WorldWideScience

Sample records for femtosecond laser ablated

  1. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, S; Vilar, R; Oliveira, V

    2012-01-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm -2 ) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm -2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm -2 . The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  3. Bending diamonds by femtosecond laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Peter; Esberg, Jakob; Kirsebom, Kim

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method based on femtosecond laser ablation for the fabrication of statically bent diamond crystals. Using this method, curvature radii of 1 m can easily be achieved, and the curvature obtained is very uniform. Since diamond is extremely tolerant to high radiation doses, partly due...

  4. Femtosecond laser ablation of bovine cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangueiro, Liliana T.; Vilar, Rui; Botelho do Rego, Ana M.; Muralha, Vania S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We study the surface topographical, structural, and compositional modifications induced in bovine cortical bone by femtosecond laser ablation. The tests are performed in air, with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (500 fs, 1030 nm) at fluences ranging from 0.55 to 2.24 J/cm2. The ablation process is monitored by acoustic emission measurements. The topography of the laser-treated surfaces is studied by scanning electron microscopy, and their constitution is characterized by glancing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation allows removing bone without melting, carbonization, or cracking. The structure and composition of the remaining tissue are essentially preserved, the only constitutional changes observed being a reduction of the organic material content and a partial recrystallization of hydroxyapatite in the most superficial region of samples. The results suggest that, within this fluence range, ablation occurs by a combination of thermal and electrostatic mechanisms, with the first type of mechanism predominating at lower fluences. The associated thermal effects explain the constitutional changes observed. We show that femtosecond lasers are a promising tool for delicate orthopaedic surgeries, where small amounts of bone must be cut with negligible damage, thus minimizing surgical trauma.

  5. Cutting thin glass by femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyesung; Kim, Dongsik

    2018-06-01

    The femtosecond laser ablation process for cutting thin aluminoborosilicate glass sheets of thickness 100 μm was investigated with emphasis on effective cutting speed (Veff) and mechanical strength of diced samples. The process parameters including the laser fluence (F), overlap ratio (r) of the laser beam and polarization direction were varied at a fixed pulse repetition rate f = 1 kHz to find the optimal process condition that maximizes Veff and edge strength. A three-point bending test was performed to evaluate the front-side and back-side bending (edge) strength of the laser-cut samples. Veff was proportional to F unless r exceeded a critical value, at which excessive energy began to be delivered at the same spot. The front-side edge strength was bigger than the back-side strength because of the back-side damages such as chipping. Good edge strength, as high as ∼280 MPa (front-side) and ∼230 MPa (back-side), was obtained at F = 19 J/m2, r = 0.99, with laser polarization vertical to the cutting path.

  6. Femtosecond laser ablation and cutting technology on PMP foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chengwei; Li Guo; Huang Yanhua; Du Kai; Yang Liang

    2013-01-01

    The femtosecond laser ablation results of PMP foam (density of 90 mg/cm 3 ) were analyzed. The laser pulses used for the study were 800 nm in wavelength, 50 fs in pulse duration and the repetition rate was 1000 Hz. The ablation threshold of the foam was 0.91 J/cm 2 when it was shot by 100 laser pulses. The impacts of laser power, the pulse number and the numerical aperture of the focusing objective on the crater diameter were obtained. In the same femtosecond laser machining system, comparing with the ablation shape into copper foil, the important factor causing the irregular shape of the ablation region was verified that there were many different sizes and randomly distributed pores inside PMP foam. The carbonation phenomenon was observed on the edge of the ablated areas when the sample was ablated using high laser power or/and more laser pulses. Thermal effect was considered to be the causes of the carbonation. A new method based on coupling laser beam to cut thickness greater than 1 mm film-foam with femtosecond laser was proposed. Using this method, the femtosecond laser cutting thickness was greater than 1.5 mm, the angle between the cutting side wall and the laser beam optical axis might be less than 5°, and the cutting surface was clean. (authors)

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of carbon reinforced polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, P.; Mendez, C.; Garcia, A.; Arias, I.; Roso, L.

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses (120 fs at 795 nm) with polymer based composites has been investigated. We have found that carbon filled polymers exhibit different ultrafast ablation behaviour depending on whether the filling material is carbon black or carbon fiber and on the polymer matrix itself. The shape and dimensions of the filling material are responsible for some geometrical bad quality effects in the entrance and inner surfaces of drilled microholes. We give an explanation for these non-quality effects in terms of fundamentals of ultrafast ablation process, specifically threshold laser fluences and material removal paths. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymers seemed particularly concerned, this could prevent the use of ultrafast ablation for microprocessing purposes of some of these materials

  8. Parametric study on femtosecond laser pulse ablation of Au films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xiaochang; Wang Chingyue; Yang Li; Li Jianping; Chai Lu; Jia Wei; Zhang Ruobing; Zhang Zhigang

    2006-01-01

    Ablation process of 1 kHz rate femtosecond lasers (pulse duration 148 fs, wavelength 775 nm) with Au films on silica substrates has been systemically studied. The single-pulse threshold can be obtained directly. For the multiple pulses the ablation threshold varies with the number of pulses applied to the surface due to the incubation effect. From the plot of accumulated laser fluence N x φ th (N) and the number of laser pulses N, incubation coefficient of Au film can be obtained (s = 0.765). As the pulse energy is increased, the single pulse ablation rate is increasing following two ablation logarithmic regimes, which can be explained by previous research

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  10. Femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.B.; Hong, M.H.; Lu, Y.F.; Wu, D.J.; Lan, B.; Chong, T.C.

    2003-01-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (bio-compatible, nonflammable, antiadhesive, and heat resistant). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of PTFE in ambient air by a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs) is investigated. It is found that the pulse number on each irradiated surface area must be large enough for a clear edge definition and the ablated depth increases with the pulse number. The air ionization effect at high laser fluences not only degrades the ablated structures quality but also reduces the ablation efficiency. High quality microstructures are demonstrated with controlling laser fluence below a critical fluence to exclude the air ionization effect. The ablated microstructures show strong adhesion property to liquids and clear edges that are suitable for bio-implantation applications. Theoretical calculation is used to analyze the evolution of the ablated width and depth at various laser fluences

  11. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trelenberg, T.W.; Dinh, L.N.; Saw, C.K.; Stuart, B.C.; Balooch, M.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of femtosecond-pulsed laser deposited GaAs nanoclusters were investigated. Nanoclusters of GaAs were produced by laser ablating a single crystal GaAs target in vacuum or in a buffer gas using a Ti-sapphire laser with a 150 fs minimum pulse length. For in-vacuum deposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the average cluster size was approximately 7 nm for laser pulse lengths between 150 fs and 25 ps. The average cluster size dropped to approximately 1.5 nm at a pulse length of 500 ps. It was also observed that film thickness decreased with increasing laser pulse length. A reflective coating, which accumulated on the laser admission window during ablation, reduced the amount of laser energy reaching the target for subsequent laser shots and developed more rapidly at longer pulse lengths. This observation indicates that non-stoichiometric (metallic) ablatants were produced more readily at longer pulse lengths. The angular distribution of ejected material about the target normal was well fitted to a bi-cosine distribution of cos 47 θ+ cos 4 θ for ablation in vacuum using 150 fs pulses. XPS and AES revealed that the vacuum-deposited films contained excess amorphous Ga or As in addition to the stoichiometric GaAs nanocrystals seen with XRD. However, films containing only the GaAs nanocrystals were produced when ablation was carried out in the presence of a buffer gas with a pressure in excess of 6.67 Pa. At buffer gas pressure on the order of 1 Torr, it was found that the stoichiometry of the ablated target was also preserved. These experiments indicate that both laser pulse length and buffer gas pressure play important roles in the formation of multi-element nanocrystals by laser ablation. The effects of gas pressure on the target's morphology and the size of the GaAs nanocrystals formed will also be discussed

  12. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Todor; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry. (paper)

  13. Reassembling Solid Materials by Femtosecond Laser Ablation: Case of Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Matsuo, Yukari

    2013-06-01

    Through atomization and ionization, we could completely alter the composition of a nonconductive material, aluminum nitride, by femtosecond laser ablation. Preferential production of pure aluminum cluster cations Aln+ (n≤32) reflects not only their higher energetic stability compared with mixed clusters AlnNm+ but also completion of thermal relaxation in ablation plasma. Observation of metastable dissociation of Aln+ indicates that cluster cations have still enough internal energy for dissociation to occur, although the process is much slower than the cluster formation. Almost no cluster formation has been observed after nanosecond laser ablation of aluminum nitride, which highlights the distinct nature of ablation plasma produced by femtosecond laser ablation.

  14. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ablation threshold for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Effective optical penetration depth for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Two ablation characteristic regimes are observed for femtosecond laser ablation. • Reduction of C=C bond following excimer or fs laser ablation is observed. • Addition of oxygen- and nitrogen-rich functional groups is observed. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser–material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (F_t_h = 0.087 J/cm"2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (F_t_h = 1.576 J/cm"2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α"−"1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α"−"1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the C=C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas C=C bond is partially

  15. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, Tian Long, E-mail: tianlong.see@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Liu, Zhu [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Li, Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhong, Xiang Li [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The Mill, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-28

    Highlights: • Ablation threshold for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Effective optical penetration depth for excimer laser is lower compared to femtosecond laser. • Two ablation characteristic regimes are observed for femtosecond laser ablation. • Reduction of C=C bond following excimer or fs laser ablation is observed. • Addition of oxygen- and nitrogen-rich functional groups is observed. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser–material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 0.087 J/cm{sup 2}) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (F{sub th} = 1.576 J/cm{sup 2}), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α{sup −1} = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the C=C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas

  16. Elemental fractionation in 785 nm picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaheen, M.E., E-mail: mshaheen73@science.tanta.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Gagnon, J.E.; Fryer, B.J. [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research (GLIER), University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada)

    2015-05-01

    Elemental fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse width laser beams originating from the same laser system. Femtosecond and picosecond laser beams at pulse widths of 130 fs and 110 ps, respectively, and wavelength of 785 nm were used to ablate NIST 610 synthetic glass and SRM 1107 Naval Brass B at the same spot for 800 to 1000 laser pulses at different repetition rates (5 to 50 Hz). Elemental fractionation was found to depend on repetition rate and showed a trend with femtosecond laser ablation that is opposite to that observed in picosecond laser ablation for most measured isotopes. ICP-MS signal intensity was higher in femtosecond than picosecond LA-ICP-MS in both NIST 610 and naval brass when ablation was conducted under the same fluence and repetition rate. The differences in signal intensity were partly related to differences in particle size distribution between particles generated by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses and the consequent differences in transport and ionization efficiencies. The main reason for the higher signal intensity resulting from femtosecond laser pulses was related to the larger crater sizes compared to those created during picosecond laser ablation. Elemental ratios measured using {sup 66}Zn/{sup 63}Cu, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th/{sup 238}U, {sup 66}Zn/{sup 232}Th and {sup 66}Zn/{sup 208}Pb were found to change with the number of laser pulses with data points being more scattered in picosecond than femtosecond laser pulses. Reproducibility of replicate measurements of signal intensities, fractionation and elemental ratios was better for fs-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 3 to 6%) than ps-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 7 to 11%). - Highlights: • Fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse widths using NIST 610 and Naval Brass. • Dependence of fractionation indices on repetition rate and pulse width. • Higher ablation rate was observed in picosecond compared to

  17. Elemental fractionation in 785 nm picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, M.E.; Gagnon, J.E.; Fryer, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Elemental fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse width laser beams originating from the same laser system. Femtosecond and picosecond laser beams at pulse widths of 130 fs and 110 ps, respectively, and wavelength of 785 nm were used to ablate NIST 610 synthetic glass and SRM 1107 Naval Brass B at the same spot for 800 to 1000 laser pulses at different repetition rates (5 to 50 Hz). Elemental fractionation was found to depend on repetition rate and showed a trend with femtosecond laser ablation that is opposite to that observed in picosecond laser ablation for most measured isotopes. ICP-MS signal intensity was higher in femtosecond than picosecond LA-ICP-MS in both NIST 610 and naval brass when ablation was conducted under the same fluence and repetition rate. The differences in signal intensity were partly related to differences in particle size distribution between particles generated by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses and the consequent differences in transport and ionization efficiencies. The main reason for the higher signal intensity resulting from femtosecond laser pulses was related to the larger crater sizes compared to those created during picosecond laser ablation. Elemental ratios measured using 66 Zn/ 63 Cu, 208 Pb/ 238 U, 232 Th/ 238 U, 66 Zn/ 232 Th and 66 Zn/ 208 Pb were found to change with the number of laser pulses with data points being more scattered in picosecond than femtosecond laser pulses. Reproducibility of replicate measurements of signal intensities, fractionation and elemental ratios was better for fs-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 3 to 6%) than ps-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 7 to 11%). - Highlights: • Fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse widths using NIST 610 and Naval Brass. • Dependence of fractionation indices on repetition rate and pulse width. • Higher ablation rate was observed in picosecond compared to femtosecond laser ablation of NIST 610 and Brass

  18. Sub-micron-scale femtosecond laser ablation using a digital micromirror device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, B; Feinaeugle, M; Sones, C L; Eason, R W; Rizvi, N

    2013-01-01

    Commercial digital multimirror devices offer a cheap and effective alternative to more expensive spatial light modulators for ablation via beam shaping. Here we present femtosecond laser ablation using the digital multimirror device from an Acer C20 Pico Digital Light Projector and show ablation of complex features with feature sizes ranging from sub-wavelength (400 nm) up to ∼30 µm. Simulations are presented that have been used to optimize and understand the experimentally observed resolution. (paper)

  19. Simultaneous atomization and ionization of large organic molecules using femtosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Tokanai, Fuyuki; Matsuo, Yukari; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kawai, Jun; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Tanihata, Isao; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2002-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated femtosecond laser ablation for simultaneous atomization and ionization (fs-SAI) of organic molecules on solid substrates. We find most of the constituent atoms of organic molecules are atomized and ionized non-resonantly by femtosecond laser ablation. This observation is in contrast with that for the photoionization of cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by femtosecond laser in the gas phase where little fragmentation has been observed. Crucial contribution of ablation plasma of solid sample to fs-SAI process is suggested. The ratio of natural abundance of stable isotopes contained in sample molecules is well reproduced, which confirms fs-SAI can be applied to the quantitative chemical analysis of isotope-labeled large organic molecules

  20. Fast femtosecond laser ablation for efficient cutting of sintered alumina substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterbeek, Reece N.; Ward, Thomas; Ashforth, Simon; Bodley, Owen; Rodda, Andrew E.; Simpson, M. Cather

    2016-09-01

    Fast, accurate cutting of technical ceramics is a significant technological challenge because of these materials' typical high mechanical strength and thermal resistance. Femtosecond pulsed lasers offer significant promise for meeting this challenge. Femtosecond pulses can machine nearly any material with small kerf and little to no collateral damage to the surrounding material. The main drawback to femtosecond laser machining of ceramics is slow processing speed. In this work we report on the improvement of femtosecond laser cutting of sintered alumina substrates through optimisation of laser processing parameters. The femtosecond laser ablation thresholds for sintered alumina were measured using the diagonal scan method. Incubation effects were found to fit a defect accumulation model, with Fth,1=6.0 J/cm2 (±0.3) and Fth,∞=2.5 J/cm2 (±0.2). The focal length and depth, laser power, number of passes, and material translation speed were optimised for ablation speed and high quality. Optimal conditions of 500 mW power, 100 mm focal length, 2000 μm/s material translation speed, with 14 passes, produced complete cutting of the alumina substrate at an overall processing speed of 143 μm/s - more than 4 times faster than the maximum reported overall processing speed previously achieved by Wang et al. [1]. This process significantly increases processing speeds of alumina substrates, thereby reducing costs, making femtosecond laser machining a more viable option for industrial users.

