WorldWideScience

Sample records for fennoscandia phylogenetic analysis

  1. Molecular evolution of Puumala hantavirus in Fennoscandia: phylogenetic analysis of strains from two recolonization routes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asikainen, Kari; Hänninen, Tarja; Henttonen, Heikki

    2000-01-01

    have studied wild-type PUUV strains originating from areas along two postulated immigration routes of bank voles to Fennoscandia. Full-length sequences of the S RNA segment and partial sequences (nt 2168-2569) of the M segment were recovered by RT-PCR directly from bank vole tissues collected at three...... locations in Russian Karelia and one location in Denmark. Phylogenetic analysis showed that strains from Karelia and Finland belong to the same genetic lineage, supporting the hypothesis that PUUV spread to present Finland via a Karelian land-bridge. The Danish PUUV strains showed no particularly close...

  2. Molecular evolution of Puumala hantavirus in Fennoscandia: phylogenetic analysis of strains from two recolonization routes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asikainen, Kari; Hänninen, Tarja; Henttonen, Heikki

    2000-01-01

    Like other members of the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, Puumala virus (PUUV) is thought to be co-evolving with its natural host, the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus. To gain insight into the evolutionary history of PUUV in northern Europe during the last post-glacial period, we h...

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of otospiralin protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torktaz, Ibrahim; Behjati, Mohaddeseh; Rostami, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fibrocyte-specific protein, otospiralin, is a small protein, widely expressed in the central nervous system as neuronal cell bodies and glia. The increased expression of otospiralin in reactive astrocytes implicates its role in signaling pathways and reparative mechanisms subsequent to injury. Indeed, otospiralin is considered to be essential for the survival of fibrocytes of the mesenchymal nonsensory regions of the cochlea. It seems that other functions of this protein are not yet completely understood. Materials and Methods: Amino acid sequences of otospiralin from 12 vertebrates were derived from National Center for Biotechnology Information database. Phylogenetic analysis and phylogeny estimation were performed using MEGA 5.0.5 program, and neighbor-joining tree was constructed by this software. Results: In this computational study, the phylogenetic tree of otospiralin has been investigated. Therefore, dendrograms of otospiralin were depicted. Alignment performed in MUSCLE method by UPGMB algorithm. Also, entropy plot determined for a better illustration of amino acid variations in this protein. Conclusion: In the present study, we used otospiralin sequence of 12 different species and by constructing phylogenetic tree, we suggested out group for some related species. PMID:27099854

  4. Future glaciation in Fennoscandia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsstroem, L. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Geosciences

    1999-09-01

    Cyclic growing and melting of great ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere is typical for the Quaternary Period, and it is likely that this cycle will continue in the future. This report discusses the principal processes predicted to occur during the future glaciation which are likely to be of importance for a nuclear waste repository. It is a revised version of a synthesis of the results of two state-of-the art reports, working meetings and a seminar. Based on present knowledge, two alternative trends (A and B) can be presented for fluctuations in climate in Fennoscandia. According to forecast A the climate will gradually become colder, permitting the growth of glaciers in the mountainous areas of Norway and Sweden after 5000 years. After a minor warmer period, a greater ice advance will cover a large part of Finland around 20 000 years from now. After a new minor interstade, the ice will advance again, so that c. 60 000 years from now the Stockholm-Helsinki region will be covered by thick ice. The ice sheet will melt partially at 70 000 years AP, but then it will grow to its maximum around 100 000 years AP and cover the whole Baltic basin. Almost complete melting of the ice sheet will take place during the next interglaciation c. 120 coo years AP. According to forecast B the growth of the ice sheet will not begin for another 50 000 years, and Finland will be covered by ice about 60 000 years from now. After a minor melting, the ice sheet will enlarge and cover almost the whole Baltic basin 100 000 years from now. During the following ice minimum, at 120 000 years AP, the ice sheet will still cover northern Finland. At 150 000 years it will cover the whole Baltic basin, but then it will melt almost completely by 165 000 years from now, during the following interglaciation. In both forecasts the main changes caused by the ice sheet will be downwarping/uplift of the crust and changes in sea level. In addition, changes in the groundwater head and flux are foreseen

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of the spirochetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Weisburg, W G; Tordoff, L A; Fraser, G J; Hespell, R B; Stanton, T B; Zablen, L; Mandelco, L; Woese, C R

    1991-10-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences were determined for species of Spirochaeta, Treponema, Borrelia, Leptospira, Leptonema, and Serpula, using a modified Sanger method of direct RNA sequencing. Analysis of aligned 16S rRNA sequences indicated that the spirochetes form a coherent taxon composed of six major clusters or groups. The first group, termed the treponemes, was divided into two subgroups. The first treponeme subgroup consisted of Treponema pallidum, Treponema phagedenis, Treponema denticola, a thermophilic spirochete strain, and two species of Spirochaeta, Spirochaeta zuelzerae and Spirochaeta stenostrepta, with an average interspecies similarity of 89.9%. The second treponeme subgroup contained Treponema bryantii, Treponema pectinovorum, Treponema saccharophilum, Treponema succinifaciens, and rumen strain CA, with an average interspecies similarity of 86.2%. The average interspecies similarity between the two treponeme subgroups was 84.2%. The division of the treponemes into two subgroups was verified by single-base signature analysis. The second spirochete group contained Spirochaeta aurantia, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirochaeta litoralis, and Spirochaeta isovalerica, with an average similarity of 87.4%. The Spirochaeta group was related to the treponeme group, with an average similarity of 81.9%. The third spirochete group contained borrelias, including Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia anserina, Borrelia hermsii, and a rabbit tick strain. The borrelias formed a tight phylogenetic cluster, with average similarity of 97%. THe borrelia group shared a common branch with the Spirochaeta group and was closer to this group than to the treponemes. A single spirochete strain isolated fromt the shew constituted the fourth group. The fifth group was composed of strains of Serpula (Treponema) hyodysenteriae and Serpula (Treponema) innocens. The two species of this group were closely related, with a similarity of greater than 99%. Leptonema illini

  6. Bosque: integrated phylogenetic analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Flandes, Salvador; Ulloa, Osvaldo

    2008-11-01

    Phylogenetic analyses today involve dealing with computer files in different formats and often several computer programs. Although some widely used applications have integrated important functionalities for such analyses, they still work with local resources only: input/output files (users have to manage them) and local computing (users have sometimes to leave their programs, on their desktop computers, running for extended periods of time). To address these problems we have developed 'Bosque', a multi-platform client-server software that performs standard phylogenetic tasks either locally or remotely on servers, and integrates the results on a local relational database. Bosque performs sequence alignments and graphical visualization and editing of trees, thus providing a powerful environment that integrates all the steps of phylogenetic analyses. http://bosque.udec.cl

  7. Can tree-ring density data reflect summer temperature extremes and associated circulation patterns over Fennoscandia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Ionita, Monica; Lohmann, Gerrit; Chen, Deliang; Linderholm, Hans W.

    2016-12-01

    Tree-ring maximum latewood density (MXD) records from Fennoscandia have been widely used to infer regional- and hemispheric-scale mean temperature variability. Here, we explore if MXD records can also be used to infer past variability of summer temperature extremes across Fennoscandia. The first principal component (PC1) based on 34 MXD chronologies in Fennoscandia explains 50% of the total variance in the observed warm-day extremes over the period 1901-1978. Variations in both observed summer warm-day extremes and PC1 are influenced by the frequency of anomalous anticyclonic pattern over the region, summer sea surface temperatures over the Baltic, North and Norwegian Seas, and the strength of the westerly zonal wind at 200 hPa across Fennoscandia. Both time series are associated with nearly identical atmospheric circulation and SST patterns according to composite map analysis. In a longer context, the first PC based on 3 millennium-long MXD chronologies in central and northern Fennoscandia explains 83% of the total variance of PC1 from the 34 MXD chronologies over the period 1901-1978, 48% of the total variance of the summer warm-day extreme variability over the period 1901-2006, and 36% of the total variance in the frequency of a summer anticyclonic pattern centered over eastern-central Fennoscandia in the period 1948-2006. The frequency of summer warm-day extremes in Fennoscandia is likely linked to a meridional shift of the northern mid-latitude jet stream. This study shows that the MXD network can be used to infer the variability of past summer warm-day extremes and the frequency of the associated summer anticyclonic circulation pattern over Fennoscandia.

  8. [Analysis phylogenetic relationship of Gynostemma (Cucurbitaceae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shuang-shuang; Li, Hai-tao; Wang, Zhou-yong; Cui, Zhan-hu; Yu, Li-ying

    2015-05-01

    The sequences of ITS, matK, rbcL and psbA-trnH of 9 Gynostemma species or variety including 38 samples were compared and analyzed by molecular phylogeny method. Hemsleya macrosperma was designated as outgroup. The MP and NJ phylogenetic tree of Gynostemma was built based on ITS sequence, the results of PAUP phylogenetic analysis showed the following results: (1) The eight individuals of G. pentaphyllum var. pentaphyllum were not supported as monophyletic in the strict consensus trees and NJ trees. (2) It is suspected whether G. longipes and G. laxum should be classified as the independent species. (3)The classification of subgenus units of Gynostemma plants is supported.

  9. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis of the genus Aeromonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Murcia, Antonio J; Monera, Arturo; Saavedra, M Jose; Oncina, Remedios; Lopez-Alvarez, Monserrate; Lara, Erica; Figueras, M Jose

    2011-05-01

    A broad multilocus phylogenetic analysis (MLPA) of the representative diversity of a genus offers the opportunity to incorporate concatenated inter-species phylogenies into bacterial systematics. Recent analyses based on single housekeeping genes have provided coherent phylogenies of Aeromonas. However, to date, a multi-gene phylogenetic analysis has never been tackled. In the present study, the intra- and inter-species phylogenetic relationships of 115 strains representing all Aeromonas species described to date were investigated by MLPA. The study included the independent analysis of seven single gene fragments (gyrB, rpoD, recA, dnaJ, gyrA, dnaX, and atpD), and the tree resulting from the concatenated 4705 bp sequence. The phylogenies obtained were consistent with each other, and clustering agreed with the Aeromonas taxonomy recognized to date. The highest clustering robustness was found for the concatenated tree (i.e. all Aeromonas species split into 100% bootstrap clusters). Both possible chronometric distortions and poor resolution encountered when using single-gene analysis were buffered in the concatenated MLPA tree. However, reliable phylogenetic species delineation required an MLPA including several "bona fide" strains representing all described species.

  10. Phylogenetic and biogeographic analysis of sphaerexochine trilobites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis R Congreve

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sphaerexochinae is a speciose and widely distributed group of cheirurid trilobites. Their temporal range extends from the earliest Ordovician through the Silurian, and they survived the end Ordovician mass extinction event (the second largest mass extinction in Earth history. Prior to this study, the individual evolutionary relationships within the group had yet to be determined utilizing rigorous phylogenetic methods. Understanding these evolutionary relationships is important for producing a stable classification of the group, and will be useful in elucidating the effects the end Ordovician mass extinction had on the evolutionary and biogeographic history of the group. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cladistic parsimony analysis of cheirurid trilobites assigned to the subfamily Sphaerexochinae was conducted to evaluate phylogenetic patterns and produce a hypothesis of relationship for the group. This study utilized the program TNT, and the analysis included thirty-one taxa and thirty-nine characters. The results of this analysis were then used in a Lieberman-modified Brooks Parsimony Analysis to analyze biogeographic patterns during the Ordovician-Silurian. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The genus Sphaerexochus was found to be monophyletic, consisting of two smaller clades (one composed entirely of Ordovician species and another composed of Silurian and Ordovician species. By contrast, the genus Kawina was found to be paraphyletic. It is a basal grade that also contains taxa formerly assigned to Cydonocephalus. Phylogenetic patterns suggest Sphaerexochinae is a relatively distinctive trilobite clade because it appears to have been largely unaffected by the end Ordovician mass extinction. Finally, the biogeographic analysis yields two major conclusions about Sphaerexochus biogeography: Bohemia and Avalonia were close enough during the Silurian to exchange taxa; and during the Ordovician there was dispersal between Eastern Laurentia and

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of cubilin (CUBN) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Alsaeed, Abbas H; Kiranmayee, S; Bammidi, Vk; Sultana, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Cubilin, (CUBN; also known as intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor [Homo sapiens Entrez Pubmed ref NM_001081.3; NG_008967.1; GI: 119606627]), located in the epithelium of intestine and kidney acts as a receptor for intrinsic factor - vitamin B12 complexes. Mutations in CUBN may play a role in autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia. The current study investigated the possible role of CUBN in evolution using phylogenetic testing. A total of 588 BLAST hits were found for the cubilin query sequence and these hits showed putative conserved domain, CUB superfamily (as on 27(th) Nov 2012). A first-pass phylogenetic tree was constructed to identify the taxa which most often contained the CUBN sequences. Following this, we narrowed down the search by manually deleting sequences which were not CUBN. A repeat phylogenetic analysis of 25 taxa was performed using PhyML, RAxML and TreeDyn softwares to confirm that CUBN is a conserved protein emphasizing its importance as an extracellular domain and being present in proteins mostly known to be involved in development in many chordate taxa but not found in prokaryotes, plants and yeast.. No horizontal gene transfers have been found between different taxa.

  12. Taxonomic review and phylogenetic analysis of Enchodontoidei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hilda M A; Gallo, Valéria

    2011-06-01

    Enchodontoidei are extinct marine teleost fishes with a long temporal range and a wide geographic distribution. As there has been no comprehensive phylogenetic study of this taxon, we performed a parsimony analysis using a data matrix with 87 characters, 31 terminal taxa for ingroup, and three taxa for outgroup. The analysis produced 93 equally parsimonious trees (L = 437 steps; CI = 0. 24; RI = 0. 49). The topology of the majority rule consensus tree was: (Sardinioides + Hemisaurida + (Nardorex + (Atolvorator + (Protostomias + Yabrudichthys ) + (Apateopholis + (Serrilepis + (Halec + Phylactocephalus ) + (Cimolichthys + (Prionolepis + ( (Eurypholis + Saurorhamphus ) + (Enchodus + (Paleolycus + Parenchodus ))))))) + ( (Ichthyotringa + Apateodus ) + (Rharbichthys + (Trachinocephalus + ( (Apuliadercetis + Brazilodercetis ) + (Benthesikyme + (Cyranichthys + Robertichthys ) + (Dercetis + Ophidercetis )) + (Caudadercetis + (Pelargorhynchus + (Nardodercetis + (Rhynchodercetis + (Dercetoides + Hastichthys )))))). The group Enchodontoidei is not monophyletic. Dercetidae form a clade supported by the presence of very reduced neural spines and possess a new composition. Enchodontidae are monophyletic by the presence of middorsal scutes, and Rharbichthys was excluded. Halecidae possess a new composition, with the exclusion of Hemisaurida. This taxon and Nardorex are Aulopiformes incertae sedis.

  13. A Distance Measure for Genome Phylogenetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Minh Duc; Allison, Lloyd; Dix, Trevor

    Phylogenetic analyses of species based on single genes or parts of the genomes are often inconsistent because of factors such as variable rates of evolution and horizontal gene transfer. The availability of more and more sequenced genomes allows phylogeny construction from complete genomes that is less sensitive to such inconsistency. For such long sequences, construction methods like maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood are often not possible due to their intensive computational requirement. Another class of tree construction methods, namely distance-based methods, require a measure of distances between any two genomes. Some measures such as evolutionary edit distance of gene order and gene content are computational expensive or do not perform well when the gene content of the organisms are similar. This study presents an information theoretic measure of genetic distances between genomes based on the biological compression algorithm expert model. We demonstrate that our distance measure can be applied to reconstruct the consensus phylogenetic tree of a number of Plasmodium parasites from their genomes, the statistical bias of which would mislead conventional analysis methods. Our approach is also used to successfully construct a plausible evolutionary tree for the γ-Proteobacteria group whose genomes are known to contain many horizontally transferred genes.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal ABC transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driessen Arnold JM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superfamily of ABC proteins is among the largest known in nature. Its members are mainly, but not exclusively, involved in the transport of a broad range of substrates across biological membranes. Many contribute to multidrug resistance in microbial pathogens and cancer cells. The diversity of ABC proteins in fungi is comparable with those in multicellular animals, but so far fungal ABC proteins have barely been studied. Results We performed a phylogenetic analysis of the ABC proteins extracted from the genomes of 27 fungal species from 18 orders representing 5 fungal phyla thereby covering the most important groups. Our analysis demonstrated that some of the subfamilies of ABC proteins remained highly conserved in fungi, while others have undergone a remarkable group-specific diversification. Members of the various fungal phyla also differed significantly in the number of ABC proteins found in their genomes, which is especially reduced in the yeast S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Conclusions Data obtained during our analysis should contribute to a better understanding of the diversity of the fungal ABC proteins and provide important clues about their possible biological functions.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of heterothallic Neurospora species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupski, M P; Jackson, D A; Natvig, D O

    1997-02-01

    We examined the phylogenetic relationships among five heterothallic species of Neurospora using restriction fragment polymorphisms derived from cosmid probes and sequence data from the upstream regions of two genes, al-1 and frq. Distance, maximum likelihood, and parsimony trees derived from the data support the hypothesis that strains assigned to N. sitophila, N. discreta, and N. tetrasperma form respective monophyletic groups. Strains assigned to N. intermedia and N. crassa, however, did not form two respective monophyletic groups, consistent with a previous suggestion based on analysis of mitochondrial DNAs that N. crassa and N. intermedia may be incompletely resolved sister taxa. Trees derived from restriction fragments and the al-1 sequence position N. tetrasperma as the sister species of N. sitophila. None of the trees produced by our data supported a previous analysis of sequences in the region of the mating type idiomorph that grouped N. crassa and N. sitophila as sister taxa, as well as N. intermedia and N. tetrasperma as sister taxa. Moreover, sequences from al-1, frq, and the mating-type region produced different trees when analyzed separately. The lack of consensus obtained with different sequences could result from the sorting of ancestral polymorphism during speciation or gene flow across species boundaries, or both.

  16. Open Reading Frame Phylogenetic Analysis on the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Lun Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analysis has become essential in researching the evolutionary relationships between viruses. These relationships are depicted on phylogenetic trees, in which viruses are grouped based on sequence similarity. Viral evolutionary relationships are identified from open reading frames rather than from complete sequences. Recently, cloud computing has become popular for developing internet-based bioinformatics tools. Biocloud is an efficient, scalable, and robust bioinformatics computing service. In this paper, we propose a cloud-based open reading frame phylogenetic analysis service. The proposed service integrates the Hadoop framework, virtualization technology, and phylogenetic analysis methods to provide a high-availability, large-scale bioservice. In a case study, we analyze the phylogenetic relationships among Norovirus. Evolutionary relationships are elucidated by aligning different open reading frame sequences. The proposed platform correctly identifies the evolutionary relationships between members of Norovirus.

  17. Open Reading Frame Phylogenetic Analysis on the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has become essential in researching the evolutionary relationships between viruses. These relationships are depicted on phylogenetic trees, in which viruses are grouped based on sequence similarity. Viral evolutionary relationships are identified from open reading frames rather than from complete sequences. Recently, cloud computing has become popular for developing internet-based bioinformatics tools. Biocloud is an efficient, scalable, and robust bioinformatics computing service. In this paper, we propose a cloud-based open reading frame phylogenetic analysis service. The proposed service integrates the Hadoop framework, virtualization technology, and phylogenetic analysis methods to provide a high-availability, large-scale bioservice. In a case study, we analyze the phylogenetic relationships among Norovirus. Evolutionary relationships are elucidated by aligning different open reading frame sequences. The proposed platform correctly identifies the evolutionary relationships between members of Norovirus. PMID:23671843

  18. A phylogenetic analysis of Aquifex pyrophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, S.; Olsen, G. J.; Stetter, K. O.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The 16S rRNA of the bacterion Aquifex pyrophilus, a microaerophilic, oxygen-reducing hyperthermophile, has been sequenced directly from the the PCR amplified gene. Phylogenetic analyses show the Aq. pyrophilus lineage to be probably the deepest (earliest) in the (eu)bacterial tree. The addition of this deep branching to the bacterial tree further supports the argument that the Bacteria are of thermophilic ancestry.

  19. Physiological and phylogenetic analysis of rhizobia isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiological and phylogenetic analysis of rhizobia isolated from Acacia nilotica L. ... only two isolates were symbiotic and the other three were non- symbiotic. ... Application of effective rhizobia strains as biofertilizers to improve legume ...

  20. Bioinformatics and phylogenetic analysis of human Tp73 gene

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imtiaz

    2013-06-26

    Jun 26, 2013 ... Key words: Tp73, Bioinformatics, phylogenetics analysis, cancer, Tp53. INTRODUCTION ... splicing at C-terminal end of that protein and give rise to six different p73 terminal variants ..... 33 in human lung cancers. Cancer Res.

  1. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of feline calicivirus isolates in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yaxin; Deng, Mingliang; Peng, Zhong; Hu, Ruiming; Chen, Huanchun; Wu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of Chinese feline calicivirus (FCV) isolates and their phylogenetic relationship with isolates from elsewhere in the world. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on the partial open reading frame (ORF) 2 sequences (regions B-F) of 21 Chinese FCV isolates and 30 global isolates. The Chinese isolates included 13 isolates from Wuhan, which were isolated in this study, and eight previously published isolates. Sixteen Chinese isolates and two Japanese isolates formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequences of the complete genome, ORF1, ORF2 and ORF3 of selected isolates supported the above findings. Genogroup analysis revealed that FCV genogroup II is present in China. These findings suggest that Chinese FCV isolates are closely related to Japanese FCV isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of cubilin (CUBN) gene

    OpenAIRE

    Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Alsaeed, Abbas H; Kiranmayee, S; Bammidi, VK; Sultana, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Cubilin, (CUBN; also known as intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor [Homo sapiens Entrez Pubmed ref NM_001081.3; NG_008967.1; GI: 119606627]), located in the epithelium of intestine and kidney acts as a receptor for intrinsic factor – vitamin B12 complexes. Mutations in CUBN may play a role in autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia. The current study investigated the possible role of CUBN in evolution using phylogenetic testing. A total of 588 BLAST hits were found for the cubilin query seque...

  3. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial reverse transcriptases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Toro

    Full Text Available Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs, Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L, and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology.

  4. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  5. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  6. TREEFINDER: a powerful graphical analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics

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    von Haeseler Arndt

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most analysis programs for inferring molecular phylogenies are difficult to use, in particular for researchers with little programming experience. Results TREEFINDER is an easy-to-use integrative platform-independent analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics. In this paper the main features of TREEFINDER (version of April 2004 are described. TREEFINDER is written in ANSI C and Java and implements powerful statistical approaches for inferring gene tree and related analyzes. In addition, it provides a user-friendly graphical interface and a phylogenetic programming language. Conclusions TREEFINDER is a versatile framework for analyzing phylogenetic data across different platforms that is suited both for exploratory as well as advanced studies.

  7. BLAST-EXPLORER helps you building datasets for phylogenetic analysis

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    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The right sampling of homologous sequences for phylogenetic or molecular evolution analyses is a crucial step, the quality of which can have a significant impact on the final interpretation of the study. There is no single way for constructing datasets suitable for phylogenetic analysis, because this task intimately depends on the scientific question we want to address, Moreover, database mining softwares such as BLAST which are routinely used for searching homologous sequences are not specifically optimized for this task. Results To fill this gap, we designed BLAST-Explorer, an original and friendly web-based application that combines a BLAST search with a suite of tools that allows interactive, phylogenetic-oriented exploration of the BLAST results and flexible selection of homologous sequences among the BLAST hits. Once the selection of the BLAST hits is done using BLAST-Explorer, the corresponding sequence can be imported locally for external analysis or passed to the phylogenetic tree reconstruction pipelines available on the Phylogeny.fr platform. Conclusions BLAST-Explorer provides a simple, intuitive and interactive graphical representation of the BLAST results and allows selection and retrieving of the BLAST hit sequences based a wide range of criterions. Although BLAST-Explorer primarily aims at helping the construction of sequence datasets for further phylogenetic study, it can also be used as a standard BLAST server with enriched output. BLAST-Explorer is available at http://www.phylogeny.fr

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Hordeum using repetitive DNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svitashev, S.; Bryngelsson, T.; Vershinin, A.

    1994-01-01

    A set of six cloned barley (Hordeum vulgare) repetitive DNA sequences was used for the analysis of phylogenetic relationships among 31 species (46 taxa) of the genus Hordeum, using molecular hybridization techniques. In situ hybridization experiments showed dispersed organization of the sequences...... over all chromosomes of H. vulgare and the wild barley species H. bulbosum, H. marinum and H. murinum. Southern blot hybridization revealed different levels of polymorphism among barley species and the RFLP data were used to generate a phylogenetic tree for the genus Hordeum. Our data are in a good...

  9. PhyloSift: phylogenetic analysis of genomes and metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E. Darling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Like all organisms on the planet, environmental microbes are subject to the forces of molecular evolution. Metagenomic sequencing provides a means to access the DNA sequence of uncultured microbes. By combining DNA sequencing of microbial communities with evolutionary modeling and phylogenetic analysis we might obtain new insights into microbiology and also provide a basis for practical tools such as forensic pathogen detection.In this work we present an approach to leverage phylogenetic analysis of metagenomic sequence data to conduct several types of analysis. First, we present a method to conduct phylogeny-driven Bayesian hypothesis tests for the presence of an organism in a sample. Second, we present a means to compare community structure across a collection of many samples and develop direct associations between the abundance of certain organisms and sample metadata. Third, we apply new tools to analyze the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities and again demonstrate how this can be associated to sample metadata.These analyses are implemented in an open source software pipeline called PhyloSift. As a pipeline, PhyloSift incorporates several other programs including LAST, HMMER, and pplacer to automate phylogenetic analysis of protein coding and RNA sequences in metagenomic datasets generated by modern sequencing platforms (e.g., Illumina, 454.

  10. A Deliberate Practice Approach to Teaching Phylogenetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, F. Collin; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kearns, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of postsecondary education is to assist students in developing expert-level understanding. Previous attempts to encourage expert-level understanding of phylogenetic analysis in college science classrooms have largely focused on isolated, or "one-shot," in-class activities. Using a deliberate practice instructional approach, we…

  11. The Great Oxidation Event Recorded in Paleoproterozoic Rocks from Fennoscandia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Rychanchik

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available With support of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP and other funding organizations, the Fennoscandia Arctic Russia – Drilling Early Earth Project (FAR-DEEP operations have been successfully completed during 2007. A total of 3650 meters of core have been recovered from fifteen holes drilled through sedimentary and volcanic formations in Fennoscandia (Fig. 1, recording several global environmental changes spanning the time interval 2500–2000 Ma, including the Great Oxidation Event (GOE (Holland, 2002. The core was meanwhile curated and archived in Trondheim, Norway, and it has been sampled by an international team of scientists.

  12. Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis of the Lipocalin Superfamily.

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    Balasubramanian Lakshmi

    Full Text Available Lipocalins constitute a superfamily of extracellular proteins that are found in all three kingdoms of life. Although very divergent in their sequences and functions, they show remarkable similarity in 3-D structures. Lipocalins bind and transport small hydrophobic molecules. Earlier sequence-based phylogenetic studies of lipocalins highlighted that they have a long evolutionary history. However the molecular and structural basis of their functional diversity is not completely understood. The main objective of the present study is to understand functional diversity of the lipocalins using a structure-based phylogenetic approach. The present study with 39 protein domains from the lipocalin superfamily suggests that the clusters of lipocalins obtained by structure-based phylogeny correspond well with the functional diversity. The detailed analysis on each of the clusters and sub-clusters reveals that the 39 lipocalin domains cluster based on their mode of ligand binding though the clustering was performed on the basis of gross domain structure. The outliers in the phylogenetic tree are often from single member families. Also structure-based phylogenetic approach has provided pointers to assign putative function for the domains of unknown function in lipocalin family. The approach employed in the present study can be used in the future for the functional identification of new lipocalin proteins and may be extended to other protein families where members show poor sequence similarity but high structural similarity.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Escherichia coli strains isolated from human samples

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    Abdollah Derakhshandeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli is a normal inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract of vertebrates, including humans. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D. Group A and B1 are generally associated with commensals, whereas group B2 is associated with extra-intestinal pathotypes. Most enteropathogenic isolates, however, are assigned to group D. In the present study, a total of 102 E. coli strains, isolated from human samples, were used. Phylogenetic grouping was done based on the Clermont triplex PCR method using primers targeted at three genetic markers, chuA, yjaA and TspE4.C2. Group A contained the majority of the collected isolates (69 isolates, 67.64%, followed by group B2 (18 isolates, 17.64% and D (15 isolates, 14.7% and no strains were found to belong to group B1. The distribution of phylogenetic groups in our study suggests that although the majority of strains were commensals, the prevalence of enteropathogenic and extra-intestinal pathotypes was noteworthy. Therefore, the role of E. coli in human infections including diarrhea, urinary tract infections and meningitis should be considered.

  14. Observations on Intraplate Seismicity in Central Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korja, Annakaisa; Uski, Marja; Lund, Bjorn; Högdahl, Karin; Grigull, Susanne; Nironen, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    the rebound stress is the main source for triggering seismicity in Fennoscandia today. However, in late- and post-glacial times, glacially-induced isostatic rebound was probably much more important for the generation of earthquakes.

  15. Glacial isostatic adjustment in the static gravity field of Fennoscandia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Root, B.C.; Van der Wal, W.; Novak, P.; Ebbing, J.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2015-01-01

    In the central part of Fennoscandia, the crust is currently rising, because of the delayed response of the viscous mantle to melting of the Late Pleistocene ice sheet. This process, called Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), causes a negative anomaly in the present-day static gravity field as isosta

  16. Phylogenetic and recombination analysis of tomato spotted wilt virus.

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    Sen Lian

    Full Text Available Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV severely damages and reduces the yield of many economically important plants worldwide. In this study, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 10 TSWV isolates recently identified from various regions and hosts in Korea. Phylogenetic analysis of these 10 isolates as well as the three previously sequenced isolates indicated that the 13 Korean TSWV isolates could be divided into two groups reflecting either two different origins or divergences of Korean TSWV isolates. In addition, the complete nucleotide sequences for the 13 Korean TSWV isolates along with previously sequenced TSWV RNA segments from Korea and other countries were subjected to phylogenetic and recombination analysis. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that both the RNA L and RNA M segments of most Korean isolates might have originated in Western Europe and North America but that the RNA S segments for all Korean isolates might have originated in China and Japan. Recombination analysis identified a total of 12 recombination events among all isolates and segments and five recombination events among the 13 Korea isolates; among the five recombinants from Korea, three contained the whole RNA L segment, suggesting reassortment rather than recombination. Our analyses provide evidence that both recombination and reassortment have contributed to the molecular diversity of TSWV.

  17. Application of the phylogenetic analysis in mitochondrial disease study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ChengYe; KONG QingPeng; ZHANG YaPing

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease currently received an increasing concern. However, the case-control design commonly adopted in this field is vulnerable to genetic background, population stratification and poor data quality. Although the phylogenetic analysis could help solve part of these problems, it has not received adequate attention. This paper is a review of this method as well as its application in mito-chondrial disease study.

  18. Mesoamerican tree squirrels evolution (Rodentia: Sciuridae): a molecular phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Federico; Gutierrez-Espeleta, Gustavo

    2014-06-01

    The tribe Sciurini comprehends the genera Sciurus, Syntheosiurus, Microsciurus, Tamiasciurus and Rheinthrosciurus. The phylogenetic relationships within Sciurus have been only partially done, and the relationship between Mesoamerican species remains unsolved. The phylogenetic relationships of the Mesoamerican tree squirrels were examined using molecular data. Sequence data publicly available (12S, 16S, CYTB mitochondrial genes and IRBP nuclear gene) and cytochrome B gene sequences of four previously not sampled Mesoamerican Sciurus species were analyzed under a Bayesian multispecies coalescence model. Phylogenetic analysis of the multilocus data set showed the neotropical tree squirrels as a monophyletic clade. The genus Sciurus was paraphyletic due to the inclusion of Microsciurus species (M. alfari and M. flaviventer). The South American species S. aestuans and S. stramineus showed a sister taxa relationship. Single locus analysis based on the most compact and complete data set (i.e. CYTB gene sequences), supported the monophyly of the South American species and recovered a Mesoamerican clade including S. aureogaster, S. granatensis and S. variegatoides. These results corroborated previous findings based on cladistic analysis of cranial and post-cranial characters. Our data support a close relationship between Mesoamerican Sciurus species and a sister relationship with South American species, and corroborates previous findings in relation to the polyphyly of Microsciurus and Syntheosciurus paraphyly.

  19. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of an endangered Mexican sparrow: Spizella wortheni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales-del-Castillo, Ricardo; Klicka, John; Favela, Susana; González-Rojas, José I

    2010-12-01

    The Worthen's Sparrow (Spizella wortheni) is an endemic bird species of the Mexican Plateau that is protected by Mexican law. Considering its limited range (25 km(2)), small population size (100-120 individuals), and declining population, it is one of the most endangered avian species in North America. Although it has been assumed to be the sister taxon of the Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla), the systematic and evolutionary relationships of Worthen's Sparrow have never been tested using modern molecular phylogenetic methods. We addressed the molecular phylogeny of S. wortheni analyzing six mitochondrial genes (3571 bp) from all of the natural members of the genus Spizella. Our maximum likelihood and Bayeasian analysis indicate that despite the superficial similarity, S. wortheni is not the sister taxon of S. pusilla, but is instead most closely related to the Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri). Also new insights about the phylogenetics relationships of the Spizella genera are presented.

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis of Orgyia pseudotsugata Single-nucleocapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Douglas-fir tussock moth Orgyia pseudotsugata (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) is a frequent defoliator of Douglas-fir and true firs in western USA and Canada. A single nucleopolyhedrovirus (SNPV) isolated from O. pseudotsugata larvae in Canada (OpSNPV) was previously analyzed via its polyhedrin gene, but is phylogenetic status was ambiguous. Sequences of four conserved baculovirus genes, polyhedrin, lef-8, pif-2 and dpol, were amplified from OpSNPV DNA in polymerase chain reactions using degenerate primer sets and their sequences were analyzed phylogenetically. The analysis revealed that OpSNPV belongs to group II NPVs and is most closely related to SNPVs that infect O. ericae and O. anartoides, respectively. These results show the need for multiple, concatenated gene phylogenies to classify baculoviruses.

  1. galaxieEST: addressing EST identity through automated phylogenetic analysis

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    Larsson Karl-Henrik

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research involving expressed sequence tags (ESTs is intricately coupled to the existence of large, well-annotated sequence repositories. Comparatively complete and satisfactory annotated public sequence libraries are, however, available only for a limited range of organisms, rendering the absence of sequences and gene structure information a tangible problem for those working with taxa lacking an EST or genome sequencing project. Paralogous genes belonging to the same gene family but distinguished by derived characteristics are particularly prone to misidentification and erroneous annotation; high but incomplete levels of sequence similarity are typically difficult to interpret and have formed the basis of many unsubstantiated assumptions of orthology. In these cases, a phylogenetic study of the query sequence together with the most similar sequences in the database may be of great value to the identification process. In order to facilitate this laborious procedure, a project to employ automated phylogenetic analysis in the identification of ESTs was initiated. Results galaxieEST is an open source Perl-CGI script package designed to complement traditional similarity-based identification of EST sequences through employment of automated phylogenetic analysis. It uses a series of BLAST runs as a sieve to retrieve nucleotide and protein sequences for inclusion in neighbour joining and parsimony analyses; the output includes the BLAST output, the results of the phylogenetic analyses, and the corresponding multiple alignments. galaxieEST is available as an on-line web service for identification of fungal ESTs and for download / local installation for use with any organism group at http://galaxie.cgb.ki.se/galaxieEST.html. Conclusions By addressing sequence relatedness in addition to similarity, galaxieEST provides an integrative view on EST origin and identity, which may prove particularly useful in cases where similarity searches

  2. [A phylogenetic analysis of plant communities of Teberda Biosphere Reserve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulakov, A A; Egorov, A V; Onipchenko, V G

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of communities is based on the comparison of distances on the phylogenetic tree between species of a community under study and those distances in random samples taken out of local flora. It makes it possible to determine to what extent a community composition is formed by more closely related species (i.e., "clustered") or, on the opposite, it is more even and includes species that are less related with each other. The first case is usually interpreted as a result of strong influence caused by abiotic factors, due to which species with similar ecology, a priori more closely related, would remain: In the second case, biotic factors, such as competition, may come to the fore and lead to forming a community out of distant clades due to divergence of their ecological niches: The aim of this' study Was Ad explore the phylogenetic structure in communities of the northwestern Caucasus at two spatial scales - the scale of area from 4 to 100 m2 and the smaller scale within a community. The list of local flora of the alpine belt has been composed using the database of geobotanic descriptions carried out in Teberda Biosphere Reserve at true altitudes exceeding.1800 m. It includes 585 species of flowering plants belonging to 57 families. Basal groups of flowering plants are.not represented in the list. At the scale of communities of three classes, namely Thlaspietea rotundifolii - commumties formed on screes and pebbles, Calluno-Ulicetea - alpine meadow, and Mulgedio-Aconitetea subalpine meadows, have not demonstrated significant distinction of phylogenetic structure. At intra level, for alpine meadows the larger share of closely related species. (clustered community) is detected. Significantly clustered happen to be those communities developing on rocks (class Asplenietea trichomanis) and alpine (class Juncetea trifidi). At the same time, alpine lichen proved to have even phylogenetic structure at the small scale. Alpine (class Salicetea herbaceae) that

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of Maverick/Polinton giant transposons across organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Wahlberg, Niklas; Savilahti, Harri

    2014-09-01

    Polintons are a recently discovered group of large transposable elements (<40Kb in size) encoding up to 10 different proteins. The increasing number of genome sequencing projects has led to the discovery of these elements in genomes of protists, fungi, and animals, but not in plants. The RepBase database of eukaryotic repetitive elements currently contains consensus sequences and information of 70 Polinton elements from 28 organisms. Previous phylogenetic analyses have shown the relationship of Polintons to linear plasmids, bacteriophages, and retroviruses. However, a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of all known Polintons has been lacking. We retrieved the Polinton consensus sequences from the most recent version of RepBase, and compiled amino acid sequences for the two most common Polinton-specific genes, the DNA polymerase-B and retroviral-like integrase. Open reading frame predictions and homology comparisons revealed partial or full sequences for 54 polymerases and 55 Polinton integrases. Multiple sequence alignments portrayed conservation in several functional motifs of these proteins. Phylogenetic analyses based on Bayesian inference using single- and combined-gene datasets revealed seven distinct lineages of Polintons that broadly follow the tree of life. Two of the seven lineages are found within the same species, indicating that ancient divergences have been retained to this day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phylogenetic and Ecological Analysis of Novel Marine Stramenopiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massana, Ramon; Castresana, Jose; Balagué, Vanessa; Guillou, Laure; Romari, Khadidja; Groisillier, Agnès; Valentin, Klaus; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Culture-independent molecular analyses of open-sea microorganisms have revealed the existence and apparent abundance of novel eukaryotic lineages, opening new avenues for phylogenetic, evolutionary, and ecological research. Novel marine stramenopiles, identified by 18S ribosomal DNA sequences within the basal part of the stramenopile radiation but unrelated to any previously known group, constituted one of the most important novel lineages in these open-sea samples. Here we carry out a comparative analysis of novel stramenopiles, including new sequences from coastal genetic libraries presented here and sequences from recent reports from the open ocean and marine anoxic sites. Novel stramenopiles were found in all major habitats, generally accounting for a significant proportion of clones in genetic libraries. Phylogenetic analyses indicated the existence of 12 independent clusters. Some of these were restricted to anoxic or deep-sea environments, but the majority were typical components of coastal and open-sea waters. We specifically identified four clusters that were well represented in most marine surface waters (together they accounted for 74% of the novel stramenopile clones) and are the obvious targets for future research. Many sequences were retrieved from geographically distant regions, indicating that some organisms were cosmopolitan. Our study expands our knowledge on the phylogenetic diversity and distribution of novel marine stramenopiles and confirms that they are fundamental members of the marine eukaryotic picoplankton. PMID:15184153

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Alsaeed, Abbas H; Sultana, Asma

    2012-01-01

    The uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) enzyme (also known as hydroxymethylbilane hydrolyase) catalyzes the cyclization of hydroxymethylbilane to uroporphyrinogen III during heme biosynthesis. A deficiency of this enzyme is associated with the very rare Gunther's disease or congenital erythropoietic porphyria, an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism. The current study investigated the possible role of UROS (Homo sapiens [EC: 4.2.1.75; 265 aa; 1371 bp mRNA; Entrez Pubmed ref NP_000366.1, NM_000375.2]) in evolution by studying the phylogenetic relationship and divergence of this gene using computational methods. The UROS protein sequences from various taxa were retrieved from GenBank database and were compared using Clustal-W (multiple sequence alignment) with defaults and a first-pass phylogenetic tree was built using neighbor-joining method as in DELTA BLAST 2.2.27+ version. A total of 163 BLAST hits were found for the uroporphyrinogen III synthase query sequence and these hits showed putative conserved domain, HemD superfamily (as on 14(th) Nov 2012). We then narrowed down the search by manually deleting the proteins which were not UROS sequences and sequences belonging to phyla other than Chordata were deleted. A repeat phylogenetic analysis of 39 taxa was performed using PhyML and TreeDyn software to confirm that UROS is a highly conserved protein with approximately 85% conserved sequences in almost all chordate taxons emphasizing its importance in heme synthesis.

  6. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of bacteriophage WO in spiders (Araneae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qian; Qiao, Huping; Gao, Jin; Yun, Yueli; Liu, Fengxiang; Peng, Yu

    2015-11-01

    Phage WO is a bacteriophage found in Wolbachia. Herein, we represent the first phylogenetic study of WOs that infect spiders (Araneae). Seven species of spiders (Araneus alternidens, Nephila clavata, Hylyphantes graminicola, Prosoponoides sinensis, Pholcus crypticolens, Coleosoma octomaculatum, and Nurscia albofasciata) from six families were infected by Wolbachia and WO, followed by comprehensive sequence analysis. Interestingly, WO could be only detected Wolbachia-infected spiders. The relative infection rates of those seven species of spiders were 75, 100, 88.9, 100, 62.5, 72.7, and 100 %, respectively. Our results indicated that both Wolbachia and WO were found in three different body parts of N. clavata, and WO could be passed to the next generation of H. graminicola by vertical transmission. There were three different sequences for WO infected in A. alternidens and two different WO sequences from C. octomaculatum. Only one sequence of WO was found for the other five species of spiders. The discovered sequence of WO ranged from 239 to 311 bp. Phylogenetic tree was generated using maximum likelihood (ML) based on the orf7 gene sequences. According to the phylogenetic tree, WOs in N. clavata and H. graminicola were clustered in the same group. WOs from A. alternidens (WAlt1) and C. octomaculatum (WOct2) were closely related to another clade, whereas WO in P. sinensis was classified as a sole cluster.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of a transfusion-transmitted hepatitis A outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettmann, Andrea; Juhász, Gabriella; Dencs, Ágnes; Tresó, Bálint; Rusvai, Erzsébet; Barabás, Éva; Takács, Mária

    2017-02-01

    A transfusion-associated hepatitis A outbreak was found in the first time in Hungary. The outbreak involved five cases. Parenteral transmission of hepatitis A is rare, but may occur during viraemia. Direct sequencing of nested PCR products was performed, and all the examined samples were identical in the VP1/2A region of the hepatitis A virus genome. HAV sequences found in recent years were compared and phylogenetic analysis showed that the strain which caused these cases is the same as that had spread in Hungary recently causing several hepatitis A outbreaks throughout the country.

  8. Genomic compositions and phylogenetic analysis of Shigella boydii subgroup

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis was used to compare the genomic compositions of all eighteen Shigella boydii serotype representative strains. The results indicated the genomic "backbone" of this subgroup contained 2552 ORFs homologous to nonpathogenic E. coli K12. Compared with the genome of K12199 ORFs were found to be absent in all S. boydii serotype representatives, including mainly outer membrane protein genes and O-antigen biosynthesis genes. Yet the specific ORFs of S. boydii subgroup contained basically bacteriophage genes and the function unknown (FUN) genes. Some iron metabolism, transport and type II secretion system related genes were found in most representative strains. According to the CGH phylogenetic analysis, the eighteen S. boydii serotype representatives were divided into four groups, in which serotype C13 strain was remarkably distinguished from the other serotype strains. This grouping result corresponded to the distribution of some metabolism related genes. Furthermore, the analysis of genome backbone genes, specific genes, and the phylogenetic trees allowed us to discover the evolution laws of S. boydii and to find out important clues to pathogenesis research, vaccination and the therapeutic medicine development.

  9. Penicillium simile sp. nov. revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davolos, Domenico; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; Persiani, Anna Maria; Maggi, Oriana

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of three phenetically identical Penicillium isolates, collected from the bioaerosol in a restoration laboratory in Italy, displayed macro- and microscopic characteristics that were similar though not completely ascribable to Penicillium raistrickii. For this reason, a phylogenetic approach based on DNA sequencing analysis was performed to establish both the taxonomic status and the evolutionary relationships of these three peculiar isolates in relation to previously described species of the genus Penicillium. We used four nuclear loci (both rRNA and protein coding genes) that have previously proved useful for the molecular investigation of taxa belonging to the genus Penicillium at various evolutionary levels. The internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2), domains D1 and D2 of the 28S rDNA, a region of the tubulin beta chain gene (benA) and part of the calmodulin gene (cmd) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Analysis of the rRNA genes and of the benA and cmd sequence data indicates the presence of three isogenic isolates belonging to a genetically distinct species of the genus Penicillium, here described and named Penicillium simile sp. nov. (ATCC MYA-4591(T)  = CBS 129191(T)). This novel species is phylogenetically different from P. raistrickii and other related species of the genus Penicillium (e.g. Penicillium scabrosum), from which it can be distinguished on the basis of morphological trait analysis.

  10. Isolation, molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of canine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Raj, J; Mukhopadhyay, H K; Thanislass, J; Antony, P X; Pillai, R M

    2010-12-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) causes acute haemorrhagic enteritis in dogs. Canine parvovirus is prone to genetic evolution and has undergone several mutations that produced different strains like CPV-2a, CPV-2b, New CPV-2a, New CPV-2b and CPV-2c in the past three decades. Mutations affecting the VP2 gene of CPV have been responsible for evolution of different antigenic variants. Sequence analysis of VP2 gene of the virus and subsequent characterization is important for molecular epidemiology. The present study was conducted to isolate and to characterize the virus by amplifying partial VP2 gene and further sequence analysis and also to estimate phylogenetic relationship of field virus with the reference strains. Out of 77 samples, 51 samples were found to be positive by PCR and all the 51 samples were subjected for virus isolation in CRFK cell line. Sixteen viruses could be isolated and 10 randomly selected isolates were subjected to sequence analysis along with four random clinical samples. All the 10 isolates and 4 clinical samples were characterized as New CPV-2a (CPV2a with 297-Ser→Ala). One of the field isolates was found to be phylogenetically closely related to New CPV-2a strains of Japan and India; another field isolates was found to share ancestral origins with New CPV-2a strains of Korea, USA, Italy, Brazil, Germany, Taiwan and Vietnam; rest other sequences had distinct lineage but shared molecular relationship with New CPV-2a reference strains.

  11. First phylogenetic analysis of Avipoxvirus (APV in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiran C. Kunert-Filho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study represents the first phylogenetic analysis of avian poxvirus recovered from turkeys in Brazil. The clinical disorders related to fowlpox herein described occurred in a turkey housing system. The birds displaying characteristic pox lesions which were observed on the neck, eyelids and beak of the turkeys. Four affected turkeys were randomly chosen, euthanized and necropsied. Tissues samples were submitted for histopathological analysis and total DNA was further extracted, amplified by conventional PCR, sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Avian poxviruses specific PCR was performed based on P4b core protein gene sequence. The histological analysis revealed dermal inflammatory process, granulation tissue, hyperplasia of epithelial cells and inclusion bodies. The P4b gene was detected in all samples. Sequencing revealed a 100% nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity among the samples, and the sequences were deposited in GenBank®. The four Avian poxviruses fragments sequenced in this study clustered along the A1 clade of avipoxviruses, and were classified as Avipoxvirus (APV. Additional studies, such as virus isolation, PCR and sequencing includinga large number of specimens from the Brazilian turkey production must be conducted due to the hazardous risk that poxvirus infections may cause to the Brazilian poultry production scenario, given that Brazil's turkey production attracts attention due to its economic importance worldwide. Our findings point to the need to identify the prevalence of APV in Brazilian turkey production, to perform risk assessment studies and continued surveillance of APV infections in both wild and commercial avian species.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of the kinesin superfamily from Physcomitrella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan eShen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kinesins are an ancient superfamily of microtubule dependent motors. They participate in an ex-tensive and diverse list of essential cellular functions, including mitosis, cytokinesis, cell polari-zation, cell elongation, flagellar development, and intracellular transport. Based on phylogenetic relationships, the kinesin superfamily has been subdivided into 14 families, which are represented in most eukaryotic phyla. The functions of these families are sometimes conserved between species, but important variations in function across species have been observed. Plants possess most kinesin families including a few plant-specific families. With the availability of an ever in-creasing number of genome sequences from plants, it is important to document the complete complement of kinesins present in a given organism. This will help develop a molecular frame-work to explore the function of each family using genetics, biochemistry and cell biology. The moss Physcomitrella patens has emerged as a powerful model organism to study gene function in plants, which makes it a key candidate to explore complex gene families, such as the kinesin superfamily. Here we report a detailed phylogenetic characterization of the 71 kinesins of the kinesin superfamily in Physcomitrella. We found a remarkable conservation of families and sub-family classes with Arabidopsis, which is important for future comparative analysis of function. Some of the families, such as kinesins 14s are composed of fewer members in moss, while other families, such as the kinesin 12s are greatly expanded. To improve the comparison between spe-cies, and to simplify communication between research groups, we propose a classification of subfamilies based on our phylogenetic analysis.

  13. Dendroclimatology in Fennoscandia – from past accomplishments to future potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Linderholm

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fennoscandia has a strong tradition in dendrochronology, and its large tracts of boreal forest make the region well suited for the development of tree-ring chronologies that extend back several thousands of years. Two of the world's longest continuous (most tree-ring chronologies are annually resolved tree-ring width chronologies are found in northern Fennoscandia, with records from Torneträsk and Finnish Lapland covering the last ca. 7500 yr. In addition, several chronologies between coastal Norway and the interior of Finland extend back several centuries. Tree-ring data from Fennoscandia have provided important information on regional climate variability during the mid to late Holocene and have played major roles in the reconstruction of hemispheric and global temperatures. Tree-ring data from the region have also been used to reconstruct large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, regional precipitation and drought. Such information is imperative when trying to reach better understanding of natural climate change and variability and its forcing mechanisms, and placing recent climate change within a long-term context.

  14. On the gravity and geoid effects of glacial isostatic adjustment in Fennoscandia - a short note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, L. E.

    2016-02-01

    Many geoscientists argue that there is a gravity low of 10-30 mGal in Fennoscandia as a remaining fingerprint of the last ice age and load, both vanished about 10 kyr ago. However, the extraction of the gravity signal related with Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) is complicated by the fact that the total gravity field is caused by many significant density distributions in the Earth. Here we recall a methodology originating with A. Bjerhammar 35 years ago, that emphasizes that the present land uplift phenomenon mainly occurs in the region thatwas covered by the ice cap, and it is highly correlated with the spectral window of degrees 10-22 of the global gravity field, whose lower limit fairly well corresponds to the wavelength that agrees with the size of the region. This implies that, although in principle the GIA is a global phenomenon, the geoid and gravity lows as well as the land upheaval in Fennoscandia are typically regional phenomena that cannot be seen in a global correlation study as it is blurred by many irrelevant gravity signals. It is suggested that a regional multi-regression analysis with a band-limited spectral gravity signal as the observable, a method tested already 2 decades ago, can absorb possible significant disturbing signals, e.g. from topographic and crustal depth variations, and thereby recover the GIA signal.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Chinese sheeppox and goatpox virus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Tao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sheeppox virus (SPPV and goatpox virus (GTPV, members of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family are causative agents of sheep pox and goat pox respectively, which are important contagious diseases and endemic in central and northern Africa, the Middle and Far East, and the Indian sub-continent. Both sheep pox and goat pox can cause wool and hide damage, and reduce the production of mutton and milk, which may result in significant economic losses and threaten the stockbreeding. In this study, three SPPVs and two GTPVs were collected from China in 2009 and 2011. We described the sequence features and phylogenetic analysis of the P32 gene, GPCR gene and RPO30 gene of the SPPVs and GTPVs to reveal their genetic relatedness. Results Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that there was a close relationship among SPPV/GanS/2/2011/China, SPPV/GanS/1/2011/China and SPPV/NingX/2009/China. They were clustered on the same SPPV clade. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 belonged to the GTPV lineage. GS-V1 was closely related to other GTPV vaccine strains. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 were clustered with GTPVs from China and some southern Asian countries. Conclusion This study may expand the datum for spread trend research of Chinese SPPVs and GTPVs, meanwhile provide theoretical references to improve the preventive and control strategy.

  16. Principal components analysis in the space of phylogenetic trees

    CERN Document Server

    Nye, Tom M W

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of DNA or other data commonly gives rise to a collection or sample of inferred evolutionary trees. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) cannot be applied directly to collections of trees since the space of evolutionary trees on a fixed set of taxa is not a vector space. This paper describes a novel geometrical approach to PCA in tree-space that constructs the first principal path in an analogous way to standard linear Euclidean PCA. Given a data set of phylogenetic trees, a geodesic principal path is sought that maximizes the variance of the data under a form of projection onto the path. Due to the high dimensionality of tree-space and the nonlinear nature of this problem, the computational complexity is potentially very high, so approximate optimization algorithms are used to search for the optimal path. Principal paths identified in this way reveal and quantify the main sources of variation in the original collection of trees in terms of both topology and branch lengths. The approach is...

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of Malassezia species based on multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellá, Gemma; Coutinho, Selene Dall' Acqua; Cabañes, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Malassezia are lipophilic basidiomycetous yeasts, which are part of the normal cutaneous microbiota of humans and other warm-blooded animals. Currently, this genus consists of 14 species that have been characterized by phenetic and molecular methods. Although several molecular methods have been used to identify and/or differentiate Malassezia species, the sequencing of the rRNA genes and the chitin synthase-2 gene (CHS2) are the most widely employed. There is little information about the β-tubulin gene in the genus Malassezia, a gene has been used for the analysis of complex species groups. The aim of the present study was to sequence a fragment of the β-tubulin gene of Malassezia species and analyze their phylogenetic relationship using a multilocus sequence approach based on two rRNA genes (ITS including 5.8S rRNA and D1/D2 region of 26S rRNA) together with two protein encoding genes (CHS2 and β-tubulin). The phylogenetic study of the partial β-tubulin gene sequences indicated that this molecular marker can be used to assess diversity and identify new species. The multilocus sequence analysis of the four loci provides robust support to delineate species at the terminal nodes and could help to estimate divergence times for the origin and diversification of Malassezia species.

  18. Phylogenetic positions of several amitochondriate protozoa-Evidence from phylogenetic analysis of DNA topoisomerase II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE De; DONG Jiuhong; WEN Jianfan; XIN Dedong; LU Siqi

    2005-01-01

    Several groups of parasitic protozoa, as represented by Giardia, Trichomonas, Entamoeba and Microsporida, were once widely considered to be the most primitive extant eukaryotic group―Archezoa. The main evidence for this is their 'lacking mitochondria' and possessing some other primitive features between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and being basal to all eukaryotes with mitochondria in phylogenies inferred from many molecules. Some authors even proposed that these organisms diverged before the endosymbiotic origin of mitochondria within eukaryotes. This view was once considered to be very significant to the study of origin and evolution of eukaryotic cells (eukaryotes). However, in recent years this has been challenged by accumulating evidence from new studies. Here the sequences of DNA topoisomerase II in G. lamblia, T. vaginalis and E. histolytica were identified first by PCR and sequencing, then combining with the sequence data of the microsporidia Encephalitozoon cunicul and other eukaryotic groups of different evolutionary positions from GenBank, phylogenetic trees were constructed by various methods to investigate the evolutionary positions of these amitochondriate protozoa. Our results showed that since the characteristics of DNA topoisomerase II make it avoid the defect of 'long-branch attraction' appearing in the previous phylogenetic analyses, our trees can not only reflect effectively the relationship of different major eukaryotic groups, which is widely accepted, but also reveal phylogenetic positions for these amitochondriate protozoa, which is different from the previous phylogenetic trees. They are not the earliest-branching eukaryotes, but diverged after some mitochondriate organisms such as kinetoplastids and mycetozoan; they are not a united group but occupy different phylogenetic positions. Combining with the recent cytological findings of mitochondria-like organelles in them, we think that though some of them (e.g. diplomonads, as represented

  19. Phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic revision of Physodactylinae (Coleoptera, Elateridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Policena Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A phylogeny based on male morphological characters and taxonomic revision of the Physodactylinae genera are presented. The phylogenetic analysis based on 66 male characters resulted in the polyphyly of Physodactylinae which comprises four independent lineages. Oligostethius and Idiotropia from Africa were found to be sister groups. Teslasena from Brazil was corroborated as belonging to Cardiophorinae clade. The South American genera Physodactylus and Dactylophysus were found to be sister groups and phylogenetically related to Heterocrepidius species. The Oriental Toxognathus resulted as sister group of that clade plus (Dicrepidius ramicornis (Lissomus sp, Physorhynus erythrocephalus. Taxonomic revisions include diagnoses and redescriptions of genera and distributional records and illustrations of species. Key to species of Teslasena, Toxognathus, Dactylophysus and Physodactylus are also provided. Teslasena lucasi is synonymized with T. femoralis. A new species of Dactylophysus is described, D. hirtus sp. nov., and lectotypes are designated to non-conspecific D. mendax sensu Fleutiaux and Heterocrepidius mendax Candèze. Physodactylus niger is removed from synonymy under P. oberthuri; P. carreti is synonymized with P. niger; P. obesus and P. testaceus are synonymized with P. sulcatus. Nine new species are described in Physodactylus: P. asper sp. nov., P. brunneus sp. nov., P. chassaini sp. nov., P. flavifrons sp. nov., P. girardi sp. nov., P. gounellei sp. nov., P. latithorax sp. nov., P. patens sp. nov. and P. tuberculatus sp. nov.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of methanogens from the bovine rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Robert J

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in methanogens from ruminants has resulted from the role of methane in global warming and from the fact that cattle typically lose 6 % of ingested energy as methane. Several species of methanogens have been isolated from ruminants. However they are difficult to culture, few have been consistently found in high numbers, and it is likely that major species of rumen methanogens are yet to be identified. Results Total DNA from clarified bovine rumen fluid was amplified using primers specific for Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences (rDNA. Phylogenetic analysis of 41 rDNA sequences identified three clusters of methanogens. The largest cluster contained two distinct subclusters with rDNA sequences similar to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium 16S rDNA. A second cluster contained sequences related to 16S rDNA from Methanosphaera stadtmanae, an organism not previously described in the rumen. The third cluster contained rDNA sequences that may form a novel group of rumen methanogens. Conclusions The current set of 16S rRNA hybridization probes targeting methanogenic Archaea does not cover the phylogenetic diversity present in the rumen and possibly other gastro-intestinal tract environments. New probes and quantitative PCR assays are needed to determine the distribution of the newly identified methanogen clusters in rumen microbial communities.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of the Argonaute protein family in platyhelminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yadong

    2013-03-01

    Argonaute proteins (AGOs) are mediators of gene silencing via recruitment of small regulatory RNAs to induce translational regression or degradation of targeted molecules. Platyhelminths have been reported to express microRNAs but the diversity of AGOs in the phylum has not been explored. Phylogenetic relationships of members of this protein family were studied using data from six platyhelminth genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all cestode and trematode AGOs, along with some triclad planarian AGOs, were grouped into the Ago subfamily and its novel sister clade, here referred to as Cluster 1. These were very distant from Piwi and Class 3 subfamilies. By contrast, a number of planarian Piwi-like AGOs formed a novel sister clade to the Piwi subfamily. Extensive sequence searching revealed the presence of an additional locus for AGO2 in the cestode Echinococcus granulosus and exon expansion in this species and E. multilocularis. The current study suggests the absence of the Piwi subfamily and Class 3 AGOs in cestodes and trematodes and the Piwi-like AGO expansion in a free-living triclad planarian and the occurrence of exon expansion prior to or during the evolution of the most-recent common ancestor of the Echinococcus species studied.

  2. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of Dictyostelium discoideum kinesin proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glöckner Gernot

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinesins constitute a large superfamily of motor proteins in eukaryotic cells. They perform diverse tasks such as vesicle and organelle transport and chromosomal segregation in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner. In recent years, the genomes of a number of eukaryotic organisms have been completely sequenced. Subsequent studies revealed and classified the full set of members of the kinesin superfamily expressed by these organisms. For Dictyostelium discoideum, only five kinesin superfamily proteins (Kif's have already been reported. Results Here, we report the identification of thirteen kinesin genes exploiting the information from the raw shotgun reads of the Dictyostelium discoideum genome project. A phylogenetic tree of 390 kinesin motor domain sequences was built, grouping the Dictyostelium kinesins into nine subfamilies. According to known cellular functions or strong homologies to kinesins of other organisms, four of the Dictyostelium kinesins are involved in organelle transport, six are implicated in cell division processes, two are predicted to perform multiple functions, and one kinesin may be the founder of a new subclass. Conclusion This analysis of the Dictyostelium genome led to the identification of eight new kinesin motor proteins. According to an exhaustive phylogenetic comparison, Dictyostelium contains the same subset of kinesins that higher eukaryotes need to perform mitosis. Some of the kinesins are implicated in intracellular traffic and a small number have unpredictable functions.

  3. PHAST and RPHAST: phylogenetic analysis with space/time models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubisz, Melissa J; Pollard, Katherine S; Siepel, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The PHylogenetic Analysis with Space/Time models (PHAST) software package consists of a collection of command-line programs and supporting libraries for comparative genomics. PHAST is best known as the engine behind the Conservation tracks in the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser. However, it also includes several other tools for phylogenetic modeling and functional element identification, as well as utilities for manipulating alignments, trees and genomic annotations. PHAST has been in development since 2002 and has now been downloaded more than 1000 times, but so far it has been released only as provisional ('beta') software. Here, we describe the first official release (v1.0) of PHAST, with improved stability, portability and documentation and several new features. We outline the components of the package and detail recent improvements. In addition, we introduce a new interface to the PHAST libraries from the R statistical computing environment, called RPHAST, and illustrate its use in a series of vignettes. We demonstrate that RPHAST can be particularly useful in applications involving both large-scale phylogenomics and complex statistical analyses. The R interface also makes the PHAST libraries acccessible to non-C programmers, and is useful for rapid prototyping. PHAST v1.0 and RPHAST v1.0 are available for download at http://compgen.bscb.cornell.edu/phast, under the terms of an unrestrictive BSD-style license. RPHAST can also be obtained from the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN; http://cran.r-project.org).

  4. RFLP analysis of mtDNA from six platyrrhine genera: phylogenetic inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-García, M; Alvarez, D

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the phylogenetic relationships of 10 species of platyrrhine primates using RFLP analysis of mtDNA. Three restriction enzymes were used to determine the restriction site haplotypes for a total of 276 individuals. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum parsimony was employed to construct phylogenetic trees. We found close phylogenetic relationships between Alouatta, Lagothrix and Ateles. We also found a close relationship between Cebus and Aotus, with Saimiri clustering with the atelines. Haplotype diversity was found in four of the species studied, in Cebus albifrons, Saimiri sciureus, Lagothrix lagotricha and Ateles fusciceps. These data provide additional information concerning the phylogenetic relationships between these platyrrhine genera and species.

  5. Comparative genomic analysis and phylogenetic position of Theileria equi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kappmeyer Lowell S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmission of arthropod-borne apicomplexan parasites that cause disease and result in death or persistent infection represents a major challenge to global human and animal health. First described in 1901 as Piroplasma equi, this re-emergent apicomplexan parasite was renamed Babesia equi and subsequently Theileria equi, reflecting an uncertain taxonomy. Understanding mechanisms by which apicomplexan parasites evade immune or chemotherapeutic elimination is required for development of effective vaccines or chemotherapeutics. The continued risk of transmission of T. equi from clinically silent, persistently infected equids impedes the goal of returning the U. S. to non-endemic status. Therefore comparative genomic analysis of T. equi was undertaken to: 1 identify genes contributing to immune evasion and persistence in equid hosts, 2 identify genes involved in PBMC infection biology and 3 define the phylogenetic position of T. equi relative to sequenced apicomplexan parasites. Results The known immunodominant proteins, EMA1, 2 and 3 were discovered to belong to a ten member gene family with a mean amino acid identity, in pairwise comparisons, of 39%. Importantly, the amino acid diversity of EMAs is distributed throughout the length of the proteins. Eight of the EMA genes were simultaneously transcribed. As the agents that cause bovine theileriosis infect and transform host cell PBMCs, we confirmed that T. equi infects equine PBMCs, however, there is no evidence of host cell transformation. Indeed, a number of genes identified as potential manipulators of the host cell phenotype are absent from the T. equi genome. Comparative genomic analysis of T. equi revealed the phylogenetic positioning relative to seven apicomplexan parasites using deduced amino acid sequences from 150 genes placed it as a sister taxon to Theileria spp. Conclusions The EMA family does not fit the paradigm for classical antigenic variation, and we propose a

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis of Apple scar skin viroid Isolates in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Hee Cho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To identify genome sequences of Apple scar skin viroid (ASSVd isolates in Korea, the field survey was performed from ‘Hongro’ apple orchards located in eight sites in South Korea (Bongwha, Cheongsong, Dangjin, Gimchoen, Muju, Mungyeong, Suwon, and Yeongwol. ASSVd was detected by RT-PCR and PCR fragments were cloned into cloning vector. Full-length viral genomes of eight ASSVd isolates were sequenced and compared with 21 isolates reported previously from Korea, India, China, Japan and Greece. Eight isolates in this study showed 92.2-99.7% nucleotide sequence identities with those reported previously. Phylogenetic analysis showed that seven isolates reported in this study belong to the same group distinct from other groups.

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane β-Barrel Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Jąkalski, Marcin; Pieńkowska, Joanna R.; Stobienia, Olgierd; Karachitos, Andonis; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Weiner, January; Kmita, Hanna; Makałowski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Transport of molecules across mitochondrial outer membrane is pivotal for a proper function of mitochondria. The transport pathways across the membrane are formed by ion channels that participate in metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytoplasm (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel, VDAC) as well as in import of proteins encoded by nuclear genes (Tom40 and Sam50/Tob55). VDAC, Tom40, and Sam50/Tob55 are present in all eukaryotic organisms, encoded in the nuclear genome, and have β-barrel topology. We have compiled data sets of these protein sequences and studied their phylogenetic relationships with a special focus on the position of Amoebozoa. Additionally, we identified these protein-coding genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii and Dictyostelium discoideum to complement our data set and verify the phylogenetic position of these model organisms. Our analysis show that mitochondrial β-barrel channels from Archaeplastida (plants) and Opisthokonta (animals and fungi) experienced many duplication events that resulted in multiple paralogous isoforms and form well-defined monophyletic clades that match the current model of eukaryotic evolution. However, in representatives of Amoebozoa, Chromalveolata, and Excavata (former Protista), they do not form clearly distinguishable clades, although they locate basally to the plant and algae branches. In most cases, they do not posses paralogs and their sequences appear to have evolved quickly or degenerated. Consequently, the obtained phylogenies of mitochondrial outer membrane β-channels do not entirely reflect the recent eukaryotic classification system involving the six supergroups: Chromalveolata, Excavata, Archaeplastida, Rhizaria, Amoebozoa, and Opisthokonta. PMID:22155732

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Viridans Group Streptococci Causing Endocarditis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmon, Keith E.; Hall, Lori; Woods, Christopher W.; Marco, Francesc; Miro, Jose M.; Cabell, Christopher; Hoen, Bruno; Marin, Mercedes; Utili, Riccardo; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Bradley, Suzanne; Mirrett, Stanley; Tambic, Arjana; Ryan, Suzanne; Gordon, David; Jones, Phillip; Korman, Tony; Wray, Dannah; Reller, L. Barth; Tripodi, Marie-Francoise; Plesiat, Patrick; Morris, Arthur J.; Lang, Selwyn; Murdoch, David R.; Petti, Cathy A.

