shock resistance. (author)

  7. Deep geothermics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The hot-dry-rocks located at 3-4 km of depth correspond to low permeable rocks carrying a large amount of heat. The extraction of this heat usually requires artificial hydraulic fracturing of the rock to increase its permeability before water injection. Hot-dry-rocks geothermics or deep geothermics is not today a commercial channel but only a scientific and technological research field. The Soultz-sous-Forets site (Northern Alsace, France) is characterized by a 6 degrees per meter geothermal gradient and is used as a natural laboratory for deep geothermal and geological studies in the framework of a European research program. Two boreholes have been drilled up to 3600 m of depth in the highly-fractured granite massif beneath the site. The aim is to create a deep heat exchanger using only the natural fracturing for water transfer. A consortium of german, french and italian industrial companies (Pfalzwerke, Badenwerk, EdF and Enel) has been created for a more active participation to the pilot phase. (J.S.). 1 fig., 2 photos

  8. Comparison of eye shields in radiotherapeutic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, B.E.; Wellington Hospital, Wellington; Johnson, A.D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Both MeV electrons and kV photons are used in the treatment of superficial cancers. The advantages and disadvantages for each of these modalities have been widely reported in the literature (See for example [1-2]). Of particular note in the literature is the use of lead and tungsten eye shields to protect ocular structures during radiotherapy. An investigation addressing issues raised in the literature that are relevant to the Wellington Cancer Centre method of treatment of lesions near the eye shall be summarised. Various small sized fields were irradiated to determine depth dose and profile curves in a water phantom shielded by various commercially available eye shields. Transmission factors relevant to critical ocular structures and particle distribution theories are used to further elucidate the comparison between the use of MeV electrons and kV photons in the treatment of superficial cancers. Superficial X-rays from a Pantak Therapax unit SXT 150 model of HVL 4.90mm Al were used for the lead eye shield measurements and electrons from a Varian Clinac 2100C nominal energies 6MeV and 9MeV (R p 3.00cm and 4.34cm respectively) were used for the tungsten eye shield measurements. For the photon measurements circular applicators of 3cm, 4cm and 5cm diameter were used and for the electrons standard 6x6cm and 10x 10cm applicators were used, with no custom inserts. A Scanditronix RFA-300 water phantom and Scanditronix RFAplus version 5.3 software application were used to collect and collate all data. The eye shields were the Radiation Products Design Inc. medium lead eye shield (item 934-014) and the MED-TEC tungsten eye shields MT-T-45 M and MT-T-45 S. It is demonstrated that electron fields have appreciably greater scatter into the area directly under the eye shields than the photon fields. Similarly at the region of d max for the electron fields the relative dose is appreciably greater than the photon fields at similar depth. The relative merits for

  9. Radiation shielding fiber and its manufacturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Ono, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To manufacture radiation shielding fibers of excellent shielding effects. Method: Fibers containing more than 1 mmol/g of carboxyl groups are bonded with heavy metals, or they are impregnated with an aqueous solution containing water-soluble heavy metal salts dissolved therein. Fibers as the substrate may be any of forms such as short fibers, long fibers, fiber tows, webs, threads, knitting or woven products, non-woven fabrics, etc. It is however necessary that fibers contain more than 1 mmol/g, preferably, from 2 to 7 mmol/g of carboxylic groups. Since heavy metals having radiation shielding performance are bonded to the outer layer of the fibers and the inherent performance of the fibers per se is possessed, excellent radiation shielding performance can be obtained, as well as they can be applied with spinning, knitting or weaving, stitching, etc. thus can be used for secondary fiber products such as clothings, caps, masks, curtains, carpets, cloths, etc. for use in radiation shieldings. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. De

    2003-02-24

    One potential failure mechanism for titanium and its alloys under repository conditions is via the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. The resulting decreased ductility and fracture toughness may lead to brittle mechanical fracture called hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) or hydrogen embrittlement. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, HIC may be a problem since the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this scientific analysis and modeling activity is to evaluate whether the drip shield will fail by HIC or not under repository conditions within 10,000 years of emplacement. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) addresses features, events, and processes related to hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield. REV 00 of this AMR served as a feed to ''Waste Package Degradation Process Model Report'' and was developed in accordance with the activity section ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' of the development plan entitled ''Analysis and Model Reports to Support Waste Package PMR'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This AMR, prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Materials Data Analyses and Modeling'' (BSC 2002), is to feed the License Application.

  11. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  12. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  13. Shielding Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Gomez, Carlos F.; Scharber, Luke L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation shielding analysis and development for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) effort is currently in progress and preliminary results have enabled consideration for critical interfaces in the reactor and propulsion stage systems. Early analyses have highlighted a number of engineering constraints, challenges, and possible mitigating solutions. Performance constraints include permissible crew dose rates (shared with expected cosmic ray dose), radiation heating flux into cryogenic propellant, and material radiation damage in critical components. Design strategies in staging can serve to reduce radiation scatter and enhance the effectiveness of inherent shielding within the spacecraft while minimizing the required mass of shielding in the reactor system. Within the reactor system, shield design is further constrained by the need for active cooling with minimal radiation streaming through flow channels. Material selection and thermal design must maximize the reliability of the shield to survive the extreme environment through a long duration mission with multiple engine restarts. A discussion of these challenges and relevant design strategies are provided for the mitigation of radiation in nuclear thermal propulsion.

  14. Analysis of Shield Construction in Spherical Weathered Granite Development Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Quan; Li, Peigang; Gong, Shuhua

    2018-01-01

    The distribution of spherical weathered bodies (commonly known as "boulder") in the granite development area directly affects the shield construction of urban rail transit engineering. This paper is based on the case of shield construction of granite globular development area in Southern China area, the parameter control in shield machine selection and shield advancing during the shield tunneling in this special geological environment is analyzed. And it is suggested that shield machine should be selected for shield construction of granite spherical weathered zone. Driving speed, cutter torque, shield machine thrust, the amount of penetration and the speed of the cutter head of shield machine should be controlled when driving the boulder formation, in order to achieve smooth excavation and reduce the disturbance to the formation.

  15. Evaluation of a permanent reactor vessel head shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.S.; Johnson, T.G.; Tipswork, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that Virginia Power recently completed installing permanent reactor vessel head shields at all four of its nuclear units-Surry 1 and 2 (781-MWe Westinghouse PWRs) and North Anna 1 and 2 (893-MWe Westinghouse PWRs). Permanent shields were chosen over the use of temporary shielding based on a cost/benefit analysis. Factors that were taken into account in the analysis included the cost of the shields, the one-time dose commitment for installation of permanent shields, dose and manpower commitments for installation and removal of temporary shielding during each outage, decontamination and storage of temporary shielding between outages, and projected dose savings for both types of shields. Basically, permanent shields were found to be more cot-effective because each required only a one-time dose commitment for installation

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  17. Passive magnetic shielding in MRI-Linac systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Brendan; Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Brad M.; Keall, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Passive magnetic shielding refers to the use of ferromagnetic materials to redirect magnetic field lines away from vulnerable regions. An application of particular interest to the medical physics community is shielding in MRI systems, especially integrated MRI-linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) systems. In these systems, the goal is not only to minimize the magnetic field in some volume, but also to minimize the impact of the shield on the magnetic fields within the imaging volume of the MRI scanner. In this work, finite element modelling was used to assess the shielding of a side coupled 6 MV linac and resultant heterogeneity induced within the 30 cm diameter of spherical volume (DSV) of a novel 1 Tesla split bore MRI magnet. A number of different shield parameters were investigated; distance between shield and magnet, shield shape, shield thickness, shield length, openings in the shield, number of concentric layers, spacing between each layer, and shield material. Both the in-line and perpendicular MRI-Linac configurations were studied. By modifying the shield shape around the linac from the starting design of an open ended cylinder, the shielding effect was boosted by approximately 70% whilst the impact on the magnet was simultaneously reduced by approximately 10%. Openings in the shield for the RF port and beam exit were substantial sources of field leakage; however it was demonstrated that shielding could be added around these openings to compensate for this leakage. Layering multiple concentric shield shells was highly effective in the perpendicular configuration, but less so for the in-line configuration. Cautious use of high permeability materials such as Mu-metal can greatly increase the shielding performance in some scenarios. In the perpendicular configuration, magnetic shielding was more effective and the impact on the magnet lower compared with the in-line configuration.

  18. Calculated shielding factors for selected European houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1984-12-01

    Shielding factors for gamma radiation from activity deposited on structures and ground surfaces have been calculated with the computer model DEPSHIELD for single-family and multi-storey buildings in France, United Kingdom and Denmark. For all three countries it was found that the shielding factors for single-family houses are approximately a factor of 2 - 10 higher that those for buildings with five or more storeys. Away from doors and windows the shielding factors for French, British, and Danish single-family houses are in the range 0.03 - 0.1, 0.06 - 0.4, and 0.07 - 0.3, respectively. The uncertainties of the calculations are discussed and DEPSHIELD-results are compared with other methods as well as with experimental results. (author)

  19. Radiation safety shield for a syringe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Safety apparatus for use in administering radioactive serums by a syringe, without endangering the health and safety of the medical operators is described. The apparatus consists of a sheath and a shield which can be retracted into the sheath to assay the radioactive serum in an assay well. The shield can be moved from the retracted position into an extended position when the serum is to be injected into the patient. To protect the operator, the shield can be constructed of tantalum or any like high density substance to attenuate the radiation, emanating from the radioactive serums contained in the syringe, from passing to the atmosphere. A lead glass window is provided so that the operator can determine the exact quantity of the radioactive serum which is contained in the syringe

  20. Slipforming of reinforced concrete shield building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, M.C.; King, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The unique design and construction features of slipforming the heavily reinforced concrete cylindrical shield walls at the Satsop nuclear plant in Washington, D.C. site are presented. The shield walls were designed in compliance with seismic requirements which resulted in the need for reinforcing steel averaging 326 kg/m/sup 3/. A 7.6 m high, three-deck moving platform was designed to permit easy installation of the reinforcing steel, embedments, and blockouts, and to facilitate concrete placement and finishing. Two circular box trusses, one on each side of the shield wall, were used in combination with a spider truss to meet both the tolerance and strength requirements for the slipform assembly

  1. Final design of ITER thermal shield manifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Kyu [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Chang Hyun, E-mail: chnoh@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Kyu; Park, Sungwoo [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kwanwoo [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wooho [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dongkwon; Kang, Kyung-O. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungmun [SFA Engineering Corporation, Hwaseong-si 10060 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jing Do [Korea Marine Equipment Research Institute, Busan 49111 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Engineering design of thermal shield manifold is finalized. • Pipe routing, support design and flow balance are verified by analysis. • Mock-ups are fabricated to verify the design. - Abstract: The ITER thermal shield is actively cooled by 80 K pressurized helium gas. The helium coolant flows from the cold valve box to the cooling tubes on the TS panels via manifold piping. This paper describes the final design of thermal shield manifold. Pipe design to accommodate the thermal contraction considering interface with adjacent components and detailed design of support structure are presented. R&D for the pipe branch connection is carried out to find a feasible manufacturing method. Global structural behavior and structural integrity of the manifold including pipe supports are investigated by a finite element analysis based on ASME B31.3 code. Flow analyses are performed to check the flow distribution.

  2. Progress of the ITER Thermal Shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Her, Namil, E-mail: namil.her@iter.org [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon – CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Hick, Robby; Le Barbier, Robin; Arzoumanian, Terenig; Choi, Chang-Ho; Sborchia, Carlo [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon – CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Chung, Wooho; Nam, Kwanwoo; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Gyoung-O. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Youngkil; Lim, Kisuk [SFA Engineering Corporation, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 10060 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Design improvement of the ITER Thermal Shields was introduced. • Design of TS manifold and TS instrumentation were summarized. • Produced main material of the TS (SS304LN) was summarized. • Status of the VVTS manufacturing and the inspection requirements were summarized. - Abstract: The role of the ITER Thermal Shields (TS) is to minimize the radiation heat load from the warm components such as vacuum vessel and cryostat to magnet operating at 4.5 K. The final design of TS was completed in 2013 and manufacturing of the vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) is now on-going. This paper describes the development status of the TS in particular the design improvements, the fabrication and the requirements.

  3. Electromagnetic Shielding Efficiency Measurement of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dřínovský, J.; Kejík, Z.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of the shielding efficiency measurements of construction composite materials. This contribution describes an alternative test method of these measurements by using the measurement circular flange. The measured results and parameters of coaxial test flange are also discussed. The measurement circular flange is described by measured scattering parameters in the frequency range from 9 kHz up to 1 GHz. The accuracy of the used shielding efficiency measurement method was checked by brass calibration ring. The suitability of the coaxial test setup was also checked by measurements on the EMC test chamber. This data was compared with the measured data on the real EMC chamber. The whole measurement of shielding efficiency was controlled by the program which runs on a personal computer. This program was created in the VEE Pro environment produced by © Agilent Technology.

  4. Radiation shielding performance of some concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, I.; Akyildirim, H.; Mavi, B.; Kilincarslan, S.; Basyigit, C.

    2007-01-01

    The energy consumption is increasing with the increased population of the world and thus new energy sources were discovered such as nuclear energy. Besides using nuclear energy, nuclear techniques are being used in a variety of fields such as medical hospital, industry, agriculture or military issue, the radiation protection becomes one of the important research fields. In radiation protection, the main rules are time, distance and shielding. The most effective radiation shields are materials which have a high density and high atomic number such as lead, tungsten which are expensive. Alternatively the concrete which produced using different aggregate can be used. The effectiveness of radiation shielding is frequently described in terms of the half value layer (HVL) or the tenth value layer (TVL). These are the thicknesses of an absorber that will reduce the radiation to half, and one tenth of its intensity respectively. In this study the radiation protection properties of different types of concrete will be discussed

  5. Accelerator shielding experts meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Fifteen years after its first CERN edition, the Shielding Aspects of Accelerator, Targets and Irradiation Facility (SATIF) conference was held again here from 2-4 June. Now at its 10th edition, SATIF10 brought together experts from all over the world to discuss issues related to the shielding techniques. They set out the scene for an improved collaboration and discussed novel shielding solutions.   This was the most attended meeting of the series with more than 65 participants from 34 institutions and 14 countries. “We welcomed experts from many different laboratories around the world. We come from different contexts but we face similar problems. In this year’s session, among other things, we discussed ways for improving the effectiveness of calculations versus real data, as well as experimental solutions to investigate the damage that radiation produces on various materials and the electronics”, says Marco Silari, Chair of the conference and member of the DGS/RP gro...

  6. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. First Wall, Blanket, Shield Engineering Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of DOE has the overall objective of providing engineering data that will define performance parameters for nuclear systems in advanced fusion reactors. The program comprises testing and the development of computational tools in four areas: (1) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of first-wall component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads; (2) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of blanket and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on bulk heating; (3) electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on transient field penetration and eddy-current effects; (4) assembly, maintenance and repair with emphasis on remote-handling techniques. This paper will focus on elements 2 and 4 above and, in keeping with the conference participation from both fusion and fission programs, will emphasize potential interfaces between fusion technology and experience in the fission industry

  8. Self-Shielding Of Transmission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Christos [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The use of shielding to contend with noise or harmful EMI/EMR energy is not a new concept. An inevitable trade that must be made for shielding is physical space and weight. Space was often not as much of a painful design trade in older larger systems as they are in today’s smaller systems. Today we are packing in an exponentially growing number of functionality within the same or smaller volumes. As systems become smaller and space within systems become more restricted, the implementation of shielding becomes more problematic. Often, space that was used to design a more mechanically robust component must be used for shielding. As the system gets smaller and space is at more of a premium, the trades starts to result in defects, designs with inadequate margin in other performance areas, and designs that are sensitive to manufacturing variability. With these challenges in mind, it would be ideal to maximize attenuation of harmful fields as they inevitably couple onto transmission lines without the use of traditional shielding. Dr. Tom Van Doren proposed a design concept for transmission lines to a class of engineers while visiting New Mexico. This design concept works by maximizing Electric field (E) and Magnetic Field (H) field containment between operating transmission lines to achieve what he called “Self-Shielding”. By making the geometric centroid of the outgoing current coincident with the return current, maximum field containment is achieved. The reciprocal should be true as well, resulting in greater attenuation of incident fields. Figure’s 1(a)-1(b) are examples of designs where the current centroids are coincident. Coax cables are good examples of transmission lines with co-located centroids but they demonstrate excellent field attenuation for other reasons and can’t be used to test this design concept. Figure 1(b) is a flex circuit design that demonstrate the implementation of self-shielding vs a standard conductor layout.

  9. A study on the shielding element using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae Goo [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this research, we simulated the elementary star shielding ability using Monte Carlo simulation to apply medical radiation shielding sheet which can replace existing lead. In the selection of elements, mainly elements and metal elements having a large atomic number, which are known to have high shielding performance, recently, various composite materials have improved shielding performance, so that weight reduction, processability, In consideration of activity etc., 21 elements were selected. The simulation tools were utilized Monte Carlo method. As a result of simulating the shielding performance by each element, it was estimated that the shielding ratio is the highest at 98.82% and 98.44% for tungsten and gold.

  10. FLUKA shielding calculations for the FAIR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbacher, Georg; Kozlova, Ekaterina; Radon, Torsten; Sokolov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    FAIR is an international accelerator project being in construction at GSI Helmholtz center for heavy ion research in Darmstadt. The Monte Carlo program FLUKA is used to study radiation protection problems. The contribution deals with general application possibilities of FLUKA and for FAIR with respect the radiation protection planning. The necessity to simulate the radiation transport through shielding of several meters thickness and to determine the equivalent doses outside the shielding with sufficient accuracy is demonstrated using two examples under consideration of the variance reduction. Results of simulation calculations for activation estimation in accelerator facilities are presented.

  11. Thermophysical Properties of Heat Resistant Shielding Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    This project was aimed at determining thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal expansion of a heat resistant shielding material for neutron absorption applications. These data are critical in predicting the structural integrity of the shielding under thermal cycling and mechanical load. The measurements of thermal conductivity and specific heat were conducted in air at five different temperatures (-31 F, 73.4 F, 140 F, 212 F and 302 F). The transient plane source (TPS) method was used in the tests. Thermal expansion tests were conducted using push rod dilatometry over the continuous range from -40 F (-40 C) to 302 F (150 C)

  12. [Electromagnetic Shielding Alters Behaviour of Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temuryants, N A; Kostyuk, A S; Tumanyants, K N

    2015-01-01

    It has been found that long-term electromagnetic shielding (19 hours per day for 10 days) leads to an increase in the duration of passive swimming time in male rats, decrease the duration of active swimming in the "forced swim" test as well as decrease of libido. On the other hand animals kept under the "open field" conditions do not show significant deviations from their normal behavior. Therefore, one could conclude that moderate electromagnetic shielding causes a depression-like state in rats.

  13. Radiation shielding issues on the FMIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Davis, A.A.; Huang, S.; Morford, R.J.

    1981-05-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) is being built to study neutron radiation effects in candidate fusion reactor materials. The FMIT will yield high fluence data in a fusion-like neutron radiation environment produced by the interaction of a 0.1A, 35 MeV deuteron beam with a flowing lithium target. The design of the facility as a whole is driven by a high availability requirement. The variety of radiation environments in the facility requires the use of diverse and extensive shielding. Shielding design throughout the FMIT must accommodate the need for maintenance and operations access while providing adequate personnel and equipment protection

  14. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING SHIELD WALL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Padula

    2000-01-13

    The scope of this analysis is to estimate the shielding wall, ceiling or equivalent door thicknesses that will be required in the Waste Handling Building to maintain the radiation doses to personnel within acceptable limits. The shielding thickness calculated is the minimum required to meet administrative limits, and not necessarily what will be recommended for the final design. The preliminary evaluations will identify the areas which have the greatest impact on mechanical and facility design concepts. The objective is to provide the design teams with the necessary information to assure an efficient and effective design.