  1. Single-shot femtosecond laser ablation of gold surface in air and isopropyl alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.; Rudenko, A. A.; Ionin, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    Single-shot IR femtosecond-laser ablation of gold surfaces in ambient air and liquid isopropyl alcohol was studied by scanning electron microscopy characterization of crater topographies and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy of ablative plumes in regimes, typical for non-filamentary and non-fragmentation laser production of nanoparticle sols. Despite one order of magnitude shorter (few nanoseconds) lifetimes and almost two orders of magnitude lower intensities of the quenched ablative plume emission in the alcohol ambient at the same peak laser fluence, craters for the dry and wet conditions appeared with rather similar nanofoam-like spallative topographies and the same thresholds. These facts envision the underlying surface spallation as one of the basic ablation mechanisms relevant for both dry and wet advanced femtosecond laser surface nano/micro-machining and texturing, as well as for high-throughput femtosecond laser ablative production of colloidal nanoparticles by MHz laser-pulse trains via their direct nanoscale jetting from the nanofoam in air and fluid environments.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of single-wall carbon nanotube-based material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, Pavel A; Ionin, Andrey A; Kudryashov, Sergey I; Makarov, Sergey V; Mel’nik, Nikolay N; Rudenko, Andrey A; Yurovskikh, Vladislav I; Zayarny, Dmitry V; Lednev, Vasily N; Obraztsova, Elena D; Pershin, Sergey M; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    Single- and multi-shot femtosecond laser surface ablation of a single-wall carbon nanotube-based substrate at 515- and 1030 nm wavelengths was studied by scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The laser ablation proceeds in two ways: as the low-fluence mesoscopic shallow disintegration of the surface nanotube packing, preserving the individual integrity and the semiconducting character of the nanotubes or as the high-fluence deep material removal apparently triggered by the strong intrinsic or impurity-mediated ablation of the individual carbon nanotubes on the substrate surface. (letter)

  3. Photomechanical ablation of biological tissue induced by focused femtosecond laser and its application for acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Ohta, Mika; Ito, Akihiko; Takaoka, Yutaka

    2013-03-01

    Photomechanical laser ablation due to focused femtosecond laser irradiation was induced on the hind legs of living mice, and its clinical influence on muscle cell proliferation was investigated via histological examination and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis to examine the expression of the gene encoding myostatin, which is a growth repressor in muscle satellite cells. The histological examination suggested that damage of the tissue due to the femtosecond laser irradiation was localized on epidermis and dermis and hardly induced in the muscle tissue below. On the other hand, gene expression of the myostatin of muscle tissue after laser irradiation was suppressed. The suppression of myostatin expression facilitates the proliferation of muscle cells, because myostatin is a growth repressor in muscle satellite cells. On the basis of these results, we recognize the potential of the femtosecond laser as a tool for noncontact, high-throughput acupuncture in the treatment of muscle disease.

  4. Ablation of silicon with bursts of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiuso, Caterina; Kämmer, Helena; Dreisow, Felix; Ancona, Antonio; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of ultrafast laser ablation of silicon with bursts of pulses. The pristine 1030nm-wavelength 200-fs pulses were split into bursts of up to 16 sub-pulses with time separation ranging from 0.5ps to 4080ps. The total ablation threshold fluence was measured depending on the burst features, finding that it strongly increases with the number of sub-pulses for longer sub-pulse delays, while a slowly increasing trend is observed for shorter separation time. The ablation depth per burst follows two different trends according to the time separation between the sub-pulses, as well as the total threshold fluence. For delays shorter than 4ps it decreases with the number of pulses, while for time separations longer than 510ps, deeper craters were achieved by increasing the number of subpulses in the burst, probably due to a change of the effective penetration depth.

  5. Experimental study on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of fused silica in air and vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shi-zhen, E-mail: xusz@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Cai-zhen; Liao, Wei [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yuan, Xiao-dong, E-mail: yxd66my@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wang, Tao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zu, Xiao-tao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Ablation rates of fused silica were studied as a function of femtosecond laser pulse fluences (0.7–41 J/cm{sup 2}) in air and vacuum. The experiment was conducted by using a Ti:sapphire laser that emits radiation at 800 nm with a pulse width of 35 fs and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The morphology and ablation depth of laser-induced damage crater were evaluated by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ablation rates were calculated from the depth of craters induced by multiple laser pulses. Results showed that two ablation regimes, i.e. non-thermal and thermal ablation co-existed in air and vacuum at low and moderate fluences. A drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence (higher than 9.5 J/cm{sup 2}) in air. While in vacuum, the ablation rate increased continuously with the increasing of laser fluence and much higher than that in air. The drop of ablation rate observed at high fluence in air was due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air. Furthermore, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), which was determined from the relationship between crater area and the logarithm of laser energy, was found to depend on the number of incident pulses on the same spot, and similar phenomenon was observed in air and vacuum.

  6. Measurement of ablation threshold of oxide-film-coated aluminium nanoparticles irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chefonov, O V; Ovchinnikov, A V; Il'ina, I V; Agranat, M B

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of experiments on estimation of femtosecond laser threshold intensity at which nanoparticles are removed from the substrate surface. The studies are performed with nanoparticles obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of pure aluminium in distilled water. The attenuation (or extinction, i.e. absorption and scattering) spectra of nanoparticles are measured at room temperature in the UV and optical wavelength ranges. The size of nanoparticles is determined using atomic force microscopy. A new method of scanning photoluminescence is proposed to evaluate the threshold of nanoparticle removal from the surface of a glass substrate exposed to IR femtosecond laser pulses with intensities 10 11 – 10 13 W cm -2 . (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation and nanoparticle formation in intermetallic NiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, David J., E-mail: davidjjorgensen@engr.ucsb.edu; Titus, Michael S.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • The single-pulse fs laser ablation threshold of NiAl is 83 mJ/cm{sup 2}. • The transition between low- and high-fluence ablation regimes is 2.8 J/cm{sup 2}. • A bimodal size distribution of nanoparticles is formed with fs laser ablation. • Smaller nanoparticles are enriched in Al during pulsed fs laser ablation. • The target surface is depleted in Al during pulsed fs laser ablation. - Abstract: The ablation behavior of a stoichiometric intermetallic compound β-NiAl subjected to femtosecond laser pulsing in air has been investigated. The single-pulse ablation threshold for NiAl was determined to be 83 ± 4 mJ/cm{sup 2} and the transition to the high-fluence ablation regime occurred at 2.8 ± 0.3 J/cm{sup 2}. Two sizes of nanoparticles consisting of Al, NiAl, Ni{sub 3}Al and NiO were formed and ejected from the target during high-fluence ablation. Chemical analysis revealed that smaller nanoparticles (1–30 nm) tended to be rich in Al while larger nanoparticles (>100 nm) were lean in Al. Ablation in the low-fluence regime maintained this trend. Redeposited material and nanoparticles remaining on the surface after a single 3.7 J/cm{sup 2} pulse, one hundred 1.7 J/cm{sup 2} pulses, or one thousand 250 mJ/cm{sup 2} pulses were enriched in Al relative to the bulk target composition. Further, the surface of the irradiated high-fluence region was depleted in Al indicating that the fs laser ablation removal rate of the intermetallic constituents in this regime does not scale with the individual pure element ablation thresholds.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of polymeric substrates for the fabrication of microfluidic channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Kuznetsov, Arseniy; Eaton, Shane M.; Kiyan, Roman; Cerullo, Giulio; Osellame, Roberto; Chichkov, Boris N.; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript presents a study of physical and chemical properties of microchannels fabricated by femtosecond laser processing technology in thermoplastic polymeric materials, including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene (PS) and cyclic olefin polymer (COP). By surface electron microscopy and optical profilometry, the dimensions of microchannels in the polymers were found to be easily tunable, with surface roughness values comparable to those obtained by standard prototyping techniques such as micromilling. Through colorimetric analysis and optical microscopy, PMMA was found to remain nearly transparent after ablation while COP and PS darkened significantly. Using infrared spectroscopy, the darkening in PS and COP was attributed to significant oxidation and dehydrogenation during laser ablation, unlike PMMA, which was found to degrade by a thermal depolymerization process. The more stable molecular structure of PMMA makes it the most viable thermoplastic polymer for femtosecond laser fabrication of microfluidic channels.

  9. An investigation on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of K9 glass in air and vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shi-zhen, E-mail: xusz@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Cai-zhen [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Dou, Hong-qiang [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Sichuan Engineering Technical College, Deyang 618000 (China); Liao, Wei, E-mail: liaowei@caep.cn [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Xiao-yang; Ding, Ren-jie [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, Li-juan; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiao-dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zu, Xiao-tao [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • The fs laser ablation of borosilicate glass (K9) were investigated under 35 and 500 fs pulses. • At high fluence regime, the ablation rate at 35 fs in air increased to a plateau, and 500 fs in air and vacuum decreased. • The mechanisms of multiple-photon ionization and impact ionization were included. • The ablation morphologies of smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures were presented and illustrated. • The ablation mechanisms of non-thermal and thermal ablation were included. - Abstract: Ablation rates of K9 glass were studied as a function of femtosecond laser fluences. The central wavelength was 800 nm, and pulse durations of 35 fs and 500 fs in air and vacuum were employed. Ablation thresholds of 0.42 J/cm{sup 2} and 2.1 J/cm{sup 2} were obtained at 35 fs and 500 fs, respectively, which were independent with the ambient conditions and depend on the incident pulse numbers due to incubation effects. The ablation rate of 35 fs pulse laser increased with the increasing of laser fluence in vacuum, while in air condition, it slowly increased to a plateau at high fluence. The ablation rate of 500 fs pulse laser showed an increase at low fluence and a slow drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence in air and vacuum, which may due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air, and/or the shielding effects of conduction band electrons (CBEs) produced by multi-photon ionization and impact ionization in K9 glass surface. The typical ablation morphologies, e.g. smooth zone and laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were also presented and illustrated.

  10. Ablation mass features in multi-pulses femtosecond laser ablate molybdenum target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongye; Gierse, Niels; Wegner, Julian; Pretzler, Georg; Oelmann, Jannis; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Liang, Yunfeng; Neubauer, Olaf; Rasinski, Marcin; Linsmeier, Christian; Ding, Hongbin

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the ablation mass features related to reflectivity of bulk Molybdenum (Mo) were investigated by a Ti: Sa 6 fs laser pulse at central wavelength 790 nm. The ablated mass removal was determined using Confocal Microscopy (CM) technique. The surface reflectivity was calibrated and measured by a Lambda 950 spectrophotometer as well as a CCD camera during laser ablation. The ablation mass loss per pulse increase with the increasing of laser shots, meanwhile the surface reflectivity decrease. The multi-pulses (100 shots) ablation threshold of Mo was determined to be 0.15 J/cm2. The incubation coefficient was estimated as 0.835. The reflectivity change of the Mo target surface following multi-pulses laser ablation were studied as a function of laser ablation shots at various laser fluences from 1.07 J/cm2 to 36.23 J/cm2. The results of measured reflectivity indicate that surface reflectivity of Mo target has a significant decline in the first 3-laser pulses at the various fluences. These results are important for developing a quantitative analysis model for laser induced ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the first wall diagnosis of EAST tokamak.

  11. Keratin film ablation for the fabrication of brick and mortar skin structure using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Bibi Safia; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Dou, Yuehua; Alam, Khan; Attaullah, Shehnaz; Zari, Islam

    2015-09-01

    The patterning of thin keratin films has been explored to manufacture model skin surfaces based on the "bricks and mortar" view of the relationship between keratin and lipids. It has been demonstrated that laser light is capable of preparing keratin-based "bricks and mortar" wall structure as in epidermis, the outermost layer of the human skin. "Bricks and mortar" pattern in keratin films has been fabricated using an ArF excimer laser (193 nm wavelength) and femtosecond laser (800 and 400 nm wavelength). Due to the very low ablation threshold of keratin, femtosecond laser systems are practical for laser processing of proteins. These model skin structures are fabricated for the first time that will help to produce potentially effective moisturizing products for the protection of skin from dryness, diseases and wrinkles.

  12. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J.

    2014-01-01

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J., E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  14. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS.

  15. Femtosecond laser ablation of polymethylmethacrylate via dual-color synthesized waveform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chan-Shan; Zaytsev, Alexey; Lin, Chih-Hsuan; Teng, Kuei-Chung; Her, Tsing-Hua; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated the laser ablation of PMMA using dual-color waveform synthesis of the fundamental (ω) and its second-harmonic (2ω) of a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. A modest and yet clear modulation (∼22%) in ablated area versus relative phase between the 2ω and ω beams with a power-ratio of 15% (28/183 mW) is revealed. This is explained qualitatively by the dependence of ablation on multiphoton ionization of which the rate is related to the relative phase of the synthesized waveform. At higher peak power ratios, the modulation decreases rapidly, as the two-photon-ionization rate of the 2ω dominates over that of the three- to four- photon ionization of the ω beam. This technique demonstrates the feasibility of phase-controlled laser processing of materials

  16. One-step fabrication of superhydrophobic hierarchical structures by femtosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukosuyev, Maxym V.; Lee, Jason; Cho, Seong Jin; Lim, Geunbae; Jun, Martin B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Superhydrophobic surface patterns by femtosecond laser ablation in open air. • Micron scale ridge-like structure with superimposed submicron convex features. • Hydrophobic or even superhydrophobic behavior with no additional silanization. - Abstract: Hydrophobic surface properties are sought after in many areas of research, engineering, and consumer product development. Traditionally, hydrophobic surfaces are produced by using various types of coatings. However, introduction of foreign material onto the surface is often undesirable as it changes surface chemistry and cannot provide a long lasting solution (i.e. reapplication is needed). Therefore, surface modification by transforming the base material itself can be preferable in many applications. Femtosecond laser ablation is one of the methods that can be used to create structures on the surface that will exhibit hydrophobic behavior. The goal of the presented research was to create micro and nano-scale patterns that will exhibit hydrophobic properties with no additional post treatment. As a result, dual scale patterned structures were created on the surface of steel aluminum and tungsten carbide samples. Ablation was performed in the open air with no subsequent treatment. Resultant surfaces appeared to be strongly hydrophobic or even superhydrophobic with contact angle values of 140° and higher. In conclusion, the nature of surface hydrophobicity proved to be highly dependent on surface morphology as the base materials used are intrinsically hydrophilic. It was also proven that the hydrophobicity inducing structures could be manufactured using femtosecond laser machining in a single step with no subsequent post treatment

  17. One-step fabrication of superhydrophobic hierarchical structures by femtosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rukosuyev, Maxym V.; Lee, Jason [Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria (Canada); Cho, Seong Jin; Lim, Geunbae [Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Martin B.G., E-mail: mbgjun@uvic.ca [Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Superhydrophobic surface patterns by femtosecond laser ablation in open air. • Micron scale ridge-like structure with superimposed submicron convex features. • Hydrophobic or even superhydrophobic behavior with no additional silanization. - Abstract: Hydrophobic surface properties are sought after in many areas of research, engineering, and consumer product development. Traditionally, hydrophobic surfaces are produced by using various types of coatings. However, introduction of foreign material onto the surface is often undesirable as it changes surface chemistry and cannot provide a long lasting solution (i.e. reapplication is needed). Therefore, surface modification by transforming the base material itself can be preferable in many applications. Femtosecond laser ablation is one of the methods that can be used to create structures on the surface that will exhibit hydrophobic behavior. The goal of the presented research was to create micro and nano-scale patterns that will exhibit hydrophobic properties with no additional post treatment. As a result, dual scale patterned structures were created on the surface of steel aluminum and tungsten carbide samples. Ablation was performed in the open air with no subsequent treatment. Resultant surfaces appeared to be strongly hydrophobic or even superhydrophobic with contact angle values of 140° and higher. In conclusion, the nature of surface hydrophobicity proved to be highly dependent on surface morphology as the base materials used are intrinsically hydrophilic. It was also proven that the hydrophobicity inducing structures could be manufactured using femtosecond laser machining in a single step with no subsequent post treatment.