    2008-01-01

    Identification of viridans group streptococci (VGS) to the species level is difficult because VGS exchange genetic material. We performed multilocus DNA target sequencing to assess phylogenetic concordance of VGS for a well-defined clinical syndrome. The hierarchy of sequence data was often discordant, underscoring the importance of establishing biological relevance for finer phylogenetic distinctions. PMID:18650347

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of viridans group streptococci causing endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmon, Keith E; Hall, Lori; Woods, Christopher W; Marco, Francesc; Miro, Jose M; Cabell, Christopher; Hoen, Bruno; Marin, Mercedes; Utili, Riccardo; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Bradley, Suzanne; Mirrett, Stanley; Tambic, Arjana; Ryan, Suzanne; Gordon, David; Jones, Phillip; Korman, Tony; Wray, Dannah; Reller, L Barth; Tripodi, Marie-Francoise; Plesiat, Patrick; Morris, Arthur J; Lang, Selwyn; Murdoch, David R; Petti, Cathy A

    2008-09-01

    Identification of viridans group streptococci (VGS) to the species level is difficult because VGS exchange genetic material. We performed multilocus DNA target sequencing to assess phylogenetic concordance of VGS for a well-defined clinical syndrome. The hierarchy of sequence data was often discordant, underscoring the importance of establishing biological relevance for finer phylogenetic distinctions.

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of Phytophthora Species Based on Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, L.P.N.M.; Bakker, F.T.; Bosch, van den G.B.M.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Flier, W.G.

    2004-01-01

    A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Phytophthora was performed, 113 isolates from 48 Phytophthora species were included in this analysis. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on regions of mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1; NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1) and nuclear gene sequen

  11. Molecular study and phylogenetic analysis of Mycoplasma synoviae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.Hosseini

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... that 7 of 10 isolate are quite similar and 3 other isolate are different ... Key words: Mycoplasma sinoviae, sequence, phylogenetic, poultry, Mazandran. .... Development and application of a polymerase chain reaction assay.

  12. POWER: PhylOgenetic WEb Repeater--an integrated and user-optimized framework for biomolecular phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Yen; Lin, Fan-Kai; Lin, Chieh Hua; Lai, Li-Wei; Hsu, Hsiu-Jun; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Hsiung, Chao A

    2005-07-01

    POWER, the PhylOgenetic WEb Repeater, is a web-based service designed to perform user-friendly pipeline phylogenetic analysis. POWER uses an open-source LAMP structure and infers genetic distances and phylogenetic relationships using well-established algorithms (ClustalW and PHYLIP). POWER incorporates a novel tree builder based on the GD library to generate a high-quality tree topology according to the calculated result. POWER accepts either raw sequences in FASTA format or user-uploaded alignment output files. Through a user-friendly web interface, users can sketch a tree effortlessly in multiple steps. After a tree has been generated, users can freely set and modify parameters, select tree building algorithms, refine sequence alignments or edit the tree topology. All the information related to input sequences and the processing history is logged and downloadable for the user's reference. Furthermore, iterative tree construction can be performed by adding sequences to, or removing them from, a previously submitted job. POWER is accessible at http://power.nhri.org.tw.

  13. Are we facing new health challenges and diseases in reindeer in Fennoscandia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Tryland

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A large number of semi-domesticated reindeer is lost every year. Predators are the single most important factor for these losses, whereas restrictions on food availability some years also may cause high mortality. In the past, reindeer herding was challenged by severe infectious diseases, killing hundreds and thousands of animals, and having huge economic and social impact on reindeer herding in Fennoscandia. The general zoo-sanitary situation in Fennoscandia is very favourable for the time being, but reindeer herding is sometimes challenged by disease outbreaks, and diseases play an important role for survival and fitness of reindeer. Reindeer herding is also facing changes and challenges, which also may impact reindeer health and the disease status. Introduction of infectious agents not commonly present in the reindeer population may take place through import of animals, as well as by contact between reindeer, livestock and wildlife. Further, changes in the herding, such as increased feeding, transport, size of herds, animal density and stress load on the animals, may affect the animals ability to cope with infectious diseases. Also changes in weather conditions and climate, such as increased precipitation and mean temperature, may over time lead to restricted availability of pastures, changes in vegetation and changed conditions for parasites and insect vectors. These changes might be especially important for the reproductive success, including fitness of the calves during their first winter. To be able to cope with these changes and their potential impact on reindeer health, increased efforts should be made to gather reference data on health and disease parameters from the different reindeer herding districts, along with epidemiological risk factor analysis. This would increase the ability for the reindeer herding to cope with changes and to continue to produce quality meat products for the market.

  14. Neotectonic stresses in Fennoscandia: field observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    The present-day stress state of Fennoscandia is traditionally viewed as the combination of far field sources and residual glacial loading stresses. Investigations were conducted in different regions of Norway with the purpose of detecting and measuring stress-relief features and to derive from them valuable information on the crustal stress state. Stress-relief features are induced by blasting and sudden rock unloading in road construction and quarrying operations and are common in Norway and very likely in other regions of Fennoscandia. Stress relief at the Earth's surface is diagnostic of anomalously high stress levels at shallow depths in the crust and appears to be a characteristic of the formerly glaciated Baltic and Canadian Precambrian shields. The studied stress-relief features are, in general, indicative of NW-SE compression, suggesting ridge-push as the main source of stress. Our derived stress directions are also in excellent agreement with the ones derived from other kinds of stress indicators, including focal mechanisms from deep earthquakes, demonstrating that stress-relief features are valuable for neotectonic research. As a second step we applied numerical modelling techniques to simulate the neotectonic stress field in Fennoscandia with particular emphasis to southern Norway. A numerical method was used to reconstruct the structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere. The numerical method involves classical steady-state heat equations to derive lithosphere thickness, geotherm and density distribution and, in addition, requires the studied lithosphere to be isostatically compensated at its base. The a priori crustal structure was derived from previous geophysical studies. Undulations of the geoid were used to calibrate the models. Once the density structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere is reconstructed it is straightforward to quantify its stress state and compare modelling results with existing stress indicators. The modelling suggests that

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of RhoGAP Domain-Containing Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcelo M.Brand(a)o; Karina L.Silva-Brand(a)o; Fernando F.Costa; Sara T.O.Saad

    2006-01-01

    Proteins containing an Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) domain work as molecular switches involved in the regulation of diverse cellular functions. The ability of these GTPases to regulate a wide number of cellular processes comes from their interactions with multiple effectors and inhibitors, including the RhoGAP family, which stimulates their intrinsic GTPase activity. Here, a phylogenetic approach was applied to study the evolutionary relationship among 59 RhoGAP domain-containing proteins. The sequences were aligned by their RhoGAP domains and the phylogenetic hypotheses were generated using Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian analyses. The character tracing of two traits, GTPase activity and presence of other domains, indicated a significant phylogenetic signal for both of them.

  16. Orthology prediction at scalable resolution by phylogenetic tree analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynen Martijn A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orthology is one of the cornerstones of gene function prediction. Dividing the phylogenetic relations between genes into either orthologs or paralogs is however an oversimplification. Already in two-species gene-phylogenies, the complicated, non-transitive nature of phylogenetic relations results in inparalogs and outparalogs. For situations with more than two species we lack semantics to specifically describe the phylogenetic relations, let alone to exploit them. Published procedures to extract orthologous groups from phylogenetic trees do not allow identification of orthology at various levels of resolution, nor do they document the relations between the orthologous groups. Results We introduce "levels of orthology" to describe the multi-level nature of gene relations. This is implemented in a program LOFT (Levels of Orthology From Trees that assigns hierarchical orthology numbers to genes based on a phylogenetic tree. To decide upon speciation and gene duplication events in a tree LOFT can be instructed either to perform classical species-tree reconciliation or to use the species overlap between partitions in the tree. The hierarchical orthology numbers assigned by LOFT effectively summarize the phylogenetic relations between genes. The resulting high-resolution orthologous groups are depicted in colour, facilitating visual inspection of (large trees. A benchmark for orthology prediction, that takes into account the varying levels of orthology between genes, shows that the phylogeny-based high-resolution orthology assignments made by LOFT are reliable. Conclusion The "levels of orthology" concept offers high resolution, reliable orthology, while preserving the relations between orthologous groups. A Windows as well as a preliminary Java version of LOFT is available from the LOFT website http://www.cmbi.ru.nl/LOFT.

  17. Taxonomic review and phylogenetic analysis of Enchodontoidei (Teleostei: Aulopiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda M. A Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Enchodontoidei are extinct marine teleost fishes with a long temporal range and a wide geographic distribution. As there has been no comprehensive phylogenetic study of this taxon, we performed a parsimony analysis using a data matrix with 87 characters, 31 terminal taxa for ingroup, and three taxa for outgroup. The analysis produced 93 equally parsimonious trees (L = 437 steps; CI = 0. 24; RI = 0. 49. The topology of the majority rule consensus tree was: (Sardinioides + Hemisaurida + (Nardorex + (Atolvorator + (Protostomias + Yabrudichthys + (Apateopholis + (Serrilepis + (Halec + Phylactocephalus + (Cimolichthys + (Prionolepis + ( (Eurypholis + Saurorhamphus + (Enchodus + (Paleolycus + Parenchodus + ( (Ichthyotringa + Apateodus + (Rharbichthys + (Trachinocephalus + ( (Apuliadercetis + Brazilodercetis + (Benthesikyme + (Cyranichthys + Robertichthys + (Dercetis + Ophidercetis + (Caudadercetis + (Pelargorhynchus + (Nardodercetis + (Rhynchodercetis + (Dercetoides + Hastichthys . The group Enchodontoidei is not monophyletic. Dercetidae form a clade supported by the presence of very reduced neural spines and possess a new composition. Enchodontidae are monophyletic by the presence of middorsal scutes, and Rharbichthys was excluded. Halecidae possess a new composition, with the exclusion of Hemisaurida. This taxon and Nardorex are Aulopiformes incertae sedis.Os Enchodontoidei são peixes teleósteos marinhos extintos, com uma longa amplitude temporal e uma ampla distribuição geográfica. Tendo em vista que não há nenhuma proposta ampla para a filogenia deste táxon, foi realizada uma aná lise de parcimônia com base numa matriz de dados de 87 caracteres, 31 táxons terminais no grupo interno, e três táxons no grupo externo. Como resultado da análise, foram obtidas 93 árvores igualmente parcimoniosas (L = 437 passos; CI = 0,24; RI = 0,49. O consenso de maioria é representado pela seguinte topologia: (Sardinioides + Hemisaurida + (Nardorex

  18. Bilateral Chondroepitrochlearis Muscle: Case Report, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeewa P. W. Palagama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous muscular variants of pectoralis major have been reported on several occasions in the medical literature. Among them, chondroepitrochlearis is one of the rarest. Therefore, this study aims to provide a comprehensive description of its anatomy and subsequent clinical significance, along with its phylogenetic importance in pectoral muscle evolution with regard to primate posture. The authors suggest a more appropriate name to better reflect its proximal attachment to the costochondral junction and distal attachment to the epicondyle of humerus, as “chondroepicondylaris”; in addition, we suggest a new theory of phylogenetic significance to explain the twisting of pectoralis major tendon in primates that may have occurred with their adoption to bipedalism and arboreal lifestyle. Finally, the clinical significance of this aberrant muscle is elaborated as a cause of potential neurovascular entrapment and as a possible hurdle during axillary surgeries (i.e., mastectomy.

  19. Darwintree: A Molecular Data Analysis and Application Environment for Phylogenetic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Meng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DarwinTree (http://www.darwintree.cn provides an integrated bioinformatics platform that supports all phases of the analytical pathway for phylogenetic study from data collections, phylogenetic tree constructions, visualization of the tree of life, and web-based rendering to specific application services & data mining. First, it is a repository for sequence records that form the basic data unit of all phylogenetic studies. Second, it is a workbench that aids the management, quality assurance, and analysis of phylogenetic data. Third, it provides a community of phylogenetic application services with tree reconstruction and related data mining. This paper provides a brief introduction to the key elements of DarwinTree, discusses their functional capabilities, details the database features, phylogeny pipeline, data mining tools, and specific application services available to support it, and concludes with future prospects.

  20. Analysis of Acorus calamus chloroplast genome and its phylogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Holland, Barbara; Hirsch-Ernst, Karen I; Hellwig, Frank H

    2005-09-01

    Determining the phylogenetic relationships among the major lines of angiosperms is a long-standing problem, yet the uncertainty as to the phylogenetic affinity of these lines persists. While a number of studies have suggested that the ANITA (Amborella-Nymphaeales-Illiciales-Trimeniales-Aristolochiales) grade is basal within angiosperms, studies of complete chloroplast genome sequences also suggested an alternative tree, wherein the line leading to the grasses branches first among the angiosperms. To improve taxon sampling in the existing chloroplast genome data, we sequenced the chloroplast genome of the monocot Acorus calamus. We generated a concatenated alignment (89,436 positions for 15 taxa), encompassing almost all sequences usable for phylogeny reconstruction within spermatophytes. The data still contain support for both the ANITA-basal and grasses-basal hypotheses. Using simulations we can show that were the ANITA-basal hypothesis true, parsimony (and distance-based methods with many models) would be expected to fail to recover it. The self-evident explanation for this failure appears to be a long-branch attraction (LBA) between the clade of grasses and the out-group. However, this LBA cannot explain the discrepancies observed between tree topology recovered using the maximum likelihood (ML) method and the topologies recovered using the parsimony and distance-based methods when grasses are deleted. Furthermore, the fact that neither maximum parsimony nor distance methods consistently recover the ML tree, when according to the simulations they would be expected to, when the out-group (Pinus) is deleted, suggests that either the generating tree is not correct or the best symmetric model is misspecified (or both). We demonstrate that the tree recovered under ML is extremely sensitive to model specification and that the best symmetric model is misspecified. Hence, we remain agnostic regarding phylogenetic relationships among basal angiosperm lineages.

  1. Multilocus sequence typing and phylogenetic analysis of Propionibacterium acnes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, Mogens; Scholz, Christian F. P.; Lomholt, Hans B.

    2012-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a commensal of human skin but is also implicated in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, in biofilm-associated infections of medical devices and endophthalmitis, and in infections of bone and dental root canals. Recent studies associate P. acnes with prostate cancer...... schemes were compared with reference to a phylogenetic tree based on 78 P. acnes genomes and their gene contents. Further support for a basically clonal population structure of P. acnes and a scenario of the global spread of epidemic clones of P. acnes was obtained. Compared to the Belfast scheme...

  2. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and Phylogenetic Analysis of Propionibacterium acnes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, Mogens; Scholz, Christian; Lomholt, Hans B

    2011-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a commensal of human skin but is also implicated in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris and in biofilm-associated infections of medical devices and endophthalmitis, and in infections of bone and dental root canals. Recent studies associate P. acnes with prostate cancer...... with reference to a phylogenetic tree based on 78 P. acnes genomes and their gene contents. Further support for a basically clonal population structure of P. acnes and a scenario of global spread of epidemic clones of P. acnes was obtained. Compared with the Belfast scheme, the Aarhus MLST scheme (http...

  3. Evolution of climatic niche specialization: a phylogenetic analysis in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Maria Fernanda; Wiens, John J

    2014-11-22

    The evolution of climatic niche specialization has important implications for many topics in ecology, evolution and conservation. The climatic niche reflects the set of temperature and precipitation conditions where a species can occur. Thus, specialization to a limited set of climatic conditions can be important for understanding patterns of biogeography, species richness, community structure, allopatric speciation, spread of invasive species and responses to climate change. Nevertheless, the factors that determine climatic niche width (level of specialization) remain poorly explored. Here, we test whether species that occur in more extreme climates are more highly specialized for those conditions, and whether there are trade-offs between niche widths on different climatic niche axes (e.g. do species that tolerate a broad range of temperatures tolerate only a limited range of precipitation regimes?). We test these hypotheses in amphibians, using phylogenetic comparative methods and global-scale datasets, including 2712 species with both climatic and phylogenetic data. Our results do not support either hypothesis. Rather than finding narrower niches in more extreme environments, niches tend to be narrower on one end of a climatic gradient but wider on the other. We also find that temperature and precipitation niche breadths are positively related, rather than showing trade-offs. Finally, our results suggest that most amphibian species occur in relatively warm and dry environments and have relatively narrow climatic niche widths on both of these axes. Thus, they may be especially imperilled by anthropogenic climate change.

  4. REFGEN and TREENAMER: Automated Sequence Data Handling for Phylogenetic Analysis in the Genomic Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Leonard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences and increasingly that of amino acid sequences is used to address a number of biological questions. Access to extensive datasets, including numerous genome projects, means that standard phylogenetic analyses can include many hundreds of sequences. Unfortunately, most phylogenetic analysis programs do not tolerate the sequence naming conventions of genome databases. Managing large numbers of sequences and standardizing sequence labels for use in phylogenetic analysis programs can be a time consuming and laborious task. Here we report the availability of an online resource for the management of gene sequences recovered from public access genome databases such as GenBank. These web utilities include the facility for renaming every sequence in a FASTA alignment fi le, with each sequence label derived from a user-defined combination of the species name and/or database accession number. This facility enables the user to keep track of the branching order of the sequences/taxa during multiple tree calculations and re-optimisations. Post phylogenetic analysis, these webpages can then be used to rename every label in the subsequent tree fi les (with a user-defined combination of species name and/or database accession number. Together these programs drastically reduce the time required for managing sequence alignments and labelling phylogenetic figures. Additional features of our platform include the automatic removal of identical accession numbers (recorded in the report file and generation of species and accession number lists for use in supplementary materials or figure legends.

  5. REFGEN and TREENAMER: Automated Sequence Data Handling for Phylogenetic Analysis in the Genomic Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Leonard

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences and increasingly that of amino acid sequences is used to address a number of biological questions. Access to extensive datasets, including numerous genome projects, means that standard phylogenetic analyses can include many hundreds of sequences. Unfortunately, most phylogenetic analysis programs do not tolerate the sequence naming conventions of genome databases. Managing large numbers of sequences and standardizing sequence labels for use in phylogenetic analysis programs can be a time consuming and laborious task. Here we report the availability of an online resource for the management of gene sequences recovered from public access genome databases such as GenBank. These web utilities include the facility for renaming every sequence in a FASTA alignment fi le, with each sequence label derived from a user-defined combination of the species name and/or database accession number. This facility enables the user to keep track of the branching order of the sequences/taxa during multiple tree calculations and re-optimisations. Post phylogenetic analysis, these webpages can then be used to rename every label in the subsequent tree fi les (with a user-defined combination of species name and/or database accession number. Together these programs drastically reduce the time required for managing sequence alignments and labelling phylogenetic figures. Additional features of our platform include the automatic removal of identical accession numbers (recorded in the report file and generation of species and accession number lists for use in supplementary materials or figure legends.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of the gut bacterial microflora of the fungus-growing termite Odontotermes formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Naoya; Muramatsu, Mizuho; Matsui, Toru; Watanabe, Yoshio

    2007-04-01

    We constructed a bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library from the gut microbial community of O. formosanus and phylogenetically analyzed it in order to contribute to the evolutional study of digestive symbiosis and method development for termite control. After screening by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 56 out of 280 clones with unique RFLP patterns were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. The representative phylotypes were affiliated to four phylogenetic groups, Firmicutes, the Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi group, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria of the domain Bacteira. No one clone affiliated with the phylum Spirochaetes was identified, in contrast to the case of wood-feeding termites. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that nearly half of the representative clones (25 phylotypes) formed monophyletic clusters with clones obtained from other termite species, especially with the sequences retrieved from fungus-growing termites. These results indicate that the presence of termite-specific bacterial lineages implies a coevolutional relationship of gut microbes and host termites.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of ruminant Theileria spp. from China based on 28S ribosomal RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Huitian; Guan, Guiquan; Ma, Miling; Liu, Aihong; Liu, Zhijie; Xu, Zongke; Ren, Qiaoyun; Li, Youquan; Yang, Jifei; Chen, Ze; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun

    2013-10-01

    Species identification using DNA sequences is the basis for DNA taxonomy. In this study, we sequenced the ribosomal large-subunit RNA gene sequences (3,037-3,061 bp) in length of 13 Chinese Theileria stocks that were infective to cattle and sheep. The complete 28S rRNA gene is relatively difficult to amplify and its conserved region is not important for phylogenetic study. Therefore, we selected the D2-D3 region from the complete 28S rRNA sequences for phylogenetic analysis. Our analyses of 28S rRNA gene sequences showed that the 28S rRNA was useful as a phylogenetic marker for analyzing the relationships among Theileria spp. in ruminants. In addition, the D2-D3 region was a short segment that could be used instead of the whole 28S rRNA sequence during the phylogenetic analysis of Theileria, and it may be an ideal DNA barcode.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis based on 28S rRNA of Babesia spp. in ruminants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Huitian; Guan, Guiquan; Ma, Miling; Liu, Aihong; Liu, Zhijie; Ren, Qiaoyun; Li, Youquan; Yang, Jifei; Chen, Ze; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun

    2013-04-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analyses are mainly based on the small ribosomal RNA subunit (18S rRNA), internal transcribed spacer regions, and other molecular markers. We compared the phylogenetic relationships of Babesia spp. using large subunit ribosomal RNA, i.e., 28S rRNA, and the united 28S + 18S rRNA sequence fragments from 11 isolates of Babesia spp. collected in China. Due to sequence length and variability, the 28S rRNA gene contained more information than the 18S rRNA gene and could be used to elucidate the phlyogenetic relationships of B. motasi, B. major, and B. bovis. Thus, 28S rRNA is another candidate marker that can be used for the phylogenetic analysis of Babesia spp. However, the united fragment (28S + 18S) analysis provided better supported phylogenetic relationships than single genes for Babesia spp. in China.

  9. The PNarec method for detection of ancient recombinations through phylogenetic network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Naruya; Kitano, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Recombinations are known to disrupt bifurcating tree structure of gene genealogies. Although recently occurred recombinations are easily detectable by using conventional methods, recombinations may have occurred at any time. We devised a new method for detecting ancient recombinations through phylogenetic network analysis, and detected five ancient recombinations in gibbon ABO blood group genes [Kitano et al., 2009. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol., 51, 465-471]. We present applications of this method, now named as "PNarec", to various virus sequences as well as HLA genes.

  10. Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis protein phylogenetic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Eisenberg, David; Grothe, Robert; Yeates, Todd O.

    2003-05-13

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of the NS5 gene of Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiga, Rama

    2016-10-01

    ZIKV infection has become a global threat spreading across 31 countries in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. However, little information is available about the molecular epidemiology of ZIKV. Shared mutation of a threonine residue to alanine at the same position in the C terminal of NS5 sequences was observed in sequences from Colombia, Mexico, Panama, and Martinique. The sequences in the phylogenetic tree fell within the same cluster. Based on shared mutation the presence of a Latin American genotype was proposed. Comparison of African and Asian lineages yielded R29N, N273S, H383Q, and P391S mutation. The study highlights that mutation of amino acids at NS5 may contribute to neutropism of ZIKV. J. Med. Virol. 88:1821-1826, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. wolfPAC: building a high-performance distributed computing network for phylogenetic analysis using 'obsolete' computational resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Patrick A; Friedman, Philip H; Richards, Christopher M

    2005-01-01

    wolfPAC is an AppleScript-based software package that facilitates the use of numerous, remotely located Macintosh computers to perform computationally-intensive phylogenetic analyses using the popular application PAUP* (Phylogenetic Analysis Using Parsimony). It has been designed to utilise readily available, inexpensive processors and to encourage sharing of computational resources within the worldwide phylogenetics community.

  13. Tourism, biodiversity and protected areas--Review from northern Fennoscandia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Anne; Kangas, Katja

    2016-03-15

    Tourist numbers in northern Fennoscandia outweigh those in other northern boreal - arctic regions, which creates a specific need to evaluate the impacts of tourism. This review 1) identifies patterns and trends in the vegetation and wildlife of northern Fennoscandian terrestrial ecosystems as a consequence of tourism and recreation, 2) discusses the implications of findings in terms of the intensity, area and magnitude of impacts, changing climate and management needs under increasing tourist pressure, and 3) identifies research gaps. The reviewed studies show negative environmental and biodiversity impacts that are most pronounced near tourist resorts. The most sensitive plants, birds and mammals decline or disappear from the disturbed sites, and the species composition shifts from 'wild' species to cultural and human associated species. There is little research on the spread of alien species, but the few examples show that alien species can be promoted by tourism activities. Impacts of the use of motorized vehicles have not been widely studied either, despite the extensive track network which can cause disturbance to wildlife. The integrated impacts of tourism and climate change on the vegetation and wildlife was not addressed directly in any of the reviewed studies. In addition, little research has been done on carrying out restoration at tourist areas. Scientific research on these topics is needed to prevent, minimize or restore the most negative ecological impacts of tourism and recreation.

  14. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Fasciola hepatica from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Ortiz, Pedro; Cabrera, Maria; Hobán, Cristian; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    The causative agent of fasciolosis in South America is thought to be Fasciola hepatica. In this study, Fasciola flukes from Peru were analyzed to investigate their genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships with those from other countries. Fasciola flukes were collected from the three definitive host species: cattle, sheep, and pigs. They were identified as F. hepatica because mature sperms were observed in their seminal vesicles, and also they displayed Fh type, which has an identical fragment pattern to F. hepatica in the nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1. Eight haplotypes were obtained from the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) sequences of Peruvian F. hepatica; however, no special difference in genetic structure was observed between the three host species. Its extremely low genetic diversity suggests that the Peruvian population was introduced from other regions. Nad1 haplotypes identical to those of Peruvian F. hepatica were detected in China, Uruguay, Italy, Iran, and Australia. Our results indicate that F. hepatica rapidly expanded its range due to human migration. Future studies are required to elucidate dispersal route of F. hepatica from Europe, its probable origin, to other areas, including Peru.

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of Canine Parvovirus VP2 Gene in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, L; Tong, M; Cheng, Y; Song, W; Cheng, S

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a total of 37 samples (58.0%) were found through PCR assay to be positive for canine parvovirus (CPV) of 66 suspected faecal samples of dogs collected from various cities throughout China. Eight CPV isolates could be obtained in the CRFK cell line. The sequencing of the VP2 gene of CPV identified the predominant CPV strain as CPV-2a (Ser297Ala), with two CPV-2b (Ser297Ala). Sequence comparison revealed homologies of 99.3-99.9%, 99.9% and 99.3-99.7% within the CPV 2a isolates, within the CPV 2b isolates and between the CPV 2a and 2b isolates, respectively. In addition, several non-synonymous and synonymous mutations were also recorded. The phylogenetic tree revealed that most of the CPV strains from different areas in China were located in the formation of a large branch, which were grouped together along with the KU143-09 strain from Thailand and followed the same evolution. In this study, we provide an updated molecular characterization of CPV 2 circulation in China.

  16. Isolation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Halophilic Archaeon AJ6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiaohong; Wu Min; Cao Yi; Wu Yuehong; Zhang Ting

    2006-01-01

    Halophilic archaeon A J6 was isolated and purified from the Altun Mountain National Nature Reserve of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.Strain AJ6 is a Gram-negative rod whose size is 0.2-0.6 by 1.6-4.2 μm,wherein a few cells are globular.The optimum salt concentration for its growth is 20% NaC1 and 0.6% Mg2+,and the optimum pH is 6.0-7.0.Morphological,physiological,and biochemical characteristics of strain AJ6 were observed.The 16S rRNA encoding gene (16S rDNA)sequence of strain A J6 was amplified by PCR,and its nucteotide sequence was determined subsequently."Clustalw"and"PHYLIP"software bags were used to analyze the 16S rDNA sequence;the homology was compared,and then the phylogenetic tree was established.The results indicate that strain AJ6 is a novel species of the genus Natrinema.The GenBank accession number of the 16S rDNA sequences of strain AJ6 is AY277584.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Biomphalaria tenagophila (Orbigny, 1835 (Mollusca: Gastropoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana K Jannotti-Passos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA of Biomphalaria tenagophila, a mollusc intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni in Brazil, was sequenced and characterised. The genome size found for B. tenagophila was 13,722 bp and contained 13 messenger RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs (tRNA and two ribosomal RNAs (rRNA. In addition to sequencing, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genome organization of B. tenagophila was analysed based on its content and localization of both coding and non-coding regions, regions of gene overlap and tRNA nucleotide sequences. Sequences of protein, rRNA 12S and rRNA 16S nucleotides as well as gene organization were compared between B. tenagophila and Biomphalaria glabrata, as the latter is the most important S. mansoni intermediate host in Brazil. Differences between such species were observed regarding rRNA composition. The complete sequence of the B. tenagophila mitochondrial genome was deposited in GenBank (accession EF433576. Furthermore, phylogenetic relationships were estimated among 28 mollusc species, which had their complete mitochondrial genome deposited in GenBank, using the neighbour-joining method, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood bootstrap. B. tenagophila was positioned at a branch close to B. glabrata and Pulmonata molluscs, collectively comprising a paraphyletic group, contrary to Opistobranchia, which was positioned at a single branch and constituted a monophyletic group.

  18. Phylogenetic relationships, virulence factors and Rep-PCR epidemiological analysis of E. coli from human sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Caroppo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Escherichia coli to cause of extra-intestinal infections was studied on a group of 94 clinical isolates. In this work, 32 E. coli isolates from urinary tract infections, 25 from bacteraemia, 12 from low respiratory tract infections, and 25 from the normal commensal flora were characterized for the phylogenetic type, the virulence factors (VFs carriage and the Rep-PCR clonal composition.The B2 phylogenetic type was predominant among the urinary isolates (59%, the B2 and D strains among the haematic isolates (32% and 32%.The A phylogenetic type was predominant among the commensal and the respiratory isolates (52% and 58% respectively.The distribution of the B2 type strains among the urinary isolates and of the D type strains among the faecal isolates was suggesting a urinary-origin for the B2 phylogenetic type isolates found in the blood and a direct faecal derivation for the haematic isolates with D phylogenetic type.Twenty-nine VFs were analyzed.The B2 and D type strains carried a higher burden of VFs than the A and B1 phylogenetic type strains (average of VFs/strain = 8 vs 3. Some of the VFs were homogeneously distributed among the phylogenetic types (fimH, iutA, fyuA, traT. The PAI, papGII, ibeA, KpsMTIII were exclusive of B2 and D phylogenetic type strains, while sfa/foc, focG, cnf1, hlyA and rfc were exclusively observed among the B2 type strains.The clustering analysis by Rep-PCR distinguished two groups of strains, the first including 96.77% of B2 and D type strains, while the second encompassing 91,5% of A and B1 type strains.

  19. A Phylogenetic Analysis of the Globins in Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogewijs, David; Dewilde, Sylvia; Vierstraete, Andy; Moens, Luc; Vinogradov, Serge N.

    2012-01-01

    Background All globins belong to one of three families: the F (flavohemoglobin) and S (sensor) families that exhibit the canonical 3/3 α-helical fold, and the T (truncated 3/3 fold) globins characterized by a shortened 2/2 α-helical fold. All eukaryote 3/3 hemoglobins are related to the bacterial single domain F globins. It is known that Fungi contain flavohemoglobins and single domain S globins. Our aims are to provide a census of fungal globins and to examine their relationships to bacterial globins. Results Examination of 165 genomes revealed that globins are present in >90% of Ascomycota and ∼60% of Basidiomycota genomes. The S globins occur in Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota in addition to the phyla that have FHbs. Unexpectedly, group 1 T globins were found in one Blastocladiomycota and one Chytridiomycota genome. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out on the fungal globins, alone and aligned with representative bacterial globins. The Saccharomycetes and Sordariomycetes with two FHbs form two widely divergent clusters separated by the remaining fungal sequences. One of the Saccharomycete groups represents a new subfamily of FHbs, comprising a previously unknown N-terminal and a FHb missing the C-terminal moiety of its reductase domain. The two Saccharomycete groups also form two clusters in the presence of bacterial FHbs; the surrounding bacterial sequences are dominated by Proteobacteria and Bacilli (Firmicutes). The remaining fungal FHbs cluster with Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. The Sgbs cluster separately from their bacterial counterparts, except for the intercalation of two Planctomycetes and a Proteobacterium between the Fungi incertae sedis and the Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota. Conclusion Our results are compatible with a model of globin evolution put forward earlier, which proposed that eukaryote F, S and T globins originated via horizontal gene transfer of their bacterial counterparts to the eukaryote ancestor, resulting from

  20. A phylogenetic analysis of the globins in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hoogewijs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All globins belong to one of three families: the F (flavohemoglobin and S (sensor families that exhibit the canonical 3/3 α-helical fold, and the T (truncated 3/3 fold globins characterized by a shortened 2/2 α-helical fold. All eukaryote 3/3 hemoglobins are related to the bacterial single domain F globins. It is known that Fungi contain flavohemoglobins and single domain S globins. Our aims are to provide a census of fungal globins and to examine their relationships to bacterial globins. RESULTS: Examination of 165 genomes revealed that globins are present in >90% of Ascomycota and ~60% of Basidiomycota genomes. The S globins occur in Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota in addition to the phyla that have FHbs. Unexpectedly, group 1 T globins were found in one Blastocladiomycota and one Chytridiomycota genome. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out on the fungal globins, alone and aligned with representative bacterial globins. The Saccharomycetes and Sordariomycetes with two FHbs form two widely divergent clusters separated by the remaining fungal sequences. One of the Saccharomycete groups represents a new subfamily of FHbs, comprising a previously unknown N-terminal and a FHb missing the C-terminal moiety of its reductase domain. The two Saccharomycete groups also form two clusters in the presence of bacterial FHbs; the surrounding bacterial sequences are dominated by Proteobacteria and Bacilli (Firmicutes. The remaining fungal FHbs cluster with Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. The Sgbs cluster separately from their bacterial counterparts, except for the intercalation of two Planctomycetes and a Proteobacterium between the Fungi incertae sedis and the Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota. CONCLUSION: Our results are compatible with a model of globin evolution put forward earlier, which proposed that eukaryote F, S and T globins originated via horizontal gene transfer of their bacterial counterparts to the eukaryote

  1. Use of GRACE data to detect the present land uplift rate in Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei Joud, Mehdi S.; Sjöberg, Lars E.; Bagherbandi, Mohammad

    2017-05-01

    After more than 13 yr of GRACE monthly data, the determined secular trend of gravity field variation can be used to study the regions of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Here we focus on Fennoscandia where long-term terrestrial and high-quality GPS data are available, and we study the monthly GRACE data from three analysis centres. We present a new approximate formula to convert the secular trend of the GRACE gravity change to the land uplift rate without making assumptions of the ice load history. The question is whether the GRACE-derived land uplift rate by our method is related to GIA. A suitable post-processing method for the GRACE data is selected based on weighted RMS differences with the GPS data. The study reveals that none of the assumed periodic changes of the GRACE gravity field is significant in the estimation of the secular trend, and they can, therefore, be neglected. Finally, the GRACE-derived land uplift rates are obtained using the selected post-processing method, and they are compared with GPS land uplift rate data. The GPS stations with significant differences were marked using a statistical significance test. The smallest rms difference (1.0 mm a-1) was obtained by using GRACE data from the University of Texas.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of cultivable bacteria isolated from Arctic sea-ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA of 8 strains of cultivable bacteria isolated from Arctic sea-ice was studied. The results showed that strain BJ1 belonged to genus Planococcus, which was a genus of low mole percent G+C gram-positive bacteria; strain BJ6 belonged to genus Burkholderia of β- proteobacteria and the rest 6 strain all belonged to γ-proteobacteria, of which strain BJ8 was a species of Pseudoalteromonas, strain BJ2-BJ5 and BJ7 were members of genus Psychrobacter. Phylogenetic analysis also indicated that bacteria of genus Psychrobacter of the isolates formed a relatively independent phylogenetic cluster in comparison with other bacteria belonged to genus Psychrobacter.

  3. Prediction and phylogenetic analysis of mammalian short interspersed elements (SINEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozin, I B; Mayorov, V I; Lavrentieva, M V; Milanesi, L; Adkison, L R

    2000-09-01

    The presence of repetitive elements can create serious problems for sequence analysis, especially in the case of homology searches in nucleotide sequence databases. Repetitive elements should be treated carefully by using special programs and databases. In this paper, various aspects of SINE (short interspersed repetitive element) identification, analysis and evolution are discussed.

  4. Tandem repeats analysis for the high resolution phylogenetic analysis of Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramisse F

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is a young and highly monomorphic species. Three biovars, each one thought to be associated with the last three Y. pestis pandemics, have been defined based on biochemical assays. More recently, DNA based assays, including DNA sequencing, IS typing, DNA arrays, have significantly improved current knowledge on the origin and phylogenetic evolution of Y. pestis. However, these methods suffer either from a lack of resolution or from the difficulty to compare data. Variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs provides valuable polymorphic markers for genotyping and performing phylogenetic analyses in a growing number of pathogens and have given promising results for Y. pestis as well. Results In this study we have genotyped 180 Y. pestis isolates by multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA using 25 markers. Sixty-one different genotypes were observed. The three biovars were distributed into three main branches, with some exceptions. In particular, the Medievalis phenotype is clearly heterogeneous, resulting from different mutation events in the napA gene. Antiqua strains from Asia appear to hold a central position compared to Antiqua strains from Africa. A subset of 7 markers is proposed for the quick comparison of a new strain with the collection typed here. This can be easily achieved using a Web-based facility, specifically set-up for running such identifications. Conclusion Tandem-repeat typing may prove to be a powerful complement to the existing phylogenetic tools for Y. pestis. Typing can be achieved quickly at a low cost in terms of consumables, technical expertise and equipment. The resulting data can be easily compared between different laboratories. The number and selection of markers will eventually depend upon the type and aim of investigations.

  5. Phyloseq: a bioconductor package for handling and analysis of high-throughput phylogenetic sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurdie, Paul J; Holmes, Susan

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed description of a new Bioconductor package, phyloseq, for integrated data and analysis of taxonomically-clustered phylogenetic sequencing data in conjunction with related data types. The phyloseq package integrates abundance data, phylogenetic information and covariates so that exploratory transformations, plots, and confirmatory testing and diagnostic plots can be carried out seamlessly. The package is built following the S4 object-oriented framework of the R language so that once the data have been input the user can easily transform, plot and analyze the data. We present some examples that highlight the methods and the ease with which we can leverage existing packages.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis and substrate specificity of GH2 beta-mannosidases from Aspergillus species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, S.K.; Rosengren, A.; Klaubauf, S.; Kulkarni, T.; Karlsson, E.N.; de Vries, R.P.; Stalbrand, H.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of glycoside hydrolase family 2 including Aspergillus sequences and characterised beta-mannosidases from other organisms, clusters putative Aspergillus beta-mannosidases in two distinct clades (A and B). Aspergillus species have at least one paralog in each of the two clades.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of freshwater mussel corbicula regularis by 18s rRNA gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magare V N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Corbicula regularis is a freshwater mussel found in the Indian sub-continent. In the present study, phylogenetic characterization of this important bivalve was attempted using 18S ribosomal RNA gene markers. Genomic DNA was extracted and 18S rRNA gene was amplified by universal primers. The amplification product was sequenced and compared with the nucleotide databases available online to evaluate phylogenetic relationship of the animal under study. Results indicated that 18S rRNA gene sequences of C. regularis showed high degree of similarity to another freshwater mussel, C. fluminea. This work constitutes the first ever sequence deposition of the C. regularis in the nucleotide databases highlighting the usefulness of 18S ribosomal gene markers for phylogenetic analysis.

  8. Biomass burning in eastern Europe during spring 2006 caused high deposition of ammonium in northern Fennoscandia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Per Erik; Ferm, Martin; Pihl Karlsson, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    High air concentrations of ammonium were detected at low and high altitude sites in Sweden, Finland and Norway during the spring 2006, coinciding with polluted air from biomass burning in eastern Europe passing over central and northern Fennoscandia. Unusually high values for throughfall deposition...

  9. Associations of Conifer-Infesting Bark Beetles and Fungi in Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnakoski, Riikka; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; Niemelä, Pekka; Wingfield, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytinae) have a widespread association with fungi, especially with ophiostomatoid fungi (Ascomycota) that cause blue staining of wood, and in some cases, serious tree diseases. In Fennoscandia, most studies of these fungi have focused on economically important bark beetle species and this is likely to have led to a biased view of the fungal biodiversity in the region. Recently, the associations between fungi and bark beetles in Fennoscandia have been shown to be more diverse than previously thought. Furthermore, they form complex and dynamic associations that are only now beginning to emerge. This review examines the current knowledge of the rather poorly known interactions between bark beetles, fungi and their conifer host trees in Fennoscandia. The diversity of ophiostomatoid species is discussed and the possible factors that influence the assemblages of fungal associates are considered for all species that are known to occur in the region. For many ophiostomatoid species found in Fennoscandia, little or nothing is known regarding their pathogenicity, particularly if they were to be transferred to new environments. We, therefore, draw attention to the possible threats of timber trade and climate change-induced invasions of new habitats by bark beetles and the fungi that can be moved along with them. PMID:26467956

  10. Phylogenetic relationships among pufferfish of genus Takifugu by RAPD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lin-Sheng; Liu, Bao-Zhong; Wang, Zai-Zhao; Li, Hong-Lei; Xiang, Jian-Hai; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2001-06-01

    Amplifications with 300 10-base primers under predetermined optimal reaction yielded 2762 reproducible amplified fragments ranging from 200 to 3000 bp. Genetic distances among five species of Takifugu and Lagocephalus spadiceus as outgroup were calculated based on the presence/absence of the amplified fragments. Topological phylogenic trees of the 5 species of Takifugu and the outgroup were generated by Parsimony and Neighbor-Joining analysis based on RAPD data set. The genetic distance between T. rubripes and T. pseudommus was almost the same as that between individuals within each species, but was much smaller than that among T. rubripes, T. pseudommus and the other species. The molecular data from RAPD analysis convincingly showed that T. rubripes and T. pseudommus should be the same species.

  11. PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG PUFFERFISH OF GENUS TAKIFUGU BY RAPD ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Amplifications with 300 10-base primers under predetermined optimal reaction yielded 2762 reproducible amplified fragments ranging from 200 to 3000 bp. Genetic distances among five species of Takifugu and Lagocephalus spadiceus as outgroup were calculated based on the presence/absence of the amplified fragments. Topological phylogenic trees of the 5 species of Takifugu and the outgroup were generated by Parsimony and Neighbor-Joining analysis based on RAPD data set. The genetic distance between T. rubripes and T. pseudommus was almost the same as that between individuals within each species, but was much smaller than that among T. rubripes, T. pseudommus and the other species. The molecular data from RAPD analysis convincingly showed that T. rubripes and T. pseudommus should be the same species.

  12. PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG PUFFERFISH OF GENUS TAKIFUGU BY RAPD ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋林生; 刘保忠; 王在照; 李红蕾; 相建海; 钱培元

    2001-01-01

    AmpLifications with 300 10-base primers under predetermined optimal reaction yielded 2762 reproducible amplified fragments ranging from 200 to 3000 bp. Genetic distances among five species of Takifugu and Lagocephalus spadiceus as outgreup were calculated based on the presence/absence of the amplified fragments. Topological phylogenie trees of the 5 species of Takgfugu and the outgroup were gen-erated by Parsimony and Neighbor-Joining analysis based on RAPD data set. The genetic distance between T. rubripes and T. pseudommus was almost the same as that between individuals within each species, but was much smaller than that among T. rubripes, T. pseudommus and the other species. The molecu-lar data from RAPD analysis convincingly showed that T. rubripes and T. pseudommus should be the same species.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of skull shape evolution in marmotine squirrels using landmarks and thin-plate splines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Swiderski

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several studies have shown that the recently developed techniques of geometric morphometrics are extremely powerful descriptive tools. And yet, one potential use of the resulting descriptions, phylogenetic analysis, has generally been neglected. This neglect is understandable because prominent systematists as well as prominent morphometricians have objected to the use of morphometric data in phylogenetic systematics. We agree that some methods of morphometric analysis produce results that cannot be used in phylogenetic systematics, and that some methods of incorporating morphometric results into statements about character transformation are not appropriate. However, we do not agree that these objections to specific techniques support a blanket rejection of the use of morphometric data in systematic studies. In this paper, we review the principles of phylogenetic systematics and show that they are equally applicable to qualitative descriptions of triangles and to quantitative descriptions (shape coordinates of the apex of those same shapes. Then we show how these principles would he applied to complex shapes like skulls of marmotine squirrels, and that the resulting analysis leads to legitimate hypotheses about marmotine phylogeny and the evolution of skull shape in these animals.

  14. ape 3.0: New tools for distance-based phylogenetics and evolutionary analysis in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Andrei-Alin; Huber, Katharina T; Paradis, Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Reflecting its continuously increasing versatility and functionality, the popularity of the ape (analysis of phylogenetics and evolution) software package has grown steadily over the years. Among its features, it has a strong distance-based component allowing the user to compute distances from aligned DNA sequences based on most methods from the literature and also build phylogenetic trees from them. However, even data generated with modern genomic approaches can fail to give rise to sufficiently reliable distance estimates. One way to overcome this problem is to exclude such estimates from data analysis giving rise to an incomplete distance data set (as opposed to a complete one). So far their analysis has been out of reach for ape. To remedy this, we have incorporated into ape several methods from the literature for phylogenetic inference from incomplete distance matrices. In addition, we have also extended ape's repertoire for phylogenetic inference from complete distances, added a new object class to efficiently encode sets of splits of taxa, and extended the functionality of some of its existing functions. ape is distributed through the Comprehensive R Archive Network: http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/ape/index.html Further information may be found at http://ape.mpl.ird.fr/pegas/

  15. Threatened species and the potential loss of phylogenetic diversity: conservation scenarios based on estimated extinction probabilities and phylogenetic risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Daniel P

    2008-12-01

    New species conservation strategies, including the EDGE of Existence (EDGE) program, have expanded threatened species assessments by integrating information about species' phylogenetic distinctiveness. Distinctiveness has been measured through simple scores that assign shared credit among species for evolutionary heritage represented by the deeper phylogenetic branches. A species with a high score combined with a high extinction probability receives high priority for conservation efforts. Simple hypothetical scenarios for phylogenetic trees and extinction probabilities demonstrate how such scoring approaches can provide inefficient priorities for conservation. An existing probabilistic framework derived from the phylogenetic diversity measure (PD) properly captures the idea of shared responsibility for the persistence of evolutionary history. It avoids static scores, takes into account the status of close relatives through their extinction probabilities, and allows for the necessary updating of priorities in light of changes in species threat status. A hypothetical phylogenetic tree illustrates how changes in extinction probabilities of one or more species translate into changes in expected PD. The probabilistic PD framework provided a range of strategies that moved beyond expected PD to better consider worst-case PD losses. In another example, risk aversion gave higher priority to a conservation program that provided a smaller, but less risky, gain in expected PD. The EDGE program could continue to promote a list of top species conservation priorities through application of probabilistic PD and simple estimates of current extinction probability. The list might be a dynamic one, with all the priority scores updated as extinction probabilities change. Results of recent studies suggest that estimation of extinction probabilities derived from the red list criteria linked to changes in species range sizes may provide estimated probabilities for many different species

  16. Reconstructing the tectonic history of Fennoscandia from its margins: The past 100 million years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir Wood, R. [EQE International Ltd (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01

    In the absence of onland late Mesozoic and Cenozoic geological formations the tectonic history of the Baltic Shield over the past 100 million years can be reconstructed from the thick sedimentary basins that surround Fennoscandia on three sides. Tectonic activity around Fennoscandia through this period has been diverse but can be divided into four main periods: a. pre North Atlantic spreading ridge (100-60 Ma) when transpressional deformation on the southern margins of Fennoscandia and transtensional activity to the west was associated with a NNE-SSW maximum compressive stress direction; b. the creation of the spreading ridge (60-45 Ma) when there was rifting along the western margin; c. the re-arrangement of spreading axes (45-25 Ma) when there was a radial compression around Fennoscandia, and d. the re-emergence of the Iceland hot-spot (25-0 Ma) when the stress-field has come to accord with ridge or plume `push`. Since 60 Ma the Alpine plate boundary has had little influence on Fennoscandia. The highest levels of deformation on the margins of Fennoscandia were achieved around 85 Ma, 60-55 Ma, with strain-rates around 10{sup -9}/year. Within the Baltic Shield long term strain rates have been around 10{sup -1}1/year, with little evidence for significant deformations passing into the shield from the margins. Fennoscandian Border Zone activity, which was prominent from 90-60 Ma, was largely abandoned following the creation of the Norwegian Sea spreading ridge, and with the exception of the Lofoten margin, there is subsequently little evidence for deformation passing into Fennoscandia. Renewal of modest compressional deformation in the Voering Basin suggest that the `Current Tectonic Regime` is of Quaternary age although the orientation of the major stress axis has remained consistent since around 10 Ma. The past pattern of changes suggest that in the geological near-future variations are to be anticipated in the magnitude rather than the orientation of stresses.

  17. A phylogenetic analysis of the myxobacteria: basis for their classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimkets, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The primary sequence and secondary structural features of the 16S rRNA were compared for 12 different myxobacteria representing all the known cultivated genera. Analysis of these data show the myxobacteria to form a monophyletic grouping consisting of three distinct families, which lies within the delta subdivision of the purple bacterial phylum. The composition of the families is consistent with differences in cell and spore morphology, cell behavior, and pigment and secondary metabolite production but is not correlated with the morphological complexity of the fruiting bodies. The Nannocystis exedens lineage has evolved at an unusually rapid pace and its rRNA shows numerous primary and secondary structural idiosyncrasies.

  18. A phylogenetic analysis of the myxobacteria: basis for their classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimkets, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The primary sequence and secondary structural features of the 16S rRNA were compared for 12 different myxobacteria representing all the known cultivated genera. Analysis of these data show the myxobacteria to form a monophyletic grouping consisting of three distinct families, which lies within the delta subdivision of the purple bacterial phylum. The composition of the families is consistent with differences in cell and spore morphology, cell behavior, and pigment and secondary metabolite production but is not correlated with the morphological complexity of the fruiting bodies. The Nannocystis exedens lineage has evolved at an unusually rapid pace and its rRNA shows numerous primary and secondary structural idiosyncrasies.

  19. Hepatitis E Virus Circulation in Italy: Phylogenetic and Evolutionary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montesano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV, a major cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries, has been classified into four main genotypes and a number of subtypes. New genotypes have been recently identified in various mammals, including HEV genotype 3, which has a worldwide distribution. It is widespread among pigs in developed countries. Objectives This study investigated the genetic diversity of HEV among humans and swine in Italy. The date of origin and the demographic history of the HEV were also estimated. Materials and Methods A total of 327 HEV sequences of swine and humans from Italy were downloaded from the national centre for biotechnology information. Three different data sets were constructed. The first and the second data set were used to confirm the genotype of the sequences analyzed. The third data set was used to estimate the mean evolutionary rate and to determine the time-scaled phylogeny and demographic history. Results The Bayesian maximum clade credibility tree and the time of the most common recent ancestor estimates showed that the root of the tree dated back to the year 1907 (95% HPD: 1811 - 1975. Two main clades were found, divided into two subclades. Skyline plot analysis, performed separately for human and swine sequences, demonstrated the presence of a bottleneck only in the skyline plot from the swine sequences. Selective pressure analysis revealed only negatively selected sites. Conclusions This study provides support for the hypothesis that humans are probably infected after contact with swine sources. The findings emphasize the importance of checking the country of origin of swine and of improving sanitary control measures from the veterinary standpoint to prevent the spread of HEV infection in Italy.

  20. Genome-wide identification and phylogenetic analysis of the ERF gene family in cucumbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the ERF transcription-factor family participate in a number of biological processes, viz., responses to hormones, adaptation to biotic and abiotic stress, metabolism regulation, beneficial symbiotic interactions, cell differentiation and developmental processes. So far, no tissue-expression profile of any cucumber ERF protein has been reported in detail. Recent completion of the cucumber full-genome sequence has come to facilitate, not only genome-wide analysis of ERF family members in cucumbers themselves, but also a comparative analysis with those in Arabidopsis and rice. In this study, 103 hypothetical ERF family genes in the cucumber genome were identified, phylogenetic analysis indicating their classification into 10 groups, designated I to X. Motif analysis further indicated that most of the conserved motifs outside the AP2/ERF domain, are selectively distributed among the specific clades in the phylogenetic tree. From chromosomal localization and genome distribution analysis, it appears that tandem-duplication may have contributed to CsERF gene expansion. Intron/exon structure analysis indicated that a few CsERFs still conserved the former intron-position patterns existent in the common ancestor of monocots and eudicots. Expression analysis revealed the widespread distribution of the cucumber ERF gene family within plant tissues, thereby implying the probability of their performing various roles therein. Furthermore, members of some groups presented mutually similar expression patterns that might be related to their phylogenetic groups.

  1. First phylogenetic analysis of Ehrlichia canis in dogs and ticks from Mexico. Preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina G. Sosa-Gutiérrez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Phylogenetic characterization of Ehrlichia canis in dogs naturally infected and ticks, diagnosed by PCR and sequencing of 16SrRNA gene; compare different isolates found in American countries. Materials and methods. Were collected Blood samples from 139 dogs with suggestive clinical manifestations of this disease and they were infested with ticks; part of 16SrRNA gene was sequenced and aligned, with 17 sequences reported in American countries. Two phylogenetic trees were constructed using the Maximum likelihood method, and Maximum parsimony. Results. They were positive to E. canis 25/139 (18.0% dogs and 29/139 (20.9% ticks. The clinical manifestations presented were fever, fatigue, depression and vomiting. Rhipicephalus sanguineus Dermacentor variabilis and Haemaphysalis leporis-palustris ticks were positive for E. canis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequences of dogs and ticks in Mexico form a third group diverging of sequences from South America and USA. Conclusions. This is the first phylogenetic analysis of E. canis in Mexico. There are differences in the sequences of Mexico with those reported in South America and USA. This research lays the foundation for further study of genetic variability.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Mexican Babesia bovis isolates using msa and ssrRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Alma D; Mosqueda, Juan J; Borgonio, Verónica M; Falcón, Alfonso; Alvarez, Antonio; Camacho, Minerva; de Lourdes Muñoz, Maria; Figueroa, Julio V

    2008-12-01

    Variable merozoite surface antigens of Babesia bovis are exposed glycoproteins having a role in erythrocyte invasion. Members of this gene family include msa-1 and msa-2 (msa-2c, msa-2a(1), msa-2a(2), and msa-2b). Small subunit ribosomal (ssr)RNA gene is subject to evolutive pressure and has been used in phylogenetic studies. To determine the phylogenetic relationship among B. bovis Mexican isolates using different genetic markers, PCR amplicons, corresponding to msa-1, msa-2c, msa-2b, and ssrRNA genes, were cloned and plasmids carrying the corresponding inserts were sequenced. Comparative analysis of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences revealed distinct degrees of variability and identity among the coding gene sequences obtained from 12 geographically different B. bovis isolates and a reference strain. Overall sequence identities of 47.7%, 72.3%, 87.7%, and 94% were determined for msa-1, msa-2b, msa-2c, and ssrRNA, respectively. A robust phylogenetic tree was obtained with msa-2b sequences. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that Mexican B. bovis isolates group in clades not concordant with the Mexican geography. However, the Mexican isolates group together in an American clade separated from the Australian clade. Sequence heterogeneity in msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c coding regions of Mexican B. bovis isolates present in different geographical regions can be a result of either differential evolutive pressure or cattle movement from commercial trade.

  3. CDAO-Store: Ontology-driven Data Integration for Phylogenetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son Tran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Comparative Data Analysis Ontology (CDAO is an ontology developed, as part of the EvoInfo and EvoIO groups supported by the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, to provide semantic descriptions of data and transformations commonly found in the domain of phylogenetic analysis. The core concepts of the ontology enable the description of phylogenetic trees and associated character data matrices. Results Using CDAO as the semantic back-end, we developed a triple-store, named CDAO-Store. CDAO-Store is a RDF-based store of phylogenetic data, including a complete import of TreeBASE. CDAO-Store provides a programmatic interface, in the form of web services, and a web-based front-end, to perform both user-defined as well as domain-specific queries; domain-specific queries include search for nearest common ancestors, minimum spanning clades, filter multiple trees in the store by size, author, taxa, tree identifier, algorithm or method. In addition, CDAO-Store provides a visualization front-end, called CDAO-Explorer, which can be used to view both character data matrices and trees extracted from the CDAO-Store. CDAO-Store provides import capabilities, enabling the addition of new data to the triple-store; files in PHYLIP, MEGA, nexml, and NEXUS formats can be imported and their CDAO representations added to the triple-store. Conclusions CDAO-Store is made up of a versatile and integrated set of tools to support phylogenetic analysis. To the best of our knowledge, CDAO-Store is the first semantically-aware repository of phylogenetic data with domain-specific querying capabilities. The portal to CDAO-Store is available at http://www.cs.nmsu.edu/~cdaostore.

  4. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling Pursuant to the Great Oxidation Event: Evidence from the Paleoproterozoic of Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kump, L.; Junium, C. K.; Arthur, M. A.; Brasier, A.; Fallick, A. E.; Melezhik, V.; Lepland, A.; Crne, A.; Luo, G.; Far-Deep Drilling Team

    2010-12-01

    A key goal of FAR-DEEP (Fennoscandia Arctic Russia - Drilling Early Earth Project) is to document the development of an aerobic biosphere following the Great Oxidation Event (GOE, ~2.4 Ga). Toward that end, we present an analysis of C and N cycling during this critical interval, based on preliminary C and N isotope analysis of archival FAR-DEEP samples. A prolonged interval of high δ13C in the ocean / atmosphere system characterizes the Paleoproterozoic from approximately 2.3 to 2.06 billion years ago. The event is known as the Lomagundi-Jatuli event (LJE). The initiation of the LJE occurs at as evidence for non-mass dependent fractionation of sulfur isotopes disappear, suggesting a relationship to the GOE. Sediments deposited during the event are notably devoid of organic matter (Corg). Moreover, Corg-rich sedimentary rocks are found which have been thought to postdate the LJE; in Fennoscandia these rocks are associated with the Zaonega Formation, with Corg contents approaching 60%. Zaonega Formation shales containing Corg-rich deposits were penetrated by three FAR-DEEP holes in the Paleoproterozoic Onega Basin, Karelia Russia. Low in the section, δ13Corg values increase gradually from ~ -28‰ to -24 ‰, then increase markedly to ~ -18 ‰, before beginning a gradual decline for much of the rest of the studied interval. δ13Ccarb values follow a parallel trend, although low in the section they have anomalously light values (~ -10‰), rising abruptly to +4‰ as δ13Corg reaches its peak value. Both δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg then decline by 15-20‰ as one proceeds up-section. In the same interval, δ15Norg values shift from relatively light values of ~ +2‰ to +4‰ to heavier values of ~ +8‰ to +9‰. δ13Ccarb values increase by +10‰ toward the top of the cored interval, while δ15Norg fluctuate between +5 to +9 ‰. Petrographic evidence shows that some of the carbonates with lowest δ13Ccarb values are diagenetic concretions, and some of the Cor has

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Selected Menthol-Producing Species Belonging to the Lamiaceae Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Motahareh; Mirzaei, Hamed; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Bagherian, Ali; Masoud Khoi, Mohammad Jaber; Reza Mirzaei, Hamid; Salehi, Rasoul; Reza Jaafari, Mahmoud; Kazemi Oskuee, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Menthol is an organic compound with diverse medicinal and commercial applications, and is made either synthetically or through extraction from mint oils. The aim of the present study was to investigate menthol levels in selected menthol-producing species belonging to the Lamiaceae family, and to determine phylogenetic relationships of menthol dehydrogenase gene sequence among these species. Three genus of Lamiaceae, namely Mentha, Salvia, and Micromeria, were selected for phytochemical and phylogenetic analyses. After identification of each species based on menthol dehydrogenase gene in NCBI, BLAST software was used for the sequence alignment. MEGA4 software was used to draw phylogenetic tree for various species. Phytochemical analysis revealed that the highest and lowest amounts of both essential oil and menthol belonged to Mentha spicata and Micromeria hyssopifolia, respectively. The species Mentha spicata and Mentha piperita, which were assigned to one cluster in the dendrogram, contained the highest amounts of essential oil and menthol while Micromeria species, which was in the distinct cluster and placed in the farther evolutionary distance, contained the lowest amount of essential oil and menthol. Phylogenetic and phytochemistry analyses showed that essential oil and menthol contents of menthol-producing species are associated with menthol dehydrogenase gene sequence.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Microtus fortis calamorum (Arvicolinae, Rodentia) and its phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianhuan; Gao, Jun; Ni, Liju; Hu, Jianhua; Li, Kai; Sun, Fengping; Xie, Jianyun; Bo, Xiong; Gao, Chen; Xiao, Junhua; Zhou, Yuxun

    2012-05-01

    Microtus fortis is a special resource of rodent in China. It is a promising experimental animal model for the study on the mechanism of Schistosome japonicum resistance. The first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for Microtus fortis calamorum, a subspecies of M. fortis (Arvicolinae, Rodentia), was reported in this study. The mitochondrial genome sequence of M. f. calamorum (Genbank: JF261175) showed a typical vertebrate pattern with 13 protein coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and one major noncoding region (CR region).The extended termination associated sequences (ETAS-1 and ETAS-2) and conserved sequence block 1 (CSB-1) were found in the CR region. The putative origin of replication for the light strand (O(L)) of M. f. calamorum was 35bp long and showed high conservation in stem and adjacent sequences, but the difference existed in the loop region among three species of genus Microtus. In order to investigate the phylogenetic position of M. f. calamorum, the phylogenetic trees (Maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods) were constructed based on 12 protein-coding genes (except for ND6 gene) on H strand from 16 rodent species. M. f. calamorum was classified into genus Microtus, Arvcicolinae for the highly phylogenetic relationship with Microtus kikuchii (Taiwan vole). Further phylogenetic analysis results based on the cytochrome b gene ranged from M. f. calamorum to one of the subspecies of M. fortis, which formed a sister group of Microtus middendorfii in the genus Microtus.

  7. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of anaerobic psychrophilic enrichment cultures obtained from a greenland glacier ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Peter P.; Miteva, Vanya I.; Brenchley, Jean E.

    2003-01-01

    The examination of microorganisms in glacial ice cores allows the phylogenetic relationships of organisms frozen for thousands of years to be compared with those of current isolates. We developed a method for aseptically sampling a sediment-containing portion of a Greenland ice core that had remained at -9 degrees C for over 100,000 years. Epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results showed that the ice sample contained over 6 x 10(7) cells/ml. Anaerobic enrichment cultures inoculated with melted ice were grown and maintained at -2 degrees C. Genomic DNA extracted from these enrichments was used for the PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with bacterial and archaeal primers and the preparation of clone libraries. Approximately 60 bacterial inserts were screened by restriction endonuclease analysis and grouped into 27 unique restriction fragment length polymorphism types, and 24 representative sequences were compared phylogenetically. Diverse sequences representing major phylogenetic groups including alpha, beta, and gamma Proteobacteria as well as relatives of the Thermus, Bacteroides, Eubacterium, and Clostridium groups were found. Sixteen clone sequences were closely related to those from known organisms, with four possibly representing new species. Seven sequences may reflect new genera and were most closely related to sequences obtained only by PCR amplification. One sequence was over 12% distant from its closest relative and may represent a novel order or family. These results show that phylogenetically diverse microorganisms have remained viable within the Greenland ice core for at least 100,000 years.

  9. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Trypanosoma evansi in Iranian dromedary camels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourjafar, Mehrdad; Badiei, Khalil; Sharifiyazdi, Hassan; Chalmeh, Aliasghar; Naghib, Mojtaba; Babazadeh, Marzieh; Mootabi Alavi, Amir; Hosseini Joshani-Zadeh, Narges

    2013-02-01

    Whole blood samples were collected from 117 male clinically healthy Camelus dromedarius aged between 6 months to 18 years from several farms in Yazd Province of Iran. Trypanosoma evansi-affected camels were detected by Giemsa-stained blood smears, and the positive blood samples (4 out of 117) were submitted to PCR examination and phylogenetic analysis. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool data of the obtained complete internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences revealed that they corresponded to those of T. evansi, Thailand cattle isolate (AY912276) with the homology of 99 %. Both phylogenetic trees generated by ITS1 and complete ITS were unable to clearly show inter- and intraspecific genetic diversity of Trypanosoma spp. isolates. The phylogenetic tree inferred from the ITS2 nucleotide sequences (569 bp) clearly showed the genetic diversity of the parasites. Phylogenetic and molecular analyses of this region showed that two distinct genotypes of T. evansi in Iranian dromedary camels are present. In contrast to the ITS1 and ITS2 regions, multiple alignment of the nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S rRNA showed a high degree of sequence conservation during evolution in various Trypanosoma spp.

  10. Assessing the Goodness of Fit of Phylogenetic Comparative Methods: A Meta-Analysis and Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhwueng, Dwueng-Chwuan

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic comparative methods (PCMs) have been applied widely in analyzing data from related species but their fit to data is rarely assessed. Can one determine whether any particular comparative method is typically more appropriate than others by examining comparative data sets? I conducted a meta-analysis of 122 phylogenetic data sets found by searching all papers in JEB, Blackwell Synergy and JSTOR published in 2002-2005 for the purpose of assessing the fit of PCMs. The number of species in these data sets ranged from 9 to 117. I used the Akaike information criterion to compare PCMs, and then fit PCMs to bivariate data sets through REML analysis. Correlation estimates between two traits and bootstrapped confidence intervals of correlations from each model were also compared. For phylogenies of less than one hundred taxa, the Independent Contrast method and the independent, non-phylogenetic models provide the best fit.For bivariate analysis, correlations from different PCMs are qualitatively similar so that actual correlations from real data seem to be robust to the PCM chosen for the analysis. Therefore, researchers might apply the PCM they believe best describes the evolutionary mechanisms underlying their data.

  11. Assessing the Goodness of Fit of Phylogenetic Comparative Methods: A Meta-Analysis and Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwueng-Chwuan Jhwueng

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic comparative methods (PCMs have been applied widely in analyzing data from related species but their fit to data is rarely assessed.Can one determine whether any particular comparative method is typically more appropriate than others by examining comparative data sets?I conducted a meta-analysis of 122 phylogenetic data sets found by searching all papers in JEB, Blackwell Synergy and JSTOR published in 2002-2005 for the purpose of assessing the fit of PCMs. The number of species in these data sets ranged from 9 to 117.I used the Akaike information criterion to compare PCMs, and then fit PCMs to bivariate data sets through REML analysis. Correlation estimates between two traits and bootstrapped confidence intervals of correlations from each model were also compared.For phylogenies of less than one hundred taxa, the Independent Contrast method and the independent, non-phylogenetic models provide the best fit.For bivariate analysis, correlations from different PCMs are qualitatively similar so that actual correlations from real data seem to be robust to the PCM chosen for the analysis. Therefore, researchers might apply the PCM they believe best describes the evolutionary mechanisms underlying their data.

  12. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a phenanthrene-degrading strain isolated from oil-contaminated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Ying; MIN Hang; LU Zhen-mei; YE Yang-fang

    2004-01-01

    Bacterium strain EVA17 was isolated from an oil-contaminated soil, and identified as Sphingononas sp.based on analysis of 16S rDNA sequence, cellular fatty acid composition and physiological-chemical tests. The salicylate hydroxylase and catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase (C23O) were detected in cell-free lysates, suggesting a pathway for phenanthrene catabolism via salicylate and catechol. Alignment showed that both of the C23O and GST genes of the strain EVA17 had high similarity with homologues of strains from genus Sphingomonas. The phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA and C23O gene sequence indicated that EVA17 should be classified into genus Sphingomonas, although the two phylogenetic trees were slightly different from each other. The results of coamplification and sequence determination indicated that GST gene should be located upstream of the C23O gene.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of 48 gene families revealing relationships between Hagfishes, Lampreys, and Gnathostomata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuiyan Yu; Weiwei Zhang; Ling Li; Huifang Huang; Fei Ma; Qingwei Li

    2008-01-01

    It has become clear that the extant vertebrates are divided into three major groups, that is, hagfishes, lampreys, and jawed vertebrates.Morphological and molecular studies, however, have resulted in conflicting views with regard m their interrelationships. To clarify the phylogenetic relationships between them, 48 orthologous protein-coding gene families were analyzed. Even as the analysis of 34 nuclear gene families supported the monophyly of cyclostomes, the analysis of 14 mitochondrial gene families suggested a closer relationship between lampreys and gnathostomes compared to hagfishes. Lampreys were sister group of gnathostomes. The results of this study sup-ported the eyclostomes. Choice of outgroup, tree-making methods, and software may affect the phylogenetic prediction, which may have caused much debate over the subject. Development of new methods for tackling such problems is still necessary.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of Porphyromonas species isolated from the oral cavity of Australian marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Milinovich, Gabriel J; Burrell, Paul C; Huynh, Sharnan C; Pettett, Lyndall M; Blackall, Linda L; Trott, Darren J; Bird, Philip S

    2008-09-01

    Porphyromonas species are frequently isolated from the oral cavity and are associated with periodontal disease in both animals and humans. Black, pigmented Porphyromonas spp. isolated from the gingival margins of selected wild and captive Australian marsupials with varying degrees of periodontal disease (brushtail possums, koalas and macropods) were compared phylogenetically to Porphyromonas strains from non-marsupials (bear, wolf, coyote, cats and dogs) and Porphyromonas gingivalis strains from humans using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The results of the phylogenetic analysis identified three distinct groups of strains. A monophyletic P. gingivalis group (Group 1) contained only strains isolated from humans and a Porphyromonas gulae group (Group 2) was divided into three distinct subclades, each containing both marsupial and non-marsupial strains. Group 3, which contained only marsupial strains, including all six strains isolated from captive koalas, was genetically distinct from P. gulae and may constitute a new Porphyromonas species.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Silphium and subtribe Engelmanniinae (Asteraceae: Heliantheae) based on ITS and ETS sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevinger, J A; Panero, J L

    2000-04-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of Silphium and subtribe Engelmanniinae were examined using DNA sequence data. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the external transcribed spacer (ETS) region were sequenced for 39 specimens representing the six genera of subtribe Engelmanniinae (Berlandiera, Chrysogonum, Dugesia, Engelmannia, Lindheimera, and Silphium), plus five additional genera identified as closely related to the Engelmanniinae by chloroplast DNA restriction site analysis, and three outgroups. Phylogenetic analysis supported the monophyly of Silphium with Lindheimera as sister. Silphium can be divided into two sections based upon two well-supported clades that correspond to root type and growth form. These results also supported the expansion of subtribe Engelmanniinae to include Balsamorhiza, Borrichia, Rojasianthe, Vigethia, and Wyethia. We hypothesize that subtribe Engelmanniinae originated in Mesoamerica and later radiated to the United States. We suggest that the cypsela complex, which is present in Berlandiera, Chrysogonum, Engelmannia, and Lindheimera, arose only once and was subsequently lost in Silphium.