  15. LOFT shield tank steady state temperatures with addition of gamma and neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyllingstad, G.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of introducing a neutron and gamma shield into the annulus between the reactor vessel and the shield tank is analyzed. This addition has been proposed in order to intercept neutron streaming up the annulus during nuclear operations. Its installation will require removal of approximately 20- 1 / 2 inches of stainless steel foil insulation at the top of the annulus. The resulting conduction path is believed to result in increased water temperatures within the shield tank, possibly beyond the 150 0 F limit, and/or cooling of the reactor vessel nozzles such that adverse thermal stresses would be generated. A two dimensional thermal analysis using the finite element code COUPLE/MOD2 was done for the shield tank system illustrated in the figure (1). The reactor was assumed to be at full power, 55 MW (th), with a loop flow rate of 2.15 x 10 6 lbm/hr (268.4 kg/s) at 2250 psi (15.51 MPa). Calculations indicate a steady state shield tank water temperature of 140 0 F (60 0 C). This is below the 150 0 F (65.56 0 C) limit. Also, no significant changes in thermal gradients within the nozzle or reactor vessel wall are generated. A spacer between the gamma shield and the shield tank is recommended, however, in order to ensure free air circulation through the annulus

  16. Deep smarts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Dorothy; Swap, Walter

    2004-09-01

    When a person sizes up a complex situation and rapidly comes to a decision that proves to be not just good but brilliant, you think, "That was smart." After you watch him do this a few times, you realize you're in the presence of something special. It's not raw brainpower, though that helps. It's not emotional intelligence, either, though that, too, is often involved. It's deep smarts. Deep smarts are not philosophical--they're not"wisdom" in that sense, but they're as close to wisdom as business gets. You see them in the manager who understands when and how to move into a new international market, in the executive who knows just what kind of talk to give when her organization is in crisis, in the technician who can track a product failure back to an interaction between independently produced elements. These are people whose knowledge would be hard to purchase on the open market. Their insight is based on know-how more than on know-what; it comprises a system view as well as expertise in individual areas. Because deep smarts are experienced based and often context specific, they can't be produced overnight or readily imported into an organization. It takes years for an individual to develop them--and no time at all for an organization to lose them when a valued veteran walks out the door. They can be taught, however, with the right techniques. Drawing on their forthcoming book Deep Smarts, Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap say the best way to transfer such expertise to novices--and, on a larger scale, to make individual knowledge institutional--isn't through PowerPoint slides, a Web site of best practices, online training, project reports, or lectures. Rather, the sage needs to teach the neophyte individually how to draw wisdom from experience. Companies have to be willing to dedicate time and effort to such extensive training, but the investment more than pays for itself.

  17. Seismic probing of Fennoscandian lithosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bock, G.; Achauer, U.; Alinaghi, A.; Ansorge, J.; Bruneton, M.; Friederich, W.; Grad, M.; Guterch, A.; Hjelt, S. E.; Plomerová, Jaroslava

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 50 (2001), s. 621, 628-629 ISSN 0096-3941 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3012908 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : seismic probing * lithosphere * Fennoscandia * SVEKALAPKO * Europrobe Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  18. Developing light nano-composites with improved mechanical properties for neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, F. [Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). School of Medicine; Mortazavi, S.M.J. [Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Medical Physics and Medical Engineering; Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). The Center for Radiological Research; Kardan, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application School; Mosleh-Shirazi, M.A. [Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiotherapy Dept.; Sina, S. [Shiraz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Research Center; Rahpeyma, J.

    2017-12-15

    Although radiation exposures in manned space missions are normally below the limits recommended to NASA by NCRP, in long-duration deep space exploratory missions astronauts may receive relatively high doses of ionizing radiation. Novel light polyethylene-based composites can be considered as effective radiation shields in space explorations. However, normally these composites cannot provide desired mechanical properties. Over the past several years our laboratories have focused on developing efficient methods for both physical and biological protection of the crew in long term space missions. In this study carbon nanotubes and either nano-sized or micro-sized boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) fillers were incorporated into the continuous phase of low density polyethylene (LDPE). In the next phase, the mechanical characteristics of the composites as well as their neutron attenuation properties were studied. Findings of this study indicated enhanced mechanical properties accompanied by an enhanced shielding efficiency for neutrons at some specific weight fraction of the fillers.

  19. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  20. Neutron shielding material based on colemanite and epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a need for compact shielding design such as self-shielding of a PET cyclotron or upgradation of radiation machinery in existing facilities. In these cases, high performance shielding materials are needed. Concrete or polyethylene have been used for a neutron shield. However, for compact shielding, they fall short in terms of performance or durability. Therefore, a new type of neutron shielding material based on epoxy resin and colemanite has been developed. Slab attenuation experiments up to 40 cm for the new shielding material were carried out using a 252Cf neutron source. Measurement was carried out using a REM-counter, and compared with calculation. The results show that the shielding performance is better than concrete and polyethylene mixed with 10 wt% boron oxide. From the result, we confirmed that the performance of the new material is suitable for practical use.

  1. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Ingersoll, J.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone?, a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory

  2. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D T [comp.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ingersoll, J K [comp.; Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  3. A new ceramic material for shielding pulsed neutron scattering instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celli, M.; Grazzi, F.; Zoppi, M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new ceramic composite, based on boron carbide, to use as a shielding material for pulsed neutron scattering instrumentation. The measured transmission data show characteristics equivalent to crispy mix, a common shielding material used at ISIS (UK)

  4. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analyses , for information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-01

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL and Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project

  5. Software Tools for Measuring and Calculating Electromagnetic Shielding Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tesny, Neal

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation and the analysis of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse response of shielded enclosures require the availability of software tools able to acquire data and calculate shielding effectiveness...

  6. Active Shielding in Measurements of DC Near Biomagnetic Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nowak, Hannes

    2001-01-01

    .... An effective SQUID based active shielding system has been developed and installed at the magnetically shielded rooms in the Biomagnetic Center of the University Jena to reduce external low frequency disturbances...

  7. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  8. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-A19897, R.H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280degF. Table 1 lists the neutron shield materials tested. The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found. The Bisco modified NS-4 and Reactor Experiments HMPP are both acceptable materials from a thermal accident standpoint for use in the shipping cask. Tests of the Kobe PP-R01 and Envirotech HDPE were stopped for safety reasons, due to inability to deal with the heavy smoke, before completion of the 30-minute heating phase. However these materials may prove satisfactory if they could undergo the complete heating. (J.P.N.)

  9. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports

  10. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act, as provided in this part and parts 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, and 78 of this chapter shall be deemed to be...

  11. Development of ceramics multifunctional shielding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senda, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Shigeru; Takahashi, Chiori; Matsuoka, Kazuyoshi; Uematsu, Susumu; Ueki, Kotaro; Ohashi, Atsuto; Naruyama, Nobuteru [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    New aspect 'multifunctional shielding materials' with high temperature structure materials and shielding performance was proposed. The enhancement effects of shielding performance by combination of various ceramics were studied and the thermal impulse strength and surface damage-resistance were evaluated. In the case of combination of chromium carbide, titanium borate and boron nitride, the best shielding arrangement was proposed as chromium carbide with intermediate nucleus on the neutron beam source side and boron nitride, light element ceramics, on the other side and titanium borate between them. Each layer showed the special effects such as chromium carbide with the promotion effect of chromium, titanium borate to decrease neutron velocity and absorption and boron nitride to absorb neutron. The thermal shock characteristic value of chromium carbide was PL=3.3 W/mm{sup 2}, about 0.2 times of titanium borate, PL=16.5 W/mm{sup 2}. Accordingly, some thermal shock relaxation layer should be set, when chromium carbide was set on the beam source side. (S.Y.)

  12. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimpson, Shane; Liu, Yuxuan; Collins, Benjamin S.; Clarno, Kevin T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as ''Lumped Parameter MOC''. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  13. Subsurface Shielding Source Term Specification Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.Su

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to establish appropriate and defensible waste-package radiation source terms for use in repository subsurface shielding design. This calculation supports the shielding design for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The objective is to identify the limiting waste package and specify its associated source terms including source strengths and energy spectra. Consistent with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M and O 2001, p. 15), the scope of work includes the following: (1) Review source terms generated by the Waste Package Department (WPD) for various waste forms and waste package types, and compile them for shielding-specific applications. (2) Determine acceptable waste package specific source terms for use in subsurface shielding design, using a reasonable and defensible methodology that is not unduly conservative. This calculation is associated with the engineering and design activity for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The technical work plan for this calculation is provided in CRWMS M and O 2001. Development and performance of this calculation conforms to the procedure, AP-3.12Q, Calculations

  14. In-beam background suppression shield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoro, V.; Cai, Xiao Xiao; DiJulio, D. D.

    2015-01-01

    , which do not use a bender to help mitigate the fast neutron background, are the most challenging. For these beam lines we propose the innovative shielding of placing blocks of material directly into the guide system, which allow a minimum attenuation of the cold and thermal fluxes relative...

  15. Internally shielded beam transport and support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schildkamp, W.; Brewer, H.

    1996-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, the Advanced Photon Source has a policy that disallows any exposed lead within the facility. This creates a real problem for the beam transport system, not so much for the pipe but for the flexible coupling (bellows) sections. A complete internally shielded x-ray transport system, consisting of long transport lines joined by flexible coupling sections, has been designed for CARS sector 14 to operate either at high vacuum or as a helium flight tube. It can effectively shield against air scattering of wiggler or undulator white beam with proper placement of apertures, collimators, and masks for direct beam control. The system makes use of male- and female-style fittings that create a labyrinth allowing for continuous shielding through the flexible coupling sections. These parts are precision machined from a ternary hypereutectic lead alloy (cast under 15 inches of head pressure to assure a pinhole-free casting) then pressed into either end (rotatable vacuum flanges) of the bellows assembly. The transport pipe itself consists of a four part construction using a stepped transition ring (Z-ring) to connect an inner tube to the vacuum flange and also to a protective and supportive outer tube. The inner tube is wrapped with 1/16 double-prime pure lead sheet to a predetermined thickness following the shape of the stepped transition ring for continuous shielding. This design has been prototyped and radiation tested. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. Shielding Effectiveness Measurements using a Reverberation Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Bergsma, J.G.; Bergsma, Hans; van Etten, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Shielding effectiveness measurements have been performed using a reverberation chamber. The reverberation chamber methodology as we1l as the measurement setup is described and some results are given. Samples include glass reinforced plastic panels, aluminum panels with many holes, wire mesh, among

  17. AP1000 shield building: a constructability challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Bonanno, Domenico

    2010-01-01

    The AP1000 Shield Building, an enhanced structure which surrounds the containment vessel, consists of standard Reinforced Concrete (RC) and composite Steel and Concrete (SC) construction. In the SC module the surface steel plates, (with attached shear studs and angles) filled with concrete, act as the steel reinforcement in concrete. This is a relatively new design technology that required the appropriate use of structural codes, supplemented with information from applicable tests on similar composite steel and concrete construction. Being a newer design concept, existing codes do not provide explicit guidance on SC construction so a review of literature and test data on composite structures similar to AP1000 shield building was done in order to confirm the technical basis for the design. The SC walls, air inlet structure and roof of the Shield Building will be constructed using modular construction practices and then transported to site and lifted into place. These modules, working also as permanent form-work, will be filled with high strength Self- Consolidating Concrete. (SCC) This paper provides a focused and integrated presentation of the enhanced shield building design methodology, testing, constructability and inspection. (authors)

  18. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  19. Rangitoto Volcano Drilling Project: Life of a Small 'Monogenetic' Basaltic Shield in the Auckland Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, P. A. R.; Linnell, T.; Lindsay, J. M.; Smith, I. E.; Augustinus, P. M.; Cronin, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Rangitoto is a small basaltic shield volcano representing the most recent and most voluminous episode of volcanism in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand. Auckland City is built on the field, and hence, Rangitoto's importance in hazard-risk modelling. The symmetrical edifice, ~6 km wide and 260 m high, has volume of 1.78 km3. It comprises summit scoria cones and a lava field. However, the lack of deep erosion dissection has prevented the development of an eruptive stratigraphy. Previous studies suggested construction in a relatively short interval at 550-500 yrs BP. However, microscopic tephra have been interpreted as evidence of intermittent activity from 1498 +/- 140 to 504 +/- 6 yrs BP, a longevity of 1000 years. A 150-m-deep hole was drilled through the edifice in February 2014 to obtain a continuous core record. The result is an unparalleled stratigraphy of the evolution of a small shield volcano. The upper 128 m of core comprises at least 27 lava flows with thicknesses in the range 0.3-15 m, representing the main shield-building phase. Underlying marine sediments are interbedded with 8 m of pyroclastic lapilli, and a thin lava flow, representing the explosive phreatomagmatic birth of the volcano. Preliminary geochemical analyses reveal suite of relatively uniform transitional basalts (MgO = 8.1 to 9.7 wt %). However, 4 compositional groups are distinguished that were erupted in sequential order. High-MgO magmas were erupted first, followed by a two more heterogeneous groups displaying differentiation trends with time. Finally, distinct low-MgO basalts were erupted. Each magma type appears to represent a new magma batch. The core places the magma types in a time series, which can be correlated to the surface lava field. Hence, allowing a geometrical reconstruction of the shield growth. Additional petrologic investigations are providing insight to magmatic ascent processes, while radiocarbon and paleomagnetic secular variation studies will reveal the

  20. Proceedings of a meeting on radiation shielding and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This is a proceedings of a meeting on radiation shielding and related topics held on Feb. 22 and 23 in 1978 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of University of Tokyo. The reports includes the following items (1) studies on neutronics with accelerators (2) radiation damage (3) shielding design (4) radiation streaming (5) shielding experiments from a point of view of radiation measurements (6) shielding benchmark experiments (7) prospects on the study of neutronics. All items are written in Japanese. (auth.)

  1. Shielding consideration for the SSCL experimental halls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, J.; Coyne, J.; Mokhov, N.; Stapleton, G.

    1994-03-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider which is being designed and built in Waxahachie, Texas consists Of series of proton accelerators, culminating in a 20 Te proton on proton collider. The collider will be in a tunnel which will be 87 km in circumference and. on average about 30 meters underground. The present design calls for two large interaction halls on the east side of the ring. The shielding for these halls is being designed for an interaction rate of 10 9 Hz or 10 16 interactions per year, based on 10 7 seconds per operational year. SSC guidelines require that the shielding be designed to meet the criterion of 1mSv per year for open areas off site 2mSv per year for open areas on site, and 2mSv per year for controlled areas. Only radiation workers will be routinely allowed to work in controlled areas. It should be pointed that there is a potential for an accidental full beam loss in either of the experimental halls, and this event would consist of the loss of the full circulating beam up to 4 x 10 14 protons. With the present design. the calculated dose equivalent for this event is about 10% of the annual dose equivalent for the normal p-p interactions, so that die accident condition does not control the shielding. If, for instance, local shielding within the experimental hall is introduced into the calculations, this could change. The shielding requirements presented here are controlled by the normal p-p interactions. Three important questions were addressed in the present calculations. They are (1) the thickness of the roof over the experimental halls, (2) the configuration of the shafts and adits which give access to the halls, and (3) the problem of ground water and air activation

  2. Flux trapping and shielding in irreversible superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, D.J.

    1978-05-01

    Flux trappings and shielding experiments were carried out on Pb, Nb, Pb-Bi, Nb-Sn, and Nb-Ti samples of various shapes. Movable Hall probes were used to measure fields near or inside the samples as a function of position and of applied field. The trapping of transverse multipole magnetic fields in tubular samples was accomplished by cooling the samples in an applied field and then smoothly reducing the applied field to zero. Transverse quadrupole and sextupole fields with gradients of over 2000 G/cm were trapped with typical fidelity to the original impressed field of a few percent. Transverse dipole fields of up to 17 kG were also trapped with similar fidelity. Shielding experiments were carried out by cooling the samples in zero field and then gradually applying an external field. Flux trapping and shielding abilities were found to be limited by two factors, the pinning strength of the material, and the susceptibility of a sample to flux jumping. The trapping and shielding behavior of flat disk samples in axial fields and thin-walled tubular samples in transverse fields was modeled. The models, which were based on the concept of the critical state, allowed a connection to be made between the pinning strength and critical current level, and the flux trapping and shielding abilities. Adiabatic and dynamic stability theories are discussed and applied to the materials tested. Good qualitative, but limited quantitative agreement was obtained between the predictions of the theoretical stability criteria and the observed flux jumping behavior

  3. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous to...

  4. Spherical warm shield design for infrared imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qijie; Chang, Songtao; He, Fengyun; Li, Zhou; Qiao, Yanfeng

    2017-09-01

    The F-number matching is the primary means to suppress stray radiation for infrared imaging systems. However, it is difficult to achieve exact F-number matching, owing to the restriction from detectors, or multiple F-number design. Hence, an additional shield is required to block the certain thermal radiation. Typical shield is called flat warm shield, which is flat and operates at room temperature. For flat warm shield, it cannot suppress stray radiation while achieving F-number matching. To overcome the restriction, a spherical reflective warm shield is required. First of all, the detailed theory of spherical warm shield design is developed on basis of the principle that stray radiation cannot directly reach the infrared focal plane array. According to the theory developed above, a polished spherical warm shield, whose radius is 18 mm, is designed to match an F/2 infrared detector with an F/4 infrared imaging system. Then, the performance and alignment errors of the designed spherical warm shield are analyzed by simulation. Finally, a contrast experiment between the designed spherical warm shield and two differently processed flat warm shields is performed in a chamber with controllable inside temperatures. The experimental results indicate that the designed spherical warm shield cannot only achieve F-number matching but suppress stray radiation sufficiently. Besides, it is demonstrated that the theory of spherical warm shield design developed in this paper is valid and can be employed by arbitrary infrared imaging systems.

  5. Advanced materials and design for electromagnetic interference shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Xingcun Colin

    2008-01-01

    Exploring the role of EMI shielding in EMC design, this book introduces the design guidelines, materials selection, characterization methodology, manufacturing technology, and future potential of EMI shielding. It covers an array of issues in advanced shielding materials and design solutions, including enclosures and composites.

  6. PRORA - program for calculating neutron flux in reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindilaru, G.; Cuculeanu, V.

    1978-06-01

    In order to perform the reactor shielding calculations for the reactor design, it is necessary a fast, accurate method which should take into account the proper shielding geometry. Thus, the PRORA program calculates space-energy neutron distribution in the reactor shielding using age-diffusion approximation and the multigroup formalism. (author)

  7. System for detecting and processing abnormality in electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Nakamura, M.; Yabana, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagata, K.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for detecting and processing an abnormality in electromagnetic shielding of an intelligent building which is constructed using an electromagnetic shielding material for the skeleton and openings such as windows and doorways so that the whole of the building is formed into an electromagnetic shielding structure. (author). 4 figs

  8. Cost Assessment for Shielding of C3 Type. Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    Oersted (2) 3.2.2 Corner Effects For a box-like shielded enclosure, the shielding effectiveness is commonly said to be "degraded" at the edges and...Young in which a limiting nonlinear theory predicts a lower bound on shielding ef- fectiveness. The procedure adopted here is as follows. As shown

  9. Determination of the shielding factors for gamma-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korun, M.; Vodenik, B.; Zorko, B.