  18. Ultra-short laser pulse ablation using shear-force feedback: Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samek, Ota; Kurowski, Andre; Kittel, Silke; Kukhlevsky, Sergei; Hergenroeder, Roland

    2005-01-01

    This work reports on a feasibility study of proximity ablation using femtosecond pulses. Ultra-short pulses were launched to a bare tapered optical fiber and delivered to the sample. The tip-sample distance was controlled by means of shear-force feedback. Consequently, ablation craters with submicrometer dimensions were obtained. Potential analytical applications for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, such as e.g. inclusions in steel or bio cells, are suggested

  19. Selective ablation of dental enamel and dentin using femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizarelli, R F Z; Costa, M M; Carvalho-Filho, E; Bagnato, V S; Nunes, F D

    2008-01-01

    The study of the interaction of intense laser light with matter, as well as transient response of atoms and molecules is very appropriated because of the laser energy concentration in a femtosecond optical pulses. The fundamental problem to be solved is to find tools and techniques which allow us to observe and manipulate on a femtosecond time scale the photonics events on and into the matter. Six third human extracted molars were exposed to a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire Q-switched and mode locked laser (Libra-S, Coherent, Palo Alto, CA, USA), emitting pulses with 70 fs width, radiation wavelength of 801 nm, at a constant pulse repetition rate of 1 KHz. The laser was operated at different power levels (70 to 400 mW) with constant exposition time of 10 seconds, at focused and defocused mode. Enamel and dentin surfaces were evaluated concerned ablation rate and morphological aspects under scanning electron microscopic. The results in this present experiment suggest that at the focused mode and under higher average power, enamel tissues present microcavities with higher depth and very precise edges, but, while dentin shows a larger melt-flushing, lower depth and melting and solidification aspect. In conclusion, it is possible to choose hard or soft ablation, under lower and higher average power, respectively, revealing different aspects of dental enamel and dentin, depending on the average power, fluence and distance from the focal point of the ultra-short pulse laser on the tooth surface

  20. Modelling the formation of nanostructures on metal surface induced by femtosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouder, M.; Itina, T.E.; Deghiche, D.; Lamrous, O.

    2012-01-01

    We employ the particle-in-cell method to simulate the mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser interactions with a metallic target. The theoretical approach considers the solid as a gas of free electrons in a lattice of immobile ions and the laser fluences close to the ablation threshold. At first moments of the interaction, our simulations mapped out different nanostructures. We carefully characterized the rippling phase and found that its morphology is dependent on the distribution of the electron density and the period of the ripples depends on the laser intensity. The simulation method provides new insights into the mechanisms that are responsible for surface grating formation.

  1. Modelling the formation of nanostructures on metal surface induced by femtosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djouder, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Itina, T.E. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516/Universite Jean Monnet, 18 rue de Professeur Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Deghiche, D. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Lamrous, O., E-mail: omarlamrous@mail.ummto.dz [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2012-01-15

    We employ the particle-in-cell method to simulate the mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser interactions with a metallic target. The theoretical approach considers the solid as a gas of free electrons in a lattice of immobile ions and the laser fluences close to the ablation threshold. At first moments of the interaction, our simulations mapped out different nanostructures. We carefully characterized the rippling phase and found that its morphology is dependent on the distribution of the electron density and the period of the ripples depends on the laser intensity. The simulation method provides new insights into the mechanisms that are responsible for surface grating formation.

  2. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-09-01

    Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuries in the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential use of laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ=1700 nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ=1053 nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18 J/cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300±15 mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3 μJ/pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18 J/cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates.

  3. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, A Z; Samad, R E; Zezell, D M; Vieira Jr, N D; Freschi, L R; Gouw-Soares, S C

    2010-01-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm 2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm 2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed

  4. Processing of Dielectric Optical Coatings by Nanosecond and Femtosecond UV Laser Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihlemann, J.; Bekesi, J.; Klein-Wiele, J.H.; Simon, P.

    2008-01-01

    Micro processing of dielectric optical coatings by UV laser ablation is demonstrated. Excimer laser ablation at deep UV wavelengths (248 nm, 193 nm) is used for the patterning of thin oxide films or layer stacks. The layer removal over extended areas as well as sub-μm-structuring is possible. The ablation of SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2, and Ta2O5 layers and layer systems has been investigated. Due to their optical, chemical, and thermal stability, these inorganic film materials are well suited for optical applications, even if UV-transparency is required. Transparent patterned films of SiO2 are produced by patterning a UV-absorbing precursor SiOx suboxide layer and oxidizing it afterwards to SiO2. In contrast to laser ablation of bulk material, in the case of thin films, the layer-layer or layer-substrate boundaries act as predetermined end points, so that precise depth control and a very smooth surface can be achieved. For large area ablation, nanosecond lasers are well suited; for patterning with submicron resolution, femtosecond excimer lasers are applied. Thus the fabrication of optical elements like dielectric masks, pixelated diffractive elements, and gratings can be accomplished.

  5. Femtosecond laser ablation profile near an interface: Analysis based on the correlation with superficial properties of individual materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolodelli, Gustavo, E-mail: nicolodelli@ursa.ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Grupo de Optica, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense 400, P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Grupo de Optica, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense 400, P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation of materials is turning to be an important tool for micromachining as well as for selective removal of biological tissues. In a great number of applications, laser ablation has to process through interfaces separating media of different properties. The investigation of the ablation behavior within materials and passing through interfaces is the main aim of this study. Especially, the analysis of the discontinuity in the ablation profile close to interfaces between distinct materials can reveal some of the phenomena involved in the formation of an ablated microcavity geometry. We have used a method that correlates the ablation cross sectional area with the local laser intensity. The effective intensity ablation properties were obtained from surface ablation data of distinct materials. The application of this method allows the prediction of the occurrence of a size discontinuity in the ablation geometry at the interface of distinct media, a fact which becomes important when planning applications in different media.

  6. Femtosecond Laser Ablated FBG with Composite Microstructure for Hydrogen Sensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A composite microstructure in fiber Bragg grating (FBG with film deposition for hydrogen detection is presented. Through ablated to FBG cladding by a femtosecond laser, straight-trenches and spiral micro-pits are formed. A Pd–Ag film is sputtered on the surface of the laser processed FBG single mode fiber, and acts as hydrogen sensing transducer. The demonstrated experimental outcomes show that a composite structure produced the highest sensitivity of 26.3 pm/%H, nearly sevenfold more sensitive compared with original standard FBG. It offers great potential in engineering applications for its good structure stability and sensitivity.

  7. 3D electrostatic actuator fabricated by non-ablative femtosecond laser exposure and chemical etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the novel design of an electrostatic micro-actuator based on monolithic three-dimensional (3D shapes fabricated by non-ablative femtosecond laser exposure combined with chemical etching. Further, we present a single-scan stacking approach exploited in the fabrication of the 3D actuator to create crack-free, highcontrast, high fidelity and integrated micro-structures. Influential parameters: energy per pulse, polarization, scanning spacing and stacking directionwere systematically studied to predict and control the etching rate of 3D planes.Finally, we report the characterization of the actuator and its potential application in optomechanics to show a complete scenario of femtosecond laser machined integrated 3D micro-systems incorporating multiple functionalities.

  8. Changes in wetting and contact charge transfer by femtosecond laser-ablation of polyimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, X.D., E-mail: xiaodong.guo@uib.no [Department of Physics and Technology, Allegaten 55, 5020 Bergen, University of Bergen (Norway); Dai, Y.; Gong, M. [Department of Physics, Shanghai 200444, Shanghai University (China); Qu, Y.G. [Center for Geobiology, Allegaten 41, 5020 Bergen, University of Bergen (Norway); Helseth, L.E. [Department of Physics and Technology, Allegaten 55, 5020 Bergen, University of Bergen (Norway)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Laser ablation significantly reduced the triboelectric charging of polyimide films. • Hierarchical micro/nanostructures formed on the surface of the sample. • Structural anisotropy leads to spatially varying contact angles of water droplets. • Raman spectroscopy revealed a carbonization of the polyimide sample. • The corresponding loss of insulation may explain the reduction of charge transfer. - Abstract: In this study it is demonstrated that the triboelectric charging of polyimide thin films is significantly reduced by using a femtosecond laser to nanostructure its. It is found that the contact charge transfer between laser-ablated Kapton and aluminum is almost negligible, and even much lower than the significant current occurring when non-treated Kapton touches the metal. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrates that laser ablation produces a hierarchical micro and nanostructure, and it is found that the structural anisotropy leads to spatially varying contact angles of water droplets residing on the surface. Raman spectra suggest that the centers of the laser-ablated tracks are carbonized; therefore, the loss of insulation can be responsible for the reduction of charge transfer.

  9. Kinetic energy of ions produced with first-, second-, and multi-shot femtosecond laser ablation on a solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Kato, Toshiyuki; Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Matsuo, Yukari; Kawai, Jun; Motobayashi, Tohru; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2007-01-01

    We report that the kinetic energy of samarium (Sm) atom and Sm + ion produced by femtosecond laser ablation of solid samarium is strongly dependent on the number of ablation laser shots in the range from 1 to 10. By ablating the fresh surface (i.e. 1st shot), we find the kinetic energy of both Sm and Sm + ion to be the largest (24 and 250 eV, respectively). Almost 10 times larger kinetic energy of Sm + ion than that of Sm clearly indicates the contribution of Coulomb explosion in the acceleration process. From the second shot, kinetic energies of Sm and Sm + ion are lower than those of the first shot and almost constant (ca. 12 and 80 eV, respectively). This behaviour suggests the change in the nature of the solid surface after femtosecond laser ablation, which can be explained by the amorphization of ablated sample surface reported in recent studies

  10. Towards nanopatterning by femtosecond laser ablation of pre-stretched elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdo, Salvatore; Piazza, Simonluca; Ceseracciu, Luca; Diaspro, Alberto; Duocastella, Martí, E-mail: marti.duocastella@iit.it

    2016-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present a new approach to increase the focusing capabilities of optical systems. • Laser patterning is performed over a stretched elastomeric membrane. • After releasing stress, patterns shrink according to the applied strain. • Minimum feature size is controlled by strain, enabling sub-diffraction patterning. - Abstract: Diffraction limits the focusing capabilities of an optical system seriously constraining the use of lasers for nanopatterning. In this work, we present a novel and simple approach to reduce the minimum feature size of a laser-direct write system by ablating a pre-stretched material. In particular, by focusing and scanning a femtosecond laser beam on the surface of a uniaxially pre-stretched elastomeric membrane we are able to obtain microstructures according to a desired pattern. After removing the stress applied to the elastomer, the membrane relaxes to its original size and the ablated patterns shrink while preserving their shape. In this way, the minimum feature size that is typically determined by the optical properties of the focusing system can be now controlled by the strain applied to the elastomer during the ablation process. We demonstrate this approach by ablating lines on a stretchable polymeric membrane at different strain conditions. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The proposed method opens up new interesting possibilities for the rapid prototyping of micro- and nano-structures suitable for a wide range of applications such as soft-lithography, micro-/nano-fluidics and lab-on-chip.

  11. Towards nanopatterning by femtosecond laser ablation of pre-stretched elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdo, Salvatore; Piazza, Simonluca; Ceseracciu, Luca; Diaspro, Alberto; Duocastella, Martí

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present a new approach to increase the focusing capabilities of optical systems. • Laser patterning is performed over a stretched elastomeric membrane. • After releasing stress, patterns shrink according to the applied strain. • Minimum feature size is controlled by strain, enabling sub-diffraction patterning. - Abstract: Diffraction limits the focusing capabilities of an optical system seriously constraining the use of lasers for nanopatterning. In this work, we present a novel and simple approach to reduce the minimum feature size of a laser-direct write system by ablating a pre-stretched material. In particular, by focusing and scanning a femtosecond laser beam on the surface of a uniaxially pre-stretched elastomeric membrane we are able to obtain microstructures according to a desired pattern. After removing the stress applied to the elastomer, the membrane relaxes to its original size and the ablated patterns shrink while preserving their shape. In this way, the minimum feature size that is typically determined by the optical properties of the focusing system can be now controlled by the strain applied to the elastomer during the ablation process. We demonstrate this approach by ablating lines on a stretchable polymeric membrane at different strain conditions. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The proposed method opens up new interesting possibilities for the rapid prototyping of micro- and nano-structures suitable for a wide range of applications such as soft-lithography, micro-/nano-fluidics and lab-on-chip.

  12. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping; Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes

  13. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping, E-mail: ypchen@sjtu.edu.cn; Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-14

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes.

  14. Near-field imaging of femtosecond laser ablated sub-λ/4 holes in lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, Airan; Lamela, Jorge; Jaque, Daniel; Lifante, Gines; Jaque, Francisco; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Zhou Guangyong; Gu Min

    2009-01-01

    We report on the direct femtosecond laser ablation of sub-λ/4 (80-250 nm) holes in LiNbO 3 crystals and on its local near-field imaging. We show that the near-field transmission of holes can feature an attenuation of ∼75% at hole central position, and a ∼20% transmission enhancement at its sides. This high-contrast ring-shaped near-field distribution is found to be in agreement with simulations, suggesting the surface relief as the main contrast mechanism.

  15. Femtosecond laser-ablated Fresnel zone plate fiber probe and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoling; Geng, Youfu; Chen, Yan; Li, Shiguo; Wang, Xinzhong

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the Fresnel zone plate (FZP) inscribed on multimode fiber endface using femtosecond laser ablation and its application in sensing. The mode transmission through fiber tips with FZP is investigated both by the beam propagation method theoretically and by measuring the beam images with a charge-coupled device camera experimentally, which show a good agreement. Such devices are tested for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using the aqueous solution of rhodamine 6G under a Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results demonstrate that the SERS signal is enhanced benefiting from focal ability of FZP, which is a promising method for the particular biochemical spectra sensing applications.

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of transparent microphotonic devices and computer-generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Montelongo, Yunuen; Penchev, Pavel; Yetisen, Ali K; Dimov, Stefan; Butt, Haider

    2017-09-21

    Femtosecond laser ablation allows direct patterning of engineering materials in industrial settings without requiring multistage processes such as photolithography or electron beam lithography. However, femtosecond lasers have not been widely used to construct volumetric microphotonic devices and holograms with high reliability and cost efficiency. Here, a direct femtosecond laser writing process is developed to rapidly produce transmission 1D/2D gratings, Fresnel Zone Plate lenses, and computer-generated holograms. The optical properties including light transmission, angle-dependent resolution, and light polarization effects for the microphotonic devices have been characterized. Varying the depth of the microgratings from 400 nm to 1.5 μm allowed the control over their transmission intensity profile. The optical properties of the 1D/2D gratings were validated through a geometrical theory of diffraction model involving 2D phase modulation. The produced Fresnel lenses had transmission efficiency of ∼60% at normal incidence and they preserved the polarization of incident light. The computer-generated holograms had an average transmission efficiency of 35% over the visible spectrum. These microphotonic devices had wettability resistance of contact angle ranging from 44° to 125°. These devices can be used in a variety of applications including wavelength-selective filters, dynamic displays, fiber optics, and biomedical devices.