  16. Genetic Analysis and Phylogenetic Comparison of Black Queen Cell Virus Genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Phylogenetic analysis of 22 Black queen cell virus (BQCV) genotypes collected from honeybee colonies in Poland, Austria and Hungary was performed on a partial helicase enzyme coding region (ORF1) and on a partial structural polypeptide coding region (ORF2). While the phylogeny based on the ORF2 region showed ? with the exception of one strain from Poland ? clustering of the genotypes corresponding to their geographic origin, the ORF1-based tree exhibited a completely diffe...

  17. PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONGST 10 Durio SPECIES BASED ON PCR-RFLP ANALYSIS OF TWO CHLOROPLAST GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panca J. Santoso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Twenty seven species of Durio have been identified in Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia, but their relationships have not been studied. This study was conducted to analyse phylogenetic relationships amongst 10 Durio species in Malaysia using PCR-RFLP on two chloroplast DNA genes, i.e. ndhC-trnV and rbcL. DNAs were extracted from young leaves of 11 accessions from 10 Durio species collected from the Tenom Agriculture Research Station, Sabah, and University Agriculture Park, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Two pairs of oligonucleotide primers, N1-N2 and rbcL1-rbcL2, were used to flank the target regions ndhC-trnV and rbcL. Eight restriction enzymes, HindIII, BsuRI, PstI, TaqI, MspI, SmaI, BshNI, and EcoR130I, were used to digest the amplicons. Based on the results of PCR-RFLP on ndhC-trnV gene, the 10 Durio species were grouped into five distinct clusters, and the accessions generally showed high variations. However, based on the results of PCR-RFLP on the rbcL gene, the species were grouped into three distinct clusters, and generally showed low variations. This means that ndhC-trnV gene is more reliable for phylogenetic analysis in lower taxonomic level of Durio species or for diversity analysis, while rbcL gene is reliable marker for phylogenetic analysis at higher taxonomic level. PCR-RFLP on the ndhC-trnV and rbcL genes could therefore be considered as useful markers to phylogenetic analysis amongst Durio species. These finding might be used for further molecular marker assisted in Durio breeding program.

  18. Phylogenomic Analysis Reveals Extensive Phylogenetic Mosaicism in the Human GPCR Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Woodwark

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel high throughput phylogenomic analysis (HTP was applied to the rhodopsin G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family. Instances of phylogenetic mosaicism between receptors were found to be frequent, often as instances of correlated mosaicism and repeated mosaicism. A null data set was constructed with the same phylogenetic topology as the rhodopsin GPCRs. Comparison of the two data sets revealed that mosaicism was found in GPCRs in a higher frequency than would be expected by homoplasy or the effects of topology alone. Various evolutionary models of differential conservation, recombination and homoplasy are explored which could result in the patterns observed in this analysis. We find that the results are most consistent with frequent recombination events. A complex evolutionary history is illustrated in which it is likely frequent recombination has endowed GPCRs with new functions. The pattern of mosaicism is shown to be informative for functional prediction for orphan receptors. HTP analysis is complementary to conventional phylogenomic analyses revealing mosaicism that would not otherwise have been detectable through conventional phylogenetics.

  19. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of NBS-encoding genes in Rutaceae fruit crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Lan, Hong; Zeng, Wenfang; Liu, Chaoyang; Xu, Jidi; Deng, Xiuxin

    2011-02-01

    The nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes are the largest class of disease resistance genes in plants. However, our understanding of the evolution of NBS-LRR genes in Rutaceae fruit crops is rather limited. We report an evolutionary study of 103 NBS-encoding genes isolated from Poncirus trifoliata (trifoliate orange), Citrus reticulata (tangerine) and their F(1) progeny. In all, 58 of the sequences contained a continuous open reading frame. Phylogenetic analysis classified the 58 NBS genes into nine clades, eight of which were genus specific. This was taken to imply that most of the ancestors of these NBS genes evolved after the genus split. The motif pattern of the 58 NBS-encoding genes was consistent with their phylogenetic profile. An extended phylogenetic analysis, incorporating citrus NBS genes from the public database, classified 95 citrus NBS genes into six clades, half of which were genus specific. RFLP analysis showed that citrus NBS-encoding genes have been evolving rapidly, and that they are unstable when passed through an intergeneric cross. Of 32 NBS-encoding genes tracked by gene-specific PCR, 24 showed segregation distortion among a set of 94 F(1) individuals. This study provides new insight into the evolution of Rutaceae NBS genes and their behaviour following an intergeneric cross.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of Beggiatoa spp. from organic rich sediment of Tokyo Bay, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2003-07-01

    Nitrate-accumulating filamentous bacteria from organic rich sediment of Tokyo Bay, morphologically similar to Beggiatoa species, were phylogenetically analyzed. From several sites in Tokyo Bay, Beggiatoa-like bacteria were collected. Each sample contained narrower or wider type (10 and 30 microns, respectively) of trichomes. With the nested PCR using specific primers for Beggiatoa, fragments of 16S rRNA gene were amplified and then subjected to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. Sequencing and the following phylogenetic analysis indicated that they are related to large Beggiatoa species. The wider type was related to uncultured Beggiatoa clones of other geographical localities and distinct from the narrower type in Tokyo Bay. Among the narrower types, a sample from a tidal flat was genetically distinct from the sample from sites of 10 and 20 m water depth. These narrower types form a new branch in Beggiatoa/Thioploca cluster. The result of phylogenetic analysis was in accordance with the previous studies that indicate possession of nitrate-accumulation capability is congruent with phylogeny based on 16S rRNA sequences.

  1. Genotypic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Cryptosporidium sp. from domestic animals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, F; da Silva, S; Bomfim, T C B; Teixeira, K R S; Bello, A R

    2007-11-30

    The purpose of the present study was the genetic characterization, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA sequences of Cryptosporidium isolates obtained from different animal hosts in Brazil. Fecal samples containing Cryptosporidium oocysts were obtained from chickens, ducks, quails, guinea pigs, dairy calves, dogs and cats. For amplification of 18S rDNA sequences the Secondary-PCR product of the extracted DNA from fecal suspension of each studied animal was utilized. The primary genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium sp. was performed using RFLP with the enzymes SspI and VspI. DNA samples were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The results showed C. baileyi infecting two ducks and one quail and C. melagridis infecting one chicken. The sequences obtained from Cryptosporidium sp. infecting guinea pigs were not identified within groups of known Cryptosporidium species. The isolates found parasitizing cats and one dog were diagnosed as C. felis and C. canis, respectively. One isolate of calf origin was identified as C. parvum. The phylogenetic analysis showed clear distribution of isolates between two Cryptosporidium sp. groups according to their gastric or intestinal parasitism. A great genetic distance was observed between C. felis and C. canis from Brazil when compared to the reference sequences obtained from GenBank. The results obtained during this study constitute the first report of rDNA sequences from C. baileyi, C. meleagridis, C. felis, C. canis and C. parvum isolated in Brazil.

  2. The Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Genetic Region on Phylogenetic Clustering Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François M J Lamoury

    Full Text Available Sequencing is important for understanding the molecular epidemiology and viral evolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. To date, there is little standardisation among sequencing protocols, in-part due to the high genetic diversity that is observed within HCV. This study aimed to develop a novel, practical sequencing protocol that covered both conserved and variable regions of the viral genome and assess the influence of each subregion, sequence concatenation and unrelated reference sequences on phylogenetic clustering analysis. The Core to the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1 of envelope-2 (E2 and non-structural-5B (NS5B regions of the HCV genome were amplified and sequenced from participants from the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC, a prospective study of the natural history and treatment of recent HCV infection. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using a general time-reversible substitution model and sensitivity analyses were completed for every subregion. Pairwise distance, genetic distance and bootstrap support were computed to assess the impact of HCV region on clustering results as measured by the identification and percentage of participants falling within all clusters, cluster size, average patristic distance, and bootstrap value. The Robinson-Foulds metrics was also used to compare phylogenetic trees among the different HCV regions. Our results demonstrated that the genomic region of HCV analysed influenced phylogenetic tree topology and clustering results. The HCV Core region alone was not suitable for clustering analysis; NS5B concatenation, the inclusion of reference sequences and removal of HVR1 all influenced clustering outcome. The Core-E2 region, which represented the highest genetic diversity and longest sequence length in this study, provides an ideal method for clustering analysis to address a range of molecular epidemiological questions.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of Pectinidae (Bivalvia) based on the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region is a useful genomic region for understanding evolutionary and genetic relationships. In the current study, the molecular phylogenetic analysis of Pectinidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) was performed using the nucleotide sequences of the nuclear ITS region in nine species of this family. The sequences were obtained from the scallop species Argopecten irradians, Mizuhopecten yessoensis, Amusium pleuronectes and Mimachlamys nobilis, and compared with the published sequences of Aequipecten opercularis, Chlamys farreri, C. distorta, M. varia, Pecten maximus, and an outgroup species Perna viridis. The molecular phylogenetic tree was constructed by the neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods. Phylogenetic analysis based on ITS1, ITS2, or their combination always yielded trees of similar topology. The results support the morphological classifications of bivalve and are nearly consistent with classification of two subfamilies (Chlamydinae and Pectininae) formulated by Waller. However, A. irradians, together with A. opercularis made up of genera Amusium, evidences that they may belong to the subfamily Pectinidae. The data are incompatible with the conclusion of Waller who placed them in Chlamydinae by morphological characteristics. These results provide new insights into the evolutionary relationships among scallop species and contribute to the improvement of existing classification systems.

  4. Identification, characteristic and phylogenetic analysis of type Ⅱ DNA topoisomerase gene in Giardia lamblia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De HE; Jian Fan WEN; Wan Qun CHEN; Si Qi LU; De Dong XIN

    2005-01-01

    The genes encoding type Ⅱ DNA topoisomerases were investigated in Giardia lamblia genome, and a type ⅡA gene,GlTop 2 was identified. It is a single copy gene with a 4476 bp long ORF without intron. The deduced amino acid sequence shows strong homology to eukaryotic DNA Top 2. However, some distortions were found, such as six insertions in the ATPase domain and the central domain, a ~100 aa longer central domain; a ~200 aa shorter C-terminal domain containing rich charged residues. These features revealed by comparing with Top 2 of the host, human, might be helpful in exploiting drug selectivity for antigiardial therapy. Phylogenetic analysis of eukaryotic enzymes showed that kinetoplastids, plants, fungi, and animals were monophyletic groups, and the animal and fungi lineages shared a more recent common ancestor than either did with the plant lineage; microsporidia grouped with fungi. However, unlike many previous phylogenetic analyses, the "amitochondriate" G. lamblia was not the earliest branch but diverged after mitochondriate kinetoplastids in our trees. Both the finding of typical eukaryotic type ⅡA topoisomerase and the phylogenetic analysis suggest G. lamblia is not possibly as primitive as was regarded before and might diverge after the acquisition of mitochondria. This is consistent with the recent discovery of mitochondrial remnant organelles in G. lamblia.

  5. Expressed sequence tags as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of placental mammal evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Kullberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We investigate the usefulness of expressed sequence tags, ESTs, for establishing divergences within the tree of placental mammals. This is done on the example of the established relationships among primates (human, lagomorphs (rabbit, rodents (rat and mouse, artiodactyls (cow, carnivorans (dog and proboscideans (elephant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have produced 2000 ESTs (1.2 mega bases from a marsupial mouse and characterized the data for their use in phylogenetic analysis. The sequences were used to identify putative orthologous sequences from whole genome projects. Although most ESTs stem from single sequence reads, the frequency of potential sequencing errors was found to be lower than allelic variation. Most of the sequences represented slowly evolving housekeeping-type genes, with an average amino acid distance of 6.6% between human and mouse. Positive Darwinian selection was identified at only a few single sites. Phylogenetic analyses of the EST data yielded trees that were consistent with those established from whole genome projects. CONCLUSIONS: The general quality of EST sequences and the general absence of positive selection in these sequences make ESTs an attractive tool for phylogenetic analysis. The EST approach allows, at reasonable costs, a fast extension of data sampling from species outside the genome projects.

  6. Whole genome analysis of diverse Chlamydia trachomatis strains identifies phylogenetic relationships masked by current clinical typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Simon R.; Clarke, Ian N.; Seth-Smith, Helena M. B.; Solomon, Anthony W.; Cutcliffe, Lesley T.; Marsh, Peter; Skilton, Rachel J.; Holland, Martin J.; Mabey, David; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Lewis, David A.; Spratt, Brian G.; Unemo, Magnus; Persson, Kenneth; Bjartling, Carina; Brunham, Robert; de Vries, Henry J.C.; Morré, Servaas A.; Speksnijder, Arjen; Bébéar, Cécile M.; Clerc, Maïté; de Barbeyrac, Bertille; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is responsible for both trachoma and sexually transmitted infections causing substantial morbidity and economic cost globally. Despite this, our knowledge of its population and evolutionary genetics is limited. Here we present a detailed whole genome phylogeny from representative strains of both trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) biovars from temporally and geographically diverse sources. Our analysis demonstrates that predicting phylogenetic structure using the ompA gene, traditionally used to classify Chlamydia, is misleading because extensive recombination in this region masks true relationships. We show that in many instances ompA is a chimera that can be exchanged in part or whole, both within and between biovars. We also provide evidence for exchange of, and recombination within, the cryptic plasmid, another important diagnostic target. We have used our phylogenetic framework to show how genetic exchange has manifested itself in ocular, urogenital and LGV C. trachomatis strains, including the epidemic LGV serotype L2b. PMID:22406642

  7. Whole genome sequencing as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of clinical strains of Mitis group streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L H; Dargis, R; Højholt, K; Christensen, J J; Skovgaard, O; Justesen, U S; Rosenvinge, F S; Moser, C; Lukjancenko, O; Rasmussen, S; Nielsen, X C

    2016-10-01

    Identification of Mitis group streptococci (MGS) to the species level is challenging for routine microbiology laboratories. Correct identification is crucial for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis, identification of treatment failure, and/or infection relapse. Eighty MGS from Danish patients with infective endocarditis were whole genome sequenced. We compared the phylogenetic analyses based on single genes (recA, sodA, gdh), multigene (MLSA), SNPs, and core-genome sequences. The six phylogenetic analyses generally showed a similar pattern of six monophyletic clusters, though a few differences were observed in single gene analyses. Species identification based on single gene analysis showed their limitations when more strains were included. In contrast, analyses incorporating more sequence data, like MLSA, SNPs and core-genome analyses, provided more distinct clustering. The core-genome tree showed the most distinct clustering.

  8. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of full-genome HBV subgenotype D3 sequences from Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojević, Boban; Osiowy, Carla; Schaefer, Stephan; Bojović, Ksenija; Blagojević, Jelena; Nešić, Milica; Yamashita, Shunichi; Stamenković, Gorana

    2011-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is classified into 8 genotypes with distinct geographical distribution. Genotype D (HBV/D) has the widest distribution area and is comprised of 7 subgenotypes. Subgenotypes D1, D2 and D3 appear worldwide, while D4-D7 have a more restricted distribution. Within the Mediterranean area, HBV/D and subgenotype D3 are the most prevalent. The purpose of this study was to characterize the full genome of Serbian HBV/D3 isolates by comparison and phylogenetic analysis with HBV/D3 sequences (66 samples) found in GeneBank/DDBJ databases from different parts of the world. Isolates were obtained from three patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B (HBsAg+). All three isolates have two very rare nucleotide substitutions, A929T and T150A, which indicate the same ancestor. Phylogenetic analysis of HBV/D3 genome sequences throughout the world follows an ethno-geographical origin of isolates with rare exceptions, which could be explained by human travelling and migration. The geographically close but ethnically different Serbian and Italian isolates clustered in the same subnode, and on a common branch with strains from Northern Canada. To test the apparently close HBV phylogenetic relationship between completely separated patients from Serbia and Northern Canada we analyzed in depth a 440 bp region of the HBsAg from Canadian (n=73) and Serbian (n=70) isolates. The constructed parsimony tree revealed that strains from Serbia and Northern Canada fell along the same branch which indicates independent evolution within regions of each country. Considering that HBsAg sequence has limited variability for phylogenetic analyses, our hypothesis needs further confirmation with more HBV complete genome sequences.

  9. Local variation in mountain birch spring phenology along an altitudinal gradient in northern coastal Fennoscandia

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöskog, Maja Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Currently there is a lack of spring phenology studies covering small-scale altitudinal gradients of mountain birch in coastal northern Fennoscandia, a region characterized by exceptionally high precipitation of snow, which gives reason to investigate the influence of snow cover on birch budburst in this area. Furthermore, ground phenology studies are today increasingly replaced by satellite data studies, but only too rarely is the latter approach properly validated. In order to provide a bett...

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the pathogenic bacteria Spiroplasma penaei based on multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heres, Allan; Lightner, Donald V

    2010-01-01

    A pathogenic Spiroplasma penaei strain was isolated from the hemolymph of moribund Pacific white shrimp, Penaeus vannamei. The shrimp sample originated from a shrimp farm near Cartagena, Colombia, that was suffering from high mortalities in ponds with very low salinity and high temperatures. This new emerging disease in a marine crustacean in the Americas is described as a systemic infection. The multilocus phylogenetic analysis suggests that S. penaei strain has a terrestrial origin. Evolutionary relationship trees, based on five partial DNA sequences of 16S rDNA, 23S rDNA, 5S rDNA, gyrB, rpoB genes and two complete DNA sequences of 16S-23S rDNA and 23S-5S rDNA intergenic spacer region, were reconstructed using the distance-based Neighboring-Joining (NJ) method with Kimura-2-parameter substitution model. The NJ trees based on all DNA sequences investigated in this study positioned S. penaei in the Citri-Poulsonii clade and corroborate the observations by other investigators using the 16S rDNA gene. Pairwise genetic distance calculation between sequences of spiroplasmas showed S. penaei to be closely related to Spiroplasma insolitum and distantly related to Spiroplasma sp. SHRIMP from China.

  11. An autochthonous case of hepatitis C virus genotype 5a in Brazil: phylogenetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, L.C.; Souto, F.J.D.; do Espirito-Santo, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Genotype 5 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been rarely identified in South America. A female of African descent who never left Brazil was found to be infected by this genotype in Mato Grosso state, Central Brazil. The patient denied drug injections and revealed that she had received blood...... transfusions several years before. One of her blood donors was identified and tested negative for anti-HCV and HCV RNA, as were her husband and offspring. Phylogenetic analysis of the E1 and NS5B regions confirmed that this HCV strain belonged to genotype 5a. However, the E1 region analysis indicates that our...

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of a spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation metagenome reveals new insights into its bacterial and fungal community diversity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Illeghems, Koen; De Vuyst, Luc; Papalexandratou, Zoi; Weckx, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    This is the first report on the phylogenetic analysis of the community diversity of a single spontaneous cocoa bean box fermentation sample through a metagenomic approach involving 454 pyrosequencing...

  13. Assessing the Goodness of Fit of Phylogenetic Comparative Methods: A Meta-Analysis and Simulation Study: e67001

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dwueng-Chwuan Jhwueng

    2013-01-01

    ...? Data I conducted a meta-analysis of 122 phylogenetic data sets found by searching all papers in JEB, Blackwell Synergy and JSTOR published in 2002-2005 for the purpose of assessing the fit of PCMs...

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of the Trypanosoma genus based on the heat-shock protein 70 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Jorge; Fernández-Calienes, Aymé; Montalvo, Ana Margarita; Maes, Ilse; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Büscher, Philippe; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Van der Auwera, Gert

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosome evolution was so far essentially studied on the basis of phylogenetic analyses of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) and glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) genes. We used for the first time the 70kDa heat-shock protein gene (hsp70) to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among 11 Trypanosoma species on the basis of 1380 nucleotides from 76 sequences corresponding to 65 strains. We also constructed a phylogeny based on combined datasets of SSU-rDNA, gGAPDH and hsp70 sequences. The obtained clusters can be correlated with the sections and subgenus classifications of mammal-infecting trypanosomes except for Trypanosoma theileri and Trypanosoma rangeli. Our analysis supports the classification of Trypanosoma species into clades rather than in sections and subgenera, some of which being polyphyletic. Nine clades were recognized: Trypanosoma carassi, Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma grayi, Trypanosoma lewisi, T. rangeli, T. theileri, Trypanosoma vivax and Trypanozoon. These results are consistent with existing knowledge of the genus' phylogeny. Within the T. cruzi clade, three groups of T. cruzi discrete typing units could be clearly distinguished, corresponding to TcI, TcIII, and TcII+V+VI, while support for TcIV was lacking. Phylogenetic analyses based on hsp70 demonstrated that this molecular marker can be applied for discriminating most of the Trypanosoma species and clades.

  15. Analysis of plasmid genes by phylogenetic profiling and visualization of homology relationships using Blast2Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazzicalupo Marco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic methods are well-established bioinformatic tools for sequence analysis, allowing to describe the non-independencies of sequences because of their common ancestor. However, the evolutionary profiles of bacterial genes are often complicated by hidden paralogy and extensive and/or (multiple horizontal gene transfer (HGT events which make bifurcating trees often inappropriate. In this context, plasmid sequences are paradigms of network-like relationships characterizing the evolution of prokaryotes. Actually, they can be transferred among different organisms allowing the dissemination of novel functions, thus playing a pivotal role in prokaryotic evolution. However, the study of their evolutionary dynamics is complicated by the absence of universally shared genes, a prerequisite for phylogenetic analyses. Results To overcome such limitations we developed a bioinformatic package, named Blast2Network (B2N, allowing the automatic phylogenetic profiling and the visualization of homology relationships in a large number of plasmid sequences. The software was applied to the study of 47 completely sequenced plasmids coming from Escherichia, Salmonella and Shigella spps. Conclusion The tools implemented by B2N allow to describe and visualize in a new way some of the evolutionary features of plasmid molecules of Enterobacteriaceae; in particular it helped to shed some light on the complex history of Escherichia, Salmonella and Shigella plasmids and to focus on possible roles of unannotated proteins. The proposed methodology is general enough to be used for comparative genomic analyses of bacteria.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of vibrios and related species by means of atpA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano L; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Swings, Jean

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the use of atpA gene sequences as alternative phylogenetic and identification markers for vibrios. A fragment of 1322 bp (corresponding to approximately 88% of the coding region) was analysed in 151 strains of vibrios. The relationships observed were in agreement with the phylogeny inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. For instance, the Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio halioticoli, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio splendidus species groups appeared in the atpA gene phylogenetic analyses, suggesting that these groups may be considered as separate genera within the current Vibrio genus. Overall, atpA gene sequences appeared to be more discriminatory for species differentiation than 16S rRNA gene sequences. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities above 97% corresponded to atpA gene sequences similarities above 80%. The intraspecies variation in the atpA gene sequence was about 99% sequence similarity. The results showed clearly that atpA gene sequences are a suitable alternative for the identification and phylogenetic study of vibrios.

  17. Completion of Eight Gynostemma BL. (Cucurbitaceae Chloroplast Genomes: Characterization, Comparative Analysis, and Phylogenetic Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gynostemma BL., belonging to the family Cucurbitaceae, is a genus containing 17 creeping herbaceous species mainly distributed in East Asia. It can be divided into two subgenera based on different fruit morphology. Herein, we report eight complete chloroplast genome sequences of the genus Gynostemma, which were obtained by Illumina paired-end sequencing, assembly, and annotation. The length of the eight complete cp genomes ranged from 157,576 bp (G. pentaphyllum to 158,273 bp (G. laxiflorum. Each encoded 133 genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, 37 tRNA genes, eight rRNA genes, and one pseudogene. The four types of repeated sequences had been discovered and indicated that the repeated structure for species in the Subgen. Triostellum was greater than that for species in the Subgen. Gynostemma. The percentage of variation of the eight cp genomes in different regions were calculated, which demonstrated that the coding and inverted repeats regions were highly conserved. Phylogenetic analysis based on Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods strongly supported the phylogenetic position of the genus Gynostemma as a member of family Cucurbitaceae. The phylogenetic relationships among the eight species were clearly resolved using the complete cp genome sequences in this study. It will also provide potential molecular markers and candidate DNA barcodes for future studies and enrich the valuable complete cp genome resources of Cucurbitaceae.

  18. Phylogenetic diversity of the Bacillus pumilus group and the marine ecotype revealed by multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Lai, Qiliang; Dong, Chunming; Sun, Fengqin; Wang, Liping; Li, Guangyu; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria closely related to Bacillus pumilus cannot be distinguished from such other species as B. safensis, B. stratosphericus, B. altitudinis and B. aerophilus simply by 16S rRNA gene sequence. In this report, 76 marine strains were subjected to phylogenetic analysis based on 7 housekeeping genes to understand the phylogeny and biogeography in comparison with other origins. A phylogenetic tree based on the 7 housekeeping genes concatenated in the order of gyrB-rpoB-pycA-pyrE-mutL-aroE-trpB was constructed and compared with trees based on the single genes. All these trees exhibited a similar topology structure with small variations. Our 79 strains were divided into 6 groups from A to F; Group A was the largest and contained 49 strains close to B. altitudinis. Additional two large groups were presented by B. safensis and B. pumilus respectively. Among the housekeeping genes, gyrB and pyrE showed comparatively better resolution power and may serve as molecular markers to distinguish these closely related strains. Furthermore, a recombinant phylogenetic tree based on the gyrB gene and containing 73 terrestrial and our isolates was constructed to detect the relationship between marine and other sources. The tree clearly showed that the bacteria of marine origin were clustered together in all the large groups. In contrast, the cluster belonging to B. safensis was mainly composed of bacteria of terrestrial origin. Interestingly, nearly all the marine isolates were at the top of the tree, indicating the possibility of the recent divergence of this bacterial group in marine environments. We conclude that B. altitudinis bacteria are the most widely spread of the B. pumilus group in marine environments. In summary, this report provides the first evidence regarding the systematic evolution of this bacterial group, and knowledge of their phylogenetic diversity will help in the understanding of their ecological role and distribution in marine environments.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of the Australian rosella parrots (Platycercus) reveals discordance among molecules and plumage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipham, Ashlee; Schmidt, Daniel J; Joseph, Leo; Hughes, Jane M

    2015-10-01

    Relationships and species limits among the colourful Australian parrots known as rosellas (Platycercus) are contentious because of poorly understood patterns of parapatry, sympatry and hybridization as well as complex patterns of geographical replacement of phenotypic forms. Two subgenera are, however, conventionally recognised: Platycercus comprises the blue-cheeked crimson rosella complex (Crimson Rosella P. elegans and Green Rosella P. caledonicus), and Violania contains the remaining four currently recognised species (Pale-headed Rosella P. adscitus, Eastern Rosella P. eximius, Northern Rosella P. venustus, and Western Rosella P. icterotis). We used phylogenetic analysis of ten loci (one mitochondrial, eight autosomal and one z-linked) and several individuals per nominal species primarily to examine relationships within the subgenera, especially the relationships and species limits within Violania. Of these, P. adscitus and P. eximius have long been considered sister species or conspecific due to a morphology-based hybrid zone and an early phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The multilocus phylogenetic analysis presented here supports an alternative hypothesis aligning P. adscitus and P. venustus as sister species. Using divergence rates published in other avian studies, we estimated the divergence between P. venustus and P. adscitus at 0.0148-0.6124MYA and that between the P. adscitus/P. venustus ancestor and P. eximius earlier at 0.1617-1.0816MYA, both within the Pleistocene. Discordant topologies among gene and species trees are discussed and proposed to be the result of historical gene flow and/or incomplete lineage sorting (ILS). In particular, we suggest that discordance between mitochondrial and nuclear data may be the result of asymmetrical mitochondrial introgression from P. adscitus into P. eximius. The biogeographical implications of our findings are discussed relative to similarly distributed groups

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the genomes of two strains of human adenovirus type 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG ZHOU; XIAO Bo SU; QI WEI ZIIANG; QI YI ZENG; BING ZHU; CHU Yu ZHANG; Hou Bo WU; ZAO HE WU; SI TANG GONG

    2007-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 3 (HAdV-3) is widely prevalent all over the world, especially in Asia. The objective of this study is to carry out complete genomic DNA sequencing and the phylogenetic analysis for two strains (Guangzhou01 and Guangzhou02) of HAdV-3 wild virus isolated from South China. Nasopharyngeal secretion aspirate specimens of sick children were inoculated into HEp-2 and HeLa culture tubes, and the cultures were identified by neutralization assay with type-specific reference rabbit antisermn. Type-specific primers were also utilized to confirm the serotype. The restriction fragments of HAdV genome DNA were cloned into pBlueScript SK ( + ) vectors and sequenced, and the 5' and 3'ends of the linear HAdV-3 genome were directly sequenced with double purified genomic DNA as templates. General features of the HAdV-3 genome sequences were explored by using several bio-software.Phylogenetic analysis was done with MEGA 3.0 software. The genomic sequences of Guangzhou01 and Guangzhou02 possess the same 4 early regions and 5 late regions and have 39 ceding sequences and two RNA coding sequences. Other non-ceding regions are conservative. Inverted repeats and palindromes were identified in the genome sequences. The genomes of group B human adenovirus as well as HAdV-3have close phylogenetic relationship with that of chimpanzee adenovirus type 21. The genomie lengths of these two isolated strains are 35 273 bp and 35 269 bp, respectively. The phylogenetie analysis showed that HAdV-B species has some relationship with eertain types of chimpanzee adenovirus.

  1. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolates in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goga, Izedin; Berxholi, Kristaq; Hulaj, Beqe; Sylejmani, Driton; Yakobson, Boris; Stram, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Three serum samples positive in Antigen ELISA BVDV have been tested to characterise genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in Kosovo. Samples were obtained in 2011 from heifers and were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, sequenced and analysed by computer-assisted phylogenetic analysis. Amplified products and nucleotide sequence showed that all 3 isolates belonged to BVDV 1 genotype and 1b sub genotype. These results enrich the extant knowledge of BVDV and represent the first documented data about Kosovo BVDV isolates.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria in sea ice brine sampled from the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in sea ice brine samples which collected from four stations located at the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean was analyzed by PCR-DGGE. Twenty-three 16S rDNA sequences of bacteria obtained from DGGE bands were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis clustered these sequences within γ-proteobacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (CFB) group, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. The phylotype of Pseudoalteromonas in the γ-proteobacteria was predominant and members of the CFB group and γ-proteobacteria were highly abundant in studied sea ice brine samples.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of parasitic trematodes of the genus Euclinostomum found in Trichopsis and Betta fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapin, S; Phiwsaiya, K; Laosinchai, P; Kowasupat, C; Ruenwongsa, P; Panijpan, B

    2014-06-01

    Many species of fish in the world are infected with digenean trematodes belonging to the genera Clinostomum and Euclinostomum. In this study, metacercariae, identified as Euclinostomum sp. on the basis of morphological characteristics and molecular data, were taken from 3 osphronemid fish- Trichopsis vittata , Trichopsis schalleri, and Betta imbellis, in Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis based on a mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I) and 2 nuclear genes (18S rDNA and ITS-internal transcribed spacer) of these Euclinostomum parasites indicated a clear distinction from those belonging to the Clinostomum genus. These are the first records of partial mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences of an Euclinostomum sp.

  4. Phylogenetic relationships of some Microsporum and Arthroderma species inferred from mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, M; Aoki, M; Ishizaki, H

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-eight strains of 12 Microsporum and 10 Arthroderma (Nannizzia) species were investigated by analysis of mitochondrial DNA with 6 restriction enzymes, and classified into 13 genetic groups. The phylogenetic tree of the 13 groups thus established was constructed. On the tree, M. audouinii, M. langeronii, M. rivalieri, M. distortum, M. equinum, M. ferrugineum and A. otae comprise one genetic group and are suggested to be the same species. A. gypseum, A. fulvum, M. duboisii, M. ripariae, A. incurvatum, A. persicolor and A. obtusum are clustered on one of five boughs of the tree indicating their close relation. A. racemosum and A. cajetani are also closely related.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from commercial poultry in Mozambique (2011-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapaco, Lourenço P; Monjane, Iolanda V A; Nhamusso, Antonieta E; Viljoen, Gerrit J; Dundon, William G; Achá, Sara J

    2016-10-01

    The complete sequence of the fusion (F) protein gene from 11 Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) isolated from commercial poultry in Mozambique between 2011 and 2016 has been generated. The F gene cleavage site motif for all 11 isolates was (112)RRRKRF(117) indicating that the viruses are virulent. A phylogenetic analysis using the full F gene sequence revealed that the viruses clustered within genotype VIIh and showed a higher similarity to NDVs from South Africa, China and Southeast Asia than to viruses previously described in Mozambique in 1994, 1995 and 2005. The identification of these new NDVs has important implications for Newcastle disease management and control in Mozambique.

  6. Short communication. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV isolates in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izedin Goga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three serum samples positive in Antigen ELISA BVDV have been tested to characterise genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV in Kosovo. Samples were obtained in 2011 from heifers and were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, sequenced and analysed by computer-assisted phylogenetic analysis. Amplified products and nucleotide sequence showed that all 3 isolates belonged to BVDV 1 genotype and 1b sub genotype. These results enrich the extant knowledge of BVDV and represent the first documented data about Kosovo BVDV isolates.

  7. The assessment of anthropogenic impact on the environment in East Fennoscandia based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miulgauzen, Daria; Pankratova, Lubov

    2017-04-01

    Being a part of Eurasian "cold sector", ecosystems of East Fennoscandia may fit in the category of the most vulnerable to any external impact, including anthropogenic one. The productivity of plant communities can serve as an indicator representing the state of ecosystems, especially in disturbed areas. The present research is aimed at the environmental impact assessment caused by the Pechenganikel Mining and Metallurgical Plant based on the plant communities' productivity data on the example of ecosystems of East Fennoscandia. Vegetation productivity was assessed on the basis of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) which is often used for screenings to quantify plant canopy. The essence of the method is that of the difference between the spectral reflectance of vegetation in red and near-infrared regions. The index was calculated on the satellite images of Landsat 8 in IDRISI Kilimanjaro (Clark Labs) according to the equation: N DV I = N-IR- RED-; N IR +RED NIR - spectral reflectance measurements in near-infrared region, RED - spectral reflectance measurements in red region. To compare the index calculations with the information on the state of plant communities, the field studies were carried out in the area of 380 km2 in the vicinity of the Pechenganikel Mining and Metallurgical Plant (Kola Peninsula, Nikel urban-type settlement). As a result, there was created a map in MapInfo Professional 12.5 (Pitney Bowes Software) that represents the vegetation damage at a scale of 1:100,000. The field research has revealed the morphogenetic discrepancy between the soil-plant cover of the area in question and the one of "zonal" ecosystems. Plant communities have been widely modified or destroyed because of air pollution and there are numerous disturbances in the soil profile structure. In terms of vegetation productivity, the analysis of the NDVI figures has shown that the closer the pollution source (Pechenganikel Plant) is, the more significant the

  8. A bootstrap based analysis pipeline for efficient classification of phylogenetically related animal miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Xun

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetically related miRNAs (miRNA families convey important information of the function and evolution of miRNAs. Due to the special sequence features of miRNAs, pair-wise sequence identity between miRNA precursors alone is often inadequate for unequivocally judging the phylogenetic relationships between miRNAs. Most of the current methods for miRNA classification rely heavily on manual inspection and lack measurements of the reliability of the results. Results In this study, we designed an analysis pipeline (the Phylogeny-Bootstrap-Cluster (PBC pipeline to identify miRNA families based on branch stability in the bootstrap trees derived from overlapping genome-wide miRNA sequence sets. We tested the PBC analysis pipeline with the miRNAs from six animal species, H. sapiens, M. musculus, G. gallus, D. rerio, D. melanogaster, and C. elegans. The resulting classification was compared with the miRNA families defined in miRBase. The two classifications were largely consistent. Conclusion The PBC analysis pipeline is an efficient method for classifying large numbers of heterogeneous miRNA sequences. It requires minimum human involvement and provides measurements of the reliability of the classification results.

  9. Fusarium culmorum is a single phylogenetic species based on multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obanor, Friday; Erginbas-Orakci, G; Tunali, B; Nicol, J M; Chakraborty, S

    2010-09-01

    Fusarium culmorum is a major pathogen of wheat and barley causing head blight and crown rot in cooler temperate climates of Australia, Europe, West Asia and North Africa. To better understand its evolutionary history we partially sequenced single copy nuclear genes encoding translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF), reductase (RED) and phosphate permease (PHO) in 100 F. culmorum isolates with 11 isolates of Fusarium crookwellense, Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium pseudograminearum. Phylogenetic analysis of multilocus sequence (MLS) data using Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony analysis showed that F. culmorum from wheat is a single phylogenetic species with no significant linkage disequilibrium and little or no lineage development along geographic origin. Both MLS and TEF and RED gene sequence analysis separated the four Fusarium species used and delineated three to four groups within the F. culmorum clade. But the PHO gene could not completely resolve isolates into their respective species. Fixation index and gene flow suggest significant genetic exchange between the isolates from distant geographic regions. A lack of strong lineage structure despite the geographic separation of the three collections indicates a frequently recombining species and/or widespread distribution of genotypes due to international trade, tourism and long-range dispersal of macroconidia. Moreover, the two mating type genes were present in equal proportion among the F. culmorum collection used in this study, leaving open the possibility of sexual reproduction.

  10. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of influenza A H7N9 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Dimonte, Slavatore; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ciotti, Marco; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    Recently, human infections with the novel avian-origin influenza A H7N9 virus have been reported from various provinces in China. Human infections with avian influenza A viruses are rare and may cause a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms. This is the first time that human infection with a low pathogenic avian influenza A virus has been associated with a fatal outcome. Here, a phylogenetic and positive selective pressure analysis of haemagglutin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), and matrix protein (MP) genes of the novel reassortant H7N9 virus was carried out. The analysis showed that both structural genes of this reassortant virus likely originated from Euro-Asiatic birds, while NA was more likely to have originated from South Korean birds. The Bayesian phylogenetic tree of the MP showed a main clade and an outside cluster including four sequences from China. The United States and Guatemala classical H7N9-isolates appeared homogeneous and clustered together, although they are distinct from other classical Euro-Asiatic and novel H7N9 viruses. Selective pressure analysis did not reveal any site under statistically significant positive selective pressure in any of the three genes analyzed. Unknown certain intermediate hosts involved might be implicated, so extensive global surveillance and bird-to-person transmission should be closely considered in the future.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis and in vitro culture of mosses from the Antarctic Fildes Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shenghao; ZHANG Zhaohui; WANG Nengfei; CONG Bailin; ZHANG Pengying; LIN Xuezheng; HUANG Xiaohang

    2014-01-01

    Molecular genetic techniques have proven very useful for initial analysis of the extent of genetic variation and dispersal in several Antarctic moss species. In the present study, the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rDNA) and internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS rDNA) were sequenced in nine individuals of different mosses from the Fildes Peninsula of Antarctica. Sequence alignment showed that the extreme environment tended to increase the genetic diversity of Antarctic mosses. In addition, in our phylogenetic analysis, one previously unidentiifed Antarctic moss species was characterized by comparison with SSU and ITS rDNA sequences of known moss species. Moreover, the optimal culture medium and conditions for surface explant sterilization and protonemata induction in tissue culture of Pohlia nutans were investigated. The successful establishment of a tissue culture protocol together with the phylogenetic analysis of Antarctic mosses will provide technological support to establish an effective resource regeneration method for discovering new functional genes and gaining novel insights into the mechanisms of stress acclimation.

  12. Combining substrate specificity analysis with support vector classifiers reveals feruloyl esterase as a phylogenetically informative protein group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivares Hernandez, Roberto; Sunner, Hampus; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2010-01-01

    Background Our understanding of how fungi evolved to develop a variety of ecological niches, is limited but of fundamental biological importance. Specifically, the evolution of enzymes affects how well species can adapt to new environmental conditions. Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) are enzymes able t...... defined via our phylogenetic analysis not only suggests that FAEs are phylogenetically informative proteins but it is also a considerable step towards improved FAEs functional prediction....

  13. Comparative Analysis of Begonia Plastid Genomes and Their Utility for Species-Level Phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Nicola; Harrison, Richard J; Kidner, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Recent, rapid radiations make species-level phylogenetics difficult to resolve. We used a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing approach to identify informative genomic regions to resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels in Begonia from a survey of sixteen species. A long-range PCR method was used to generate draft plastid genomes to provide a strong phylogenetic backbone, identify fast evolving regions and provide informative molecular markers for species-level phylogenetic studies in Begonia.

  14. PyElph - a software tool for gel images analysis and phylogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Ana Brânduşa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents PyElph, a software tool which automatically extracts data from gel images, computes the molecular weights of the analyzed molecules or fragments, compares DNA patterns which result from experiments with molecular genetic markers and, also, generates phylogenetic trees computed by five clustering methods, using the information extracted from the analyzed gel image. The software can be successfully used for population genetics, phylogenetics, taxonomic studies and other applications which require gel image analysis. Researchers and students working in molecular biology and genetics would benefit greatly from the proposed software because it is free, open source, easy to use, has a friendly Graphical User Interface and does not depend on specific image acquisition devices like other commercial programs with similar functionalities do. Results PyElph software tool is entirely implemented in Python which is a very popular programming language among the bioinformatics community. It provides a very friendly Graphical User Interface which was designed in six steps that gradually lead to the results. The user is guided through the following steps: image loading and preparation, lane detection, band detection, molecular weights computation based on a molecular weight marker, band matching and finally, the computation and visualization of phylogenetic trees. A strong point of the software is the visualization component for the processed data. The Graphical User Interface provides operations for image manipulation and highlights lanes, bands and band matching in the analyzed gel image. All the data and images generated in each step can be saved. The software has been tested on several DNA patterns obtained from experiments with different genetic markers. Examples of genetic markers which can be analyzed using PyElph are RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism, RAPD

  15. Genome Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Three Avian Influenza H9N2 Subtypes in Guangxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-xun XIE; Jian-bao DONG; Xiao-fei TANG; Jia-bo LIU; Yao-shan PANG; Xian-wen DENG; Zhi-qin XIE; Li-ji XIE; Mazhar I Khan

    2009-01-01

    Three isolates of H9N2 Avian Influenza viruses (AIV) were isolated from chickens in Guangxi province. Eight pairs of specific primers were designed and synthesized according to the sequences of H9N2 at GenBank. phylogenetic analysis showed a high degree of homology between the Guangxi isolates and isolates from Guangdong and Jiangsu provinces, suggesting that the Guangxi isolates originated from the same source. However, the eight genes of the three isolates from Guangxi were not in the same sublineages in their respective phylogenetic trees, which suggests that they were products of natural reassortment between H9N2 avian influenza viruses from different sublineages. The 9 nucleotides ACAGAGATA which encode amino acids T, G, I were absent between nucleotide 205 and 214 in the open reading frame of the NA gene in the Guangxi isolates. AIV strains that infect human have, in their HA proteins, leucine at position 226. The analysis of deduced amino acid sequence of HA proteins showed that position 226 of these isolates contained glycine instead of leucine, suggesting that these three isolates differ from H9N2 AIV strains isolated from human infections.

  16. Reappraisal of phylogenetic status and genetic diversity analysis of Asian population of Lentinula edodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationship within the Lentinula genus is constructed based on the sequenced ITS fragments of the 60Chinese wild L. edodes isolates and the sequence data of 48 isolates of different species from other districts downloaded from the GenBank. The 108 isolates of Lentinula genus are divided into two branches and seven groups, one branch and two groups in the New World, and the other branch and five groups in the Old World, and the isolates clustering of different groups corresponds obviously with the classification of the morphological species. Asian isolates are partitioned in group Ⅰ and Ⅴ, two of the five groups of the Old World,by which the germplasm resources status represented is of great importance shown by the phylogenetic analysis. Group V which fills up the blank of geographic distribution has become one of the mainstream groups with an increased isolate number, while group Ⅰ has a tendency to dissimilate into two subgroups (Ia and Ib) with a huge isolate quantity and a coverage of most tested districts, suggesting that China (or Asia) is an important genetic diversity center of the natural population of Lentinula genus. Genetic analysis of Asian isolates based on groups Ia, Ib and group V indicates that the diversity of the east coastal-land, northwestern highland and southwestern China and Himalayas districts is the most plentiful, which is the three priorities in diversity protection of Asian Lentinula population.

  17. Partial sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of Soybean mosaic virus isolated in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polischuk V. P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to compare the biological and molecular properties of Ukrainian soybean mosaic virus (SMV isolates with those of known strains or isolates from other countries, and to trace their possible origin. The methods of mechanical inoculation, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis have been used. Results. Five SMV isolates have been collected and biologically purified from breeding plots in Vinnitsa region of Ukraine. It has been found that all these isolates show the same reaction patterns when infecting 11 differential soybean cultivars. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences of the coat protein coding region and P1 coding region revealed strong genetic relationships between representative Ukrainian (UA1Gr and SMV-VA2 isolates which together were sorted in one clade with G2 strain. The investigation of sequence identity showed that different genomic regions of SMV were under different evolutionary constraints. Conclusions. SMV, isolated in Ukraine for the first time, belongs to the G2 strain group that is widespread in North America. The SMV isolates obtained in this work may be employed in the Ukrainian national breeding programs to create soybean with durable virus resistance.

  18. Analysis of Domain Architecture and Phylogenetics of Family 2 Glycoside Hydrolases (GH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talens-Perales, David; Górska, Anna; Huson, Daniel H; Polaina, Julio; Marín-Navarro, Julia

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report a detailed analysis of the topology and phylogenetics of family 2 glycoside hydrolases (GH2). We distinguish five topologies or domain architectures based on the presence and distribution of protein domains defined in Pfam and Interpro databases. All of them share a central TIM barrel (catalytic module) with two β-sandwich domains (non-catalytic) at the N-terminal end, but differ in the occurrence and nature of additional non-catalytic modules at the C-terminal region. Phylogenetic analysis was based on the sequence of the Pfam Glyco_hydro_2_C catalytic module present in most GH2 proteins. Our results led us to propose a model in which evolutionary diversity of GH2 enzymes is driven by the addition of different non-catalytic domains at the C-terminal region. This model accounts for the divergence of β-galactosidases from β-glucuronidases, the diversification of β-galactosidases with different transglycosylation specificities, and the emergence of bicistronic β-galactosidases. This study also allows the identification of groups of functionally uncharacterized protein sequences with potential biotechnological interest.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial community in deep-sea sediment from the western Pacific "warm pool"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A depth profile of bacterial community structure in one deep-sea sediment core of the western Pacific "warm pool" (WP) was investigated and compared with that in a sediment sample from the eastern Pacific (EP) by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA fragments.Five bacterial 16S rDNA clone libraries were constructed, and t33 clones with different restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP) patterns were sequenced. A phylogenetic analysis of these sequences revealed that the bacterial diversity in a sample from the WP was more abundant than that in the EP sample. The bacterial population in the sediment core of WP was composed of eight major lineages of the domain bacteria. Among them the γ-Proteobacteria was the predominant and most diverse group in each section of WP sediment core, followed by the α-Proteobacteria. The genus Colwellia belonging to γ-Proteobacteria was predominant in this sample.The shift of bacterial communities among different sections of the WP sediment core was δ-, ε-Proteobacteria, and Cytopahga-Flexibacteria-Bacteroides (CFB) group. The ratios between them in the bacterial communities all showed inversely proportional to the depth of sediment. The sequences related to sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) were detected in every section. The bacterial community structure in this sediment core might be related to the environmental characteristics of the surface seawater of the western Pacific WP.

  20. Comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes of five aphid species (Hemiptera: Aphididae and phylogenetic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wang

    Full Text Available Insect mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes are of great interest in exploring molecular evolution, phylogenetics and population genetics. Only two mitogenomes have been previously released in the insect group Aphididae, which consists of about 5,000 known species including some agricultural, forestry and horticultural pests. Here we report the complete 16,317 bp mitogenome of Cavariella salicicola and two nearly complete mitogenomes of Aphis glycines and Pterocomma pilosum. We also present a first comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes of aphids. Results showed that aphid mitogenomes share conserved genomic organization, nucleotide and amino acid composition, and codon usage features. All 37 genes usually present in animal mitogenomes were sequenced and annotated. The analysis of gene evolutionary rate revealed the lowest and highest rates for COI and ATP8, respectively. A unique repeat region exclusively in aphid mitogenomes, which included variable numbers of tandem repeats in a lineage-specific manner, was highlighted for the first time. This region may have a function as another origin of replication. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on protein-coding genes and the stem-loop structures of control regions confirmed a sister relationship between Cavariella and pterocommatines. Current evidence suggest that pterocommatines could be formally transferred into Macrosiphini. Our paper also offers methodological instructions for obtaining other Aphididae mitochondrial genomes.

  1. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE SWINE LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN-6 GENE GENERATED FROM SPLEENTISSUE OF KOREAN NATIVE PIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoung Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to search genetic variants, to investigate phylogenetic relationships between pig breeds and to provide basic genetic information of Korean Native Pigs (KNP using the variations of the Swine Leukocyte Antigen-6 (SLA-6 gene. Cloning of the Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA-6 gene in the MHC non-classical region was performed with spleen tissues of Korean Native Pigs (KNP. Sequencing analysis identified 10 genetic variants positioned at nucleotides 108 (T>C, 251 (G>A, 324 (C>A, 460 (T>C, 556 (T>C, 559 (A>G, 598 (G>A, 665 (T>C, 920 (G>A and 1,115 (G>A. The identified sequences were submitted into GenBank with accession numbers (DQ992502-10 and DQ976363 according to the specified locations of each SNP. Clustering analysis revealed that KNP was formed to a major group, showing close genetic relationships with SLA-6*0105, SLA-6*01w01 and SLA-6*w02sa01 alleles except DQ992503. KNP showed the low nucleotide diversity with significant differences of the ratio of ti/tv (transition/transversion compared with other breeds. The identified variants of the SLA-6 gene are useful information to differentiate phylogenetic relationships between KNP and other pig breeds. The unique results of the SLA-6 SNPs of KNP will serve as reference study for further analyses of gene fixations in evolution studies."

  2. Molecular phylogenetic and dating analysis of pierid butterfly species using complete mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Hao, J S; Sun, X Y; Zheng, B; Yang, Q

    2016-12-02

    Pieridae is a butterfly family whose evolutionary history is poorly understood. Due to the difficulties in identifying morphological synapomorphies within the group and the scarcity of the fossil records, only a few studies on higher phylogeny of Pieridae have been reported to date. In this study, we describe the complete mitochondrial genomes of four pierid butterfly species (Aporia martineti, Aporia hippia, Aporia bieti, and Mesapia peloria), in order to better characterize the pierid butterfly mitogenomes and perform the phylogenetic analyses using all available mitogenomic sequence data (13PCGs, rRNAs, and tRNAs) from the 18 pierid butterfly species comprising the three main subfamilies (Dismorphiinae, Coliadinae and Pierinae). Our analysis shows that the four new mitogenomes share similar features with other known pierid mitogenomes in gene order and organization. Phylogenetic analyses by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference show that the pierid higher-level relationship is: Dismorphiinae + (Coliadinae + Pierinae), which corroborates the results of some previous molecular and morphological studies. However, we found that the Hebomoia and Anthocharis make a sister group, supporting the traditional tribe Anthocharidini; in addition, the Mesapia peloria was shown to be clustered within the Aporia group, suggesting that the genus Mesapia should be reduced to the taxonomic status of subgenus. Our molecular dating analysis indicates that the family Pieridae began to diverge during the Late Cretaceous about 92 million years ago (mya), while the subfamily Pierinae diverged from the Coliadinae at about 86 mya (Late Cretaceous).

  3. Phylogenetic and chronological analysis of proteins causing Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases

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    Bilal Hussain

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is evident that Neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's have many similarities at cellular and molecular level as they carry parallel mechanisms including protein aggregation and inclusion body formation caused by protein mis-folding. The main objective of this study was to have detailed insight on variation and resemblance among these proteins. One hundred and four protein sequences, both directly and indirectly involved in disease mechanism to perform phylogenetic analysis revealing insight on evolutionary relationship among these proteins, were selected. The percentage of replicate trees, in which the associated taxa clustered together in the bootstrap test, was 1000 replicates. Various statistical tests were performed for the confirmation of results e.g., Tajma's Neutrality Test showed D gt 6, nucleotide diversity π gt 0.6 and ps value as greater than 1. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the protein sequences of neurodegenerative diseases had high sequence similarity and identity to each other as depicted by the evolutionary tree. It showed the similar mechanism of evolving from each other and had similar mechanism of generating mis-folding leading towards symptoms of disease.

  4. Using genes as characters and a parsimony analysis to explore the phylogenetic position of turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Lu

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic position of turtles within the vertebrate tree of life remains controversial. Conflicting conclusions from different studies are likely a consequence of systematic error in the tree construction process, rather than random error from small amounts of data. Using genomic data, we evaluate the phylogenetic position of turtles with both conventional concatenated data analysis and a "genes as characters" approach. Two datasets were constructed, one with seven species (human, opossum, zebra finch, chicken, green anole, Chinese pond turtle, and western clawed frog and 4584 orthologous genes, and the second with four additional species (soft-shelled turtle, Nile crocodile, royal python, and tuatara but only 1638 genes. Our concatenated data analysis strongly supported turtle as the sister-group to archosaurs (the archosaur hypothesis, similar to several recent genomic data based studies using similar methods. When using genes as characters and gene trees as character-state trees with equal weighting for each gene, however, our parsimony analysis suggested that turtles are possibly sister-group to diapsids, archosaurs, or lepidosaurs. None of these resolutions were strongly supported by bootstraps. Furthermore, our incongruence analysis clearly demonstrated that there is a large amount of inconsistency among genes and most of the conflict relates to the placement of turtles. We conclude that the uncertain placement of turtles is a reflection of the true state of nature. Concatenated data analysis of large and heterogeneous datasets likely suffers from systematic error and over-estimates of confidence as a consequence of a large number of characters. Using genes as characters offers an alternative for phylogenomic analysis. It has potential to reduce systematic error, such as data heterogeneity and long-branch attraction, and it can also avoid problems associated with computation time and model selection. Finally, treating genes as

  5. Using genes as characters and a parsimony analysis to explore the phylogenetic position of turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Weizhao; Dai, Qiang; Fu, Jinzhong

    2013-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of turtles within the vertebrate tree of life remains controversial. Conflicting conclusions from different studies are likely a consequence of systematic error in the tree construction process, rather than random error from small amounts of data. Using genomic data, we evaluate the phylogenetic position of turtles with both conventional concatenated data analysis and a "genes as characters" approach. Two datasets were constructed, one with seven species (human, opossum, zebra finch, chicken, green anole, Chinese pond turtle, and western clawed frog) and 4584 orthologous genes, and the second with four additional species (soft-shelled turtle, Nile crocodile, royal python, and tuatara) but only 1638 genes. Our concatenated data analysis strongly supported turtle as the sister-group to archosaurs (the archosaur hypothesis), similar to several recent genomic data based studies using similar methods. When using genes as characters and gene trees as character-state trees with equal weighting for each gene, however, our parsimony analysis suggested that turtles are possibly sister-group to diapsids, archosaurs, or lepidosaurs. None of these resolutions were strongly supported by bootstraps. Furthermore, our incongruence analysis clearly demonstrated that there is a large amount of inconsistency among genes and most of the conflict relates to the placement of turtles. We conclude that the uncertain placement of turtles is a reflection of the true state of nature. Concatenated data analysis of large and heterogeneous datasets likely suffers from systematic error and over-estimates of confidence as a consequence of a large number of characters. Using genes as characters offers an alternative for phylogenomic analysis. It has potential to reduce systematic error, such as data heterogeneity and long-branch attraction, and it can also avoid problems associated with computation time and model selection. Finally, treating genes as characters provides a

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of dermatophyte species using DNA sequence polymorphism in calmodulin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Bahram; Mirhendi, Hossein; Makimura, Koichi; de Hoog, G Sybren; Shidfar, Mohammad Reza; Nouripour-Sisakht, Sadegh; Jalalizand, Niloofar

    2016-07-01

    Use of phylogenetic species concepts based on rDNA internal transcribe spacer (ITS) regions have improved the taxonomy of dermatophyte species; however, confirmation and refinement using other genes are needed. Since the calmodulin gene has not been systematically used in dermatophyte taxonomy, we evaluated its intra- and interspecies sequence variation as well as its application in identification, phylogenetic analysis, and taxonomy of 202 strains of 29 dermatophyte species. A set of primers was designed and optimized to amplify the target followed by bilateral sequencing. Using pairwise nucleotide comparisons, a mean similarity of 81% was observed among 29 dermatophyte species, with inter-species diversity ranging from 0 to 200 nucleotides (nt). Intraspecies nt differences were found within strains of Trichophyton interdigitale, Arthroderma simii, T. rubrum and A. vanbreuseghemii, while T. tonsurans, T. violaceum, Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, M. audouinii, M. cookei, M. racemosum, M. gypseum, T. mentagrophytes, T schoenleinii, and A. benhamiae were conserved. Strains of E. floccosum/M. racemosum/M. cookei, A. obtosum/A. gertleri, T. tonsurans/T. equinum and a genotype of T. interdigitale had identical calmodulin sequences. For the majority of the species, tree topology obtained for calmodulin gene showed a congruence with coding and non-coding regions including ITS, BT2, and Tef-1α. Compared with the phylogenetic tree derived from ITS, BT2, and Tef-1α genes, some species such as E. floccosum and A. gertleri took relatively remote positions. Here, characterization and obtained dendrogram of calmodulin gene on a broad range of dermatophyte species provide a basis for further discovery of relationships between species. Studies of other loci are necessary to confirm the results.

  7. Phylogeny.fr: robust phylogenetic analysis for the non-specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereeper, A.; Guignon, V.; Blanc, G.; Audic, S.; Buffet, S.; Chevenet, F.; Dufayard, J.-F.; Guindon, S.; Lefort, V.; Lescot, M.; Gascuel, O.

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses are central to many research areas in biology and typically involve the identification of homologous sequences, their multiple alignment, the phylogenetic reconstruction and the graphical representation of the inferred tree. The Phylogeny.fr platform transparently chains programs to automatically perform these tasks. It is primarily designed for biologists with no experience in phylogeny, but can also meet the needs of specialists; the first ones will find up-to-date tools chained in a phylogeny pipeline to analyze their data in a simple and robust way, while the specialists will be able to easily build and run sophisticated analyses. Phylogeny.fr offers three main modes. The ‘One Click’ mode targets non-specialists and provides a ready-to-use pipeline chaining programs with recognized accuracy and speed: MUSCLE for multiple alignment, PhyML for tree building, and TreeDyn for tree rendering. All parameters are set up to suit most studies, and users only have to provide their input sequences to obtain a ready-to-print tree. The ‘Advanced’ mode uses the same pipeline but allows the parameters of each program to be customized by users. The ‘A la Carte’ mode offers more flexibility and sophistication, as users can build their own pipeline by selecting and setting up the required steps from a large choice of tools to suit their specific needs. Prior to phylogenetic analysis, users can also collect neighbors of a query sequence by running BLAST on general or specialized databases. A guide tree then helps to select neighbor sequences to be used as input for the phylogeny pipeline. Phylogeny.fr is available at: http://www.phylogeny.fr/ PMID:18424797

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Demodex caprae based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Demodex caprae infests the hair follicles and sebaceous glands of goats worldwide, which not only seriously impairs goat farming, but also causes a big economic loss. However, there are few reports on the DNA level of D. caprae. To reveal the taxonomic position of D. caprae within the genus Demodex, the present study conducted phylogenetic analysis of D. caprae based on mt16S rDNA sequence data. D. caprae adults and eggs were obtained from a skin nodule of the goat suffering demodicidosis. The mt16S rDNA sequences of individual mite were amplified using specific primers, and then cloned, sequenced, and aligned. The sequence divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversion rate were computed, and the phylogenetic trees in Demodex were reconstructed. Results revealed the 339-bp partial sequences of six D. caprae isolates were obtained, and the sequence identity was 100% among isolates. The pairwise divergences between D. caprae and Demodex canis or Demodex folliculorum or Demodex brevis were 22.2-24.0%, 24.0-24.9%, and 22.9-23.2%, respectively. The corresponding average genetic distances were 2.840, 2.926, and 2.665, and the average transition/transversion rates were 0.70, 0.55, and 0.54, respectively. The divergences, genetic distances, and transition/transversion rates of D. caprae versus the other three species all reached interspecies level. The five phylogenetic trees all presented that D. caprae clustered with D. brevis first, and then with D. canis, D. folliculorum, and Demodex injai in sequence. In conclusion, D. caprae is an independent species, and it is closer to D. brevis than to D. canis, D. folliculorum, or D. injai.

  9. Outbreak of Chikungunya virus in the north Caribbean area of Colombia: clinical presentation and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Salim; Miranda, Jorge; Pinzon, Hernando; Tique, Vanesa; Bolanos, Amada; Aponte, Jose; Arrieta, German; Gonzalez, Marco; Barrios, Katerine; Contreras, Hector; Alvarez, Jaime; Aleman, Ader

    2015-10-29

    The Caribbean area of Colombia has been severely affected by a Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) outbreak since 2014. The study was carried out on 100 patients during a fever outbreak from August to September 2014 in two small rural villages in the northern Caribbean area of Colombia. The molecular assays performed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on acute patient sera were collected within one to five days of the appearance of symptoms. Sequence analyses were carried out based on phylogenetic analyses of genes NS1 and E2. For serological assays, 49 (49%) patients at ≥ 6 days of disease onset were tested with NovaLisa Chikungunya IgG/IgM µ-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The main signs or symptoms associated with Chikungunya infection were arthralgia of the lower limbs (96%), fever (91%), arthralgia of the upper limbs (85%), rash (64%), and headache (57%). Ninety-four percent (46/49) of patients were positive for either IgM or IgG; the remaining three (6%) patients were seronegative. Viral loads were detected in 25 patients. Based on phylogenetic analysis of NS1 and E2, the characterization of the Colombian CHIKV indicated that it was a strain closely related to the British Virgin Islands strain and to the Asian genotype. This study shows the phylogenetic and clinical description of CHIKV in Colombia. The main symptoms shown were: arthralgia, fever, and rash. CHIKV sequences detected in Colombian patients were within the Asian genotype and closely related to the British Virgin Islands strain.

  10. Multigene phylogenetic analysis redefines dung beetles relationships and classification (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Sergei; Dimitrov, Dimitar

    2016-11-29

    Dung beetles (subfamily Scarabaeinae) are popular model organisms in ecology and developmental biology, and for the last two decades they have experienced a systematics renaissance with the adoption of modern phylogenetic approaches. Within this period 16 key phylogenies and numerous additional studies with limited scope have been published, but higher-level relationships of this pivotal group of beetles remain contentious and current classifications contain many unnatural groupings. The present study provides a robust phylogenetic framework and a revised classification of dung beetles. We assembled the so far largest molecular dataset for dung beetles using sequences of 8 gene regions and 547 terminals including the outgroup taxa. This dataset was analyzed using Bayesian, maximum likelihood and parsimony approaches. In order to test the sensitivity of results to different analytical treatments, we evaluated alternative partitioning schemes based on secondary structure, domains and codon position. We assessed substitution models adequacy using Bayesian framework and used these results to exclude partitions where substitution models did not adequately depict the processes that generated the data. We show that exclusion of partitions that failed the model adequacy evaluation has a potential to improve phylogenetic inference, but efficient implementation of this approach on large datasets is problematic and awaits development of new computationally advanced software. In the class Insecta it is uncommon for the results of molecular phylogenetic analysis to lead to substantial changes in classification. However, the results presented here are congruent with recent morphological studies and support the largest change in dung beetle systematics for the last 50 years. Here we propose the revision of the concepts for the tribes Deltochilini (Canthonini), Dichotomiini and Coprini; additionally, we redefine the tribe Sisyphini. We provide and illustrate synapomorphies and

  11. Development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for phylogenetic analysis of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour, Mojtaba; Najafi, Akram

    2017-03-28

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is among major pathogens causing 80-90% of all episodes of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recently, E. coli strains are divided into eight main phylogenetic groups including A, B1, B2, C, D, E, F, and clade I. This study was aimed to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific multiplex real time PCR method capable of detecting phylogenetic groups of E. coli strains. This study was carried out on E. coli strains (isolated from the patient with UTI) in which the presence of all seven target genes had been confirmed in our previous phylogenetic study. An EvaGreen-based singleplex and multiplex real-time PCR with melting curve analysis was designed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these genes. The primers were selected mainly based on the production of amplicons with melting temperatures (Tm) ranging from 82°C to 93°C and temperature difference of more than 1.5°C between each peak.The multiplex real-time PCR assays that have been developed in the present study were successful in detecting the eight main phylogenetic groups. Seven distinct melting peaks were discriminated, with Tm value of 93±0.8 for arpA, 89.2±0.1for chuA, 86.5±0.1 for yjaA, 82.3±0.2 for TspE4C2, 87.8±0.1for trpAgpC, 85.4±0.6 for arpAgpE genes, and 91±0.5 for the internal control. To our knowledge, this study is the first melting curve-based real-time PCR assay developed for simultaneous and discrete detection of these seven target genes. Our findings showed that this assay has the potential to be a rapid, reliable and cost-effective alternative for routine phylotyping of E. coli strains.

  12. BOOL-AN: a method for comparative sequence analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakó, Eena; Ari, Eszter; Ittzés, Péter; Horváth, Arnold; Podani, János

    2009-09-01

    A novel discrete mathematical approach is proposed as an additional tool for molecular systematics which does not require prior statistical assumptions concerning the evolutionary process. The method is based on algorithms generating mathematical representations directly from DNA/RNA or protein sequences, followed by the output of numerical (scalar or vector) and visual characteristics (graphs). The binary encoded sequence information is transformed into a compact analytical form, called the Iterative Canonical Form (or ICF) of Boolean functions, which can then be used as a generalized molecular descriptor. The method provides raw vector data for calculating different distance matrices, which in turn can be analyzed by neighbor-joining or UPGMA to derive a tree, or by principal coordinates analysis to get an ordination scattergram. The new method and the associated software for inferring phylogenetic trees are called the Boolean analysis or BOOL-AN.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis and positive-selection site detecting of vascular endothelial growth factor family in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenwu; Tang, Yanyan; Qi, Bin; Lu, Chuansen; Qin, Chao; Wei, Yunfei; Yi, Jiachao; Chen, Mingwu

    2014-02-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), known to play an important role in vascular homeostasis, vascular integrity and angiogenesis, is little known about the evolutionary relationship of its five members especially the role of gene duplication and natural selection in the evolution of the VEGF family. In this study, seventy-five full-length cDNA sequences from 33 vertebrate species were extracted from the NCBI's GenBank, UniProt protein database and the Ensembl database. By phylogenetic analyses, we investigated the origin, conservation, and evolution of the VEGFs. Five VEGF family members in vertebrates might be formed by gene duplication. The inferred evolutionary transitions that separate members which belong to different gene clusters correlated with changes in functional properties. Selection analysis and protein structure analysis were combined to explain the relationship of the site-specific evolution in the vertebrate VEGF family. Eleven positive selection sites, one transmembrane region and the active sites were detected in this process.