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the shielding factors for gamma-ray spectrometers is described. The shielding factors are expressed by decomposing the peaked background of the spectrometer into contributions of the detector, spectrometer shield and ambient radiation to the spectrometer background. The dimensions of the sample and its mass-attenuation coefficient are taken into account using a simple model. For six spectrometers, with contributions to the background quantified, the shielding factors were determined for the background based on the thorium decay series and the radon daughters. For a water sample with a diameter of 9 cm and a thickness of 4 cm and the nuclides of the thorium decay series that are in the spectrometer shields, the values of the shielding factors lie in the interval 0.95–1.00. For a spectrometer exhibiting the diffusion of radon into the shielding material, the values of the shielding factors for the same sample for gamma-rays from the radon daughters lie in the interval 0.88–1.00. - Highlights: • A model is described to assess shielding factors for gamma-ray spectrometers. • The background due to the detector, shield and ambient radiation must be known. • The sample attenuation, its dimensions and distance from the crystal are considered. • Shielding factors for gamma-rays from the 232 Th and 226 Ra decay chains are assessed. • For a water sample with a mass of 0.25 kg, shielding factors above 0.88 are obtained

  10. On New Limits of the Coefficient of Gravitation Shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... New limits of the shielding coefficients in the supposed phenomenon of gravitation shielding have recently become available. The new values are briefly reviewed and discussed in order to update the state of art since some new limits for gravitation shielding are not necessarily the lowest ones which, ...

  11. Simulation of a Shielded Thermocouple | Berntsson | Rwanda Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A shielded thermocouple is a measurement device used for monitoring the temperature in chemically, or mechanically, hostile environments. The sensitive parts of the thermocouple are protected by a shielding layer. In this work we use numerical methods to study the accuracy and dynamic properties of a shielded ...

  12. The shielding calculation for the CN guide shielding assembly in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H.

    2006-01-01

    The cold neutron research facility in HANARO is under construction. The area including neutron guides and rotary shutter in the reactor hall should be shielded by the guide shielding assembly which is constructed of heavy concrete blocks and structure. The guide shielding assembly is divided into 2 parts, A and B. Part A is about 6.4 meters apart from the reactor biological shield and it is constructed of heavy concrete blocks whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 . And part B is a fixed heavy concrete structure whose density is above 3.5g/cm 3 . The rotary shutter is also made with heavy concrete whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 and includes 5 neutron guides inside. It can block the neutron beam by rotating when CNS is not operating. The dose criterion outside the guide shielding assembly is established as 12.5 μSv/hr which is also applied to reactor shielding in HANARO

  13. Shielding of Electronic Systems against Transient Electromagnetic Interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to protect electronic systems against the effects of transient electromagnetic interferences, shields made of electrically conductive material can be used. The subject of this paper is an electrically conductive textile. When applying the shield, a reliable measure is needed in order to determine the effectiveness of the shield to protect against electromagnetic pulses. For this purpose, a time domain measurement technique is presented using double exponential pulses. With these pulses, the susceptibility of an operating electronic device with and without the shield is determined. As a criterion of quality of a shield, the breakdown failure rate found in both cases is compared.

  14. Deep breathing after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000440.htm Deep breathing after surgery To use the sharing features on ... way to do so is by doing deep breathing exercises. Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated ...

  15. Comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for HDPE, BPE and concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhang, Prosenjit; Verma, Rishi; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    In the compact accelerator based DD neutron generator, the deuterium ions generated by the ion source are accelerated after the extraction and bombarded to a deuterated titanium target. The emitted neutrons have typical energy of ∼2.45MeV. Utilization of these compact accelerator based neutron generators of yield up to 10 9 neutron/second (DD) is under active consideration in many research laboratories for conducting active neutron interrogation experiments. Requirement of an adequately shielded laboratory is mandatory for the effective and safe utilization of these generators for intended applications. In this reference, we report the comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Borated Polyethylene (BPE) and Concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding. In shielding calculations, neutron induced scattering and absorption gamma dose has also been considered along with neutron dose. Contemporarily any material with higher hydrogenous concentration is best suited for neutron shielding. Choice of shielding material is also dominated by practical issues like economic viability and availability of space. Our computational analysis results reveal that utilization of BPE sheets results in minimum wall thickness requirement for attaining similar range of attenuation in neutron and gamma dose. The added advantage of using borated polyethylene is that it reduces the effect of both neutron and gamma dose by absorbing neutron and producing lithium and alpha particle. It has also been realized that for deciding upon optimum thickness determination of any shielding material, three important factors to be necessarily considered are: use factor, occupancy factor and work load factor. (author)

  16. Radiation shielding activities at the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Vaz, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has devoted considerable effort over the years to radiation shielding issues. The issues are addressed through international working groups. These activities are carried out in close co-ordination and co-operation with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The areas of work include: basic nuclear data activities in support of radiation shielding, computer codes, shipping cask shielding applications, reactor pressure vessel dosimetry, shielding experiments database. The method of work includes organising international code comparison exercises and benchmark studies. Training courses on radiation shielding computer codes are organised regularly including hands-on experience in modelling skills. The scope of the activity covers mainly reactor shields and spent fuel transportation packages, but also fusion neutronics and in particular shielding of accelerators and irradiation facilities. (author)

  17. Radiation shielding for medical compact cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatsukawa, Syoji; Hatakeyama, Satoru; Saito, Yoshihiro; Sera, Kouichiro; Hatano, Kentaro; Sasaki, Toshiaki.

    1993-01-01

    We are using a medical compact cyclotron for PET (positron emission tomography) and PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) analysis in Nishina Memorial Cyclotron Center. The cyclotron vault is covered by concrete wall of 1.5 m thickness. However, a big penetrating window of 1.8 m square was needed at the concrete wall between the cyclotron vault and the PIXE room for beam transport equipment. This window was closed by packing materials of iron shots, small grained polyethylenes mixed with boron and lead grains for shielding of neutrons and γ-rays. Several measurement data have showed that this method is useful for shielding of radiations from the compact cyclotron. (author)

  18. Radiation shielding aspects of compact medical cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.; Ruth, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Hospital-based compact medical cyclotrons are commonly used to produce large activities of short-lived PET radioisotopes such as fluorine-18 (HL110 min) and oxygen-18 (HL= 20 min), by bombarding suitably enriched gas or liquid targets with 11-15 MeV protons. High energy prompt neutron/gamma radiation fields are generated as the nuclear reaction product. The compact medical cyclotrons are installed either inside or in the close proximity of the nuclear medicine clinic. Therefore the adequacy of the radiation shielding is vitally important for the radiological safety of the patients and members of the public. The present paper highlights the important radiation shielding aspects of some compact medical cyclotrons presently available in the international market. 2 tabs., 4 figs

  19. Radiation shielding design considerations for Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engholm, B.A.

    1980-06-01

    Calculations and measurements were made of the bremsstrahlung (x-ray) doses resulting from runaway electron shots at Doublet III. The analysis considered direct, wall-scattered, and skyshine contributions. Reasonably good agreement was obtained between calculations and measurements. The x-ray dose in the control room was about 1 mR per runaway shot, while that at the north boundary was undetectable, with a calculated value of 0.05 mR per shot. These low doses attest to the adequacy of the 2 ft concrete shadow shield surrounding the Doublet III room. Exploratory shielding analyses were performed for possible neutron generation if Doublet III were operated with neutral beam injection in an aggressive D-D mode

  20. Thermoforming plastic in lead shield construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, M.E.; Chow, C.H.; Loyd, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation treatments using low energy X-rays or electrons frequently require a final field defining shield to be placed on the patient's skin. A custom made lead cut-out is used to provide a close fit to a particular patient's surface contours. We have developed a procedure which utilizes POLYFORM thermoplastic to obtain a negative mold of the patient instead of the traditional plaster bandage or dental impression gel. The Polyform is softened in warm water, molded carefully over the patient's surface, and is removed when set or hardened, usually within five minutes. Then lead sheet cut-outs can be formed within this negative. For shielding cut-outs requiring thicker lead sheet, a positive is made from dental stone using this Polyform negative. We have found this procedure to be neat, fast and comfortable for both patient and the dosimetrist

  1. EMC Test Report Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Lynne M.; Boyette, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the Electromagnetic Interference E M I evaluation performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) which is part of the MISSE-X System under the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. Measurements are performed to document the emissions environment associated with the EDS units. The purpose of this report is to collect all information needed to reproduce the testing performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield units, document data gathered during testing, and present the results. This document presents information unique to the measurements performed on the Bioculture Express Rack payload; using test methods prepared to meet SSP 30238 requirements. It includes the information necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer per work order number 1037104. The information presented herein should only be used to meet the requirements for which it was prepared.

  2. Future directions in shielding methods and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, H.

    1987-01-01

    Over the nearly half century history of shielding against reactor radiation, there has been a see-saw battle between theory and measurement. During that period the capability and accuracy of calculational methods have been enormously improved. The microscopic cross sections needed as input to the theoretical computations are now also known to adequate accuracy (with certain exceptions). Nonetheless, there remain substantial classes of shielding problems not yet accessible to satisfactory computational methods, particularly where three-dimensional geometries are involved. This paper discusses promising avenues to approach such problems, especially in the light of recent and expected advances in supercomputers. In particular, it seems that Monte Carlo methods should be much more advantageous in the new computer environment than they have been in the past

  3. Grounding and shielding circuits and interference

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Applies basic field behavior in circuit design and demonstrates how it relates to grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design This book connects the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory to the problems of interference in all types of electronic design. The text covers power distribution in facilities, mixing of analog and digital circuitry, circuit board layout at high clock rates, and meeting radiation and susceptibility standards. The author examines the grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design and applies basic physics to circuit behavior. The sixth edition of this book has been updated with new material added throughout the chapters where appropriate. The presentation of the book has also been rearranged in order to reflect the current trends in the field.

  4. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11.

  5. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11

  6. Symbolic math for computation of radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, Vitisha; Datta, D.; Sarkar, P.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation transport calculations for shielding studies in the field of accelerator technology often involve intensive numerical computations. Traditionally, radiation transport equation is solved using finite difference scheme or advanced finite element method with respect to specific initial and boundary conditions suitable for the geometry of the problem. All these computations need CPU intensive computer codes for accurate calculation of scalar and angular fluxes. Computation using symbols of the analytical expression representing the transport equation as objects is an enhanced numerical technique in which the computation is completely algorithm and data oriented. Algorithm on the basis of symbolic math architecture is developed using Symbolic math toolbox of MATLAB software. Present paper describes the symbolic math algorithm and its application as a case study in which shielding calculation of rectangular slab geometry is studied for a line source of specific activity. Study of application of symbolic math in this domain evolves a new paradigm compared to the existing computer code such as DORT. (author)

  7. DeepPy: Pythonic deep learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo

    This technical report introduces DeepPy – a deep learning framework built on top of NumPy with GPU acceleration. DeepPy bridges the gap between highperformance neural networks and the ease of development from Python/NumPy. Users with a background in scientific computing in Python will quickly...

  8. Monte Carlo methods for shield design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimstone, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    A suite of Monte Carlo codes is being developed for use on a routine basis in commercial reactor shield design. The methods adopted for this purpose include the modular construction of codes, simplified geometries, automatic variance reduction techniques, continuous energy treatment of cross section data, and albedo methods for streaming. Descriptions are given of the implementation of these methods and of their use in practical calculations. 26 references. (U.S.)

  9. Shielding analyses: the rabbit vs the turtle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper compares solutions using Monte Carlo and discrete- ordinates methods applied to two actual shielding situations in order to make some general observations concerning the efficiency and advantages/disadvantages of the two approaches. The discrete- ordinates solutions are performed using two-dimensional geometries, while the Monte Carlo approaches utilize three-dimensional geometries with both multigroup and point cross-section data

  10. Radiation shielded movable work station apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Andrews, H.N.; Massaro, A.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A movable work station includes travelling hoist-supported tools and a radiation-shielded enclosure or gondola that may be moved vertically or rotated. The enclosure is divided and accommodates four upright workers in facing pairs at opposite sides of a clearanceway observable and accessible from the gondola interior via lead glass windows and hand holes. The work station is particularly suitable for personnel involved in tube bundle replacement tasks performed within the shell of a nuclear power plant steam generator

  11. SINBAD: Shielding integral benchmark archive and database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Roussin, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    SINBAD is a new electronic database developed to store a variety of radiation shielding benchmark data so that users can easily retrieve and incorporate the data into their calculations. SINBAD is an excellent data source for users who require the quality assurance necessary in developing cross-section libraries or radiation transport codes. The future needs of the scientific community are best served by the electronic database format of SINBAD and its user-friendly interface, combined with its data accuracy and integrity

  12. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations on resolving the issue are discussed

  13. Grounding and shielding in the accelerator environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, Q.

    1991-01-01

    Everyday features of the accelerator environment include long cable runs, high power and low level equipment sharing building space, stray electromagnetic fields and ground voltage differences between the sending and receiving ends of an installation. This paper pictures some Fermilab installations chosen to highlight significant features and presents practices, test methods and equipment that have been helpful in achieving successful shielding. Throughout the report are numbered statements aimed at summarizing good practices and avoiding pitfalls

  14. Computer control of shielded cell operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffords, W.R. III.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a computer system to remotely control shielded cell operations. System hardware, software, and design criteria are discussed. We have designed a computer-controlled buret that provides a tenfold improvement over the buret currently in service. A computer also automatically controls cell analyses, calibrations, and maintenance. This system improves conditions for the operators by providing a safer, more efficient working environment and is expandable for future growth and development

  15. The TPC shielding of the CAST experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruz, J; Luzon, G; Beltran, B; Carmona, J M; Cebrian, S; Gomez, H; Irastorza, I G; Morales, J; Ortiz de Solorzano, A; RodrIguez, A; Villar, J A

    2006-01-01

    Sunset solar axions traversing the intense magnetic field of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment may be detected in a TPC detector, placed at one side of the magnet, as point-like X-rays signals. This signal could be masked, however, by the inhomogeneous radioactive background of materials and experimental site. Here we present the shielding built to reduce and homogenize the radioactive background levels of the TPC detector

  16. The TPC shielding of the CAST experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruz, J [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Luzon, G [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Beltran, B [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Carmona, J M [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Cebrian, S [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Gomez, H [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Irastorza, I G [DAPNIA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (CEA-Saclay), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morales, J [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Ortiz de Solorzano, A [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); RodrIguez, A [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Villar, J A [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas EnergIas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2006-05-15

    Sunset solar axions traversing the intense magnetic field of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment may be detected in a TPC detector, placed at one side of the magnet, as point-like X-rays signals. This signal could be masked, however, by the inhomogeneous radioactive background of materials and experimental site. Here we present the shielding built to reduce and homogenize the radioactive background levels of the TPC detector.

  17. The effect of some organic and non-organic additions on the shielding and mechanical properties of radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Yousef, S.; Al-Nassar, M.

    2011-04-01

    Few studies on the effect of some additives on the shielding properties of concrete have been carried out in this research. These studies included the effect of carbon powder, boron compounds, and waste polyethylene. The effect of water to cement ratio has been studied too. The research results showed that carbon powder and some boron compounds could be used to improve shielding concrete properties, and the possibility to add waste polyethylene in shielding concrete without effects on shielding properties. No significant effect for water to cement ratio on shielding properties of concrete. (author)

  18. An attenuation Layer for Electromagnetic Shielding in X- Band Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vida Zaroushani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled exposure to X-band frequency leads to health damage. One of the principles of radiation protection is shielding. But, conventional shielding materials have disadvantages. Therefore, studies of novel materials, as an alternative to conventional shielding materials, are required to obtain new electromagnetic shielding material. Therefore, this study investigated the electromagnetic shielding of two component epoxy thermosetting resin for the X - band frequency with workplace approach. Two components of epoxy resin mixed according to manufacturing instruction with the weight ratio that was 100:10 .Epoxy plates fabricated in three different thicknesses (2, 4 and 6mm and shielding effectiveness measured by Vector Network Analyzer. Then, shielding effectiveness measured by the scattering parameters.The results showed that 6mm thickness of epoxy had the highest and 2mm had the lowest average of shielding effectiveness in X-band frequency that is 4.48 and 1.9 dB, respectively. Also, shielding effectiveness increased by increasing the thickness. But this increasing is useful up to 4mm. Percentage shielding effectiveness of attenuation for 6, 4 and 2mm thicknesses is 64.35%, 63.31% and 35.40%. Also, attenuation values for 4mm and 6mm thicknesses at 8.53 GHz and 8.52 GHz frequency are 77.15% and 82.95%, respectively, and can be used as favourite shields for the above frequency. 4mm-Epoxy is a suitable candidate for shielding application in X-band frequency range but, in the lower section, 6mm thickness is recommended. Finely, the shielding matrix can be used for selecting the proper thickness for electromagnetic shielding in X- Band frequency.

  19. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Andrew T.; Teich, Yaron G.; Nims, Elise; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Warren, Steven R.; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E. C.; Haurberg, Nathalie; Ott, Jürgen; Saintonge, Amelie; Cave, Ian; Hagen, Cedric; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Marshall, Melissa V.; Thomann, Clara M.; Van Sistine, Angela

    2016-11-01

    We present kinematic analyses of the 12 galaxies in the “Survey of H I in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs” (SHIELD). We use multi-configuration interferometric observations of the H I 21 cm emission line from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA)22 to produce image cubes at a variety of spatial and spectral resolutions. Both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed in an attempt to derive inclination-corrected rotation curves for each galaxy. In most cases, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make spatially resolved position-velocity cuts, corrected for inclination using the stellar components, to estimate the circular rotation velocities. We find {v}{circ} ≤slant 30 km s-1 for the entire survey population. Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish H I fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical masses estimated from the position-velocity analysis. The SHIELD galaxies are then placed on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. There exists an empirical threshold rotational velocity, V {}{rot} < 15 km s-1, below which current observations cannot differentiate coherent rotation from pressure support. The SHIELD galaxies are representative of an important population of galaxies whose properties cannot be described by current models of rotationally dominated galaxy dynamics.

  20. Active Muon Shield - Preliminary Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, Victoria; Rawlings, T

    2015-01-01

    This report summarises the initial design study which was carried out for the SHiP magnetic muon shield – which is proposed to consist of a 40m beamline of seven magnets generating a 1.8T By field over defined cross-section. This is intended to sweep unwanted muons off the beamline to prevent them reaching the detector. The magnetic shield is an alternative to a passive tungsten shield. This work was carried out in three sections. Initially the magnets were considered in isolation to establish whether they were theoretically feasible to build and the impact of the iron yoke shape and material was considered. Next the beamline was considered as a whole; this included issues such as the impact of neighbouring magnets and the hadrons stopper, and also building a model of the complete beamline whose magnetic fields could be exported for use in particle modelling. Finally, some consideration was given to the manufacture and operational issues, including costs.

  1. Deep space test bed for radiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Deep Space Test-Bed (DSTB) Facility is designed to investigate the effects of galactic cosmic rays on crews and systems during missions to the Moon or Mars. To gain access to the interplanetary ionizing radiation environment the DSTB uses high-altitude polar balloon flights. The DSTB provides a platform for measurements to validate the radiation transport codes that are used by NASA to calculate the radiation environment within crewed space systems. It is also designed to support other exploration related investigations such as measuring the shielding effectiveness of candidate spacecraft and habitat materials, testing new radiation monitoring instrumentation, flight avionics and investigating the biological effects of deep space radiation. We describe the work completed thus far in the development of the DSTB and its current status

  2. Instability of the southern Canadian Shield during the late Proterozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannell, Kalin T.; Zeitler, Peter K.; Schneider, David A.

    2018-05-01

    Cratons are generally considered to comprise lithosphere that has remained tectonically quiescent for billions of years. Direct evidence for stability is mainly founded in the Phanerozoic sedimentary record and low-temperature thermochronology, but for extensive parts of Canada, earlier stability has been inferred due to the lack of an extensive rock record in both time and space. We used 40Ar/39Ar multi-diffusion domain (MDD) analysis of K-feldspar to constrain cratonic thermal histories across an intermediate (∼150-350 °C) temperature range in an attempt to link published high-temperature geochronology that resolves the timing of orogenesis and metamorphism with lower-temperature data suited for upper-crustal burial and unroofing histories. This work is focused on understanding the transition from Archean-Paleoproterozoic crustal growth to later intervals of stability, and how uninterrupted that record is throughout Earth's Proterozoic "Middle Age." Intermediate-temperature thermal histories of cratonic rocks at well-constrained localities within the southern Canadian Shield of North America challenge the stability worldview because our data indicate that these rocks were at elevated temperatures in the Proterozoic. Feldspars from granitic rocks collected at the surface cooled at rates of gap. These data also raise questions about the evolution of cratons during the Proterozoic and the nature of cratonic stability across deep time.