  17. Wavelength dependence of the single pulse femtosecond laser ablation threshold of indium phosphide in the 400-2050 nm range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowiec, A.; Tiedje, H.F.; Haugen, H.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present single pulse femtosecond laser ablation threshold measurements of InP obtained by optical, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopy. The experiments were conducted with laser pulses 65-175 fs in duration, in the wavelength range from 400 to 2050 nm, covering the photon energy region above and below the bandgap of InP. The ablation thresholds determined from depth and volume measurements varied from 87 mJ/cm 2 at 400 nm to 250 mJ/cm 2 at 2050 nm. In addition, crater depths and volumes were measured over a range of laser fluences extending well above the ablation threshold

  18. Self-organized pattern formation upon femtosecond laser ablation by circularly polarized light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamova, Olga; Costache, Florenta; Reif, Juergen; Bestehorn, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Surface ripples generation upon femtosecond laser ablation is attributed to self-organized structure formation from instability. We report that linear arrangements are observed not only for linearly polarized light but also for ablation with circularly polarized light. Long ordered chains of spherical nanoparticles, reminding of bead-strings are almost parallel but exhibit typical non-linear dynamics features such as bifurcations. In a first attempt to understand the self-assembly, we rely on models recently developed for the description of similar structures upon ion beam erosion and for the simulation of instabilities in thin liquid films. Our picture describes an unstable surface layer, non-uniformly eroded through Coulomb repulsion between individual positive charges

  19. Femtosecond laser writing of nanostructures on bulk Al via its ablation in air and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, E. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH), PO Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, Heraklion 710 03 (Greece)], E-mail: stratak@iesl.forth.gr; Zorba, V.; Barberoglou, M.; Fotakis, C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH), PO Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion 714 09 (Greece); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-03-01

    We report on the formation of self-organized nanostructures (NS) on bulk Al under its ablation in air and liquids with femtoseconds (fs) laser pulses. In case of exposure into liquids, NS are regularly formed on the Al surface with an average period of about 200 nm, independent of the laser polarization. A dispersion of Al nanoparticles (NPs) into the liquid additionally occurs. Irregular nano-bumps are produced when the irradiation is performed in air. NP dispersions as well as NS formed on Al surface show a characteristic absorption peak in the near UV which has been attributed to plasmon oscillation of electrons. The wings of this peak extending to the visible, lead to a distinct yellow coloration of the processed Al surface and the liquid dispersions. Ultrafast laser processing of bulk Al in liquids may be potentially a promising technique for efficient production of nanosized aluminum.

  20. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in microfluidics for synthesis of photoluminescent ZnSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chao, E-mail: chaoyangscu@gmail.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Feng, Guoying, E-mail: guoing_feng@scu.edu.cn [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Dai, Shenyu, E-mail: 232127079@qq.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Wang, Shutong, E-mail: wangshutong.scu@gmail.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Li, Guang, E-mail: 632524844@qq.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhang, Hua [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhou, Shouhuan, E-mail: zhoush@scu.edu.cn [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); North China Research Institute of Electro-Optics, 4 Jiuxianqiao Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100015 (China)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • A novel method for synthesis and coating of quantum dots by ultrafast laser pulses. • Mild and “green” synthesis method without toxic chemicals. • Enhanced bright green light emission without doped transition metal ions. • Ultrafast laser and coating layer enhanced the emission originated from defects. - Abstract: A simple but new toxic chemical free method, Femtosecond Laser Ablation in Microfluidics (FLAM) was proposed for the first time. ZnSe quantum dots of 4–6 nm were synthesized and with the use of hyperbranched Polyethyleneimine (PEI) as both structural and functional coated layer. These aqueous nanosized micelles consisting of quantum dots exhibit deep defect states emission of bright green light centered at 500 nm. A possible mechanism for the enhanced board band emission was discussed. The properties of toxic matters free and enhanced photoluminescence without doped transition metal ions demonstrate an application potential for biomedical imaging.

  1. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in microfluidics for synthesis of photoluminescent ZnSe quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chao; Feng, Guoying; Dai, Shenyu; Wang, Shutong; Li, Guang; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel method for synthesis and coating of quantum dots by ultrafast laser pulses. • Mild and “green” synthesis method without toxic chemicals. • Enhanced bright green light emission without doped transition metal ions. • Ultrafast laser and coating layer enhanced the emission originated from defects. - Abstract: A simple but new toxic chemical free method, Femtosecond Laser Ablation in Microfluidics (FLAM) was proposed for the first time. ZnSe quantum dots of 4–6 nm were synthesized and with the use of hyperbranched Polyethyleneimine (PEI) as both structural and functional coated layer. These aqueous nanosized micelles consisting of quantum dots exhibit deep defect states emission of bright green light centered at 500 nm. A possible mechanism for the enhanced board band emission was discussed. The properties of toxic matters free and enhanced photoluminescence without doped transition metal ions demonstrate an application potential for biomedical imaging.

  2. Micro-scale novel stable isotope fractionation during weathering disclosed by femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessler, J. A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2012-12-01

    The stable isotope fractionation of metals and metalloids during chemical weathering and alteration of rocks at low temperature is a topic receiving increasing scientific attention. For these systems, weathering of primary minerals leads to selective partitioning of isotopes between the secondary minerals formed from them, and the dissolved phase of soil or river water. While the isotopic signatures of these processes have been mapped-out at the catchment or the soil scale, the actual isotopic fractionation is occurring at the mineral scale. To identify the processes underlying such micro-scale fractionation, the development of micro-analytical tools allows to investigate mechanisms of isotope fractionation in-situ, in combination with textural information of weathering reactions. We have developed a second-generation UV femtosecond (fs) laser system at GFZ Potsdam. The advantage of UV-fs laser ablation is the reduction of laser-induced isotopic and elemental fractionation by avoiding 'thermal effects' during ablation, such that accurate isotope ratios can be measured by standard-sample-standard bracketing using laser ablation multicollector ICP-MS; where the matrix of the bracketing standard does not need to match that of the sample [1]. Our system consists of the latest generation femtosecond solid-state laser (Newport Spectra Physics Solstice), producing an ultra short pulse width of about 100 femtoseconds at a wavelength of 196 nm. The system is combined with a custom-build computer-controlled sample stage and allows fully automated isotope analyses through synchronised operation of the laser with the Neptune MC-ICP-MS. To assess precision and accuracy of our laser ablation method, we analysed various geological reference materials. We obtained δ30Si values of -0.31 ± 0.23 (2SD, n = 13) for basalt glass BHVO-2G, and -1.25 ± 0.21 (2SD, n = 27) for pure Si IRMM17 when bracketed against NBS-28 quartz. δ56Fe and δ26Mg values obtained from non-matrix matched

  3. Minimizing matrix effect by femtosecond laser ablation and ionization in elemental determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bochao; He, Miaohong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2013-05-07

    Matrix effect is unavoidable in direct solid analysis, which usually is a leading cause of the nonstoichiometric effect in quantitative analysis. In this research, experiments were carried out to study the overall characteristics of atomization and ionization in laser-solid interaction. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers were applied in a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twenty-nine solid standards of ten different matrices, including six metals and four dielectrics, were analyzed. The results indicate that the fs-laser mode offers more stable relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) with irradiance higher than 7 × 10(13) W·cm(-2), which could be more reliable in the determination of element composition of solids. The matrix effect is reduced by half when the fs-laser is employed, owing to the fact that the fs-laser ablation and ionization (fs-LAI) incurs an almost heat-free ablation process and creates a dense plasma for the stable ionization.

  4. On the anisotropy of stress-distribution induced in glasses and crystals by non-ablative femtosecond laser exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMillen, B.W.; Bellouard, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser exposure in the non-ablative regime induces a variety of bulk structural modifications, in which anisotropy may depend on the polarization of the writing beam. In this work, we investigate the correlation between polarization state and stress anisotropy. In particular, we introduce

  5. Detection efficiencies in nano- and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelle, M.; Koch, J.; Flamigni, L.; Heiroth, S.; Lippert, T.; Hartung, W.; Guenther, D.

    2009-01-01

    Detection efficiencies of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), defined as the ratio of ions reaching the detector and atoms released by LA were measured. For this purpose, LA of silicate glasses, zircon, and pure silicon was performed using nanosecond (ns) as well as femtosecond (fs) LA. For instance, ns-LA of silicate glass using helium as in-cell carrier gas resulted in detection efficiencies between approximately 1E-7 for low and 3E-5 for high mass range elements which were, in addition, almost independent on the laser wavelength and pulse duration chosen. In contrast, the application of argon as carrier gas was found to suppress the detection efficiencies systematically by a factor of up to 5 mainly due to a less efficient aerosol-to-ion conversion and ion transmission inside the ICP-MS

  6. Femtosecond laser irradiation on Nd:YAG crystal: Surface ablation and high-spatial-frequency nanograting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yingying; Zhang, Limu; Romero, Carolina; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Chen, Feng

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we systematically study the surface modifications of femtosecond (fs) laser irradiated Nd:YAG crystal in stationary focusing case (i.e., the beam focused on the target in the steady focusing geometry) or dynamic scanning case (i.e., focused fs-laser beam scanning over the target material). Micro-sized structures (e.g. micro-craters or lines) are experimentally produced in a large scale of parameters in terms of pulse energy as well as (effective) pulse number. Surface ablation of Nd:YAG surface under both processing cases are investigated, involving the morphological evolution, parameter dependence, the ablation threshold fluences and the incubation factors. Meanwhile, under specific irradiation conditions, periodic surface structures with high-spatial-frequency (Investigations on the evolution of nanograting formation and fluence dependence of period are performed. The experimental results obtained under different cases and the comparison between them reveal that incubation effect plays an important role not only in the ablation of Nd:YAG surface but also in the processes of nanograting formation.

  7. Study of ablation on surfaces of nuclear-use metals irradiated with Femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Alessandro F.; Samad, Ricardo E.; Vieira Junior, Nilson D.; Rossi, Wagner de

    2017-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulsed lasers is an alternative for micro-machining in metal surfaces, with diverse applications in several industrial areas, such as aeronautics, aerospace, naval, nuclear, among others, where there is a growing concern with reliability in service. In this work, micro-machining were performed on titanium surfaces using femtosecond ultrashort pulses. Such a process resulted in minimal heat transfer to the material, thus avoiding and surface deformation of the titanium plate and the formation of resolidified material in the ablated region, which are drawbacks present in the use of the long pulsed keyed laser of the order of nanoseconds. Three types of micro-machining were performed, with variations in the distances between the machined lines. It was also verified that the wettability increases when there is an increase in the distance between machined lines. Finally, in order to change the surface with minimal removal of material, it has been found that the use of ultra-short pulse lasers provide great benefits for the integrity of the ablated material. This initial study is the starting point for the study of other metals, such as Maraging Steels and Zircaloy that will be the target of future work. (author)

  8. Study of ablation on surfaces of nuclear-use metals irradiated with Femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Alessandro F.; Samad, Ricardo E.; Vieira Junior, Nilson D.; Rossi, Wagner de, E-mail: alessandro.nogueira@usp.br, E-mail: resamad@ipen.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Engenharia de Sorocaba (FACENS), Ipero, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The use of ultrashort pulsed lasers is an alternative for micro-machining in metal surfaces, with diverse applications in several industrial areas, such as aeronautics, aerospace, naval, nuclear, among others, where there is a growing concern with reliability in service. In this work, micro-machining were performed on titanium surfaces using femtosecond ultrashort pulses. Such a process resulted in minimal heat transfer to the material, thus avoiding and surface deformation of the titanium plate and the formation of resolidified material in the ablated region, which are drawbacks present in the use of the long pulsed keyed laser of the order of nanoseconds. Three types of micro-machining were performed, with variations in the distances between the machined lines. It was also verified that the wettability increases when there is an increase in the distance between machined lines. Finally, in order to change the surface with minimal removal of material, it has been found that the use of ultra-short pulse lasers provide great benefits for the integrity of the ablated material. This initial study is the starting point for the study of other metals, such as Maraging Steels and Zircaloy that will be the target of future work. (author)

  9. The effect of defocusing on spot diameter when ablate the silicon surface by femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xinkai; Li, Wei; Wu, Tengfei; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2018-02-01

    Femtosecond laser has been demonstrated to be a prominent tool to manufacture micro scale structure. In the processing, the focusing lens is usually used as the concentrated tool to assemble the original beam to the tiny spot to provide enough energy for ablation. What is more, different focal length means the diverse scale of the focused spot. In common use, various sizes of the spot are required to adjust to the multifarious profiles and substituting the focus lens is the general method. There is no doubt that changing the lens is a fussy job and frequent replacing the lens may cause the lack of stability. In this paper, we report the defocus of the lens to modify the scale of the spot and it is proved to be an effective way to vary the diameter of the focused spot without changing the focus lens.

  10. Resonant ablation of single-wall carbon nanotubes by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, N R; Komlenok, M S; Kononenko, V V; Pashinin, V P; Pozharov, A S; Konov, V I; Obraztsova, E D

    2015-01-01

    The thin 50 nm film of bundled arc-discharge single-wall carbon nanotubes was irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses with wavelengths 675, 1350 and 1745 nm corresponding to the absorption band of metallic nanotubes E 11 M , to the background absorption and to the absorption band of semiconducting nanotubes E 11 S , respectively. The aim was to induce a selective removal of nanotubes of specific type from the bundled material. Similar to conducted thermal heating experiments, the effect of laser irradiation results in suppression of all radial breathing modes in the Raman spectra, with preferential destruction of the metallic nanotubes with diameters less than 1.26 nm and of the semiconducting nanotubes with diameters 1.36 nm. However, the etching rate of different nanotubes depends on the wavelength of the laser irradiation. It is demonstrated that the relative content of nanotubes of different chiralities can be tuned by a resonant laser ablation of undesired nanotube fraction. The preferential etching of the resonant nanotubes has been shown for laser wavelengths 675 nm (E 11 M ) and 1745 nm (E 11 S ). (paper)

  11. High-Performance solar-blind flexible Deep-UV photodetectors based on quantum dots synthesized by femtosecond-laser ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Somak; Aravindh, Assa; Das, Gobind; Pak, Yusin; Ajia, Idris A.; Loganathan, Kalaivanan; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Roqan, Iman S.

    2018-01-01

    -performance flexible DUV photodetectors operating at ambient conditions based on quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by femtosecond-laser ablation in liquid (FLAL) technique. Our method is facile without complex chemical procedures, which allows large-scale cost

  12. Time-resolved investigations of the non-thermal ablation process of graphite induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalupka, C., E-mail: christian.kalupka@llt.rwth-aachen.de; Finger, J. [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074 (Germany); Reininghaus, M. [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, Steinbachstraße 15, Aachen 52074 (Germany)

    2016-04-21

    We report on the in-situ analysis of the ablation dynamics of the, so-called, laser induced non-thermal ablation process of graphite. A highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is excited by femtosecond laser pulses with fluences below the classic thermal ablation threshold. The ablation dynamics are investigated by axial pump-probe reflection measurements, transversal pump-probe shadowgraphy, and time-resolved transversal emission photography. The combination of the applied analysis methods allows for a continuous and detailed time-resolved observation of the non-thermal ablation dynamics from several picoseconds up to 180 ns. Formation of large, μm-sized particles takes place within the first 3.5 ns after irradiation. The following propagation of ablation products and the shock wave front are tracked by transversal shadowgraphy up to 16 ns. The comparison of ablation dynamics of different fluences by emission photography reveals thermal ablation products even for non-thermal fluences.

  13. Origin of blue photoluminescence from colloidal silicon nanocrystals fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, H L; Wu, W S; Zhang, Y; Wu, L K; Shen, W Z

    2016-08-12

    We present a detailed investigation into the origin of blue emission from colloidal silicon (Si) nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation of Si powder in 1-hexene. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations confirm that Si NCs with average size 2.7 nm are produced and well dispersed in 1-hexene. Fourier transform infrared spectrum and x-ray photoelectron spectra have been employed to reveal the passivation of Si NCs surfaces with organic molecules. On the basis of the structural characterization, UV-visible absorption, temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and PL excitation spectra investigations, we deduce that room-temperature blue luminescence from colloidal Si NCs originates from the following two processes: (i) under illumination, excitons first form within colloidal Si NCs by direct transition at the X or Γ (Γ25 → Γ'2) point; (ii) and then some trapped excitons migrate to the surfaces of colloidal Si NCs and further recombine via the surface states associated with the Si-C or Si-C-H2 bonds.