  14. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacillus subtilis Strains Applicable to Natto (Fermented Soybean) Production ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yuji; Rooney, Alejandro P.; Tsukakoshi, Yoshiki; Nakagawa, Rikio; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Kimura, Keitarou

    2011-01-01

    Spore-forming Bacillus strains that produce extracellular poly-γ-glutamic acid were screened for their application to natto (fermented soybean food) fermentation. Among the 424 strains, including Bacillus subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens, which we isolated from rice straw, 59 were capable of fermenting natto. Biotin auxotrophism was tightly linked to natto fermentation. A multilocus nucleotide sequence of six genes (rpoB, purH, gyrA, groEL, polC, and 16S rRNA) was used for phylogenetic analysis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was also conducted on the natto-fermenting strains. The ability to ferment natto was inferred from the two principal components of the AFLP banding pattern, and natto-fermenting strains formed a tight cluster within the B. subtilis subsp. subtilis group. PMID:21764950

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Bacillus subtilis strains applicable to natto (fermented soybean) production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yuji; Rooney, Alejandro P; Tsukakoshi, Yoshiki; Nakagawa, Rikio; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Kimura, Keitarou

    2011-09-01

    Spore-forming Bacillus strains that produce extracellular poly-γ-glutamic acid were screened for their application to natto (fermented soybean food) fermentation. Among the 424 strains, including Bacillus subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens, which we isolated from rice straw, 59 were capable of fermenting natto. Biotin auxotrophism was tightly linked to natto fermentation. A multilocus nucleotide sequence of six genes (rpoB, purH, gyrA, groEL, polC, and 16S rRNA) was used for phylogenetic analysis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was also conducted on the natto-fermenting strains. The ability to ferment natto was inferred from the two principal components of the AFLP banding pattern, and natto-fermenting strains formed a tight cluster within the B. subtilis subsp. subtilis group.

  16. A revision and phylogenetic analysis of Stoiba Spaeth 1909 (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chulwoo; Chaboo, Caroline S

    2012-01-01

    Stoiba Spaeth, 1909 is revised with a phylogenetic analysis of 38 adult morphological characters for nine Stoiba species and 11 outgroup species (Mesomphaliini, Ischyrosonychini, and Hemisphaerotini). Four Cuban species of Stoiba were not sampled. Parsimony analysis located the four most parsimonious trees. The strict consensus (CI=0.59, RI=0.78, Steps=83) resolved the monophyly of Stoiba. The monophyly of Stoiba is supported by pale yellow antennae, antennomere VII broader than its length, and rounded basal line of pronotum. An illustrated key to ten species of Stoiba is provided along with a distribution map of 11 species. Stoiba rufa Blake is synonymized with Stoiba swartzii (Thunberg) by a morphological comparison which includes female genitalia.

  17. A revision and phylogenetic analysis of Stoiba Spaeth 1909 (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

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    Chulwoo Shin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stoiba Spaeth, 1909 is revised with a phylogenetic analysis of 38 adult morphological characters for nine Stoiba species and 11 outgroup species (Mesomphaliini, Ischyrosonychini, and Hemisphaerotini. Four Cuban species of Stoiba were not sampled. Parsimony analysis located the four most parsimonious trees. The strict consensus (CI=0.59, RI=0.78, Steps=83 resolved the monophyly of Stoiba. The monophyly of Stoiba is supported by pale yellow antennae, antennomere VII broader than its length, and rounded basal line of pronotum. An illustrated key to ten species of Stoiba is provided along with a distribution map of 11 species. Stoiba rufa Blake is synonymized with S. swartzii (Thunberg by a morphological comparison which includes female genitalia.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of the sharpshooter genus Subrasaca Young, 1977 (Hemiptera, Cicadellidae, Cicadellini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta dos Santos da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The South American sharpshooter genus Subrasaca comprises 14 species. Some species of this genus are quite common in the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest. In this paper, a phylogenetic analysis of Subrasaca, based on a matrix of 20 terminal taxa and 72 morphological characters of the head, thorax, and male and female genitalia, is presented. The analysis yielded six equally most parsimonious trees (197 steps, CI = 0.6091, RI = 0.5722, and RC = 0.3486. The results suggest that Subrasaca is a monophyletic taxon, although the genus branch is not robust. The clade showing the highest bootstrap and Bremer scores is formed by species with longitudinal dark brown to black stripes on the forewings (S. bimaculata, S. constricta, S. curvovittata, and S. flavolineata, followed by S. atronasa + S. austera.

  19. Social mating system and sex-biased dispersal in mammals and birds: a phylogenetic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Mabry

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that patterns of sex-biased dispersal are related to social mating system in mammals and birds has gained widespread acceptance over the past 30 years. However, two major complications have obscured the relationship between these two behaviors: 1 dispersal frequency and dispersal distance, which measure different aspects of the dispersal process, have often been confounded, and 2 the relationship between mating system and sex-biased dispersal in these vertebrate groups has not been examined using modern phylogenetic comparative methods. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the relationship between mating system and sex-biased dispersal in mammals and birds. Results indicate that the evolution of female-biased dispersal in mammals may be more likely on monogamous branches of the phylogeny, and that females may disperse farther than males in socially monogamous mammalian species. However, we found no support for a relationship between social mating system and sex-biased dispersal in birds when the effects of phylogeny are taken into consideration. We caution that although there are larger-scale behavioral differences in mating system and sex-biased dispersal between mammals and birds, mating system and sex-biased dispersal are far from perfectly associated within these taxa.

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Virulent Borrelia Species Isolated from Patients with Relapsing Fever▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, A.; Anda, P.; Escudero, R.; Larsson, C.; Bergstrom, S.; Benach, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) was used to clarify the taxonomic status of a virulent Borrelia organism previously isolated from patients with relapsing fever and from ticks in Spain that is designated the Spanish relapsing fever (SRF) Borrelia. This species has been used extensively in experimental infection models because of its continued virulence. Seven genes were amplified to analyze the phylogenetic relationships among several Spanish isolates of SRF Borrelia and other relapsing fever Borrelia species. The genes targeted in this study included rrs and flaB, which have commonly been used in phylogenetic studies; the rrf-rrl intergenic spacer (IGS), which is highly discriminatory; and four additional genes, p66, groEL, glpQ, and recC, which are located on the chromosome and which have therefore evolved in a clonal way. The species included in this study were Borrelia duttonii, B. recurrentis, B. crocidurae, and B. hispanica as Old World Borrelia species and B. turicatae and B. hermsii as New World Borrelia species. The results obtained by MLSA of the SRF Borrelia on the basis of 1% of the genomic sequence data analyzed confirmed that the SRF Borrelia isolates are B. hispanica. However, the prototype isolates of B. hispanica used in this study have an uncertain history and display unique phenotypic characteristics that are not shared with the SRF Borrelia. Therefore, we propose to use strain SP1, isolated from a relapsing fever patient in 1994 in southern Spain, as the type strain for B. hispanica. PMID:20463158

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of Bacillus P450 monooxygenases and evaluation of their activity towards steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Shibata, Daisuke; Kino, Kuniki

    2009-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) open reading frames (ORFs) identified in genome sequences of Bacillus species are potential resources for new oxidation biocatalysts. Phylogenetic analysis of 29 Bacillus P450 ORFs revealed that the P450s consist of a limited number of P450 families, CYP102, CYP106, CYP107, CYP109, CYP134, CYP152, and CYP197. Previously, we identified the catalytic activities of three P450s of Bacillus subtilis towards steroids by rapid substrate screening using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR/MS). Here, we further applied this method to evaluate the activity of Bacillus cereus P450s towards steroids. Five P450 genes were cloned from B. cereus ATCC 10987 based on its genomic sequence and were expressed in Escherichia coli. These P450s were reacted with a mixture of 30 compounds that mainly included steroids, and the reaction mixtures were analyzed using FT-ICR/MS. We found that BCE_2659 (CYP106) catalyzed the monooxygenation of methyltestosterone, progesterone, 11-ketoprogesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and chlormadinone acetate. BCE_2654 (CYP107) monooxygenated testosterone enanthate, and BCE_3250 (CYP109) monooxygenated testosterone and compactin. Based on the phylogenetic relationship and the known substrate specificities including ones identified in this study, we discuss the catalytic potential of Bacillus P450s towards steroids.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Tibetan mastiffs based on mitochondrial hypervariable region I

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZHANJUN REN; HUILING CHEN; XUEJIAO YANG; CHENGDONG ZHANG

    2017-03-01

    Recently, the number of Tibetan mastiffs, which is a precious germplasm resource and cultural heritage, is decreasing sharply. Therefore, the genetic diversity of Tibetan mastiffs needs to be studied to clarify its phylogenetics relationships and lay the foundation for resource protection, rational development and utilization of Tibetan mastiffs. We sequenced hypervariable region I of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 110 individuals from Tibet region and Gansu province. A total of 12 polymorphic sites were identified which defined eight haplotypes of which H4 and H8 were unique to Tibetan population with H8 being identified first. The haplotype diversity (Hd: 0.808), nucleotide diversity (Pi: 0.603%), the average number of nucleotide difference (K: 3.917) of Tibetan mastiffs from Gansu were higher than those from Tibet region (Hd: 0.794; Pi: 0.589%; K: 3.831), which revealed higher genetic diversity in Gansu. In terms of total population, the genetic variation was low. The median-joining network and phylogenetic tree based on the mtDNA hypervariable region I showed that Tibetan mastiffs originated from grey wolves, as the other domestic dogs and had different history of maternal origin. The mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests indicated that Tibetan mastiffs were in genetic equilibrium or in a population decline.

  3. Isolation, characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a bacterial strain capable of degrading acetamiprid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Xiao-hua; MIN Hang

    2006-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium, capable of degrading the new chloronicotine pesticide acetamiprid, was isolated from the sludge of pesticide factory after successive enrichment cultures and named strain FH2 which is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, obligate aerobic organism with ((0.5-0.7) ×(1.5-3.0))μm of cell size and with monotrichous flagellum. It was identified as a member of Pseudomonas sp. based on morphology, physio-biochemical properties, Biolog GN2, 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic characteristic analysis. The isolate could grow optimally at pH 7.0 and 30℃ in acetamiprid-mineral medium with 800 mg/L concentration. About 53.3% acetamiprid was degraded by strain FH2 after incubation for 14 d in acetamiprid-mineral medium and nearly 96.7% degraded when incubated in acetamiprid-yeast mineral medium at 30℃ for 14 d. This paper describes phylogenetic and degradation characterization of a pure bacterium being able to mineralize acetamiprid for the first time.

  4. PHYRN: a robust method for phylogenetic analysis of highly divergent sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Bhardwaj

    Full Text Available Both multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis are problematic in the "twilight zone" of sequence similarity (≤ 25% amino acid identity. Herein we explore the accuracy of phylogenetic inference at extreme sequence divergence using a variety of simulated data sets. We evaluate four leading multiple sequence alignment (MSA methods (MAFFT, T-COFFEE, CLUSTAL, and MUSCLE and six commonly used programs of tree estimation (Distance-based: Neighbor-Joining; Character-based: PhyML, RAxML, GARLI, Maximum Parsimony, and Bayesian against a novel MSA-independent method (PHYRN described here. Strikingly, at "midnight zone" genetic distances (~7% pairwise identity and 4.0 gaps per position, PHYRN returns high-resolution phylogenies that outperform traditional approaches. We reason this is due to PHRYN's capability to amplify informative positions, even at the most extreme levels of sequence divergence. We also assess the applicability of the PHYRN algorithm for inferring deep evolutionary relationships in the divergent DANGER protein superfamily, for which PHYRN infers a more robust tree compared to MSA-based approaches. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PHYRN represents a powerful mechanism for mapping uncharted frontiers in highly divergent protein sequence data sets.

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis and Rapid Identification of the Whitefly, Bemisia afer, in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dong; Liu, Guoxia; Wan, Fanghao; Tao, Yunli; Gill, Ray J

    2010-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationship between the whitefly Bemisia afer (Priesner & Hosny) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) from China and other populations among the world were analyzed based on the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) gene. Phylogenetic analysis of mtCOI sequences and those of reference B. afer sequences showed that the populations of the species could be separated into 5 clades (I–V). There were at least two clades of the species from China (IV and V). These data suggested that B. afer might be a species complex. The Chinese B. afer populations were most divergent with B. afer from the United Kingdom and African countries. The distance between the Chinese B. afer (IV and V) and clades I, II, and III is more than 32%, while the distance among clades I, II, III is lower than 7.7%. A new set of primers specific to B. afer was designed to amplify a region of approximately 400 bp to discriminate B. afer from other Bemisia species in China based on mtCOI sequences. PMID:20673071

  6. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis of Bovine Non-aureus Staphylococci Species Based on Whole-Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Sohail; Barkema, Herman W.; Luby, Christopher; Condas, Larissa A. Z.; Nobrega, Diego B.; Carson, Domonique A.; De Buck, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Non-aureus staphylococci (NAS), a heterogeneous group of a large number of species and subspecies, are the most frequently isolated pathogens from intramammary infections in dairy cattle. Phylogenetic relationships among bovine NAS species are controversial and have mostly been determined based on single-gene trees. Herein, we analyzed phylogeny of bovine NAS species using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 441 distinct isolates. In addition, evolutionary relationships among bovine NAS were estimated from multilocus data of 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, sodA, and tuf genes and sequences from these and numerous other single genes/proteins. All phylogenies were created with FastTree, Maximum-Likelihood, Maximum-Parsimony, and Neighbor-Joining methods. Regardless of methodology, WGS-trees clearly separated bovine NAS species into five monophyletic coherent clades. Furthermore, there were consistent interspecies relationships within clades in all WGS phylogenetic reconstructions. Except for the Maximum-Parsimony tree, multilocus data analysis similarly produced five clades. There were large variations in determining clades and interspecies relationships in single gene/protein trees, under different methods of tree constructions, highlighting limitations of using single genes for determining bovine NAS phylogeny. However, based on WGS data, we established a robust phylogeny of bovine NAS species, unaffected by method or model of evolutionary reconstructions. Therefore, it is now possible to determine associations between phylogeny and many biological traits, such as virulence, antimicrobial resistance, environmental niche, geographical distribution, and host specificity. PMID:28066335

  7. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of small ruminant lentiviruses isolated from Canadian sheep and goats

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    Bertoni Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLV are widespread in Canadian sheep and goats and represent an important health issue in these animals. There is however no data about the genetic diversity of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus (CAEV or Maedi Visna Virus (MVV in this country. Findings We performed a molecular and phylogenetic analysis of sheep and goat lentiviruses from a small geographic area in Canada using long sequences from the gag region of 30 infected sheep and 36 infected goats originating from 14 different flocks. Pairwise DNA distance and phylogenetic analyses revealed that all SRLV sequences obtained from sheep clustered tightly with prototypical Maedi visna sequences from America. Similarly, all SRLV strains obtained from goats clustered tightly with prototypical US CAEV-Cork strain. Conclusions The data reported in this study suggests that Canadian and US SRLV strains share common origins. In addition, the molecular data failed to bring to light any evidence of past cross species transmission between sheep and goats, which is consistent with the type of farming practiced in this part of the country where single species flocks predominate and where opportunities of cross species transmissions are proportionately low.

  8. Uncertain-tree: discriminating among competing approaches to the phylogenetic analysis of phenotype data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Alastair R.; Fleming, James F.; Tarver, James E.; Pisani, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Morphological data provide the only means of classifying the majority of life's history, but the choice between competing phylogenetic methods for the analysis of morphology is unclear. Traditionally, parsimony methods have been favoured but recent studies have shown that these approaches are less accurate than the Bayesian implementation of the Mk model. Here we expand on these findings in several ways: we assess the impact of tree shape and maximum-likelihood estimation using the Mk model, as well as analysing data composed of both binary and multistate characters. We find that all methods struggle to correctly resolve deep clades within asymmetric trees, and when analysing small character matrices. The Bayesian Mk model is the most accurate method for estimating topology, but with lower resolution than other methods. Equal weights parsimony is more accurate than implied weights parsimony, and maximum-likelihood estimation using the Mk model is the least accurate method. We conclude that the Bayesian implementation of the Mk model should be the default method for phylogenetic estimation from phenotype datasets, and we explore the implications of our simulations in reanalysing several empirical morphological character matrices. A consequence of our finding is that high levels of resolution or the ability to classify species or groups with much confidence should not be expected when using small datasets. It is now necessary to depart from the traditional parsimony paradigms of constructing character matrices, towards datasets constructed explicitly for Bayesian methods. PMID:28077778

  9. The performance of the Congruence Among Distance Matrices (CADM) test in phylogenetic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background CADM is a statistical test used to estimate the level of Congruence Among Distance Matrices. It has been shown in previous studies to have a correct rate of type I error and good power when applied to dissimilarity matrices and to ultrametric distance matrices. Contrary to most other tests of incongruence used in phylogenetic analysis, the null hypothesis of the CADM test assumes complete incongruence of the phylogenetic trees instead of congruence. In this study, we performed computer simulations to assess the type I error rate and power of the test. It was applied to additive distance matrices representing phylogenies and to genetic distance matrices obtained from nucleotide sequences of different lengths that were simulated on randomly generated trees of varying sizes, and under different evolutionary conditions. Results Our results showed that the test has an accurate type I error rate and good power. As expected, power increased with the number of objects (i.e., taxa), the number of partially or completely congruent matrices and the level of congruence among distance matrices. Conclusions Based on our results, we suggest that CADM is an excellent candidate to test for congruence and, when present, to estimate its level in phylogenomic studies where numerous genes are analysed simultaneously. PMID:21388552

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of Citrus tristeza virus Isolates of Wild Type Citrus in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Long; ZHOU Chang-yong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from Chinese wild type citrus were analyzed by comparing the sequences of nine genomic regions (p23, p20, p13, p18, p25, p27, POL, HEL and k17) with the CTV isolates of cultivated citrus from different countries. The results showed that the divergence pattern of genomic RNA of the CTV isolates from wild type citrus was similar to that of other isolates from cultivated citrus, the 3´ proximal region was relatively conserved, and the 5´ proximal region had greater variability. The nine genomic regions of CTV isolates analyzed were found to have been under purifying selection in the evolution process. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the eleven Chinese wild CTV isolates were located at different clades and did not relfect their geographical origins, suggesting genetic diversity among the Chinese wild CTV populations. These results will aid in the understanding of molecular evolution of the Chinese CTV populations.

  11. Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of the Andean clade and the placement of new Colombian blueberries (Ericaceae, Vaccinieae

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    Paola Pedraza-Penalosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The blueberry tribe Vaccinieae (Ericaceae is particularly diverse in South America and underwent extensive radiation in Colombia where many endemics occur. Recent fieldwork in Colombia has resulted in valuable additions to the phylogeny and as well in the discovery of morphologically noteworthy new species that need to be phylogenetically placed before being named. This is particularly important, as the monophyly of many of the studied genera have not been confirmed. In order to advance our understanding of the relationships within neotropical Vaccinieae and advice the taxonomy of the new blueberry relatives, here we present the most comprehensive phylogenetic analysis for the Andean clade. Anthopterus, Demosthenesia, and Pellegrinia are among the putative Andean genera recovered as monophyletic, while other eight Andean genera were not. The analyses also showed that genera that have been traditionally widely defined are non-monophyletic and could be further split into more discrete groups. Four newly discovered Colombian Vaccinieae are placed in the monophyletic Satyria s.s. and the Psammisia I clade. Although these new species are endemic to the Colombian Western Cordillera and Chocó biogeographic region and three are not known outside of Las Orquídeas National Park, they do not form sister pairs.

  12. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of partial CXCR2 gene of Murrah buffalo

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    S. A. Wani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Present study was carried out to sequence and phylogenetic analysis of CXCR2 gene of Murrah buffalo. Materials and Methods: For the present investigation, from a group of forty eight Murrah buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, blood samples were collected randomly from eight animals, out of which four were healthy and four were mastitic. Results: The amplification of Interleukin-8B (IL-8B receptor gene target sequence was carried out using the primer pair in an optimized polymerase chain reaction. Partial sequencing of IL-8B receptor gene of Bubalus bubalis (Murrah has been done successfully. The sequences of IL-8B receptor gene showed 99% homology to that of Bos indicus × Bos taurus, 98% to that of Bos taurus, 97% to that of Ovis aries, 93% to that of Sus scrofa, 92% to that of Equus caballus and 90% to that of Felis catus. Conclusion: From the present study it can be concluded that the PCR amplification procedure for target region of IL-8B receptor gene yielding 459 bp products has been standardized, which yielded consistent and specific amplification. Amplification of partial IL-8B receptor gene (exon 2- 459 bp using self designed primers specific for cattle ortholog sequence signifies that the locus is conserved in cattle and buffaloes. In phylogenetic tree, the target sequence of IL-8B receptor gene of Bubalus bubalis were found to be more closely related to Bos indicus × Bos Taurus and Bos taurus than to Ovis aries and Sus scrofa.

  13. XplorSeq: A software environment for integrated management and phylogenetic analysis of metagenomic sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Daniel N

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in automated DNA sequencing technology have accelerated the generation of metagenomic DNA sequences, especially environmental ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA sequences. As the scale of rDNA-based studies of microbial ecology has expanded, need has arisen for software that is capable of managing, annotating, and analyzing the plethora of diverse data accumulated in these projects. Results XplorSeq is a software package that facilitates the compilation, management and phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences. XplorSeq was developed for, but is not limited to, high-throughput analysis of environmental rRNA gene sequences. XplorSeq integrates and extends several commonly used UNIX-based analysis tools by use of a Macintosh OS-X-based graphical user interface (GUI. Through this GUI, users may perform basic sequence import and assembly steps (base-calling, vector/primer trimming, contig assembly, perform BLAST (Basic Local Alignment and Search Tool; 123 searches of NCBI and local databases, create multiple sequence alignments, build phylogenetic trees, assemble Operational Taxonomic Units, estimate biodiversity indices, and summarize data in a variety of formats. Furthermore, sequences may be annotated with user-specified meta-data, which then can be used to sort data and organize analyses and reports. A document-based architecture permits parallel analysis of sequence data from multiple clones or amplicons, with sequences and other data stored in a single file. Conclusion XplorSeq should benefit researchers who are engaged in analyses of environmental sequence data, especially those with little experience using bioinformatics software. Although XplorSeq was developed for management of rDNA sequence data, it can be applied to most any sequencing project. The application is available free of charge for non-commercial use at http://vent.colorado.edu/phyloware.

  14. Growing season changes in Fennoscandia and Kola peninsula during the period 1982 to 1999 - Implications for reindeer husbandry (In Norwegian with Summary in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Tømmervik

    2005-04-01

    phenological registrations are sparse. On Kola Peninsula, however, such observations can be tracked back more than 70 years. The few existing historical series may be useful for local studies of climatic and environmental effects through time. However, the rugged topography within the area, with its large variations in micro and local climate and thus growing conditions, makes it difficult to draw conclusions for regions or larger areas. Accordingly, in order to document the effects of the current climatic trend there is a need for objective methods applicable on a regional level. Hence, satellite data is probably the only realistic way of documenting regional trends in phenological events within Fennoscandia and Kola Peninsula. However, there are very few time-series of data available that span a sufficient time-period to be useful for trend analysis. The only long-time series with sufficient spatial coverage and temporal resolution is the NOAA AVHRR GIMMS NDVI dataset produced by Dr. Tucker at NASA, at present covering the period from July 1981 to December 2002. This dataset has been used for several global studies, but for our purpose the main challenge is the low spatial resolution of 8x8 km2. For a typical Norwegian coastal area, within one pixel there will be all types of land-cover types from ocean to rich vegetated lowland to non-vegetated high mountains and glaciers. The advantage with this dataset is that it is based on satellite data acquired several times a day, and therefore it is very good to use in order to follow "the green wave" of vegetation during springtime. Accordingly, it is of importance to investigate whether this dataset can be applied to document the regional phenological differences within the region, and whether phonological trends that may be related to climate change is observed. The NOAA AVHRR GIMMS NDVI data set obtained from weather satellites was together with in-situ data and climate data used to investigate regional climatic change impact on

  15. The Postglacial Rebound Signal of Fennoscandia Observed by Absolute Gravimetry, GPS, and Tide Gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Ragnvald Pettersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have compiled time derivatives of gravity and vertical motion for a dozen sites in Fennoscandia. Time series of absolute gravimetry and permanent GPS cover a time span of about a decade. Tide gauges have operated for many decades near seven of the sites. Linear relations are found to range from −0.17 to −0.22 for the slope between gravity and vertical uplift rates. An eustatic sea level rate of 1.2 mm/year is derived from these data. This compares well with results for North America and with theoretical predictions for viscoelastic Earth models.

  16. Ixodes ricinus tick lipocalins: identification, cloning, phylogenetic analysis and biochemical characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Beaufays

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During their blood meal, ticks secrete a wide variety of proteins that interfere with their host's defense mechanisms. Among these proteins, lipocalins play a major role in the modulation of the inflammatory response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Screening a cDNA library in association with RT-PCR and RACE methodologies allowed us to identify 14 new lipocalin genes in the salivary glands of the Ixodes ricinus hard tick. A computational in-depth structural analysis confirmed that LIRs belong to the lipocalin family. These proteins were called LIR for "Lipocalin from I. ricinus" and numbered from 1 to 14 (LIR1 to LIR14. According to their percentage identity/similarity, LIR proteins may be assigned to 6 distinct phylogenetic groups. The mature proteins have calculated pM and pI varying from 21.8 kDa to 37.2 kDa and from 4.45 to 9.57 respectively. In a western blot analysis, all recombinant LIRs appeared as a series of thin bands at 50-70 kDa, suggesting extensive glycosylation, which was experimentally confirmed by treatment with N-glycosidase F. In addition, the in vivo expression analysis of LIRs in I. ricinus, examined by RT-PCR, showed homogeneous expression profiles for certain phylogenetic groups and relatively heterogeneous profiles for other groups. Finally, we demonstrated that LIR6 codes for a protein that specifically binds leukotriene B4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work confirms that, regarding their biochemical properties, expression profile, and sequence signature, lipocalins in Ixodes hard tick genus, and more specifically in the Ixodes ricinus species, are segregated into distinct phylogenetic groups suggesting potential distinct function. This was particularly demonstrated by the ability of LIR6 to scavenge leukotriene B4. The other LIRs did not bind any of the ligands tested, such as 5-hydroxytryptamine, ADP, norepinephrine, platelet activating factor, prostaglandins D2 and E2, and finally leukotrienes B4 and C

  17. Functional and phylogenetic analysis of ureD in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyert, Susan R; Rasko, David A; Kaper, James B

    2011-02-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a food-borne pathogen that can cause severe health complications and utilizes a much lower infectious dose than other E. coli pathotypes. Despite having an intact ure locus, ureDABCEFG, the majority of EHEC strains are phenotypically urease negative under tested conditions. Urease activity potentially assists with survival fitness by enhancing acid tolerance during passage through the stomach or by aiding with colonization in either human or animal reservoirs. Previously, in the EHEC O157:H7 Sakai strain, a point mutation in ureD, encoding a urease chaperone protein, was identified, resulting in a substitution of an amber stop codon for glutamine. This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is observed in the majority of EHEC O157:H7 isolates and correlates with a negative urease phenotype in vitro. We demonstrate that the lack of urease activity in vitro is not solely due to the amber codon in ureD. Our analysis has identified two additional SNPs in ureD affecting amino acid positions 38 and 205, in both cases determining whether the encoded amino acid is leucine or proline. Phylogenetic analysis based on Ure protein sequences from a variety of urease-encoding bacteria demonstrates that the proline at position 38 is highly conserved among Gram-negative bacteria. Experiments reveal that the L38P substitution enhances urease enzyme activity; however, the L205P substitution does not. Multilocus sequence typing analysis for a variety of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli isolates combined with the ureD sequence reveals that except for a subset of the O157:H7 strains, neither the in vitro urease-positive phenotype nor the ureD sequence is phylogenetically restricted.

  18. Revision and phylogenetic analysis of the orb-weaving spider genus Glenognatha Simon, 1887 (Araneae, Tetragnathidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabra-García, Jimmy; Brescovit, Antonio D

    2016-01-27

    A taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the spider genus Glenognatha Simon, 1887 is presented. This analysis is based on a data set including 24 Glenognatha species plus eight outgroups representing three related tetragnathine genera and one metaine as the root. These taxa were scored for 78 morphological characters. Parsimony was used as the optimality criterion and a sensitivity analysis was performed using different character weighting concavities. Seven unambiguous synapomorphies support the monophyly of Glenognatha. Some internal clades within the genus are well-supported and its relationships are discussed. Glenognatha as recovered includes 27 species, four of them only known from males. A species identification key and distribution maps are provided for all. New morphological data are also presented for thirteen previously described species. Glenognatha has a broad distribution occupying the Neartic, Afrotropic, Indo-Malaya, Oceania and Paleartic regions, but is more diverse in the Neotropics. The following eleven new species are described: G. vivianae n. sp., G. caaguara n. sp., G. boraceia n. sp. and G. timbira n. sp. from southeast Brazil, G. caparu n. sp., G. januari n. sp. and G. camisea n. sp. from the Amazonian region, G. mendezi n. sp., G. florezi n. sp. and G. patriceae n. sp. from northern Andes and G. gouldi n. sp. from Southern United States and central Mexico. Females of G. minuta Banks, 1898, G. gaujoni Simon, 1895 and G. gloriae (Petrunkevitch, 1930) and males of G. globosa (Petrunkevitch, 1925) and G. hirsutissima (Berland, 1935) are described for the first time. Three new combinations are proposed in congruence with the phylogenetic results: G. argyrostilba (O. P.-Cambridge, 1876) n. comb., G. dentata (Zhu & Wen, 1978) n. comb. and G. tangi (Zhu, Song & Zhang, 2003) n. comb., all previously included in Dyschiriognatha Simon, 1893. The following taxa are newly synonymized: Dyschiriognatha montana Simon, 1897, Glenognatha mira Bryant

  19. Untangling long branches: identifying conflicting phylogenetic signals using spectral analysis, neighbor-net, and consensus networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Martyn; Holland, Barbara R; Gray, Russell D; Spencer, Hamish G

    2005-08-01

    Long-branch attraction is a well-known source of systematic error that can mislead phylogenetic methods; it is frequently invoked post hoc, upon recovering a different tree from the one expected based on prior evidence. We demonstrate that methods that do not force the data onto a single tree, such as spectral analysis, Neighbor-Net, and consensus networks, can be used to detect conflicting signals within the data, including those caused by long-branch attraction. We illustrate this approach using a set of taxa from three unambiguously monophyletic families within the Pelecaniformes: the darters, the cormorants and shags, and the gannets and boobies. These three families are universally acknowledged as forming a monophyletic group, but the relationship between the families remains contentious. Using sequence data from three mitochondrial genes (12S, ATPase 6, and ATPase 8) we demonstrate that the relationship between these three families is difficult to resolve because they are separated by a short internal branch and there are conflicting signals due to long-branch attraction, which are confounded with nonhomogeneous sequence evolution across the different genes. Spectral analysis, Neighbor-Net, and consensus networks reveal conflicting signals regarding the placement of one of the darters, with support found for darter monophyly, but also support for a conflicting grouping with the outgroup, pelicans. Furthermore, parsimony and maximum-likelihood analyses produced different trees, with one of the two most parsimonious trees not supporting the monophyly of the darters. Monte Carlo simulations, however, were not sensitive enough to reveal long-branch attraction unless the branches are longer than those actually observed. These results indicate that spectral analysis, Neighbor-Net, and consensus networks offer a powerful approach to detecting and understanding the source of conflicting signals within phylogenetic data.

  20. Phylogenetic and proteomic analysis of an anaerobic toluene-degrading community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehmlich, N; Kleinsteuber, S; Vogt, C; Benndorf, D; Harms, H; Schmidt, F; Von Bergen, M; Seifert, J

    2010-12-01

    This study intended to unravel the physiological interplay in an anaerobic microbial community that degrades toluene under sulfate-reducing conditions combining proteomic and genetic techniques. An enriched toluene-degrading community (Zz5-7) growing in batch cultures was investigated by DNA- and protein-based analyses. The affiliation and diversity of the community were analysed using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes as a phylogenetic marker as well as bssA and dsrAB genes as functional markers. Metaproteome analysis was carried out by a global protein extraction and a subsequent protein separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). About 85% of the proteins in the spots were identified by nano-liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. DNA sequencing of bssA and the most abundant dsrAB amplicons revealed high similarities to a member of the Desulfobulbaceae, which was also predominant according to 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Metaproteome analysis provided 202 unambiguous protein identifications derived from 236 unique protein spots. The proteins involved in anaerobic toluene activation, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, hydrogen production/consumption and autotrophic carbon fixation were mainly affiliated to members of the Desulfobulbaceae and several other Deltaproteobacteria. Phylogenetic and metaproteomic analyses revealed a member of the Desulfobulbaceae as the key player of anaerobic toluene degradation in a sulfate-reducing consortium.   This is the first study that combines genetic and proteomic analyses to indicate the interactions in an anaerobic toluene-degrading microbial consortium. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of Dobrava-Belgrade virus L and S genetic segments isolated from an animal reservoir in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV is a member of the Bunyaviridae family, genus Hantavirus, possessing a single-stranded RNA genome consisting of three segments, designated L (large, M (medium and S (small. In this study, we present phylogenetic analysis of a newly detected DOBV strain isolated from Apodemus agrarius. Analysis was based on partial L and S segment sequences, in comparison to previously published DOBV sequences from Serbia and elsewhere. A phylogenetic tree based on partial S segment revealed local geographical clustering of DOBV sequences from Serbia, unrelated to host (rodent or human. The topology of the phylogenetic tree was confirmed with a high percent of completely or partially resolved quartets in likelihood-mapping analysis, whereas no evidence of possible recombination in the examined S segment data set was found.

  2. Using Phylogenetic Analysis to Detect Market Substitution of Atlantic Salmon for Pacific Salmon: An Introductory Biology Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Erica; Gogarten, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    We describe a laboratory exercise developed for the cell and molecular biology quarter of a year-long majors' undergraduate introductory biology sequence. In an analysis of salmon samples collected by students in their local stores and restaurants, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to detect market substitution of Atlantic salmon…

  3. Phylogenetic trees

    OpenAIRE

    Baños, Hector; Bushek, Nathaniel; Davidson, Ruth; Gross, Elizabeth; Harris, Pamela E.; Krone, Robert; Long, Colby; Stewart, Allen; WALKER, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the package PhylogeneticTrees for Macaulay2 which allows users to compute phylogenetic invariants for group-based tree models. We provide some background information on phylogenetic algebraic geometry and show how the package PhylogeneticTrees can be used to calculate a generating set for a phylogenetic ideal as well as a lower bound for its dimension. Finally, we show how methods within the package can be used to compute a generating set for the join of any two ideals.

  4. Multiple alignment analysis on phylogenetic tree of the spread of SARS epidemic using distance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiroch, S.; Pradana, M. S.; Irawan, M. I.; Mukhlash, I.

    2017-09-01

    Multiple Alignment (MA) is a particularly important tool for studying the viral genome and determine the evolutionary process of the specific virus. Application of MA in the case of the spread of the Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic is an interesting thing because this virus epidemic a few years ago spread so quickly that medical attention in many countries. Although there has been a lot of software to process multiple sequences, but the use of pairwise alignment to process MA is very important to consider. In previous research, the alignment between the sequences to process MA algorithm, Super Pairwise Alignment, but in this study used a dynamic programming algorithm Needleman wunchs simulated in Matlab. From the analysis of MA obtained and stable region and unstable which indicates the position where the mutation occurs, the system network topology that produced the phylogenetic tree of the SARS epidemic distance method, and system area networks mutation.

  5. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus among domestic dogs in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGUYEN, Dung Van; SUZUKI, Junko; MINAMI, Shohei; YONEMITSU, Kenzo; NAGATA, Nao; KUWATA, Ryusei; SHIMODA, Hiroshi; VU, Chien Kim; TRUONG, Thuy Quoc; MAEDA, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is one of the most serious pathogens found in many species of carnivores, including domestic dogs. In this study, hemagglutinin (H) genes were detected in five domestic Vietnamese dogs with diarrhea, and two CDVs were successfully isolated from dogs positive for H genes. The complete genome of one isolate, CDV/dog/HCM/33/140816, was determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all Vietnamese CDVs belonged to the Asia-1 genotype. In addition, the H proteins of Vietnamese CDV strains were the most homologous to those of Chinese CDVs (98.4% to 99.3% identity). These results indicated that the Asia-1 genotype of CDV was the predominant genotype circulating among the domestic dog population in Vietnam and that transboundary transmission of CDV has occurred between Vietnam and China. PMID:27746406

  6. Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Potato virus Y Liaoning Isolate in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fang; GAO Zheng-liang; AN Meng-nan; ZHOU Ben-guo; and WU Yuan-hua

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequence of Potato virus Y Liaoning isolate (PVY-LN) causing tobacco vein necrosis symptoms were isolated from Liaoning Province in China. Genome sequences of PVY-LN was 9 714 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3′-terminal poly (A) tail. PVY-LN encodes a single long open reading frame (ORF) of polyprotein that is predicted to be cleaved into ten mature proteins by three viral proteases. No recombination can be predicted in PVY-LN sequences compared with that of the other PVY strains using Recombination Detection Programe v. 4.16 (RDP4). Complete genome sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that PVY-LN is closely related to PVY necrosis strain (PVYN).

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Lensia (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa, Siphonophora), based on the species morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Eric Y; Ribeiro, Guilherme C; Oliveira, Otto M P

    2016-07-01

    Siphonophores are poorly studied despite their abundance and ecological importance in marine ecosystems. The genus Lensia Totton, 1932 contains the highest number of species within Siphonophora, but systematic studies of these organisms are scarce in the literature. This study presents a phylogenetic analysis for fifteen species of Lensia based on morphological data. The material for this study was obtained during two oceanographic campaigns made along the southeastern Brazilian coast. A total of twenty two characters of the anterior nectophore morphology were scored. The shortest trees were searched using parsimony (under different weighting regimes). All analyses provided the same topology: (M. kochi (D. dispar + D. bojani) (L. leloupi (L. havock (L. conoidea (L. subtilis; L. meteori; L. hardy; L. fowleri; (L. subtiloides (L. hotspur; L. cossack; L. campanella)); (L. multicristata (L. hunter (L. lelouveteau + L. grimaldii))). The monophyly of the genus Lensia is supported by the hydroecium measuring up to 1/4 the height of the nectosac.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Bambusa (Poaceae: Bambusoideae) based on internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Xia, Nianhe; Lin, Rushun

    2005-12-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of Bambusa species were performed using internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The 21 species sampled included members of Bambusa (sensu stricto), Dendrocalamopsis, Dendrocalamus, Guadua, Leleba, and Lingnania. Arundinaria gigantea was used as an outgroup. Using the maximum parsimony method with PAUP*, gaps were treated as missing states or new states. Parsimonious analysis revealed that Dendrocalamus latiflorus was closely related to the members of Dendrocalamopsis. Dendrocalamus membranaceus was a sister species to Dendrocalamus strictus. Three Dendrocalamus species were closely related to and nested in a polyphyletic Bambusa. Bambusa subaequalis was a sister species to B. multiplex, B. emeiensis to B. chungii, B. contracta to B. hainanensis, and B. flexuosa was a sister species to B. sinospinosa, B. tuldoides, B. surrecta, B. intermedia, and B. valida group, which raised doubts about the monophyly of the subgenera Bambusa (sensu stricto), Dendrocalamopsis, Leleba, and Lingnania under the genus Bambusa.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of Phytophthora sojae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengfei; Han, Yingpeng; Wu, Junjiang; Lv, Huiying; Qiu, Lijuan; Chang, Ruzhen; Jin, Limei; Wang, Jinsheng; Yu, Anliang; Chen, Chen; Nan, Haiyang; Xu, Xiuhong; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Dayong; Zhang, Shuzhen; Li, Wenbin; Chen, Weiyuan

    2007-02-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S rDNA) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) was amplified via the PCR method in seventeen different isolates of Phytophthora sojae using the common primers of the ITS of fungi. Around 800 bp-1,000 bp fragments were obtained based on the DL2000 marker and the sequences of the PCR products were tested. Taking isolate USA as outgroup, the phylogenetic tree was constructed by means of maximum parsimony analysis, and the genetic evolution among isolates was analyzed. The results showed that there is a great difference between the base constitution of ITS1 and ITS2 among various isolates. The seventeen isolates are classified into three groups, and the isolates from the same region belong to the same group, which shows the variation in geography.

  10. Isolation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Thermophile Community Within Tanjung Sakti Hot Spring, South Sumatera, Indonesia

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    Heni Yohandini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A community of thermophiles within Tanjung Sakti Hot Spring (South Sumatera have been cultivated and identified based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence. The hot spring has temperature 80C-91C and pH 7-8. We used a simple method for culturing the microbes, by enriching the spring water with nutrient broth media. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the method could recover microbes, which clustered within four distinct taxonomic groups: Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, Brevibacillus, and Bacillus. These microbes closely related to Anoxybacillus rupiensis, Anoxybacillus flavithermus, Geobacillus pallidus, Brevibacillus thermoruber, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus thermoamylovorans. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence of one isolate only had 96% similarity with Brevibacillus sequence in GenBank.

  11. [Phylogenetic relationships and intraspecific variation of D-genome Aegilops L. as revealed by RAPD analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriunova, S V; Kochieva, E Z; Chikida, N N; Pukhal'skiĭ, V A

    2004-05-01

    RAPD analysis was carried out to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species, which contain the D genome as a component of the alloploid genome, and diploid Aegilops tauschii, which is a putative donor of the D genome for common wheat. In total, 74 accessions of six D-genome Aegilops species were examined. The highest intraspecific variation (0.03-0.21) was observed for Ae. tauschii. Intraspecific distances between accessions ranged 0.007-0.067 in Ae. cylindrica, 0.017-0.047 in Ae. vavilovii, and 0.00-0.053 in Ae. juvenalis. Likewise, Ae. ventricosa and Ae. crassa showed low intraspecific polymorphism. The among-accession difference in alloploid Ae. ventricosa (genome DvNv) was similar to that of one parental species, Ae. uniaristata (N), and substantially lower than in the other parent, Ae. tauschii (D). The among-accession difference in Ae. cylindrica (CcDc) was considerably lower than in either parent, Ae. tauschii (D) or Ae. caudata (C). With the exception of Ae. cylindrica, all D-genome species--Ae. tauschii (D), Ae. ventricosa (DvNv), Ae. crassa (XcrDcrl and XcrDcrlDcr2), Ae. juvenalis (XjDjUj), and Ae. vavilovii (XvaDvaSva)--formed a single polymorphic cluster, which was distinct from clusters of other species. The only exception, Ae. cylindrica, did not group with the other D-genome species, but clustered with Ae. caudata (C), a donor of the C genome. The cluster of these two species was clearly distinct from the cluster of the other D-genome species and close to a cluster of Ae. umbellulata (genome U) and Ae. ovata (genome UgMg). Thus, RAPD analysis for the first time was used to estimate and to compare the interpopulation polymorphism and to establish the phylogenetic relationships of all diploid and alloploid D-genome Aegilops species.

  12. Phylogenetic meta-analysis of the functional traits of clonal plants foraging in changing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiu-Fang; Song, Yao-Bin; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Pan, Xu; Dong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Foraging behavior, one of the adaptive strategies of clonal plants, has stimulated a tremendous amount of research. However, it is a matter of debate whether there is any general pattern in the foraging traits (functional traits related to foraging behavior) of clonal plants in response to diverse environments. We collected data from 97 published papers concerning the relationships between foraging traits (e.g., spacer length, specific spacer length, branch intensity and branch angle) of clonal plants and essential resources (e.g., light, nutrients and water) for plant growth and reproduction. We incorporated the phylogenetic information of 85 plant species to examine the universality of foraging hypotheses using phylogenetic meta-analysis. The trends toward forming longer spacers and fewer branches in shaded environments were detected in clonal plants, but no evidence for a relation between foraging traits and nutrient availability was detected, except that there was a positive correlation between branch intensity and nutrient availability in stoloniferous plants. The response of the foraging traits of clonal plants to water availability was also not obvious. Additionally, our results indicated that the foraging traits of stoloniferous plants were more sensitive to resource availability than those of rhizomatous plants. In consideration of plant phylogeny, these results implied that the foraging traits of clonal plants (notably stoloniferous plants) only responded to light intensity in a general pattern but did not respond to nutrient or water availability. In conclusion, our findings on the effects of the environment on the foraging traits of clonal plants avoided the confounding effects of phylogeny because we incorporated phylogeny into the meta-analysis.

  13. Multilocus molecular and phylogenetic analysis of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Weigl, Stefania; Tarallo, Viviana Domenica; Parisi, Antonio; Traversa, Donato; Otranto, Domenico

    2011-08-01

    This study reports a combined analysis of mitochondrial and ribosomal DNA target regions of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Mediterranean region. A ∼900 bp long fragment of the mitochondrial DNA encompassing regions within cytb and nd1 gene and the complete ITS2 ribosomal region (∼500 bp) were sequenced and characterized for Phlebotomus perniciosus, Phlebotomus perfiliewi, Phlebotomus neglectus, Phlebotomus papatasi, and Sergentomyia minuta, captured in two sites of southern Italy. From one to eight mitochondrial haplotypes and from one to three ITS2 sequence types were found for the examined specimens according to the different sand fly species. The mean interspecific difference in the mitochondrial sequences was of 16.1%, with an overall intraspecific nucleotide variation from 0.1 to 2.8%. A higher interspecific difference (mean 25.1%) was recorded for the ITS2 sequence, with an overall intraspecific nucleotide variation up to 4.9%. The sequence types alignment of ITS2 region showed that all phlebotomine specimens possessed a split 5.8S rRNA, consisting of a mature 5.8S rRNA and a 2S rRNA separated by a short transcribed spacer. Phylogenetic analysis of the Phlebotomus spp. sequences, herein determined and of those available in GenBank™ were concordant in clustering P. neglectus, P. perfiliewi and P. papatasi with the same species collected from different geographic areas of the Mediterranean basin in four main clades for mtDNA and ITS2, respectively. This study demonstrates the utility of multilocus sequencing, provides a dataset for the molecular identification of the most prevalent phlebotomine sand flies in southern Europe and defines the phylogenetic relationships among species examined.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis and comparison between cow and buffalo (including Egyptian buffaloes) mitochondrial displacement-loop regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Hassan A I; El-Hefnawi, Mahmoud M

    2008-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis has been used extensively for phylogenetic analysis studies and systematics. The displacement loop (D-loop) region inside the mtDNA is a non-coding part whose analysis can indicate variations between closely related populations. This paper reports for the first time the characterization and analysis of the complete sequence of the D-loop region from Egyptian buffaloes and analysis in conjunction with previously published Indian and European Bubalus bubalis and Bos sub-tribe sequences. In the entire D-loop of the Egyptian buffaloes, we identified four haplotypes and nine polymorphic sites from the nine sequenced D-loop regions--while in the studied set of buffaloes we identified 28 polymorphic sites in the entire D-loop, and 49 polymorphic sites in the case of cows. Alignment between buffaloes and cows to evaluate the characteristics of the D-loop region showed that the second region of the conserved sequence block (CSB2) is apparently the most variable region in the D-loop between cows and buffaloes, with four insertions in all buffaloes and two substitutions, followed by the second region of the extended termination associated sequence (ETAS2) with a substitution rate of 1/10. The Egyptian buffaloes were shown to be closest to the Italian counterparts, exemplifying the closeness of ethnicity and the history of civilization of that region.

  15. MPI-PHYLIP: parallelizing computationally intensive phylogenetic analysis routines for the analysis of large protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Ropelewski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phylogenetic study of protein sequences provides unique and valuable insights into the molecular and genetic basis of important medical and epidemiological problems as well as insights about the origins and development of physiological features in present day organisms. Consensus phylogenies based on the bootstrap and other resampling methods play a crucial part in analyzing the robustness of the trees produced for these analyses. METHODOLOGY: Our focus was to increase the number of bootstrap replications that can be performed on large protein datasets using the maximum parsimony, distance matrix, and maximum likelihood methods. We have modified the PHYLIP package using MPI to enable large-scale phylogenetic study of protein sequences, using a statistically robust number of bootstrapped datasets, to be performed in a moderate amount of time. This paper discusses the methodology used to parallelize the PHYLIP programs and reports the performance of the parallel PHYLIP programs that are relevant to the study of protein evolution on several protein datasets. CONCLUSIONS: Calculations that currently take a few days on a state of the art desktop workstation are reduced to calculations that can be performed over lunchtime on a modern parallel computer. Of the three protein methods tested, the maximum likelihood method scales the best, followed by the distance method, and then the maximum parsimony method. However, the maximum likelihood method requires significant memory resources, which limits its application to more moderately sized protein datasets.

  16. Faunistic review of the cuckoo wasps of Fennoscandia, Denmark and the Baltic countries (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukkunen, Juho; Rosa, Paolo; Soon, Villu; Johansson, Niklas; Ødegaard, Frode

    2014-09-19

    A critical and annotated review of published records of the Chrysididae of the Nordic and Baltic countries and the Russian part of Fennoscandia is presented with some taxonomic and faunistic notes. A total of 73 species are listed from the region. Additionally, 17 species are deleted. Three species are recorded for the first time from Denmark, six species from Estonia, one from Finland, eleven from Latvia, four from Norway, one from Sweden and 15 from Russian Fennoscandia. Elampus foveatus and Chrysis pulcherrima are reported for the first time from the Nordic and Baltic countries. Lectotypes are designated for Hedychrum cupreum Dahlbom, 1845, Chrysis zetterstedti Dahlbom, 1845, Chrysis succincta var. chrysoprasina Trautmann, 1927, Chrysis succincta var. virideocincta Trautmann, 1927 and Chrysis succincta var. nordstromi Trautmann, 1927. Information and images of the holotypes of Hedychrum metallicum Dahlbom, 1854, Chrysis var. westerlundi Trautmann, 1927 are given. Chrysis integra Dahlbom, 1829 is found to be a new synonym of Hedychridium ardens (Coquebert, 1801) and Chrysis scintillans Valkeila, 1971 a new synonym of Chrysis solida Haupt, 1957. Chrysis terminata Dahlbom, 1854 is reported for the first time as the valid name for C. ignita Form A sensu Linsenmaier, 1959.

  17. An improved model for whole genome phylogenetic analysis by Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changchuan; Yau, Stephen S-T

    2015-10-07

    and demonstrates that the improved DFT dissimilarity measure is an efficient and effective similarity measure of DNA sequences. Due to its high efficiency and accuracy, the proposed DFT similarity measure is successfully applied on phylogenetic analysis for individual genes and large whole bacterial genomes.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of local-scale tree soil associations in a lowland moist tropical forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Schreeg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Local plant-soil associations are commonly studied at the species-level, while associations at the level of nodes within a phylogeny have been less well explored. Understanding associations within a phylogenetic context, however, can improve our ability to make predictions across systems and can advance our understanding of the role of evolutionary history in structuring communities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we quantified evolutionary signal in plant-soil associations using a DNA sequence-based community phylogeny and several soil variables (e.g., extractable phosphorus, aluminum and manganese, pH, and slope as a proxy for soil water. We used published plant distributional data from the 50-ha plot on Barro Colorado Island (BCI, Republic of Panamá. Our results suggest some groups of closely related species do share similar soil associations. Most notably, the node shared by Myrtaceae and Vochysiaceae was associated with high levels of aluminum, a potentially toxic element. The node shared by Apocynaceae was associated with high extractable phosphorus, a nutrient that could be limiting on a taxon specific level. The node shared by the large group of Laurales and Magnoliales was associated with both low extractable phosphorus and with steeper slope. Despite significant node-specific associations, this study detected little to no phylogeny-wide signal. We consider the majority of the 'traits' (i.e., soil variables evaluated to fall within the category of ecological traits. We suggest that, given this category of traits, phylogeny-wide signal might not be expected while node-specific signals can still indicate phylogenetic structure with respect to the variable of interest. CONCLUSIONS: Within the BCI forest dynamics plot, distributions of some plant taxa are associated with local-scale differences in soil variables when evaluated at individual nodes within the phylogenetic tree, but they are not detectable by phylogeny

  19. Phylogenetics and Srf Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA COII Gene in Anopheles Species (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Sharma

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA COII gene was used to study the interspecific variation and molecular analysis among six species of genus Anopheles belonging to subgenus Cellia i.e. An. stephensi, An. culicifacies, An. maculatus, An. subpictus, An. annularis and An. splendidus. The sequence was found to be AT rich with maximum of 75.07% in An. culicifacies. The sequence analysis revealed the number of transversions to be more than transitions which is opposite of the general contention with transitions being more frequent than transversions in mitochondrial genes. However, among the Anopheles species, the maximum number of substitutions was found in An. maculatus. The phylogenetic analysis using the three methods MP, ML and NJ methods was also carried out for which Cx. quinquefasciatus was taken as outgroup. Analysis showed that An. stephensi and An. culicifacies shared a close genetic homology while An. annularis and An. splendidus made another group with identical genetic qualities. To the contrary, An. subpictus and An. maculatus had hypervariable non-homologous genomic qualities. Short tandem as well as nontandem repeats were also studied using SRF (Spectral Repeat Finder programme. The repeats were conserved in all the species except certain polymorphic repeats such as TAT and TTTAT were present in An. stephensi whereas no polymorphic repeats were present in An. subpictus. Identification of repeats is crucial to shed light on the function and structure of proteins, and explain their evolutionary past.

  20. Ground Truth Collection for Mining Explosions in Northern Fennoscandia and Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D; Ringdal, F; Kremenetskaya, E; Mykkeltveit, S; Rock, D E; Schweitzer, J; Hauk, T; Lewis, J

    2004-07-15

    Analysis of data from our deployments and ground truth collection in northern Fennoscandia and northwestern Russia shows systematic variations in the P/S ratios of different types of explosions. The fact that this fundamental discriminant varies with firing practice is not in itself surprising - such variations probably contribute to the spread in P/S ratios normally observed for ripple-fired explosions. However, the nature of the variations is sometimes counterintuitive. Last year [Harris, 2003] we found that the P/S ratios of small compact underground explosions in mines of the Khibiny Massif are systematically lower than the P/S ratios of large ripple-fired surface explosions. We had anticipated that smaller underground shots would be more like single well-coupled explosions, thus having higher P/S ratios than large ripple-fired explosions. We now are performing a more extensive analysis of the data including compact and large ripple-fired explosions at additional mines and different types of explosions: small surface shots and large ripple-fired underground explosions. Our data are more complete as a result of an additional year of collection and allow a more complete sampling of the signals in range from the source. As of this writing we have measured Pn/Lg ratios on a larger number of explosions of three types: compact underground explosions, surface ripple-fired explosions and now underground ripple-fired explosions. We find that both types of underground explosions have systematically lower P/S ratios than surface ripple-fired shots; this effect is most pronounced in the 4-8 Hz frequency band. This result appears to be due to relatively diminished shear wave excitation by the surface explosions. We speculate that the relatively large shear phases in underground explosions may be caused by large amounts of rockfall in these events, which are designed to collapse the ceilings of tunnels. We have continued comprehensive ground truth collection at the Khibiny

  1. [Phylogenetic and Bioinformatics Analysis of Replicase Gene Sequence of Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chaoqiong; Meng, Yan; Luo, Laixin; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Jianqiang

    2015-11-01

    kD proteins of tested CGMMV isolates. The current results that there was no significant difference between the replicase gene sequences, it was stable and conservative for intra-species and clearly difference for inter-species. CGMMV-No. 1, CGMMV-No. 3, CGMMV-No. 4 and CGMMV-No. 5 had. a close genetic relationship with Shandong and Liangning isolates (Accession No. KJ754195 and EF611826), they are potentially originate from the same source. CGMMV-No. 2 was closer with Korea isolate. High sequence similarity of tested samples were gathered for a class in phylogenetic tree. It didn't show regularity of the bioinformatics analysis results of 129 kD and 57 kD proteins of tested CGMMV isolates. There was no corresponding relationship among the molecular phylogeny and the bioinformatics analysis of the tested CGMMV isolates.

  2. Analysis of phylogenetic signal in protostomial intron patterns using Mutual Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Natascha; Leow, Alexander; Bleidorn, Christoph; Groth, Detlef; Tiedemann, Ralph; Selbig, Joachim; Hartmann, Stefanie

    2013-06-01

    Many deep evolutionary divergences still remain unresolved, such as those among major taxa of the Lophotrochozoa. As alternative phylogenetic markers, the intron-exon structure of eukaryotic genomes and the patterns of absence and presence of spliceosomal introns appear to be promising. However, given the potential homoplasy of intron presence, the phylogenetic analysis of this data using standard evolutionary approaches has remained a challenge. Here, we used Mutual Information (MI) to estimate the phylogeny of Protostomia using gene structure data, and we compared these results with those obtained with Dollo Parsimony. Using full genome sequences from nine Metazoa, we identified 447 groups of orthologous sequences with 21,732 introns in 4,870 unique intron positions. We determined the shared absence and presence of introns in the corresponding sequence alignments and have made this data available in "IntronBase", a web-accessible and downloadable SQLite database. Our results obtained using Dollo Parsimony are obviously misled through systematic errors that arise from multiple intron loss events, but extensive filtering of data improved the quality of the estimated phylogenies. Mutual Information, in contrast, performs better with larger datasets, but at the same time it requires a complete data set, which is difficult to obtain for orthologs from a large number of taxa. Nevertheless, Mutual Information-based distances proved to be useful in analyzing this kind of data, also because the estimation of MI-based distances is independent of evolutionary models and therefore no pre-definitions of ancestral and derived character states are necessary.

  3. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Middle East 2009 H1N1 pdm isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ghaleb Adwan

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To study hemagglutinin genetic evolution of some Middle East(ME) 2009 H1N1 pdm isolates and compared them with prototype vaccine strain [A/California/07/2009 (H1N1)], which is used as a vaccine strain in the Northern Hemisphere2010-2011.Methods: Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences ofHA gene of fifty-fourME 2009 H1N1 pdm isolates were retrieved from GenBank Database by using BasicBLAST engine. Phylogenetic trees were established for both nucleotide and amino acid sequences using the muscle algorithm of the computer programCLC free workbench 5.6.1 JREsoftware. Amino acids alignment was also done to compare sequences HA1 domains of HA genes of ME 2009 H1N1 pdm isolates (n=39) with amino acid sequence of prototype vaccine strain A/California/07/2009 (H1N1).Results: Phylogenetic analysis of amino acids and nucleotides of theHA gene of theME 2009 H1N1 pdm isolates confirmed their evolutionary position in cluster with prototype vaccine strain (A/California/07/2009 (H1N1)) which is used as vaccine strain in the Northern Hemisphere2010-2011. Antigenically, theME 2009 H1N1pdm isolates were homogeneous and closely related to prototype vaccine. Only a few amino acid substitutions in the HA among the ME2009 H1N1 pdm isolates were analyzed.Conclusions:The current influenza vaccine is expected to provide a good protection againstME 2009 H1N1 pdm because it contains strains withH1 HA [A/California/07/2009 (H1N1)]-like strain.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a high prevalence of Sporothrix brasiliensis in feline sporotrichosis outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Messias Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Sporothrix schenckii, previously assumed to be the sole agent of human and animal sporotrichosis, is in fact a species complex. Recently recognized taxa include S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. mexicana, and S. luriei, in addition to S. schenckii sensu stricto. Over the last decades, large epidemics of sporotrichosis occurred in Brazil due to zoonotic transmission, and cats were pointed out as key susceptible hosts. In order to understand the eco-epidemiology of feline sporotrichosis and its role in human sporotrichosis a survey was conducted among symptomatic cats. Prevalence and phylogenetic relationships among feline Sporothrix species were investigated by reconstructing their phylogenetic origin using the calmodulin (CAL and the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1α loci in strains originated from Rio de Janeiro (RJ, n = 15, Rio Grande do Sul (RS, n = 10, Paraná (PR, n = 4, São Paulo (SP, n =3 and Minas Gerais (MG, n = 1. Our results showed that S. brasiliensis is highly prevalent among cats (96.9% with sporotrichosis, while S. schenckii was identified only once. The genotype of Sporothrix from cats was found identical to S. brasiliensis from human sources confirming that the disease is transmitted by cats. Sporothrix brasiliensis presented low genetic diversity compared to its sister taxon S. schenckii. No evidence of recombination in S. brasiliensis was found by split decomposition or PHI-test analysis, suggesting that S. brasiliensis is a clonal species. Strains recovered in states SP, MG and PR share the genotype of the RJ outbreak, different from the RS clone. The occurrence of separate genotypes among strains indicated that the Brazilian S. brasiliensis epidemic has at least two distinct sources. We suggest that cats represent a major host and the main source of cat and human S. brasiliensis infections in Brazil.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a high prevalence of Sporothrix brasiliensis in feline sporotrichosis outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Melo Teixeira, Marcus; de Hoog, G Sybren; Schubach, Tânia Maria Pacheco; Pereira, Sandro Antonio; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; Bezerra, Leila Maria Lopes; Felipe, Maria Sueli; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2013-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii, previously assumed to be the sole agent of human and animal sporotrichosis, is in fact a species complex. Recently recognized taxa include S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. mexicana, and S. luriei, in addition to S. schenckii sensu stricto. Over the last decades, large epidemics of sporotrichosis occurred in Brazil due to zoonotic transmission, and cats were pointed out as key susceptible hosts. In order to understand the eco-epidemiology of feline sporotrichosis and its role in human sporotrichosis a survey was conducted among symptomatic cats. Prevalence and phylogenetic relationships among feline Sporothrix species were investigated by reconstructing their phylogenetic origin using the calmodulin (CAL) and the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1α) loci in strains originated from Rio de Janeiro (RJ, n = 15), Rio Grande do Sul (RS, n = 10), Paraná (PR, n = 4), São Paulo (SP, n =3) and Minas Gerais (MG, n = 1). Our results showed that S. brasiliensis is highly prevalent among cats (96.9%) with sporotrichosis, while S. schenckii was identified only once. The genotype of Sporothrix from cats was found identical to S. brasiliensis from human sources confirming that the disease is transmitted by cats. Sporothrix brasiliensis presented low genetic diversity compared to its sister taxon S. schenckii. No evidence of recombination in S. brasiliensis was found by split decomposition or PHI-test analysis, suggesting that S. brasiliensis is a clonal species. Strains recovered in states SP, MG and PR share the genotype of the RJ outbreak, different from the RS clone. The occurrence of separate genotypes among strains indicated that the Brazilian S. brasiliensis epidemic has at least two distinct sources. We suggest that cats represent a major host and the main source of cat and human S. brasiliensis infections in Brazil.

  6. Clinical features and phylogenetic analysis of Coxsackievirus A9 in Northern Taiwan in 2011

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    Huang Yi-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxsackievirus A9 (CA9 was one of the most prevalent serotype of enteroviral infections in Taiwan in 2011. After several patient series were reported in the 1960s and 1970s, few studies have focused on the clinical manifestations of CA9 infections. Our study explores and deepens the current understanding of CA9. Methods We analyzed the clinical presentations of 100 culture-proven CA9-infected patients in 2011 by reviewing their medical records and depicted the CA9 phylogenetic tree. Results Of the 100 patients with culture-proven CA9 infections, the mean (SD age was 4.6 (3.4 years and the male to female ratio was 1.9. For clinical manifestations, 96 patients (96% had fever and the mean (SD duration of fever was 5.9 (3.4 days. Sixty one patients (61% developed a skin rash, and the predominant pattern was a generalized non-itchy maculopapular rash without vesicular changes. While most patients showed injected throat, oral ulcers were found in only 19 cases (19%, among whom, 6 were diagnosed as herpangina. Complicated cases included: aseptic meningitis (n=8, bronchopneumonia (n=6, acute cerebellitis (n=1, and polio-like syndrome (n=1. Phylogenetic analysis for current CA9 strains is closest to the CA9 isolate 27-YN-2008 from the border area of mainland China and Myanmar. Conclusions The most common feature of CA9 during the 2011 epidemic in Taiwan is generalized febrile exanthema rather than herpangina or hand, foot, and mouth disease. Given that prolonged fever and some complications are possible, caution should be advised in assessing patients as well as in predicting the clinical course.

  7. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of peste des petits ruminants virus isolated from outbreaks in Punjab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, M; Zohari, S; Saeed, A; Khan, Q M; Abubakar, M; LeBlanc, N; Berg, M

    2012-02-01

    Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) is an important viral disease of small ruminants and is endemic in Pakistan. In the following study, samples from two outbreaks of PPR in goats have been subjected to laboratory investigations. The Peste des Petits Ruminants virus (PPRV) genome was detected using both conventional and real-time PCR. Genetic characterization of the local PPRV field isolates was conducted by sequencing 322 bp of the fusion (F) gene and 255 bp of the nucleoprotein (N) gene. The phylogenetic tree based on the F gene clustered samples from both outbreaks into lineage 4 along with other Asian isolates, specifically into subcluster 1 along with isolates from Middle East. Analysis of N gene revealed a different pattern. In this case, the Pakistani samples clustered with Chinese, Tajikistani and Iranian isolates, which probably represents the true geographical pattern of virus circulation. This is the first report presenting the phylogenetic tree based on N gene as well as performing a parallel comparison of the trees of F and N gene together from Pakistani isolates. The results of this study shed light on the PPRV population in Pakistan and emphasize the importance of using molecular methods to understand the epidemiology. Such understanding is essential in any efforts to control the number and impact of outbreaks that are occurring in endemic countries such as Pakistan, especially in the current scenario where OIE and FAO are eager to control and subsequently eradicate PPR from the globe, as has been achieved for Rinderpest. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Monascus and new species from honey, pollen and nests of stingless bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, R N; Leong, S L; Vinnere-Pettersson, O; Chen, A J; Souza-Motta, C M; Frisvad, J C; Samson, R A; Oliveira, N T; Houbraken, J

    2017-03-01

    The genus Monascus was described by van Tieghem (1884) to accommodate M. ruber and M. mucoroides, two species with non-ostiolate ascomata. Species delimitation in the genus is still mainly based on phenotypic characters, and taxonomic studies that include sequence data are limited. The genus is of economic importance. Species are used in fermented Asian foods as food colourants (e.g. 'red rice' (ang-kak, angka)) and found as spoilage organisms, and recently Monascus was found to be essential in the lifecycle of stingless bees. In this study, a polyphasic approach was applied combining morphological characters, ITS, LSU, β-tubulin, calmodulin and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit sequences and extrolite data, to delimit species and to study phylogenetic relationships in Monascus. Furthermore, 30 Monascus isolates from honey, pollen and nests of stingless bees in Brazil were included. Based on this polyphasic approach, the genus Monascus is resolved in nine species, including three new species associated with stingless bees (M. flavipigmentosus sp. nov., M. mellicola sp. nov., M. recifensis sp. nov., M. argentinensis, M. floridanus, M. lunisporas, M. pallens, M. purpureus, M. ruber), and split in two new sections (section Floridani sect. nov., section Rubri sect. nov.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the xerophile Monascus eremophilus does not belong in Monascus and monophyly in Monascus is restored with the transfer of M. eremophilus to Penicillium (P. eremophilum comb. nov.). A list of accepted and excluded Monascus and Basipetospora species is given, together with information on (ex-)types cultures and barcode sequence data.

  9. Assumption 0 analysis: comparative phylogenetic studies in the age of complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks, D.R.; Veller, van M.G.P.

    2008-01-01

    Darwin's panoramic view of biology encompassed two metaphors: the phylogenetic tree, pointing to relatively linear (and divergent) complexity, and the tangled bank, pointing to reticulated (and convergent) complexity. The emergence of phylogenetic systematics half a century ago made it possible to i

  10. Whole genome sequencing as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of clinical strains of Mitis group streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusen, L. H.; Dargis, R.; Iversen, Katrine Højholt

    2016-01-01

    with infective endocarditis were whole genome sequenced. We compared the phylogenetic analyses based on single genes (recA, sodA, gdh), multigene (MLSA), SNPs, and core-genome sequences. The six phylogenetic analyses generally showed a similar pattern of six monophyletic clusters, though a few differences were...

  11. A ground-validated NDVI dataset for monitoring vegetation dynamics and mapping phenology in Fennoscandia and the Kola peninsula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, P.S.A.; Jonsson, P.; Hogda, K.A.; Karlsen, S.R.; Skidmore, A.K.; Eklundh, L.