  3. DeepPy: Pythonic deep learning

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo

    2016-01-01

    This technical report introduces DeepPy – a deep learning framework built on top of NumPy with GPU acceleration. DeepPy bridges the gap between highperformance neural networks and the ease of development from Python/NumPy. Users with a background in scientific computing in Python will quickly be able to understand and change the DeepPy codebase as it is mainly implemented using high-level NumPy primitives. Moreover, DeepPy supports complex network architectures by letting the user compose mat...

  4. PWR Containment Shielding Calculations with SCALE6.1 Using Hybrid Deterministic-Stochastic Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Matijević

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of the SCALE6.1/MAVRIC hybrid shielding methodology (CADIS and FW-CADIS were demonstrated when applied to a realistic deep penetration Monte Carlo (MC shielding problem of a full-scale PWR containment model. Automatic preparation of variance reduction (VR parameters is based on deterministic transport theory (SN method providing the space-energy importance function. The aim of this paper was to determine the neutron-gamma dose rate distributions over large portions of PWR containment with uniformly small MC uncertainties. The sources of ionizing radiation included fission neutrons and photons from the reactor and photons from the activated primary coolant. We investigated benefits and differences of FW-CADIS over CADIS methodology for the objective of the uniform MC particle density in the desired tally regions. Memory intense deterministic module was used with broad group library “v7_27n19g” opposed to the fine group library “v7_200n47g” used for final MC simulation. Compared with CADIS and with the analog MC, FW-CADIS drastically improved MC dose rate distributions. Modern shielding problems with large spatial domains require not only extensive computational resources but also understanding of the underlying physics and numerical interdependence between SN-MC modules. The results of the dose rates throughout the containment are presented and discussed for different volumetric adjoint sources.

  5. Shielding data for hadron-therapy ion accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Sagia, E; Silari, M

    2014-01-01

    The secondary radiation field produced by seven different ion species (from hydrogen to nitrogen), impinging onto thick targets made of either iron or ICRU tissue, was simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and transported through thick concrete shields: the ambient dose equivalent was estimated and shielding parameters evaluated. The energy for each ion beam was set in order to reach a maximum penetration in ICRU tissue of 290 mm (equivalent to the therapeutic range of 430 MeV/amu carbon ions). Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of emission angle and ion species, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. Trends of source terms and attenuation lengths as a function of neutron emission angle and ion species impinging on tar- get are discussed. A comparison of double differential distributions of neutrons with results from similar simulation works reported in the literature is also included. The aim of this work is to provide shi...

  6. Chemical stability of copper-canisters in deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, L.

    1995-12-01

    The spent fuel from Finnish nuclear reactors is planned to be encapsulated in thick-walled copper-iron canisters and placed deep into the bedrock. The copper wall of the canister provides a long-time shield against corrosion, preventing the high-level nuclear fuel from contact with ground water. In the report, stability of metallic copper and its possible corrosion reactions in the conditions of deep bedrock are evaluated by means of thermo-dynamic calculations. (90 refs., 28 figs., 11 tabs.)

  7. SU-F-I-71: Fetal Protection During Fluoroscopy: To Shield Or Not to Shield?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, S; Vanderhoek, M [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Lead aprons are routinely used to shield the fetus from radiation during fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) involving pregnant patients. When placed in the primary beam, lead aprons often reduce image quality and increase fluoroscopic radiation output, which can adversely affect fetal dose. The purpose of this work is to identify an effective and practical method to reduce fetal dose without affecting image quality. Methods: A pregnant patient equivalent abdominal phantom is set on the table along with an image quality test object (CIRS model 903) representing patient anatomy of interest. An ion chamber is positioned at the x-ray beam entrance to the phantom, which is used to estimate the relative fetal dose. For three protective methods, image quality and fetal dose measurements are compared to baseline (no protection):1. Lead apron shielding the entire abdomen; 2. Lead apron shielding part of the abdomen, including the fetus; 3. Narrow collimation such that fetus is excluded from the primary beam. Results: With lead shielding the entire abdomen, the dose is reduced by 80% relative to baseline along with a drastic deterioration of image quality. With lead shielding only the fetus, the dose is reduced by 65% along with complete preservation of image quality, since the image quality test object is not shielded. However, narrow collimation results in 90% dose reduction and a slight improvement of image quality relative to baseline. Conclusion: The use of narrow collimation to protect the fetus during FGI is a simple and highly effective method that simultaneously reduces fetal dose and maintains sufficient image quality. Lead aprons are not as effective at fetal dose reduction, and if placed improperly, they can severely degrade image quality. Future work aims to investigate a wider variety of fluoroscopy systems to confirm these results across many different system geometries.

  8. Method for limiting movement of a thermal shield for a nuclear reactor, and thermal shield displacement limiter therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Boyd, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method of limiting the movement of a thermal shield of a nuclear reactor. It comprises: machining at least four (4) pockets in upper portions of a thermal shield circumferentially about a core barrel of a nuclear reactor to receive key-wave inserts; tapping bolt holes in the pockets of the thermal shield to receive bolts; positioning key-wave inserts into the pockets of the thermal shield to be bolted in place with the bolt holes; machining dowel holes at least partially through the positioned key-way inserts and the thermal shield to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the key-way insert and thermal shield to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; sliding limiter keys into the key-way inserts and bolting the limiter keys to the core barrel to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative and the core barrel while allowing radial and axial movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; machining dowel holes through the limiter key and at least partially through the core barrel to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the limiter key and core barrel to restrain tangential movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel of the nuclear reactor

  9. Application of SCALE 6.1 MAVRIC Sequence for Activation Calculation in Reactor Primary Shield Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong IL

    2014-01-01

    Activation calculation requires flux information at desired location and reaction cross sections for the constituent elements to obtain production rate of activation products. Generally it is not an easy task to obtain fluxes or reaction rates with low uncertainties in a reasonable time for deep penetration problems by using standard Monte Carlo methods. The MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence in SCALE 6.1 code package is intended to perform radiation transport on problems that are too challenging for standard, unbiased Monte Carlo methods. And the SCALE code system provides plenty of ENDF reaction types enough to consider almost all activation reactions in the nuclear reactor materials. To evaluate the activation of the important isotopes in primary shield, SCALE 6.1 MAVRIC sequence has been utilized for the KSNP reactor model and the calculated results are compared to the isotopic activity concentration of related standard. Related to the planning for decommission, the activation products in concrete primary shield such as Fe-55, Co-60, Ba-133, Eu-152, and Eu-154 are identified as important elements according to the comparisons with related standard for exemption. In this study, reference data are used for the concrete compositions in the activation calculation to see the applicability of MAVRIC code to the evaluation of activation inventory in the concrete primary shield. The composition data of trace elements as shown in Table 1 are obtained from various US power plant sites and accordingly they have large variations in quantity due to the characteristics of concrete composition. In practical estimation of activation radioactivity for a specific plant related to decommissioning, rigorous chemical analysis of concrete samples of the plant would first have to be performed to get exact information for compositions of concrete. Considering the capability of solving deep penetration transport problems and richness

  10. Greedy Deep Dictionary Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Tariyal, Snigdha; Majumdar, Angshul; Singh, Richa; Vatsa, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new deep learning tool called deep dictionary learning. Multi-level dictionaries are learnt in a greedy fashion, one layer at a time. This requires solving a simple (shallow) dictionary learning problem, the solution to this is well known. We apply the proposed technique on some benchmark deep learning datasets. We compare our results with other deep learning tools like stacked autoencoder and deep belief network; and state of the art supervised dictionary learning t...

  11. Graphene-Based Sandwich Structures for Frequency Selectable Electromagnetic Shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei-Li; Gong, Congcheng; Li, Huimin; Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Mingji; Yuan, Xujin; Chen, Haosen; Yang, Yazheng; Fang, Daining

    2017-10-18

    Due to substantial development of electronics and telecommunication techniques, materials with electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance are significant in alleviating the interference impacts induced from a remarkable variety of devices. In the work, we propose novel sandwich structures for manipulating the EM wave transport, which holds unique EMI shielding features of frequency selectivity. By employing electrical and magnetic loss spacers, the resultant sandwich structures are endowed with tunable EMI shielding performance, showing substantial improvements in overall shielding effectiveness along with pronounced shielding peak shift. The mechanisms suggest that the multiple interfaces, electromagnetic loss media, and changes of representative EM wavelength could be critical roles in tailoring the EMI shielding performance. The results provide a versatile strategy that could be extended in other frequency ranges and various types of sandwich structures, promising great opportunities for designing and fabricating advanced electromagnetic attenuation materials and devices.

  12. RADSHI: shielding calculation program for different geometries sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelen, A.; Alvarez, I.; Lopez, H.; Manso, M.

    1996-01-01

    A computer code written in pascal language for IBM/Pc is described. The program calculates the optimum thickness of slab shield for different geometries sources. The Point Kernel Method is employed, which enables the obtention of the ionizing radiation flux density. The calculation takes into account the possibility of self-absorption in the source. The air kerma rate for gamma radiation is determined, and with the concept of attenuation length through the equivalent attenuation length the shield is obtained. The scattering and the exponential attenuation inside the shield material is considered in the program. The shield materials can be: concrete, water, iron or lead. It also calculates the shield for point isotropic neutron source, using as shield materials paraffin, concrete or water. (authors). 13 refs

  13. Neutron shielding performance of water-extended polyester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Carrillo, H.R.; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Hernandez-Davila, V.M.; Vega Carrillo, H.R.; Hernandez-Davila, V.M.; Gallego, E.; Lorente, A.

    2006-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study to determine the shielding features to neutrons of water-extended polyester (WEP) was carried out. Materials with low atomic number are predominantly used for neutron shielding because these materials effectively attenuate neutrons, mainly through elastic and inelastic collisions. In addition to neutron attenuation properties, other desirable properties for neutron shielding materials include mechanical strength, stability, low cost, and ease of handling. During the selection of materials to design a neutron shield, prompt gamma production as well as radionuclide induced by neutron activation must be considered. In this investigation the Monte Carlo method (MCNP code) was used to evaluate the performance of a water-extended polyester shield designed for the transportation, storage, and use of a 252 Cf isotopic neutron source, for comparison the calculations were extended to water shielding, the bare source in vacuum and in air. (authors)

  14. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) conceptual design shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.O.; Odano, N.; Lillie, R.A.

    1998-03-01

    The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented

  15. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akarslan, F.; Molla, T. [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Textile Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Üncü, I. S. [Suleyman Demirel University, Technological Fac. Electrical-Electronic Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Kılıncarslan, S., E-mail: seref@tef.sdu.edu.tr [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Civil Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Akkurt, I. [Suleyman Demirel University, Art and Science Fac., Physics Dep., Isparta (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained.

  16. A new high-voltage interconnection shielding method for SOI monolithic ICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Zhu, Jing; Sun, Weifeng; Huang, Xuequan; Zhao, Minna; Chen, Jiajun; Shi, Longxing; Chen, Jian; Ding, Desheng

    2017-07-01

    The high-voltage interconnection (HVI) issue becomes severe in the high-voltage monolithic ICs when single-layer metal is used for lowering the cost. This paper proposes a dual deep-oxide trenches (DDOT) structure for 500 V Silicon-on-Insulator Lateral Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (SOI-LIGBT) to shield the influence of HVI on the breakdown voltage. Compared with the conventional DDOT structure, HVI region of the proposed DDOT structure is shrunk by employing a shallow trench (T1) and a deep trench (T2). Besides the breakdown mechanism in the off-state, the current density and impact ionization rate distributions in the on-state of the proposed structure are also investigated. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed DDOT structure can fully shield the influence of HVI with significant reduction in the area of silicon region beneath the HVI. With almost the same off-state breakdown voltage (BVoff) of 550 V as the conventional DDOT structure, the length of the silicon region under the HVI in the proposed structure is shortened from 45 μm to 15 μm. Meanwhile, no on-state breakdown voltage (BVon) degradation is observed according to the measured results. The new method proposed in this work can also be used for other types of high-voltage devices such as LDMOS and free-wheeling diode in SOI Monolithic ICs.

  17. Shielding design at Fermilab: Calculations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    The development of the Fermilab accelerator complex during the past two decades from its concept as the ''200 BeV accelerator'' to that of the present tevatron, designed to operate at energies as high as 1 TeV, has required a coincidental refinement and development in methods of shielding design. In this paper I describe these methods as used by the radiation protection staff of Fermilab. This description will review experimental measurements which substantiate these techniques in realistic situations. Along the way, observations will be stated which likely are applicable to other protron accelerators in the multi-hundred GeV energy region, including larger ones yet to be constructed

  18. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Quentin E.; Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq 153 Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D 98% ), I-RSBT reduced urethral D 0.1cc below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D 1cc was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D 1cc was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq 153 Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed 153 Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29%–44% if the clinician allows

  19. Neutron streaming studies along JET shielding penetrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatelatos Ion E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutronic benchmark experiments are carried out at JET aiming to assess the neutronic codes and data used in ITER analysis. Among other activities, experiments are performed in order to validate neutron streaming simulations along long penetrations in the JET shielding configuration. In this work, neutron streaming calculations along the JET personnel entrance maze are presented. Simulations were performed using the MCNP code for Deuterium-Deuterium and Deuterium- Tritium plasma sources. The results of the simulations were compared against experimental data obtained using thermoluminescence detectors and activation foils.

  20. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). However, the results of this investigation are believed to be generally applicable to the broad class of the next generation of experimental tokamak facilities such as ETF. The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties are compared to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations are developed on resolving the issue

  1. Elements for containment shell or shielded cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayet, L.

    1984-01-01

    These elements are the first shield making work possible and are the first components around which hot labs are built. Multiplication and improvement of these materials imply the definition of some principles, coordination and standardization. All the materials were realized according to safety standards with the best performance possible. Examples are given of analysis of data given by the designer of a containment to the manufacturer to obtain the quality required by the French standard M62-221 (March 1983) and catalogs of standardized PMDS (Protection, handling, detection, safety) materials and equipments [fr

  2. An analytical theory of transmission line shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Per

    1993-01-01

    The classical electrogeometric model of shielding failure flashovers on transmission lines is investigated by analytical methods. Most of the basic elements that has appeared in the literature on the subject have been incorporated and put into a comprehensive model. These elements are: tower top geometry, structure height above ground, line insulation, lateral slope of ground, probability distribution of lightning currents, ratio of striking distances to ground wire and earth relative to conductor, and probability distribution of lightning leader approach angle to ground. Departing from a basic idealistic case, the sensitivity of the model to variations in these parameters is studied. Numerical examples are given. 8 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  3. Space Shuttle Orbiter AFT heat shield seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the orbiter aft heat shield seal (AHSS) design, which involved advancing mechanical seal technology in severe thermal environment is discussed. The baseline design, various improvements for engine access, and technical problem solution are presented. It is a structure and mechanism at the three main propulsion system (MPS) engine interfaces to the aft compartment structure. Access to each MPS engine requires disassembly and removal of the AHSS. Each AHSS accommodates the engine movement, is exposed to an extremely high temperature environment, and is part of the venting control of the aft compartment.

  4. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  5. Long-term climate change: the evolution of shield surface boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, W.R.

    2007-01-01

    The Earths surface during the Pleistocene epoch has been repeatedly subjected to glacial cycles that have markedly influenced both the landscape and surface boundary conditions that, in part, governed past evolution of deep-seated Shield groundwater flow domains. As part of the Deep Geologic Repository Technology Programme simulations of the last Laurentide glacial episode have been undertaken with the University of Toronto Glacial System Model (GSM). The purpose of these simulations is to yield constrained predictions of the magnitude and time rate of change of peri-glacial, glacial and boreal regimes that have perturbed Shield flow domains in the geologic past. A detailed model of long timescale climate change has been developed, which is able to make useful predictions of the process of continental glaciation and deglaciation that has occurred in the past due to the small changes in the effective intensity of the Sun at the location of the Earth caused by gravitational many body effects in Solar System evolution. Based upon the success of this model we are able to assert that we have demonstrated a basic understanding of why this process has continually recurred in the past on a timescale of approximately 100 000 years. Continuing work with the Glacial Systems Model and efforts to provide explicit linkage to numerical analyses of sub-surface hydrology are beginning to yield a new understanding of groundwater flow system evolution and response to glacial perturbations. In so doing this understanding is not only providing a reasoned basis on which to examine issues of geosphere stability as relevant to the safety of a hypothetical repository for used nuclear fuel in Shield terrain, but is also offering an improved basis for the integrated interpretation of multi-disciplinary geo-scientific data necessary for development of a descriptive geosphere model that is seen as fundamental to the repository Safety Case. (author)

  6. Methods and procedures for shielding analyses for the SNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, I.; Ferguson, F.; Gallmeier, F.X.; Iverson, E.; Lu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide radiologically safe Spallation Neutron Source operation, shielding analyses are performed according to Oak Ridge National Laboratory internal regulations and to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations. An overview of on-going shielding work for the accelerator facility and neutrons beam lines, methods used for the analyses, and associated procedures and regulations are presented. Methods used to perform shielding analyses are described as well. (author)

  7. Shielding design method for LMFBR validation on the Phenix factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrillat, J.C.; Crouzet, J.; Misrakis, J.; Salvatores, M.; Rado, V.; Palmiotti, G.

    1983-05-01

    Shielding design methods, developed at CEA for shielding calculations find a global validation by the means of Phenix power reactor (250 MWe) measurements. Particularly, the secondary sodium activation of pool type LMFBR such as Super Phenix (1200 MWe) which is subject to strict safety limitation is well calculated by the adapted scheme, i.e. a two dimension transport calculation of shielding coupled to a Monte-Carlo calculation of secondary sodium activation

  8. Study and application of construction technology of shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chongming; Ding Dexin; Chen Liangzhu; Zhao Jingfa; Li Shilong

    2008-01-01

    Process and techniques such as mixing,transportation and pouring have been studied. The construction technology for the shielding concrete with different densities has been summarized. The technology for the common concrete is quite different from that of shielding concrete, especially when its density is more than 4000 kg/m3. Application and practices have shown that different construction technologies shall be used for shielding concretes with different densities, and thus to ensure its uniformity and construction quality. (authors)

  9. Revised neutral gas shielding model for pellet ablation - combined neutral and plasma shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Schuresko, D.D.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The ablation and penetration of pellets in early ORMAK and ISX-A experiments were reliably predicted by the neutral gas shielding model of Milora and Foster. These experiments demonstrated that the principle components of the model - a self-generated shield which reduces the heat flux at the plasma surface - were correct. In more recent experiments with higher temperature plasmas, this model consistently predicts greater penetration than observed in the experiments. Upgarding known limitations of the original model brings the predicted and observed penetration values into agreement. These improvements include: (1) treating the incident electrons as having distribution in energy rather than being monoenergetic; (2) including the shielding effects of cold, dense plasma extending along the magnetic field outside the neutral shield; and (3) modifying the finite plasma, self-limiting incident heat flux so that it represents a collisionless plasma limit rather than a collisional limit. Comparisons are made between the models for a selection of ISX-B Alcator-C, and TFTR shots. The net effect of the changes in the model is an increase in pellet ablation rates and decrease in penetration for current and future experiments

  10. Development of special radiation shielding concretes using natural local materials and evaluation of their shielding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Takeyeddin, M.; Al-Nassri, M.; Yousef, S.