  14. Comparison of femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Judge, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dirmyer, Matthew R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Campbell, Keri [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzalez, Jhanis J. [Applied Spectra Inc., Fremont, CA (United States)

    2016-10-20

    Feasibility tests were conducted using femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid uranium isotopic measurements. The samples used in this study consisted of a range of pg quantities of known 235/238 U solutions as dried spot residues of 300 pL drops on silicon substrates. The samples spanned the following enrichments of 235U: 0.5, 1.5, 2, 3, and 15.1%. In this direct comparison using these particular samples both pulse durations demonstrated near equivalent data can be produced on either system with respect to accuracy and precision. There is no question that either LA-ICP-MS method offers the potential for rapid, accurate and precise isotopic measurements of U10Mo materials whether DU, LEU or HEU. The LA-ICP-MS equipment used for this work is commercially available. The program is in the process of validating this work for large samples using center samples strips from Y-12 MP-1 LEU-Mo Casting #1.

  15. Comparison of femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havrilla, George Joseph; McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Judge, Elizabeth; Dirmyer, Matthew R.; Campbell, Keri; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.

    2016-01-01

    Feasibility tests were conducted using femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid uranium isotopic measurements. The samples used in this study consisted of a range of pg quantities of known 235/238 U solutions as dried spot residues of 300 pL drops on silicon substrates. The samples spanned the following enrichments of 235 U: 0.5, 1.5, 2, 3, and 15.1%. In this direct comparison using these particular samples both pulse durations demonstrated near equivalent data can be produced on either system with respect to accuracy and precision. There is no question that either LA-ICP-MS method offers the potential for rapid, accurate and precise isotopic measurements of U10Mo materials whether DU, LEU or HEU. The LA-ICP-MS equipment used for this work is commercially available. The program is in the process of validating this work for large samples using center samples strips from Y-12 MP-1 LEU-Mo Casting #1.

  16. Band gap tuning of ZnO nanoparticles via Mg doping by femtosecond laser ablation in liquid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelnokov, E.; Rivoal, M.; Colignon, Y.; Gachet, D.; Bekere, L.; Thibaudau, F.; Giorgio, S.; Khodorkovsky, V.; Marine, W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Femtosecond laser ablation synthesis of Mg doped ZnO nanoparticles. ► Electronic properties of ZnO are modified by Mg. ► Band gap and exciton energy shifts to the blue. ► The exciton energy shift is saturated at Mg content of about 20%. ► Phase separation at Mg content is at more than 25%. ► Mechanism of exciton pinning – recombination via new surface states. - Abstract: We use multiphoton IR femtosecond laser ablation to induce non-thermal non-equilibrium conditions of the nanoparticle growth in liquids. Modifications of the electronic properties of ZnO NP were achieved by Mg ion doping of targets prepared from mixtures of Zn and Mg acetylacetonates. The nanoparticle sizes were 3–20 nm depending on the ablation conditions. X-ray fluorescence indicates that stoichiometric ablation and incorporation of Mg in nanocrystalline ZnO occurs. HRTEM observations show that nanoparticles retain their wurtzite structure, while at high Mg concentrations we detect the MgO rich domains. Exciton emissions exhibit relatively narrow bands with progressive and controlled blue shifts up to 184 meV. The exciton energy correlates to band edge absorption indicating strong modification of the NP band gaps. Stabilisation of the exciton blue shift is observed at high Mg concentration. It is accompanied by the formation of structure defects and ZnO/MgO phase separation within the nanoparticles.

  17. Ultra-pure, water-dispersed Au nanoparticles produced by femtosecond laser ablation and fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubiliūtė R

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reda Kubiliūtė,1,2 Ksenia A Maximova,3 Alireza Lajevardipour,1 Jiawey Yong,1 Jennifer S Hartley,1 Abu SM Mohsin,1 Pierre Blandin,3 James WM Chon,1 Marc Sentis,3 Paul R Stoddart,1 Andrei Kabashin,3 Ričardas Rotomskis,2 Andrew HA Clayton,1,4 Saulius Juodkazis1,4 1Centre for Micro-Photonics and Industrial Research Institute Swinburne, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia; 2Laboratory of Biomedical Physics, Vilnius University Institute of Oncology, Baublio, Vilnius, Lithuania; 3Aix-Marseille University, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, Lasers, Plasmas and Photonics Processing Laboratory, Campus de Luminy, Marseille, France; 4The Australian National Fabrication Facility, Victoria node, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia Abstract: Aqueous solutions of ultra-pure gold nanoparticles have been prepared by methods of femtosecond laser ablation from a solid target and fragmentation from already formed colloids. Despite the absence of protecting ligands, the solutions could be (1 fairly stable and poly size-dispersed; or (2 very stable and monodispersed, for the two fabrication modalities, respectively. Fluorescence quenching behavior and its intricacies were revealed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in rhodamine 6G water solution. We show that surface-enhanced Raman scattering of rhodamine 6G on gold nanoparticles can be detected with high fidelity down to micromolar concentrations using the nanoparticles. Application potential of pure gold nanoparticles with polydispersed and nearly monodispersed size distributions are discussed. Keywords: nanotechnologies applications, methods of nanofabrication and processing, materials for nanomedicine

  18. Femtosecond Laser Ablation Reveals Antagonistic Sensory and Neuroendocrine Signaling that Underlie C. elegans Behavior and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel H. Chung

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The specific roles of neuronal subcellular components in behavior and development remain largely unknown, even though advances in molecular biology and conventional whole-cell laser ablation have greatly accelerated the identification of contributors at the molecular and cellular levels. We systematically applied femtosecond laser ablation, which has submicrometer resolution in vivo, to dissect the cell bodies, dendrites, or axons of a sensory neuron (ASJ in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine their roles in modulating locomotion and the developmental decisions for dauer, a facultative, stress-resistant life stage. Our results indicate that the cell body sends out axonally mediated and hormonal signals in order to mediate these functions. Furthermore, our results suggest that antagonistic sensory dendritic signals primarily drive and switch polarity between the decisions to enter and exit dauer. Thus, the improved resolution of femtosecond laser ablation reveals a rich complexity of neuronal signaling at the subcellular level, including multiple neurite and hormonally mediated pathways dependent on life stage.

  19. Iron isotope composition of particles produced by UV-femtosecond laser ablation of natural oxides, sulfides, and carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Abzac, Francois-Xavier; Beard, Brian L; Czaja, Andrew D; Konishi, Hiromi; Schauer, James J; Johnson, Clark M

    2013-12-17

    The need for femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) systems coupled to MC-ICP-MS to accurately perform in situ stable isotope analyses remains an open question, because of the lack of knowledge concerning ablation-related isotopic fractionation in this regime. We report the first iron isotope analysis of size-resolved, laser-induced particles of natural magnetite, siderite, pyrrhotite, and pyrite, collected through cascade impaction, followed by analysis by solution nebulization MC-ICP-MS, as well as imaging using electron microscopy. Iron mass distributions are independent of mineralogy, and particle morphology includes both spheres and agglomerates for all ablated phases. X-ray spectroscopy shows elemental fractionation in siderite (C-rich agglomerates) and pyrrhotite/pyrite (S-rich spheres). We find an increase in (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratios of +2‰, +1.2‰, and +0.8‰ with increasing particle size for magnetite, siderite, and pyrrhotite, respectively. Fe isotope differences in size-sorted aerosols from pyrite ablation are not analytically resolvable. Experimental data are discussed using models of particles generation by Hergenröder and elemental/isotopic fractionation by Richter. We interpret the isotopic fractionation to be related to the iron condensation time scale, dependent on its saturation in the gas phase, as a function of mineral composition. Despite the isotopic variations across aerosol size fractions, total aerosol composition, as calculated from mass balance, confirms that fs-LA produces a stoichiometric sampling in terms of isotopic composition. Specifically, both elemental and isotopic fractionation are produced by particle generation processes and not by femtosecond laser-matter interactions. These results provide critical insights into the analytical requirements for laser-ablation-based stable isotope measurements of high-precision and accuracy in geological samples, including the importance of quantitative aerosol transport to the ICP.

  20. Single- and multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of optical filter materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, J.; Lenzner, M.; Martin, S.; Lenner, M.; Spielmann, C.; Fiedler, A.; Kautek, W.

    2003-01-01

    Ablation experiments employing Ti:sapphire laser pulses with durations from 30 to 340 fs (centre wavelength 800 nm, repetition rate 1 kHz) were performed in air. Absorbing filters (Schott BG18 and BG36) served as targets. The direct focusing technique was used under single- and multi-pulse irradiation conditions. Ablation threshold fluences were determined from a semi-logarithmic plot of the ablation crater diameter versus laser fluence. The threshold fluence decreases for a shorter pulse duration and an increasing number of pulses. The multi-pulse ablation threshold fluences are similar to those of undoped glass material (∼1 J cm -2 ). That means that the multi-pulse ablation threshold is independent on the doping level of the filters. For more than 100 pulses per spot and all pulse durations applied, the threshold fluence is practically constant. This leads to technically relevant ablation threshold values

  1. Imaging the ultrafast Kerr effect, free carrier generation, relaxation and ablation dynamics of Lithium Niobate irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario, E-mail: mario@io.cfmac.csic.es; Siegel, Jan, E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-21

    The interaction of high-power single 130 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with the surface of Lithium Niobate is experimentally investigated in this work. The use of fs-resolution time-resolved microscopy allows us to separately observe the instantaneous optical Kerr effect induced by the pulse and the generation of a free electron plasma. The maximum electron density is reached 550 fs after the peak of the Kerr effect, confirming the presence of a delayed carrier generation mechanism. We have also observed the appearance of transient Newton rings during the ablation process, related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front and back surface of the ablating layer. Finally, we have analyzed the dynamics of the photorefractive effect on a much longer time scale by measuring the evolution of the transmittance of the irradiated area for different fluences below the ablation threshold.

  2. Imaging the ultrafast Kerr effect, free carrier generation, relaxation and ablation dynamics of Lithium Niobate irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Siegel, Jan; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of high-power single 130 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with the surface of Lithium Niobate is experimentally investigated in this work. The use of fs-resolution time-resolved microscopy allows us to separately observe the instantaneous optical Kerr effect induced by the pulse and the generation of a free electron plasma. The maximum electron density is reached 550 fs after the peak of the Kerr effect, confirming the presence of a delayed carrier generation mechanism. We have also observed the appearance of transient Newton rings during the ablation process, related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front and back surface of the ablating layer. Finally, we have analyzed the dynamics of the photorefractive effect on a much longer time scale by measuring the evolution of the transmittance of the irradiated area for different fluences below the ablation threshold.

  3. Observation of self-assembled periodic nano-structures induced by femtosecond laser in both ablation and deposition regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingzhen; Zhang, Haitao; Her, Tsing-Hua

    2008-02-01

    We observed the spontaneous formation of periodic nano-structures in both femtosecond laser ablation and deposition. The former involved 400-nm femtosecond pulses from a 250-KHz regenerated amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser and periodic nanocracks and the nano-structure are in the form of periodic nanocracks in the substrate, the latter applied an 80-MHz mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator with pulse energy less than half nanojoule in a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition configuration and tungsten nanogratings grow heterogeneously on top of the substrates. These two observed periodic nanostructures have opposite orientations respecting to laser polarization: the periodic nanocracks are perpendicular to, whereas the deposited tungsten nanogratings are parallel to laser polarization direction. By translating the substrate respecting to the laser focus, both the periodic nanocrack and tungsten nanograting extend to the whole scanning range. The deposited tungsten nanogratings possess excellent uniformity on both the grating period and tooth length. Both the attributes can be tuned precisely by controlling the laser power and scanning speed. Furthermore, we discovered that the teeth of transverse tungsten nanogratings are self aligned along their axial direction during multiple scanning with appropriate offset between scans. We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating large-area one-dimensional grating by exploiting such unique property. These distinct phenomena of nanocracks and tungsten nanogratings indicate different responsible mechanisms.

  4. Sequencing of Isotope-Labeled Small RNA Using Femtosecond Laser Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Ando, Yoshinari; Kobayashi, Tohru; Matsuo, Yukari; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-01

    A novel method for the analysis of sequences of small RNAs using nucleotide triphosphates labeled with stable isotopes has been developed using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy combined with femtosecond laser ablation (fsLA-TOF-MS). Small RNAs synthesized with nucleotides enriched in 13C and 15N were efficiently atomized and ionized by single-shot fsLA and the isotope ratios 13C/12C and 15N/14N were evaluated using the TOF-MS method. By comparing the isotope ratios among four different configurations, the number of nucleotide contents of the control RNA sample were successfully reproduced.

  5. Investigation of the particle size distribution of the ejected material generated during the single femtosecond laser pulse ablation of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Han; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Single 50 fs laser pulse ablation of an aluminium target in vacuum is investigated in our experiments. • Nanoparticles with large radii of several hundred nanometers are observed. • The nanoparticles are most likely from the mechanical tensile stress relaxation. - Abstract: Single femtosecond laser pulses are employed to ablate an aluminium target in vacuum, and the particle size distribution of the ablated material deposited on a mica substrate is examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The recorded AFM images show that these particles have a mean radius of several tens of nanometres. It is also determined that the mean radius of these deposited nanoparticles increases when the laser fluence at the aluminium target increases from 0.44 J/cm 2 to 0.63 J/cm 2 . The mechanism of the laser-induced nanoparticle generation is thought to be photomechanical tensile stress relaxation. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm that the nanoparticles thus produced have the same structure as the bulk aluminium

  6. Non-thermal effects on femtosecond laser ablation of polymers extracted from the oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumada, Takayuki, E-mail: kumada.takayuki@jaea.go.jp; Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Nishikino, Masaharu; Yokoyama, Atsushi [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation of transparent polymers were examined using time-resolved reflectivity. When these polymers were irradiated by a pump pulse with fluence above the ablation threshold of 0.8–2.0 J/cm{sup 2}, we observed the oscillation of the reflectivity caused by the interference between the reflected probe pulses from the sample surface and the thin layer due to the non-thermal photomechanical effects of spallation. As the fluence of the pump pulse increased, the separation velocity of the thin layer increased from 6 km/s to the asymptotic value of 11 km/s. It is suggested that the velocities are determined by shock-wave velocities of the photo-excited layer.

  7. Spot size and pulse number dependence of femtosecond laser ablation thresholds of silicon and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, Oskar; Naghilou, Aida [University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, Währinger Straße 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kitzler, Markus [TU Wien, Photonics Institute, Gusshausstraße 27-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Kautek, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Department of Physical Chemistry, Währinger Straße 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Influence of laser spot size and pulse number on the ablation of solids. • An extended defect model describes the dependence of the threshold fluence on the basis of high and low density defects. • Successfully applied to silicon and stainless steel. - Abstract: Laser spot size and pulse number are two major parameters influencing the ablation of solids. The extended defect model describes the dependence of the threshold fluence on the basis of high and low density defects. This model was successfully applied to silicon and stainless steel. It is demonstrated that heat accumulation cannot describe the experimental results.