    2007-01-01

    An NDVI dataset covering Fennoscandia and the Kola peninsula was created for vegetation and climate studies, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer 16-day maximum value composite data from 2000 to 2005. To create the dataset, (1) the influence of the polar night and snow on the NDVI

  12. Bio++: a set of C++ libraries for sequence analysis, phylogenetics, molecular evolution and population genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galtier Nicolas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of bioinformatics applications in the fields of bio-sequence analysis, molecular evolution and population genetics typically share input/ouput methods, data storage requirements and data analysis algorithms. Such common features may be conveniently bundled into re-usable libraries, which enable the rapid development of new methods and robust applications. Results We present Bio++, a set of Object Oriented libraries written in C++. Available components include classes for data storage and handling (nucleotide/amino-acid/codon sequences, trees, distance matrices, population genetics datasets, various input/output formats, basic sequence manipulation (concatenation, transcription, translation, etc., phylogenetic analysis (maximum parsimony, markov models, distance methods, likelihood computation and maximization, population genetics/genomics (diversity statistics, neutrality tests, various multi-locus analyses and various algorithms for numerical calculus. Conclusion Implementation of methods aims at being both efficient and user-friendly. A special concern was given to the library design to enable easy extension and new methods development. We defined a general hierarchy of classes that allow the developer to implement its own algorithms while remaining compatible with the rest of the libraries. Bio++ source code is distributed free of charge under the CeCILL general public licence from its website http://kimura.univ-montp2.fr/BioPP.

  13. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of Laccases from Trichoderma: A Bioinformatic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cázares-García, Saila Viridiana; Vázquez-Garcidueñas, Ma. Soledad; Vázquez-Marrufo, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The genus Trichoderma includes species of great biotechnological value, both for their mycoparasitic activities and for their ability to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Although activity of extracellular laccase has previously been reported in Trichoderma spp., the possible number of isoenzymes is still unknown, as are the structural and functional characteristics of both the genes and the putative proteins. In this study, the system of laccases sensu stricto in the Trichoderma species, the genomes of which are publicly available, were analyzed using bioinformatic tools. The intron/exon structure of the genes and the identification of specific motifs in the sequence of amino acids of the proteins generated in silico allow for clear differentiation between extracellular and intracellular enzymes. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the common ancestor of the genus possessed a functional gene for each one of these enzymes, which is a characteristic preserved in T. atroviride and T. virens. This analysis also reveals that T. harzianum and T. reesei only retained the intracellular activity, whereas T. asperellum added an extracellular isoenzyme acquired through horizontal gene transfer during the mycoparasitic process. The evolutionary analysis shows that in general, extracellular laccases are subjected to purifying selection, and intracellular laccases show neutral evolution. The data provided by the present study will enable the generation of experimental approximations to better understand the physiological role of laccases in the genus Trichoderma and to increase their biotechnological potential. PMID:23383142

  14. Prevalence and phylogenetic analysis of Fig mosaic virus and Fig badnavirus-1 in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimoradian Mohammadreza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fig mosaic virus (FMV and Fig badnavirus-1 (FBV-1 are two of the most important fig infecting viruses. The incidence and distribution of FBV-1 and FMV were determined by testing in PCR 138 asymptomatic and symptomatic samples. These samples were collected from 60 fig gardens and agricultural fields in three provinces of Iran. The fig infecting viruses FBV-1 and FMV, respectively, were detected in 92 (66.6% and 34 (24.6% samples collected from all the surveyed fields. Overall, 24 out of 138 (17.3% samples showed mixed infections. The sequence analysis of a genomic fragment of 922 nt, comprising the entire ORF-2 and part of the 5’ termini of the ORF-3 of 10 selected FBV-1 Iranian isolates from different provinces, and of the type member from GenBank (Acc. No: JF411989, showed a variation ranging from 1 to 3% at nucleotide level and 1% at the amino acid level. The phylogenetic analysis grouped the FBV-1 isolates into two groups, with the Iranian isolates clustered in two distinct subgroups of group I, according to their geographical origin. In our research, the prevalence and sequence analysis of FBV-1 as the only identified DNA virus infecting fig trees, was studied for the first time in Iran.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of avian poxviruses among free-ranging birds of Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cary J; Feldman, Sanford H; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2005-12-01

    Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify a portion of the avian poxvirus core 4b gene of infected free-ranging birds that presented at the Wildlife Center of Virginia during the 2003 and early 2004 years. The species of bird infected were a great blue heron (Ardea herodias), two American crows (Corvus brachyrhyncos), two American robins (Turdus migratorius), two mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), a blue-gray gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea), a northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), a house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), and a northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis). Phylogenetic analysis was performed using the consensus sequences determined for each avian case in Virginia in combination with avian poxvirus core 4b gene sequence from isolates previously described in Europe and that of vaccinia virus. Alignment of DNA sequences identified areas of point mutations and, in the case of a single mourning dove, the incorporation of a triplet of nucleotides. Maximum-likelihood analysis grouped the 2003-2004 Virginia avian poxviruses into a clade distinct from those reported in European free-ranging birds, with the exception of a single case in a mourning dove that clustered within one European clade. The cladogram that resulted from our analysis of the European isolates is in agreement with those previously published. This study identified a distinct clade of avian poxvirus unique from four clades previously described and associated with epornitics in free-ranging birds, where the core 4b gene DNA sequence has been the basis of comparison.

  16. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of a novel starch synthase in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanmei eLiu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Starch is an important reserve of carbon and energy in plants, providing the majority of calories in the human diet and animal feed. Its synthesis is orchestrated by several key enzymes, and the amount and structure of starch, affecting crop yield and quality, are determined mainly by starch synthase (SS activity. To date, five SS isoforms, including SSI-IV and Granule Bound Starch Synthase (GBSS have been identified and their physiological functions have been well characterized. Here, we report the identification of a new SS isoform in maize, designated SSV. By searching sequenced genomes, SSV has been found in all green plants with conserved sequences and gene structures. Our phylogenetic analysis based on 780 base pairs has suggested that SSIV and SSV resulted from a gene duplication event, which may have occurred before the algae formation. An expression profile analysis of SSV in maize has indicated that ZmSSV is mainly transcribed in the kernel and ear leaf during the grain filling stage, which is partly similar to other SS isoforms. Therefore, it is likely that SSV may play an important role in starch biosynthesis. Subsequent analysis of SSV function may facilitate understanding the mechanism of starch granules formation, number and structure.

  17. Phylogenetic Analysis of Stenotrophomonas spp. Isolates Contributes to the Identification of Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Godoy Cerezer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas ssp. has a wide environmental distribution and is also found as an opportunistic pathogen, causing nosocomial or community-acquired infections. One species, S. maltophilia, presents multidrug resistance and has been associated with serious infections in pediatric and immunocompromised patients. Therefore, it is relevant to conduct resistance profile and phylogenetic studies in clinical isolates for identifying infection origins and isolates with augmented pathogenic potential. Here, multilocus sequence typing was performed for phylogenetic analysis of nosocomial isolates of Stenotrophomonas spp. and, environmental and clinical strains of S. maltophilia. Biochemical and multidrug resistance profiles of nosocomial and clinical strains were determined. The inferred phylogenetic profile showed high clonal variability, what correlates with the adaptability process of Stenotrophomonas to different habitats. Two clinical isolates subgroups of S. maltophilia sharing high phylogenetic homogeneity presented intergroup recombination, thus indicating the high permittivity to horizontal gene transfer, a mechanism involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance and expression of virulence factors. For most of the clinical strains, phylogenetic inference was made using only partial ppsA gene sequence. Therefore, the sequencing of just one specific fragment of this gene would allow, in many cases, determining whether the infection with S. maltophilia was nosocomial or community-acquired.

  18. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of the hybrid Epinephelus moara♀ × Epinephelus lanceolatus♂, and phylogenetic analysis in subfamily epinephelinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fengtao; Wei, Min; Zhu, Ying; Guo, Hua; Chen, Songlin; Yang, Guanpin

    2017-06-01

    This study presents the complete mitochondrial genome of the hybrid Epinephelus moara♀× Epinephelus lanceolatus♂. The genome is 16886 bp in length, and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, a light-strand replication origin and a control region. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of 13 conserved protein-coding genes using the maximum likelihood method indicated that the mitochondrial genome is maternally inherited. This study presents genomic data for studying phylogenetic relationships and breeding of hybrid Epinephelinae.

  19. Spatial and phylogenetic analysis of the vesicular stomatitis virus epidemic in the southwestern United States in 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    The southwestern United States has been incidentally affected by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) epidemics during the last 100 years. By the time this manuscript was written, the last episodes were reported in 2004-2006. Results of space clustering and phylogenetic analysis techniques used here sug...

  20. The combination of phylogenetic analysis with epidemiological and serological data to track HIV-1 transmission in a sexual transmission case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the linkage of HIV transmission from a man to a woman through unprotected sexual contact without disclosing his HIV-positive status.Combined with epidemiological information and serological tests, phylogenetic analysis was used to test the a priori hypothesis of HIV transmission from the man to the woman. Control subjects, infected with HIV through heterosexual intercourse, from the same location were also sampled. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the consensus gag, pol and env sequences obtained from blood samples of the man, the woman and the local control subjects. The env quasispecies of the man, the woman, and two controls were also obtained using single genome amplification and sequencing (SGA/S to explore the paraphyletic relationship by phylogenetic analysis.Epidemiological information and serological tests indicated that the man was infected with HIV-1 earlier than the woman. Phylogenetic analyses of the consensus sequences showed a monophyletic cluster for the man and woman in all three genomic regions. Furthermore, gag sequences of the man and woman shared a unique recombination pattern from subtype B and C, which was different from those of CRF07_BC or CRF08_BC observed in the local samples. These indicated that the viral sequences from the two subjects display a high level of similarity. Further, viral quasispecies from the man exhibited a paraphyletic relationship with those from the woman in the Bayesian and maximum-likelihood (ML phylogenetic trees of the env region, which supported the transmission direction from the man to the woman.In the context of epidemiological and serological evidence, the results of phylogenetic analyses support the transmission from the man to the woman.

  1. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of Bartonella species from wild carnivores of the suborder Caniformia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shingo; Kabeya, Hidenori; Miura, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Kazuo; Bai, Ying; Kosoy, Michael; Sentsui, Hiroshi; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Soichi

    2012-12-28

    The prevalence of Bartonella species was investigated among wild carnivores of the suborder Caniformia, including 15 Japanese badgers (Meles anakuma), 8 Japanese martens (Martes melampus), 2 Japanese weasels (Mustela itatsi), 1 Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica), 171 raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides), and 977 raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Japan. Bartonella bacteria were isolated from one Japanese badger (6.7%) and from one Japanese marten (12.5%); however, no Bartonella species was found in other representatives of Caniformia. Phylogenetic analysis was based on concatenated sequences of six housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, ftsZ, gltA, groEL, ribC, and rpoB) and sequence of the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region. The sequence analysis indicated that the isolate derived from the Japanese badger (strain JB-15) can represent a novel Bartonella species and the isolate from the Japanese marten (strain JM-1) was closely related to Bartonella washoensis. This is the first report on isolation of Bartonella from badger and marten.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene of canine parvovirus and comparison with Indian and world isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, G; Chandra, M; Dwivedi, P N

    2016-03-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) causes hemorrhagic enteritis, especially in young dogs, leading to high morbidity and mortality. It has four main antigenic types CPV-2, CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. Virus protein 2 (VP2) is the main capsid protein and mutations affecting VP2 gene are responsible for the evolution of various antigenic types of CPV. Full length VP2 gene from field isolates was amplified and cloned for sequence analysis. The sequences were submitted to the GenBank and were assigned Acc. Nos., viz. KP406928.1 for P12, KP406927.1 for P15, KP406930.1 for P32, KP406926.1 for Megavac-6 and KP406929.1 for NobivacDHPPi. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the samples were forming a separate clad with vaccine strains. When the samples were compared with the world and Indian isolates, it was observed that samples formed a separate node indicating regional genetic variation in CPV.

  3. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the gp200 protein of Ehrlichia canis from dogs in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chia-Chia; Hsieh, Yu-Chen; Tsang, Chau-Loong; Chung, Yang-Tsung

    2010-12-01

    Ehrlichia (E.) canis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Currently, the genetic diversity of E. canis strains worldwide is poorly defined. In the present study, sequence analysis of the nearly full-length 16S rDNA (1,620 bp) and the complete coding region (4,269 bp) of the gp200 gene, which encodes the largest major immunoreactive protein in E. canis, from 17 Taiwanese samples was conducted. The resultant 16S rDNA sequences were found to be identical to each other and have very high homology (99.4~100%) with previously reported E. canis sequences. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis of gp200 demonstrated that the E. canis Taiwanese genotype was genetically distinct from other reported isolates obtained from the United States, Brazil, and Israel, and that it formed a separate clade. Remarkable variations unique to the Taiwanese genotype were found throughout the deduced amino acid sequence of gp200, including 15 substitutions occurring in two of five known species-specific epitopes. The gp200 amino acid sequences of the Taiwanese genotype bore 94.4~94.6 identities with those of the isolates from the United States and Brazil, and 93.7% homology with that of the Israeli isolate. Taken together, these results suggest that the Taiwanese genotype represents a novel strain of E. canis that has not yet been characterized.

  4. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome of a porcine sapovirus from Chinese swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shixing; Zhang, Wen; Shen, Quan; Huang, Fen; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Jianguo; Cui, Li; Yang, Zhibiao; Hua, Xiuguo

    2009-12-06

    Porcine sapovirus was first identified in the United States in 1980, hitherto, several Asian countries have detected this virus. In 2008, the first outbreak of gastroenteritis in piglets caused by porcine sapovirus in China was reported. The complete genome of the identified SaV strain Ch-sw-sav1 was sequenced and analyzed to provide gene profile for this outbreak. The whole genome of Ch-sw-sav1 was amplified by RT-PCR and was sequenced. Sequence alignment of the complete genome or RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene was done. 3' end of ORF2 with 21-nt nucleotide insertion was further analyzed using software. Sequence analysis indicated that the genome of Ch-sw-sav1 was 7541 nucleotide long with two ORFs, excluding the 17 nucleotides ploy (A) at the 3' end. Phylogenetic analysis based on part of RdRp gene of this strain showed that it was classified into subgroup GIII. Sequence alignment indicated that there was an inserted 21-nt long nucleotide sequence at the 3' end of ORF2. The insertion showed high antigenicity index comparing to other regions in ORF2. Ch-sw-sav1 shared similar genetic profile with an American PEC strain except the 21-nt nucleotide at the 3' end of ORF2. The insert sequence shared high identity with part gene of Sus scrofa clone RP44-484M10.

  5. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome of a porcine sapovirus from Chinese swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Li

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine sapovirus was first identified in the United States in 1980, hitherto, several Asian countries have detected this virus. In 2008, the first outbreak of gastroenteritis in piglets caused by porcine sapovirus in China was reported. The complete genome of the identified SaV strain Ch-sw-sav1 was sequenced and analyzed to provide gene profile for this outbreak. Methods The whole genome of Ch-sw-sav1 was amplified by RT-PCR and was sequenced. Sequence alignment of the complete genome or RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp gene was done. 3' end of ORF2 with 21-nt nucleotide insertion was further analyzed using software. Results Sequence analysis indicated that the genome of Ch-sw-sav1 was 7541 nucleotide long with two ORFs, excluding the 17 nucleotides ploy (A at the 3' end. Phylogenetic analysis based on part of RdRp gene of this strain showed that it was classified into subgroup GIII. Sequence alignment indicated that there was an inserted 21-nt long nucleotide sequence at the 3' end of ORF2. The insertion showed high antigenicity index comparing to other regions in ORF2. Conclusion Ch-sw-sav1 shared similar genetic profile with an American PEC strain except the 21-nt nucleotide at the 3' end of ORF2. The insert sequence shared high identity with part gene of Sus scrofa clone RP44-484M10.

  6. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of three feline calicivirus strains from domestic cats in Jilin Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Ying, Ying; Wang, Kai; Dong, Hongwei; Gao, Chao; Yang, Songtao; Hu, Guixue

    2017-05-06

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a highly prevalent pathogen that can cause infectious felid upper respiratory tract disease. The majority of complete genome sequences of FCV strains reported to date are from the USA. In this study, three FCV strains, CH-JL1, CH-JL2 and CH-JL3, were isolated from domestic cats in Jilin Province, China. Sequence analysis revealed that except for strains HRB-SS, WZ-1, XH, 12Q087-1 and 12Q087-5, the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of CH-JL2 and CH-JL3 are more than 20 nucleotides longer than those of all other reference isolates. The complete sequences of the three CH-JLs were compared with other reference strains, with nucleotide sequence identity values in the range of 76.2%-82.2%, 76.8%-96.4 and 76.8%-96.4%. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CH-JL1 forms a branch with FB-NJ-13, GD, 12Q087-1 and 12Q087-5. CH-JL2 was found to be most closely related to CH-JL3, forming another branch together with the other isolates. CH-JL1 shares a long nucleotide span with CH-JL2 and CH-JL3. It can be inferred that many FCV strains are co-circulating in Jilin Province. The availability of complete genome sequences will serve as a reference for future epidemiological studies of FCV.

  7. Group B strains of human respiratory syncytial virus in Saudi Arabia: molecular and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajhdi, Fahad N; Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M

    2014-04-01

    The genetic variability and circulation pattern of human respiratory syncytial virus group B (HRSV-B) strains, identified in Riyadh during the winters of 2008 and 2009, were evaluated by partial sequencing of the attachment (G) protein gene. The second hypervariable region (HVR-2) of G gene was amplified by RT-PCR, sequenced and compared to representatives of different HRSV-B genotypes. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Saudi strains belonged to the genotype BA, which is characterized by 60-nucleotide duplication at HVR-2. Only strains of 2008 were clustered with subgroup BA-IV, while those isolated at 2009 were clustered among the most recent subgroups (particularly BA-X and CB-B). Amino acid sequence analysis demonstrated 18 amino acid substitutions in Saudi HRSV-B strains; among which five are specific for individual strains. Furthermore, two potential N-glycosylation sites at residues 230 and 296 were identified for all Saudi strains, and an additional site at amino acid 273 was found only in Riyadh 28/2008 strain. O-glycosylation was predicted in 42-43 sites, where the majority (no = 38) are highly conserved among Saudi strains. The average ratio between non-synonymous and synonymous mutations (ω) implied stabilizing selection pressure on G protein, with evidences of positive selection on certain Saudi strains. This report provides preliminary data on the circulation pattern and molecular characteristics of HRSV-B strains circulating in Saudi Arabia.

  8. Study on Phylogenetic Status of Javan Plover Bird (Charadrius, Charadriidae, Charadriiformes through DNA Barcoding Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayat Ashari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Javan Plover named Charadrius javanicus is taxonomically under controversy and phylogenetically unresolved yet. Through an analysis of DNA barcode, this study aims (1 to confirm whether Javan Plover is separated species named Charadrius javanicus or a subspecies of C. alexandrinus which named C. a. javanicus and (2 to determine a relationship within this genus. Totally 666 bp DNA sequences of COI barcode gene were analyzed.  The results showed that a sequence divergence between Javan Plover and C. alexandrinus alexandrinus was only 1.2%, while sequence divergences between C.a.alexandrinus and others species, or between Javan Plover and others species were ranged from 9-12%.  Neighbour-joining (NJ and maximum-parsimony (MP analyses showed that all individuals of both Javan Plover and Kenith Plover were clustered together, and supported by 99 % and 100 % of bootstrap value in NJ and MP, respectively. This study tends to support the previous findings that Javan Plover was not a separated species named C. javanicus, but it was as a subspecies of C. alexandrinus; named C. a. javanicus. There were two groups of Plover in this study; (C. leschenaultii and C. javanicus + C.a.alexandrinus, and (C.dubius and C. melodus + C. semipalmatus. DNA barcoding analysis can give certainty taxonomic status of the bird. Then, this study has implication as a basic data that can be used to provide and support the planning of Javan plover conservation programs. 

  9. [Ontogenetic and phylogenetic analysis of myosin light chain proteins from skeletal muscles of loach Misgurnus fossilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miuge, N S; Tikhonov, A V; Ozerniuk, N D

    2005-01-01

    mRNAs of all three types of myosin light chain proteins are expressed in skeletal muscles of both larval and adult stages of loach Misgurnus fossilis (Cobitidae) and these proteins are encoded by different genes (mlc1, mlc2, and mlc3). No difference was revealed between transcripts from larval stage and adult fish for all three mlc proteins. Our approach (RT-PCR with fish-specific mlc1, mlc2, and mlc3 primers) failed to reveal the larval form of myosin light chain protein found previously by protein electrophoresis of loach fry muscle extract. Comparative analysis of the protein structure shows high homology of MLC1 and MLC3 proteins sharing a large EF-hand calcium-binding domain. Phylogenetic analysis of MLC1 from skeletal muscles of fish and other vertebrate species is concordant with the traditional phylogeny of the group. Within the Teleostei, loach MLC1 had the highest homology with other Cyprinidae, and least with Salmonidae fishes.

  10. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity in high-grade serous ovarian cancer: a phylogenetic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland F Schwarz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The major clinical challenge in the treatment of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC is the development of progressive resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. The objective of this study was to determine whether intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity resulting from clonal evolution and the emergence of subclonal tumour populations in HGSOC was associated with the development of resistant disease.Evolutionary inference and phylogenetic quantification of heterogeneity was performed using the MEDICC algorithm on high-resolution whole genome copy number profiles and selected genome-wide sequencing of 135 spatially and temporally separated samples from 14 patients with HGSOC who received platinum-based chemotherapy. Samples were obtained from the clinical CTCR-OV03/04 studies, and patients were enrolled between 20 July 2007 and 22 October 2009. Median follow-up of the cohort was 31 mo (interquartile range 22-46 mo, censored after 26 October 2013. Outcome measures were overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. There were marked differences in the degree of clonal expansion (CE between patients (median 0.74, interquartile range 0.66-1.15, and dichotimization by median CE showed worse survival in CE-high cases (PFS 12.7 versus 10.1 mo, p = 0.009; OS 42.6 versus 23.5 mo, p = 0.003. Bootstrap analysis with resampling showed that the 95% confidence intervals for the hazard ratios for PFS and OS in the CE-high group were greater than 1.0. These data support a relationship between heterogeneity and survival but do not precisely determine its effect size. Relapsed tissue was available for two patients in the CE-high group, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the prevalent clonal population at clinical recurrence arose from early divergence events. A subclonal population marked by a NF1 deletion showed a progressive increase in tumour allele fraction during chemotherapy.This study demonstrates that quantitative measures of intra

  11. A mathematical model of past, present and future shore level displacement in Fennoscandia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasse, T. [Sveriges Geologiska Undersoekning, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    Shore level displacement in Fennoscandia is mainly due to two interactive vertical movements, glacio-isostatic uplift and eustatic sea level rise. A recent investigation of the lake-tilting phenomenon has made it possible to discern the course of glacio-isostatic. As a consequence an iteration process to estimate glacio-isostatic uplift and eustatic rise using empirical data of the shore level displacement has been started. The model indicates that there are two mechanisms involved in glacio-isostatic uplift, one slow and the other fast. The main uplift, still in progress, acts slowly. Arctan functions have proved to be suitable tools for describing slow glacio-isostatic uplift. The time of maximal uplift rate is isochronous, meaning that slow uplift occurred simultaneously in all Fennoscandia in an interactive movement. For slow uplift there is a relationship between the rate of decline and the crustal thickness. In areas with greater crustal thickness the rate of decline of the glacio-isostatic recovery is lower than in areas with thinner crust. The fast mechanism gave rise to a crustal subsidence which started about 12 500 BP. After about 10 300 BP, in the early Holocene, the subsidence was restored by a fast uplift. Normal distribution functions have been used for calculating the fast mechanism. The mantle material exhibits plastic behaviour. When the mantle encounters short-lived stresses the material behaves like an elastic solid but in response to long-term stresses it will flow. The slow mechanism can be linked to viscous flow and as a response to long-term stresses. The fast mechanism is probably the response to a short-lived stress. This stress could have been caused by renewed ice loading, due to a self-triggered redistribution of the ice load during deglaciation. Future development regarding glacio-isostatic uplift, eustasy and shore level displacement is predicted in Fennoscandia using the results from the modelling. Predictions are based on the

  12. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the swine leukocyte antigen 3 gene from Korean native pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H Y; Choi, Y C; Park, H N

    2015-05-18

    We investigated the phylogenetic relationships between pig breeds, compared the genetic similarity between humans and pigs, and provided basic genetic information on Korean native pigs (KNPs), using genetic variants of the swine leukocyte antigen 3 (SLA-3) gene. Primers were based on sequences from GenBank (accession Nos. AF464010 and AF464009). Polymerase chain reaction analysis amplified approximately 1727 bp of segments, which contained 1086 bp of coding regions and 641 bp of the 3'- and 5'-untranslated regions. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones of miniature pigs were used for sequencing the SLA-3 genomic region, which was 3114 bp in total length, including the coding (1086 bp) and non-coding (2028 bp) regions. Sequence analysis detected 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), based on a minor allele frequency greater than 0.01, which is low compared with other pig breeds, and the results suggest that there is low genetic variability in KNPs. Comparative analysis revealed that humans possess approximately three times more genetic variation than do pigs. Approximately 71% of SNPs in exons 2 and 3 were detected in KNPs, and exon 5 in humans is a highly polymorphic region. Newly identified sequences of SLA-3 using KNPs were submitted to GenBank (accession No. DQ992512-18). Cluster analysis revealed that KNPs were grouped according to three major alleles: SLA-3*0502 (DQ992518), SLA-3*0302 (DQ992513 and DQ992516), and SLA-3*0303 (DQ992512, DQ992514, DQ992515, and DQ992517). Alignments revealed that humans have a relatively close genetic relationship with pigs and chimpanzees. The information provided by this study may be useful in KNP management.

  13. First phylogenetic analysis of Ehrlichia canis in dogs and ticks from Mexico. Preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina G. Sosa-Gutiérrez; Teresa Quintero-Martinez; Margarita Vargas-Sandoval; Guadalupe Gordillo-Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Phylogenetic characterization of Ehrlichia canis in dogs naturally infected and ticks, diagnosed by PCR and sequencing of 16SrRNA gene; compare different isolates found in American countries. Materials and methods. Were collected Blood samples from 139 dogs with suggestive clinical manifestations of this disease and they were infested with ticks; part of 16SrRNA gene was sequenced and aligned, with 17 sequences reported in American countries. Two phylogenetic trees were constructed...

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of the incidence of lux gene horizontal transfer in Vibrionaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Ast, Jennifer C; Kaeding, Allison J; Oliver, James D; Dunlap, Paul V

    2008-05-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is thought to occur frequently in bacteria in nature and to play an important role in bacterial evolution, contributing to the formation of new species. To gain insight into the frequency of HGT in Vibrionaceae and its possible impact on speciation, we assessed the incidence of interspecies transfer of the lux genes (luxCDABEG), which encode proteins involved in luminescence, a distinctive phenotype. Three hundred three luminous strains, most of which were recently isolated from nature and which represent 11 Aliivibrio, Photobacterium, and Vibrio species, were screened for incongruence of phylogenies based on a representative housekeeping gene (gyrB or pyrH) and a representative lux gene (luxA). Strains exhibiting incongruence were then subjected to detailed phylogenetic analysis of horizontal transfer by using multiple housekeeping genes (gyrB, recA, and pyrH) and multiple lux genes (luxCDABEG). In nearly all cases, housekeeping gene and lux gene phylogenies were congruent, and there was no instance in which the lux genes of one luminous species had replaced the lux genes of another luminous species. Therefore, the lux genes are predominantly vertically inherited in Vibrionaceae. The few exceptions to this pattern of congruence were as follows: (i) the lux genes of the only known luminous strain of Vibrio vulnificus, VVL1 (ATCC 43382), were evolutionarily closely related to the lux genes of Vibrio harveyi; (ii) the lux genes of two luminous strains of Vibrio chagasii, 21N-12 and SB-52, were closely related to those of V. harveyi and Vibrio splendidus, respectively; (iii) the lux genes of a luminous strain of Photobacterium damselae, BT-6, were closely related to the lux genes of the lux-rib(2) operon of Photobacterium leiognathi; and (iv) a strain of the luminous bacterium Photobacterium mandapamensis was found to be merodiploid for the lux genes, and the second set of lux genes was closely related to the lux genes of the lux-rib(2

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial populations in waters of the former Texcoco Lake, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan-Roblero, Janet; Magos, Xochitl; Fernández, Luis; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Le Borgne, Sylvie

    2004-12-01

    Molecular techniques were used to compare the compositions of the bacterial communities of the 2 following lagoons from the former soda Texcoco Lake, Mexico: the restored Facultativa lagoon and the Nabor Carrillo lagoon. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) revealed that bacterial communities of the 2 lagoons were different and presented a relatively low diversity. Clone libraries of 16S rDNA genes were constructed, and significant phylotypes were distinguished by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A representative clone from each phylotype was partially sequenced. Molecular identification and phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal sequences revealed that the Facultativa lagoon harbored mainly gamma- and beta-Proteobacteria, low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, and several members of the Halobacteriaceae family of archaea. The Nabor Carrillo lagoon mainly included typical halophilic and alkaliphilic low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, gamma-Proteobacteria, and beta-Proteobacteria similar to those found in other soda lakes. Several probably noncultured new bacterial species were detected. Three strains were isolated from the Nabor Carrillo lagoon, their partial 16S rDNA sequences were obtained. On this basis, they were identified as Halomonas magadiensis (H1), Halomonas eurihalina (H2), and Staphylococcus sciuri (H3). This is the first study that uses molecular techniques to investigate potential genetic diversity in the Texcoco lakes. In this preliminary evaluation, we infer the presence of alkalophilic, halophilic, or haloalkaliphilic bacteria potentially useful for biotechnology.

  16. Evolution in Australasian mangrove forests: multilocus phylogenetic analysis of the Gerygone warblers (Aves: Acanthizidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árpád S Nyári

    Full Text Available The mangrove forests of Australasia have many endemic bird species but their evolution and radiation in those habitats has been little studied. One genus with several mangrove specialist species is Gerygone (Passeriformes: Acanthizidae. The phylogeny of the Acanthizidae is reasonably well understood but limited taxon sampling for Gerygone has constrained understanding of its evolution and historical biogeography in mangroves. Here we report on a phylogenetic analysis of Gerygone based on comprehensive taxon sampling and a multilocus dataset of thirteen loci spread across the avian genome (eleven nuclear and two mitochondrial loci. Since Gerygone includes three species restricted to Australia's coastal mangrove forests, we particularly sought to understand the biogeography of their evolution in that ecosystem. Analyses of individual loci, as well as of a concatenated dataset drawn from previous molecular studies indicates that the genus as currently defined is not monophyletic, and that the Grey Gerygone (G. cinerea from New Guinea should be transferred to the genus Acanthiza. The multilocus approach has permitted the nuanced view of the group's evolution into mangrove ecosystems having occurred on multiple occasions, in three non-overlapping time frames, most likely first by the G. magnirostris lineage, and subsequently followed by those of G. tenebrosa and G. levigaster.

  17. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of a novel parvovirus isolated from chickens in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Xie, Zhixun; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Liji; Xie, Zhiqin; Huang, Li; Fan, Qin; Luo, Sisi; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Leyi

    2016-11-01

    A previously unidentified chicken parvovirus (ChPV) strain, associated with runting-stunting syndrome (RSS), is now endemic among chickens in China. To explore the genetic diversity of ChPV strains, we determined the first complete genome sequence of a novel ChPV isolate (GX-CH-PV-7) identified in chickens in Guang Xi, China, and showed moderate genome sequence similarity to reference strains. Analysis showed that the viral genome sequence is 86.4 %-93.9 % identical to those of other ChPVs. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses showed that this newly emergent GX-CH-PV-7 is closely related to Gallus gallus enteric parvovirus isolate ChPV 798 from the USA, indicating that they may share a common ancestor. The complete DNA sequence is 4612 bp long with an A+T content of 56.66 %. We determined the first complete genome sequence of a previously unidentified ChPV strain to elucidate its origin and evolutionary status.

  18. Phylogenetic inferences in Avena based on analysis of FL intron2 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuan-Ying; Wei, Yu-Ming; Baum, Bernard R; Yan, Ze-Hong; Lan, Xiu-Jin; Dai, Shou-Fen; Zheng, You-Liang

    2010-09-01

    The development and application of molecular methods in oats has been relatively slow compared with other crops. Results from the previous analyses have left many questions concerning species evolutionary relationships unanswered, especially regarding the origins of the B and D genomes, which are only known to be present in polyploid oat species. To investigate the species and genome relationships in genus Avena, among 13 diploid (A and C genomes), we used the second intron of the nuclear gene FLORICAULA/LEAFY (FL int2) in seven tetraploid (AB and AC genomes), and five hexaploid (ACD genome) species. The Avena FL int2 is rather long, and high levels of variation in length and sequence composition were found. Evidence for more than one copy of the FL int2 sequence was obtained for both the A and C genome groups, and the degree of divergence of the A genome copies was greater than that observed within the C genome sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the FL int2 sequences resulted in topologies that contained four major groups; these groups reemphasize the major genomic divergence between the A and C genomes, and the close relationship among the A, B, and D genomes. However, the D genome in hexaploids more likely originated from a C genome diploid rather than the generally believed A genome, and the C genome diploid A. clauda may have played an important role in the origination of both the C and D genome in polyploids.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of rubella viruses identified in Uganda, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namuwulya, Prossy; Abernathy, Emily; Bukenya, Henry; Bwogi, Josephine; Tushabe, Phionah; Birungi, Molly; Seguya, Ronald; Kabaliisa, Theopista; Alibu, Vincent P; Kayondo, Jonathan K; Rivailler, Pierre; Icenogle, Joseph; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas

    2014-12-01

    Molecular data on rubella viruses are limited in Uganda despite the importance of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Routine rubella vaccination, while not administered currently in Uganda, is expected to begin by 2015. The World Health Organization recommends that countries without rubella vaccination programs assess the burden of rubella and CRS before starting a routine vaccination program. Uganda is already involved in integrated case-based surveillance, including laboratory testing to confirm measles and rubella, but molecular epidemiologic aspects of rubella circulation have so far not been documented in Uganda. Twenty throat swab or oral fluid samples collected from 12 districts during routine rash and fever surveillance between 2003 and 2012 were identified as rubella virus RNA positive and PCR products encompassing the region used for genotyping were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the 20 sequences identified 19 genotype 1G viruses and 1 genotype 1E virus. Genotype-specific trees showed that the Uganda viruses belonged to specific clusters for both genotypes 1G and 1E and grouped with similar sequences from neighboring countries. Genotype 1G was predominant in Uganda. More epidemiological and molecular epidemiological data are required to determine if genotype 1E is also endemic in Uganda. The information obtained in this study will assist the immunization program in monitoring changes in circulating genotypes.

  20. A phylogenetic analysis of the emberizid sparrows based on three mitochondrial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Rebecca J; Spicer, Greg S

    2003-10-01

    Previous molecular phylogenetic studies have examined the taxonomic relationships among a number of typical emberizid sparrow genera. To help clarify these relationships, we sequenced a 1673 base pair fragment for the complete sequence of three mitochondrial genes: adenosine triphosphatase (Atp8 and Atp6) and cytochrome oxidase subunit III (COIII) for 38 sparrow species, along with Passerina amoena (Cardinalidae) and Piranga ludoviciana (Thraupidae) which were selected as the outgroups. Our analysis confirms the monophyly of traditional genera such as Junco, Melospiza, and Zonotrichia. Although Calcarius and Plectrophenax are often thought to be putative emberizids, all our analyses placed these genera basal to all other sparrows examined. As observed with Calcarius, Spizella did not form a monophyletic group, with S. arborea being the sister-taxon to Passerella iliaca. Our analyses also suggest that Aimophila ruficeps is probably more closely related to the "brown towhees" (Pipilo aberti, P. crissalis, and P. fuscus) than its putative congeners. The genus Ammodramus was also not monophyletic, since it appears that Passerculus sandwichensis is more closely related to A. henslowii and A. leconteii then either one is related to its congener A. savannarum. Finally, our analyses exhibited other unsuspected associations, such as the sister-taxon relationships between Amphispiza bilineata and the Chondestes grammacus/Calamospiza melanocorys clade, and Amphispiza belli and Pooecetes gramineus.

  1. Identification, molecular and phylogenetic analysis of poxvirus in skin lesions of southern right whale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorito, Carla; Palacios, Carlos; Golemba, Marcelo; Bratanich, Ana; Argüelles, Maria Belen; Fazio, Ana; Bertellotti, Marcelo; Lombardo, Daniel

    2015-10-16

    Poxvirus skin disease has been reported in several species of cetaceans, principally in odontocetes, and a single report in mysticetes. Southern right whales Eubalaena australis in Peninsula Valdes, Argentina, show a variety of skin lesions of unknown etiology, and the number of these lesions has increased in recent years. Samples from dead whales were taken in order to establish the etiology of these lesions. One calf and one adult presented ring-type lesions, characterized by a circumscribed and slightly raised area of skin. Lesions were histologically characterized by the presence of microvesicles and vacuolated cells in the stratum spinosum, along with hyperplasia of the stratum corneum and eosinophilic inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy showed aggregations of virions with typical poxvirus morphology. PCR of cetacean poxvirus (CPV) DNA polymerase, DNA topoisomerase I and parapoxvirus DNA polymerase gene fragments was done, and confirmed the presence of poxvirus in one sample. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the detected poxvirus belongs to the CPV-2 group. This is the first confirmed report of poxvirus in southern right whales in Argentina.

  2. Nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis of a new potexvirus: Malva mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Fabien; Paré, Christine; Majeau, Nathalie; Bolduc, Marilène; Leblanc, Eric; Bergeron, Michel G; Bernardy, Michael G; Leclerc, Denis

    2008-01-01

    A filamentous virus isolated from Malva neglecta Wallr. (common mallow) and propagated in Chenopodium quinoa was grown, cloned and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined (GenBank accession # DQ660333). The genomic RNA is 6858 nt in length and contains five major open reading frames (ORFs). The genomic organization is similar to members and the viral encoded proteins shared homology with the group of the Potexvirus genus in the Flexiviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship with narcissus mosaic virus (NMV), scallion virus X (ScaVX) and, to a lesser extent, to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX) and pepino mosaic virus (PepMV). A novel putative pseudoknot structure is predicted in the 3'-UTR of a subgroup of potexviruses, including this newly described virus. The consensus GAAAA sequence is detected at the 5'-end of the genomic RNA and experimental data strongly suggest that this motif could be a distinctive hallmark of this genus. The name Malva mosaic virus is proposed.

  3. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of Anaplasma spp. in sheep and goats from six provinces of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Lv, Yali; Zhang, Feifei; Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Jinhong; Cui, Yanyan; Wang, Rongjun; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Longxian; Ning, Changshen

    2016-12-30

    Members of the genus Anaplasma are important emerging tick-borne pathogens in both humans and animals in tropical and subtropical areas. Here, we investigated the presence of Anaplasma spp. in 621 sheep and 710 goats from six provinces of China. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing were conducted to determine the prevalence of Anaplasma (A.) phagocytophilum, A. ovis and A. bovis targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA or the major surface protein 4 gene. PCR revealed Anaplasma in 39.0% (240/621) of sheep and 45.5% (323/710) of goats. The most frequently detected species was A. ovis (88/621, 14.2% for sheep; 129/710, 18.2% for goats), followed by A. bovis (60/621, 9.7% for sheep; 74/710, 10.4% for goats) and A. phagocytophilum (33/621, 5.3% for sheep; 15/710, 2.1% for goats). Additionally, eight sheep and 20 goats were found to be infected with three pathogens simultaneously. DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of these three Anaplasma species in the investigated areas, and phylogenetic analysis indicated that there was geographic segregation to a certain extent, as well as a relationship between the host and cluster of A. ovis. The results of the present study provide valuable data that helps understand the epidemiology of anaplasmosis in ruminants from China.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of the expansion of the MATH-BTB gene family in the grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juranić, Martina; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    MATH-BTB proteins are known to act as substrate-specific adaptors of cullin3 (CUL3)-based ubiquitin E3 ligases to target protein for ubiquitination. In a previous study we reported the presence of 31 MATH-BTB genes in the maize genome and determined the regulatory role of the MATH-BTB protein MAB1 during meiosis to mitosis transition. In contrast to maize, there are only 6 homologous genes in the model plant Arabidopsis, while this family has largely expanded in grasses. Here, we report a phylogenetic analysis of the MATH-BTB gene family in 9 land plant species including various mosses, eudicots, and grasses. We extend a previous classification of the plant MATH-BTB family and additionally arrange the expanded group into 5 grass-specific clades. Synteny studies indicate that expansion occurred to a large extent due to local gene duplications. Expression studies of 3 closely related MATH-BTB genes in maize (MAB1-3) indicate highly specific expression pattern. In summary, this work provides a solid base for further studies comparing genetic and functional information of the MATH-BTB family especially in the grasses.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of the expansion of the MATH-BTB gene family in the grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juranić, Martina; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    MATH-BTB proteins are known to act as substrate-specific adaptors of cullin3 (CUL3)-based ubiquitin E3 ligases to target protein for ubiquitination. In a previous study we reported the presence of 31 MATH-BTB genes in the maize genome and determined the regulatory role of the MATH-BTB protein MAB1 during meiosis to mitosis transition. In contrast to maize, there are only 6 homologous genes in the model plant Arabidopsis, while this family has largely expanded in grasses. Here, we report a phylogenetic analysis of the MATH-BTB gene family in 9 land plant species including various mosses, eudicots, and grasses. We extend a previous classification of the plant MATH-BTB family and additionally arrange the expanded group into 5 grass-specific clades. Synteny studies indicate that expansion occurred to a large extent due to local gene duplications. Expression studies of 3 closely related MATH-BTB genes in maize (MAB1–3) indicate highly specific expression pattern. In summary, this work provides a solid base for further studies comparing genetic and functional information of the MATH-BTB family especially in the grasses. PMID:24614623

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of canine parvovirus isolates from Sichuan and Gansu provinces of China in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Guo, H-C; Wei, Y-Q; Shu, L; Wang, J; Li, J-S; Cao, S-Z; Sun, S-Q

    2015-02-01

    Canine parvovirus causes serious disease in dogs. Study of the genetic variation in emerging CPV strains is important for disease control strategy. The antigenic property of CPV is connected with specific amino acid changes, mainly in the capsid protein VP2. This study was carried out to characterize VP2 gene of CPV viruses from two provinces of China in 2011. The complete VP2 genes of the CPV-positive samples were amplified and sequenced. Genetic analysis based on the VP2 genes of CPV was conducted. All of the isolates screened and sequenced in this study were typed as CPV-2a except GS-K11 strain, which was typed as CPV-2b. Sequence comparison showed nucleotide identities of 98.8-100% among CPV strains, whereas the Aa similarities were 99.6-100%. Compared with the reference strains, there are three distinctive amino acid changes at VP2 gene residue 267, 324 and 440 of the strains isolated in this study. Of the 27 strains, fourteen (51.85%) had the 267 (Phe-Tyr) and 440 (Thr-Ala) substitution, all the 27 (100%) had 324 (Tyr-Ile) substitution. Phylogenetically, all of the strains isolated in this study formed a major monophyletic cluster together with one South Korean isolate, two Thailand isolates and four Chinese former isolates.

  7. Integration of Morphological Data into Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis: Toward the Identikit of the Stylasterid Ancestor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puce, Stefania; Pica, Daniela; Schiaparelli, Stefano; Negrisolo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Stylasteridae is a hydroid family including 29 worldwide-distributed genera, all provided with a calcareous skeleton. They are abundant in shallow and deep waters and represent an important component of marine communities. In the present paper, we studied the evolution of ten morphological characters, currently used in stylasterid taxonomy, using a phylogenetic approach. Our results indicate that stylasterid morphology is highly plastic and that many events of independent evolution and reversion have occurred. Our analysis also allows sketching a possible identikit of the stylasterid ancestor. It had calcareous skeleton, reticulate-granular coenosteal texture, polyps randomly arranged, gastrostyle, and dactylopore spines, while lacking a gastropore lip and dactylostyles. If the ancestor had single or double/multiple chambered gastropore tube is uncertain. These data suggest that the ancestor was similar to the extant genera Cyclohelia and Stellapora. Our investigation is the first attempt to integrate molecular and morphological information to clarify the stylasterid evolutionary scenario and represents the first step to infer the stylasterid ancestor morphology. PMID:27537333

  8. Chitinase from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: molecular cloning, structural, phylogenetic, expression and activity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim, Sheyla M R C; Cruz, Aline H S; Jesuino, Rosália S A; Ulhoa, Cirano J; Molinari-Madlum, Eugênia E W I; Soares, Célia M A; Pereira, Maristela

    2006-03-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding a chitinase (Pbcts1) was cloned by screening a cDNA library from the yeast cells of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The cDNA consists of 1888 bp and encodes an ORF of 1218 bp corresponding to a protein of 45 kDa with 406 amino acid residues. The deduced PbCTS1 is composed of two signature family 18 catalytic domains and seems to belong to fungal/bacterial class. Phylogenetic analysis of PbCTS1 and other chitinases suggests the existence of paralogs of several chitinases to be grouped based on specialized functions, which may reflect the multiple and diverse roles played by fungi chitinases. Glycosyl hydrolase activity assays demonstrated that P. brasiliensis is able to produce and secrete these enzymes mainly during transition from yeast to mycelium. The fungus should be able to use chitin as a carbon source. The presence of an endocytic signal in the deduced protein suggests that it could be secreted by a vesicular nonclassical export pathway. The Pbcts1 expression in mycelium, yeast, during differentiation from mycelium to yeast and in yeast cells obtained from infected mice suggests the relevance of this molecule in P. brasiliensis electing PbCTS1 as an attractive drug target.

  9. The Potamophylax nigricornis group (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae: resolution of phylogenetic species by fine structure analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh, J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Applying the phylogenetic species concept and the sexual selection theory we have reviewed some natal aspects of incipient species and their accelerated evolution. How can we recognise early stages of divergence? Which selection pressures are at work during speciation? Which pathways accelerate the speed of speciation? Which kinds of trait variabilities makes difficult to find initial split criteria? Elaborating the principles of Fine Structure Analysis (FSA and the morphological Initial Split Criteria (ISP it was discovered that the European spring dwelling caddisfly Potamophylax nigricornis doesn’tbelong to a single species. It represents an entire species group with seventeen peripatric species evolving on the southernperipheries of the distributional area. Four new species subgroups have been erected: Potamophylax nigricornis new species subgroup, P. elegantulus new species subgroup, P. horgos new species subgroup, P. simas new species subgroup. Eleven new species have been described: Potamophylax apados sp. nov., P. fules sp. nov., P. fureses sp. nov., P. hasas sp. novov., P. horgos sp. nov., P. kethas sp. nov., P. lemezes sp. nov., P. peremes sp. nov., P. simas sp. nov., P. tuskes sp. nov., P. ureges sp. nov. One Potamophylax sp. nov. has been differentiated and three new species status have been documented:Potamophylax elegantulus (Klapálek stat. n., P. mista (Navás stat. nov., P. testaceus (Zetterstedt stat. nov.

  10. ZikaVR: An Integrated Zika Virus Resource for Genomics, Proteomics, Phylogenetic and Therapeutic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit Kumar; Kaur, Karambir; Rajput, Akanksha; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Sehgal, Manika; Khan, Md. Shoaib; Monga, Isha; Dar, Showkat Ahmad; Singh, Sandeep; Nagpal, Gandharva; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Thakur, Anamika; Kaur, Gazaldeep; Sharma, Shivangi; Bhardwaj, Aman; Qureshi, Abid; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Current Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreaks that spread in several areas of Africa, Southeast Asia, and in pacific islands is declared as a global health emergency by World Health Organization (WHO). It causes Zika fever and illness ranging from severe autoimmune to neurological complications in humans. To facilitate research on this virus, we have developed an integrative multi-omics platform; ZikaVR (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/zikavr/), dedicated to the ZIKV genomic, proteomic and therapeutic knowledge. It comprises of whole genome sequences, their respective functional information regarding proteins, genes, and structural content. Additionally, it also delivers sophisticated analysis such as whole-genome alignments, conservation and variation, CpG islands, codon context, usage bias and phylogenetic inferences at whole genome and proteome level with user-friendly visual environment. Further, glycosylation sites and molecular diagnostic primers were also analyzed. Most importantly, we also proposed potential therapeutically imperative constituents namely vaccine epitopes, siRNAs, miRNAs, sgRNAs and repurposing drug candidates. PMID:27633273

  11. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Rhizobium sullae isolated from Algerian Hedysarum flexuosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliliche, Khadidja; Beghalem, Hamida; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Chriki, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Isolates from root nodules of Hedysarum flexuosum, sampled from north region of Algeria, were analyzed on the basis of their phenotypic and molecular characteristics. They were tested for their tolerance to NaCl, pH, temperatures, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance. Interestingly, the isolate Hf_04N appeared resistant to ZnCl2 (50 μg/mL) and grew at high saline concentration up to 9 %. The phylogenetic positions of five isolates were studied by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, recA, nifH and nodD genes. There were grouped close to the Rhizobium sullae type strain in relation to their 16S rRNA, recA and nifH genes-based phylogenies. By contrast, the tree of nodD gene was not congruent with ribosomal, housekeeping and nitrogen fixation genes. We suggest that our strains have a novel nodD gene. The detection of conserved domains of NodD protein and nitrogenase reductase enzyme, confirm their ability to nodulate and fix nitrogen.

  12. Detection and Phylogenetic Analysis of the Hepatitis E Virus in a Canadian Swine Production Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantel-Fortier, Nicolas; Letellier, Ann; Lachapelle, Virginie; Fravalo, Philippe; L'Homme, Yvan; Brassard, Julie

    2016-12-01

    Viral contamination along the production chain is a significant concern in both food safety and livestock health. Pigs have been reported to act as a reservoir for zoonotic viruses, sometimes emerging ones, and epidemiological studies have shown direct links between the consumption of uncooked pork offal and cases of hepatitis caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 in humans. The presence of HEV in swine herds has been reported, but its dissemination in pork production environments is still unknown. To investigate viral contamination sources in the swine industry, 452 environment and fecal samples, including samples from livestock transportation vehicles, were collected over a period of 11 months from ten farms and one slaughterhouse that together represent a single production network. Hepatitis E virus RNA was detected by nested RT-PCR in 32 samples from both inside and outside farm buildings, on trucks, and, mostly, from fomites collected in the slaughterhouse yard, such as on a utility vehicle. Phylogenetic analysis showed a wide diversity of HEV genotype 3 strains, similar to human and swine strains previously found. According to the results of this study, the movements of trucks and utility vehicles might play an important role in HEV dissemination on a slaughterhouse site and throughout an entire network.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of Epicauta chinensis (Coleoptera: Meloidae) and phylogenetic analysis among Coleopteran insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chao; He, Shilin; Song, Xuhao; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2016-03-10

    The blister beetle is an important resource insect due to its defensive substance cantharidin, which was widely used in pharmacology and plant protection. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Epicauta chinensis Laporte (Coleoptera: Tenebrionoidae: Meloidae). The circular genome is 15,717 bp long, encoding 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two ribosomal RNAs and 22 tRNAs and containing a A+T-rich region with gene arrangement identical to other Coleopteran species. Twelve PCGs start with typical ATN codon, while ATP8 gene initiate with GTT for first report in Insecta. All PCGs terminate with conventional stop codon TAA or TAG. All tRNAs in E. chinensis are predicted to fold into typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except tRNA-Ser(AGN), in which the dihydrouracil arm (DHU arm) could not form stable stem-loop structure. The secondary structure of lrRNA and srRNA comprises 48 helices and 32 helices respectively. The 1101 bp A+T-rich region contains a 15 bp poly-T stretch and microsatellite-like repeats rather than large tandem repetitive sequences. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 13 PCGs of 45 Coleopteran species, show that E. chinensis grouped with Tenebrionidae species. It also support the topology of (((Chrysomelidae+Curculionoidea)+(Cucujoidea+Cleroidea))+Tenebrionoidea) within Cucujiformia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of polyketide synthase I domains from soil metagenomic libraries allows selection of promising clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginolhac, Aurélien; Jarrin, Cyrille; Gillet, Benjamin; Robe, Patrick; Pujic, Petar; Tuphile, Karine; Bertrand, Hélène; Vogel, Timothy M; Perrière, Guy; Simonet, Pascal; Nalin, Renaud

    2004-09-01

    The metagenomic approach provides direct access to diverse unexplored genomes, especially from uncultivated bacteria in a given environment. This diversity can conceal many new biosynthetic pathways. Type I polyketide synthases (PKSI) are modular enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of many natural products of industrial interest. Among the PKSI domains, the ketosynthase domain (KS) was used to screen a large soil metagenomic library containing more than 100,000 clones to detect those containing PKS genes. Over 60,000 clones were screened, and 139 clones containing KS domains were detected. A 700-bp fragment of the KS domain was sequenced for 40 of 139 randomly chosen clones. None of the 40 protein sequences were identical to those found in public databases, and nucleic sequences were not redundant. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on the protein sequences of three metagenomic clones to select the clones which one can predict to produce new compounds. Two PKS-positive clones do not belong to any of the 23 published PKSI included in the analysis, encouraging further analyses on these two clones identified by the selection process.

  15. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of human parainfluenza virus type 3 isolated from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajhdi, Fahad N; Alshaman, Mohamed S; Amer, Haitham M

    2012-08-01

    Human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV-3) is a leading cause of respiratory disease in children worldwide. Previous sequence analyses of the entire virus genome, among different HPIV-3 strains, demonstrated that HN is the most variable gene. There is a dearth of data on HPIV-3 strains circulating in Saudi Arabia. In this report, HPIV-3 was screened in nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from hospitalized children with acute respiratory disease during two successive seasons (2007/08 and 2008/09) using nested RT-PCR. Out of 73 samples collected during 2007/08, seven (9.59%) were positive; while 3 out of 107 samples collected during 2008/09 (2.8%) were positive. Virus isolation in cell culture was successful using HEp2, but not Vero cells. The identity of the isolated viruses was confirmed using immunofluorescence and neutralization assays. To elucidate the genetic characteristics and phylogeny of Saudi HPIV-3 strains, the complete HN gene sequence of two selected Saudi strains was analyzed in comparison to 20 strains isolated by others from different countries worldwide. Both strains showed the highest degree of sequence homology with Indian strains, followed by Chinese and most Japanese strains. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these strains fell into a distinct Asian lineage. This study is the first in Saudi Arabia to recover HPIV-3 isolates of confirmed identity, and to generate sequence data that may help in understanding virus diversity and evolution.

  16. Functional phylogenetic analysis of LGI proteins identifies an interaction motif crucial for myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Linde; Jaegle, Martine; Driegen, Siska; Aunin, Eerik; Leslie, Kris; Fukata, Yuko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Fukata, Masaki; Meijer, Dies

    2014-04-01

    The cellular interactions that drive the formation and maintenance of the insulating myelin sheath around axons are only partially understood. Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) proteins play important roles in nervous system development and mutations in their genes have been associated with epilepsy and amyelination. Their function involves interactions with ADAM22 and ADAM23 cell surface receptors, possibly in apposing membranes, thus attenuating cellular interactions. LGI4-ADAM22 interactions are required for axonal sorting and myelination in the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS). Functional analysis revealed that, despite their high homology and affinity for ADAM22, LGI proteins are functionally distinct. To dissect the key residues in LGI proteins required for coordinating axonal sorting and myelination in the developing PNS, we adopted a phylogenetic and computational approach and demonstrate that the mechanism of action of LGI4 depends on a cluster of three amino acids on the outer surface of the LGI4 protein, thus providing a structural basis for the mechanistic differences in LGI protein function in nervous system development and evolution.

  17. HIV-1 phylogenetic analysis shows HIV-1 transits through the meninges to brain and peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L; Gray, Rebecca R; Salemi, Marco; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; McGrath, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Brain infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been investigated in many reports with a variety of conclusions concerning the time of entry and degree of viral compartmentalization. To address these diverse findings, we sequenced HIV-1 gp120 clones from a wide range of brain, peripheral and meningeal tissues from five patients who died from several HIV-1 associated disease pathologies. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis confirmed previous studies that showed a significant degree of compartmentalization in brain and peripheral tissue subpopulations. Some intermixing between the HIV-1 subpopulations was evident, especially in patients that died from pathologies other than HIV-associated dementia. Interestingly, the major tissue harboring virus from both the brain and peripheral tissues was the meninges. These results show that (1) HIV-1 is clearly capable of migrating out of the brain, (2) the meninges are the most likely primary transport tissues, and (3) infected brain macrophages comprise an important HIV reservoir during highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  18. Genome organization and phylogenetic tree analysis of Garlic virus E, a new member of genus Allexivirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The complete sequence of an Allexivirus isolated from garlic plants in Yuhang City, Zhejiang Province, China had been determined. The single-strand, positive RNA genome was 8451 nucleotides in length excluding poly(A) tail. The genome organization of this virus was similar to that of the other Allexiviruses but only with 62.8%-64.8% nucleotide acid identities. The amino acid sequences of proteins encoded by ORF1-6 shared 67.6%-78.5%, 55.4%-66.2%, 56.7%- 66.4%, 40.3%-55.6%, 66.3%-79.7% and 52.2%- 68.8% identities with those of the others respectively. The homology range between it and the other Allexiviruses was similar to that between the other distinct species in this genus. A more comprehensive comparison using all available CP amino acid sequences showed that it shared only 63.9%- 79.8% amino acids identical with the others. Therefore, it had been considered as a new member of the genus, named as garlic virus E (GarV-E). Phylogenetic analysis confirmed GarV-E as a distinct member and the correct names and classification of some members of genus Allexivirus were also discussed.

  19. Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the flightless Mancallinae (Aves, Pan-Alcidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Smith

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although flightless alcids from the Miocene and Pliocene of the eastern Pacific Ocean have been known for over 100 years, there is no detailed evaluation of diversity and systematic placement of these taxa. This is the first combined analysis of morphological and molecular data to include all extant alcids, the recently extinct Great Auk Pinguinus impennis, the mancalline auks, and a large outgroup sampling of 29 additional non-alcid charadriiforms. Based on the systematic placement of Mancallinae outside of crown clade Alcidae, the clade name Pan-Alcidae is proposed to include all known alcids. An extensive review of the Mancallinae fossil record resulted in taxonomic revision of the clade, and identification of three new species. In addition to positing the first hypothesis of inter-relationships between Mancallinae species, phylogenetic results support placement of Mancallinae as the sister taxon to all other Alcidae, indicating that flightlessness evolved at least twice in the alcid lineage. Convergent osteological characteristics of Mancallinae, the flightless Great Auk, and Spheniscidae are summarized, and implications of Mancallinae diversity, radiation, and extinction in the context of paleoclimatic changes are discussed.

  20. Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the flightless Mancallinae (Aves, Pan-Alcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil Adam

    2011-04-20

    Although flightless alcids from the Miocene and Pliocene of the eastern Pacific Ocean have been known for over 100 years, there is no detailed evaluation of diversity and systematic placement of these taxa. This is the first combined analysis of morphological and molecular data to include all extant alcids, the recently extinct Great Auk Pinguinus impennis, the mancalline auks, and a large outgroup sampling of 29 additional non-alcid charadriiforms. Based on the systematic placement of Mancallinae outside of crown clade Alcidae, the clade name Pan-Alcidae is proposed to include all known alcids. An extensive review of the Mancallinae fossil record resulted in taxonomic revision of the clade, and identification of three new species. In addition to positing the first hypothesis of inter-relationships between Mancallinae species, phylogenetic results support placement of Mancallinae as the sister taxon to all other Alcidae, indicating that flightlessness evolved at least twice in the alcid lineage. Convergent osteological characteristics of Mancallinae, the flightless Great Auk, and Spheniscidae are summarized, and implications of Mancallinae diversity, radiation, and extinction in the context of paleoclimatic changes are discussed.

  1. Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. based on RAPD analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nualsri, C.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variability and phylogenetic relationships in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. were studied using RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA. Leaf samples of 151 plants were collected from different areas in southern Thailand. DNA from the leaf samples was isolated using CTAB buffer and screened by decamer oligonucleotide primers. Among the total of 160 primers screened, 7 primers (OPB-08, OPR-11, OPT-06, OPT-19, OPAB-01, OPAB-09 and OPAB-14 were chosen to analyse for genetic variation in 151 individuals representing 52 dura, 60 tenera and 39 pisifera. Two hundred and nine amplified fragments were obtained from 7 primers with an average of 29.85 RAPD markers per primer. A dendrogram showing genetic similarities among oil palm was constructed based on polymorphic bands using UPGMA (Unweighted Pair-Group Method Using Arithmetic Average. Cluster analysis was performed using the SPSS program, which revealed four major clusters: 1 dura, tenera and pisifera from Paorong Oil Palm Company, Oil Palm Research Center, dura and tenera from private plantation in Krabi, and dura from Thepa Research Station;2 dura and tenera from Thai Boonthong Company, pisifera and tenera from Thepa Research Station, dura, tenera and pisifera from Klong Hoi Khong Research Station; 3 and 4 dura and tenera from Univanit Company, respectively. In general, a similarity index showed relatively high levels of 0.6 or greater.

  2. A phylogenetic analysis of Pseudonaja (Hydrophiinae, Elapidae, Serpentes) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Adam; Donnellan, Stephen C; Hutchinson, Mark N; Hutchinson, Rhonda G

    2005-11-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial ND4 and adjacent tRNA sequences for a geographically extensive series of specimens reveals nine major clades within Pseudonaja, of which six are largely coincident with nominal taxa (P. affinis, P. guttata, P. inframacula, P. ingrami, P. modesta, and P. textilis). The remaining three clades are composed of specimens presently referred to P. nuchalis. Two of these clades correspond with the "Darwin" and "Southern" morphs of previous authors, while the third clade incorporates the "Orange with black head" and "Pale head, grey nape" morphs. We are unable to confirm the presence of consistent karyotypic differences between "Orange with black head" and "Pale head, grey nape" specimens, however, P. inframacula, P. textilis, and P. nuchalis "Darwin" are found to exhibit distinctive karyotypes, as previously reported. These results, in conjunction with additional observations of karyotpic and morphological variation, are consistent with nine historically-independent lineages (i.e., species) within Pseudonaja. There is strong support for a clade composed of P. affinis, P. inframacula, P. ingrami, P. textilis, and the three P. nuchalis lineages, and for the relationships (P. inframacula, P. nuchalis "Southern") and (P. nuchalis "Darwin", P. nuchalis "Orange with black head"--"Pale head, grey nape" ).

  3. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Fasciola gigantica from western Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kei; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Allamanda, Puttik; Wibowo, Putut Eko; Mohanta, Uday Kumar; Sodirun; Guswanto, Azirwan; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-10-01

    Fasciola gigantica and aspermic (hybrid) Fasciola flukes are thought to be distributed in Southeast Asian countries. The objectives of this study were to investigate the distribution of these flukes from unidentified ruminants in western Java, Indonesia, and to determine their distribution history into the area. Sixty Fasciola flukes from western Java were identified as F. gigantica based on the nucleotide sequences of the nuclear phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck) and DNA polymerase delta (pold) genes. The flukes were then analyzed phylogenetically based on the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) gene, together with Fasciola flukes from other Asian countries. All but one F. gigantica fluke were classified in F. gigantica haplogroup C, which mainly contains nad1 haplotypes detected in flukes from Thailand, Vietnam, and China. A population genetic analysis suggested that haplogroup C spread from Thailand to the neighboring countries including Indonesia together with domestic ruminants, such as the swamp buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. The swamp buffalo is one of the important definitive hosts of Fasciola flukes in Indonesia, and is considered to have been domesticated in the north of Thailand. The remaining one fluke displayed a novel nad1 haplotype that has never been detected in the reference countries. Therefore, the origin of the fluke could not be established. No hybrid Fasciola flukes were detected in this study, in contrast to neighboring Asian countries. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Use of phylogenetical analysis to predict susceptibility of pathogenic Candida spp. to antifungal drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, Andrée F; Sellam, Adnane; Piché, Yves; Boissinot, Maurice; Pelletier, René; Boudreau, Dominique K; Picard, François J; Trépanier, Hélène; Boily, Marie-Josée; Ouellette, Marc; Roy, Paul H; Bergeron, Michel G

    2016-12-01

    Successful treatment of a Candida infection relies on 1) an accurate identification of the pathogenic fungus and 2) on its susceptibility to antifungal drugs. In the present study we investigated the level of correlation between phylogenetical evolution and susceptibility of pathogenic Candida spp. to antifungal drugs. For this, we compared a phylogenetic tree, assembled with the concatenated sequences (2475-bp) of the ATP2, TEF1, and TUF1 genes from 20 representative Candida species, with published minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the four principal antifungal drug classes commonly used in the treatment of candidiasis: polyenes, triazoles, nucleoside analogues, and echinocandins. The phylogenetic tree revealed three distinct phylogenetic clusters among Candida species. Species within a given phylogenetic cluster have generally similar susceptibility profiles to antifungal drugs and species within Clusters II and III were less sensitive to antifungal drugs than Cluster I species. These results showed that phylogenetical relationship between clusters and susceptibility to several antifungal drugs could be used to guide therapy when only species identification is available prior to information pertaining to its resistance profile. An extended study comprising a large panel of clinical samples should be conducted to confirm the efficiency of this approach in the treatment of candidiasis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of influenza A viruses (H3N2 circulating in Zhytomyr region during 2013–2014 epidemic season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyalska O. G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To perform phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of influenza A(H3N2 viruses circulating in the Zhytomyr region during 2013–2014 epidemic season. To make comparison of the HA and NA genes sequences of the Zhytomyr region isolates with the HA and NA genes sequences of influenza viruses circulating in the world. Methods. Laboratory diagnosis was conducted by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. In this study the sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were carried out. Results. For the first time the genes of influenza A(H3N2 viruses isolated in the Zhytomyr region during 2013–2014 epidemic season, coding hemagglutinin and neuraminidase were compared with their orthologs. According to the results of this comparison the phylogenetic tree was constructed. Additionally, the amino acid substitutions of the influenza viruses circulating in Ukraine and worldwide were analyzed. Conclusions. The nucleotide sequences of the influenza A(H3N2 viruses genes HA and NA isolated in the Zhytomyr region were identified. Based on the nucleotide sequences of HA and NA we constructed the influenza virus phylogenetic tree demonstrating that the virus isolated in the Zhytomyr region was closely related to the Ukrainian isolate from Kharkov and in the world to the isolates from Germany, Romania, Italy.

  6. Towards a better understanding of Apis mellifera and Varroa destructor microbiomes: introducing 'phyloh' as a novel phylogenetic diversity analysis tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandionigi, A; Vicario, S; Prosdocimi, E M; Galimberti, A; Ferri, E; Bruno, A; Balech, B; Mezzasalma, V; Casiraghi, M

    2015-07-01

    The study of diversity in biological communities is an intriguing field. Huge amount of data are nowadays available (provided by the innovative DNA sequencing techniques), and management, analysis and display of results are not trivial. Here, we propose for the first time the use of phylogenetic entropy as a measure of bacterial diversity in studies of microbial community structure. We then compared our new method (i.e. the web tool phyloh) for partitioning phylogenetic diversity with the traditional approach in diversity analyses of bacteria communities. We tested phyloh to characterize microbiome in the honeybee (Apis mellifera, Insecta: Hymenoptera) and its parasitic mite varroa (Varroa destructor, Arachnida: Parasitiformes). The rationale is that the comparative analysis of honeybee and varroa microbiomes could open new perspectives concerning the role of the parasites on honeybee colonies health. Our results showed a dramatic change of the honeybee microbiome when varroa occurs, suggesting that this parasite is able to influence host microbiome. Among the different approaches used, only the entropy method, in conjunction with phylogenetic constraint as implemented in phyloh, was able to discriminate varroa microbiome from that of parasitized honeybees. In conclusion, we foresee that the use of phylogenetic entropy could become a new standard in the analyses of community structure, in particular to prove the contribution of each biological entity to the overall diversity.

  7. Vertical crustal motion determined by satellite altimetry and tide gauge data in Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C. Y.; Shum, C. K.; Braun, A.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2004-01-01

    We present a new method of combining satellite altimetry and tide gauge data to obtain improved estimates of absolute (or geocentric) vertical crustal motion at tide gauges within a semi-enclosed sea. As an illustration, we combine TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry data (1992-2001) and 25 long-term (>40 years) tide gauge records around the Baltic Sea region of Fennoscandia, an area where crustal deformation is dominated by glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). A comparison of the estimated vertical motion, at 1-11 mm/yr, with independent solutions from 10 collocated BIFROST GPS sites, shows a difference of 0.2 +/- 0.9 mm/yr, thus verifying the accuracy and robustness of the procedure. The solution uncertainty is estimated at 0.4 mm/yr, which is significantly lower than previous analyses of this type. We conclude that our technique can potentially provide accurate vertical motion observations globally where long-term tide gauge records exist.

  8. Transformation of nitrogen compounds in the tundra soils of Northern Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, M. N.; Makarov, M. I.