    2008-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most important materials used for radiation shielding in facilities containing radioactive sources and radiation generating machines. The concrete shielding properties may vary depending on the composite of the concrete. Aggregates is the largest constituent (about 70-80% of the total weight of normal concrete). The aim of this work is to develop special concrete with good shielding properties for gamma and neutrons, using natural local materials. For this reason two types of typical concrete widely used in Syria (in Damascus and Aleppo) and four other types of concrete, using aggregates from different regions, have been prepared. The shielding properties of these six types were studied for gamma ray (from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources)and for neutrons (from am-Be source). A reduction of about 10% in the HVL was obtained for the concrete from Damascus in comparison with that from Aleppo, for both neutrons and gammas. One of the other four types of concrete (from Rajo site, mostly Hematite), was found to further reduce the HVL by about 10% for both neutrons and gamma rays.(author)

  11. Using natural local materials for developing special radiation shielding concretes, and deduction of its shielding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Takeyeddin, M.; Al-Nassar, M.; Yousef, S.

    2006-06-01

    Concrete is considered as the most important material to be used for radiation shielding in facilities contain radioactive sources and radiation generating machines. The concrete shielding properties may vary depending on the construction of the concrete, which is highly relative to the composing aggregates i.e. aggregates consist about 70 - 80% of the total weight of normal concrete. In this project tow types of concrete used in Syria (in Damascus and Aleppo) had been studied and their shielding properties were defined for gamma ray from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources, and for neutrons from Am-Be source. About 10% reduction in HVL was found in the comparison between the tow concrete types for both neutrons and gammas. Some other types of concrete were studied using aggregates from different regions in Syria, to improve the shielding properties of concrete, and another 10% of reduction was achieved in comparison with Damascene concrete (20% in comparison with the concrete from Aleppo) for both neutrons and gamma rays. (author)

  12. Polyolefin-Nanocrystal Composites for Radiation Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — EIC Laboratories Inc. is proposing a lightweight multifunctional polymer/nanoparticle composite for radiation shielding during long-duration lunar missions. Isolated...

  13. Effects of realistic satellite shielding on SEE rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    Realistic models of satellite shielding have been used to calculate SEE rates for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and solar flare protons. The results are compared with those obtained with a nominal 0.1 inch spherical shield. The rates for GCR (solar minimum) are systematically lower than those calculated with the nominal shield. The ratio of rates is greater than 75% for lightly shielded devices, but may be as high as a factor of two where there is shielding by other circuit boards. A more nearly realistic estimate of the rates would be obtained with a spherical shield with a thickness of at least 0.4 inches (3 gm/cm 2 ) for the typical satellites considered. The calculation of the SEE rate due to protons was reformulated to expedite shielding calculations. When the method was applied to the 93L422 RAM for various flare spectra, it was apparent that shielding has a first order effect on rate predictions. The calculated flare upset rates for the TDRS satellite were within 20% of the observed rates. A spherical shield of thickness 0.3 inches (2 gm/cm 2 ) would reproduce the rates. The method was also applied to a trapped proton environment predicted from standard models for CRRES. The predicted rate was consistent with the uncertainties of the environment

  14. Multifunctional Structural Composites for Radiation Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding materials are necessary for protecting astronaut crews from the hazards of space radiation during future NASA missions. Although polyethylene...

  15. 14-MeV neutron streaming through shield gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been performed to determine the neutron streaming through straight and single-bend gaps for three different shield thicknesses. A uniform plane source emitting 14-MeV neutrons with a cosine angular distribution was used in the analyses. The results obtained are discussed in terms of how they might be used in the early stages of a shield design to obtain approximate solutions to design questions. These results have direct implications regarding neutron-streaming problems that will be encountered in the shielding analyses of tokamak fusion reactors which are constructed from pie-shaped shield/vacuum chamber segments

  16. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  17. Design of radiation shields in nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi Shirazi, A.; Daneshvar, Sh.; Aghanajafi, C.; Jahanfarnia, Gh.; Rahgoshay, M.

    2008-01-01

    This article consists of designing radiation shields in the core of nuclear reactors to control and restrain the harmful nuclear radiations in the nuclear reactor cores. The radiation shields protect the loss of energy. caused by nuclear radiation in a nuclear reactor core and consequently, they cause to increase the efficiency of the reactor and decrease the risk of being under harmful radiations for the staff. In order to design these shields, by making advantages of the O ppenheim Electrical Network m ethod, the structure of the shields are physically simulated and by obtaining a special algorithm, the amount of optimized energy caused by nuclear radiations, is calculated

  18. Neutron shielding for a {sup 252} Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares e Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Eduardo Gallego, Alfredo Lorente [Depto. de Ingenieria Nuclear, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C. Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2006-07-01

    To determine the neutron shielding features of water-extended polyester a Monte Carlo study was carried out. Materials with low atomic number are predominantly used for neutron shielding because these materials effectively attenuate neutrons, mainly through inelastic collisions and absorption reactions. During the selection of materials to design a neutron shield, prompt gamma production as well as radionuclide production induced by neutron activation must be considered. In this investigation the Monte Carlo method was used to evaluate the performance of a water-extended polyester shield designed for the transportation, storage, and use of a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source. During calculations a detailed model for the {sup 252}Cf and the shield was utilized. To compare the shielding features of water extended polyester, the calculations were also made for the bare {sup 252}Cf in vacuum, air and the shield filled with water. For all cases the calculated neutron spectra was utilized to determine the ambient equivalent neutron dose at four sites around the shielding. In the case of water extended polyester and water shielding the calculations were extended to include the prompt gamma rays produced during neutron interactions, with this information the Kerma in air was calculated at the same locations where the ambient equivalent neutron dose was determined. (Author)

  19. Electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of 3D printed polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskadourakis, Z.; Vasilopoulos, K. C.; Economou, E. N.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Kenanakis, G.

    2017-12-01

    We report on preliminary results regarding the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of various 3D printed polymeric composite structures. All studied samples were fabricated using 3D printing technology, following the fused deposition modeling approach, using commercially available filaments as starting materials. The electromagnetic shielding performance of the fabricated 3D samples was investigated in the so called C-band of the electromagnetic spectrum (3.5-7.0 GHz), which is typically used for long-distance radio telecommunications. We provide evidence that 3D printing technology can be effectively utilized to prepare operational shields, making them promising candidates for electromagnetic shielding applications for electronic devices.

  20. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Sheila A.; Fay, Catharine C.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Earle, Kevin D.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kang, Jin Ho; Park, Cheol; McMullen, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    than possible with hydrogen storage; however, a systematic experimental hydrogenation study has not been reported. A combination of the two approaches may be explored to provide yet higher hydrogen content. The hydrogen containing BNNT produced in our study will be characterized for hydrogen content and thermal stability in simulated space service environments. These new materials systems will be tested for their radiation shielding effectiveness against high energy protons and high energy heavy ions at the HIMAC facility in Japan, or a comparable facility. These high energy particles simulate exposure to SEP and GCR environments. They will also be tested in the LaRC Neutron Exposure Laboratory for their neutron shielding effectiveness, an attribute that determines their capability to shield against the secondary neutrons found inside structures and on lunar and planetary surfaces. The potential significance is to produce a radiation protection enabling technology for future exploration missions. Crew on deep space human exploration missions greater than approximately 90 days cannot remain below current crew Permissible Exposure Limits without shielding and/or biological countermeasures. The intent of this research is to bring the Agency closer to extending space missions beyond the 90-day limit, with 1 year as a long-term goal. We are advocating a systems solution with a structural materials component. Our intent is to develop the best materials system for that materials component. In this Phase I study, we have shown, computationally, that hydrogen containing BNNT is effective for shielding against GCR, SEP, and neutrons over a wide range of energies. This is why we are focusing on hydrogen containing BNNT as an innovative advanced concept. In our future work, we plan to demonstrate, experimentally, that hydrogen, boron, and nitrogen based materials can provide mechanically strong, thermally stable, structural materials with effective radiation shielding against GCR

  1. Hydrogen Cosmology from the Deep Space Gateway: Data Analysis Pipeline for Low-Frequency Radio Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapetti, D.; Tauscher, K.; Burns, J. O.; Switzer, E.; Mirocha, J.; Furlanetto, S.; Monsalve, R.

    2018-02-01

    The Deep Space Gateway will provide a unique opportunity for low-frequency radio telescopes shielded by the Moon to study the unexplored Cosmic Dawn, which our novel pipeline is able to constrain by extracting the spectrum of a neutral hydrogen line.

  2. Radioactivity, shielding, radiation damage, and remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.T.

    1975-01-01

    Proton beams of a few hundred million electron volts of energy are capable of inducing hundreds of curies of activity per microampere of beam intensity into the materials they intercept. This adds a new dimension to the parameters that must be considered when designing and operating a high-intensity accelerator facility. Large investments must be made in shielding. The shielding itself may become activated and require special considerations as to its composition, location, and method of handling. Equipment must be designed to withstand large radiation dosages. Items such as vacuum seals, water tubing, and electrical insulation must be fabricated from radiation-resistant materials. Methods of maintaining and replacing equipment are required that limit the radiation dosages to workers.The high-intensity facilities of LAMPF, SIN, and TRIUMF and the high-energy facility of FERMILAB have each evolved a philosophy of radiation handling that matches their particular machine and physical plant layouts. Special tooling, commercial manipulator systems, remote viewing, and other techniques of the hot cell and fission reactor realms are finding application within accelerator facilities. (U.S.)

  3. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  4. Photon Shielding Features of Quarry Tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega-Carrillo Hector Rene

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cantera is a quarry tuff widely used in the building industry; in this work the shielding features of cantera were determined. The shielding characteristics were calculated using XCOM and MCNP5 codes for 0.03, 0.07, 0.1, 0.3, 0.662, 1, 2, and 3 MeV photons. With XCOM the mass interaction coefficients, and the total mass attenuation coefficients, were calculated. With the MCNP5 code a transmission experiment was modelled using a point-like source located 42 cm apart from a point-like detector. Between the source and the detector, cantera pieces with different thickness, ranging from 0 to 40 cm were included. The collided and uncollided photon fluence, the Kerma in air and the Ambient dose equivalent were estimated. With the uncollided fluence the linear attenuation coefficients were determined and compared with those calculated with XCOM. The linear attenuation coefficient for 0.662 MeV photons was compared with the coefficient measured with a NaI(Tl-based γ-ray spectrometer and a 137Cs source.

  5. The AA disappearing under concrete shielding

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    When the AA started up in July 1980, the machine stood freely in its hall, providing visitors with a view through the large window in the AA Control Room. The target area, in which the high-intensity 26 GeV/c proton beam from the PS hit the production target, was heavily shielded, not only towards the outside but also towards the AA-Hall. However, electrons and pions emanating from the target with the same momentum as the antiprotons, but much more numerous, accompanied these through the injection line into the AA ring. The pions decayed with a half-time corresponding to approximately a revolution period (540 ns), whereas the electrons lost energy through synchrotron radiation and ended up on the vacuum chamber wall. Electrons and pions produced the dominant component of the radiation level in the hall and the control room. With operation times far exceeding original expectations, the AA had to be buried under concrete shielding in order to reduce the radiation level by an order of magnitude.

  6. Oxidative shielding and the cost of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Jonathan D; Vitikainen, Emma I K; Stott, Iain; Cant, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Life-history theory assumes that reproduction and lifespan are constrained by trade-offs which prevent their simultaneous increase. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the possibility that this cost of reproduction is mediated by oxidative stress. However, empirical tests of this theory have yielded equivocal support. We carried out a meta-analysis to examine associations between reproduction and oxidative damage across markers and tissues. We show that oxidative damage is positively associated with reproductive effort across females of various species. Yet paradoxically, categorical comparisons of breeders versus non-breeders reveal that transition to the reproductive state is associated with a step-change reduction in oxidative damage in certain tissues and markers. Developing offspring may be particularly sensitive to harm caused by oxidative damage in mothers. Therefore, such reductions could potentially function to shield reproducing mothers, gametes and developing offspring from oxidative insults that inevitably increase as a consequence of reproductive effort. According to this perspective, we hypothesise that the cost of reproduction is mediated by dual impacts of maternally-derived oxidative damage on mothers and offspring, and that mothers may be selected to diminish such damage. Such oxidative shielding may explain why many existing studies have concluded that reproduction has little or no oxidative cost. Future advance in life-history theory therefore needs to take account of potential transgenerational impacts of the mechanisms underlying life-history trade-offs. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  7. Discussion on variance reduction technique for shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    As the task of the engineering design activity of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER), on 316 type stainless steel (SS316) and the compound system of SS316 and water, the shielding experiment using the D-T neutron source of FNS in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been carried out. However, in these analyses, enormous working time and computing time were required for determining the Weight Window parameter. Limitation or complication was felt when the variance reduction by Weight Window method of MCNP code was carried out. For the purpose of avoiding this difficulty, investigation was performed on the effectiveness of the variance reduction by cell importance method. The conditions of calculation in all cases are shown. As the results, the distribution of fractional standard deviation (FSD) related to neutrons and gamma-ray flux in the direction of shield depth is reported. There is the optimal importance change, and when importance was increased at the same rate as that of the attenuation of neutron or gamma-ray flux, the optimal variance reduction can be done. (K.I.)

  8. Protein surface shielding agents in protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hašek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization process can be controlled by protein surface shielding agents blocking undesirable competitive adhesion modes during non-equilibrium processes of deposition of protein molecules on the surface of growing crystalline blocks. The hypothesis is based on a number of experimental proofs from diffraction experiments and also retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. The molecules adhering temporarily on the surface of protein molecules change the propensity of protein molecules to deposit on the crystal surface in a definite position and orientation. The concepts of competitive adhesion modes and protein surface shielding agents acting on the surface of molecules in a non-equilibrium process of protein crystallization provide a useful platform for the control of crystallization. The desirable goal, i.e. a transient preference of a single dominating adhesion mode between protein molecules during crystallization, leads to uniform deposition of proteins in a crystal. This condition is the most important factor for diffraction quality and thus also for the accuracy of protein structure determination. The presented hypothesis is a generalization of the experimentally well proven behaviour of hydrophilic polymers on the surface of protein molecules of other compounds

  9. Enhanced radiation shielding with galena concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadad Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concrete, containing galena mineral, with enhanced shielding properties for gamma sources is developed. To achieve optimized shielding properties, ten types of galena concrete containing different mixing ratios and a reference normal concrete of 2300 kg/m3 density are studied experimentally and numerically using Monte Carlo and XCOM codes. For building galena concrete, in addition to the main composition, micro-silica and water, galena mineral (containing lead were used. The built samples have high density of 4470 kg/m3 to 5623 kg/m3 and compressive strength of 628 kg/m2 to 685 kg/m2. The half and tenth value layers (half value layer and tenth value layers for the galena concrete, when irradiated with 137Cs gamma source, were found to be 1.45 cm and 4.94 cm, respectively. When irradiated with 60Co gamma source, half value layer was measured to be 2.42 cm. The computation modeling by FLUKA and XCOM shows a good agreement between experimental and computational results.

  10. MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, Kenneth R

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberras ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

  11. Shielding analysis of the advanced voloxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Je; Park, J. J.; Lee, J. W.; Shin, J. M.; Park, G. I.; Song, K. C

    2008-09-15

    This report deals describes how much a shielding benefit can be obtained by the Advanced Voloxidation process. The calculation was performed with the MCNPX code and a simple problem was modeled with a spent fuel source which was surrounded by a concrete wall. The source terms were estimated with the ORIGEN-ARP code and the gamma spectrum and the neutron spectrum were also obtained. The thickness of the concrete wall was estimated before and after the voloxidation process. From the results, the gamma spectrum after the voloxidation process was estimated as a 67% reduction compared with that of before the voloxidation process due to the removal of several gamma emission elements such as cesium and rubidium. The MCNPX calculations provided that the thickness of the general concrete wall could be reduced by 12% after the voloxidation process. And the heavy concrete wall provided a 28% reduction in the shielding of the source term after the voloxidation process. This can be explained in that there lots of gamma emission isotopes still exist after the advanced voloxidation process such as Pu-241, Y-90, and Sr-90 which are independent of the voloxidation process.

  12. A superconducting shield to protect astronauts

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Superconductors team in the Technology department is involved in the European Space Radiation Superconducting Shield (SR2S) project, which aims to demonstrate the feasibility of using superconducting magnetic shielding technology to protect astronauts from cosmic radiation in the space environment. The material that will be used in the superconductor coils on which the project is working is magnesium diboride (MgB2), the same type of conductor developed in the form of wire for CERN for the LHC High Luminosity Cold Powering project.   Image: K. Anthony/CERN. Back in April 2014, the CERN Superconductors team announced a world-record current in an electrical transmission line using cables made of the MgB2 superconductor. This result proved that the technology could be used in the form of wire and could be a viable solution for both electrical transmission for accelerator technology and long-distance power transportation. Now, the MgB2 superconductor has found another application: it wi...

  13. System for imaging plutonium through heavy shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckertz, T.H.; Cannon, T.M.; Fenimore, E.E.; Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.

    1984-04-01

    A single pinhole can be used to image strong self-luminescent gamma-ray sources such as plutonium on gamma scintillation (Anger) cameras. However, if the source is weak or heavily shielded, a poor signal to noise ratio can prevent acquisition of the image. An imaging system designed and built at Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a coded aperture to image heavily shielded sources. The paper summarizes the mathematical techniques, based on the Fast Delta Hadamard transform, used to decode raw images. Practical design considerations such as the phase of the uniformly redundant aperture and the encoded image sampling are discussed. The imaging system consists of a custom designed m-sequence coded aperture, a Picker International Corporation gamma scintillation camera, a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system, and custom imaging software. The paper considers two sources - 1.5 mCi 57 Co unshielded at a distance of 27 m and 220 g of bulk plutonium (11.8% 240 Pu) with 0.3 cm lead, 2.5 cm steel, and 10 cm of dense plastic material at a distance of 77.5 cm. Results show that the location and geometry of a source hidden in a large sealed package can be determined without having to open the package. 6 references, 4 figures

  14. Boron filled siloxane polymers for radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouriau, Andrea; Robison, Tom; Shonrock, Clinton; Simmonds, Steve; Cox, Brad; Pacheco, Adam; Cady, Carl

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present work was to evaluate changes to structure-property relationships of 10B filled siloxane-based polymers when exposed to nuclear reactor radiation. Highly filled polysiloxanes were synthesized with the intent of fabricating materials that could shield high neutron fluences. The newly formulated materials consisted of cross-linked poly-diphenyl-methylsiloxane filled with natural boron and carbon nanofibers. This polymer was chosen because of its good thermal and chemical stabilities, as well as resistance to ionizing radiation thanks to the presence of aromatic groups in the siloxane backbone. Highly isotopically enriched 10B filler was used to provide an efficient neutron radiation shield, and carbon nanofibers were added to improve mechanical strength. This novel polymeric material was exposed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Labs to five different neutron/gamma fluxes consisting of very high neutron fluences within very short time periods. Thermocouples placed on the specimens recorded in-situ temperature changes during radiation exposure, which agreed well with those obtained from our MCNP simulations. Changes in the microstructural, thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties were evaluated by SEM, DSC, TGA, FT-IR NMR, solvent swelling, and uniaxial compressive load measurements. Our results demonstrate that these newly formulated materials are well-suitable to be used in applications that require exposure to different types of ionizing conditions that take place simultaneously.