  8. Ag nanoparticles formed by femtosecond pulse laser ablation in water: self-assembled fractal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santillán, Jesica M. J. [CONICET La Plata-CIC, Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp) (Argentina); Fernández van Raap, Marcela B., E-mail: raap@fisica.unlp.edu.ar; Mendoza Zélis, Pedro; Coral, Diego [CONICET, Instituto de Física La Plata (IFLP) (Argentina); Muraca, Diego [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin” (IFGW) (Brazil); Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B., E-mail: lucias@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [CONICET La Plata-CIC, Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp) (Argentina)

    2015-02-15

    We report for the first time on the formation of self-assembled fractals of spherical Ag nanoparticles (Nps) fabricated by femtosecond pulse laser ablation of a solid silver target in water. Fractal structures grew both in two and three Euclidean dimensions (d). Ramified-fractal assemblies of 2 nm height and 5–14 μm large, decorated with Ag Nps of 3 nm size, were obtained in a 2d geometry when highly diluted drops of colloidal suspension were dried at a fast heating rate over a mica substrate. When less-diluted drops were dried at slow heating rate, isolated single Nps or rosette-like structures were formed. Fractal aggregates about 31 nm size in 3d geometry were observed in the as-prepared colloidal suspension. Electron diffraction and optical extinction spectroscopy (OES) analyses performed on the samples confirmed the presence of Ag and Ag{sub 2}O. The analysis of the optical extinction spectrum, using the electrostatic approximation of Mie theory for small spheres, showed the existence of Ag bare core, Ag–Ag{sub 2}O and air–Ag core–shell Nps, Ag–Ag{sub 2}O being the most frequent type [69 % relative abundance (r.a.)]. Core-size and shell-thickness distribution was derived from OES. In situ scattering measurements of the Ag colloidal suspension, carried out by small-angle X-ray scattering, indicate a mass fractal composed of packaged 〈D{sub SAXS}〉 = (5 ± 1) nm particles and fractal dimension d{sub f} = 2.5. Ex situ atomic force microscopy imaging displayed well-ramified structures, which, analyzed with box-counting method, yield a fractal dimension d{sub f} = 1.67. The growing behavior of these 2d and 3d self-assembled fractals is consistent with the diffusion-limited aggregation model.

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of silver foil with single and double pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, DE

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The average ablation depth per pulse of silver foil by 130 fs laser pulses has been measured in vacuum over a range of three orders of magnitude of pulse fluence up to 900 J cm-2. In addition, double pulses with separations up to 3.4 ns have been...

  10. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials: experiments and modeling of optical properties and ablation depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Frislev, Martin Thomas; Balling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of the interaction between a dielec- tric material and ultrashort laser pulses provides the tem- poral evolution of the electronic excitation and the optical properties of the dielectric. Experimentally determined re- flectances and ablation depths for sapphire are compared...... to the calculations. A decrease in reflectance at high fluences is observed experimentally, which demonstrates the neces- sity of a temperature-dependent electron scattering rate in the model. The comparison thus provides new constraints on the optical parameters of the model....

  11. Photo-Machining of Semiconductor Related Materials with Femtosecond Laser Ablation and Characterization of Its Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokotani, Atushi; Mizuno, Toshio; Mukumoto, Toru; Kawahara, Kousuke; Ninomiya, Takahumi; Sawada, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kou

    We have analyzed the drilling process with femtosecond laser on the silicon surface in order to investigate a degree of thermal effect during the dicing process of the very thin silicon substrate. A regenerative amplified Ti:Al2O3 laser (E= 30˜500 μJ/pulse, τ= 200 fs, λ= 780 nm, f= 10 Hz) was used and focused onto a 50 μm-thick silicon sample. ICCD (Intensified Charge coupled Device) camera with a high-speed gate of 5 ns was utilized to take images of processing hole. First, we investigated the dependence of laser energy on the speed of the formation of the drilled hole. As a result, it was found that the lager the energy, the slower the speed of the formation under the minimum hole was obtained. Consequently, in the case of defocused condition, even when the smaller the energy density was used, the very slow speed of formation and the much lager thermal effects are simultaneously observed. So we can say that the degree of the thermal effects is not simply related to energy density of the laser but strongly related to the speed of the formation, which can be measured by the ICCD camera. The similar tendency was also obtained for other materials, which are important for the fabrication of ICs (Al, Cu, SiO2 and acrylic resin).

  12. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Thickness...

  13. Synthesis of three-dimensional calcium carbonate nanofibrous structure from eggshell using femtosecond laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatakrishnan Krishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural biomaterials from bone-like minerals derived from avian eggshells have been considered as promising bone substitutes owing to their biodegradability, abundance, and lower price in comparison with synthetic biomaterials. However, cell adhesion to bulk biomaterials is poor and surface modifications are required to improve biomaterial-cell interaction. Three-dimensional (3D nanostructures are preferred to act as growth support platforms for bone and stem cells. Although there have been several studies on generating nanoparticles from eggshells, no research has been reported on synthesizing 3D nanofibrous structures. Results In this study, we propose a novel technique to synthesize 3D calcium carbonate interwoven nanofibrous platforms from eggshells using high repetition femtosecond laser irradiation. The eggshell waste is value engineered to calcium carbonate nanofibrous layer in a single step under ambient conditions. Our striking results demonstrate that by controlling the laser pulse repetition, nanostructures with different nanofiber density can be achieved. This approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3D interwoven nanofibrous platforms from natural biomaterials. Conclusion The synthesized 3D nanofibrous structures can promote biomaterial interfacial properties to improve cell-platform surface interaction and develop new functional biomaterials for a variety of biomedical applications.

  14. Femtosecond laser-induced herringbone patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcell, Erik M.; Lam, Billy; Guo, Chunlei

    2018-06-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced herringbone patterns are formed on copper (Cu). These novel periodic structures are created following s-polarized, large incident angle, femtosecond laser pulses. Forming as slanted and axially symmetric laser-induced periodic surface structures along the side walls of ablated channels, the result is a series of v-shaped structures that resemble a herringbone pattern. Fluence mapping, incident angle studies, as well as polarization studies have been conducted and provide a clear understanding of this new structure.

  15. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Katherine J.

    This thesis focuses on research I have done on ytterbium-doped femtosecond fiber lasers. These lasers operate in the near infrared region, lasing at 1030 nm. This wavelength is particularly important in biomedical applications, which includes but is not limited to confocal microscopy and ablation for surgical incisions. Furthermore, fiber lasers are advantageous compared to solid state lasers in terms of their cost, form factor, and ease of use. Solid state lasers still dominate the market due to their comparatively high energy pulses. High energy pulse generation in fiber lasers is hindered by either optical wave breaking or by multipulsing. One of the main challenges for fiber lasers is to overcome these limitations to achieve high energy pulses. The motivation for the work done in this thesis is increasing the output pulse peak power and energy. The main idea of the work is that decreasing the nonlinearity that acts on the pulse inside the cavity will prevent optical wave breaking, and thus will generate higher energy pulses. By increasing the output energy, ytterbium-doped femtosecond fiber lasers can be competitive with solid state lasers which are used commonly in research. Although fiber lasers tend to lack the wavelength tuning ability of solid state lasers, many biomedical applications take advantage of the 1030 microm central wavelength of ytterbium-doped fiber lasers, so the major limiting factor of fiber lasers in this field is simply the output power. By increasing the output energy without resorting to external amplification, the cavity is optimized and cost can remain low and economical. During verification of the main idea, the cavity was examined for possible back-reflections and for components with narrow spectral bandwidths which may have contributed to the presence of multipulsing. Distinct cases of multipulsing, bound pulse and harmonic mode-locking, were observed and recorded as they may be of more interest in the future. The third

  16. Amorphization of silicon by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Jimmy; Li Ming; Thompson, Carl V.

    2004-01-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to drill submicron holes in single crystal silicon films in silicon-on-insulator structures. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of material adjacent to the ablated holes indicates the formation of a layer of amorphous Si. This demonstrates that even when material is ablated using femtosecond pulses near the single pulse ablation threshold, sufficient heating of the surrounding material occurs to create a molten zone which solidifies so rapidly that crystallization is bypassed

  17. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, See Leang

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond Laser Filamentation gives a comprehensive review of the physics of propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in optical media (principally air) and the applications and challenges of this new technique. This book presents the modern understanding of the physics of femtosecond laser pulse propagation, including unusual new effects such as the self-transformation of the pulse into a white light laser pulse, intensity clamping, the physics of multiple filamentation and competition, and how filaments’ ability to melt glass leads to wave guide writing. The potential applications of laser filamentation in atmospheric sensing and the generation of other electromagnetic pulses from the UV to the radio frequency are treated, together with possible future challenges in the excitation of super-excited states of molecules. Exciting new phenomena such as filament induced ultrafast birefringence and the excitation of molecular rotational wave packets and their multiple revivals in air (gases) will also ...

  18. The influence of thin film grain size on the size of nanoparticles generated during UV femtosecond laser ablation of thin gold films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haustrup, N., E-mail: natalie.haustrup@nuigalway.ie [National Centre for Laser Applications, School of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); O’Connor, G.M. [National Centre for Laser Applications, School of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2013-08-01

    The upsurge in the number of thin film products has encouraged studies into every aspect of their fabrication and application. An additional source of industrial interest is the laser ablation of thin films to generate nanoparticles. This technique offers advantages over other fabrication methods, as no chemical pre-cursers are required, thereby giving rise to a pure product. The main disadvantage lies in the difficulty with controlling the size of the nanoparticles. This study aims to clarify the influence of the microstructure of a thin film on its optical properties and also to establish the size relationship between the film grain and the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation. A comprehensive sample set of Gold (Au) films with different grain sizes was achieved using different deposition rates, temperatures, film thicknesses (<100 nm) and substrates: Silica, Quartz and Sapphire. The microstructure of each film was analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Single femtosecond laser pulses, above the ablation threshold fluence of each film, were applied to generate nanoparticles. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to image the re-deposited nanoparticles, from which the nanoparticle size distribution was established. Results confirm that the film microstructure is directly linked to the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation.

  19. The influence of thin film grain size on the size of nanoparticles generated during UV femtosecond laser ablation of thin gold films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustrup, N.; O’Connor, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    The upsurge in the number of thin film products has encouraged studies into every aspect of their fabrication and application. An additional source of industrial interest is the laser ablation of thin films to generate nanoparticles. This technique offers advantages over other fabrication methods, as no chemical pre-cursers are required, thereby giving rise to a pure product. The main disadvantage lies in the difficulty with controlling the size of the nanoparticles. This study aims to clarify the influence of the microstructure of a thin film on its optical properties and also to establish the size relationship between the film grain and the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation. A comprehensive sample set of Gold (Au) films with different grain sizes was achieved using different deposition rates, temperatures, film thicknesses (<100 nm) and substrates: Silica, Quartz and Sapphire. The microstructure of each film was analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Single femtosecond laser pulses, above the ablation threshold fluence of each film, were applied to generate nanoparticles. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to image the re-deposited nanoparticles, from which the nanoparticle size distribution was established. Results confirm that the film microstructure is directly linked to the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation.

  20. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  1. Experimental and computational study of the effect of 1 atm background gas on nanoparticle generation in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Han; Wu, Chengping; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, Xiaonong; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2018-03-01

    Laser ablation of metal targets is actively used for generation of chemically clean nanoparticles for a broad range of practical applications. The processes involved in the nanoparticle formation at all relevant spatial and temporal scales are still not fully understood, making the precise control of the size and shape of the nanoparticles challenging. In this paper, a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and experiments is applied to investigate femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum targets in vacuum and in 1 atm argon background gas. The results of the simulations reveal a strong effect of the background gas environment on the initial plume expansion and evolution of the nanoparticle size distribution. The suppression of the generation of small/medium-size Al clusters and formation of a dense layer at the front of the expanding ablation plume, observed during the first nanosecond of the plume expansion in a simulation performed in the gas environment, have important implications on the characteristics of the nanoparticles deposited on a substrate and characterized in the experiments. The nanoparticles deposited in the gas environment are found to be more round-shaped and less flattened as compared to those deposited in vacuum. The nanoparticle size distributions exhibit power-law dependences with similar values of exponents obtained from fitting experimental and simulated data. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the gas environment may be effectively used to control size and shape of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation.

  2. Laser ablative fabrication of nanocrowns and nanojets on the Cu supported film surface using femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchmizhak, A.A., E-mail: ku4mijak@dvo.ru [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Pavlov, D.V. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Vitrik, O.B. [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Kulchin, Yu. N. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Formation dynamics of the laser-induced nanojets and nanocrowns on the Cu film surface was studied. • The key role of subsurface boiling on the metal film–substrate interface was revealed. • Five-fold plasmon enhancement of the Rh6G photoluminescence signal was demonstrated. • Plasmonic nature of enhancement was proved by measuring of the emission spectra of the Rh6G near the nanocrowns. - Abstract: Formation dynamics of the nanojets and nanocrowns induced on the surface of the Cu supported films of different thickness under the impact of tightly focused femtosecond pulses was studied in detail. We show that the single-shot fs-pulse irradiation of the 120-nm-thick Cu film results in formation of a single nanojet, which splits at increased pulse energy into two and then into a plurality of periodically arranged nanospikes eventually acquiring the form of the so-called nanocrown. The number of nanospike in the nanocrown was found to be linearly dependent on the pulse energy and nanocrown radius. The key role of subsurface boiling occurring on the metal film–substrate interface in the formation process of crown-like nanostructures was revealed by comparing the obtained results with the formation dynamics studied for thinner 60-nm and 20-nm-thick Cu films. In addition, the applicability of the fabricated nanostructures as low-cost substrate for photoluminescence signal enhancement of the organic dyes is also discussed in this paper.

  3. Construction of a femtosecond laser microsurgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmeyer, Joseph D; Gilleland, Cody L; Pardo-Martin, Carlos; Angel, Matthew; Rohde, Christopher B; Scott, Mark A; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2010-03-01

    Femtosecond laser microsurgery is a powerful method for studying cellular function, neural circuits, neuronal injury and neuronal regeneration because of its capability to selectively ablate sub-micron targets in vitro and in vivo with minimal damage to the surrounding tissue. Here, we present a step-by-step protocol for constructing a femtosecond laser microsurgery setup for use with a widely available compound fluorescence microscope. The protocol begins with the assembly and alignment of beam-conditioning optics at the output of a femtosecond laser. Then a dichroic mount is assembled and installed to direct the laser beam into the objective lens of a standard inverted microscope. Finally, the laser is focused on the image plane of the microscope to allow simultaneous surgery and fluorescence imaging. We illustrate the use of this setup by presenting axotomy in Caenorhabditis elegans as an example. This protocol can be completed in 2 d.

  4. Femtosecond laser ablation of silver foil with single and double pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, DE

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available . Tan, B.K.A. Ngoi, Opt. Laser Technol. 34 (2002) 199–202. [5] M. Hashida, A.F. Semerok, O. Gobert, G. Petite, Y. Izawa, J.F. Wagner, Appl. Surf. Sci. 197–198 (2002) 862–867. [6] P.T. Mannion, J. Magee, E. Coyne, G.M. O’Connor, Proc. SPIE 4876 (2003.... Nicolas, D. Anglos, Spectrochim. Acta B 63 (2008) 1006– 1010. [25] S. Singha, Z. Hu, R.J. Gordon, J. Appl. Phys. 104 (2008) 113520. [26] T.Y. Choi, D.J. Hwang, C.P. Girgoropoulos, Appl. Surf. Sci. (2002) 720–725. [27] A. Semerok, C. Dutouquet, Thin...

  5. Water spray assisted ultrashort laser pulse ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, M.; Kaakkunen, J.J.J.; Paivasaari, K.; Vahimaa, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We show the novel method to use multibeam processing with ultrashort pulses efficiently. ► Sprayed thin water layer on ablation zone enhances ablation rate and quality. ► In some cases this method also enables ablation of the deeper and straighter holes compared to ones made without the water layer. ► Method also makes possible to directly write features without the self-organizing structures. - Abstract: We have studied femtosecond ablation under sprayed thin water film and its influence and benefits compared with ablation in the air atmosphere. These have been studied in case of the hole and the groove ablation using IR femtosecond laser. Water enhances the ablation rate and in some situations it makes possible to ablate the holes with a higher aspect ratio. While ablating the grooves, the water spray allows using the high fluences without the generation of the self-organized structures.