    2016-07-01

    The transformation of organic nitrogen compounds in the soils of tundra ecosystems of Northern Fennoscandia has been studied under laboratory and natural conditions. Tundra soils contain significant reserves of total nitrogen, but they are poor in its extractable mineral and organic forms. The potential rates of the net mineralization and net immobilization of nitrogen by microorganisms vary among the soils and depend on the C: N ratio in the extractable organic matter and microbial biomass of soil. Under natural conditions, the rate of nitrogen net mineralization is lower than the potential rate determined under laboratory conditions by 6-25 times. The incubation of tundra soils in the presence of plants does not result in the accumulation of mineral nitrogen compounds either in the soil or in microbial biomass. This confirms the high competitive capacity of plants under conditions of limited nitrogen availability in tundra ecosystems.

  9. Ice marginal fluctuations during the Weichselian glaciation in Fennoscandia, a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokrantz, Hanna; Sohlenius, Gustav [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    This report presents an overview regarding ice marginal fluctuations during the last glacial, the Weichselian. It is focusing on marginal positions in Sweden with surroundings. The results are used to calibrate a computer simulation of the Weichselian ice sheet. The report also contains some information regarding basal conditions beneath the Swedish part of the Weichselian ice sheet. This information will be used to validate the results of the simulation of the Weichselian ice sheet. The Weichselian glaciation started 115 ka BP (thousands of years before present) and ended at the transition to the Holocene 11.5 ka BP. Terrestrial and marine records show that ice volumes fluctuated drastically during the Weichselian. The marine isotope record shows the global variations in climate and ice volume during the last ice age and has been divided into Marine Isotope Stages (MIS), which are well dated (MIS5d to MIS 2). Dating of terrestrial records is, however, problematic due to stratigraphical gaps and deposits, which are difficult to date. In many areas the timing of local and regional ice marginal fluctuations, prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), is therefore poorly understood. Age attribution of terrestrial deposits is often interpreted from bio- and litostratigraphical information, which has been correlated to other records, e.g. marine stratigraphies. The marine record from Early Weichselian (MIS 5d-5a) shows that two relatively warm periods, interstadials (MIS 5c and 5a), prevailed 105-9 ka BP and 85-74 ka BP. After MIS 5a global ice volume increased and remained large throughout Middle Weichselian (74-24 ka BP). During the LGM (c 21 ka BP), before the onset of the deglaciation, the ice volume was at its largest. Stratigraphical data indicate at least two periods with ice-free conditions in northern Fennoscandia, which have been correlated with the two early Weichselian interstadials Broerup and Odderade (MIS 5c and 5a). Few absolute dates have, however, been

  10. Enteroviral infection outbreak in the Republic of Belarus: principal characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of etiological agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amvrosieva, Tamara V; Paklonskaya, Natallia V; Biazruchka, Aliaksei A; Kazinetz, Olga N; Bohush, Zoya F; Fisenko, Elena G

    2006-06-01

    For the last decade enterovirus outbreaks were registered in all of six districts of Belarus. Two of them, reported in 1997 (in Gomel) and in 2003 (in Minsk), were the most extensive and involved 461 and 1,351 patients respectively. Virus ECHO 30 was identified as the dominant etiologic agent of the outbreak in 1997 whereas co-circulation of ECHO 30, ECHO 6 and Coxsackievirus B5 took place in 2003. Analysis of clinical manifestations during the Minsk outbreak revealed unusually high rate of severe clinical forms of infection including aseptic meningitis, encephalitis and myocardial disorders. Epidemiologic observation was ordinary for enterovirus epidemics in temperate climates: the peak of the outbreak was recorded during summer-autumn period of 2003, and 0-14 years old children predominated. Data from the case-control study indicated that illness was associated with drinking water from community water system. Also the laboratory examination demonstrated contamination of different water samples with the epidemic virus serotypes and sequence analysis showed high level of genetic similarity between waterborne and clinical isolates. For these reasons the outbreak should be classified as a waterborne one. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that all Belarusian ECHO 30 isolates belong to the major genotype of ECHO 30 which has been circulating for last 15 years in Europe and North America. Viral agents of 2003 were very similar and substantially differed from isolates of 1997. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of isolates from myocarditis patients revealed their considerable genetic similarity with ECHO 30 isolates from patients with aseptic meningitis and from water. The results of the study draw attention to the importance of virological control of tap and bottled water as a relevant measure aimed at reduction of epidemiological risks.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; da Silva Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1–4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population. PMID:26887252

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo da Silva; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1-4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population.

  13. Partial sequencing of the bottle gourd genome reveals markers useful for phylogenetic analysis and breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Sha

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bottle gourd [Lagenaria siceraria (Mol. Standl.] is an important cucurbit crop worldwide. Archaeological research indicates that bottle gourd was domesticated more than 10,000 years ago, making it one of the earliest plants cultivated by man. In spite of its widespread importance and long history of cultivation almost nothing has been known about the genome of this species thus far. Results We report here the partial sequencing of bottle gourd genome using the 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. A total of 150,253 sequence reads, which were assembled into 3,994 contigs and 82,522 singletons were generated. The total length of the non-redundant singletons/assemblies is 32 Mb, theoretically covering ~ 10% of the bottle gourd genome. Functional annotation of the sequences revealed a broad range of functional types, covering all the three top-level ontologies. Comparison of the gene sequences between bottle gourd and the model cucurbit cucumber (Cucumis sativus revealed a 90% sequence similarity on average. Using the sequence information, 4395 microsatellite-containing sequences were identified and 400 SSR markers were developed, of which 94% amplified bands of anticipated sizes. Transferability of these markers to four other cucurbit species showed obvious decline with increasing phylogenetic distance. From analyzing polymorphisms of a subset of 14 SSR markers assayed on 44 representative China bottle gourd varieties/landraces, a principal coordinates (PCo analysis output and a UPGMA-based dendrogram were constructed. Bottle gourd accessions tended to group by fruit shape rather than geographic origin, although in certain subclades the lines from the same or close origin did tend to cluster. Conclusions This work provides an initial basis for genome characterization, gene isolation and comparative genomics analysis in bottle gourd. The SSR markers developed would facilitate marker assisted breeding schemes for efficient

  14. Phylogenetic relationships of the ciliate class Heterotrichea (Protista, Ciliophora, Postciliodesmatophora) inferred from multiple molecular markers and multifaceted analysis strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazib, Shahed Uddin Ahmed; Vd'ačný, Peter; Kim, Ji Hye; Jang, Seok Won; Shin, Mann Kyoon

    2014-09-01

    The ciliate class Heterotrichea is defined by somatic dikinetids bearing postciliodesmata, by an oral apparatus consisting of a paroral membrane and an adoral zone of membranelles, as well as by features of nuclear division involving extramacronuclear microtubules. Although phylogenetic interrelationships among heterotrichs have been analyzed several times, deeper nodes of the heterotrichean tree of life remain poorly resolved. To cast more light on the evolutionary history of heterotricheans, we performed phylogenetic analyses of multiple loci (18S rRNA gene, ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 region, and 28S rRNA gene) using traditional tree-building phylogenetic methods and statistical tree topology tests as well as phylogenetic networks, split spectrum analysis and quartet likelihood mapping. This multifaceted approach has shown that (1) Peritromus is very likely an adelphotaxon of all other heterotrichs; (2) Spirostomum and Anigsteinia are sister taxa and their common monophyletic origin is strongly supported by a uniquely posteriorly-thickened paroral membrane; (3) the monotypic family Chattonidiidae should be suppressed because its type genus clusters within the family Condylostomatidae; and (4) new families are needed for Gruberia and Fabrea because their affiliation with Spirostomidae and Climacostomidae, respectively, is not supported by molecular phylogenies nor the fine structure of the paroral membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Complete Sequence of Mitochondrial COⅡ Gene of Fenneropenaeus chinensis and Its Applicability as a Marker for Phylogenetic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Shanshan; KONG Xiaoyu; LI Yulong; XU Hui

    2007-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit Ⅱ (COⅡ) gene of Penaeinae shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis was cloned and sequenced. The gene is 688 bp in length and codes for 229 amino acids. It shows 83.2%, 87.0% and 83.8% sequence similarity to Marsupenaeus Japonicus, Penaeus monodon and Farfantepenaeus notialis, respectively. The A+T content of the whole gene and that at the third position of codons are 64.7% and 78.2%, respectively. The phylogenetic relationship between F. chinensis and three other species representing genera Farfanatepenaeus, Marsupenaeus and Penaeus was analyzed. Results showed that the genetic distances among the four taxa ranged from 0.144 0 to 0.200 5, exceeding those estimated with COⅠ and partial 16S rRNA gene sequences among Marsupenaeus, Litopenaeus and Melicertus, and being therefore larger than the value among subgenera. It has been suggested that the COⅡ gene has a faster evolutionary rate than that of the COⅠ gene and partial 16S rRNA gene and could be used for phylogenetic analysis at genus or species level. The results of the present study indicated that Farfantepenaeus, Fenneropenaeus, Marsupenaeus and Penaeus are at a higher phylogenetic level than subgenus, which supports the opinion of the elevation of phylogenetic status of the four subgenera to genus level.

  16. Phylogenetic Analysis of Cynoglossidae in the Yangtze Estuary Based on Partial Sequence of Mitochondrial COⅠ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Chao; Yu Yanan; Zhang Tao; Yang Gang; Zhang Longzhen

    2015-01-01

    To determine the role of mitochondrial COⅠgene in classification and identification of species,a total of 39 single individuals from nine species pertaining to two genera of Cynoglossidae in the Yangtze Estuary were barcoded by COⅠ,sequenced and compared with that of other Cynoglossidae species recorded in the Gen Bank. Total genomic DNA was extracted from each scale sample using the classic phenol / chloroform extraction method. Six hundred and fifty base pairs( bp)COⅠfragments were amplified using the primers ’i. e. ’ F1: 5’- TCA ACC AAC CAC AAA GAC ATT GGC AC- 3’,R1: 5’- TAG ACT TCT GGG TGG CCA AAG AAT CA- 3’. Every PCR amplification was performed in a total volume of 50 μL of PCR mixture. PCR products were purified and then sequenced in both forward and reverse directions using an ABI PRISMTM 3730 XL Automated Sequencer. DNA sequences were aligned with clustal W using default parameters. Base composition,variable and parsimony informative sites were determined using MEGA 5. 0. Neighbor- joining( NJ) and Maximum parsimony( MP) phylogenetic trees were constructed for COⅠhaplotypes( Kimura 2 Parameter substitution model,K2P; 1 000 bootstraps pseudoreplications) using MEGA 5. 0. Using the MEGA5. 0 software for statistical analysis,the averaged AT content was greater than the GC content( Tab. 2). The GC content of codon position 1 averaged 53. 8%( 51. 8%-57. 3%),which of position 2 for 42. 0%,and that of position 3 ranged from 28. 1% to 37. 8% in average of 32. 4%( Tab. 4). The transitional pairs( si) was slightly more than the transversional pairs( sv),and the ratio( R = si/sv) was 1. 45( Tab. 3). Analysis of the frequency of amino acids in COⅠgene encoding protein showed that the highest frequency of amino acid was leucine,and the lowest frequency of amino acid was tryptophan( Tab. 5). The average K2 P distances pairwise-species and within-species were 0. 191 and 0. 003,respectively( Tab. 6). The K2 P distance pairwise-species was 63. 7

  17. Laboratory investigation and phylogenetic analysis of an imported Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus case in Greece.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Kossyvakis

    Full Text Available Rapid and reliable laboratory diagnosis of persons suspected of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV infection is important for timely implementation of infection control practices and disease management. In addition, monitoring molecular changes in the virus can help elucidate chains of transmission and identify mutations that might influence virus transmission efficiency. This was illustrated by a recent laboratory investigation we conducted on an imported MERS-CoV case in Greece. Two oropharyngeal swab specimens were collected on the 1st and 2nd day of patient hospitalization and tested using two real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR assays targeting the UpE and Orf-1a regions of the MERS-CoV genome and RT-PCR and partial sequencing of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and nucleocapsid genes. Serum specimens were also collected and serological test were performed. Results from the first swab sample were inconclusive while the second swab was strongly positive for MERS-CoV RNA by rRT-PCR and confirmed positive by RT-PCR and partial gene sequencing. Positive serologic test results further confirmed MERS-CoV infection. Full-length nucleocapsid and spike gene coding sequences were later obtained from the positive swab sample. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus was closely related to recent human-derived MERS-CoV strains obtained in Jeddah and Makkah, Saudi Arabia, in April 2014 and dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia and Qatar. These findings were consistent with the patient's history. We also identified a unique amino acid substitution in the spike receptor binding domain that may have implications for receptor binding efficiency. Our initial inconclusive rRT-PCR results highlight the importance of collecting multiple specimens from suspect MERS-CoV cases and particularly specimens from the lower respiratory tract.

  18. The small heat shock proteins from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans: gene expression, phylogenetic analysis, and structural modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Daniela A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that has been successfully used in metal bioleaching. In this study, an analysis of the A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 genome revealed the presence of three sHSP genes, Afe_1009, Afe_1437 and Afe_2172, that encode proteins from the HSP20 family, a class of intracellular multimers that is especially important in extremophile microorganisms. Results The expression of the sHSP genes was investigated in A. ferrooxidans cells submitted to a heat shock at 40°C for 15, 30 and 60 minutes. After 60 minutes, the gene on locus Afe_1437 was about 20-fold more highly expressed than the gene on locus Afe_2172. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses showed that the sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are possible non-paralogous proteins, and are regulated by the σ32 factor, a common transcription factor of heat shock proteins. Structural studies using homology molecular modeling indicated that the proteins encoded by Afe_1009 and Afe_1437 have a conserved α-crystallin domain and share similar structural features with the sHSP from Methanococcus jannaschii, suggesting that their biological assembly involves 24 molecules and resembles a hollow spherical shell. Conclusion We conclude that the sHSPs encoded by the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes are more likely to act as molecular chaperones in the A. ferrooxidans heat shock response. In addition, the three sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are not recent paralogs, and the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes could be inherited horizontally by A. ferrooxidans.

  19. Family structure and phylogenetic analysis of odorant receptor genes in the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Peng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemosensory receptors, which are all G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, come in four types: odorant receptors (ORs, vomeronasal receptors, trace-amine associated receptors and formyl peptide receptor-like proteins. The ORs are the most important receptors for detecting a wide range of environmental chemicals in daily life. Most fish OR genes have been identified from genome databases following the completion of the genome sequencing projects of many fishes. However, it remains unclear whether these OR genes from the genome databases are actually expressed in the fish olfactory epithelium. Thus, it is necessary to clone the OR mRNAs directly from the olfactory epithelium and to examine their expression status. Results Eighty-nine full-length and 22 partial OR cDNA sequences were isolated from the olfactory epithelium of the large yellow croaker, Larimichthys crocea. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis classified the vertebrate OR genes into two types, with several clades within each type, and showed that the L. crocea OR genes of each type are more closely related to those of fugu, pufferfish and stickleback than they are to those of medaka, zebrafish and frog. The reconciled tree showed 178 duplications and 129 losses. The evolutionary relationships among OR genes in these fishes accords with their evolutionary history. The fish OR genes have experienced functional divergence, and the different clades of OR genes have evolved different functions. The result of real-time PCR shows that different clades of ORs have distinct expression levels. Conclusion We have shown about 100 OR genes to be expressed in the olfactory epithelial tissues of L. crocea. The OR genes of modern fishes duplicated from their common ancestor, and were expanded over evolutionary time. The OR genes of L. crocea are closely related to those of fugu, pufferfish and stickleback, which is consistent with its evolutionary position. The different expression

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of HpnP reveals the origin of 2-methylhopanoid production in Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, J N; Michel, A J; Newman, D K

    2015-05-01

    Hopanoids are bacterial steroid-like lipids that can be preserved in the rock record on billion-year timescales. 2-Methylhopanoids are of particular interest to geobiologists because methylation is one of the few chemical modifications that remain after diagenesis and catagenesis. 2-Methylhopanes, the molecular fossils of 2-methylhopanoids, are episodically enriched in the rock record, but we do not have a robust interpretation for their abundance patterns. Here, we exploit the evolutionary record found in molecular sequences from extant organisms to reconstruct the biosynthetic history of 2-methylhopanoids using the C-2 hopanoid methylase, HpnP. Based on HpnP phylogenetic analysis, we find that 2-methylhopanoids originated in a subset of the Alphaproteobacteria. This conclusion is statistically robust and reproducible in multiple trials varying the outgroup, trimming stringency, and ingroup dataset used to infer the evolution of this protein family. The capacity for 2-methylhopanoid production was likely horizontally transferred from the Alphaproteobacteria into the Cyanobacteria after the Cyanobacteria's major divergences. Together, these results suggest that the ancestral function of 2-methylhopanoids was not related to oxygenic photosynthesis but instead to a trait already present in the Alphaproteobacteria. Moreover, given that early 2-methylhopane deposits could have been made solely by Alphaproteobacteria before the acquisition of hpnP by Cyanobacteria, and that the Alphaproteobacteria are thought to be ancestrally aerobic, we infer that 2-methylhopanoids likely arose after the oxygenation of the atmosphere. This finding is consistent with the geologic record-the oldest syngenetic 2-methylhopanes occur after the rise of oxygen, in middle Proterozoic strata of the Barney Creek Formation.

  1. Phylogenetic and molecular analysis of food-borne shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Elisabeth; Mellmann, Alexander; Semmler, Torsten; Stoeber, Helen; Wieler, Lothar H; Karch, Helge; Kuebler, Nikole; Fruth, Angelika; Harmsen, Dag; Weniger, Thomas; Tietze, Erhard; Schmidt, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Seventy-five food-associated Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains were analyzed by molecular and phylogenetic methods to describe their pathogenic potential. The presence of the locus of proteolysis activity (LPA), the chromosomal pathogenicity island (PAI) PAI ICL3, and the autotransporter-encoding gene sabA was examined by PCR. Furthermore, the occupation of the chromosomal integration sites of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), selC, pheU, and pheV, as well as the Stx phage integration sites yehV, yecE, wrbA, z2577, and ssrA, was analyzed. Moreover, the antibiotic resistance phenotypes of all STEC strains were determined. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed, and sequence types (STs) and sequence type complexes (STCs) were compared with those of 42 hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS)-associated enterohemorrhagic E. coli (HUSEC) strains. Besides 59 STs and 4 STCs, three larger clusters were defined in this strain collection. Clusters A and C consist mostly of highly pathogenic eae-positive HUSEC strains and some related food-borne STEC strains. A member of a new O26 HUS-associated clone and the 2011 outbreak strain E. coli O104:H4 were found in cluster A. Cluster B comprises only eae-negative food-borne STEC strains as well as mainly eae-negative HUSEC strains. Although food-borne strains of cluster B were not clearly associated with disease, serotypes of important pathogens, such as O91:H21 and O113:H21, were in this cluster and closely related to the food-borne strains. Clonal analysis demonstrated eight closely related genetic groups of food-borne STEC and HUSEC strains that shared the same ST and were similar in their virulence gene composition. These groups should be considered with respect to their potential for human infection.

  2. The first report of diablo in Megalobrama amblycephala: characterization, phylogenetic analysis, functional annotation and expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NGOC TUAN TRAN; IVAN JAKOVLIĆ; WEI-MIN WANG

    2017-09-01

    Smac/DIABLO gene is essential for the apoptosis mechanism in mammals. This study is the first report of the Megalobrama amblycephala (ma) diablo gene, and the first report of the tertiary structure of a Diablo polypeptide in fish. Madiablois 1540-bp long with an open reading frame of 792 bp, encoding a putative protein of 263 amino acids with a molecular weight of 29.2 kDa. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is closely related to the zebrafish Diablo-a homologue. It also indicates the existence of two diablo copies (a and b) in teleosts; apart fromthe Percomorpha group,where diablo-b has been lost, but diablo-a had undergone an independent duplication. Madiablo protein contains a long Smac_DIABLO super family domain (Leu32–Asp263) and alpha heliceswere prevalent in the secondary structure. Homology model of madiablo protein was constructed using the comparative modelling method. Expression of madiablo mRNA transcript was investigated using qPCR: (i) in five tissues from a healthy blunt snout bream, indicating the highest constitutive expression level in liver. (ii) During the embryo and juvenile development, indicating a spike inexpression during hatching and in later phases of the juvenile development. (iii) In response to Aeromonas hydrophila infection, indicating the downregulation in liver, spleen and kidney during the first 12 h postinfection and upregulation in spleen and kidney after 24 h postinfection (hpi). The results imply that madiablo is homologous to Diablo orthologues in other species, both structurallyand functionally, and that, it probably plays a role in the immune system of M. amblycephala.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of Austrian canine distemper virus strains from clinical samples from dogs and wild carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetka, V; Leschnik, M; Affenzeller, N; Möstl, K

    2011-04-01

    Austrian field cases of canine distemper (14 dogs, one badger [Meles meles] and one stone marten [Martes foina]) from 2002 to 2007 were investigated and the case histories were summarised briefly. Phylogenetic analysis of fusion (F) and haemagglutinin (H) gene sequences revealed different canine distemper virus (CDV) lineages circulating in Austria. The majority of CDV strains detected from 2002 to 2004 were well embedded in the European lineage. One Austrian canine sample detected in 2003, with a high similarity to Hungarian sequences from 2005 to 2006, could be assigned to the Arctic group (phocine distemper virus type 2-like). The two canine sequences from 2007 formed a clearly distinct group flanked by sequences detected previously in China and the USA on an intermediate position between the European wildlife and the Asia-1 cluster. The Austrian wildlife strains (2006 and 2007) could be assigned to the European wildlife group and were most closely related to, yet clearly different from, the 2007 canine samples. To elucidate the epidemiological role of Austrian wildlife in the transmission of the disease to dogs and vice versa, H protein residues related to receptor and host specificity (residues 530 and 549) were analysed. All samples showed the amino acids expected for their host of origin, with the exception of a canine sequence from 2007, which had an intermediate position between wildlife and canine viral strains. In the period investigated, canine strains circulating in Austria could be assigned to four different lineages reflecting both a high diversity and probably different origins of virus introduction to Austria in different years.

  4. Phylogenetic and Molecular Clock Analysis of Dengue Serotype 1 and 3 from New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afreen, Nazia; Naqvi, Irshad H; Broor, Shobha; Ahmed, Anwar; Parveen, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most prevalent arboviral disease in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. The present report describes molecular detection and serotyping of dengue viruses in acute phase blood samples collected from New Delhi, India. Phylogenetic and molecular clock analysis of dengue virus serotype 1 and 3 strains were also investigated. Dengue virus infection was detected in 68.87% out of 604 samples tested by RT-PCR between 2011 & 2014. Dengue serotype 1 was detected in 25.48% samples, dengue serotype 2 in 79.56% samples and dengue serotype 3 in 11.29% samples. Dengue serotype 4 was not detected. Co-infection by more than one dengue serotype was detected in 18.26% samples. Envelope gene of 29 DENV-1 and 14 DENV-3 strains were sequenced in the study. All the DENV-1 strains grouped with the American African genotype. All DENV-3 strains were found to belong to Genotype III. Nucleotide substitution rates of dengue 1 and 3 viruses were determined in the study. Time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of dengue 1 viruses was determined to be 132 years. TMRCA of DENV-3 viruses was estimated to be 149 years. Bayesian skyline plots were constructed for Indian DENV-1 and 3 strains which showed a decrease in population size since 2005 in case of DENV- 1 strains while no change was observed in recent years in case of DENV-3 strains. The study also revealed a change in the dominating serotype in Delhi, India in recent years. The study will be helpful in formulating control strategies for the outbreaks. In addition, it will also assist in tracking the movement and evolution of this emerging virus.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of P5 P-type ATPases, a eukaryotic lineage of secretory pathway pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Annette; Asp, Torben; Holm, Preben Bach

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotes encompass a remarkable variety of organisms and unresolved lineages. Different phylogenetic analyses have lead to conflicting conclusions as to the origin and associations between lineages and species. In this work, we investigated evolutionary relationship of a family of cation pumps...... exclusive for the secretory pathway of eukaryotes by combining the identification of lineage-specific genes with phylogenetic evolution of common genes. Sequences of P5 ATPases, which are regarded to be cation pumps in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), were identified in all eukaryotic lineages but not in any...

  6. A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Makendi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of dermatophyte species using DNA sequence polymorphism in calmodulin gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, Bahram; Mirhendi, Hossein; Makimura, Koichi; de Hoog, G Sybren; Shidfar, Mohammad Reza; Nouripour-Sisakht, Sadegh; Jalalizand, Niloofar

    2016-01-01

    Use of phylogenetic species concepts based on rDNA internal transcribe spacer (ITS) regions have improved the taxonomy of dermatophyte species; however, confirmation and refinement using other genes are needed. Since the calmodulin gene has not been systematically used in dermatophyte taxonomy, we e

  8. The evolution and function of adult attachment: a comparative and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, R Chris; Brumbaugh, Claudia C; Marks, Michael J

    2005-11-01

    Although the evolutionary functions of attachment in infant-caregiver relationships are undisputed, it is unclear what functions--if any--attachment serves in adult romantic relationships. The objective of this research was to examine the evolution and function of adult attachment (i.e., pair bonding) by applying comparative and phylogenetic methods to archival data collected on 2 diverse samples of mammalian species. The authors found that species exhibiting adult attachment were more likely than others to be characterized by paternal care, developmental immaturity or neoteny, small social groups, and small body sizes. The authors also used phylogenetic techniques to reconstruct the evolution of adult attachment and test alternative evolutionary models of the comparative correlates of pair bonding. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the relationship between paternal care and adult attachment may be a functional one (i.e., due to convergent evolution) but that the relationship between neoteny and adult attachment may be due to homology (i.e., shared ancestry). Discussion focuses on the potential of comparative and phylogenetic methods for advancing the science of social and personality psychology.

  9. Alignment-Free Phylogenetic Reconstruction: Sample Complexity via a Branching Process Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Daskalakis, Constantinos

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient phylogenetic reconstruction algorithm, allowing insertions and deletions, which provably achieves a sequence-length requirement (or sample complexity) growing polynomially in the number of taxa. Our algorithm is distance-based, that is, it relies on pairwise sequence comparisons. More importantly, our approach largely bypasses the difficult problem of multiple sequence alignment.

  10. Using phylogenetic probes for quantification of stable isotope labeling and microbial community analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Eoin L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Karaoz, Ulas; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-12-09

    Herein is described methods for a high-sensitivity means to measure the incorporation of stable isotope labeled substrates into RNA following stable isotope probing experiments (SIP). RNA is hybridized to a set of probes such as phylogenetic microarrays and isotope incorporation is quantified such as by secondary ion mass spectrometer imaging (NanoSIMS).

  11. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa: comparative genomic analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and expression profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Zhang, Shifan; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms. Despite much research on carotenoid biosynthesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there is a lack of information on the carotenoid pathway in Brassica rapa. To better understand its carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, we performed a systematic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes at the genome level in B. rapa. Results We identified 67 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa, which were ort...

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of Neuraminidase gene of avian influenza H5N1 subtype detected in Iran in 1390(2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Kord

    2013-09-01

    Background & aim: Among the various subtypes of avian influenza viruses, an H5N1 subtype virus with high pathogenicity is of great importance. The aim of this study was to determine the Phylogenetic analysis of neuraminidase gene of avian influenza virus subtype of the H5N1 in Iran in 1390. Methods: In this experimental study, two swab samples from chickens with suspected symptoms of avian influenza were tested by the World Health Organization recommendation. The neuraminidase gene of positive samples was amplified by RT-PCR technique. After sequencing the phylogenetic studies were analyzed using MEGA5 and Megalign. Results: Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus belongs to the Clade 2.3.2.1 which is highly similar to the viruses that are identified in Mongolia in 2010. Also in the stem of this virus neuraminidase protein a number of 20 amino acid has been deleted at position 69-49. Conclusion: Due to findings of this study, it seems that the virus has entered by migratory wild birds with the origin of Mongolia. Key words: Influenza, Avian, Neuraminidase

  13. Discrimination and chemical phylogenetic study of seven species of Dendrobium using infrared spectroscopy combined with cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Congpei; He, Tao; Chun, Ze

    2013-04-01

    Dendrobium is a commonly used and precious herb in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The high biodiversity of Dendrobium and the therapeutic needs require tools for the correct and fast discrimination of different Dendrobium species. This study investigates Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy followed by cluster analysis for discrimination and chemical phylogenetic study of seven Dendrobium species. Despite the general pattern of the IR spectra, different intensities, shapes, peak positions were found in the IR spectra of these samples, especially in the range of 1800-800 cm-1. The second derivative transformation and alcoholic extracting procedure obviously enlarged the tiny spectral differences among these samples. The results indicated each Dendrobium species had a characteristic IR spectra profile, which could be used to discriminate them. The similarity coefficients among the samples were analyzed based on their second derivative IR spectra, which ranged from 0.7632 to 0.9700, among the seven Dendrobium species, and from 0.5163 to 0.9615, among the ethanol extracts. A dendrogram was constructed based on cluster analysis the IR spectra for studying the chemical phylogenetic relationships among the samples. The results indicated that D. denneanum and D. crepidatum could be the alternative resources to substitute D. chrysotoxum, D. officinale and D. nobile which were officially recorded in Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In conclusion, with the advantages of high resolution, speediness and convenience, the experimental approach can successfully discriminate and construct the chemical phylogenetic relationships of the seven Dendrobium species.

  14. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification.

  15. Identification of Tunisian Leishmania spp. by PCR amplification of cysteine proteinase B (cpb) genes and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouch, Melek; Fathallah-Mili, Akila; Driss, Mehdi; Lahmadi, Ramzi; Ayari, Chiraz; Guizani, Ikram; Ben Said, Moncef; Benabderrazak, Souha

    2013-03-01

    Discrimination of the Old World Leishmania parasites is important for diagnosis and epidemiological studies of leishmaniasis. We have developed PCR assays that allow the discrimination between Leishmania major, Leishmania tropica and Leishmania infantum Tunisian species. The identification was performed by a simple PCR targeting cysteine protease B (cpb) gene copies. These PCR can be a routine molecular biology tools for discrimination of Leishmania spp. from different geographical origins and different clinical forms. Our assays can be an informative source for cpb gene studying concerning drug, diagnostics and vaccine research. The PCR products of the cpb gene and the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase (nagt) Leishmania gene were sequenced and aligned. Phylogenetic trees of Leishmania based cpb and nagt sequences are close in topology and present the classic distribution of Leishmania in the Old World. The phylogenetic analysis has enabled the characterization and identification of different strains, using both multicopy (cpb) and single copy (nagt) genes. Indeed, the cpb phylogenetic analysis allowed us to identify the Tunisian Leishmania killicki species, and a group which gathers the least evolved isolates of the Leishmania donovani complex, that was originated from East Africa. This clustering confirms the African origin for the visceralizing species of the L. donovani complex.

  16. Phylogenetic relationships of five species of Dorippinae (Crustacea, Decapoda) revealed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANYu; LIXinzheng; SONGLinsheng; CAIZhonghua

    2004-01-01

    A molecular phylogeny is presented for the subfamily Dorippinae (including 9 individuals, representing 5 species and 4 genera), based on the sequence data from 16S rRNA gene. Two-cluster test between lineages in these phylogenetic trees has been performed. On the basis of rate constancy, the rate of nucleotide substitutions of 16S rDNA sequence data is estimated as 0.27% per million years. The analysis strongly supports the recognition of the Dorippinae as a monophyletic subfamily. Phylogenetic tree indicates that the subfamily Dorippinae is divided into two main clades, and genus Dorippe appears basal in the subfamily, diverging from other species 36.6 Ma ago. It is also clear that the Heikea is closely related to the genus Neodorippe. The divergence time between them is 15.8 Ma.

  17. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris: Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis and Deduction of Putative Cognate Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-01-20

    ABSTRACT-Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTS) composed of sensory histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR), constitute a key element of the mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to changes in environments. A large number of TCSTSs including 59 putative HKs and 55 RRs were identified from the Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome, indicating their important roles in regulation of cellular metabolism. In this study, the structural and phylogenetic analysis of all putative TCSTSs in D. vulgaris was performed. The results showed D. vulgaris contained an unexpectedly large number of hybrid-type HKs, implying that multiple-step phosphorelay may be a common signal transduction mechanism in D. vulgaris. Most TCSTS components of D. vulgaris were found clustered into several subfamilies previously recognized in other bacteria and extensive co-evolution between D. vulgaris HKs and RRs was observed, suggesting that the concordance of HKs and RRs in cognate phylogenetic groups could be indicative of cognate TCSTSs...

  18. Data set for phylogenetic tree and RAMPAGE Ramachandran plot analysis of SODs in Gossypium raimondii and G. arboreum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this paper is supporting the research article “Genome-Wide Analysis of Superoxide Dismutase Gene Family in Gossypium raimondii and G. arboreum” [1]. In this data article, we present phylogenetic tree showing dichotomy with two different clusters of SODs inferred by the Bayesian method of MrBayes (version 3.2.4, “Bayesian phylogenetic inference under mixed models” [2], Ramachandran plots of G. raimondii and G. arboreum SODs, the protein sequence used to generate 3D sructure of proteins and the template accession via SWISS-MODEL server, “SWISS-MODEL: modelling protein tertiary and quaternary structure using evolutionary information.” [3] and motif sequences of SODs identified by InterProScan (version 4.8 with the Pfam database, “Pfam: the protein families database” [4].

  19. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that Japanese encephalitis virus genotype III is still prevalent in swine herds in Sichuan province in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Qiao; Liu, Hongming; Chai, Chunxia; He, Bo; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Wen, Xintian; Yan, Qiguai; Ma, Xiaoping; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-06-01

    The genome of JEV strain SC201301, which was isolated from an aborted fetal piglet in 2013 in Sichuan province in China, was completely sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Sequence alignments showed that the SC201301 strain shared 97-100% sequence identity with other genotype III strains but showed less similarity to genotype I representative JEVs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the SC201301 strain belonged to genotype III and was most closely related to representative strains such as SA14-14-2, HW and SH0601. Our findings suggest that JEV genotype III is still prevalent in swine herds in Sichuan province in China, and thus, there is an urgent need to monitor the infection status of JEV among swine herds in China.

  20. Review and phylogenetic analysis of qac genes that reduce susceptibility to quaternary ammonium compounds in Staphylococcus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David; Nielsen, Lene Nørby;

    2015-01-01

    The qac genes of Staphylococcus species encode multidrug efflux pumps: membrane proteins that export toxic molecules and thus increase tolerance to a variety of compounds such as disinfecting agents, including quaternary ammonium compounds (for which they are named), intercalating dyes and some...... described in the literature for qac detection may miss particular qac genes due to lack of DNA conservation. Despite their resemblance in substrate specificity, the Qac proteins belonging to the two protein families have little in common. QacA and QacB are highly conserved in Staphylococcus species, while...... variation, despite their short length, even within the Staphylococcus genus. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes identified similarity to a large number of other SMR members, found in staphylococci as well as in other genera. A number of phylogenetic trees of SMR Qac proteins are presented here, starting...

  1. Data set for phylogenetic tree and RAMPAGE Ramachandran plot analysis of SODs in Gossypium raimondii and G. arboreum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Minxuan; Chen, Jie; Deng, Fenni; Yuan, Rui; Zhang, Xiaopei; Shen, Fafu

    2016-12-01

    The data presented in this paper is supporting the research article "Genome-Wide Analysis of Superoxide Dismutase Gene Family in Gossypium raimondii and G. arboreum" [1]. In this data article, we present phylogenetic tree showing dichotomy with two different clusters of SODs inferred by the Bayesian method of MrBayes (version 3.2.4), "Bayesian phylogenetic inference under mixed models" [2], Ramachandran plots of G. raimondii and G. arboreum SODs, the protein sequence used to generate 3D sructure of proteins and the template accession via SWISS-MODEL server, "SWISS-MODEL: modelling protein tertiary and quaternary structure using evolutionary information." [3] and motif sequences of SODs identified by InterProScan (version 4.8) with the Pfam database, "Pfam: the protein families database" [4].

  2. Climate, vegetation and lake development at Sokli (northern Finland) during early MIS 3 at approx50 kyr: Revising earlier concepts on climate, glacial and vegetation dynamics in Fennoscandia during the Weichselian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmens, Karin F. (Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-08-15

    Long sediment records that register environmental changes in formerly glaciated regions such as Fennoscandia in the period preceding the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at approx 20 kyr are rare. The Weichselian history of Fennoscandia is based on the long-distance correlation of poorly dated stratigraphic fragmentary evidence and studies on glacial geomorphology. Environmental conditions during ice-free intervals have been mostly reconstructed based on low resolution palynological analysis only. Here we present the results of a detailed study of a for Fennoscandia unusually long and continuous sediment sequence that has been recovered from the Sokli basin in northern Finland. The Sokli sequence consists of tills, glacio-fluvial beds, and fluvial beds, interlayered with fossil-rich lacustrine sediments that according to multiple accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) 14C and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) datings extend from the present into the Penultimate Glacial representing the last approx130 kyr. This report focuses on the youngest Weichselian interstadial interval with ice-free conditions at Sokli dated to approx50 kyr in the early part of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3. A comprehensive environmental reconstruction is made based on multi-proxy analysis on a two meter thick laminated, lacustrine clay-silt sequence, including lithological characteristics; organic content (loss-on-ignition, LOI); plant microfossils (pollen, spores, algal and fungal remains); macrofossils of plants (e.g. seeds, moss remains) and of aquatic animals (e.g. statoblasts of Bryozoa); head-capsules of chironomids (i.e. aquatic insects); and diatoms and other siliceous microfossils (e.g. phytolits, chrysophyte stomatocysts). Additionally, geomorphic evidence and analysis of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data are employed in the environmental reconstruction. Mean July temperatures are reconstructed by applying transfer functions to the pollen, chironomid and diatom records. The results

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis Supports Horizontal Transmission as a Driving Force of the Spread of Avian Bornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Schmidt, Volker; Rinder, Monika; Legler, Marko; Twietmeyer, Sönke; Schwemmer, Phillip; Corman, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    Avian bornaviruses are a genetically diverse group of viruses initially discovered in 2008. They are known to infect several avian orders. Bornaviruses of parrots and related species (Psittaciformes) are causative agents of proventricular dilatation disease, a chronic and often fatal neurologic disease widely distributed in captive psittacine populations. Although knowledge has considerably increased in the past years, many aspects of the biology of avian bornaviruses are still undiscovered. In particular, the precise way of transmission remains unknown. In order to collect further information on the epidemiology of bornavirus infections in birds we collected samples from captive and free-ranging aquatic birds (n = 738) and Passeriformes (n = 145) in Germany and tested them for the presence of bornaviruses by PCR assays covering a broad range of known bornaviruses. We detected aquatic bird bornavirus 1 (ABBV-1) in three out of 73 sampled free-ranging mute swans (Cygnus olor) and one out of 282 free-ranging Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus). Canary bornavirus 1 (CnBV-1), CnBV-2 and CnBV-3 were detected in four, six and one out of 48 captive common canaries (Serinus canaria forma domestica), respectively. In addition, samples originating from 49 bornavirus-positive captive Psittaciformes were used for determination of parrot bornavirus 2 (PaBV-2) and PaBV-4 sequences. Bornavirus sequences compiled during this study were used for phylogenetic analysis together with all related sequences available in GenBank. Within ABBV-1, PaBV-2 and PaBV-4, identical or genetically closely related bornavirus sequences were found in parallel in various different avian species, suggesting that inter-species transmission is frequent relative to the overall transmission of these viruses. Our results argue for an important role of horizontal transmission, but do not exclude the additional possibility of vertical transmission. Furthermore we defined clearly separated sequence

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis Supports Horizontal Transmission as a Driving Force of the Spread of Avian Bornaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Schmidt, Volker; Rinder, Monika; Legler, Marko; Twietmeyer, Sönke; Schwemmer, Phillip; Corman, Victor M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Avian bornaviruses are a genetically diverse group of viruses initially discovered in 2008. They are known to infect several avian orders. Bornaviruses of parrots and related species (Psittaciformes) are causative agents of proventricular dilatation disease, a chronic and often fatal neurologic disease widely distributed in captive psittacine populations. Although knowledge has considerably increased in the past years, many aspects of the biology of avian bornaviruses are still undiscovered. In particular, the precise way of transmission remains unknown. Aims and Methods In order to collect further information on the epidemiology of bornavirus infections in birds we collected samples from captive and free-ranging aquatic birds (n = 738) and Passeriformes (n = 145) in Germany and tested them for the presence of bornaviruses by PCR assays covering a broad range of known bornaviruses. We detected aquatic bird bornavirus 1 (ABBV-1) in three out of 73 sampled free-ranging mute swans (Cygnus olor) and one out of 282 free-ranging Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus). Canary bornavirus 1 (CnBV-1), CnBV-2 and CnBV-3 were detected in four, six and one out of 48 captive common canaries (Serinus canaria forma domestica), respectively. In addition, samples originating from 49 bornavirus-positive captive Psittaciformes were used for determination of parrot bornavirus 2 (PaBV-2) and PaBV-4 sequences. Bornavirus sequences compiled during this study were used for phylogenetic analysis together with all related sequences available in GenBank. Results of the Study Within ABBV-1, PaBV-2 and PaBV-4, identical or genetically closely related bornavirus sequences were found in parallel in various different avian species, suggesting that inter-species transmission is frequent relative to the overall transmission of these viruses. Our results argue for an important role of horizontal transmission, but do not exclude the additional possibility of vertical transmission

  5. Molecular phylogenetic and positive selection analysis of Japanese encephalitis virus strains isolated from pigs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Ming; Pei, Jing-Jing; Dong, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Ming-Qiu; Wang, Jia-Ying; Gou, Hong-Chao; Luo, Yong-Wen; Chen, Jin-Ding

    2013-12-26

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is one of the most important virus which causes encephalitis. This disease is most prevalent in the south, southeast and the east region of Asia. In this study, two JEV strains, named JEV/SW/GD/01/2009 and JEV/SW/GZ/09/2004, were isolated from aborted fetuses and seminal fluid of pigs in China. To determine the characteristic of these virus isolates, the virulence of two newly JEV isolates was investigated, the result evidenced that the JEV/SW/GD/01/2009 did not kill mice, while the JEV/SW/GZ/09/2004 displayed neurovirulence with 0.925log10 p.f.u./LD50. Additionally, the full genome sequences of JEV were determined and compared with other known JEV strains. Results demonstrated that the genome of two JEV isolates was 10,976 nucleotides (nt) in length. As compared to the Chinese vaccine strain SA14-14-2, the JEV/SW/GD/01/2009 and the JEV/SW/GZ/09/2004 showed 99.7% and 97.5% identity at the nucleotide level, 99.6% and 96.7% identity at the amino acid level, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the full-length genome revealed that two JEV isolates were all clustered into genotype III compared to the reference strains. Furthermore, selection analyses revealed that dominant selective pressure acting on the JEV genome was purifying selection. Four sites under positive selection were identified: codon 521 (amino acid E-227), 2296 (amino acid NS4b-24), 3048 (amino acid NS5-521) and 3055 (amino acid NS5-528). Amino acid E-227 was proved to be related to neurovirulence. Taken together, the molecular epidemiology and functional of positively selected amino acid sites of two newly JEV isolates were fully understood, which might be helpful to predict possible changes in virulence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain structure evolution in a basal vertebrate clade: evidence from phylogenetic comparative analysis of cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolm Niclas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate brain is composed of several interconnected, functionally distinct structures and much debate has surrounded the basic question of how these structures evolve. On the one hand, according to the 'mosaic evolution hypothesis', because of the elevated metabolic cost of brain tissue, selection is expected to target specific structures mediating the cognitive abilities which are being favored. On the other hand, the 'concerted evolution hypothesis' argues that developmental constraints limit such mosaic evolution and instead the size of the entire brain varies in response to selection on any of its constituent parts. To date, analyses of these hypotheses of brain evolution have been limited to mammals and birds; excluding Actinopterygii, the basal and most diverse class of vertebrates. Using a combination of recently developed phylogenetic multivariate allometry analyses and comparative methods that can identify distinct rates of evolution, even in highly correlated traits, we studied brain structure evolution in a highly variable clade of ray-finned fishes; the Tanganyikan cichlids. Results Total brain size explained 86% of the variance in brain structure volume in cichlids, a lower proportion than what has previously been reported for mammals. Brain structures showed variation in pair-wise allometry suggesting some degree of independence in evolutionary changes in size. This result is supported by variation among structures on the strength of their loadings on the principal size axis of the allometric analysis. The rate of evolution analyses generally supported the results of the multivariate allometry analyses, showing variation among several structures in their evolutionary patterns. The olfactory bulbs and hypothalamus were found to evolve faster than other structures while the dorsal medulla presented the slowest evolutionary rate. Conclusion Our results favor a mosaic model of brain evolution, as certain

  7. Detection of feline calicivirus (FCV) from vaccinated cats and phylogenetic analysis of its capsid genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, K; Sakai, S; Sunaga, F; Murakami, M; Kiuchi, A; Fukuyama, M; Furuhata, K; Hara, M; Soma, T; Ishikawa, Y; Taneno, A

    2006-04-01

    We analysed genogroups of four feline calcivirus (FCV) isolates (FCV-S, H10, Ao198-1 and ML89) obtained from cats that experienced FCV infection after having been vaccinated against FCV. New PCR primer sets (8F/8R, Ao-S/Ao-A, cp-S/cp-A) were also designed, since the conventional Seal primer failed to amplify the target sequences in two samples. The genogroups of the four isolates as well as eight global and 17 domestic strains were determined by phylogenetic analysis of their amino acid sequences. One out of the four strains (25%) isolated in this study, H10, was grouped into genogroup I, along with the vaccine strains F9 and FCV-255. The other three isolates (75%) belonged to genogroup II. Thus, there were more isolates in genogroup II than in genogroup I. However, the antibody values of the four isolates against cat anti-F9 antisera were significantly decreased. There may be no relationship between the neutralizing antibody titre and genogroup. Amino acid sequence alignment of the four isolates showed that only a single amino acid in region C, which is involved in neutralization epitopes, was different in ML89 strain from that of F9. The other three strains, H10, Ao198-1 and FCV-B, shared the same amino acid sequence with F9. Alignment of amino acids for linear epitopes in the F9 strain, which are located at regions D and E, showed variations in 5' hypervariable region (HVR) of E, whereas D and conE had only synonymous substitutions i.e. no change in the amino acid sequence. This mutation in 5' HVR of region E suggested a vaccine breakdown, as the region is known to be essential for antigenicity. The genogroup II FCV is likely to be the cause of the FCV infection in this study, while the vaccine strains belong to genogroup I. Thus, the existing vaccine may need reevaluation for its effectiveness.

  8. Composition and phylogenetic analysis of vitellogenin coding sequences in the Indonesian coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canapa, Adriana; Olmo, Ettore; Forconi, Mariko; Pallavicini, Alberto; Makapedua, Monica Daisy; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Barucca, Marco

    2012-07-01

    The coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis, a living fossil, occupies a key phylogenetic position to explore the changes that have affected the genomes of the aquatic vertebrates that colonized dry land. This is the first study to isolate and analyze L. menadoensis mRNA. Three different vitellogenin transcripts were identified and their inferred amino acid sequences compared to those of other known vertebrates. The phylogenetic data suggest that the evolutionary history of this gene family in coelacanths was characterized by a different duplication event than those which occurred in teleosts, amniotes, and amphibia. Comparison of the three sequences highlighted differences in functional sites. Moreover, despite the presence of conserved sites compared with the other oviparous vertebrates, some sites were seen to have changed, others to be similar only to those of teleosts, and others still to resemble only to those of tetrapods.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of Persian Gazella, Gazella subgutturosa (Artiodactyla: Bovidae based on cytochrome b in central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Fadakar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Persian gazelle, Gazella subgutturosa, exists throughout arid and semiarid regions of Iran and has a key role in these frail ecosystems. Habitat degradation and population decline has placed it on the list of vulnerable species in 2008. The phylogenetic relationships of three Persian gazelle populations in the central part of Iran (i.e. Ghamishlou National Park and Wildlife Refuge, Mouteh Wildlife Refuge in Isfahan province and Kalmand-Bahadoran Protected Area in Yazd province were investigated using parts and short fragments of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (425 base pairs. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree separated the populations of Yazd and Isfahan provinces, but populations within the Isfahan province shared the same clade. All populations were classified as Persian gazelle. The studied populations are facing threats because of road construction, industrial development and urbanization. Accordingly urgent conservation plans are needed to preserve their genetic diversity and prevent them from falling into extinction.

  10. Multilocus sequence analysis of Fusarium pseudograminearum reveals a single phylogenetic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason B; Chakraborty, Sukumar

    2006-12-01

    Fusarium pseudograminearum causes crown rot of wheat in Australia and most other wheat growing regions, but its evolutionary history is largely unknown. We demonstrate for the first time that F. pseudograminearum is a single phylogenetic species without consistent lineage development across genes. Isolates of F. pseudograminearum, F. graminearum sensu lato, and F. cerealis, were collected from four countries and four single copy, nuclear genes were partially sequenced, aligned with previously published sequences of these and related species, and analysed by maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Evolutionary divergence varied between genes, with high phylogenetic incongruence occurring between the gene genealogies. The absence of geographic differentiation between isolates indicates that the introduction of new fungal strains to a region has the potential to introduce new pathogenic and toxigenic genes into the native population through sexual recombination.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA in a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome containing a novel 7629-bp deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Sosa, Jose Francisco; Herrero, María Dolores; Munoz, Maria de Lourdes; Aguirre-Campa, Luis Enrique; Pérez-Ramírez, Gerardo; García-Ramírez, Rubén; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Montoya, Julio

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been associated with different illnesses in humans, such as Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), which is related to deletions of different sizes and positions among patients. Here, we report a Mexican patient with typical features of KSS containing a novel deletion of 7629 bp in size with 85% heteroplasmy, which has not been previously reported. Sequence analysis revealed 3-bp perfect short direct repeats flanking the deletion region, in addition to 7-bp imperfect direct repeats within 9-10 bp. Furthermore, sequencing, alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the hypervariable region revealed that the patient may belong to a founder Native American haplogroup C4c.

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis on SLG and SRK Genes in Brassica and Raphanus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yu-tang; MA Chao-zhi; FU Ting-dong; TU Jin-xing

    2005-01-01

    S-locus genes were cloned from three Brassica napus and three B. campestris lines by using PCR walking and homologue sequence methods. A phylogenetic gene tree was constructed based on the six cloned genes and fifty-one previously reported SLG/SRK genes of Brassica and Raphanus. The SLGs from R. sativus were dispersed in the phylogenetic tree intermingling with SLG/SRKs from B. oleracea, B. napus and B. campestris. The SLG/SRK genes of class Ⅱ clustered independently in one group. The SLG/SRK genes of class Ⅰ showed to be more divergent than class Ⅱ genes. These results suggested that the divergence of class Ⅰ and class Ⅱ should have occurred before the differentiation of the genera Brassica and Raphanus. In addition, SLG and SRK of the same S haplotypes belonged to the same class. It suggested that class-Ⅰ and class-Ⅱ group divergence occurred first, and then SLG and SRK diverged. The three SC SRK genes from B. napus and B. campestris were grouped into one cluster, displaying difference from the SC SLG of B.oleracea. These three SC SRK genes were close to SI SRK of SI1300, SI271 and guanyou in phylogenetic relationships.These results indicated that SC and SI genes diverged more recently. It is not clear yet whether the differentiation of SC and SI genes was earlier than the differentiation of Brassica and Raphanus. Studies based on more genes are necessary for a comprehensive elucidation of the phylogenetic relationships in Brassicaceae.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of the true water bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Nepomorpha: evidence from mitochondrial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Qiang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The true water bugs are grouped in infraorder Nepomorpha (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera and are of great economic importance. The phylogenetic relationships within Nepomorpha and the taxonomic hierarchies of Pleoidea and Aphelocheiroidea are uncertain. Most of the previous studies were based on morphological characters without algorithmic assessment. In the latest study, the molecular markers employed in phylogenetic analyses were partial sequences of 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA with a total length about 1 kb. Up to now, no mitochondrial genome of the true water bugs has been sequenced, which is one of the largest data sets that could be compared across animal taxa. In this study we analyzed the unresolved problems in Nepomorpha using evidence from mitochondrial genomes. Results Nine mitochondrial genomes of Nepomorpha and five of other hemipterans were sequenced. These mitochondrial genomes contain the commonly found 37 genes without gene rearrangements. Based on the nucleotide sequences of mt-genomes, Pleoidea is not a member of the Nepomorpha and Aphelocheiroidea should be grouped back into Naucoroidea. Phylogenetic relationships among the superfamilies of Nepomorpha were resolved robustly. Conclusion The mt-genome is an effective data source for resolving intraordinal phylogenetic problems at the superfamily level within Heteroptera. The mitochondrial genomes of the true water bugs are typical insect mt-genomes. Based on the nucleotide sequences of the mt-genomes, we propose the Pleoidea to be a separate heteropteran infraorder. The infraorder Nepomorpha consists of five superfamilies with the relationships (Corixoidea + ((Naucoroidea + Notonectoidea + (Ochteroidea + Nepoidea.

  14. Comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes in Diplura (hexapoda, arthropoda): taxon sampling is crucial for phylogenetic inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Jun; Koch, Markus; Mallatt, Jon M; Luan, Yun-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Two-pronged bristletails (Diplura) are traditionally classified into three major superfamilies: Campodeoidea, Projapygoidea, and Japygoidea. The interrelationships of these three superfamilies and the monophyly of Diplura have been much debated. Few previous studies included Projapygoidea in their phylogenetic considerations, and its position within Diplura still is a puzzle from both morphological and molecular points of view. Until now, no mitochondrial genome has been sequenced for any projapygoid species. To fill in this gap, we determined and annotated the complete mitochondrial genome of Octostigma sinensis (Octostigmatidae, Projapygoidea), and of three more dipluran species, one each from the Campodeidae, Parajapygidae, and Japygidae. All four newly sequenced dipluran mtDNAs encode the same set of genes in the same gene order as shared by most crustaceans and hexapods. Secondary structure truncations have occurred in trnR, trnC, trnS1, and trnS2, and the reduction of transfer RNA D-arms was found to be taxonomically correlated, with Campodeoidea having experienced the most reduction. Partitioned phylogenetic analyses, based on both amino acids and nucleotides of the protein-coding genes plus the ribosomal RNA genes, retrieve significant support for a monophyletic Diplura within Pancrustacea, with Projapygoidea more closely related to Campodeoidea than to Japygoidea. Another key finding is that monophyly of Diplura cannot be recovered unless Projapygoidea is included in the phylogenetic analyses; this explains the dipluran polyphyly found by past mitogenomic studies. Including Projapygoidea increased the sampling density within Diplura and probably helped by breaking up a long-branch-attraction artifact. This finding provides an example of how proper sampling is significant for phylogenetic inference.

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of Homologous Proteins Encoded by UL2 and UL23 genes of Herpesviridae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-ding LIU; Wen-juan WU; Min HONG; Hai-jing SHI; Shao-hui MA; Jing-jing WANG; Hong-ling ZHAO; Yun LIAO; Qi-han LI

    2007-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the Herpesviridae β-gene play a critical role in the replication stage of the virus. In this paper, phylogenetic analyses provided evidence that someβ-gene products, such as UL2 and UL23 from HSV1, have their homologous genes in its family, and also exist in prokaryotic organisms, indicating that these viruses appear to have been assembled over evolutionary time by numerous independent events of horizontal gene transfer.

  16. Phylogenetic relationships among clonal groups of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli as assessed by multi-locus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James R; Owens, Krista L; Clabots, Connie R; Weissman, Scott J; Cannon, Steven B

    2006-06-01

    The evolutionary origins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) remain uncertain despite these organisms' relevance to human disease. A valid understanding of ExPEC phylogeny is needed as a framework against which the observed distribution of virulence factors and clinical associations can be analyzed. Accordingly, phylogenetic relationships were defined by multi-locus sequence analysis among 44 representatives of selected ExPEC clonal groups and the E. coli Reference (ECOR) collection. Recombination, which significantly obscured the phylogenetic signal for several strains, was dealt with by excluding strains or specific sequences. Conflicting overall phylogenies, and internal phylogenies for virulence-associated phylogenetic group B2, were inferred depending on the specific dataset (i.e., how extensively purged of recombination), outgroup (Salmonella enterica and/or Escherichia fergusonii), and analysis method (neighbor joining, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, or Bayesian likelihood). Nonetheless, the major E. coli phylogenetic groups A, B1, and B2 were consistently well resolved, as was a major sub-component of group D and an ECOR 37-O157:H7 clade. Moreover, nine important ExPEC clonal groups within groups B2 and D, characterized by serotypes O6:K2:H1, O18:K1:H7, O6:H31, and O4:K+:H+ (from group B2), and O1:K1:H-, O7:K1:H-, O157:K+:H (non-7), O15:K52:H1, and O11/17/77:K52:H18 ("clonal group A") (from group D), were consistently well resolved, regardless of clinical background (cystitis, pyelonephritis, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, or fecal), host group, geographical origin, and virulence profile. Among the group B2-derived clonal groups the O6:K2:H1 clade appeared basal. Within group D, "clonal group A" and the O15:K52:H1 clonal group were consistently placed with ECOR 47 and ECOR 44, respectively, as nearest neighbors. These findings clarify phylogenetic relationships among key ExPEC clonal groups but also emphasize that recombination

  17. Structural, Functional and Phylogenetic Analysis of Sperm Lysozyme-Like Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Shalini; Pradeep, Mangottil Ayyappan; Mohanty, Ashok K; Kaushik, Jai K

    2016-01-01

    well as hydrogen bonding network between (NAG)3 and proteins were mostly conserved. LYZL5 in buffalo and other mammalian species contained additional 10-12 amino acid sequence at c-terminal that matched with ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein 27. Phylogenetic analysis indicated LYZL2 to be most ancient among all the LYZL proteins and that the evolution of LYZL proteins occurred through several gene duplications preceding the speciation of mammals from other vertebrates as distant as reptiles and amphibians.

  18. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Spontaneous Cocoa Bean Fermentation Metagenome Reveals New Insights into Its Bacterial and Fungal Community Diversity: e38040

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koen Illeghems; Luc De Vuyst; Zoi Papalexandratou; Stefan Weckx

    2012-01-01

      This is the first report on the phylogenetic analysis of the community diversity of a single spontaneous cocoa bean box fermentation sample through a metagenomic approach involving 454 pyrosequencing...

  19. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of NBS-encoding genes in Rosaceae fruit crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Wen, Xiaopeng; Deng, Xiuxin

    2007-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of the nucleotide binding site (NBS)-encoding resistance gene homologues (RGHs) among 12 species in five genera of Rosaceae fruit crops were evaluated. A total of 228 Rosaceous RGHs were deeply separated into two distinct clades, designated as TIR (sequences within this clade containing a Toll Interleukin-1 Receptor domain) and NonTIR (sequences lacking a TIR domain). Most Rosaceous RGH genes were phylogenetically distinct from Arabidopsis, Rice or Pine genes, except for a few Rosaceous members which grouped closely with Arabidopsis genes. Within Rosaceae, sequences from multiple species were often phylogenetically clustered together, forming heterogenous groups, however, apple- and chestnut rose-specific groups really exist. Gene duplication followed by sequence divergence were proposed as the mode for the evolution of a large number of distantly or closely related RGH genes in Rosaceae, and this mode may play a role in the generation of new resistance specificity. Positively selected sites within NBS-coding region were detected and thus nucleotide variation within NBS domain may function in determining disease resistance specificity. This study also discusses the synteny of a genomic region that encompass powdery mildew resistance locus among Malus, Prunus and Rosa, which may have potential use for fruit tree disease breeding and important gene cloning.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution of the dormancy associated MADS-box genes from peach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbott Albert G

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dormancy associated MADS-box (DAM genes are candidates for the regulation of growth cessation and terminal bud formation in peach. These genes are not expressed in the peach mutant evergrowing, which fails to cease growth and enter dormancy under dormancy-inducing conditions. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships among and the rates and patterns of molecular evolution within DAM genes in the phylogenetic context of the MADS-box gene family. Results The peach DAM genes grouped with the SVP/StMADS11 lineage of type II MIKCC MADS-box genes. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the peach SVP/StMADS11-like gene family, which contains significantly more members than annual model plants, expanded through serial tandem gene duplication. We found evidence of strong purifying selection acting to constrain functional divergence among the peach DAM genes and only a single codon, located in the C-terminal region, under significant positive selection. Conclusion Because all DAM genes are expressed in peach and are subjected to strong purifying selection we suggest that the duplicated genes have been maintained by subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization. In addition, this pattern of selection suggests that the DAM genes are important for peach growth and development.

  1. GENE 16S RRNA SEQUENCE PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF LYSINE PRODUCERS STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Andriiash

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic relationships of strainsproducers of essential amino acids of aspartate family Brevibacterium sp. UCM Ac-674 (Brevibacterium sp. 90, Brevibacterium sp. IMV Ac-5004 (Brevibacterium sp. 90H, Brevibacterium sp. UCM Ac-675 (Brevibacterium sp. E531, mutant strain Brevibacterium sp. IMV B-7447 from the «Collections strains and lines of plants for food and agricultural biotechnology SO “Institute for Food Biotechnology and Genomics” of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine were investigated. The affiliation strain Brevibacterium sp. IMV B-7447 to the genus Brevibacterium within the sequences of the genes based on 16S rRNA was confirmed. The dendogram of phylogenetic relationships of studied strains and related strains Brevibacterium from database GenBank was constructed. It was shown that by the criterion of homology gene sequences based on 16S rRNA the investigated strains-producers belong to three phylogenetic groups. It was established that the mutant strain Brevibacterium sp. ІMV B-7447 has no analogues in the database GenBank.

  2. Multilocus sequence analysis for assessment of phylogenetic diversity and biogeography in Thalassospira bacteria from diverse marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qiliang; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Jun; Du, Juan; Wang, Liping; Sun, Fengqin; Shao, Zongze

    2014-01-01

    Thalassospira bacteria are widespread and have been isolated from various marine environments. Less is known about their genetic diversity and biogeography, as well as their role in marine environments, many of them cannot be discriminated merely using the 16S rRNA gene. To address these issues, in this report, the phylogenetic analysis of 58 strains from seawater and deep sea sediments were carried out using the multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) based on acsA, aroE, gyrB, mutL, rpoD and trpB genes, and the DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) based on genome sequences. The MLSA analysis demonstrated that the 58 strains were clearly separated into 15 lineages, corresponding to seven validly described species and eight potential novel species. The DDH and ANI values further confirmed the validity of the MLSA analysis and eight potential novel species. The MLSA interspecies gap of the genus Thalassospira was determined to be 96.16-97.12% sequence identity on the basis of the combined analyses of the DDH and MLSA, while the ANIm interspecies gap was 95.76-97.20% based on the in silico DDH analysis. Meanwhile, phylogenetic analyses showed that the Thalassospira bacteria exhibited distribution pattern to a certain degree according to geographic regions. Moreover, they clustered together according to the habitats depth. For short, the phylogenetic analyses and biogeography of the Thalassospira bacteria were systematically investigated for the first time. These results will be helpful to explore further their ecological role and adaptive evolution in marine environments.

  3. Phenotypic Microdiversity and Phylogenetic Signal Analysis of Traits Related to Social Interaction in Bacillus spp. from Sediment Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Torres, María Dolores; Islas-Robles, África; Gómez-Lunar, Zulema; Delaye, Luis; Hernández-González, Ismael; Souza, Valeria; Travisano, Michael; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between phylogeny and predicted traits is important to uncover the dimension of the predictive power of a microbial composition approach. Numerous works have addressed the taxonomic composition of bacteria in communities, but little is known about trait heterogeneity in closely related bacteria that co-occur in communities. We evaluated a sample of 467 isolates from the Churince water system of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB), enriched for Bacillus spp. The 16S rRNA gene revealed a random distribution of taxonomic groups within this genus among 11 sampling sites. A subsample of 141 Bacillus spp. isolates from sediment, with seven well-represented species was chosen to evaluate the heterogeneity and the phylogenetic signal of phenotypic traits that are known to diverge within small clades, such as substrate utilization, and traits that are conserved deep in the lineage, such as prototrophy, swarming and biofilm formation. We were especially interested in evaluating social traits, such as swarming and biofilm formation, for which cooperation is needed to accomplish a multicellular behavior and for which there is little information from natural communities. The phylogenetic distribution of traits, evaluated by the Purvis and Fritz's D statistics approached a Brownian model of evolution. Analysis of the phylogenetic relatedness of the clusters of members sharing the trait using consenTRAIT algorithm, revealed more clustering and deeper phylogenetic signal for prototrophy, biofilm and swimming compared to the data obtained for substrate utilization. The explanation to the observed Brownian evolution of social traits could be either loss due to complete dispensability or to compensated trait loss due to the availability of public goods. Since many of the evaluated traits can be considered to be collective action traits, such as swarming, motility and biofilm formation, the observed microdiversity within taxonomic groups might be explained

  4. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 variants circulating among injecting drug users in Mashhad-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro FM

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic and phylogenetic information on the HIV-1 epidemic in Middle-East Countries, and in particular in Iran, are extremely limited. By March 2004, the Iranian Ministry of Health officially reported a cumulative number of 6'532 HIV positive individuals and 214 AIDS cases in the Iranian HIV-1 epidemic. The intra-venous drug users (IDUs represent the group at highest risk for HIV-1 infection in Iran, accounting for almost 63% of all HIV-infected population. In this regards, a molecular phylogenetic study has been performed on a sentinel cohort of HIV-1 seropositive IDUs enrolled at the end of 2005 at the University of Mashhad, the largest city North East of Tehran. The study has been performed on both gag and env subgenomic regions amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and characterized by direct DNA sequence analysis. The results reported here show that the HIV-1 subtype A is circulating in this IDUs sentinel cohort. Moreover, the single phylogenetic cluster as well as the intra-group low nucleotide divergence is indicative of a recent outbreak. Unexpectedly, the Iranian samples appear to be phylogenetically derived from African Sub-Saharan subtype A viruses, raising stirring speculations on HIV-1 introduction into the IDUs epidemic in Mashhad. This sentinel study could represent the starting point for a wider molecular survey of the HIV-1 epidemics in Iran to evaluate in detail the distribution of genetic subtypes and possible natural drug-resistant variants, which are extremely helpful information to design diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  5. Phenotypic Microdiversity and Phylogenetic Signal Analysis of Traits Related to Social Interaction in Bacillus spp. from Sediment Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Torres, María Dolores; Islas-Robles, África; Gómez-Lunar, Zulema; Delaye, Luis; Hernández-González, Ismael; Souza, Valeria; Travisano, Michael; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between phylogeny and predicted traits is important to uncover the dimension of the predictive power of a microbial composition approach. Numerous works have addressed the taxonomic composition of bacteria in communities, but little is known about trait heterogeneity in closely related bacteria that co-occur in communities. We evaluated a sample of 467 isolates from the Churince water system of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB), enriched for Bacillus spp. The 16S rRNA gene revealed a random distribution of taxonomic groups within this genus among 11 sampling sites. A subsample of 141 Bacillus spp. isolates from sediment, with seven well-represented species was chosen to evaluate the heterogeneity and the phylogenetic signal of phenotypic traits that are known to diverge within small clades, such as substrate utilization, and traits that are conserved deep in the lineage, such as prototrophy, swarming and biofilm formation. We were especially interested in evaluating social traits, such as swarming and biofilm formation, for which cooperation is needed to accomplish a multicellular behavior and for which there is little information from natural communities. The phylogenetic distribution of traits, evaluated by the Purvis and Fritz’s D statistics approached a Brownian model of evolution. Analysis of the phylogenetic relatedness of the clusters of members sharing the trait using consenTRAIT algorithm, revealed more clustering and deeper phylogenetic signal for prototrophy, biofilm and swimming compared to the data obtained for substrate utilization. The explanation to the observed Brownian evolution of social traits could be either loss due to complete dispensability or to compensated trait loss due to the availability of public goods. Since many of the evaluated traits can be considered to be collective action traits, such as swarming, motility and biofilm formation, the observed microdiversity within taxonomic groups might be explained

  6. Phylogenetic relationships within the speciose family Characidae (Teleostei: Ostariophysi: Characiformes based on multilocus analysis and extensive ingroup sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vari Richard P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With nearly 1,100 species, the fish family Characidae represents more than half of the species of Characiformes, and is a key component of Neotropical freshwater ecosystems. The composition, phylogeny, and classification of Characidae is currently uncertain, despite significant efforts based on analysis of morphological and molecular data. No consensus about the monophyly of this group or its position within the order Characiformes has been reached, challenged by the fact that many key studies to date have non-overlapping taxonomic representation and focus only on subsets of this diversity. Results In the present study we propose a new definition of the family Characidae and a hypothesis of relationships for the Characiformes based on phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences of two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes (4,680 base pairs. The sequences were obtained from 211 samples representing 166 genera distributed among all 18 recognized families in the order Characiformes, all 14 recognized subfamilies in the Characidae, plus 56 of the genera so far considered incertae sedis in the Characidae. The phylogeny obtained is robust, with most lineages significantly supported by posterior probabilities in Bayesian analysis, and high bootstrap values from maximum likelihood and parsimony analyses. Conclusion A monophyletic assemblage strongly supported in all our phylogenetic analysis is herein defined as the Characidae and includes the characiform species lacking a supraorbital bone and with a derived position of the emergence of the hyoid artery from the anterior ceratohyal. To recognize this and several other monophyletic groups within characiforms we propose changes in the limits of several families to facilitate future studies in the Characiformes and particularly the Characidae. This work presents a new phylogenetic framework for a speciose and morphologically diverse group of freshwater fishes of significant ecological and

  7. Phylogenetic relationships within the speciose family Characidae (Teleostei: Ostariophysi: Characiformes) based on multilocus analysis and extensive ingroup sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Claudio; Avelino, Gleisy S; Abe, Kelly T; Mariguela, Tatiane C; Benine, Ricardo C; Ortí, Guillermo; Vari, Richard P; Corrêa e Castro, Ricardo M

    2011-09-26

    With nearly 1,100 species, the fish family Characidae represents more than half of the species of Characiformes, and is a key component of Neotropical freshwater ecosystems. The composition, phylogeny, and classification of Characidae is currently uncertain, despite significant efforts based on analysis of morphological and molecular data. No consensus about the monophyly of this group or its position within the order Characiformes has been reached, challenged by the fact that many key studies to date have non-overlapping taxonomic representation and focus only on subsets of this diversity. In the present study we propose a new definition of the family Characidae and a hypothesis of relationships for the Characiformes based on phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences of two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes (4,680 base pairs). The sequences were obtained from 211 samples representing 166 genera distributed among all 18 recognized families in the order Characiformes, all 14 recognized subfamilies in the Characidae, plus 56 of the genera so far considered incertae sedis in the Characidae. The phylogeny obtained is robust, with most lineages significantly supported by posterior probabilities in Bayesian analysis, and high bootstrap values from maximum likelihood and parsimony analyses. A monophyletic assemblage strongly supported in all our phylogenetic analysis is herein defined as the Characidae and includes the characiform species lacking a supraorbital bone and with a derived position of the emergence of the hyoid artery from the anterior ceratohyal. To recognize this and several other monophyletic groups within characiforms we propose changes in the limits of several families to facilitate future studies in the Characiformes and particularly the Characidae. This work presents a new phylogenetic framework for a speciose and morphologically diverse group of freshwater fishes of significant ecological and evolutionary importance across the Neotropics and portions

  8. Simulation of The Weichselian Glaciation In Fennoscandia With The Ice-sheet Model Sicopolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsström, P.-L.; Sallasmaa, O.; Greve, R.; Zwinger, T.