  15. Indicia carbonate - ultrabasic massives of Ukrainian Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovchenko S.E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches of geology and composition of silicate-carbonate rocks of the Ukrainian shield. Concluded that they belonged to the karbonatites of the normal series. Metallogenic characteristics and specialization are confirming to the magmatic origin and resemblance with karbonatites alkaline series. In connection with the prevalence in the Precambrian ultrabasic-basic formation of carbonatites magmatism it was, seems to be more widespread in the areal extent of the ancient protoplatforms and rift zones. Numerous experimental data explicitly confirm the possibility of origin of dolomite melts of peridotite magma at its saturation pressure of CO2 and more than 5.7 GPa. Determined formational belonging and potential metallogenic specialization of silicate-carbonate rocks, associated with ultrabasic complexes of the Ukrainian Shield. Particular attention is paid to the identification of features that silicate-carbonate rocks can be attributed to magmatic or metamorphogenic-sedimentary formations, compared to their material composition and geotectonic position. As a result, identified the main characteristics for their recognition. Of these, the leading classified geotectonic, structural-geological, petrographic and mineralogical features, material composition and structure of the silicate-carbonate rocks associated with them relations of ultrabasic, mineralogical and geochemical features and communication with the manifestations useful mineralization. When you select features also include the effect of metamorphism on the nature of the transformation of carbonate-ultrabasic massifs and their modern look at this level erosion of the crust.

  16. Study and application of the ANISN and DOT 3.5 codes to problems in nuclear radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    The application of the Sn transport codes ANISN and DOT 3.5 to problems in radiation shielding is reviewed. In addition, a large array of codes involved in radiation shielding calculations is described and applied in this work. The ANISN and DOT 3.5 codes solve the multigroup transport equation in plane, cylindrical and spherical geometries, the first in one dimension and the second in two dimensions, by using the Sn approximation and were designed to solve coupled neutron-photon transport problems commonly found in reactor shielding calculations. In this work the numerical methods used in these codes are reviewed and their basic application to deep-penetration and void problems is discussed. Benchmark problems are solved by employing the array of codes previously mentioned. In particular, the ability of the ISOFLUXO program coupled to the DOT 3.5 code of mapping contours of regions with approximately the same scalar fluxes is illustrated, showing that they can be efficiently used in shielding analysis. (Author) [pt

  17. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  18. Preliminary evaluation of FY98 KALIMER shielding design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Woon; Kang, Chang Mu; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a preliminary evaluation of the shielding design of FY98 KALIMER. The KALIMER shielding design includes the Inner Fixed Shield of a stainless cylinder located inside the support barrel; the Radial PSDRS Shields which are three B{sub 4}C cylinders located outside the support barrel at core level; the Lower IHX shield of a cylindrical B{sub 4}C plate located above the flow guide; and Inner and Outer IHX shields of B{sub 4}C cylinders located inside and outside of the support barrel, respectively. The DORT3.1 two-dimensional transport code was used to evaluate the KALIMER shielding design. The reactor system was represented by four axial zones, each of which was modeled in the R-Z geometry. The KAFAX-F22 library was used in the analyses, which was generated from the JEF-2.2 of OECD/NEA files for LMR applications by KAERI. The performance of the KALIMER shielding design is compared against the shielding design criteria. The results indicate that the support barrel, upper grid plate, and other reactor structures meet the maximum neutron fluence and DPA limits established in the shielding design criteria. Activities of the air effluent in the PSDRS were also evaluated and are shown to satisfy the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) limits in 10 CFR Part 20. In the future, the validation of the DORT model by a detailed three dimensional calculation such as MCNP and the justification of the current shielding design limits are needed. (author). 13 refs., 23 figs., 31 tabs.

  19. Radiation shielding techniques and applications. 3. Analysis of Photon Streaming Through and Around Shield Doors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Marvin; Hack, Joe; Nathan, Steve; White, Travis

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions (Westinghouse SMS) has been tasked with providing radiological engineering design support for the new Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) being constructed at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Remote Handling Building (RHB) of the CLWR-TEF will act as the receiving facility for irradiated targets used in the production of tritium for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of the high dose rates, approaching 50 000 rads/h (500 Gy/h) from the irradiated target bundles, significant attention has been made to shielding structures within the facility. One aspect of the design that has undergone intense review is the shield doors. The RHB has six shield doors that needed to be studied with respect to photon streaming. Several aspects had to be examined to ensure that the design meets the radiation dose levels. Both the thickness and streaming issues around the door edges were designed and examined. Photon streaming through and around a shield door is a complicated problem, creating a reliance on computer modeling to perform the analyses. The computer code typically used by the Westinghouse SMS in the evaluation of photon transport through complex geometries is the MCNP Monte Carlo computer code. The complexity of the geometry within the problem can cause problems even with the Monte Carlo codes. Striking a balance between how the code handles transport through the shield door with transport through the streaming paths, particularly with the use of typical variance reduction methods, is difficult when trying to ensure that all important regions of the model are sampled appropriately. The thickness determination used a simple variance reduction technique. In construction, the shield door will not be flush against the wall, so a solid rectangular slab leaves streaming paths around the edges. Administrative controls could be used to control dose to workers; however, 10 CFR 835.1001 states

  20. Recursive Monte Carlo method for deep-penetration problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.; Greenspan, E.

    1980-01-01

    The Recursive Monte Carlo (RMC) method developed for estimating importance function distributions in deep-penetration problems is described. Unique features of the method, including the ability to infer the importance function distribution pertaining to many detectors from, essentially, a single M.C. run and the ability to use the history tape created for a representative region to calculate the importance function in identical regions, are illustrated. The RMC method is applied to the solution of two realistic deep-penetration problems - a concrete shield problem and a Tokamak major penetration problem. It is found that the RMC method can provide the importance function distributions, required for importance sampling, with accuracy that is suitable for an efficient solution of the deep-penetration problems considered. The use of the RMC method improved, by one to three orders of magnitude, the solution efficiency of the two deep-penetration problems considered: a concrete shield problem and a Tokamak major penetration problem. 8 figures, 4 tables

  1. Split shielding plates in electrostatic sector analyzers and Wien filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavor, Mikhail I.

    1995-09-01

    An analytical method is developed for calculation of the influence of the splitted shielding plates in inhomogeneous electrostatic sector analyzers and Wien filters on their electron optical properties. The method allows one to simplify considerably the choice of the mode of operation of the shielding plates needed to achieve a required electrostatic field distribution inside the analyzer.

  2. Analysis and evaluation of a shielding for scum mensurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viant Garrido, E.; Fernandez Rondon, M.; Torres Berdeguez, M.; Fernandez, M.; Perez Sanchez, D.; Falcon, L.

    1998-01-01

    In this work the evaluation of a shielding is presented developed by the Nuclear Technology Center of carry out scum mensurations in systems of mensuration gamma spectrometric. The evaluation of the capacity of attenuation of the shielding one carries out starting from the comparisons of the count rates with systems used by anteriority by the Laboratory of Environmental Radiological Surveillance

  3. Open Rotor Noise Shielding by Blended-Wing-Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping; Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of open rotor noise shielding by Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft by using model scale test data acquired in the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF) with a legacy F7/A7 rotor model and a simplified BWB platform. The objective of the analysis is the understanding of the shielding features of the BWB and the method of application of the shielding data for noise studies of BWB aircraft with open rotor propulsion. By studying the directivity patterns of individual tones, it is shown that though the tonal energy distribution and the spectral content of the wind tunnel test model, and thus its total noise, may differ from those of more advanced rotor designs, the individual tones follow directivity patterns that characterize far field radiations of modern open rotors, ensuring the validity of the use of this shielding data. Thus, open rotor tonal noise shielding should be categorized into front rotor tones, aft rotor tones and interaction tones, not only because of the different directivities of the three groups of tones, but also due to the differences in their source locations and coherence features, which make the respective shielding characteristics of the three groups of tones distinctly different from each other. To reveal the parametric trends of the BWB shielding effects, results are presented with variations in frequency, far field emission angle, rotor operational condition, engine installation geometry, and local airframe features. These results prepare the way for the development of parametric models for the shielding effects in prediction tools.

  4. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F. Hua

    2004-01-01

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847])

  5. Neutral and plasma shielding model for pellet ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-10-01

    The neutral gas shielding model for ablation of frozen hydrogenic pellets is extended to include the effects of an initial Maxwelliam distribution of incident electron energies; a cold plasma shield outside the neutral shield and extended along the magnetic field; energetic neutral beam ions and alpha particles; and self-limiting electron ablation in the collisionless plasma limit. Including the full electron distribution increases ablation, but adding the cold ionized shield reduces ablation; the net effect is a modest reduction in pellet penetration compared with the monoenergetic electron neutral shielding model with no plasma shield. Unlike electrons, fast ions can enter the neutral shield directly without passing through the cold ionized shield because their gyro-orbits are typically larger than the diameter of the cold plasma tube. Fast alpha particles should not enhance the ablation rate unless their population exceeds that expected from local classical thermalization. Fast beam ions, however, may enhance ablation in the plasma periphery if their population is high enough. Self-limiting ablation in the collisionless limit leads to a temporary distortion of the original plasma electron Maxwellian distribution function through preferential depopulation of the higher-energy electrons. 23 refs., 9 figs

  6. Recent trends in radiation shielding: a RSIC perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubey, D.K.; Roussin, R.W.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1979-01-01

    The subject of radiation transport and shielding in the nuclear power industry is reviewed, and advances in the state of the art are described. These fall into the areas of computational methods, nuclear cross sections, industry practices, and standards. Computer codes and data available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) representing recent advances are also described

  7. Thermal analysis of biological shield of fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sarda, V.

    1976-01-01

    A design optimisation of the biological shield of fast breeder test reactor was carried out using computer code HEATING. The effect of different heat sources, variation of coolant tube pitch circle radius, coolant temperature, angular pitch of coolant tubes and thermal conductivity of concrete on the temperature distribution within the shield has been studied. (author)

  8. Radiation shielding for 250 MeV protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awschalom, M.

    1987-04-01

    This paper is targetted at personnel who have the responsibility of designing the radiation shielding against neutron fluences created when protons interact with matter. Shielding of walls and roofs are discussed, as well as neutron dose leakage through labyrinths. Experimental data on neutron flux attenuation are considered, as well as some calculations using the intranuclear cascade calculations and parameterizations.

  9. Computer program optimizes design of nuclear radiation shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, G. P.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program, OPEX 2, determines minimum weight, volume, or cost for shields. Program incorporates improved coding, simplified data input, spherical geometry, and an expanded output. Method is capable of altering dose-thickness relationship when a shield layer has been removed.

  10. Electromagnetic behaviour of the shield in turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Vecchio, P.; Veca, G.M.; Sacerdoti, G.

    1975-11-01

    The structure of turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids is analyzed and the investigation of electromagnetic behaviour of the rotating shield is presented. The cases considered are: (a) An hypothetical operation with a single phase with nominal current; (b) Steady-state operation in inverse sequence with 10% of the nominal current; (c) A step variation of the magnetic field intensity in the shield

  11. Radiation shielding phenolic fibers and method of producing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtomo, K.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation shielding phenolic fiber is described comprising a filamentary phenolic polymer consisting predominantly of a sulfonic acid group-containing cured novolak resin and a metallic atom having a great radiation shielding capacity, the metallic atom being incorporated in the polymer by being chemically bound in the ionic state in the novolak resin. A method for the production of the fiber is discussed

  12. Building with electromagnetic shield structure for individual floors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Nakamura, M.; Yabana, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagata, K.

    1991-01-01

    This invention relates to a building having a floor-by-floor electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system in which an electromagnetically shielded space is divided by individual floors and electric waves are utilized within the building on a floor-by-floor basis. (author). 8 figs

  13. Neoproterozoic tectonics of the Arabian-Nubian Shield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasband, B.

    2006-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic tectonic development of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) can be divided in three parts: 1) the oceanic stage; 2) the arc-accretion stage; 3) the extensional stage. Three key-areas in the Arabian-Nubian Shield, namely the Bi'r Umq Complex, The Tabalah and Tarj Complex and the Wadi

  14. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  15. Geodynamic evolution and crustal growth of the central Indian Shield

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    significant in this evolution (Martin 1986, 1993). In this paper we report the geochemical data of gneisses and granitoids from Bastar and Bundelk- hand craton (together called central Indian Shield) and look for evidences to discern the geodynamic evolution and crustal growth of the central Indian. Shield from Archaean to ...

  16. Muck Problems in Subway Shield Tunneling in Sandy Cobble Stratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Kai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Experiments aiming at the muck improvement for Chengdu’s subway shield tunneling in water-rich sandy cobble ground initially finds out the kinds and ratio of muck improver suitable for the this strata, and through the field application determines the reasonable ratio of muck improver for shield tunneling in sandy cobble ground, providing a reference to other muck improvement for shied tunneling in similar ground. And the earth pressure balanced shield is widely used in tunnel engineering, with its characteristics as wide adaptability, safe operation, fast driving speed, low environmental noise and low cost. Taking Chengdu Metro Line as the background, aiming at the difficulty faced by EPB shield tunneling in water-rich sandy cobble ground, and based on the explorations and researches of the predecessors and scholars, engineering and technical personnel, the present paper combines with engineering examples to make a systematic summary and research on key construction technology of EPB shield tunneling through sandy cobble ground from the aspects of EPB shield adaptability, , structure and transformation of cutter and helical unearthed wares, settlement control method, and muck improvement measures. It has certain reference value and guiding significance to the selection of shield machine and the reconstruction of shield machine in complex geological condition.

  17. 30 CFR 57.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous to persons. (b) All welding operations shall be well-ventilated. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 57.14213...

  18. The sword-shield strategy of the early 1960s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhoff, J.

    1994-01-01

    The sword and shield strategy of the post WWII German Federal Republic is discussed. The effort to rebuild the German air force following WWII is outlined. This effort was initiated in 1956 with material furnished by the US through the Nash Plan. The debate surrounding the validity of the sword-shield concept is described

  19. Radiation shielding for 250 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awschalom, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is targetted at personnel who have the responsibility of designing the radiation shielding against neutron fluences created when protons interact with matter. Shielding of walls and roofs are discussed, as well as neutron dose leakage through labyrinths. Experimental data on neutron flux attenuation are considered, as well as some calculations using the intranuclear cascade calculations and parameterizations

  20. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. The shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station and advanced manned lunar base. (author)

  1. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances, and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. Shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station, and advanced manned lunar base

  2. Deep Incremental Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Mosca, Alan; Magoulas, George D

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces Deep Incremental Boosting, a new technique derived from AdaBoost, specifically adapted to work with Deep Learning methods, that reduces the required training time and improves generalisation. We draw inspiration from Transfer of Learning approaches to reduce the start-up time to training each incremental Ensemble member. We show a set of experiments that outlines some preliminary results on some common Deep Learning datasets and discuss the potential improvements Deep In...

  3. Influence of the shielding effect on the formation of a micro-texture on the cermet with nanosecond pulsed laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiandong; Liang, Liang; Jiang, Lelun; Liu, Xin

    2018-04-01

    The degree of laser pulse overlapping in a laser scanning path has a significant impact on the ablation regime in the laser machining of a micro-texture. In this Letter, a nanosecond pulsed laser is used to prepare the micro-scaled groove on WC-8Co cermet under different scanning speeds. It is observed that as the scanning speed increases, the ablated trace morphology in the first scanning pass transits from a succession of intermittent deep dimples to the consecutive overlapped shallow pits. The test result also indicates that ablated trace morphology with respect to the low scanning speed stems from a plume shielding effect. Moreover, the ablation regime considering the shielding effect in micro-groove formation process is clarified. The critical scanning speed that can circumvent the shielding effect is also summarized with respect to different laser powers.

  4. Gamma shielding by aluminum (Al-shielder manual)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, J.; Arshad, W.; Rashid, A.; Akhter, P.

    2010-12-01

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software 'AI-Shielder', developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), PINSTECH. The AI-Shielder software estimates shielding thickness of Aluminum for photons having energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. The software is helpful in safe handling or storage of gamma emitting radionuclide(s) by using Aluminum as shielding material. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the AI-Shielder, but also to provide the user(s) with the necessary information about gamma shielding. (author)

  5. Calculation of parameters for an iron shield experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavazza, S.

    1986-01-01

    In this text is carreid out the evaluation of radiation transport methodology, comparying the calculated reactions and dose rates, for neutrons and gama-rays, with the experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in YAYOI reactor. Were employed the ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system for generation of cross sections, collapsed by the ANISN code. The tranpsort calculations were made by using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the spectrum of the iron shield boundary source to the reaction and doses rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The distributions calculated for neutrons and gamma-rays, on iron shield, presented reasonable concordance with the experimental measurements. Finally, is presented a proposal for setting up of an experimental arrangement, using the IEA-R1 reactor, with the purpose of lay down a shielding benchmark. (Author) [pt

  6. Analytic flux formulas and tables of shielding functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, O.J.

    1981-06-01

    Hand calculations of radiation flux and dose rates are often useful in evaluating radiation shielding and in determining the scope of a problem. The flux formulas appropriate to such calculations are almost always based on the point kernel and allow for at most the consideration of laminar slab shields. These formulas often require access to tables of values of integral functions for effective use. Flux formulas and function tables appropriate to calculations involving homogeneous source regions with the shapes of lines, disks, slabs, truncated cones, cylinders, and spheres are presented. Slab shields may be included in most of these calculations, and the effect of a cylindrical shield surrounding a cylindrical source may be estimated. Detector points may be located axially, laterally, or interior to a cylindrical source. Line sources may be tilted with respect to a slab shield. All function tables are given for a wide range of arguments

  7. Design and fabrication of a multipurpose neutron source shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlke, L.W.

    1975-01-01

    A portable multipurpose solid radiation shield for a 5 mg 252 Cf source was designed and constructed to safely investigate its applicability to the nondestructive inspection of weapon components. The source shield features a ten in. square beam port with a manually operated sliding-rotating internal shutter, allowing one to position the source anywhere within this area. By inserting different functional beam plugs into the port one can perform neutron radiography, neutron gaging, and other neutron applications. The basic shielding materials utilized in this 60 in. dia, six ton shield include borated polyethylene, depleted uranium and steel. With a 3.8 mg 252 Cf source in the storage position the shield has an average combined neutron-gamma 3 ft mid-plane dose rate of 1.0 mr/h. (U.S.)

  8. Low-Frequency EM Field Penetration Through Magnetic and Conducting Cylindrical Shields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morgan, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    .... Example field intensities and shielding are computed for a steel pipe at frequencies of 1 Hz and I kHz. The relative effectiveness of induced magnetic shielding and eddy-current shielding is considered.

  9. MFTF-α+T end cell vacuum vessel and nuclear shield trade studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.

    1984-01-01

    Three separate and distinct vacuum vessel and nuclear shield trade studies were performed in series. The studies are: vacuum topology, nuclear shield location and composition, and water bulk shield location and material selection

  10. Deep Space Telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Resch, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing load on NASA's deep Space Network, the new capabilities for deep space missions inherent in a next-generation radio telescope, and the potential of new telescope technology for reducing construction and operation costs suggest a natural marriage between radio astronomy and deep space telecommunications in developing advanced radio telescope concepts.

  11. Calandria and shield tank assembly replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottram, R.; Guin, J.; Poxleitner, T.