  6. Effect of boron incorporation on the structure and electrical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, A. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Bourgeois, O. [Institut Neel, UPR 2940 CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Sanchez-Lopez, J.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Avda. Americo Vespucio, 49 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Rouzaud, J.-N. [Laboratoire de Geologie, UMR 8538 CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure, 45 Rue d' Ulm, 75230 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Rojas, T.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Avda. Americo Vespucio, 49 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Loir, A.-S. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garden, J.-L. [Institut Neel, UPR 2940 CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Donnet, C., E-mail: christophe.donnet@univ-st-etienne.f [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2009-12-31

    The influence of the incorporation of boron in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the microstructure of the coatings has been investigated. The boron-containing DLC films (a-C:B) have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature in high vacuum conditions, by ablating graphite and boron targets either with a femtosecond pulsed laser (800 nm, 150 fs, fs-DLC) or with a nanosecond pulsed laser (248 nm, 20 ns, ns-DLC). Alternative ablation of the graphite and boron targets has been carried out to deposit the a-C:B films. The film structure and composition have been highlighted by coupling Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Using the B K-edge, EELS characterization reveals the boron effect on the carbon bonding. Moreover, the plasmon energy reveals a tendency of graphitization associated to the boron doping. Pure boron particles have been characterized by HRTEM and reveal that those particles are amorphous or crystallized. The nanostructures of the boron-doped ns-DLC and the boron-doped fs-DLC are thus compared. In particular, the incorporation of boron in the DLC matrix is highlighted, depending on the laser used for deposition. Electrical measurements show that some of these films have potentialities to be used in low temperature thermometry, considering their conductivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) estimated within the temperature range 160-300 K.

  7. Tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Svane, Ask Sebastian; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate electrically-tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser output at the visible range. Using an all-fiber, self-starting femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser as the pump source and nonlinear photonic crystal fiber link as the wave-conversion medium, ultrafast, milliwatt-level, tunable...... and spectral isolated Cherenkov radiation at visible wavelengths are reported. Such a femtosecond Cherenkov laser source is promising for practical biophotonics applications....

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: a green route for large-scale production of porous graphene and graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Paola; Hu, Anming; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Duley, Walter W.; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2014-01-01

    Porous graphene (PG) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are attracting attention due to their potential applications in photovoltaics, catalysis, and bio-related fields. We present a novel way for mass production of these promising materials. The femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is employed for their synthesis. Porous graphene (PG) layers were found to float at the water-air interface, while graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were dispersed in the solution. The sheets consist of one to six stacked layers of spongy graphene, which form an irregular 3D porous structure that displays pores with an average size of 15-20 nm. Several characterization techniques have confirmed the porous nature of the collected layers. The analyses of the aqueous solution confirmed the presence of GQDs with dimensions of about 2-5 nm. It is found that the formation of both PG and GQDs depends on the fs-laser ablation energy. At laser fluences less than 12 J cm-2, no evidence of either PG or GQDs is detected. However, polyynes with six and eight carbon atoms per chain are found in the solution. For laser energies in the 20-30 J cm-2 range, these polyynes disappeared, while PG and GQDs were found at the water-air interface and in the solution, respectively. The origin of these materials can be explained based on the mechanisms for water breakdown and coal gasification. The absence of PG and GQDs, after the laser ablation of HOPG in liquid nitrogen, confirms the proposed mechanisms.Porous graphene (PG) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are attracting attention due to their potential applications in photovoltaics, catalysis, and bio-related fields. We present a novel way for mass production of these promising materials. The femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is employed for their synthesis. Porous graphene (PG) layers were found to float at the water-air interface, while graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were dispersed in the

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: a green route for large-scale production of porous graphene and graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Paola; Hu, Anming; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Duley, Walter W; Zhou, Norman Y

    2014-02-21

    Porous graphene (PG) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are attracting attention due to their potential applications in photovoltaics, catalysis, and bio-related fields. We present a novel way for mass production of these promising materials. The femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is employed for their synthesis. Porous graphene (PG) layers were found to float at the water-air interface, while graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were dispersed in the solution. The sheets consist of one to six stacked layers of spongy graphene, which form an irregular 3D porous structure that displays pores with an average size of 15-20 nm. Several characterization techniques have confirmed the porous nature of the collected layers. The analyses of the aqueous solution confirmed the presence of GQDs with dimensions of about 2-5 nm. It is found that the formation of both PG and GQDs depends on the fs-laser ablation energy. At laser fluences less than 12 J cm(-2), no evidence of either PG or GQDs is detected. However, polyynes with six and eight carbon atoms per chain are found in the solution. For laser energies in the 20-30 J cm(-2) range, these polyynes disappeared, while PG and GQDs were found at the water-air interface and in the solution, respectively. The origin of these materials can be explained based on the mechanisms for water breakdown and coal gasification. The absence of PG and GQDs, after the laser ablation of HOPG in liquid nitrogen, confirms the proposed mechanisms.

  10. Application of femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of thin Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seokhee [School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Gonzalez, Jhanis J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Applied Spectra Inc., 46665 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Yoo, Jong H. [Applied Spectra Inc., 46665 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Chirinos, Jose R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas 1041A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Russo, Richard E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Applied Spectra Inc., 46665 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Jeong, Sungho, E-mail: shjeong@gist.ac.kr [School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-27

    This work reports that the composition of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin solar cell films can be quantitatively predicted with high accuracy and precision by femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (fs-LA-ICP-MS). It is demonstrated that the results are strongly influenced by sampling conditions during fs-laser beam (λ = 1030 nm, τ = 450 fs) scanning on the CIGS surface. The fs-LA-ICP-MS signals measured at optimal sampling conditions generally provide a straight line calibration with respect to the reference concentrations measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The concentration ratios predicted by fs-LA-ICP-MS showed high accuracy, to 95–97% of the values measured with ICP-OES, for Cu, In, Ga, and Se elements. - Highlights: • Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of thin film is reported. • Concentration ratio prediction with a confidence level of 95–97% is achieved. • Quantitative determination of composition is demonstrated.

  11. Femtosecond lasers for countermeasure applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, G.C.; Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Heuvel, J.C. van den; Buersing, H.; Eberle, B.; Walter, D.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, much advance in the field of high-power femtosecond laser technology has been made. The high pulse power of femtosecond laser systems leads to various interesting phenomena, such as a very high power density and the formation of a plasma in the propagation medium, which is usually

  12. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots for ratiometric pH sensing by femtosecond laser ablation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Huanhuan; Yan, Lihe; Nguyen, Vanthan; Yu, Yang; Xu, Yanmin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-containing carbon nanodots (CDs) are synthesize using pulsed laser ablation in liquid. • The CDs show a strong fluorescence consisting of a dual-band luminescence peak. • The as prepared CDs can offer a ratiometric sensing platform for the detection the pH values. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots (CDs) are synthesized by one-step femtosecond laser ablation of graphite powder in aminotoluene at room temperature. The as-prepared CDs have the average diameter of 2.87 nm and possess an excitation-independent emission covering nearly the whole visible light region at a single excitation wavelength. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicate that there are a huge number of multiple oxygen groups and amine groups on the surface of the CDs. As their different fluorescence peaks originated from different emission surface groups on the nanodots show different pH dependence, these CDs can be used for ratiometric pH sensing.

  13. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots for ratiometric pH sensing by femtosecond laser ablation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Huanhuan [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Lab. of Information Photonic Technique, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Yan, Lihe, E-mail: liheyan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Lab. of Information Photonic Technique, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Nguyen, Vanthan [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Lab. of Information Photonic Technique, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Le Quy Don Technical University, Hanoi 122314 (Viet Nam); Yu, Yang; Xu, Yanmin [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Lab. of Information Photonic Technique, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-containing carbon nanodots (CDs) are synthesize using pulsed laser ablation in liquid. • The CDs show a strong fluorescence consisting of a dual-band luminescence peak. • The as prepared CDs can offer a ratiometric sensing platform for the detection the pH values. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots (CDs) are synthesized by one-step femtosecond laser ablation of graphite powder in aminotoluene at room temperature. The as-prepared CDs have the average diameter of 2.87 nm and possess an excitation-independent emission covering nearly the whole visible light region at a single excitation wavelength. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicate that there are a huge number of multiple oxygen groups and amine groups on the surface of the CDs. As their different fluorescence peaks originated from different emission surface groups on the nanodots show different pH dependence, these CDs can be used for ratiometric pH sensing.

  14. Imaging femtosecond laser-induced electronic excitation in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    While substantial progress has been achieved in understanding laser ablation on the nanosecond and picosecond time scales, it remains a considerable challenge to elucidate the underlying mechanisms during femtosecond laser material interactions. We present experimental observations of electronic excitation inside a wide band gap glass during single femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs, 800 nm) irradiation. Using a femtosecond time-resolved imaging technique, we measured the evolution of a laser-induced electronic plasma inside the glass and calculated the electron number density to be on the order of 10 19 cm -3

  15. Numerical Simulation of Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Stent Material%飞秒激光烧蚀血管支架材料的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雷雷; 郑洋洋; 霍扬; 刘建英; 李春霞; 卢洋

    2017-01-01

    为了研究飞秒脉冲激光烧蚀血管支架材料的特性,利用考虑了电子之间热传导项的双温模型,采用有限差分法,对飞秒激光烧蚀NiTi合金的温度场分布进行数值模拟,计算得到了电子温度和晶格温度随时间和烧蚀深度的变化规律,进一步讨论了不同激光能量密度、不同激光脉宽、不同延迟时间对电子和晶格的温度场影响.发现血管支架材料在飞秒激光的作用下,先是电子吸收能量温度快速升高,再通过电声耦合作用将能量传递给晶格,最后两者的温度达到一个平衡状态;激光能量密度主要影响电子的峰值温度和电子与晶格的平衡温度;脉冲宽度主要影响电子的峰值温度和达到峰值温度所用的时间;电子温度随着延迟时间的增加先升高后降低,晶格温度随着延迟时间的增加不断上升.这些理论分析对实际飞秒激光加工血管支架有重要的指导意义.%In order to study the characteristics of femtosecond laser ablation of stent material,two-temperature model which considers the thermal conduction between the electronics,and finite difference method were used to simulate temperature field of NiTi alloys during femtosecond laser ablation.According to the results,the influences of laser energy density,pulse width and delay time on the temperature field of electron and lattice were discussed.The results showed that the temperature of electron and lattice finally reached a state of equilibrium.Before that,firstly,the temperature of electron increased rapidly due to energy absorption,then,the absorbed energy was transferred to lattice through electron phonon coupling effect;at last,the equilibrium would be reached.Laser energy density played a major role in the equilibrium temperature,and pulse width determined the peak temperature and the time to reach it.Consequently,the temperature of electrons first increased and then decreased with the increase of the delay time

  16. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  17. Development of routines for simultaneous in situ chemical composition and stable Si isotope ratio analysis by femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frick, Daniel A., E-mail: dfrick@gfz-potsdam.de [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Schuessler, Jan A. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Geological Science, Freie Universität Berlin, 12249 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-09-28

    Stable metal (e.g. Li, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and metalloid (B, Si, Ge) isotope ratio systems have emerged as geochemical tracers to fingerprint distinct physicochemical reactions. These systems are relevant to many Earth Science questions. The benefit of in situ microscale analysis using laser ablation (LA) over bulk sample analysis is to use the spatial context of different phases in the solid sample to disclose the processes that govern their chemical and isotopic compositions. However, there is a lack of in situ analytical routines to obtain a samples' stable isotope ratio together with its chemical composition. Here, we evaluate two novel analytical routines for the simultaneous determination of the chemical and Si stable isotope composition (δ{sup 30}Si) on the micrometre scale in geological samples. In both routines, multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) is combined with femtosecond-LA, where stable isotope ratios are corrected for mass bias using standard-sample-bracketing with matrix-independent calibration. The first method is based on laser ablation split stream (LASS), where the laser aerosol is split and introduced simultaneously into both the MC-ICP-MS and a quadrupole ICP-MS. The second method is based on optical emission spectroscopy using direct observation of the MC-ICP-MS plasma (LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES). Both methods are evaluated using international geological reference materials. Accurate and precise Si isotope ratios were obtained with an uncertainty typically better than 0.23‰, 2SD, δ{sup 30}Si. With both methods major element concentrations (e.g., Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca) can be simultaneously determined. However, LASS-ICP-MS is superior over LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES, which is limited by its lower sensitivity. Moreover, LASS-ICP-MS offers trace element analysis down to the μg g{sup −1}-range for more than 28 elements due to lower limits of detection, and with typical uncertainties better than 15%. For in situ

  18. Development of routines for simultaneous in situ chemical composition and stable Si isotope ratio analysis by femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, Daniel A.; Schuessler, Jan A.; Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von

    2016-01-01

    Stable metal (e.g. Li, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and metalloid (B, Si, Ge) isotope ratio systems have emerged as geochemical tracers to fingerprint distinct physicochemical reactions. These systems are relevant to many Earth Science questions. The benefit of in situ microscale analysis using laser ablation (LA) over bulk sample analysis is to use the spatial context of different phases in the solid sample to disclose the processes that govern their chemical and isotopic compositions. However, there is a lack of in situ analytical routines to obtain a samples' stable isotope ratio together with its chemical composition. Here, we evaluate two novel analytical routines for the simultaneous determination of the chemical and Si stable isotope composition (δ 30 Si) on the micrometre scale in geological samples. In both routines, multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) is combined with femtosecond-LA, where stable isotope ratios are corrected for mass bias using standard-sample-bracketing with matrix-independent calibration. The first method is based on laser ablation split stream (LASS), where the laser aerosol is split and introduced simultaneously into both the MC-ICP-MS and a quadrupole ICP-MS. The second method is based on optical emission spectroscopy using direct observation of the MC-ICP-MS plasma (LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES). Both methods are evaluated using international geological reference materials. Accurate and precise Si isotope ratios were obtained with an uncertainty typically better than 0.23‰, 2SD, δ 30 Si. With both methods major element concentrations (e.g., Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca) can be simultaneously determined. However, LASS-ICP-MS is superior over LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES, which is limited by its lower sensitivity. Moreover, LASS-ICP-MS offers trace element analysis down to the μg g −1 -range for more than 28 elements due to lower limits of detection, and with typical uncertainties better than 15%. For in situ

  19. Femtosecond UV laser non-ablative surface structuring of ZnO crystal: impact on exciton photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Museur, Luc [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers (LPL), UMR 7538 CNRS, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Michel, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire des Proprietes Mecaniques et Thermodynamiques des Materiaux (LPMTM), UMR 9001 CNRS, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Portes, Patrick; Kanaev, Andrei V. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions (LIMHP), UMR 1311 CNRS, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Englezis, Apostolis; Stassinopoulos, Andreas; Anglos, Demetrios [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH), 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2010-03-15

    The ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation (248 nm) of monocrystalline wurtzite ZnO with 450 fs pulses results in surface modification. A formation of two orthogonal ripple structures with a period of 400-500 nm was observed oriented parallel and perpendicular to the laser beam polarization. The UV exciton emission obtained on the irradiated domains is found greatly enhanced locally up to {approx}10{sup 3} times. The photoluminescence band is redshifted by 2-3 nm and 40% narrower (full width at half-maximum), while at the same time the E{sub 2} (439 cm{sup -1}) Raman band intensity increases up to {approx}50 times. The process is found irreversible with the threshold fluence of 11 mJ/cm{sup 2}, which is considerably lower than the ablation threshold 115 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Fine surface nanostructuring on the scale of {approx}10 nm may be responsible for the observed effect. (c) 2008 Optical Society of America.