    In order to reconstruct the palaeo-glaciation in Fennoscandia during the last (Weich- selian) ice age, simulations with the dynamic/thermodynamic ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS are carried out. Model time is from 250 kyr BP until the present. Cli- matic forcing is based on present distributions of mean annual surface temperature and precipitation over the region, which are derived from the NCEP/NCAR Reanal- ysis Project and University of Delaware (GHCN and Legates &Wilmott, 1990) data sets. For the past, these distributions are modified due to climatic changes as reflected by the GRIP 18O record and changes in surface elevation. Emphasis is put on the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ca. 20 kyr BP. It turns out that the glaciation patterns vary to some extent for the two different data sets and depend strongly on the param- eters which determine the past variations of surface temperature and precipitation. By comparing the results with geological reconstructions of maximum ice extent, reason- able values for these parameters can be estimated. We discuss the simulated dynamic and thermodynamic state of the Scandinavian ice sheet at the LGM and the timing and pattern of deglaciation during the transition to the Holocene.

  9. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Fragaria (strawberry) using intron-containing sequence from the ADH-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMeglio, Laura M; Staudt, Günter; Yu, Hongrun; Davis, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    The genus Fragaria encompasses species at ploidy levels ranging from diploid to decaploid. The cultivated strawberry, Fragaria×ananassa, and its two immediate progenitors, F. chiloensis and F. virginiana, are octoploids. To elucidate the ancestries of these octoploid species, we performed a phylogenetic analysis using intron-containing sequences of the nuclear ADH-1 gene from 39 germplasm accessions representing nineteen Fragaria species and one outgroup species, Dasiphora fruticosa. All trees from Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed two major clades, Clade A and Clade B. Each of the sampled octoploids contributed alleles to both major clades. All octoploid-derived alleles in Clade A clustered with alleles of diploid F. vesca, with the exception of one octoploid allele that clustered with the alleles of diploid F. mandshurica. All octoploid-derived alleles in clade B clustered with the alleles of only one diploid species, F. iinumae. When gaps encoded as binary characters were included in the Maximum Parsimony analysis, tree resolution was improved with the addition of six nodes, and the bootstrap support was generally higher, rising above the 50% threshold for an additional nine branches. These results, coupled with the congruence of the sequence data and the coded gap data, validate and encourage the employment of sequence sets containing gaps for phylogenetic analysis. Our phylogenetic conclusions, based upon sequence data from the ADH-1 gene located on F. vesca linkage group II, complement and generally agree with those obtained from analyses of protein-encoding genes GBSSI-2 and DHAR located on F. vesca linkage groups V and VII, respectively, but differ from a previous study that utilized rDNA sequences and did not detect the ancestral role of F. iinumae.

  10. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Fragaria (strawberry using intron-containing sequence from the ADH-1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M DiMeglio

    Full Text Available The genus Fragaria encompasses species at ploidy levels ranging from diploid to decaploid. The cultivated strawberry, Fragaria×ananassa, and its two immediate progenitors, F. chiloensis and F. virginiana, are octoploids. To elucidate the ancestries of these octoploid species, we performed a phylogenetic analysis using intron-containing sequences of the nuclear ADH-1 gene from 39 germplasm accessions representing nineteen Fragaria species and one outgroup species, Dasiphora fruticosa. All trees from Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed two major clades, Clade A and Clade B. Each of the sampled octoploids contributed alleles to both major clades. All octoploid-derived alleles in Clade A clustered with alleles of diploid F. vesca, with the exception of one octoploid allele that clustered with the alleles of diploid F. mandshurica. All octoploid-derived alleles in clade B clustered with the alleles of only one diploid species, F. iinumae. When gaps encoded as binary characters were included in the Maximum Parsimony analysis, tree resolution was improved with the addition of six nodes, and the bootstrap support was generally higher, rising above the 50% threshold for an additional nine branches. These results, coupled with the congruence of the sequence data and the coded gap data, validate and encourage the employment of sequence sets containing gaps for phylogenetic analysis. Our phylogenetic conclusions, based upon sequence data from the ADH-1 gene located on F. vesca linkage group II, complement and generally agree with those obtained from analyses of protein-encoding genes GBSSI-2 and DHAR located on F. vesca linkage groups V and VII, respectively, but differ from a previous study that utilized rDNA sequences and did not detect the ancestral role of F. iinumae.

  11. Automated discovery and phylogenetic analysis of new toxin-antitoxin systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milinkovitch Michel C

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although often viewed as elements "at the service of" bacteria, plasmids exhibit replication and maintenance mechanisms that make them purely "selfish DNA" candidates. Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are a spectacular example of such mechanisms: a gene coding for a cytotoxic stable protein is preceded by a gene coding for an unstable antitoxin. The toxin being more stable than the antitoxin, absence of the operon causes a reduction of the amount of the latter relative to the amount of the former. Thus, a cell exhibiting a TA system on a plasmid is 'condemned' either not to loose it or to die. Results Different TA systems have been described and classified in several families, according to similarity and functional parameters. However, given the small size and large divergence among TA system sequences, it is likely that many TA systems are not annotated as such in the rapidly accumulating NCBI database. To detect these putative TA systems, we developed an algorithm that searches public databases on the basis of predefined similarity and TA-specific structural constraints. This approach, using a single starting query sequence for each of the ParE, Doc, and VapC families, and two starting sequences for the MazF/CcdB family, identified over 1,500 putative TA systems. These groups of sequences were analyzed phylogenetically for a better classification and understanding of TA systems evolution. Conclusion The phylogenetic distributions of the newly uncovered TA systems are very different within the investigated families. The resulting phylogenetic trees are available for browsing and searching through a java program available at http://ueg.ulb.ac.be/tiq/.

  12. Interpretation of anatomical characters in phylogenetic analysis of Pinnipedia, with emphasis on Otariidae (Mammalia, Carnivora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sanfelice

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2013v26n2p185   The hypothesis that pinnipeds have a common origin gained support during the 1980s in discussions focused on the systematics of the group. However, the limited knowledge of the anatomy of several species and the frequent variation in several character states make it difficult to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of pinnipeds. Our purpose was to review the anatomical characters of the syncranium and dentition used in phylogenetic analyses by studying the otariids Otaria byronia (n=25 and Arctocephalus australis (n=48. Some interpretations of characters presented in the literature were found to be questionable, notably: (1 shape and position of the premaxillary tuberosity; (2 orientation of the maxillary postcanine alveoli; (3 naso-labialis fossa; (4 shape of the jugal contact with the zygomatic process of temporal; (5 relief and length of the tympanic bone; (6 relationship between the height of the condylar process in relation to the lower postcanine teeth alveoli; (7 individualization of the canal of the cochlear aqueduct and round window; (8 separation of the openings for the cranial nerves VII and VIII in the internal auditory meatus; (9 lingual cingulum on the third upper incisor; (10 development of the metaconid of the fifth upper postcanine tooth, and (11 number of roots in the second to fourth upper postcanine teeth and fifth lower postcanine tooth. These observations indicate the relevance and the need for detailed anatomical descriptions of pinnipeds for understanding their phylogenetic relationships and, consequently, their evolutionary relationships.

  13. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes from extinct and extant rhinoceroses reveals lack of phylogenetic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, Tom; Binladen, Jonas;

    2009-01-01

    genes is highly diffuse, with mixed topological support from different genes. Furthermore, the choice of outgroup (horse vs tapir) has considerable effect on reconstruction of the phylogeny. The lack of resolution is suggestive of a hard polytomy at the base of crown-group Rhinocerotidae......BACKGROUND: The scientific literature contains many examples where DNA sequence analyses have been used to provide definitive answers to phylogenetic problems that traditional (non-DNA based) approaches alone have failed to resolve. One notable example concerns the rhinoceroses, a group for which...

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of Sicilian goats reveals a new mtDNA lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardina, M T; Ballester, M; Marmi, J; Finocchiaro, R; van Kaam, J B C H M; Portolano, B; Folch, J M

    2006-08-01

    The mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) sequence of 67 goats belonging to the Girgentana, Maltese and Derivata di Siria breeds was partially sequenced in order to present the first phylogenetic characterization of Sicilian goat breeds. These sequences were compared with published sequences of Indian and Pakistani domestic goats and wild goats. Mitochondrial lineage A was observed in most of the Sicilian goats. However, three Girgentana haplotypes were highly divergent from the Capra hircus clade, indicating that a new mtDNA lineage in domestic goats was found.

  15. Phylogenetic ctDNA analysis depicts early stage lung cancer evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Gareth A.; Constantin, Tudor; Quesne, John Le; Moore, David A.; Kirkizlar, Eser; Fraioli, Francesco; Bakir, Maise Al; Zambrana, Francisco; Endozo, Raymondo; Bi, Wenya Linda; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Forster, Martin D.; Hafez, Dina; Ganguly, Apratim; Kareht, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The early detection of relapse following primary surgery for non-small cell lung cancer and the characterization of emerging subclones seeding metastatic sites might offer new therapeutic approaches to limit tumor recurrence. The potential to non-invasively track tumor evolutionary dynamics in ctDNA of early-stage lung cancer is not established. Here we conduct a tumour-specific phylogenetic approach to ctDNA profiling in the first 100 TRACERx (TRAcking non-small cell lung Cancer Evolution th...

  16. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea isolated from the East Asian waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐祥海; 于仁成; 张清春; 王云峰; 颜天; 周名江

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies found intraspecific diversity in Scrippsiella trochoidea A. R. Loeblich III, a widely distributed calcareous cyst-producing dinoflagellate. In this study, three strains (ST-1, ST-D6 and ST-K) of S. trochoidea isolated from the East Asian waters were studied, together with other geographical strains, to resolve their phylogenetic relationships. For the three East Asian isolates, two highly diverse regions of nuclear-encoded ribosomal DNA (rDNA), the 5.8S rDNA and its flanking internal transc...

  17. Temporal shifts and temperature sensitivity of avian spring migratory phenology: a phylogenetic meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Takuji; Butchart, Stuart H M; Phillimore, Albert B

    2017-03-01

    There are wide reports of advances in the timing of spring migration of birds over time and in relation to rising temperatures, though phenological responses vary substantially within and among species. An understanding of the ecological, life-history and geographic variables that predict this intra- and interspecific variation can guide our projections of how populations and species are likely to respond to future climate change. Here, we conduct phylogenetic meta-analyses addressing slope estimates of the timing of avian spring migration regressed on (i) year and (ii) temperature, representing a total of 413 species across five continents. We take into account slope estimation error and examine phylogenetic, ecological and geographic predictors of intra- and interspecific variation. We confirm earlier findings that on average birds have significantly advanced their spring migration time by 2·1 days per decade and 1·2 days °C(-1) . We find that over time and in response to warmer spring conditions, short-distance migrants have advanced spring migratory phenology by more than long-distance migrants. We also find that larger bodied species show greater advance over time compared to smaller bodied species. Our results did not reveal any evidence that interspecific variation in migration response is predictable on the basis of species' habitat or diet. We detected a substantial phylogenetic signal in migration time in response to both year and temperature, suggesting that some of the shifts in migratory phenological response to climate are predictable on the basis of phylogeny. However, we estimate high levels of species and spatial variance relative to phylogenetic variance, which is consistent with plasticity in response to climate evolving fairly rapidly and being more influenced by adaptation to current local climate than by common descent. On average, avian spring migration times have advanced over time and as spring has become warmer. While we are able to

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of Monascus and new species from honey, pollen and nests of stingless bees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, R. N.; Leong, Su-lin L.; Vinnere-Pettersson, O.

    2017-01-01

    is of economic importance. Species are used in fermented Asian foods as food colourants (e.g. 'red rice' (ang-kak, angka)) and found as spoilage organisms, and recently Monascus was found to be essential in the lifecycle of stingless bees. In this study, a polyphasic approach was applied combining morphological...... characters, ITS, LSU, β-tubulin, calmodulin and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit sequences and extrolite data, to delimit species and to study phylogenetic relationships in Monascus. Furthermore, 30 Monascus isolates from honey, pollen and nests of stingless bees in Brazil were included. Based...

  19. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: Uncovering General Features of Nitrogen-fixation (nif)-Flavodoxins

    OpenAIRE

    Inmaculada Pérez-Dorado; Ana Bortolotti; Néstor Cortez; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50’s loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including...

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of isolates of Pasteurella pneumotropica from laboratory animals based on the gyrB gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Ueno, Masami; Takakura, Akira; Itoh, Toshio

    2006-10-01

    Phylogenetic analysis using the gyrB sequence was performed to investigate the genetic relevance among 49 isolates of P. pneumotropica. In the phylogeny, the isolates were clearly classified into three groups as follows: group A for the isolates of biotype Jawetz derived from mice, group B for the isolates of biotype Jawetz derived from rats, and group C for the isolates of biotype Heyl. These results suggest that the gyrB sequence of P. pneumotropica differs between the isolates of two biotypes, and also between the isolates derived from mice and rats in the biotype Jawetz.

  1. [Variability and phylogenetic relationships of the Cucumis sativus L. species inferred from NBS profiling and RAPD analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriunova, S V; Gashkova, I V; Kosareva, G A

    2011-08-01

    Genetic variability of the Cucumis sativus species and its phylogenetic relationsips with other species of the genus were studied on the basis of RAPD marking and analysis of intra- and interspecific polymorphism of the nucleotide sequences of the NBS-LRR gene family in species of the genus Cucumis with the use of the NBS profiling method. According to RAPD analysis, cucumber cultivars from different geographic regions are highly similar, except for accessions k-3835 and k-3833 from Afghanistan. NBS profiling analysis revealed phylogenetically most distinct accessions expected to be characterized by specificity of resistance: k-3845 from Uzbekistan, k-3851 from Kyrgyzstan, line 701, k-3835 and k-3833 from Afghanistan, k-2757 and k-3079 from Netherlands, vr.k. 908 from Canada, k-2926 from Bulgaria, Russian cultivars Monastyrskii, Izyashchnyi, and Lel'. Three essentially different groups of species were distinguished, and the C. sativus species (subgenus Cucumis) was found to be distant from the species belonging to the subgenus Melo.

  2. Piscine Reovirus: Genomic and Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis from Farmed and Wild Salmonids Collected on the Canada/US Pacific Coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Siah

    Full Text Available Piscine reovirus (PRV is a double stranded non-enveloped RNA virus detected in farmed and wild salmonids. This study examined the phylogenetic relationships among different PRV sequence types present in samples from salmonids in Western Canada and the US, including Alaska (US, British Columbia (Canada and Washington State (US. Tissues testing positive for PRV were partially sequenced for segment S1, producing 71 sequences that grouped into 10 unique sequence types. Sequence analysis revealed no identifiable geographical or temporal variation among the sequence types. Identical sequence types were found in fish sampled in 2001, 2005 and 2014. In addition, PRV positive samples from fish derived from Alaska, British Columbia and Washington State share identical sequence types. Comparative analysis of the phylogenetic tree indicated that Canada/US Pacific Northwest sequences formed a subgroup with some Norwegian sequence types (group II, distinct from other Norwegian and Chilean sequences (groups I, III and IV. Representative PRV positive samples from farmed and wild fish in British Columbia and Washington State were subjected to genome sequencing using next generation sequencing methods. Individual analysis of each of the 10 partial segments indicated that the Canadian and US PRV sequence types clustered separately from available whole genome sequences of some Norwegian and Chilean sequences for all segments except the segment S4. In summary, PRV was genetically homogenous over a large geographic distance (Alaska to Washington State, and the sequence types were relatively stable over a 13 year period.

  3. In Silico Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Modelling Study of 2-Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzymes from Bacterial and Fungal Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Satpathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-Haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzymes have broad range of applications, starting from bioremediation to chemical synthesis of useful compounds that are widely distributed in fungi and bacteria. In the present study, a total of 81 full-length protein sequences of 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase from bacteria and fungi were retrieved from NCBI database. Sequence analysis such as multiple sequence alignment (MSA, conserved motif identification, computation of amino acid composition, and phylogenetic tree construction were performed on these primary sequences. From MSA analysis, it was observed that the sequences share conserved lysine (K and aspartate (D residues in them. Also, phylogenetic tree indicated a subcluster comprised of both fungal and bacterial species. Due to nonavailability of experimental 3D structure for fungal 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase in the PDB, molecular modelling study was performed for both fungal and bacterial sources of enzymes present in the subcluster. Further structural analysis revealed a common evolutionary topology shared between both fungal and bacterial enzymes. Studies on the buried amino acids showed highly conserved Leu and Ser in the core, despite variation in their amino acid percentage. Additionally, a surface exposed tryptophan was conserved in all of these selected models.

  4. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of non-sexually transmitted strains of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan R Gaston

    Full Text Available Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has been previously reported to show genetic variance in several key virulence factors, placing strains of the bacterium into two genetically distinct classes. Recent studies done in yaws-endemic areas of the South Pacific have shown that H. ducreyi is also a major cause of cutaneous limb ulcers (CLU that are not sexually transmitted. To genetically assess CLU strains relative to the previously described class I, class II phylogenetic hierarchy, we examined nucleotide sequence diversity at 11 H. ducreyi loci, including virulence and housekeeping genes, which encompass approximately 1% of the H. ducreyi genome. Sequences for all 11 loci indicated that strains collected from leg ulcers exhibit DNA sequences homologous to class I strains of H. ducreyi. However, sequences for 3 loci, including a hemoglobin receptor (hgbA, serum resistance protein (dsrA, and a collagen adhesin (ncaA contained informative amounts of variation. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these non-sexually transmitted strains of H. ducreyi comprise a sub-clonal population within class I strains of H. ducreyi. Molecular dating suggests that CLU strains are the most recently developed, having diverged approximately 0.355 million years ago, fourteen times more recently than the class I/class II divergence. The CLU strains' divergence falls after the divergence of humans from chimpanzees, making it the first known H. ducreyi divergence event directly influenced by the selective pressures accompanying human hosts.

  5. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of non-sexually transmitted strains of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Jordan R; Roberts, Sally A; Humphreys, Tricia L

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has been previously reported to show genetic variance in several key virulence factors, placing strains of the bacterium into two genetically distinct classes. Recent studies done in yaws-endemic areas of the South Pacific have shown that H. ducreyi is also a major cause of cutaneous limb ulcers (CLU) that are not sexually transmitted. To genetically assess CLU strains relative to the previously described class I, class II phylogenetic hierarchy, we examined nucleotide sequence diversity at 11 H. ducreyi loci, including virulence and housekeeping genes, which encompass approximately 1% of the H. ducreyi genome. Sequences for all 11 loci indicated that strains collected from leg ulcers exhibit DNA sequences homologous to class I strains of H. ducreyi. However, sequences for 3 loci, including a hemoglobin receptor (hgbA), serum resistance protein (dsrA), and a collagen adhesin (ncaA) contained informative amounts of variation. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these non-sexually transmitted strains of H. ducreyi comprise a sub-clonal population within class I strains of H. ducreyi. Molecular dating suggests that CLU strains are the most recently developed, having diverged approximately 0.355 million years ago, fourteen times more recently than the class I/class II divergence. The CLU strains' divergence falls after the divergence of humans from chimpanzees, making it the first known H. ducreyi divergence event directly influenced by the selective pressures accompanying human hosts.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of brine shrimp (Artemia) in China using DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Luo, Qibin; Guo, Haiyan; Bossier, Peter; Van Stappen, Gilbert; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Xin, Naihong; Sun, Qishi; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2008-12-01

    DNA barcoding is a powerful approach for characterizing species of organisms, especially those with almost identical morphological features, thereby helping to to establish phylogenetic relationships and reveal evolutionary histories. In this study, we chose a 648-bp segment of the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI), as a standard barcode region to establish phylogenetic relationships among brine shrimp (Artemia) species from major habitats around the world and further focused on the biodiversity of Artemia species in China, especially in the Tibetan Plateau. Samples from five major salt lakes of the Tibetan Plateau located at altitudes over 4,000 m showed clear differences from other Artemia populations in China. We also observed two consistent amino acid changes, 153A/V and 183L/F, in the COI gene between the high and low altitude species in China. Moreover, indels in the COI sequence were identified in cyst and adult samples unique to the Co Qen population from the Tibetan Plateau, demonstrating the need for additional investigations of the mitochondrial genome among Tibetan Artemia populations.

  7. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a cnidarian LMP X-like cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishaw, Larry J; Herrera, Manuel L; Bigger, Charles H

    2006-06-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit protease complexes which are partly responsible for metabolism of intracellular, ubiquitinylated proteins. Vertebrates have adapted a second and specialized structure responsible for the generation of peptides presented to the adaptive immune system and is thus, commonly referred to as the immunoproteasome. This complex is assembled from paralogous copies of subunits belonging to the constitutive, housekeeping proteasome. The immunoproteasome is more efficient in the generation of peptides for display on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Important components of this complex are the paralogous members, LMP X and 7; where the latter replaces the former in the assembly of the immunoproteasome of vertebrates. In this report, we describe an LMP X-like cDNA from an endosymbiont-free gorgonian coral, Swiftia exserta. Cnidarians predate the phylogenetic divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes (P-D split), and are becoming an essential model for our comprehension of immune system evolution. Phylogenetic analyses of available sequences indicates that invertebrate LMP X-like sequences are outgroups to vertebrate LMP X and LMP 7, and is in agreement with previous observations that the duplication event giving rise to the two rapidly diverging lineages of proteasomal subunits occurred before jawed fished divergence.

  8. Complete sequence and phylogenetic analysis of a porcine sapovirus strain isolated from western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Yang, Bin; Wang, Enli; Liu, Jixing; Lan, Xi

    2014-08-01

    Sapovirus (SaV) is a type of calicivirus that can cause acute viral gastroenteritis in humans and animals. SaVs have been found in several mammalian species, including humans, pigs, minks, dogs, and bats. Porcine sapovirus (PoSaV) was first identified in 1980 in the United States and has been found to be circulating throughout China in recent years. In this study, the complete genomic characterization of PoSaV CH430, first found in west China, was reported and analyzed. The genome was 7,342 bp excluding the 30 nt poly(A) tail at the 3' terminus and comprised two major open reading frames. Comprehensive evolutionary and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the CH430 strain belongs to genotype III SaVs. However, this particular isolate and DG24 strain occupied an independent branch of the phylogenetic tree we generated, indicating that they could form a separate subgenotype in the near future. We predicted the cleavage sites for the ORF1 polyprotein located at Q56/G57, Q310/A311, E649/A650, E934/A935, E1047/G1048, and E1712/A1713, separately. This is the first PoSaV strain isolated from western China to be fully sequenced and characterized. It provided a reliable experimental basis for studying the genetic nature of emerging PoSaVs.

  9. [Phylogenetic analysis of envelope gene of dengue virus serotype 2 in Guangzhou, 2001-2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Jiang, L Y; Luo, L; Cao, Y M; Jing, Q L; Yang, Z C

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To investigate the molecular characteristics of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2) in Guangzhou during 2001-2015, and analyze the E gene of the strains isolated, the phylogenetic tree and molecular clock were constructed to know about the evolution of the strains. Methods: The serum samples of the patients were detected by real time PCR, and positive samples were used to isolate dengue virus by using C6/36 cells. The E gene of the isolated strains were sequenced. The phylogenetic tree was constructed by using software Mega 4.0, and the molecular clock was drawn by using software BEASTv1.8.2. Results: Twenty-six dengue virus strains were isolated between 2001 and 2015. They were all clustered into 2 genotypes, i.e. cosmopolitan genotype and Asian genotype Ⅰ. The strains isolated in Guangzhou shared high homology with Southeast Asian strains. The cosmopolitan genotype was divided into 2 sub-genotype at about 46 and 35 years ago. The substitution rate of dengue virus serotype 2 in Guangzhou was 7.1 × 10(-4) per year per site. Conclusions: There were close relationship between the Guangzhou strains and Southeast Asian strains. Guangzhou was at high risk of imported dengue fever, outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. There might be two ways of introduction of cosmopolitan genotype. The substitution rate of the strains in Guangzhou was similar to that in the neighbor countries.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis using Lévy processes: finding jumps in the evolution of continuous traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Michael J; Schraiber, Joshua G; Liang, Mason

    2013-03-01

    Gaussian processes, a class of stochastic processes including Brownian motion and the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, are widely used to model continuous trait evolution in statistical phylogenetics. Under such processes, observations at the tips of a phylogenetic tree have a multivariate Gaussian distribution, which may lead to suboptimal model specification under certain evolutionary conditions, as supposed in models of punctuated equilibrium or adaptive radiation. To consider non-normally distributed continuous trait evolution, we introduce a method to compute posterior probabilities when modeling continuous trait evolution as a Lévy process. Through data simulation and model testing, we establish that single-rate Brownian motion (BM) and Lévy processes with jumps generate distinct patterns in comparative data. We then analyzed body mass and endocranial volume measurements for 126 primates. We rejected single-rate BM in favor of a Lévy process with jumps for each trait, with the lineage leading to most recent common ancestor of great apes showing particularly strong evidence against single-rate BM.

  11. Phylogenetic estimation and morphological evolution of Arundinarieae (Bambusoideae: Poaceae) based on plastome phylogenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attigala, Lakshmi; Wysocki, William P; Duvall, Melvin R; Clark, Lynn G

    2016-08-01

    We explored phylogenetic relationships among the twelve lineages of the temperate woody bamboo clade (tribe Arundinarieae) based on plastid genome (plastome) sequence data. A representative sample of 28 taxa was used and maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses were conducted to estimate the Arundinarieae phylogeny. All the previously recognized clades of Arundinarieae were supported, with Ampelocalamus calcareus (Clade XI) as sister to the rest of the temperate woody bamboos. Well supported sister relationships between Bergbambos tessellata (Clade I) and Thamnocalamus spathiflorus (Clade VII) and between Kuruna (Clade XII) and Chimonocalmus (Clade III) were revealed by the current study. The plastome topology was tested by taxon removal experiments and alternative hypothesis testing and the results supported the current plastome phylogeny as robust. Neighbor-net analyses showed few phylogenetic signal conflicts, but suggested some potentially complex relationships among these taxa. Analyses of morphological character evolution of rhizomes and reproductive structures revealed that pachymorph rhizomes were most likely the ancestral state in Arundinarieae. In contrast leptomorph rhizomes either evolved once with reversions to the pachymorph condition or multiple times in Arundinarieae. Further, pseudospikelets evolved independently at least twice in the Arundinarieae, but the ancestral state is ambiguous. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis of Brine Shrimp (Artemia) in China Using DNA Barcoding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Wang; Jun Yu; Qibin Luo; Haiyan Guo; Peter Bossier; Gilbert Van Stappen; Patrick Sorgeloos; Naihong Xin; Qishi Sun; Songnian Hu

    2008-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a powerful approach for characterizing species of organisms,especially those with almost identical morphological features, thereby helping to to establish phylogenetic relationships and reveal evolutionary histories. In this study, we chose a 648-bp segment of the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI), as a standard barcode region to establish phylogenetic relationships among brine shrimp (Artemia) species from major habitats around the world and further focused on the biodiversity of Artemia species in China, especially in the Tibetan Plateau. Samples from five major salt lakes of the Tibetan Plateau located at altitudes over 4,000 m showed clear differences from other Artemia populations in China. We also observed two consistent amino acid changes, 153A/V and 183L/F, in the COI gene between the high and low altitude species in China.Moreover, indels in the COI sequence were identified in cyst and adult samples unique to the Co Qen population from the Tibetan Plateau, demonstrating the need for additional investigations of the mitochondrial genome among Tibetan Artemia populations.

  13. A new effective method for estimating missing values in the sequence data prior to phylogenetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoulaye Baniré Diallo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we address the problem of phylogenetic inference from nucleic acid data containing missing bases. We introduce a new effective approach, called “Probabilistic estimation of missing values” (PEMV, allowing one to estimate unknown nucleotides prior to computing the evolutionary distances between them. We show that the new method improves the accuracy of phylogenetic inference compared to the existing methods “Ignoring Missing Sites” (IMS, “Proportional Distribution of Missing and Ambiguous Bases” (PDMAB included in the PAUP software [26]. The proposed strategy for estimating missing nucleotides is based on probabilistic formulae developed in the framework of the Jukes-Cantor [10] and Kimura 2-parameter [11] models. The relative performances of the new method were assessed through simulations carried out with the SeqGen program [20], for data generation, and the BioNJ method [7], for inferring phylogenies. We also compared the new method to the DNAML program [5] and “Matrix Representation using Parsimony” (MRP [13], [19] considering an example of 66 eutherian mammals originally analyzed in [17].

  14. Uprooting phylogenetic uncertainty in coalescent species delimitation:A meta-analysis of empirical studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Itzue W CAVIEDES-SOLIS; Nassima M BOUZID; Barbara L BANBURY; Adam D LEACH

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies rely on the accurate quantification of biodiversity. In recent studies of tax-onomically ambiguous groups, species boundaries are often determined based on multi-locus sequence data.Bayesian Phyloge-netics and Phylogeography(BPP) is a coalescent-based method frequently used to delimit species; however, empirical studies suggest that the requirement of a user-specified guide tree biases the range of possible outcomes. We evaluate fifteen multi-locus datasets using the most recent iteration of BPP, which eliminates the need for a user-specified guide tree and reconstructs the species tree in synchrony with species delimitation (= unguided species delimitation). We found that the number of species recovered with guided versus unguided species delimitation was the same except for two cases, and that posterior probabilities were generally lower for the unguided analyses as a result of searching across species trees in addition to species delimitation models. The guide trees used in previous studies were often discordant with the species tree topologies estimated by BPP. We also compared species trees estimated using BPP and *BEAST and found that when the topologies are the same, BPP tends to give higher posterior probabilities [Current Zoology 61 (5): 866–873, 2015].

  15. Phylogenetic Relationships of Sorghum and Related Species Inferred from Sequence Analysis of the nrDNA ITS Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qiong-xia; HUANG Ke-hui; YU Yun; HUANG Zhen; WU Zhen-quan

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of phylogenetic and evolution in six species of Sorghum was based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences in nuclear ribosomal DNA. Results showed that the length of the ITS regions among the six species ranged from 588 to 589bp and the contents of G + C in ITS (ITS 1 + 5.8S + ITS2) regions ranged from 60.27 to 61.05%; the length of ITS 1 ranged from 207 to 208 bp and the contents of G+C in the ITS1 regions ranged from 53.91 to 61.54%. The length of the 5.8S rDNA and ITS2 regions in the six species was 164 and 217 bp respectively, and the contents of G+C ranged from 56.10 to 58.54% in the 5.8S rDNA region and 66.36 to 67.28% in the ITS2 region. Among regions of ITS, ITS1, ITS2, and 5.8S, the best sequence for genetic relationship analysis in the six species was the ITS region. On the basis of the Jaccard coefficient and phylogentic tree, S. sp. was more related to S. propinguum than to other species. This was consistent with the fact that S.sp. is derived from S. propinguum. From the phylogenetic tree based on ITS 1, S. halepense, silk sorghum and S. sudanense,are identical in the ITS1 sequence, whereas the phylogenetic tree based one shows that S. sudanense has a closer genetic association with S. almum rather than with S. halepense and silk sorghum.

  16. Molecular, phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis of the cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase gene family in the Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameaux, Sabine; Cockram, James; Thiel, Thomas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Stein, Nils; Taudien, Stefan; Jack, Peter; Werner, Peter; Gray, John C; Greenland, Andy J; Powell, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of cereals such as wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) are large and therefore problematic for the map-based cloning of agronomicaly important traits. However, comparative approaches within the Poaceae permit transfer of molecular knowledge between species, despite their divergence from a common ancestor sixty million years ago. The finding that null variants of the rice gene cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase 2 (OsCKX2) result in large yield increases provides an opportunity to explore whether similar gains could be achieved in other Poaceae members. Here, phylogenetic, molecular and comparative analyses of CKX families in the sequenced grass species rice, brachypodium, sorghum, maize and foxtail millet, as well as members identified from the transcriptomes/genomes of wheat and barley, are presented. Phylogenetic analyses define four Poaceae CKX clades. Comparative analyses showed that CKX phylogenetic groupings can largely be explained by a combination of local gene duplication, and the whole-genome duplication event that predates their speciation. Full-length OsCKX2 homologues in barley (HvCKX2.1, HvCKX2.2) and wheat (TaCKX2.3, TaCKX2.4, TaCKX2.5) are characterized, with comparative analysis at the DNA, protein and genetic/physical map levels suggesting that true CKX2 orthologs have been identified. Furthermore, our analysis shows CKX2 genes in barley and wheat have undergone a Triticeae-specific gene-duplication event. Finally, by identifying ten of the eleven CKX genes predicted to be present in barley by comparative analyses, we show that next-generation sequencing approaches can efficiently determine the gene space of large-genome crops. Together, this work provides the foundation for future functional investigation of CKX family members within the Poaceae. © 2011 National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB). Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell

  17. Whole Genome Sequence and Phylogenetic Analysis Show Helicobacter pylori Strains from Latin America Have Followed a Unique Evolution Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Ramírez, Zilia Y.; Mendez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Kato, Ikuko; Bravo, Maria M.; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Thorell, Kaisa; Torres, Roberto; Aviles-Jimenez, Francisco; Camorlinga, Margarita; Canzian, Federico; Torres, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) genetics may determine its clinical outcomes. Despite high prevalence of HP infection in Latin America (LA), there have been no phylogenetic studies in the region. We aimed to understand the structure of HP populations in LA mestizo individuals, where gastric cancer incidence remains high. The genome of 107 HP strains from Mexico, Nicaragua and Colombia were analyzed with 59 publicly available worldwide genomes. To study bacterial relationship on whole genome level we propose a virtual hybridization technique using thousands of high-entropy 13 bp DNA probes to generate fingerprints. Phylogenetic virtual genome fingerprint (VGF) was compared with Multi Locus Sequence Analysis (MLST) and with phylogenetic analyses of cagPAI virulence island sequences. With MLST some Nicaraguan and Mexican strains clustered close to Africa isolates, whereas European isolates were spread without clustering and intermingled with LA isolates. VGF analysis resulted in increased resolution of populations, separating European from LA strains. Furthermore, clusters with exclusively Colombian, Mexican, or Nicaraguan strains were observed, where the Colombian cluster separated from Europe, Asia, and Africa, while Nicaraguan and Mexican clades grouped close to Africa. In addition, a mixed large LA cluster including Mexican, Colombian, Nicaraguan, Peruvian, and Salvadorian strains was observed; all LA clusters separated from the Amerind clade. With cagPAI sequence analyses LA clades clearly separated from Europe, Asia and Amerind, and Colombian strains formed a single cluster. A NeighborNet analyses suggested frequent and recent recombination events particularly among LA strains. Results suggests that in the new world, H. pylori has evolved to fit mestizo LA populations, already 500 years after the Spanish colonization. This co-adaption may account for regional variability in gastric cancer risk. PMID:28293542

  18. Nucleotide sequence characterization and phylogenetic analysis of hantaviruses isolated in Shandong Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian; ZHAO Zhong-tang; WANG Zhi-qiang; LIU Yun-xi; HU Mao-hong

    2007-01-01

    Background China is the most severe endemic area of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in the world with 30 000-50 000 cases reported annually, which accounts for more than 90% of total number of cases worldwide. The incidence rate of the syndrome in Shandong Province is one of the highest in China, which has ever reached 50 per 100 000 persons per year. However, the molecular characteristics of hantaviruses (HV) epidemic in Shandong Province remain unclear. Therefore it is useful to clarify nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic characteristics of HV isolated in Shandong Province in order to provide better advices to control and prevent HFRS.Methods RNAs were extracted from sera of clinically diagnosed patients and positive rodent lungs that were detected by indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA). Partial M segments of HV were amplified from the RNAs with reverse transcription nested polymerase chain reactions (nested PCR) using hantavirus genotype specific primers. The nested PCR products were sequenced and compared with those from previously epidemic isolates in Shandong and with other representative HV sequences from GenBank. Phylogenetic tree analyses were performed based on the sequences of the M genes.Results Thirty-four HV isolates in Shandong showed 67.1%-100% nucleotide identities. The nucleotide homologies among 6 Hantaan viruses (HTNV) isolates in Shandong were 78.1%-98.7%, while the homologies among 28 Seoul virus (SEOV) isolates in Shandong were 93.7%-100%. There were at least 3 subtypes HTNV (H2, H5, H9) and 2 subtypes SEOV (S2, S3) in Shandong Province.Conclusions In Shandong Province, the homologies of HTNV were lower and there were no predominant subtypes,while the homologies of SEOV were higher and S3 was the predominant subtype. The homologies of SEOV from rodents were higher than those from patients. The distribution of subtypes in Shandong was similar to that of the adjoining provinces. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequences showed

  19. Phylogenetic analysis in Myrcia section Aulomyrcia and inferences on plant diversity in the Atlantic rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggemeier, Vanessa Graziele; Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola; Forest, Félix; Lucas, Eve

    2015-04-01

    Myrcia section Aulomyrcia includes ∼120 species that are endemic to the Neotropics and disjunctly distributed in the moist Amazon and Atlantic coastal forests of Brazil. This paper presents the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of this group and this phylogeny is used as a basis to evaluate recent classification systems and to test alternative hypotheses associated with the history of this clade. Fifty-three taxa were sampled out of the 120 species currently recognized, plus 40 outgroup taxa, for one nuclear marker (ribosomal internal transcribed spacer) and four plastid markers (psbA-trnH, trnL-trnF, trnQ-rpS16 and ndhF). The relationships were reconstructed based on Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses. Additionally, a likelihood approach, 'geographic state speciation and extinction', was used to estimate region- dependent rates of speciation, extinction and dispersal, comparing historically climatic stable areas (refugia) and unstable areas. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inferences indicate that Myrcia and Marlierea are polyphyletic, and the internal groupings recovered are characterized by combinations of morphological characters. Phylogenetic relationships support a link between Amazonian and north-eastern species and between north-eastern and south-eastern species. Lower extinction rates within glacial refugia suggest that these areas were important in maintaining diversity in the Atlantic forest biodiversity hotspot. This study provides a robust phylogenetic framework to address important ecological questions for Myrcia s.l. within an evolutionary context, and supports the need to unite taxonomically the two traditional genera Myrcia and Marlierea in an expanded Myrcia s.l. Furthermore, this study offers valuable insights into the diversification of plant species in the highly impacted Atlantic forest of South America; evidence is presented that the lowest extinction rates are found inside refugia and that range expansion from unstable areas

  20. Analysis of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO WenBin; CHEN GuoHong; LI BiChun; WU XinSheng; SHU JingTing; WU ShengLong; XU Qi; Steffen WEIGEND

    2008-01-01

    Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among 568 individuals of two red jungle fowl subspe-cies (Gallus gallus spadiceus in China and Gallus gallus gallus in Thailand) and 14 Chinese domestic chicken breeds were evaluated with 29 microstaellite loci, the genetic variability within population and genetic differentiation among population were estimated, and then genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls. A total of 286 alleles were detected in 16 population with 29 microsatellite markers and the average number of the alleles observed in 29 microsatellite loci was 9.86±6.36. The overall expected heterozygosity of all population was 0.6708±0.0251, and the number of population deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium per locus ranged from 0 to 7. In the whole population, the average of genetic differentiation among population, measured as FST value, was 16.7% (P<0.001), and all loci contributed significantly (P<0.001) to this differentiation. It can also be seen that the deficit of heterozygotes was very high (0.015) (P<0.01). Reynolds' distance values varied between 0.036 (Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair) and 0.330 (G gallus gallus-Gushi chicken pair). The Nm value ranged from 0.533 (between G gallus gallus and Gushi chicken) to 5.833 (between Xiaoshan chicken and Luyuan chicken). An unrooted consensus tree was constructed using the neighbour-joining method and the Reynolds' genetic distance. The heavy-body sized chicken breeds, Luyuan chicken, Xiaoshan chicken, Beijing Fatty chicken, Henan Game chicken, Huainan Partridge and Langshan chicken formed one branch, and it had a close genetic relationship between Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair and Chahua chicken-Tibetan chicken pair. Chahua chicken and Tibetan chicken had closer genetic relationship with these two subspecies of red jungle fowl than other domestic chicken breeds. G gallus spadiceus showed closer phylogenetic

  1. Analysis of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steffen; WEIGEND

    2008-01-01

    Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among 568 individuals of two red jungle fowl subspe- cies (Gallus gallus spadiceus in China and Gallus gallus gallus in Thailand) and 14 Chinese domestic chicken breeds were evaluated with 29 microstaellite loci, the genetic variability within population and genetic differentiation among population were estimated, and then genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed among red jungle fowls and Chinese domestic fowls. A total of 286 alleles were detected in 16 population with 29 microsatellite markers and the average number of the alleles observed in 29 microsatellite loci was 9.86±6.36. The overall expected heterozygosity of all population was 0.6708±0.0251, and the number of population deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium per locus ranged from 0 to 7. In the whole population, the average of genetic differentiation among population, measured as FST value, was 16.7% (P<0.001), and all loci contributed significantly (P<0.001) to this differentiation. It can also be seen that the deficit of heterozygotes was very high (0.015) (P<0.01). Reynolds’ distance values varied between 0.036 (Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair) and 0.330 (G. gallus gallus-Gushi chicken pair). The Nm value ranged from 0.533 (between G. gallus gallus and Gushi chicken) to 5.833 (between Xiaoshan chicken and Luyuan chicken). An unrooted consensus tree was constructed using the neighbour-joining method and the Reynolds’ genetic distance. The heavy-body sized chicken breeds, Luyuan chicken, Xiaoshan chicken, Beijing Fatty chicken, Henan Game chicken, Huainan Partridge and Langshan chicken formed one branch, and it had a close genetic relationship between Xiaoshan chicken-Luyuan chicken pair and Chahua chicken-Tibetan chicken pair. Chahua chicken and Tibetan chicken had closer genetic relationship with these two subspecies of red jungle fowl than other domestic chicken breeds. G. gallus spadiceus showed closer phylogenetic

  2. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genome sequences increases phylogenetic resolution of bears (Ursidae, a mammalian family that experienced rapid speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryder Oliver A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the small number of ursid species, bear phylogeny has long been a focus of study due to their conservation value, as all bear genera have been classified as endangered at either the species or subspecies level. The Ursidae family represents a typical example of rapid evolutionary radiation. Previous analyses with a single mitochondrial (mt gene or a small number of mt genes either provide weak support or a large unresolved polytomy for ursids. We revisit the contentious relationships within Ursidae by analyzing complete mt genome sequences and evaluating the performance of both entire mt genomes and constituent mtDNA genes in recovering a phylogeny of extremely recent speciation events. Results This mitochondrial genome-based phylogeny provides strong evidence that the spectacled bear diverged first, while within the genus Ursus, the sloth bear is the sister taxon of all the other five ursines. The latter group is divided into the brown bear/polar bear and the two black bears/sun bear assemblages. These findings resolve the previous conflicts between trees using partial mt genes. The ability of different categories of mt protein coding genes to recover the correct phylogeny is concordant with previous analyses for taxa with deep divergence times. This study provides a robust Ursidae phylogenetic framework for future validation by additional independent evidence, and also has significant implications for assisting in the resolution of other similarly difficult phylogenetic investigations. Conclusion Identification of base composition bias and utilization of the combined data of whole mitochondrial genome sequences has allowed recovery of a strongly supported phylogeny that is upheld when using multiple alternative outgroups for the Ursidae, a mammalian family that underwent a rapid radiation since the mid- to late Pliocene. It remains to be seen if the reliability of mt genome analysis will hold up in studies of other

  3. Multivariate analysis of microbial communities in the River Elbe (Germany) on different phylogenetic and spatial levels of resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloep, Frank; Manz, Werner; Röske, Isolde

    2006-04-01

    The microbial communities of three different habitat types and from two sediment depths in the River Elbe were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization at various levels of complexity. Differences in the microbial community composition of free-flowing river water, water within the hyporheic interstitial and sediment-associated bacteria were quantitatively analyzed using domain- and group-specific oligonucleotide probes. Qualitative data on the presence/absence of specific bacterial taxa were gathered using genus- and species-specific probes. The complete data set was statistically processed by univariate statistical approaches, and two-dimensional ordinations of nonmetric multidimensional scaling. The analysis showed: (1) that the resolution of microbial community structures at microenvironments, habitats and locations can be regulated by targeted application of oligonucleotides on phylogenetic levels ranging from domains to species, and (2) that an extensive qualitative presence/absence analysis of multiparallel hybridization assays enables a fine-scale apportionment of spatial differences in microbial community structures that is robust against apparent limitations of fluorescence in situ hybridization such as false positive hybridization signals or inaccessibility of in situ oligonucleotide probes. A general model for the correlation of the phylogenetic depth of focus and the relative spatial resolution of microbial communities by fluorescence in situ hybridization is presented.

  4. Cryptorchestia ruffoi sp. n. from the island of Rhodes (Greece, revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Talitridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Davolos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new Cryptorchestia species, Cryptorchestia ruffoi Latella & Vonk, sp. n. from the island of Rhodes in south-eastern Greece, can be distinguished on the basis of morphological and phylogenetic data. Morphological analysis and DNA sequencing of mitochondrial and nuclear protein-coding genes indicated that this species is related to C. cavimana (Cyprus and C. garbinii (Mediterranean regions, with a recent northward expansion. Results supported a genetic separation between the Cryptorchestia species of the east Mediterranean regions and those of the northeast Atlantic volcanic islands examined in this study (C. canariensis, C. gomeri, C. guancha, and C. stocki from the Canary islands, C. monticola from Madeira, and C. chevreuxi from the Azores. The Mediterranean and Atlantic Cryptorchestia species appear to be also morphologically distinct. Cryptorchestia ruffoi sp. n., C. cavimana, C. garbinii, and C. kosswigi (Turkish coast clearly have a small lobe on the male gnathopod 1 merus. This character was the main diagnostic difference between Cryptorchestia (sensu Lowry, 2013 and Orchestia. However, among the six northeast Atlantic island Cryptorchestia species only C. stocki has a small lobe on the merus of gnathopod 1. Reduction or loss of the lobe in the Atlantic Island species cannot be ruled out; however, molecular phylogenetic analysis leads us to presume that this lobe independently evolved between the east Mediterranean Cryptorchestia species and C. stocki from Gran Canaria.

  5. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of the attachment glycoprotein of phocine distemper viruses of the 2002 and 1988 epizootics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L; Arctander, P; Jensen, T H

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the possible origin and spread of the dramatic re-emergent 2002 distemper epizootic observed among seals in Danish Waters, we have sequenced wild-type genes of the attachment (H) glycoproteins of viruses from both the 2002 and 1988 epizootics. Phylogenetic analysis of the H genes o...... epizootic in Danish Waters was investigated and determined to be caused by canine distemper virus, the closest relative of PDV, revealing no direct epidemiological link to the seal epizootics. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......To investigate the possible origin and spread of the dramatic re-emergent 2002 distemper epizootic observed among seals in Danish Waters, we have sequenced wild-type genes of the attachment (H) glycoproteins of viruses from both the 2002 and 1988 epizootics. Phylogenetic analysis of the H genes...... of phocine distemper virus (PDV) together with other morbilliviruses, suggests that the re-emergent 2002 PDV is more closely related to a putative recent ancestral PDV than the 1988 PDV isolates. Moreover, upsurges of distemper disease in land-living carnivores linked in time and locality to the 2002 seal...

  6. The Finding and Phylogenetic Evolution Analysis of Bovine Piroplasms in the Rasŏn Area of North Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Li-jun; ZHANG Shou-fa; CAO Shi-nuo; QIAN Nian-chao; YU Long-zheng; XUAN Xue-nan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of bovine Piroplasms infections in the Rasŏn area of North Korea. The survey was carried out by light microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained blood smears, PCR, and phylogenetic evolution analysis of 128 blood samples collected from the Rasŏn area. The results showed that the infection rates of the small and large parasites were about 2.5 and 1.5% on average, respectively, in all Theileria sergenti and Babesia ovata-positive blood smears by microscopic examination of blood smears. The detection rate of T. sergenti Giemsa-stained smears was 43.75%, while that with PCR was 67.97%. The detection rate of B. ovata Giemsa-stained smears was 49.21%, while that with PCR was 71.88%. The sequence and phylogenetic analysis of DNA showed 98.84%homology between the 18S rRNA gene sequences of T. sergenti isolates from North Korean and that of Yanbian state from China, indicating the closest genetic relationship between both of them. Moreover, 100%homology was shown between the 18S rRNA gene sequence of B. ovata isolates from North Korea and the published sequence AY081192 of GenBank, indicating the closest genetic relationship between both of them. This survey confirmed that Rasŏn is the endemic area of T. sergenti and B. ovata in North Korea.

  7. Biomass Allocation of Stoloniferous and Rhizomatous Plant in Response to Resource Availability: A Phylogenetic Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiu-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Pan, Xu; Liu, Feng-Hong; Song, Yao-Bin; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Resource allocation to different functions is central in life-history theory. Plasticity of functional traits allows clonal plants to regulate their resource allocation to meet changing environments. In this study, biomass allocation traits of clonal plants were categorized into absolute biomass for vegetative growth vs. for reproduction, and their relative ratios based on a data set including 115 species and derived from 139 published literatures. We examined general pattern of biomass allocation of clonal plants in response to availabilities of resource (e.g., light, nutrients, and water) using phylogenetic meta-analysis. We also tested whether the pattern differed among clonal organ types (stolon vs. rhizome). Overall, we found that stoloniferous plants were more sensitive to light intensity than rhizomatous plants, preferentially allocating biomass to vegetative growth, aboveground part and clonal reproduction under shaded conditions. Under nutrient- and water-poor condition, rhizomatous plants were constrained more by ontogeny than by resource availability, preferentially allocating biomass to belowground part. Biomass allocation between belowground and aboveground part of clonal plants generally supported the optimal allocation theory. No general pattern of trade-off was found between growth and reproduction, and neither between sexual and clonal reproduction. Using phylogenetic meta-analysis can avoid possible confounding effects of phylogeny on the results. Our results shown the optimal allocation theory explained a general trend, which the clonal plants are able to plastically regulate their biomass allocation, to cope with changing resource availability, at least in stoloniferous and rhizomatous plants.

  8. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Brachypodium distachyon: sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of eight grass plastomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Olin D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat, barley, and rye, of tribe Triticeae in the Poaceae, are among the most important crops worldwide but they present many challenges to genomics-aided crop improvement. Brachypodium distachyon, a close relative of those cereals has recently emerged as a model for grass functional genomics. Sequencing of the nuclear and organelle genomes of Brachypodium is one of the first steps towards making this species available as a tool for researchers interested in cereals biology. Findings The chloroplast genome of Brachypodium distachyon was sequenced by a combinational approach using BAC end and shotgun sequences derived from a selected BAC containing the entire chloroplast genome. Comparative analysis indicated that the chloroplast genome is conserved in gene number and organization with respect to those of other cereals. However, several Brachypodium genes evolve at a faster rate than those in other grasses. Sequence analysis reveals that rice and wheat have a ~2.1 kb deletion in their plastid genomes and this deletion must have occurred independently in both species. Conclusion We demonstrate that BAC libraries can be used to sequence plastid, and likely other organellar, genomes. As expected, the Brachypodium chloroplast genome is very similar to those of other sequenced grasses. The phylogenetic analyses and the pattern of insertions and deletions in the chloroplast genome confirmed that Brachypodium is a close relative of the tribe Triticeae. Nevertheless, we show that some large indels can arise multiple times and may confound phylogenetic reconstruction.

  9. Characterization of heterotrophic prokaryote subgroups in the Sfax coastal solar salterns by combining flow cytometry cell sorting and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigui, Hana; Masmoudi, Salma; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Barani, Aude; Grégori, Gérald; Denis, Michel; Dukan, Sam; Maalej, Sami

    2011-05-01

    Here, we combined flow cytometry (FCM) and phylogenetic analyses after cell sorting to characterize the dominant groups of the prokaryotic assemblages inhabiting two ponds of increasing salinity: a crystallizer pond (TS) with a salinity of 390 g/L, and the non-crystallizer pond (M1) with a salinity of 200 g/L retrieved from the solar saltern of Sfax in Tunisia. As expected, FCM analysis enabled the resolution of high nucleic acid content (HNA) and low nucleic acid content (LNA) prokaryotes. Next, we performed a taxonomic analysis of the bacterial and archaeal communities comprising the two most populated clusters by phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone library. We show for the first time that the presence of HNA and LNA content cells could also be extended to the archaeal populations. Archaea were detected in all M1 and TS samples, whereas representatives of Bacteria were detected only in LNA for M1 and HNA for TS. Although most of the archaeal sequences remained undetermined, other clones were most frequently affiliated to Haloquadratum and Halorubrum. In contrast, most bacterial clones belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria class (Phyllobacterium genus) in M1 samples and to the Bacteroidetes phylum (Sphingobacteria and Salinibacter genus) in TS samples.

  10. Genomic evidence of bitter taste in snakes and phylogenetic analysis of bitter taste receptor genes in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huaming; Shang, Shuai; Wu, Xiaoyang; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Wanchao; Yan, Jiakuo; Li, Haotian; Zhang, Honghai

    2017-01-01

    As nontraditional model organisms with extreme physiological and morphological phenotypes, snakes are believed to possess an inferior taste system. However, the bitter taste sensation is essential to distinguish the nutritious and poisonous food resources and the genomic evidence of bitter taste in snakes is largely scarce. To explore the genetic basis of the bitter taste of snakes and characterize the evolution of bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2rs) in reptiles, we identified Tas2r genes in 19 genomes (species) corresponding to three orders of non-avian reptiles. Our results indicated contractions of Tas2r gene repertoires in snakes, however dramatic gene expansions have occurred in lizards. Phylogenetic analysis of the Tas2rs with NJ and BI methods revealed that Tas2r genes of snake species formed two clades, whereas in lizards the Tas2r genes clustered into two monophyletic clades and four large clades. Evolutionary changes (birth and death) of intact Tas2r genes in reptiles were determined by reconciliation analysis. Additionally, the taste signaling pathway calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (Calhm1) gene of snakes was putatively functional, suggesting that snakes still possess bitter taste sensation. Furthermore, Phylogenetically Independent Contrasts (PIC) analyses reviewed a significant correlation between the number of Tas2r genes and the amount of potential toxins in reptilian diets, suggesting that insectivores such as some lizards may require more Tas2rs genes than omnivorous and carnivorous reptiles.

  11. Biomass Allocation of Stoloniferous and Rhizomatous Plant in Response to Resource Availability: A Phylogenetic Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Fang eXie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resource allocation to different functions is central in life-history theory. Plasticity of functional traits allows clonal plants to regulate their resource allocation to meet changing environments. In this study, biomass allocation traits of clonal plants were categorized into absolute biomass for vegetative growth versus for reproduction, and their relative ratios based on a data set including 115 species and derived from 139 published literatures. We examined general pattern of biomass allocation of clonal plants in response to availabilities of resource (e.g. light, nutrients and water using phylogenetic meta-analysis. We also tested whether the pattern differed among clonal organ types (stolon vs. rhizome. Overall, we found that stoloniferous plants were more sensitive to light intensity than rhizomatous plants, preferentially allocating biomass to vegetative growth, aboveground part and clonal reproduction under shaded conditions. Under nutrient- and water-poor condition, rhizomatous plants were constrained more by ontogeny than by resource availability, preferentially allocating biomass to belowground part. Biomass allocation between belowground and aboveground part of clonal plants generally supported the optimal allocation theory. No general pattern of trade-off was found between growth and reproduction, and neither between sexual and clonal reproduction. Using phylogenetic meta-analysis can avoid possible confounding effects of phylogeny on the results. Our results shown the optimal allocation theory explained a general trend, which the clonal plants are able to plastically regulate their biomass allocation, to cope with changing resource availability, at least in stoloniferous and rhizomatous plants.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of vitamin B12-related metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas B. Young

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of genome sequences from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with phylogenetically-related pathogens Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium leprae reveals diversity amongst genes associated with vitamin B12-related metabolism. Diversity is generated by gene deletion events, differential acquisition of genes by horizontal transfer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms with predicted impact on protein function and transcriptional regulation. Differences in the B12 synthesis pathway, methionine biosynthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and DNA repair and replication are consistent with adaptations to different environmental niches and pathogenic lifestyles. While there is no evidence of further gene acquisition during expansion of the M. tuberculosis complex, the emergence of other forms of genetic diversity provides insights into continuing host-pathogen co-evolution and has the potential to identify novel targets for disease intervention.

  13. Molecular surveillance and phylogenetic analysis of Old World arenaviruses in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akihiro; Thomas, Yuka; Moonga, Ladslav; Nakamura, Ichiro; Ohnuma, Aiko; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Takada, Ayato; Mweene, Aaron S; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2012-10-01

    In order to survey arenaviruses in the Republic of Zambia, we captured 335 rodents from three cities between 2010 and 2011. Eighteen Luna virus (LUNV) and one lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-related virus RNAs were detected by one-step RT-PCR from Mastomys natalensis and Mus minutoides, respectively. Four LUNV strains and one LCMV-related virus were isolated, and the whole genome nucleotide sequence was determined by pyrosequencing. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the LUNV clade consists of two branches that are distinguished by geographical location and that the LCMV-related virus belongs to the LCMV clade, but diverges from the typical LCMVs. Comparison of nucleoprotein amino acid sequences indicated that the LCMV-related virus could be designated a novel arenavirus, which was tentatively named as the Lunk virus. Amino acid sequences of the GP, NP, Z and L proteins showed poor similarity among the three Zambian arenavirus strains, i.e. Luna, Lunk and Lujo virus.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that sociality is associated with reduced effectiveness of selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settepani, Virginia; Bechsgaard, Jesper Smærup; Bilde, Trine

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of sociality in spiders is associated with female bias, reproductive skew and an inbreeding mating system, factors that cause a reduction in effective population size and increase effects of genetic drift. These factors act to decrease the effectiveness of selection, thereby...... increasing the fixation probability of deleterious mutations. Comparative studies of closely related species with contrasting social traits and mating systems provide the opportunity to test consequences of low effective population size on the effectiveness of selection empirically. We used phylogenetic...... analyses of three inbred social spider species and seven outcrossing subsocial species of the genus Stegodyphus, and compared dN/dS ratios and codon usage bias between social Inbreeding and subsocial outcrossing mating systems to assess the effectiveness of selection. The overall results do not differ...

  15. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of heme synthesis genes in trypanosomatids and their bacterial endosymbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M P Alves

    Full Text Available It has been known for decades that some insect-infecting trypanosomatids can survive in culture without heme supplementation while others cannot, and that this capability is associated with the presence of a betaproteobacterial endosymbiont in the flagellate's cytoplasm. However, the specific mechanisms involved in this process remained obscure. In this work, we sequence and phylogenetically analyze the heme pathway genes from the symbionts and from their hosts, as well as from a number of heme synthesis-deficient Kinetoplastida. Our results show that the enzymes responsible for synthesis of heme are encoded on the symbiont genomes and produced in close cooperation with the flagellate host. Our evidence suggests that this synergistic relationship is the end result of a history of extensive gene loss and multiple lateral gene transfer events in different branches of the phylogeny of the Trypanosomatidae.

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the SrRNA gene and phylogenetic analysis of Trichomonas tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukura, K; Yamamoto, A; Hashimoto, T; Goto, N

    1996-01-01

    The small subunit ribosomal RNA (SrRNA) gene of Trichomonas tenax ATCC30207 was amplified by PCR and the 1.55-kb product was cloned into plasmid vector pUC18. Four clones were isolated and sequenced. The insert DNAs were 1,552 bp long and their G+C contents were 48.1%; three of them had exactly the same DNA sequences and one had only one nucleotide change. A representative SrRNA sequence was analyzed and a phylogenetic tree was estimated by the neighbor-joining (NJ) method. Among the protists examined, T. tenax was placed as the closest relative of Tritrichomonas foetus, as expected from the traditional taxonomy. The total homology between the two SrRNA sequences was 89.2%.

  17. Phylogenetic ctDNA analysis depicts early stage lung cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbosh, Christopher; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Wilson, Gareth A.

    2017-01-01

    of early-stage lung cancer is not established. Here we conduct a tumour-specific phylogenetic approach to ctDNA profiling in the first 100 TRACERx (TRAcking non-small cell lung Cancer Evolution through therapy (Rx)) study participants, including one patient co-recruited to the PEACE (Posthumous Evaluation......The early detection of relapse following primary surgery for non-small cell lung cancer and the characterization of emerging subclones seeding metastatic sites might offer new therapeutic approaches to limit tumor recurrence. The potential to non-invasively track tumor evolutionary dynamics in ctDNA...... of Advanced Cancer Environment) post-mortem study. We identify independent predictors of ctDNA release and perform tumor volume limit of detection analyses. Through blinded profiling of post-operative plasma, we observe evidence of adjuvant chemotherapy resistance and identify patients destined to experience...

  18. Phylogenetic Analysis Supports a Link between DUF1220 Domain Number and Primate Brain Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Fabian; Montgomery, Stephen H

    2015-06-25

    The expansion of DUF1220 domain copy number during human evolution is a dramatic example of rapid and repeated domain duplication. Although patterns of expression, homology, and disease associations suggest a role in cortical development, this hypothesis has not been robustly tested using phylogenetic methods. Here, we estimate DUF1220 domain counts across 12 primate genomes using a nucleotide Hidden Markov Model. We then test a series of hypotheses designed to examine the potential evolutionary significance of DUF1220 copy number expansion. Our results suggest a robust association with brain size, and more specifically neocortex volume. In contradiction to previous hypotheses, we find a strong association with postnatal brain development but not with prenatal brain development. Our results provide further evidence of a conserved association between specific loci and brain size across primates, suggesting that human brain evolution may have occurred through a continuation of existing processes.

  19. The past 1-Myr of erosion in Fennoscandia via inverse modelling with CNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, John; Knudsen, Mads; Egholm, David; Andersen, Jane; Jacobsen, Bo; Heyman, Jakob

    2017-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclide (CN) abundances at Earth's surface reflect the balance of accumulation during intervals of cosmic-ray exposure and loss via erosion and radioactive decay. Analyses of remnant CN inventories accumulated prior to the last glaciation (viz, CN inheritance) have granted valuable insights to the erosional legacy of polythermal ice masses. Simple exposure ages that match the timing of deglaciation imply >2-3 m of subglacial erosion via warm-based ice, whereas significant CN inheritance implies minimal erosion due to the development of frozen-bed patches. By comparing a compilation of simple 10Be bedrock exposure ages (n=355) to a recently published deglaciation chronology of Fennoscandia (±0.5 kyr) we find that 54% of samples contain appreciable (>2σ) CN inheritance, whereas just 7% of samples contain zero (>2σ) inheritance. With the aim of extracting deeper landscape history information from inherited CNs, we devised a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inverse approach that matches present-day CN (10Be-26Al) abundances with the most probable permutation of exposure history and erosion rates over multiple glacial and interglacial periods. Shifts in ice cover (and therefore cosmic-ray exposure) over successive glacial cycles are simulated via a free parameter threshold applied to a benthic δ18O record. Our MCMC model yields two key outputs integrated over the past 1-Myr: mean erosion (denudation) rate, and the ratio of burial to exposure. In addition, we propose a new measure of surface erosion history termed the 10Be-memory: the time since 1-1/e ( 63%) of 10Be atoms were accumulated, which effectively marks the starting point for landscape history recorded by 10Be. We apply our MCMC model to a subset (n=72) of Fennoscandian CN data spanning four bedrock landscape types: tors, blockfields, glacial troughs, and areally-scoured terrain. Our preliminary results (given as 1st-3rd quartile ranges) reveal that median erosion rates among all four landscape

  20. Ice-free conditions in Fennoscandia during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 3?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlfarth, Barbara (Dept. of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-04-15

    One of the central aims of the climate research conducted by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is to investigate the extremes within which climate conditions may vary within a 100,000 year perspective. The 100,000 year time perspective corresponds to one glacial cycle during which warm interstadial and cold stadial conditions alternated, leading to ice sheet advance and retreat over Fennoscandia. To address the issue of how extreme climate conditions may impact the deep nuclear waste repository, a climate modelling study was initiated with the aim to investigate the response to different climate scenarios: glacial conditions, permafrost conditions and temperate conditions. A model set-up for the permafrost and glacial scenario required information on, for example past ice cover, vegetation, and land-sea configuration. The permafrost climate scenario focussed on a stadial event (Greenland stadial 12) during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 3, because it was assumed that southern Sweden and the areas of Forsmark and Oskarshamn were not ice covered, but possibly experienced permafrost conditions. This assumption however needed to be validated by paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic records for MIS 3. Available paleoenvironmental records for this time interval are comparably scarce and due to chronological uncertainties also partly conflicting. Most records are derived from marginal areas of the former Fennoscandian ice sheet and only little and inconsistent information exists for the central part. Geological investigations along the Norwegian coast, in Denmark, southern Sweden, northern and eastern Finland have for example shown that the Fennoscandian ice sheet margin responded distinctly to some of the warmest middle Weichselian interstadials (MIS 3). Interstadial organic sediments from the central part of the former ice sheet have been described from several localities in Sweden, but radiocarbon (14C) dates for these deposits provided ages

  1. Intron sequences provide a tool for high-resolution phylogenetic analysis of volvocine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, M; Kirk, D L; Beyser, K; Fabry, S

    1997-03-01

    Three nuclear spliceosomal introns in conserved locations were amplified and sequenced from 28 strains representing 14 species and 4 genera of volvocalean green algae. Data derived from the three different introns yielded congruent results in nearly all cases. In pairwise comparisons, a spectrum of taxon-specific sequence differences ranging from complete identity to no significant similarity was observed, with the most distantly related organisms lacking any conserved elements apart from exon-intron boundaries and a pyrimidine-rich stretch near the 3' splice site. A metric (SI50), providing a measure of the degree of similarity of any pair of intron sequences, was defined and used to calculate phylogenetic distances between organisms whose introns displayed statistically significant similarities. The rate of sequences divergence in the introns was great enough to provide useful information about relationships among different geographical isolates of a single species, but in most cases was too great to provide reliable guides to relationships above the species level. A substitution rate of approximately 3 x 10(-8) per intron position per year was estimated, which is about 150-fold higher than in nuclear genes encoding rRNA and about 10-fold higher than the synonymous substitution rate in protein-coding regions. Thus, these homologous introns not only provide useful information about intraspecific phylogenetic relationships, but also illustrate the concept that different parts of a gene may be subject to extremely different intensities of selection. The intron data generated here (1) reliably resolve for the first time the relationships among the five most extensively studied strains of Volvox, (2) reveal that two other Volvox species may be more closely related than had previously been suspected, (3) confirm prior evidence that particular isolates of Eudorina elegans and Pleodorina illinoisensis appear to be sibling taxa, and (4) contribute to the resolution of

  2. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) with phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Yang, Hong; Dai, Renhuai

    2017-07-20

    Acanthoscelides obtectus is a common species of the subfamily Bruchinae and a worldwide-distributed seed-feeding beetle. The complete mitochondrial genome of A. obtectus is 16,130 bp in length with an A + T content of 76.4%. It contains a positive AT skew and a negative GC skew. The mitogenome of A. obtectus contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes and a non-coding region (D-loop). All PCGs start with an ATN codon, and seven (ND3, ATP6, COIII, ND3, ND4L, ND6, and Cytb) of them terminate with TAA, while the remaining five (COI, COII, ND1, ND4, and ND5) terminate with a single T, ATP8 terminates with TGA. Except tRNA (Ser) , the secondary structures of 21 tRNAs that can be folded into a typical clover-leaf structure were identified. The secondary structures of lrRNA and srRNA were also predicted in this study. There are six domains with 48 helices in lrRNA and three domains with 32 helices in srRNA. The control region of A. obtectus is 1354 bp in size with the highest A + T content (83.5%) in a mitochondrial gene. Thirteen PCGs in 19 species have been used to infer their phylogenetic relationships. Our results show that A. obtectus belongs to the family Chrysomelidae (subfamily-Bruchinae). This is the first study on phylogenetic analyses involving the mitochondrial genes of A. obtectus and could provide basic data for future studies of mitochondrial genome diversities and the evolution of related insect lineages.