    2011-01-01

    In late 2008, Bruce Powers Refurbishment of Bruce A Units 1 and 2 began to experience delays which led to a question of whether there was an alternative approach to future reactor refurbishments. A proposed alternative was to remove and replace the entire Calandria and Shield Tank Assembly (CSTA) as a modular component. In early 2009, a team of expert contractors was brought together, led by Bruce Power personnel, to establish the feasibility of the removal and replacement approach as an alternative to conventional in-situ fuel channel assembly replacement. The accepted option of removing the entire CSTA was vertically up through the vault roof without end fittings. The study findings suggest that modular replacement of the entire CSTA is a viable option for future reactor refurbishments at Bruce Power. The project itself is an example of the successful integration of contractors and Bruce Power personnel solving complex multi-disciplinary issues. (author)

  12. Solar energy apparatus with apertured shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Roger J. (Inventor); Bannon, David G. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A protective apertured shield for use about an inlet to a solar apparatus which includesd a cavity receiver for absorbing concentrated solar energy. A rigid support truss assembly is fixed to the periphery of the inlet and projects radially inwardly therefrom to define a generally central aperture area through which solar radiation can pass into the cavity receiver. A non-structural, laminated blanket is spread over the rigid support truss in such a manner as to define an outer surface area and an inner surface area diverging radially outwardly from the central aperture area toward the periphery of the inlet. The outer surface area faces away from the inlet and the inner surface area faces toward the cavity receiver. The laminated blanket includes at least one layer of material, such as ceramic fiber fabric, having high infra-red emittance and low solar absorption properties, and another layer, such as metallic foil, of low infra-red emittance properties.

  13. Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL; Kodeli, I. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Sartori, Enrico [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2011-01-01

    The Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD) collection of benchmarks was initiated in the early 1990 s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development s Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD is a major attempt to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD is also a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories fission, fusion, and accelerator benchmarks. Where possible, each experiment is described and analyzed using deterministic or probabilistic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software.

  14. Shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, B.L.; Grove, R.E. [Radiation Safety Information Computational Center RSICC, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6171 (United States); Kodeli, I. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gulliford, J.; Sartori, E. [OECD NEA Data Bank, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2011-07-01

    The shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD) collection of experiments descriptions was initiated in the early 1990s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD was designed to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD can serve as a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories - fission, fusion, and accelerator experiments. Many experiments are described and analyzed using deterministic or stochastic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software. The nuclear cross sections also play an important role as they are necessary in performing computational analysis. (authors)

  15. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Rajeev R.; Cowan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

  16. The value of tax shields IS equal to the present value of tax shields

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Ian; Nyborg, Kjell Gustav

    2006-01-01

    Fernandez (2004b) argues that the present value effect of the tax saving on debt cannot be calculated as simply the present value of the tax shields associated with interest. This contradicts standard results in the literature. It implies that, even though the capital market is complete, value-additivity is violated. As a consequence, adjusted present value formulae of a standard sort cannot be used. Also, Fernandez’s argument implies that the value of the tax saving differs from conventional...

  17. SHIELD 1.0: development of a shielding calculator program in diagnostic radiology; SHIELD 1.0: desenvolvimento de um programa de calculo de blindagem em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Romulo R.; Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da [Hospital Sao Lucas (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: ana.marques@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    In shielding calculation of radiological facilities, several parameters are required, such as occupancy, use factor, number of patients, source-barrier distance, area type (controlled and uncontrolled), radiation (primary or secondary) and material used in the barrier. The shielding design optimization requires a review of several options about the physical facility design and, mainly, the achievement of the best cost-benefit relationship for the shielding material. To facilitate the development of this kind of design, a program to calculate the shielding in diagnostic radiology was implemented, based on data and limits established by National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 147 and SVS-MS 453/98. The program was developed in C⌗ language, and presents a graphical interface for user data input and reporting capabilities. The module initially implemented, called SHIELD 1.0, refers to calculating barriers for conventional X-ray rooms. The program validation was performed by the comparison with the results of examples of shielding calculations presented in NCRP 147.

  18. A Reinforcement for Multifunctional Composites for Non-Parasitic Radiation Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are enabling to shield humans in aerospace transportation vehicles and other human habited spaces....

  19. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Deep Vein Thrombosis Deep Vein Thrombosis Leer en español What Is Deep vein thrombosis ( ... life-threatening problems if not treated. Deep Vein Thrombosis Only about half of the people who have ...

  20. Deep learning with Python

    CERN Document Server

    Chollet, Francois

    2018-01-01

    DESCRIPTION Deep learning is applicable to a widening range of artificial intelligence problems, such as image classification, speech recognition, text classification, question answering, text-to-speech, and optical character recognition. Deep Learning with Python is structured around a series of practical code examples that illustrate each new concept introduced and demonstrate best practices. By the time you reach the end of this book, you will have become a Keras expert and will be able to apply deep learning in your own projects. KEY FEATURES • Practical code examples • In-depth introduction to Keras • Teaches the difference between Deep Learning and AI ABOUT THE TECHNOLOGY Deep learning is the technology behind photo tagging systems at Facebook and Google, self-driving cars, speech recognition systems on your smartphone, and much more. AUTHOR BIO Francois Chollet is the author of Keras, one of the most widely used libraries for deep learning in Python. He has been working with deep neural ...

  1. Drumlinised glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine sediments on the Småland peneplain, South Sweden - new information on the growth and decay history of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheets during MIS 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Per; Murray, Andrew S.

    2015-08-01

    Dug trenches in sediment-cored drumlins on the Småland peneplain, southern Sweden, occurring intermixed with rock-cored drumlins, revealed sedimentary successions and facies suggesting that the core sediments were primarily deposited proglacially, both in glaciolacustrine settings as delta-front and more distal deeper-water sediments, and as glaciofluvial braidplain sediments. From the relationship between the drumlin sorted-sediment cores and their surficial drape by a till carapace, it is concluded that erosion was the main drumlin-forming process here, reshaping the original sediment morphology into streamlined landforms, after which a more or less thick traction till was deposited over the eroded and/or deformed ice-bed interface. Drumlin formation probably took place during the last deglaciation over the area. The drumlin-core sediments in 14 excavated trenches were dated by Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL); most retrieved ages fall into two distinct groups, both within Marine Isotope Stage 3 (c. 60-30 ka). When plotted as mean OSL ages for each site, all but two sites fall either into an older age group, c. 48-56 ka (seven sites), or into a younger age group, c. 28-38 ka (five sites). These age intervals correlate well with the suggested time spans for the Ristinge and Klintholm ice advances in Denmark by ice flowing from the Baltic Basin westwards, terminating in fan-shaped patterns. These interstadial ice advances in the southwestern sector of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet give rise to enigmatic questions on the physics and mechanics of ice sheet build-up and decay, especially as palaeoenvironmental data for northern Fennoscandia suggest widespread ice-free conditions within roughly the same time fame as the recorded ice advances in the south.

  2. The assembly of the disk shielding is finished.

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Hedberg

    At the end of March, the shielding project engineer, Jan Palla, could draw a sigh of relief when the fourth and final rotation of the disk shielding was carried out without incident. The two 80-ton heavy shielding assemblies were built in a horizontal position and they had to be first turned upside-down and then rotated to a vertical position during the assembly. The relatively thin disk plate with a diameter of 9 meters, made this operation quite delicate and a lot of calculation work and strengthening of the shielding was carried out before the rotations could take place. The disk shielding is being turned upside-down. The stainless steel cylinder in the centre supports the shielding as well as the small muon wheel. The two disk shielding assemblies consist of different materials such as bronze, gray steel, cast iron, stainless steel, boron doped polyethylene and lead. The project is multinational with the major pieces having been made by companies in Armenia, Serbia, Spain, Bulgaria, Italy, Slovaki...

  3. Evaluation of syringe shield effectiveness in handling radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Yong-In

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the radiation shield of radionuclide syringes and the personal dose equivalent by performing a simulation of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine diagnosis. In order to evaluate the dose depending on the distance between the radiation source and the ICRU sphere against the thickness of the shielding device, the distance at which a nuclear medicine worker may inadvertently come into contact with radiation from the radiation source was set at 0 cm to 30 cm according to the thickness of the shield, thus fixing the ICRU sphere. For a dose evaluation, Hp(10, Hp(3, and Hp(0.07 measurable in specific depth of the ICRU were evaluated. It was found that a dose measured on skin surface of nuclear medicine workers was relatively higher, that the dose varied in relation to the thickness of the radiation shield, and that the shielding effect decreased for some radiation sources such as 67Ga and 111In. It proved necessary to increase thickness of shielding device to the radiation sources such as 67Ga and 111In. It is also considered that a study of proper shielding thickness will be needed in future.

  4. Shielding device for control rod in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo; Tomatsu, Tsutomu.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention shields radiation emitted from control rods to greatly reduce an operator's radiation exposure even if reactor water level is lowered and the upper portion of the control rod is exposed upon inspection of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a shield assembly has a structure comprising a set of four columnar shields in a two-row and two-column arrangement, which can be inserted into a control rod guide tube. Upon conducting inspection, the control rod is lowered into the control rod guide tube, and in this state, the columnar shields of the shield assembly are inserted to the control rod in the control rod guide tube. With such procedures, the upper portion of the control rod protruded from the control rod guide tube is covered with the shield assembly. As a result, radiation leaked from the control rod is shielded. Accordingly, irradiation in the reactor due to leaked radiation can be prevented thereby enabling to reduce an operator's radiation exposure. (I.S.)

  5. Nuclear shielding of openings in ITER Tokamak building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, A., E-mail: alexis.dammann@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Arumugam, A.P.; Beaudoin, V.; Beltran, D.; Benchikhoune, M.; Berruyer, F.; Cortes, P.; Gandini, F. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ghirelli, N. [ASSYSTEM E.O.S, ZAC Saint Martin, 23, rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Gray, A.; Hurzlmeier, H.; Le Page, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Lemée, A. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue René Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France); Lentini, G.; Loughlin, M.; Mita, Y.; Patisson, L.; Rigoni, G.; Rathi, D.; Song, I. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Establishment of a methodology to design shielded opening in external wall of the Tokamak building. ► Analysis of the shielding requirement, case by case, depending on the localization and the context. ► Implementation of an integrated solution for shielded opening. -- Abstract: The external walls of the Tokamak building, made of thick concrete, provide the nuclear shielding for operators working in adjacent buildings and for the environment. There are a series of openings to these external walls, devoted to ducts or pipes for ventilation, waveguides and transmission lines for heating systems and diagnostics, cooling pipes, cable trays or busbars. The shielding properties of the wall shall be preserved by adequate design of the openings in order not to affect the radiological zoning in adjacent areas. For some of them, shielding properties of the wall are not affected because the size of the network is quite small or the source is far from the opening. But for most of the openings, specific features shall be considered. Even if the approach is the same and the ways to shield can be standardized, specific analysis is requested in any case because the constraints are different.

  6. Implementing Dust Shielding as a Criteria for Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Lindsey; Christensen, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    Star formation is observed to occur in dense regions of molecular gas. Although the exact nature of the link between star formation and molecular hydrogen is still unclear, it has been suggested that dust shielding of dense gas is the key factor enabling the presence of both. We present a model in which star formation is linked explicitly to local dust shielding, rather than molecular hydrogen abundance, in smoothed particle hydrodynamics galaxy formation simulations. We used simulations of isolated Milky-Way-mass disk galaxies to develop a dust shielding model in which the radiative shielding length was based off of the Jeans length with a T=40 K temperature cap. Using this shielding model, we compare the effects of different star formation recipes, including recipes in which star formation is based on the amount of dust shielding or the local molecular hydrogen abundance. We test our star formation models on two sets of isolated disk galaxies with solar and sub-solar metallicities and on a cosmological dwarf galaxy simulation. We find that the shielding-based model can reproduce the observed transition from atomic to molecular hydrogen at realistic surface densities, exhibits periodic bursts of star formation, and allows for star formation at higher temperatures and lower densities than a model in which star formation is tied directly to H2 abundance.

  7. Activation of the concrete in the bio shield of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.

    2005-02-01

    Calculations of neutron spectra in different parts of the tokamak building of ITER are performed. A computational geometry model of the tokamak building is prepared using MCNP-4C. The model includes adequate material composition and geometry description of the main parts of the tokamak for PPCS plant model A: toroidal field coils, vacuum vessel, shield, blanket structure, first wall, divertor, 14.1 MeV neutron source. The design and the dimensions of the bio shield are taken from the current ITER design. MCNP calculations of the neutron spectra in the bio shield (concrete) of ITER are performed, using the neutron spectra in TF coils calculated at UKAEA as external neutron source. The neutron spectra in the concrete calculated by MCNP are used as input data in the code EASY99 for estimations of the activation of the concrete in the bio shield around the tokamak. The time evolutions of the maximum (in the bio shield floor) and minimum (in the bio shield side walls) specific activity (Bq/kg) and dose rate (Sv/h.) of the main dominant nuclides in the concrete are evaluated and compared for 3 different concrete types, used as biological shield in the PWR and BR3 reactors. (author)

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Shieldings of Stacked Aromatic and Antiaromatic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundholm, Dage; Rauhalahti, Markus; Özcan, Nergiz; Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Kussmann, Jörg; Luenser, Arne; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-05-09

    Nuclear magnetic shieldings have been calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level for stacks of benzene, hexadehydro[12]annulene, dodecadehydro[18]annulene, and hexabenzocoronene. The magnetic shieldings due to the ring currents in the adjacent molecules have been estimated by calculating nucleus independent molecular shieldings for the monomer in the atomic positions of neighbor molecules. The calculations show that the independent shielding model works reasonably well for the 1 H NMR shieldings of benzene and hexadehydro[12]annulene, whereas for the larger molecules and for the 13 C NMR shieldings the interaction between the molecules leads to shielding effects that are at least of the same size as the ring current contributions from the adjacent molecules. A better agreement is obtained when the nearest neighbors are also considered at full quantum mechanical (QM) level. The calculations suggest that the nearest solvent molecules must be included in the quantum mechanical system, at least when estimating solvent shifts at the molecular mechanics (MM) level. Current density calculations show that the stacking does not significantly affect the ring current strengths of the individual molecules, whereas the shape of the ring current for a single molecule differs from that of the stacked molecules.

  9. Face shield design against blast-induced head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Long Bin; Tse, Kwong Ming; Tan, Yuan Hong; Sapingi, Mohamad Ali Bin; Tan, Vincent Beng Chye; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2017-12-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has been on the rise in recent years because of the increasing use of improvised explosive devices in conflict zones. Our study investigates the response of a helmeted human head subjected to a blast of 1 atm peak overpressure, for cases with and without a standard polycarbonate (PC) face shield and for face shields comprising of composite PC and aerogel materials and with lateral edge extension. The novel introduction of aerogel into the laminate face shield is explored and its wave-structure interaction mechanics and performance in blast mitigation is analysed. Our numerical results show that the face shield prevented direct exposure of the blast wave to the face and help delays the transmission of the blast to reduce the intracranial pressures (ICPs) at the parietal lobe. However, the blast wave can diffract and enter the midface region at the bottom and side edges of the face shield, resulting in traumatic brain injury. This suggests that the bottom and sides of the face shield are important regions to focus on to reduce wave ingress. The laminated PC/aerogel/PC face shield yielded higher peak positive and negative ICPs at the frontal lobe, than the original PC one. For the occipital and temporal brain regions, the laminated face shield performed better than the original. The composite face shield with extended edges reduced ICP at the temporal lobe but increases ICP significantly at the parietal lobe, which suggests that a greater coverage may not lead to better mitigating effects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Self shielding in cylindrical fissile sources in the APNea system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensley, D.

    1997-01-01

    In order for a source of fissile material to be useful as a calibration instrument, it is necessary to know not only how much fissile material is in the source but also what the effective fissile content is. Because uranium and plutonium absorb thermal neutrons so Efficiently, material in the center of a sample is shielded from the external thermal flux by the surface layers of the material. Differential dieaway measurements in the APNea System of five different sets of cylindrical fissile sources show the various self shielding effects that are routinely encountered. A method for calculating the self shielding effect is presented and its predictions are compared with the experimental results

  11. The manufacturing of depleted uranium biological shield components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metelkin, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The unique combination of the physical and mechanical properties of uranium made it possible to manufacture biological shield components of transport package container (TPC) for transportation nuclear power plant irradiated fuel and radionuclides of radiation diagnostic instruments. Protective properties are substantially dependent on the nature radionuclide composition of uranium, that why I recommended depleted uranium after radiation chemical processing. Depleted uranium biological shield (DUBS) has improved specific mass-size characteristics compared to a shield made of lead, steel or tungsten. Technological achievements in uranium casting and machining made it possible to manufacture DUBS components of TPC up to 3 tons of mass and up to 2 metres of the maximum size. (authors)

  12. Design of platform for removing screws from LCD display shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zimei; Qin, Qin; Dou, Jianfang; Zhu, Dongdong

    2017-11-01

    Removing the screws on the sides of a shield is a necessary process in disassembling a computer LCD display. To solve this issue, a platform has been designed for removing the screws on display shields. This platform uses virtual instrument technology with LabVIEW as the development environment to design the mechanical structure with the technologies of motion control, human-computer interaction and target recognition. This platform removes the screws from the sides of the shield of an LCD display mechanically thus to guarantee follow-up separation and recycle.

  13. EMC characteristics of composite structure - Electric/electromagnetic shielding attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegertseder, P.; Breitsameter, R.

    1989-09-01

    The paper reports electric/electromagnetic shielding-attenuation experiments performed on different test boxes built with the same materials and processes as those to be used for the construction of a helicopter. The measurements are performed in the frequency range of 14 to 18 GHz, and the effects of different composite materials, jointing and bonding of structure parts of the boxes, application and bonding of the mesh, the construction of access panels, and conductive seals on these panels are assessed. It is demonstrated that moderate electric/electromagnetic shielding-attenuation values can be achieved by composite structures made from carbon, and materials and procedures required for high shielding attenuation are discussed.

  14. Shielding consideration for a deuteron activated liquid lithium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.T.; Shapiro, A.M.; Lee, J.B.; Miller, W.C.

    1979-09-01

    A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the potential shielding implication due to the 7 Be plateout on the lithium piping in the FMIT facility. Various parameters such as plateout percentage, hot flush efficiency and 7 Be trapping efficiency were varied to assess the overall shielding requirement relationship. The 7 Be plateout was found to place severe limitations on the hands-on maintenance access. Hot flush and 7 Be traps are effective ways of minimizing the 7 Be plateout. To be effective in reducing local shielding requirements, the combined 7 Be trapping and hot flush efficiency shall be greater than 95%

  15. Electrically nonconductive shield for electric equipment generating ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.

    1979-01-01

    As a radiation protection shield there is proposed a nonconductive shield fabricated from epoxides or other plastics material and containing finely dispersed radiation absorbing metal. It is to be designed in such a way that it lies in the range of a high electric gradient in the equipment, close to the radiation-producing component. As suitable metals there are mentioned tin, tungsten, and lead resp. their oxides. As an example there is used an X-ray shielding. (RW) 891 RW/RW 892 MKO [de

  16. Efficiency of the cervical lead shield during intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaffe, I.; Littner, M.M.; Shlezinger, T.; Segal, P.

    1986-12-01

    The cervical lead shield was compared with the conventional lead apron with regard to efficiency of protection against radiation during a full-month survey (fourteen periapical and two bitewing radiographs). The study was performed on a Temex tissue-equivalent human phantom, and thermoluminescent dosimetry was used to measure radiation absorption in the ovaries, testes, and thyroid gland areas. Results showed that the cervical shield significantly reduces the amount of radiation to the skin in all three areas and is equally as effective as the combination of lead apron and thyroid shield. It is therefore recommended as a protective measure during intraoral radiography.

  17. NF ISO 15080. Nuclear facilities. Ventilation penetrations for shielded containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    This standard document applies to any kind of shielded containment devoted to the handling of gamma-emitting or neutron-emitting radioactive materials that require a remote handling behind a protection screen. It covers all kinds of hot cells used in the nuclear fuel cycle (reprocessing facilities, hot labs, shielded containments, radioactive waste storage facilities etc..). It can eventually apply also to the containments used in accelerators, research reactors and fusion reactors, radiography facilities and neutrons generators. It precises the general and detailed principles that must be respected during the design of ventilation penetrations inside shielded containments (conventional penetration systems and 'helicoidal cast iron screw technique' systems). (J.S.)

  18. Development of silicone rubber-type neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Jae Bum; Cho, Soo Hang; Kim, Ik Soo; Oh, Seung Chul; Hong, Soon Seok; Noh, Sung Ki; Jeong, Duk Yeon.