  3. GENOME-WIDE PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL OF VIBRIO FURNISSII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Michael Lux

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the genome sequence of a free-living strain of Vibrio furnissii (NCTC 11218 harvested from an estuarine environment. V. furnissii is a widespread, free-living proteobacterium and emerging pathogen that can cause acute gastroenteritis in humans and lethal zoonoses in aquatic invertebrates, including farmed crustaceans and molluscs. Here we present the fully annotated genome of Vibrio furnissii NCTC11218 and analyses to further assess the potential pathogenic impact of V. furnissii. We compared the complete genome of V. furnissii with 8 other emerging and pathogenic Vibrio species. We selected and analysed more deeply 10 genomic regions based upon unique or common features, and used 3 of these regions to construct a phylogenetic tree. Thus, we positioned V. furnissii more accurately than before and revealed a closer relationship between V. furnissii and V. cholerae than previously thought. However, V. furnissii lacks several important features normally associated with virulence in the human pathogens V. cholera and V. vulnificus. We systematically built phylogenetic trees of all the predicted proteins and grouped them according GO categories. A striking feature of the V. furnissii genome is the hugely increased Super Integron, compared to the other Vibrio. Analyses of predicted genomic islands resulted in the discovery of a protein sequence that is present only in Vibrio associated with diseases in aquatic animals. We also discovered evidence of high levels horizontal gene transfer in V. furnissii. V. furnissii seems therefore to have a dynamic and fluid genome that could quickly adapt to environmental perturbation or increase its pathogenicity. Taken together, these analyses confirm the potential of V. furnissii as an emerging marine and possible human pathogen, especially in the developing, tropical, coastal regions that are most at risk from climate change.

  4. Cryptic intercontinental colonization in water fleas Daphnia pulicaria inferred from phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marková, Silvia; Dufresne, France; Rees, David J; Cerný, Martin; Kotlík, Petr

    2007-07-01

    The water fleas of the Daphnia pulex complex play a key role in freshwater ecosystems throughout the northern hemisphere. Despite the fact that they have been the subject of study for numerous biological disciplines, their phylogeny and species delimitation remain controversial. We used DNA sequence variation of the mitochondrial ND5 gene to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of D. pulicaria Forbes, a widespread member of this complex from North America and Europe. Populations from the two continents respectively split into two evolutionary lineages, Eastern Nearctic and European, which each belong to another main clade within the D. pulex complex (the pulicaria and tenebrosa groups, respectively). Unexpectedly, melanin and carotenoid pigmented D. pulicaria populations from European high-mountain lakes were not allied with the transparent populations inhabiting the same lakes and the lowland ponds and reservoirs throughout Europe, but were included with the samples from Canada and Greenland in the Eastern Nearctic lineage. Until now populations belonging to this lineage were known only from Canada and North Atlantic islands, but not from mainland Europe. Independent data from microsatellite markers supported the genetic distinctiveness of the sympatric carotenoid pigmented and transparent populations and suggested that they may have undergone transition to obligate parthenogenesis, possibly as a consequence of past introgressive hybridization. Two different taxa are therefore confused under the name D. pulicaria in Europe. The close phylogenetic relationships of European populations with those from Canada and Greenland suggest that the Nearctic lineage is of recent origin in Europe via intercontinental dispersal from the North America. It has evolved melanin and carotenoid pigmentation as adaptations against the UV light stress, which enable it to share habitat occupied by the transparent European species. The Nearctic D. pulicaria thus provides a new model

  5. Phylogenetic analysis, structural evolution and functional divergence of the 12-oxo-phytodienoate acid reductase gene family in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongbin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductases (OPRs are enzymes that catalyze the reduction of double-bonds in α, β-unsaturated aldehydes or ketones and are part of the octadecanoid pathway that converts linolenic acid to jasmonic acid. In plants, OPRs belong to the old yellow enzyme family and form multigene families. Although discoveries about this family in Arabidopsis and other species have been reported in some studies, the evolution and function of multiple OPRs in plants are not clearly understood. Results A comparative genomic analysis was performed to investigate the phylogenetic relationship, structural evolution and functional divergence among OPR paralogues in plants. In total, 74 OPR genes were identified from 11 species representing the 6 major green plant lineages: green algae, mosses, lycophytes, gymnosperms, monocots and dicots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that seven well-conserved subfamilies exist in plants. All OPR genes from green algae were clustered into a single subfamily, while those from land plants fell into six other subfamilies, suggesting that the events leading to the expansion of the OPR family occurred in land plants. Further analysis revealed that lineage-specific expansion, especially by tandem duplication, contributed to the current OPR subfamilies in land plants after divergence from aquatic plants. Interestingly, exon/intron structure analysis showed that the gene structures of OPR paralogues exhibits diversity in intron number and length, while the intron positions and phase were highly conserved across different lineage species. These observations together with the phylogenetic tree revealed that successive single intron loss, as well as indels within introns, occurred during the process of structural evolution of OPR paralogues. Functional divergence analysis revealed that altered functional constraints have occurred at specific amino acid positions after diversification of the paralogues

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 gene sequences of waterfowl parvoviruses from the Mainland of China revealed genetic diversity and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao; Cheng, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Shao-Ying; Lin, Feng-Qiang; Chen, Shi-Long; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Huang, Mei-Qing; Zheng, Min

    2016-03-01

    To determine the origin and evolution of goose parvovirus (GPV) and Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) in the Mainland of China, phylogenetic and recombination analyses in the present study were performed on 32 complete VP1 gene sequences from China and other countries. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene, GPV strains studied here from Mainland China (PRC) could be divided into three genotypes, namely PRC-I, PRC-II and PRC-III. Genotype PRC-I is indigenous to Mainland China. Only one GPV strain from Northeast China was of Genotype PRC-II and was thought to be imported from Europe. Genotype PRC-III, which was the most isolated genotype during 1999-2012, is related to GPVs in Taiwan and has been the predominant pathogen responsible for recent Derzy's disease outbreaks in Mainland China. Current vaccine strains used in Mainland China belong to Genotype PRC-I that is evolutionary distant from Genotypes PRC-II and PRC-III. In comparison, MDPV strains herein from Mainland China are clustered in a single group which is closely related to Taiwanese MDPV strains, and the full-length sequences of the VP1 gene of China MDPVs are phylogenetic closely related to the VP1 sequence of a Hungarian MDPV strain. Moreover, We also found that homologous recombination within VP1 gene plays a role in generating genetic diversity in GPV evolution. The GPV GDFSh from Guangdong Province appears to be the evolutionary product of a recombination event between parental GPV strains GD and B, while the major parent B proved to be a reference strain for virulent European GPVs. Our findings provide valuable information on waterfowl parvoviral evolution in Mainland China.

  7. Four genotyping schemes for phylogenetic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: comparison of their congruence with multi-locus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maâtallah, Makaoui; Bakhrouf, Amina; Habeeb, Muhammed Asif; Turlej-Rogacka, Agata; Iversen, Aina; Pourcel, Christine; Sioud, Olfa; Giske, Christian G

    2013-01-01

    Several molecular typing schemes have been proposed to differentiate among isolates and clonal groups, and hence establish epidemiological or phylogenetic links. It has been widely accepted that multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) is the gold standard for phylogenetic typing/long-term epidemiological surveillance, but other recently described methods may be easier to carry out, especially in settings with limited access to DNA sequencing. Comparing the performance of such techniques to MLST is therefore of relevance. A study was therefore carried out with a collection of P. aeruginosa strains (n = 133) typed by four typing schemes: MLST, multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and the commercial DiversiLab microbial typing system (DL). The aim of this study was to compare the results of each typing method with MLST. The Simpson's indices of diversity were 0.989, 0.980, 0.961 and 0.906 respectively for PFGE, MLVA, DL and MLST. The congruence between techniques was measured by the adjusted Wallace index (W): this coefficient indicates the probability that a pair of isolates which is assigned to the same type by one typing method is also typed as identical by the other. In this context, the congruence between techniques was recorded as follow: MLVA-type to predict MLST-type (93%), PFGE to MLST (92%), DL to MLST (64.2%), PFGE to MLVA (63.5%) and PFGE to DL (61.7%). Conversely, for all above combinations, prediction was very poor. The congruence was increased at the clonal complex (CC) level. MLST is regarded the gold standard for phylogenetic classification of bacteria, but is rather laborious to carry out in many settings. Our data suggest that MLVA can predict the MLST-type with high accuracy, and even higher when studying the clonal complex level. Of the studied three techniques MLVA was therefore the best surrogate method to predict MLST.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of conservation priorities for aquatic mammals and their terrestrial relatives, with a comparison of methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J May-Collado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Habitat loss and overexploitation are among the primary factors threatening populations of many mammal species. Recently, aquatic mammals have been highlighted as particularly vulnerable. Here we test (1 if aquatic mammals emerge as more phylogenetically urgent conservation priorities than their terrestrial relatives, and (2 if high priority species are receiving sufficient conservation effort. We also compare results among some phylogenetic conservation methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A phylogenetic analysis of conservation priorities for all 620 species of Cetartiodactyla and Carnivora, including most aquatic mammals. Conservation priority ranking of aquatic versus terrestrial species is approximately proportional to their diversity. However, nearly all obligated freshwater cetartiodactylans are among the top conservation priority species. Further, ∼74% and 40% of fully aquatic cetartiodactylans and carnivores, respectively, are either threatened or data deficient, more so than their terrestrial relatives. Strikingly, only 3% of all 'high priority' species are thought to be stable. An overwhelming 97% of these species thus either show decreasing population trends (87% or are insufficiently known (10%. Furthermore, a disproportional number of highly evolutionarily distinct species are experiencing population decline, thus, such species should be closely monitored even if not currently threatened. Comparison among methods reveals that exact species ranking differs considerably among methods, nevertheless, most top priority species consistently rank high under any method. While we here favor one approach, we also suggest that a consensus approach may be useful when methods disagree. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results reinforce prior findings, suggesting there is an urgent need to gather basic conservation data for aquatic mammals, and special conservation focus is needed on those confined to freshwater. That

  9. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis of true morels (Morchella) reveals high levels of endemics in Turkey relative to other regions of Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Hatira; Büyükalaca, Saadet; Hansen, Karen; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to better understand how the phylogenetic diversity of true morels (Morchella) in Turkey compares with species found in other regions of the world. The current research builds on our recently published surveys of 10 Turkish provinces and the northern hemisphere in which DNA sequence data from 247 and 562 collections respectively were analyzed phylogenetically. Herein we report on phylogenetic analyses of 243 additional collections made in spring 2009 and 2010 from eight additional provinces in the Aegean, Black Sea, central Anatolia, eastern Anatolia and Marmara regions of Turkey. Our analysis revealed that five species within the Esculenta clade (yellow morels) and 15 species within the Elata clade (black morels) were present in Turkey. Our preliminary results also indicate that M. anatolica, recently described from a collection in Muğla province in the Aegean region of Turkey, is a closely related sister of M. rufobrunnea; these two species comprise a separate evolutionary lineage from the Esculenta and Elata clades. Nine species of Morchella currently are known only from Turkey, four species were present in Turkey and other European countries and seven species might have been introduced to Turkey anthropogenically. Three of the putatively exotic species in Turkey appear to be endemic to western North America; they are nested within a clade of fire-adapted morels that dates to the late Oligocene, 25 000 000 y ago. Our results indicate that there are roughly twice as many Morchella species in Turkey compared with the other regions of Europe sampled. Knowledge of Morchella species diversity and their biogeographic distribution are crucial for formulating informed conservation policies directed at preventing species loss and ensuring that annual morel harvests are sustainable and ecologically sound.

  10. Effects of shrub and tree cover increase on the near-surface atmosphere in northern Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydsaa, Johanne H.; Stordal, Frode; Bryn, Anders; Tallaksen, Lena M.

    2017-09-01

    Increased shrub and tree cover in high latitudes is a widely observed response to climate change that can lead to positive feedbacks to the regional climate. In this study we evaluate the sensitivity of the near-surface atmosphere to a potential increase in shrub and tree cover in the northern Fennoscandia region. We have applied the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the Noah-UA land surface module in evaluating biophysical effects of increased shrub cover on the near-surface atmosphere at a fine resolution (5.4 km × 5.4 km). Perturbation experiments are performed in which we prescribe a gradual increase in taller vegetation in the alpine shrub and tree cover according to empirically established bioclimatic zones within the study region. We focus on the spring and summer atmospheric response. To evaluate the sensitivity of the atmospheric response to inter-annual variability in climate, simulations were conducted for two contrasting years, one warm and one cold. We find that shrub and tree cover increase leads to a general increase in near-surface temperatures, with the highest influence seen during the snowmelt season and a more moderate effect during summer. We find that the warming effect is stronger in taller vegetation types, with more complex canopies leading to decreases in the surface albedo. Counteracting effects include increased evapotranspiration, which can lead to increased cloud cover, precipitation, and snow cover. We find that the strength of the atmospheric feedback is sensitive to snow cover variations and to a lesser extent to summer temperatures. Our results show that the positive feedback to high-latitude warming induced by increased shrub and tree cover is a robust feature across inter-annual differences in meteorological conditions and will likely play an important role in land-atmosphere feedback processes in the future.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of subgenus vigna species using nuclear ribosomal RNA ITS: evidence of hybridization among Vigna unguiculata subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykumar, Archana; Saini, Ajay; Jawali, Narendra

    2010-01-01

    Molecular phylogeny among species belonging to subgenus Vigna (genus Vigna) was inferred based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of 18S-5.8S-26S ribosomal RNA gene unit. Analysis showed a total of 356 polymorphic sites of which approximately 80% were parsimony informative. Phylogenetic reconstruction by neighbor joining and maximum parsimony methods placed the 57 Vigna accessions (belonging to 15 species) into 5 major clades. Five species viz. Vigna heterophylla, Vigna pubigera, Vigna parkeri, Vigna laurentii, and Vigna gracilis whose position in the subgenus was previously not known were placed in the section Vigna. A single accession (Vigna unguiculata ssp. tenuis, NI 1637) harbored 2 intragenomic ITS variants, indicative of 2 different types of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeat units. ITS variant type-I was close to ITS from V. unguiculata ssp. pubescens, whereas type-II was close to V. unguiculata ssp. tenuis. Transcript analysis clearly demonstrates that in accession NI 1637, rDNA repeat units with only type-II ITS variants are transcriptionally active. Evidence from sequence analysis (of 5.8S, ITS1, and ITS2) and secondary structure analysis (of ITS1 and ITS2) indicates that the type-I ITS variant probably does not belong to the pseudogenic rDNA repeat units. The results from phylogenetic and transcript analysis suggest that the rDNA units with the type-I ITS may have introgressed as a result of hybridization (between ssp. tenuis and ssp. pubescens); however, it has been epigenetically silenced. The results also demonstrate differential evolution of ITS sequence among wild and cultivated forms of V. unguiculata.

  12. A multivariate analysis of variation in genome size and endoreduplication in angiosperms reveals strong phylogenetic signal and association with phenotypic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainard, Jillian D; Bainard, Luke D; Henry, Thomas A; Fazekas, Aron J; Newmaster, Steven G

    2012-12-01

    Genome size (C-value) and endopolyploidy (endoreduplication index, EI) are known to correlate with various morphological and ecological traits, in addition to phylogenetic placement. A phylogenetically controlled multivariate analysis was used to explore the relationships between DNA content and phenotype in angiosperms. Seeds from 41 angiosperm species (17 families) were grown in a common glasshouse experiment. Genome size (2C-value and 1Cx-value) and EI (in four tissues: leaf, stem, root, petal) were determined using flow cytometry. The phylogenetic signal was calculated for each measure of DNA content, and phylogenetic canonical correlation analysis (PCCA) explored how the variation in genome size and EI was correlated with 18 morphological and ecological traits. Phylogenetic signal (λ) was strongest for EI in all tissues, and λ was stronger for the 2C-value than the 1Cx-value. PCCA revealed that EI was correlated with pollen length, stem height, seed mass, dispersal mechanism, arbuscular mycorrhizal association, life history and flowering time, and EI and genome size were both correlated with stem height and life history. PCCA provided an effective way to explore multiple factors of DNA content variation and phenotypic traits in a phylogenetic context. Traits that were correlated significantly with DNA content were linked to plant competitive ability. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Investigating cultural evolution using phylogenetic analysis: the origins and descent of the southeast Asian tradition of warp ikat weaving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Buckley

    Full Text Available The warp ikat method of making decorated textiles is one of the most geographically widespread in southeast Asia, being used by Austronesian peoples in Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines, and Daic peoples on the Asian mainland. In this study a dataset consisting of the decorative characters of 36 of these warp ikat weaving traditions is investigated using Bayesian and Neighbornet techniques, and the results are used to construct a phylogenetic tree and taxonomy for warp ikat weaving in southeast Asia. The results and analysis show that these diverse traditions have a common ancestor amongst neolithic cultures the Asian mainland, and parallels exist between the patterns of textile weaving descent and linguistic phylogeny for the Austronesian group. Ancestral state analysis is used to reconstruct some of the features of the ancestral weaving tradition. The widely held theory that weaving motifs originated in the late Bronze Age Dong-Son culture is shown to be inconsistent with the data.

  14. Investigating cultural evolution using phylogenetic analysis: the origins and descent of the southeast Asian tradition of warp ikat weaving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    The warp ikat method of making decorated textiles is one of the most geographically widespread in southeast Asia, being used by Austronesian peoples in Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines, and Daic peoples on the Asian mainland. In this study a dataset consisting of the decorative characters of 36 of these warp ikat weaving traditions is investigated using Bayesian and Neighbornet techniques, and the results are used to construct a phylogenetic tree and taxonomy for warp ikat weaving in southeast Asia. The results and analysis show that these diverse traditions have a common ancestor amongst neolithic cultures the Asian mainland, and parallels exist between the patterns of textile weaving descent and linguistic phylogeny for the Austronesian group. Ancestral state analysis is used to reconstruct some of the features of the ancestral weaving tradition. The widely held theory that weaving motifs originated in the late Bronze Age Dong-Son culture is shown to be inconsistent with the data.

  15. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport, and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.......4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and....../or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G + C content) and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed...

  16. Ultrafast Approximation for Phylogenetic Bootstrap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Quang Minh, [No Value; Nguyen, Thi; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2013-01-01

    Nonparametric bootstrap has been a widely used tool in phylogenetic analysis to assess the clade support of phylogenetic trees. However, with the rapidly growing amount of data, this task remains a computational bottleneck. Recently, approximation methods such as the RAxML rapid bootstrap (RBS) and

  17. [RAPD analysis of the intraspecific and interspecific variation and phylogenetic relationships of Aegilops L. species with the U genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriunova, S V; Chikida, N N; Kochieva, E Z

    2010-07-01

    RAPD analysis was used to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species with the U genome. In total, 115 DNA samples of eight polyploid species containing the U genome and the diploid species Ae. umbellulata (U) were examined. Substantial interspecific polymorphism was observed for the majority of the polyploid species with the U genome (interspecific differences, 0.01-0,2; proportion of polymorphic loci, 56.6-88.2%). Aegilops triuncialis was identified as the only alloploid species with low interspecific polymorphism (interspecific differences, 0-0.01, P = 50%) in the U-genome group. The U-genome Aegilops species proved to be separated from other species of the genus. The phylogenetic relationships were established for the U-genome species. The greatest separation within the U-genome group was observed for the US-genome species Ae. kotschyi and Ae. variabilis. The tetraploid species Ae. triaristata and Ae. columnaris, which had the UX genome, and the hexaploid species Ae. recta (UXN) were found to be related to each other and separate from the UM-genome species. A similarity was observed between the U M-genome species Ae. ovata and Ae. biuncialis, which had the UM genome, and the ancestral diploid U-genome species Ae. umbellulata. The UC-genome species Ae. triuncialis was rather separate and slightly similar to the UX-genome species.

  18. A Phylogenetic Analysis of 34 Chloroplast Genomes Elucidates the Relationships between Wild and Domestic Species within the Genus Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Alonso, Roberto; Ibañez, Victoria; Terol, Javier; Talon, Manuel; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2015-08-01

    Citrus genus includes some of the most important cultivated fruit trees worldwide. Despite being extensively studied because of its commercial relevance, the origin of cultivated citrus species and the history of its domestication still remain an open question. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the chloroplast genomes of 34 citrus genotypes which constitutes the most comprehensive and detailed study to date on the evolution and variability of the genus Citrus. A statistical model was used to estimate divergence times between the major citrus groups. Additionally, a complete map of the variability across the genome of different citrus species was produced, including single nucleotide variants, heteroplasmic positions, indels (insertions and deletions), and large structural variants. The distribution of all these variants provided further independent support to the phylogeny obtained. An unexpected finding was the high level of heteroplasmy found in several of the analyzed genomes. The use of the complete chloroplast DNA not only paves the way for a better understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within the Citrus genus but also provides original insights into other elusive evolutionary processes, such as chloroplast inheritance, heteroplasmy, and gene selection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Mitochondrial genomes of the hoverflies Episyrphus balteatus and Eupeodes corollae (Diptera: Syrphidae), with a phylogenetic analysis of Muscomorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, De-qiang; Liu, Hong-ling; Gong, Yi-yun; Ji, Pei-cheng; Li, Yue-jian; Mou, Fang-sheng; Wei, Shu-jun

    2017-01-01

    The hoverflies Episyrphus balteatus and Eupeodes corollae (Diptera: Muscomorpha: Syrphidae) are important natural aphid predators. We obtained mitochondrial genome sequences from these two species using methods of PCR amplification and sequencing. The complete Episyrphus mitochondrial genome is 16,175 bp long while the incomplete one of Eupeodes is 15,326 bp long. All 37 typical mitochondrial genes are present in both species and arranged in ancestral positions and directions. The two mitochondrial genomes showed a biased A/T usage versus G/C. The cox1, cox2, cox3, cob and nad1 showed relatively low level of nucleotide diversity among protein-coding genes, while the trnM was the most conserved one without any nucleotide variation in stem regions within Muscomorpha. Phylogenetic relationships among the major lineages of Muscomorpha were reconstructed using a complete set of mitochondrial genes. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses generated congruent topologies. Our results supported the monophyly of five species within the Syrphidae (Syrphoidea). The Platypezoidea was sister to all other species of Muscomorpha in our phylogeny. Our study demonstrated the power of the complete mitochondrial gene set for phylogenetic analysis in Muscomorpha. PMID:28276531

  20. Specialization clines in the pollination systems of agaves (Agavaceae) and columnar cacti (Cactaceae): A phylogenetically controlled meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A; Sosa, Vinicio J; Ojeda, Mario M; De-Nova, J Arturo

    2009-10-01

    The biogeography of plant-animal interactions is a novel topic on which many disciplines converge (e.g., reproductive biology, biogeography, and evolutionary biology). Narrative reviews have indicated that tropical columnar cacti and agaves have highly specialized pollination systems, while extratropical species have generalized systems. However, this dichotomy has never been quantitatively tested. We tested this hypothesis using traditional and phylogenetically informed meta-analysis. Three effect sizes were estimated from the literature: diurnal, nocturnal, and hand cross-pollination (an indicator of pollen limitation). Columnar cactus pollination systems ranged from purely bat-pollinated in the tropics to generalized pollination, with diurnal visitors as effective as nocturnal visitors in extratropical regions; even when phylogenetic relatedness among species is taken into account. Metaregressions identified a latitudinal increase in pollen limitation in columnar cacti, but this increase was not significant after correcting for phylogeny. The currently available data for agaves do not support any latitudinal trend. Nectar production of columnar cacti varied with latitude. Although this variation is positively correlated with pollination by diurnal visitors, it is influenced by phylogeny. The degree of specificity in the pollination systems of columnar cacti is heavily influenced by ecological factors and has a predictable geographic pattern.

  1. Biosynthesis of ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate in archaea: a phylogenetic analysis of archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Soderberg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A phylogenetic analysis of the genes encoding enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP pathway, and the chorismate pathway of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, employing data from 13 complete archaeal genomes, provides a potential explanation for the enigmatic phylogenetic patterns of the PPP genes in archaea. Genomic and biochemical evidence suggests that three archaeal species (Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Thermoplasma volcanium produce ribose-5-phosphate via the nonoxidative PPP (NOPPP, whereas nine species apparently lack an NOPPP but may employ a reverse RuMP pathway for pentose synthesis. One species (Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 lacks both the NOPPP and the RuMP pathway but may possess a modified oxidative PPP (OPPP, the details of which are not yet known. The presence of transketolase in several archaeal species that are missing the other two NOPPP genes can be explained by the existence of differing requirements for erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P among archaea: six species use transketolase to make E4P as a precursor to aromatic amino acids, six species apparently have an alternate biosynthetic pathway and may not require the ability to make E4P, and one species (Pyrococcus horikoshii probably does not synthesize aromatic amino acids at all.

  2. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of full-length mariner elements isolated from the Indian tasar silkmoth, Antheraea mylitta (Lepidoptera: saturniidae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Dharma Prasad; J Nagaraju

    2003-06-01

    Mariner like elements (MLEs) are widely distributed type II transposons with an open reading frame (ORF) for transposase. We studied comparative phylogenetic evolution and inverted terminal repeat (ITR) conservation of MLEs from Indian saturniid silkmoth, Antheraea mylitta with other full length MLEs submitted in the database. Full length elements from A. mylitta were inactive with multiple mutations. Many conserved amino acid blocks were identified after aligning transposase sequences. Mariner signature sequence, DD(34)D was almost invariable although a few new class of elements had different signatures. A. mylitta MLEs (Anmmar) get phylogenetically classified under cecropia subfamily and cluster closely with the elements from other Bombycoidea superfamily members implying vertical transmission from a common ancestor. ITR analysis showed a conserved sequence of AGGT(2-8N)ATAAGT for forward repeat and AGGT(2-8N)ATGAAAT for reverse repeat. These results and additional work may help us to understand the dynamics of MLE distribution in A. mylitta and construction of appropriate vectors for mariner mediated transgenics.

  3. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Kaduna, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, J.; Olonitola, O. S.; Radu, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Listeria (L.) monocytogenes isolated from milk and milk products in Kaduna, Nigeria, were subjected to a multiplex PCR assay to identify virulence-associated genes (such as prf A, inl A, hly A, act A, and iap). Of the 36 isolates, 9 (25%) were positive for one or two virulence-associated genes. Based on the sample type, 6 (16.9%) of the isolates that possessed virulence-associated genes were obtained from raw milk, 2 (3.2%) from “Manshanu,” and 1 (2.8%) from “Kindrimo.” Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA revealed that Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, NGA 41A, and NGA 38A), when compared with reference L. monocytogenes, were grouped into two distinct clusters, A and B, with sequence (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, and NGA 41A) phylogenetically closer to J1776; N1-011A; R2-502; J1816; and J2-031, whereas L. monocytogenes isolate (NGA 38A) clustered with EDG; J1-220; J1926; J1817; and J2-1091. The separation of the Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates into linage A (responsible for epidemic listeriosis) and lineage B (responsible for sporadic cases of listeriosis) is of public health concern and that local isolates might have potentials for human food borne listeriosis based on the virulence factors so far identified. PMID:27597873

  4. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Kaduna, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Usman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Listeria (L. monocytogenes isolated from milk and milk products in Kaduna, Nigeria, were subjected to a multiplex PCR assay to identify virulence-associated genes (such as prf A, inl A, hly A, act A, and iap. Of the 36 isolates, 9 (25% were positive for one or two virulence-associated genes. Based on the sample type, 6 (16.9% of the isolates that possessed virulence-associated genes were obtained from raw milk, 2 (3.2% from “Manshanu,” and 1 (2.8% from “Kindrimo.” Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA revealed that Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, NGA 41A, and NGA 38A, when compared with reference L. monocytogenes, were grouped into two distinct clusters, A and B, with sequence (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, and NGA 41A phylogenetically closer to J1776; N1-011A; R2-502; J1816; and J2-031, whereas L. monocytogenes isolate (NGA 38A clustered with EDG; J1-220; J1926; J1817; and J2-1091. The separation of the Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates into linage A (responsible for epidemic listeriosis and lineage B (responsible for sporadic cases of listeriosis is of public health concern and that local isolates might have potentials for human food borne listeriosis based on the virulence factors so far identified.

  5. Phylogenetic diversity and genotypical complexity of H9N2 influenza A viruses revealed by genomic sequence analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoying Dong

    Full Text Available H9N2 influenza A viruses have become established worldwide in terrestrial poultry and wild birds, and are occasionally transmitted to mammals including humans and pigs. To comprehensively elucidate the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of H9N2 influenza viruses, we performed a large-scale sequence analysis of 571 viral genomes from the NCBI Influenza Virus Resource Database, representing the spectrum of H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from 1966 to 2009. Our study provides a panoramic framework for better understanding the genesis and evolution of H9N2 influenza viruses, and for describing the history of H9N2 viruses circulating in diverse hosts. Panorama phylogenetic analysis of the eight viral gene segments revealed the complexity and diversity of H9N2 influenza viruses. The 571 H9N2 viral genomes were classified into 74 separate lineages, which had marked host and geographical differences in phylogeny. Panorama genotypical analysis also revealed that H9N2 viruses include at least 98 genotypes, which were further divided according to their HA lineages into seven series (A-G. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal genes showed that H9N2 viruses are closely related to H3, H4, H5, H7, H10, and H14 subtype influenza viruses. Our results indicate that H9N2 viruses have undergone extensive reassortments to generate multiple reassortants and genotypes, suggesting that the continued circulation of multiple genotypical H9N2 viruses throughout the world in diverse hosts has the potential to cause future influenza outbreaks in poultry and epidemics in humans. We propose a nomenclature system for identifying and unifying all lineages and genotypes of H9N2 influenza viruses in order to facilitate international communication on the evolution, ecology and epidemiology of H9N2 influenza viruses.

  6. Impact of duplicate gene copies on phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates in butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liswi Saif W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in availability of genomic sequences for a wide range of organisms has revealed gene duplication to be a relatively common event. Encounters with duplicate gene copies have consequently become almost inevitable in the context of collecting gene sequences for inferring species trees. Here we examine the effect of incorporating duplicate gene copies evolving at different rates on tree reconstruction and time estimation of recent and deep divergences in butterflies. Results Sequences from ultraviolet-sensitive (UVRh, blue-sensitive (BRh, and long-wavelength sensitive (LWRh opsins,EF-1α and COI were obtained from 27 taxa representing the five major butterfly families (5535 bp total. Both BRh and LWRh are present in multiple copies in some butterfly lineages and the different copies evolve at different rates. Regardless of the phylogenetic reconstruction method used, we found that analyses of combined data sets using either slower or faster evolving copies of duplicate genes resulted in a single topology in agreement with our current understanding of butterfly family relationships based on morphology and molecules. Interestingly, individual analyses of BRh and LWRh sequences also recovered these family-level relationships. Two different relaxed clock methods resulted in similar divergence time estimates at the shallower nodes in the tree, regardless of whether faster or slower evolving copies were used, with larger discrepancies observed at deeper nodes in the phylogeny. The time of divergence between the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus and the queen D. gilippus (15.3–35.6 Mya was found to be much older than the time of divergence between monarch co-mimic Limenitis archippus and red-spotted purple L. arthemis (4.7–13.6 Mya, and overlapping with the time of divergence of the co-mimetic passionflower butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene (13.5–26.1 Mya. Our family-level results are congruent with

  7. Bioinformatics analysis and construction of phylogenetic tree of aquaporins from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Ye, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Cyst echinococcosis caused by the matacestodal larvae of Echinococcus granulosus (Eg), is a chronic, worldwide, and severe zoonotic parasitosis. The treatment of cyst echinococcosis is still difficult since surgery cannot fit the needs of all patients, and drugs can lead to serious adverse events as well as resistance. The screen of target proteins interacted with new anti-hydatidosis drugs is urgently needed to meet the prevailing challenges. Here, we analyzed the sequences and structure properties, and constructed a phylogenetic tree by bioinformatics methods. The MIP family signature and Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites were predicted in all nine EgAQPs. α-helix and random coil were the main secondary structures of EgAQPs. The numbers of transmembrane regions were three to six, which indicated that EgAQPs contained multiple hydrophobic regions. A neighbor-joining tree indicated that EgAQPs were divided into two branches, seven EgAQPs formed a clade with AQP1 from human, a "strict" aquaporins, other two EgAQPs formed a clade with AQP9 from human, an aquaglyceroporins. Unfortunately, homology modeling of EgAQPs was aborted. These results provide a foundation for understanding and researches of the biological function of E. granulosus.

  8. Isolation, phylogenetic analysis and anti-infective activity screening of marine sponge-associated actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila M; Hanora, Amro; Radwan, Mona; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H; Ahmed, Safwat; Hentschel, Ute

    2010-02-26

    Terrestrial actinomycetes are noteworthy producers of a multitude of antibiotics, however the marine representatives are much less studied in this regard. In this study, 90 actinomycetes were isolated from 11 different species of marine sponges that had been collected from offshore Ras Mohamed (Egypt) and from Rovinj (Croatia). Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 18 different actinomycete genera representing seven different suborders. Fourteen putatively novel species were identified based on sequence similarity values below 98.2% to other strains in the NCBI database. A putative new genus related to Rubrobacter was isolated on M1 agar that had been amended with sponge extract, thus highlighting the need for innovative cultivation protocols. Testing for anti-infective activities was performed against clinically relevant, Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, fungi (Candida albicans) and human parasites (Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei). Bioactivities against these pathogens were documented for 10 actinomycete isolates. These results show a high diversity of actinomycetes associated with marine sponges as well as highlight their potential to produce anti-infective agents.

  9. Isolation, Phylogenetic Analysis and Anti-infective Activity Screening of Marine Sponge-Associated Actinomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safwat Ahmed

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial actinomycetes are noteworthy producers of a multitude of antibiotics, however the marine representatives are much less studied in this regard. In this study, 90 actinomycetes were isolated from 11 different species of marine sponges that had been collected from offshore Ras Mohamed (Egypt and from Rovinj (Croatia. Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 18 different actinomycete genera representing seven different suborders. Fourteen putatively novel species were identified based on sequence similarity values below 98.2% to other strains in the NCBI database. A putative new genus related to Rubrobacter was isolated on M1 agar that had been amended with sponge extract, thus highlighting the need for innovative cultivation protocols. Testing for anti-infective activities was performed against clinically relevant, Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, fungi (Candida albicans and human parasites (Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei. Bioactivities against these pathogens were documented for 10 actinomycete isolates. These results show a high diversity of actinomycetes associated with marine sponges as well as highlight their potential to produce anti-infective agents.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of antimicrobial lactic acid bacteria from farmed seabass Dicentrarchus labrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourouni, Ouissal Chahad; El Bour, Monia; Calo-Mata, Pilar; Mraouna, Radhia; Abedellatif, Boudabous; Barros-Velàzquez, Jorge

    2012-04-01

    The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the prevention or reduction of fish diseases is receiving increasing attention. In the present study, 47 LAB strains were isolated from farmed seabass ( Dicentrarchus labrax ) and were phenotypically and phylogenetically analysed by 16S rDNA and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA - polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Their antimicrobial effect was tested in vitro against a wide variety of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. Most of the strains isolated were enterococci belonging to the following species: Enterococcus faecium (59%), Enterococcus faecalis (21%), Enterococcus sanguinicola (4 strains), Enterococcus mundtii (1 strain), Enterococcus pseudoavium (1 strain), and Lactococcus lactis (1 strain). An Aerococcus viridans strain was also isolated. The survey of their antimicrobial susceptibility showed that all isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and exhibited resistance to between 4 and 10 other antibiotics relevant for therapy in human and animal medicine. Different patterns of resistance were noted for skin and intestines isolates. More than 69% (32 strains) of the isolates inhibited the growth of the majority of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria tested, including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas salmonicida, Vibrio anguillarum, and Carnobacterium sp. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bioactive enterococcal species isolated from seabass that could potentially inhibit the undesirable bacteria found in food systems.

  11. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Odontamblyopus rubicundus (Perciformes: Gobiidae): genome characterization and phylogenetic analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tianxing Liu; Xiaoxiao Jin; Rixin Wang; Tianjun Xu

    2013-12-01

    Odontamblyopus rubicundus is a species of gobiid fishes, inhabits muddy-bottomed coastal waters. In this paper, the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of O. rubicundus is reported. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence is 17119 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, a control region and an L-strand origin as in other teleosts. Most mitochondrial genes are encoded on H-strand except for ND6 and seven tRNA genes. Some overlaps occur in protein-coding genes and tRNAs ranging from 1 to 7 bp. The possibly nonfunctional L-strand origin folded into a typical stem-loop secondary structure and a conserved motif (5′-GCCGG-3′) was found at the base of the stem within the $tRNA^{Cys}$ gene. The TAS, CSB-2 and CSB-3 could be detected in the control region. However, in contrast to most of other fishes, the central conserved sequence block domain and the CSB-1 could not be recognized in O. rubicundus, which is consistent with Acanthogobius hasta (Gobiidae). In addition, phylogenetic analyses based on different sequences of species of Gobiidae and different methods showed that the classification of O. rubicundus into Odontamblyopus due to morphology is debatable.

  12. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the VP4 gene of human rotaviruses isolated in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espínola, E E; Amarilla, A; Arbiza, J; Parra, G I

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide and amino acid analyzes of the VP4 gene of human rotaviruses isolated both in Paraguay and worldwide were carried out in order to increase our knowledge about the complex pattern of evolution of this virus in nature. Paraguayan strains bearing the P[8] genotype were grouped in the lineages P[8]-1, P[8]-2, and P[8]-3. Regardless of the year of detection, all of the G4 and G9 strains were related to lineage P[8]-3, whereas the G1 strains were related to the three lineages detected in Paraguay; this fact reinforces the notion of the existence of constraints within specific populations of rotavirus strains except for the G1 strains. In addition, we propose a phylogenetic classification for the P[4] strains in five different lineages (i.e. P[4]-1 to P[4]-5). The findings presented in this paper reinforce the importance of a continuous surveillance of rotavirus strains in order to predict the possible variants that will circulate in a country, and ultimately improve current vaccination programs.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of canine parvovirus partial VP2 gene in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, H K; Matta, Samyukta Lakshmi; Amsaveni, S; Antony, P X; Thanislass, J; Pillai, R M

    2014-02-01

    A total of 85 samples (58.0 %) were found to be positive for Canine parvovirus (CPV) by PCR assay (Hfor/Hrev primers) out of 158 suspected faecal samples of dogs collected from various states/union territories of India. Nine CPV isolates could be obtained in A-72 cell line. The sequencing of the partial VP2 gene of CPV identified the predominant CPV strain as CPV-2a (Ser297Ala) with one CPV-2b (Ser297Ala) and another CPV-2a variant strain (Ser297Gly). Several non-synonymous and synonymous mutations were also recorded in this study. The phylogenetic tree revealed that most of the CPV sequences from Tamil Nadu (Southern India) and Maharashtra (Western India) obtained during 2011 and few sequences from Northern India obtained during 2012 were grouped together along with CPV-2a (Ser297Ala) strains from China and India and followed the same evolution; although there was definitive indication of separate lineages too by few other sequences.

  14. Molecular Characterization and Comparative Phylogenetic Analysis of Phytases from Fungi with Their Prospective Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Tiwari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant seeds that have high phytate content are used as animal feed. Phytases, enzymes that catalyze the breakdown of phytate into inorganic phosphorus and myoinositol phosphate derivatives, have been intensively studied in recent years and gained immense attention because of their application in reducing phytate content in animal feed and food for human consumption, thus indirectly lowering environmental pollution caused by undigested phytate. This review is focused on summarising the current knowledge on recent developments of fungal and yeast phytases. Comparative account on diverse sources and physiological roles, molecular characteristics and regulation mechanisms of phytases are discussed. Phylogenetic relationship of phytases from different classes of fungi is studied in details. It is inferred on the basis of phylogeny that phytases from Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes differ in the amino acid sequences, therefore they fall in separate clade in the tree. The prospective biotechnological applications of microbial phytases such as animal feed additives, probiotics, pharmaceuticals, as well as in aquaculture, food industry, paper manufacturing, development of transgenic plants and animals with special reference to its use as biofertilizers are also emphasised in this review.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of surface proteins of novel H1N1 virus isolated from 2009 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2009-09-30

    Swine Influenza Virus (H1N1) is a known causative agent of swine flu. Transmission of Swine Influenza Virus form pig to human is not a common event and may not always cause human influenza. The 2009 outbreak by subtype H1N1 in humans is due to transfer of Swine Influenza Virus from pig to human. Thus to analyze the origin of this novel virus we compared two surface proteins (HA and NA) with influenza viruses of swine, avian and humans isolates recovered from 1918 to 2008 outbreaks. Phylogenetic analyses of hemagglutinin gene from 2009 pandemic found to be clustered with swine influenza virus (H1N2) circulated in U.S.A during the 1999-2004 outbreaks. Whereas, neuraminidase gene was clustered with H1N1 strains isolated from Europe and Asia during 1992-2007 outbreaks. This study concludes that the new H1N1 strain appeared in 2009 outbreak with high pathogenicity to human was originated as result of re-assortment (exchange of gene). Moreover, our data also suggest that the virus will remain sensitive to the pre-existing therapeutic strategies.

  16. [Genetic variability and phylogenetic analysis of 39 short tandem repeat loci in Beijing Han population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiuyan, Ruan; Weini, Wang; Yaran, Yang; Bingbing, Xie; Jing, Chen; Yacheng, Liu; Jiangwei, Yan

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we studied the genetic polymorphisms of short tandem repeat (STR) loci from 13 CODIS and 26 non-CODIS system in Beijing Han population for the first time, and established a database of 39 STR loci whose forensic parameters were further evaluated. Our results demonstrated no significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of 39 STR loci and no pairwise linkage disequilibrium between them. The power of discriminations, expected heterozygosity, polymorphic information content, and power of exclusion of 39 STR loci ranged from 0.7740-0.9818, 0.6000-0.9350, 0.5317-0.9047 and 0.2909-0.8673. The cumulated discrimination power and cumulative probability of exclusion were 0.999999999999999999999999999999999999999964971 and 0.999999999973878, respectively. Moreover, the genetic distance was calculated based on allele frequency and phylogenetic tree was built using STR loci data from Beijing Han and other 11 Chinese ethnic groups.This study provides important basic data for Chinese forensic DNA database and population genetics database, and has important significance in carrying out forensic individual identification, paternity testing, and population genetic study.

  17. Dissecting the fungal biology of Bipolaris papendorfii: from phylogenetic to comparative genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Yew, Su Mei; Toh, Yue Fen; Chan, Chai Ling; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Lee, Kok Wei; Na, Shiang Ling; Yee, Wai-Yan; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-06-01

    Bipolaris papendorfii has been reported as a fungal plant pathogen that rarely causes opportunistic infection in humans. Secondary metabolites isolated from this fungus possess medicinal and anticancer properties. However, its genetic fundamental and basic biology are largely unknown. In this study, we report the first draft genome sequence of B. papendorfii UM 226 isolated from the skin scraping of a patient. The assembled 33.4 Mb genome encodes 11,015 putative coding DNA sequences, of which, 2.49% are predicted transposable elements. Multilocus phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses showed B. papendorfii UM 226 clustering with Curvularia species, apart from other plant pathogenic Bipolaris species. Its genomic features suggest that it is a heterothallic fungus with a putative unique gene encoding the LysM-containing protein which might be involved in fungal virulence on host plants, as well as a wide array of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, degradation of polysaccharides and lignin in the plant cell wall, secondary metabolite biosynthesis (including dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, polyketide synthase), the terpenoid pathway and the caffeine metabolism. This first genomic characterization of B. papendorfii provides the basis for further studies on its biology, pathogenicity and medicinal potential.

  18. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Odontamblyopus rubicundus (Perciformes: Gobiidae): genome characterization and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianxing; Jin, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-12-01

    Odontamblyopus rubicundus is a species of gobiid fishes, inhabits muddy-bottomed coastal waters. In this paper, the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of O. rubicundus is reported. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence is 17119 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, a control region and an L-strand origin as in other teleosts. Most mitochondrial genes are encoded on H-strand except for ND6 and seven tRNA genes. Some overlaps occur in protein-coding genes and tRNAs ranging from 1 to 7 bp. The possibly nonfunctional L-strand origin folded into a typical stem-loop secondary structure and a conserved motif (5'-GCCGG-3') was found at the base of the stem within the tRNACys gene. The TAS, CSB-2 and CSB-3 could be detected in the control region. However, in contrast to most of other fishes, the central conserved sequence block domain and the CSB-1 could not be recognized in O. rubicundus, which is consistent with Acanthogobius hasta (Gobiidae). In addition, phylogenetic analyses based on different sequences of species of Gobiidae and different methods showed that the classification of O. rubicundus into Odontamblyopus due to morphology is debatable.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of genes involved in mycosporine-like amino acid biosynthesis in symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosic, Nedeljka N

    2012-04-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are multifunctional secondary metabolites involved in photoprotection in many marine organisms. As well as having broad ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectra (310-362 nm), these biological sunscreens are also involved in the prevention of oxidative stress. More than 20 different MAAs have been discovered so far, characterized by distinctive chemical structures and a broad ecological distribution. Additionally, UV-screening MAA metabolites have been investigated and used in biotechnology and cosmetics. The biosynthesis of MAAs has been suggested to occur via either the shikimate or pentose phosphate pathways. Despite their wide distribution in marine and freshwater species and also the commercial application in cosmetic products, there are still a number of uncertainties regarding the genetic, biochemical, and evolutionary origin of MAAs. Here, using a transcriptome-mining approach, we identify the gene counterparts from the shikimate or pentose phosphate pathway involved in MAA biosynthesis within the sequences of the reef-building coral symbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium). We also report the highly similar sequences of genes from the proposed MAA biosynthetic pathway involved in the metabolism of 4-deoxygadusol (direct MAA precursor) in various Symbiodinium strains confirming their algal origin and conserved nature. Finally, we reveal the separate identity of two O-methyltransferase genes, possibly involved in MAA biosynthesis, as well as nonribosomal peptide synthetase and adenosine triphosphate grasp homologs in symbiotic dinoflagellates. This study provides a biochemical and phylogenetic overview of the genes from the proposed MAA biosynthetic pathway with a focus on coral endosymbionts.

  20. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of -gliadin gene sequences reveals significant genomic divergence in Triticeae species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guang-Rong Li; Tao Lang; En-Nian Yang; Cheng Liu; Zu-Jun Yang

    2014-12-01

    Although the unique properties of wheat -gliadin gene family are well characterized, little is known about the evolution and genomic divergence of -gliadin gene family within the Triticeae. We isolated a total of 203 -gliadin gene sequences from 11 representative diploid and polyploid Triticeae species, and found 108 sequences putatively functional. Our results indicate that -gliadin genes may have possibly originated from wild Secale species, where the sequences contain the shortest repetitive domains and display minimum variation. A miniature inverted-repeat transposable element insertion is reported for the first time in -gliadin gene sequence of Thinopyrum intermedium in this study, indicating that the transposable element might have contributed to the diversification of -gliadin genes family among Triticeae genomes. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that the -gliadin gene sequences of Dasypyrum, Australopyrum, Lophopyrum, Eremopyrum and Pseudoroengeria species have amplified several times. A search for four typical toxic epitopes for celiac disease within the Triticeae -gliadin gene sequences showed that the -gliadins of wild Secale, Australopyrum and Agropyron genomes lack all four epitopes, while other Triticeae species have accumulated these epitopes, suggesting that the evolution of these toxic epitopes sequences occurred during the course of speciation, domestication or polyploidization of Triticeae.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of some Newcastle disease virus isolates from the Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Elmardi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used to amplify 1412 bp of the fusion protein gene (F gene of four Newcastle disease virus (NDV isolates; two velogenic (TY-1/90 and DIK-90 and two lentogenic isolates (Dongla 88/1 and GD.S.1. Following sequencing, nucleotide sequences were annotated and 894 bp were compared phylogenetically with those from strains previously reported in the Sudan and the virus strains published on the GenBank. It could be demonstrated that TY-1/90 and DIK-90 strains belong to the genotype VI of NDV and are in close genetic relationship to sub- genotype VIb. TY-1/90 and DIK-90 strains were observed to be genetically unrelated to the earlier Sudanese isolates of 1970/80s and the late of 2000s suggesting a different origin. The close genetic relationship to the European and African pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1 suggests a common ancestor. Dongola, GD.S.1 strains were classified into genotype II that comprises non-pathogenic lentogenic NDV strains. The present genetic classification of NDV isolates of the Sudan provides valuable information on genotypes of NDV. Further molecular epidemiological investigations of the recent outbreaks of Newcastle disease in the Sudan are needed in order to improve the efficiency of control strategies and vaccine development.

  2. Descriptive distribution and phylogenetic analysis of feline infectious peritonitis virus isolates of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Habibah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The descriptive distribution and phylogeny of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs were studied in cats suspected of having feline infectious peritonitis (FIP in Malaysia. Ascitic fluids and/or biopsy samples were subjected to a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR targeted for a conserved region of 3'untranslated region (3'UTR of the FCoV genome. Eighty nine percent of the sampled animals were positive for the presence of FCoV. Among the FCoV positive cats, 80% of cats were males and 64% were below 2 years of age. The FCoV positive cases included 56% domestic short hair (DSH, 40% Persian, and 4% Siamese cats. The nucleotide sequences of 10 selected amplified products from FIP cases were determined. The sequence comparison revealed that the field isolates had 96% homology with a few point mutations. The extent of homology decreased to 93% when compared with reference strains. The overall branching pattern of phylogenetic tree showed two distinct clusters, where all Malaysian isolates fall into one main genetic cluster. These findings provided the first genetic information of FCoV in Malaysia.

  3. Descriptive distribution and phylogenetic analysis of feline infectious peritonitis virus isolates of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Saeed; Arshad, Siti S; Hair-Bejo, Mohd; Omar, Abdul R; Zeenathul, Nazariah A; Fong, Lau S; Rahman, Nor-Alimah; Arshad, Habibah; Shamsudin, Shahirudin; Isa, Mohd-Kamarudin A

    2010-01-06

    The descriptive distribution and phylogeny of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) were studied in cats suspected of having feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in Malaysia. Ascitic fluids and/or biopsy samples were subjected to a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeted for a conserved region of 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of the FCoV genome. Eighty nine percent of the sampled animals were positive for the presence of FCoV. Among the FCoV positive cats, 80% of cats were males and 64% were below 2 years of age. The FCoV positive cases included 56% domestic short hair (DSH), 40% Persian, and 4% Siamese cats. The nucleotide sequences of 10 selected amplified products from FIP cases were determined. The sequence comparison revealed that the field isolates had 96% homology with a few point mutations. The extent of homology decreased to 93% when compared with reference strains. The overall branching pattern of phylogenetic tree showed two distinct clusters, where all Malaysian isolates fall into one main genetic cluster. These findings provided the first genetic information of FCoV in Malaysia.

  4. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Psathyrostachys (Poaceae) based on one nuclear gene, three plastid genes, and morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Baden, Claus

    2004-01-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of the small, Central Asian genus Psathyrostachys Nevski is presented. The analysis is based on morphological characters and nucleotide sequence data from one nuclear gene, DMC1, and three plastid genes, rbcL, rpoA, and rpoC2. Separate analyses of the three data partitions...

  5. Phylogenetic comparative analysis of electric communication signals in ghost knifefishes (Gymnotiformes: Apteronotidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Cameron R; Derylo, Maksymilian; de Santana, C David; Alves-Gomes, José A; Smith, G Troy

    2007-12-01

    Electrocommunication signals in electric fish are diverse, easily recorded and have well-characterized neural control. Two signal features, the frequency and waveform of the electric organ discharge (EOD), vary widely across species. Modulations of the EOD (i.e. chirps and gradual frequency rises) also function as active communication signals during social interactions, but they have been studied in relatively few species. We compared the electrocommunication signals of 13 species in the largest gymnotiform family, Apteronotidae. Playback stimuli were used to elicit chirps and rises. We analyzed EOD frequency and waveform and the production and structure of chirps and rises. Species diversity in these signals was characterized with discriminant function analyses, and correlations between signal parameters were tested with phylogenetic comparative methods. Signals varied markedly across species and even between congeners and populations of the same species. Chirps and EODs were particularly evolutionarily labile, whereas rises differed little across species. Although all chirp parameters contributed to species differences in these signals, chirp amplitude modulation, frequency modulation (FM) and duration were particularly diverse. Within this diversity, however, interspecific correlations between chirp parameters suggest that mechanistic trade-offs may shape some aspects of signal evolution. In particular, a consistent trade-off between FM and EOD amplitude during chirps is likely to have influenced the evolution of chirp structure. These patterns suggest that functional or mechanistic linkages between signal parameters (e.g. the inability of electromotor neurons increase their firing rates without a loss of synchrony or amplitude of action potentials) constrain the evolution of signal structure.

  6. Arginine kinase from the Tardigrade, Macrobiotus occidentalis: molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis and enzymatic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Kouji; Ishida, Mikako; Matsui, Tohru; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2010-10-01

    Arginine kinase (AK), which catalyzes the reversible transfer of phosphate from ATP to arginine to yield phosphoarginine and ADP, is widely distributed throughout the invertebrates. We determined the cDNA sequence of AK from the tardigrade (water bear) Macrobiotus occidentalis, cloned the sequence into pET30b plasmid, and expressed it in Escherichia coli as a 6x His-tag—fused protein. The cDNA is 1377 bp, has an open reading frame of 1080 bp, and has 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions of 116 and 297 bp, respectively. The open reading frame encodes a 359-amino acid protein containing the 12 residues considered necessary for substrate binding in Limulus AK. This is the first AK sequence from a tardigrade. From fragmented and non-annotated sequences available from DNA databases, we assembled 46 complete AK sequences: 26 from arthropods (including 19 from Insecta), 11 from nematodes, 4 from mollusks, 2 from cnidarians and 2 from onychophorans. No onychophoran sequences have been reported previously. The phylogenetic trees of 104 AKs indicated clearly that Macrobiotus AK (from the phylum Tardigrada) shows close affinity with Epiperipatus and Euperipatoides AKs (from the phylum Onychophora), and therefore forms a sister group with the arthropod AKs. Recombinant 6x His-tagged Macrobiotus AK was successfully expressed as a soluble protein, and the kinetic constants (K(m), K(d), V(ma) and k(cat)) were determined for the forward reaction. Comparison of these kinetic constants with those of AKs from other sources (arthropods, mollusks and nematodes) indicated that Macrobiotus AK is unique in that it has the highest values for k(cat) and K(d)K(m) (indicative of synergistic substrate binding) of all characterized AKs.

  7. A phylogenetic re-analysis of groupers with applications for ciguatera fish poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Schoelinck

    Full Text Available Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP is a significant public health problem due to dinoflagellates. It is responsible for one of the highest reported incidence of seafood-borne illness and Groupers are commonly reported as a source of CFP due to their position in the food chain. With the role of recent climate change on harmful algal blooms, CFP cases might become more frequent and more geographically widespread. Since there is no appropriate treatment for CFP, the most efficient solution is to regulate fish consumption. Such a strategy can only work if the fish sold are correctly identified, and it has been repeatedly shown that misidentifications and species substitutions occur in fish markets.We provide here both a DNA-barcoding reference for groupers, and a new phylogenetic reconstruction based on five genes and a comprehensive taxonomical sampling. We analyse the correlation between geographic range of species and their susceptibility to ciguatera accumulation, and the co-occurrence of ciguatoxins in closely related species, using both character mapping and statistical methods.Misidentifications were encountered in public databases, precluding accurate species identifications. Epinephelinae now includes only twelve genera (vs. 15 previously. Comparisons with the ciguatera incidences show that in some genera most species are ciguateric, but statistical tests display only a moderate correlation with the phylogeny. Atlantic species were rarely contaminated, with ciguatera occurrences being restricted to the South Pacific.The recent changes in classification based on the reanalyses of the relationships within Epinephelidae have an impact on the interpretation of the ciguatera distribution in the genera. In this context and to improve the monitoring of fish trade and safety, we need to obtain extensive data on contamination at the species level. Accurate species identifications through DNA barcoding are thus an essential tool in controlling CFP since

  8. Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis of the pathogenic potential of Vibrio furnissii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Thomas M; Lee, Rob; Love, John

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported the genome sequence of a free-living strain of Vibrio furnissii (NCTC 11218) harvested from an estuarine environment. V. furnissii is a widespread, free-living proteobacterium and emerging pathogen that can cause acute gastroenteritis in humans and lethal zoonoses in aquatic invertebrates, including farmed crustaceans and molluscs. Here we present the analyses to assess the potential pathogenic impact of V. furnissii. We compared the complete genome of V. furnissii with 8 other emerging and pathogenic Vibrio species. We selected and analyzed more deeply 10 genomic regions based upon unique or common features, and used 3 of these regions to construct a phylogenetic tree. Thus, we positioned V. furnissii more accurately than before and revealed a closer relationship between V. furnissii and V. cholerae than previously thought. However, V. furnissii lacks several important features normally associated with virulence in the human pathogens V. cholera and V. vulnificus. A striking feature of the V. furnissii genome is the hugely increased Super Integron, compared to the other Vibrio. Analyses of predicted genomic islands resulted in the discovery of a protein sequence that is present only in Vibrio associated with diseases in aquatic animals. We also discovered evidence of high levels horizontal gene transfer in V. furnissii. V. furnissii seems therefore to have a dynamic and fluid genome that could quickly adapt to environmental perturbation or increase its pathogenicity. Taken together, these analyses confirm the potential of V. furnissii as an emerging marine and possible human pathogen, especially in the developing, tropical, coastal regions that are most at risk from climate change.

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of Polygalacturonase-Producing Bacillus and Pseudomonas Isolated From Plant Waste Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Muhammad; Latif, Zakia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keeping in mind the commercial application of polygalacturonase (PG) in juice and beverages industry, bacterial strains were isolated from rotten fruits and vegetables to screen for competent producers of PG. Objectives: In this study, the plate method was used for preliminary screening of polygalacturonase-producing bacteria, while the Dinitrosalicylic Acid (DNS) method was used for quantifications of PG. Materials and Methods: Biochemically-identified polygalacturonase-producing Bacillus and Pseudomonas species were further characterized by molecular markers. The genetic diversity among these selected strains was analyzed by investigating microsatellite distribution in their genome. Out of 110 strains, 17 competent strains of Bacillus and eight strains of Pseudomonas were selected, identified and confirmed biochemically. Selected strains were characterized by 16S rRNA sequencing and data was submitted to the national center for biotechnology information (NCBI) website for accession numbers. Results: Among the Bacillus, Bacillus vallismortis (JQ990307) isolated from mango was the most competent producer of PG; producing up to 4.4 U/µL. Amongst Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (JQ990314) isolated from oranges was the most competent PG producer equivalent to B. vallismortis (JQ990307). To determine genetic diversity of different strains of Pseudomonas and Bacillus varying in PG production, fingerprinting was done on the basis of Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) or microsatellites. The data was analyzed and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the Minitab 3 software for comparison of bacterial isolates producing different concentrations of PG. Fingerprinting showed that presence or absence of certain microsatellites correlated with the ability of PG production. Conclusions: Bacteria from biological waste were competent producers of PG and must be used on an industrial scale to cope with the demand of PG in the food industry. PMID:27099686

  10. Expression and phylogenetic analysis of the zic gene family in the evolution and development of metazoans

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    Layden Michael J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background zic genes are members of the gli/glis/nkl/zic super-family of C2H2 zinc finger (ZF transcription factors. Homologs of the zic family have been implicated in patterning neural and mesodermal tissues in bilaterians. Prior to this study, the origin of the metazoan zic gene family was unknown and expression of zic gene homologs during the development of early branching metazoans had not been investigated. Results Phylogenetic analyses of novel zic candidate genes identified a definitive zic homolog in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, two gli/glis/nkl-like genes in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, confirmed the presence of three gli/glis/nkl-like genes in Porifera, and confirmed the five previously identified zic genes in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. In the cnidarian N. vectensis, zic homologs are expressed in ectoderm and the gastrodermis (a bifunctional endomesoderm, in presumptive and developing tentacles, and in oral and sensory apical tuft ectoderm. The Capitella teleta zic homolog (Ct-zic is detectable in a subset of the developing nervous system, the foregut, and the mesoderm associated with the segmentally repeated chaetae. Lastly, expression of gli and glis homologs in Mnemiopsis. leidyi is detected exclusively in neural cells in floor of the apical organ. Conclusions Based on our analyses, we propose that the zic gene family arose in the common ancestor of the Placozoa, Cnidaria and Bilateria from a gli/glis/nkl-like gene and that both ZOC and ZF-NC domains evolved prior to cnidarian-bilaterian divergence. We also conclude that zic expression in neural ectoderm and developing neurons is pervasive throughout the Metazoa and likely evolved from neural expression of an ancestral gli/glis/nkl/zic gene. zic expression in bilaterian mesoderm may be related to the expression in the gastrodermis of a cnidarian-bilaterian common ancestor.

  11. Expression and phylogenetic analysis of the zic gene family in the evolution and development of metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, Michael J; Meyer, Néva P; Pang, Kevin; Seaver, Elaine C; Martindale, Mark Q

    2010-11-05

    zic genes are members of the gli/glis/nkl/zic super-family of C2H2 zinc finger (ZF) transcription factors. Homologs of the zic family have been implicated in patterning neural and mesodermal tissues in bilaterians. Prior to this study, the origin of the metazoan zic gene family was unknown and expression of zic gene homologs during the development of early branching metazoans had not been investigated. Phylogenetic analyses of novel zic candidate genes identified a definitive zic homolog in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, two gli/glis/nkl-like genes in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, confirmed the presence of three gli/glis/nkl-like genes in Porifera, and confirmed the five previously identified zic genes in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. In the cnidarian N. vectensis, zic homologs are expressed in ectoderm and the gastrodermis (a bifunctional endomesoderm), in presumptive and developing tentacles, and in oral and sensory apical tuft ectoderm. The Capitella teleta zic homolog (Ct-zic) is detectable in a subset of the developing nervous system, the foregut, and the mesoderm associated with the segmentally repeated chaetae. Lastly, expression of gli and glis homologs in Mnemiopsis. leidyi is detected exclusively in neural cells in floor of the apical organ. Based on our analyses, we propose that the zic gene family arose in the common ancestor of the Placozoa, Cnidaria and Bilateria from a gli/glis/nkl-like gene and that both ZOC and ZF-NC domains evolved prior to cnidarian-bilaterian divergence. We also conclude that zic expression in neural ectoderm and developing neurons is pervasive throughout the Metazoa and likely evolved from neural expression of an ancestral gli/glis/nkl/zic gene. zic expression in bilaterian mesoderm may be related to the expression in the gastrodermis of a cnidarian-bilaterian common ancestor.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of S1 gene of infectious bronchitis virus isolates from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fang; Zhao, Yujun; Yue, Wenbin; Yao, J; Lihua, Lv; Ji, Wenhui; Li, Xuying; Liu, Fengbo; Wu, Qian

    2011-09-01

    Between 2006 and 2009, seven strains of infectious bronchitis (IB) virus (IBV) were isolated from vaccinated chicken flocks on different chicken farms in China. The pathogenic characters of seven IBV strains were assessed. Each of the seven strains was infective to the test chickens and could induce an immune response. The results from chicken embryo cross-neutralization assays showed that these strains were antigenically distinct from classic IBV strains of H120, M41, Conn, and Gray. Compared to H120 vaccine strain, point mutation, short insertion, and deletion occurred at many positions in the S1 protein of the seven strains. Five of the seven strains had the motif (HRRRR), which was identical to that of the epidemic IBV strains in China. Two new motifs (HRLRR and RRIRR) emerged in the isolated strains. The homology of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the S1 gene among the seven isolates was 81.7%-99.7% and 79.0%-99.4%, respectively. These seven strains were also genetically different from the vaccine strains and non-China IBV strains but closely related to large numbers of Chinese strains. The seven isolates and 36 reference IBV strains were clustered into six distinct groups (I-VI). The seven strains were categorized into groups I, II, and III, forming a big phylogenetic branch, which is closely related to Chinese IBVs, whereas the vaccine strains belonging to group VI are genetically distant from groups I, II, and III. The results from this study indicate that different IBV strains cocirculate in the chicken population in China.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Pneumocystis from pig lungs obtained from slaughterhouses in southern and midwestern regions of Brazil

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    E.M.C Sanches

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Pneumocystis genus is comprised of pathogens dwelling in the lungs of terrestrial, aerial, and aquatic mammals. Occasionally they induce severe pneumonitis, particularly in hosts with severe impairment of the immune system and progressively may fill pulmonary alveolar cavities causing respiratory failure. Molecular genetic studies revealed that Pneumocystis gene sequences present a marked divergence with the host species concerned. In the present study, the genetic diversity of Pneumocystis obtained from lungs of swines was examined by analyzing mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU and small subunit (mtSSU rRNA sequences. The samples were obtained from two slaughterhouses located in two Brazilian states. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that genetic groupings within Pneumocystis organisms were in accordance with those of the corresponding hosts and that two clusters were formed. In conclusion, these data show that there are genetically distinct porcine Pneumocystis genotypes with at least two separate clusters in Brazil.

  14. Structural and phylogenetic analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: uncovering general features of nitrogen-fixation (nif)-flavodoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Hermoso, Juan A

    2013-01-09

    Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50's loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including different functional prototypes, correlating the previously defined as "short-chain" with the firmicutes flavodoxins and the "long-chain" with gram-negative species. The comparison of Rhodobacter NifF structure with other bacterial flavodoxin prototypes discloses the concurrence of specific features of these functional electron donors to nitrogenase.

  15. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: Uncovering General Features of Nitrogen-fixation (nif-Flavodoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Pérez-Dorado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50’s loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including different functional prototypes, correlating the previously defined as “short-chain” with the firmicutes flavodoxins and the “long-chain” with gram-negative species. The comparison of Rhodobacter NifF structure with other bacterial flavodoxin prototypes discloses the concurrence of specific features of these functional electron donors to nitrogenase.

  16. Back to basics – the influence of DNA extraction and primer choice on phylogenetic analysis in activated sludge communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Karst, Søren Michael; Ziegler, Anja Sloth

    DNA extraction and primer choice have a large effect on the observed community structure in all phylogenetic analyses. Although the biases are well known, no comprehensive analysis have been conducted in activated sludge communities. In this study we investigated the effect of bead beating...... intensity and primer choice on the observed community using 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (qFISH) was used as a DNA extraction independent method to evaluate the results. The bead beating intensity correlated with cell-wall strength and showed...... that the manufacture recommended settings were insufficient to retrieve a large part of the community. In addition, the in silico “best” primer set was found to greatly underestimate a number of important phyla when compared to qFISH results. The findings underline the need for sample specific and DNA extraction...

  17. A preliminary phylogenetic analysis of the Capsalidae (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea: Monopisthocotylea) inferred from large subunit rDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, I D; Deveney, M R; Morgan, J A T; Chisholm, L A; Adlar