    1997-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 16 tabs., 17 figs., 25 refs

  19. Impact of the retained heat shield concept on science instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    Associated interface problems between the mass spectrometer and the actual probe design are considered along with the problem of producing a clean sample to the gas detection instrument. Of particular interest is the penetration of the heat shield by the mass spectrometer sampling tube, because it must be demonstrated that the sampling tube can penetrate the heat shield and that the mass spectrometer can be supplied with a contaminant-free gas sample, free of contaminants from out-gassing of the heat shield.

  20. Alternative methodology for irradiation reactor experimental shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellozo, Sergio de Oliveira; Vital, Helio de Carvalho

    1996-01-01

    Due to a change in the project of the Experimental Irradiation Reactor, its shielding design had to be recalculated according to an alternative simplified analytical approach, since the standard transport calculations were temporarily unavailable. In the calculation of the new width for the shielding made up of steel and high-density concrete layers, the following radiation components were considered: fast neutrons and primary gammas (produced by fission and beta decay), from the core; and secondary gammas, produced by thermal neutron capture in the shielding. (author)

  1. The shielding of a 14 MeV neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brighton, D.R.

    1976-10-01

    The concrete masonry shield for a 14 MeV neutron generator was designed using data supplied by the manufacturer. Subsequent radiation surveys outside the shield showed doses higher than expected. Calculations indicated the sensitivity of dose transmission factors to concrete composition. The observed dose transmission factor agreed with that of Broerse but not with that of Hacke and Prudhomme. Measurements and calculations delineated the contribution that neutrons, scattered from the upper wall that supports the laboratory roof, made to the dose in adjoining areas. In redesigning the shield a compromise was made between additional cost and restrictions on the generator's duty cycle, which is automatically controlled to ensure personnel safety. (Author)

  2. Planar quadrature coil design using shielded-loop resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, A

    1997-01-01

    The shielded-loop resonator is known to have a low capacitive sample loss due to a perfect balancing. In this paper, it is demonstrated that shielded-loop technology also can be used to improve design of planar quadrature coils. Both a dual-loop circuit and especially a dual-mode circuit may...... benefit from use of shielded-loop resonators. Observations in measurements agree with theory for both a dual-loop coil and a dual-mode coil. The coils were designed for use as transmit/receive coil for 1H imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 T in rat brain....

  3. Shielding analysis methods available in the scale computational system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C.V.; Tang, J.S.; Hermann, O.W.; Bucholz, J.A.; Emmett, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Computational tools have been included in the SCALE system to allow shielding analysis to be performed using both discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques. One-dimensional discrete ordinates analyses are performed with the XSDRNPM-S module, and point dose rates outside the shield are calculated with the XSDOSE module. Multidimensional analyses are performed with the MORSE-SGC/S Monte Carlo module. This paper will review the above modules and the four Shielding Analysis Sequences (SAS) developed for the SCALE system. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Development of epoxy resin-type neutron shielding materials (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy.

    1997-12-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear /radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various materials properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 31 refs., 22 tabs., 17 figs

  5. CHESS upgrade 1995: Improved radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, K.

    1996-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) stores electrons and positrons at 5.3 GeV for the production and study of B mesons, and, in addition, it supplies synchrotron radiation for CHESS. The machine has been upgraded for 300 mA operation. It is planned that each beam will be injected in about 5 minutes and that particle beam lifetimes will be several hours. In a cooperative effort, staff members at CHESS and LNS have studied sources in CESR that produce radiation in the user areas. The group has been responsible for the development and realization of new tunnel shielding walls that provide a level of radiation protection from 20 to approx-gt 100 times what was previously available. Our experience has indicated that a major contribution to the environmental radiation is not from photons, but results from neutrons that are generated by particle beam loss in the ring. Neutrons are stopped by inelastic scattering and absorption in thick materials such as heavy concrete. The design for the upgraded walls, the development of a mix for our heavy concrete, and all the concrete casting was done by CHESS and LNS personnel. The concrete incorporates a new material for this application, one that has yielded a significant cost saving in the production of over 200 tons of new wall sections. The material is an artificially enriched iron oxide pellet manufactured in vast quantities from hematite ore for the steel-making industry. Its material and chemical properties (iron and impurity content, strength, size and uniformity) make it an excellent substitute for high grade Brazilian ore, which is commonly used as heavy aggregate in radiation shielding. Its cost is about a third that of the natural ore. The concrete has excellent workability, a 28 day compressive strength exceeding 6000 psi and a density of 220 lbs/cu.ft (3.5 gr/cc). The density is limited by an interesting property of the pellets that is motivated by efficiency in the steel-making application. (Abstract Truncated)

  6. The earthquakes of the Baltic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slunga, R.

    1990-06-01

    More than 200 earthquakes in the Baltic Shield area in the size range ML 0.6-4.5 have been studied by dense regional seismic networks. The analysis includes focal depths, dynamic source parameters, and fault plane solutions. In southern Sweden a long part of the Protogene zone marks a change in the seismic activity. The focal depths indicate three crustal layers: Upper crust (0-18 km in southern Sweden, 0-13 km in northern Sweden), middle crust down to 35 km, and the quiet lower crust. The fault plane solutions show that strike-slip is dominating. Along the Tornquist line significant normal faulting occurs. The stresses released by the earthquakes show a remarkable consistency with a regional principle compression N60W. This indicates that plate-tectonic processes are more important than the land uplift. The spatial distribution is consistent with a model where the earthquakes are breakdowns of asperities on normally stably sliding faults. The aseismic sliding is estimated to be 2000 times more extensive than the seismic sliding. Southern Sweden is estimated to deform horizontally at a rate of 1 mm/year or more. (orig.)

  7. Nutrient shielding in clusters of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude among different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ.

  8. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells’ spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude between different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ. PMID:23848711

  9. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented

  10. Isotopic dependence of GCR fluence behind shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Hu, Xiaodong; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (±100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (∼170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past; however, less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies

  11. Shield Effect Of Functional Interlining Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šaravanja Bosiljka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference (EMI have become very serious in a variety of different electronic equipments, such as personal computers (frequency at several GHz, mobile devices (0.9 – 2.4 GHz and similar. This imposes the need for setting boundaries for EM emission of electric and electronic devices in order to minimize the possibility of interference with radio and wireless communications. Functional textiles can offer protective properties against EM radiation. The aim of this study is to investigate the degree of protection against EM radiation provided by polyamide copper-coated interlining fabric before and after dry cleaning treatment. EM protection efficiency of the interlining functional fabric is explored on both sides at the frequencies of 0.9; 1.8; 2.1 and 2.4 GHz. The results obtained have shown that the interlining fabric has good protective properties against EM radiation, but after dry cleaning, treatment reduction is observed. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs of the interlining surface confirms shield effect decline due to degradation and firing of the copper layers during the process of dry cleaning.

  12. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented.

  13. Study on Composite Material for Shielding Mixed Neutron and γ-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huasi; Wang, Qunshu; Qin, Juan; Wu, Yuelei; Zhang, Tiankui; Xie, Zhongsheng; Jiang, Xinbiao; Zhang, Guoguang; Xu, Hu; Zheng, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Wenhao; Li, Zhenghong; Zhang, Boping; Li, Linbo; Song, Zhaohui; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Yaolin; Mi, Xiaoqin; Dong, Zhengping; Li, Cheng; Jiang, Zhenyu; Zhan, Yuanping

    2008-08-01

    Optimized lightweight, compact and high temperature sustaining shielding materials for neutron and gamma radiation were developed by genetic algorithms (GA) combined with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. A series of samples were designed according to the method. Deep penetration tests by the MCNP code were completed. The results show that the designed samples have more advantages related to the radiation shielding effects in comparison with PB202 and KRAFTON-XP3, especially the Cakes with multi-layers structures of the Fe-interlayer-Pb have excellent performance. Taking into account the ratios designed of components among elements in the material, the manufacturing process of polymer with nano-TiO2 was studied experimentally by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Several samples have been tested. The attenuation experiments on the samples were carried out using tandem electrostatic accelerator neutron source, spontaneous fission neutron source of 252Cf and gamma-rays source of 60Co. The experimental results verify the correctness of optimal design and craft. The Cakes are quite suitable for applications in the practices of nuclear science and technology.

  14. IBM Deep Learning Service

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharjee, Bishwaranjan; Boag, Scott; Doshi, Chandani; Dube, Parijat; Herta, Ben; Ishakian, Vatche; Jayaram, K. R.; Khalaf, Rania; Krishna, Avesh; Li, Yu Bo; Muthusamy, Vinod; Puri, Ruchir; Ren, Yufei; Rosenberg, Florian; Seelam, Seetharami R.

    2017-01-01

    Deep learning driven by large neural network models is overtaking traditional machine learning methods for understanding unstructured and perceptual data domains such as speech, text, and vision. At the same time, the "as-a-Service"-based business model on the cloud is fundamentally transforming the information technology industry. These two trends: deep learning, and "as-a-service" are colliding to give rise to a new business model for cognitive application delivery: deep learning as a servi...

  15. Deep cascade learning

    OpenAIRE

    Marquez, Enrique, Salvador; Hare, Jonathon; Niranjan, Mahesan

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for efficient training of deep neural networks in a bottom-up fashion using a layered structure. Our algorithm, which we refer to as Deep Cascade Learning, is motivated by the Cascade Correlation approach of Fahlman who introduced it in the context of perceptrons. We demonstrate our algorithm on networks of convolutional layers, though its applicability is more general. Such training of deep networks in a cascade, directly circumvents the well-know...

  16. Astronaut Exposures to Ionizing Radiation in a Lightly-Shielded Spacesuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Simonsen, L. C.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badavi, F. F.; Atwell, W.

    1999-01-01

    The normal working and living areas of the astronauts are designed to provide an acceptable level of protection against the hazards of ionizing radiation of the space environment. Still there are occasions when they must don a spacesuit designed mainly for environmental control and mobility and leave the confines of their better-protected domain. This is especially true for deep space exploration. The impact of spacesuit construction on the exposure of critical astronaut organs will be examined in the ionizing radiation environments of free space, the lunar surface and the Martian surface. The computerized anatomical male model is used to evaluate astronaut self-shielding factors and to determine space radiation exposures to critical radiosensitive human organs.

  17. Radiation shielding design of BNCT treatment room for D-T neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouryavi, Mehdi; Farhad Masoudi, S; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that D-T neutron generator can be used as a proper neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of deep-seated brain tumors. In this paper, radiation shielding calculations have been conducted based on the computational method for designing a BNCT treatment room for a recent proposed D-T neutron source. By using the MCNP-4C code, the geometry of the treatment room has been designed and optimized in such a way that the equivalent dose rate out of the treatment room to be less than 0.5μSv/h for uncontrolled areas. The treatment room contains walls, monitoring window, maze and entrance door. According to the radiation protection viewpoint, dose rate results of out of the proposed room showed that using D-T neutron source for BNCT is safe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiation Shielding Utilizing A High Temperature Superconducting Magnet Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project aims to leverage near-term high-temperature superconducting technologies to assess applicability of magnetic shielding for protecting against exposure...

  19. Solvent effects on the magnetic shielding of tertiary butyl alcohol

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    )4 and tetramethyl ammonium cation N(CH3)4(+) have also been presented. KEY WORDS: Solvent effects, Magnetic shielding, Tertiary butyl alcohol, Tertiary butyl amine, Continuum solvation calculations, Chemical shift estimation methods

  20. Multifunctional, Boron-Foam Based Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA vision of Space Exploration requires new approaches to radiation shielding. Both Spiral 2 and Spiral 3 concepts are extremely sensitive to weight reduction....

  1. Low Cost, Lightweight, Multifunctional Structural Shielding Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR involves the development of a lightweight innovative material for use as structure and radiation shielding in one. APS has assembled a uniquely qualified...

  2. A Shielding Concept for the MedAustron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägerhofer, L.; Feldbaumer, E.; Roesler, S.; Theis, C.; Vincke, H.

    2017-09-01

    MedAustron is a synchrotron based accelerator facility for cancer therapy and research in Wiener Neustadt, 50 km south of Vienna. The facility will provide protons up to kinetic energies of 250 MeV and carbon ions up to 400 MeV/n for ion beam therapy. Additionally, protons up to 800 MeV kinetic energy will be used in a dedicated room for non-clinical research. In order to obtain a shielding concept for this facility a detailed geometry of the accelerator facility was implemented into the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and shielding simulations were performed. In the course of these simulations the contributions of different particle types to the mixed fields around the accelerator and behind shielding were analysed. In an iterative process with the architect the final design of the shielding concept was developed until it was capable of reducing the effect of secondary radiation on humans and the environment below Austrian legal limits.

  3. Shielding of electromagnetic fields of current sources by spherical enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, S. V. K.; Rao, M. N.; Katti, V. R.

    Expressions for the shielding effectiveness of a conductive spherical enclosure excited by a Hertzian dipole have been derived using the dyadic Green's function technique. This technique has the advantage that the fields inside or outside the enclosure due to arbitrary current distribution may be found by employing the same set of dyadic Green's functions. The shielding effectiveness for plane wave incidence has been determined by considering the limiting case of the current source external to the spherical shell. Computed values of shielding effectiveness deduced in this manner have been compared with those obtained by the numerical evaluation of the expressions derived by earlier authors. The theory presented here may be useful to EMC (electromagnetic compatibility) engineers who must consider electromagnetic coupling from current sources in the vicinity of shielding enclosures.

  4. Criticality Evaluation - Cask Unloading Using the Shielded Transfer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.; Nadeau, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    This evaluation reviewed the criticality aspects of Shielded Transfer System (STS) operation. The existing Nuclear Safety Control (NSC) elements were examined and new NSC elements were developed, as needed

  5. Characterizing and Manufacturing Multifunctional Radiation Shielding Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses two vital problems for long-term space travel activities: radiation shielding and hydrogen storage for power and propulsion. While both...

  6. Magnetic Active Radiation Shielding System Using Helmholtz Coil Lattices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to investigate whether a magnetic active radiation shielding systems can be designed from an optics perspective, where Helmholtz...

  7. Efficient Radiation Shielding Through Direct Metal Laser Sintering

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed a method for efficient component-level radiation shielding that can be printed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) from files generated by the...

  8. Radiation Shielding and Hydrogen Storage with Multifunctional Carbon, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses two vital problems for long-term space travel activities: radiation shielding and hydrogen storage for power and propulsion. While both...

  9. Thyroid shields and neck exposures in cephalometric radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha-Cruz Joana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thyroid is among the more radiosensitive organs in the body. The goal of this study was twofold: (1 to evaluate age-related changes in what is exposed to ionizing radiation in the neck area, and (2 to assess thyroid shield presence in cephalometric radiographs Methods Cephalometric radiographs at one academic setting were sampled and neck exposure was related to calendar year and patient's gender and age. Results In the absence of shields, children have more vertebrae exposed than adults (p Conclusion In the absence of a thyroid shield, children have more neck structure exposed to radiation than adults. In agreement with other reports, thyroid shield utilization in this study was low, particularly in children.

  10. Study of ceramic mixed boron element as a neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail Mustapha; Mohd Reusmaazran Yusof; Md Fakarudin Ab Rahman; Nor Paiza Mohamad Hasan; Samihah Mustaffha; Yusof Abdullah; Mohamad Rabaie Shari; Airwan Affandi Mahmood; Nurliyana Abdullah; Hearie Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Shielding upon radiation should not be underestimated as it can causes hazard to health. Precautions on the released of radioactive materials should be well concerned and considered. Therefore, the combination of ceramic and boron make them very useful for shielding purpose in areas of low and intermediate neutron. A six grades of ceramic tile have been produced namely IMN05 - 5 % boron, IMN06 - 6 % boron, IMN07 - 7 % boron, IMN08 - 8 % boron, IMN09 - 9 % boron, IMN10 - 10 % boron from mixing, press and sintered process. Boron is a material that capable of absorbing and capturing neutron, so that neutron and gamma test were conducted to analyze the effectiveness of boron material in combination with ceramic as shielding. From the finding, percent reduction number of count per minute shows the ceramic tiles are capable to capture neutron. Apart from all the percentage of boron used, 10 % is the most effective shields since the percent reduction indicating greater neutron captured increased. (author)

  11. Fusion Engineering Device (FED) first wall/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, P.H.; Fuller, G.; Cramer, B.; Davisson, J.; Haines, J.; Kirchner, J.

    1981-01-01

    The torus of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is comprised of the bulk shield and its associated spool lstructure and support system, the first wall water-cooled panel and armor systems, and the pumped limiter. The bulk shielding is provided by ten shield sectors that are installed in the spool structure in such a way as to permit extraction of the sectors through the openings between adjacent toroidal field coils with a direct radial movement. The first wall armor is installed on the inboard and top interior walls of these sectors, and the water-cooled panels are installed on the outboard interior walls and the pumped limiter in the bottom of the sectors. The overall design of the first wall and shield system is described in this paper

  12. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Vishvanath P.; Badiger, Nagappa M.; Gerward, Leif

    2016-01-01

    at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section. It is shown that ZrH2 and VH2 are very good shielding materials for gamma rays and fast neutrons due to their suitable......Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fitting...... combination of low-and high-Z elements. The present work should be useful for the selection and design of blankets and shielding, and for dose evaluation for components in fusion reactors....

  13. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase II program, builds on the phase I feaibility where a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite was developed and fabricated. This...

  14. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release...

  15. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II program will concentrate on manufacturing of qualified low-current, light-weight, 10K ADR magnets for space application. Shielded ADR solenoidal magnets...

  16. Remote operation of a fully shielded electron probe microanalyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, J.; Sparry, R.P.

    1977-11-01

    A 'Microscan 5' Cambridge Instrument Company electron probe micro-analyser has been equipped with full shielding to enable high radioactive materials to be examined. The transfer of controls for remote operation are described. (author)

  17. Development of highly effective neutron shields and neutron absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, K.; Matsuda, F.; Taniuchi, H.; Yuhara, T.; Iida, T.

    1993-01-01

    A wide range of materials, including polymers and hydrogen-occluded alloys that might be usable as the neutron shielding material were examined. And a wide range of materials, including aluminum alloys that might be usable as the neutron-absorbing material were examined. After screening, the candidate material was determined on the basis of evaluation regarding its adaptabilities as a high-performance neutron-shielding and neutron-absorbing material. This candidate material was manufactured for trial, after which material properties tests, neutron-shielding tests and neutron-absorbing tests were carried out on it. The specifications of this material were thus determined. This research has resulted in materials of good performance; a neutron-shielding material based on ethylene propylene rubber and titanium hydride, and a neutron-absorbing material based on aluminum and titanium hydride. (author)

  18. Heat Shield Recession Measurements Using Remote Spectral Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OKSI proposes a minimally invasive in-flight diagnostic to measure heat shield recession during flight tests. These measurements can be used to validate models and...

  19. A low background gamma ray spectrometer with anticosmic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Quoc Hung; Vo Hong Hai; Tran Kim Tuyet; Ho Lai Tuan

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a gamma ray spectrometer protected by a lead shield (Model 747E Canberra lead shield) and an active shield made of an 80 cm x 80 cm x 3 cm plastic scintillator plate in anticoincidence on top of the lead shield. The detector used as low background gamma-spectrometer is a high purity Germanium crystal of model GC2018 Canberra. The background count rate currently achieved (30-2400 keV) is 1.27 cps without anticoincidence. The level of background suppression obtained from the active protection is 0.80 overall and about 0.43 for the 511 keV gamma line. The gamma ray spectrometer is installed and operated in the Nuclear Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Science, Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam National University. (author)

  20. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An important consideration of the use of superconducting magnets in ADR applications is shielding of the other instruments in the vicinity of the superconducting...