  20. Cutting NiTi with Femtosecond Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Quintino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Superelastic shape memory alloys are difficult to machine by thermal processes due to the facility for Ti oxidation and by mechanical processes due to their superelastic behavior. In this study, femtosecond lasers were tested to analyze the potential for machining NiTi since femtosecond lasers allow nonthermal processing of materials by ablation. The effect of processing parameters on machining depth was studied, and material removal rates were computed. Surfaces produced were analyzed under SEM which shows a resolidified thin layer with minimal heat affected zones. However, for high cutting speeds, that is, for short interaction times, this layer was not observed. A depletion of Ni was seen which may be beneficial in biomedical applications since Ni is known to produce human tissue reactions in biophysical environments.

  1. High-precision cutting of polyimide film using femtosecond laser for the application in flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganin, D. V.; Lapshin, K. E.; Obidin, A. Z.; Vartapetov, S. K.

    2018-01-01

    The experimental results of cutting a polyimide film on the optical glass substrate by means of femtosecond lasers are given. Two modes of laser cutting of this film without damages to a glass base are determined. The first is the photo graphitization using a high repetition rate femtosecond laser. The second is ablative, under the effect of femtosecond laser pulses with high energy and low repetition rate. Cutting of semiconductor chips formed on the polyimide film surface is successfully demonstrated.

  2. High-Performance solar-blind flexible Deep-UV photodetectors based on quantum dots synthesized by femtosecond-laser ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Somak

    2018-03-31

    High-performance deep ultraviolet (DUV) photodetectors operating at ambient conditions with < 280nm detection wavelengths are in high demand because of their potential applications in diverse fields. We demonstrate for the first time, high-performance flexible DUV photodetectors operating at ambient conditions based on quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by femtosecond-laser ablation in liquid (FLAL) technique. Our method is facile without complex chemical procedures, which allows large-scale cost-effective devices. This synthesis method is demonstrated to produce highly stable and reproducible ZnO QDs from zinc nitride target (Zn3N2) without any material degradation due to water and oxygen molecule species, allowing photodetectors operate at ambient conditions. Carbon-doped ZnO QD-based photodetector is capable of detecting efficiently in the DUV spectral region, down to 224nm, and exhibits high photo responsivity and stability. As fast response of DUV photodetector remains significant parameter for high-speed communication; we show fast-response QD-based DUV photodetector. Such surfactant-free synthesis by FLAL can lead to commercially available high-performance low-cost optoelectronic devices based on nanostructures for large scale applications.

  3. Improvement of aluminum drilling efficiency and precision by shaped femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Ying; Qi, Hongxia; Chen, Anmin; Hu, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The ablation accuracy can be improved by the shaped femtosecond laser pulse. • The ablation rate can be improved by the shaped femtosecond laser pulse with higher laser fluence. • The results can be used to optimize femtosecond micromachining metal. - Abstract: Shaped femtosecond laser pulses with the plain phase (transform-limited pulse) and sine phase (A = 1.2566, T = 30, T = 10, and T = 5) were used to drill Al sheet in vacuum. Using different phase, the number of pulses required to drill through the sheet was different. With lower laser pulse energy, the ablation rate was the highest when plain phase (corresponding to transform limited pulse) was used. With higher laser energy, the optimized ablation rate can be achieved by increasing the time separation between the subpulses of pulse train produced from the sine phase function. And, with the shaped femtosecond laser, the diameter of ablation holes produced was smaller, the ablation precision was also improved. The results showed that shaped femtosecond laser pulse has great advantages in the context of femtosecond laser drilling

  4. Femtosecond laser's application in the corneal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Liang Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development over the past two decades,femtosecond(10-15slasers(FShas become a new application in ophthalmic surgery. As laser power is defined as energy delivered per unit time, decreasing the pulse duration to femtosecond level(100fsnot only increases the power delivered but also decreases the fluence threshold for laser induced optical breakdown. In ablating tissue, FS has an edge over nanosecond lasers as there is minimal collateral damage from shock waves and heat conduction during surgical ablation. Thus, application of FS has been widely spread, from flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis(LASIKsurgery, cutting of donor and recipient corneas in keratoplasty, creation of pockets for intracorneal ring implantation. FS applied in keratoplasty is mainly used in making graft and recipient bed, and can exactly cut different tissue of keratopathy. FS can also cut partial tissue of cornea, even if it is under the moderate corneal macula and corneal edema condition.

  5. Drilling of Copper Using a Dual-Pulse Femtosecond Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Wei Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The drilling of copper using a dual-pulse femtosecond laser with wavelength of 800 nm, pulse duration of 120 fs and a variable pulse separation time (0.1–150 ps is investigated theoretically. A one-dimensional two-temperature model with temperature-dependent material properties is considered, including dynamic optical properties and the thermal-physical properties. Rapid phase change and phase explosion models are incorporated to simulate the material ablation process. Numerical results show that under the same total laser fluence of 4 J/cm2, a dual-pulse femtosecond laser with a pulse separation time of 30–150 ps can increase the ablation depth, compared to the single pulse. The optimum pulse separation time is 85 ps. It is also demonstrated that a dual pulse with a suitable pulse separation time for different laser fluences can enhance the ablation rate by about 1.6 times.

  6. Femtosecond lasers as novel tool in dental surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbin, J.; Bauer, T.; Fallnich, C.; Kasenbacher, A.; Arnold, W. H.

    2002-09-01

    There is a proven potential of femtosecond lasers for medical applications like cornea shaping [1], ear surgery or dental surgery [2]. Minimal invasive treatment of carious tissue has become an increasingly important aspect in modern dentistry. State of the art methods like grinding using turbine-driven drills or ablation by Er:YAG lasers [3] generate mechanical and thermal stress, thus generating micro cracks of several tens of microns in the enamel [4]. These cracks are starting points for new carious attacks and have to be avoided for long term success of the dental treatment. By using femtosecond lasers (1 fs=10 -15 s) for ablating dental tissue, these drawbacks can be overcome. We have demonstrated that femtosecond laser ablation offers a tool for crack-free generation of cavities in dental tissue. Furthermore, spectral analysis of the laser induced plasma has been used to indicate carious oral tissue. Our latest results on femtosecond laser dentistry will be presented, demonstrating the great potential of this kind of laser technology in medicine.

  7. Oxygen assisted interconnection of silver nanoparticles with femtosecond laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Zhou, Y., E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Duley, W. W. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2015-12-14

    Ablation of silver (Ag) nanoparticles in the direction of laser polarization is achieved by utilizing femtosecond laser irradiation in air at laser fluence ranging from ∼2 mJ/cm{sup 2} to ∼14 mJ/cm{sup 2}. This directional ablation is attributed to localized surface plasmon induced localized electric field enhancement. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the irradiated particles in different gases and at different pressures indicate that the ablation is further enhanced by oxygen in the air. This may be due to the external heating via the reactions of its dissociation product, atomic oxygen, with the surface of Ag particles, while the ablated Ag is not oxidized. Further experimental observations show that the ablated material re-deposits near the irradiated particles and results in the extension of the particles in laser polarization direction, facilitating the interconnection of two well-separated nanoparticles.

  8. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  9. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    The use femtosecond pulses for materials processing results in very precise cutting and drilling with high efficiency. Energy deposited in the electrons is not coupled into the bulk during the pulse, resulting in negligible shock or thermal loading to adjacent areas

  10. Thermal conductivity contrast measurement of Fused Silica exposed to low-energy femtosecond laser pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellouard, Y.J.; Dugan, M.; Said, A.A.; Bado, P.

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond laser irradiation has various noticeable effects on fused silica. Of particular interest, pulses with energy levels below the ablation threshold can locally increase the refractive index and the material etching selectivity to hydrofluoric acid. The mechanism responsible for these

  11. 2 micron femtosecond fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wan, Peng; Yang, Lihmei

    2014-07-29

    Methods and systems for generating femtosecond fiber laser pulses are disclose, including generating a signal laser pulse from a seed laser oscillator; using a first amplifier stage comprising an input and an output, wherein the signal laser pulse is coupled into the input of the first stage amplifier and the output of the first amplifier stage emits an amplified and stretched signal laser pulse; using an amplifier chain comprising an input and an output, wherein the amplified and stretched signal laser pulse from the output of the first amplifier stage is coupled into the input of the amplifier chain and the output of the amplifier chain emits a further amplified, stretched signal laser pulse. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  12. Femtosecond laser etching of dental enamel for bracket bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabas, Ayse Sena; Ersoy, Tansu; Gülsoy, Murat; Akturk, Selcuk

    2013-09-01

    The aim is to investigate femtosecond laser ablation as an alternative method for enamel etching used before bonding orthodontic brackets. A focused laser beam is scanned over enamel within the area of bonding in a saw tooth pattern with a varying number of lines. After patterning, ceramic brackets are bonded and bonding quality of the proposed technique is measured by a universal testing machine. The results are compared to the conventional acid etching method. Results show that bonding strength is a function of laser average power and the density of the ablated lines. Intrapulpal temperature changes are also recorded and observed minimal effects are observed. Enamel surface of the samples is investigated microscopically and no signs of damage or cracking are observed. In conclusion, femtosecond laser exposure on enamel surface yields controllable patterns that provide efficient bonding strength with less removal of dental tissue than conventional acid-etching technique.

  13. Near-field mapping by laser ablation of PMMA coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, J.; Maibohm, C.; Kostiucenko, O.

    2011-01-01

    The optical near-field of lithography-defined gold nanostructures, arranged into regular arrays on a gold film, is characterized via ablation of a polymer coating by laser illumination. The method utilizes femto-second laser pulses from a laser scanning microscope which induces electrical field...... that the different stages in the ablation process can be controlled and characterized making the technique suitable for characterizing optical near-fields of metal nanostructures....

  14. High precision patterning of ITO using femtosecond laser annealing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Chung-Wei; Lin, Cen-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have reported a process of fabrication of crystalline indium tin oxide (c-ITO) patterns using femtosecond laser-induced crystallization with a Gaussian beam profile followed by chemical etching. • The experimental results have demonstrated that the ablation and crystallization threshold fluences of a-ITO thin film are well-defined, the line width of the c-ITO patterns is controllable. • Fast fabrication of the two parallel sub-micro (∼0.5 μm) c-ITO line patterns using a single femtosecond laser beam and a single scanning path can be achieved. • A long-length sub-micro c-ITO line pattern is fabricated, and the feasibility of fabricating c-ITO patterns is confirmed, which are expected to be used in micro-electronics devices. - Abstract: High precision patterning of crystalline indium tin oxide (c-ITO) patterns on amorphous ITO (a-ITO) thin films by femtosecond laser-induced crystallization with a Gaussian beam profile followed by chemical etching is demonstrated. In the proposed approach, the a-ITO thin film is selectively transformed into a c-ITO structure via a low heat affect zone and the well-defined thresholds (ablation and crystallization) supplied by the femtosecond laser pulse. The experimental results show that by careful control of the laser fluence above the crystallization threshold, c-ITO patterns with controllable line widths and ridge-free characteristics can be accomplished. By careful control of the laser fluence above the ablation threshold, fast fabrication of the two parallel sub-micro c-ITO line patterns using a single femtosecond laser beam and single scanning path can be achieved. Along-length sub-micro c-ITO line pattern is fabricated, and the feasibility of fabricating c-ITO patterns is confirmed, which are expected to be used in micro-electronics devices

  15. Risk Factors for Retreatment Following Myopic LASIK with Femtosecond Laser and Custom Ablation for the Treatment of Myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruh, Jonathan N; Garrett, Kenneth A; Huntington, Brian; Robinson, Steve; Melki, Samir A

    2017-01-01

    To identify risks factors for retreatment post-laser in situ keratomeliusis (LASIK). A retrospective chart review from December 2008 to September 2012 identified 1,402 patients (2,581 eyes) that underwent LASIK treatment for myopia with the Intralase™ FS, STAR S4 IR™ Excimer Laser, and WaveScan WaveFront™ technology. In this group, 83 patients were retreated. All charts were reviewed for preoperative age, gender, initial manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE), total astigmatism, and iris registration. Increased incidence rates of retreatment post-LASIK were preoperative age >40 years (p -3.0 D (p = 0.02), and astigmatism >1D (p = 0.001). Iris registration capture did not significantly reduce the retreatment rate (p = 0.12). Risk factors for retreatment included preoperative age >40 years, initial MRSE > -3.0 D, and astigmatism >1D. There was no difference in retreatment rate for patients based on gender or iris registration capture.

  16. Debris of potassium–magnesium silicate glass generated by femtosecond laser-induced ablation in air: An analysis by near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, micro Raman and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grehn, M.; Seuthe, T.; Reinhardt, F.; Höfner, M.; Griga, N.; Eberstein, M.; Bonse, J.

    2014-01-01

    The redeposited material (debris) resulting from ablation of a potassium–magnesium silicate glass upon scanning femtosecond laser pulse irradiation (130 fs, 800 nm) in air environment is investigated by means of three complementary surface analytical methods. Changes in the electronic band structure of the glass constituent Magnesium (Mg) were identified by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy (XANES) using synchrotron radiation. An up-shift of ≈0.8 eV of a specific Magnesium K-edge absorption peak in the spectrum of the redeposited material along with a significant change in its leading edge position was detected. In contrast, the surface left after laser ablation exhibits a downshift of the peak position by ≈0.9 eV. Both observations may be related to a change of the Mg coordinative state of the laser modified/redeposited glass material. The presence of carbon in the debris is revealed by micro Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). These observations are attributed to structural changes and chemical reactions taking place during the ablation process.

  17. Experimental study and numerical simulation of the propulsion of microbeads by femtosecond laser filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Nan; Liu Weiwei; Xu Zhijun; Wang Mingwei; Zhu Xiaonong

    2008-01-01

    The light filament formed by intense femtosecond laser pulses in air can be used to generate the effective impulse to propel a micro glass bead. In this report, through both experimental studies and the corresponding numerical simulations that involve the dynamics of the nonlinear propagation of light and the laser ablation mechanism, we confirm that this propulsion scheme is based on the laser ablation of the target material. The fundamental characteristics of laser propulsion using a single ultrafast laser filament is also revealed

  18. The art of femtosecond laser writing

    OpenAIRE

    Kazansky, Peter G.; Yang, Weijia; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Arai, Alan; Svirko, Yuri P.

    2009-01-01

    Common beliefs that laser writing does not change when reversing beam scan or propagation direction are challenged. Recently discovered phenomena of quill and non-reciprocal femtosecond laser writing in glasses and crystals are reviewed

  19. Avant-garde femtosecond laser writing

    OpenAIRE

    Kazansky, Peter G.; Beresna, Martynas; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Svirko, Yuri P.; Aktürk, Selcuk

    2010-01-01

    Recently discovered phenomena of quill and non-reciprocal femtosecond laser writing in glasses and crystals are reviewed. Common beliefs that laser writing does not change when reversing beam scan or propagation direction are challenged.

  20. High incidence of rainbow glare after femtosecond laser assisted-LASIK using the upgraded FS200 femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Yue-Guo

    2018-03-05

    To compare the incidence of rainbow glare (RG) after femtosecond laser assisted-LASIK (FS-LASIK) using the upgraded FS200 femtosecond laser with different flap cut parameter settings. A consecutive series of 129 patients (255 eyes) who underwent FS-LASIK for correcting myopia and/or astigmatism using upgraded WaveLight FS200 femtosecond laser with the original settings was included in group A. Another consecutive series of 129 patients (255 eyes) who underwent FS-LASIK using upgraded WaveLight FS200 femtosecond laser with flap cut parameter settings changed (decreased pulse energy, spot and line separation) was included in group B. The incidence and fading time of RG, confocal microscopic image and postoperative clinical results were compared between the two groups. There were no differences between the two groups in age, baseline refraction, excimer laser ablation depth, postoperative uncorrected visual acuity and refraction. The incidence rate of RG in group A (35/255, 13.73%) was significantly higher than that in group B (4/255, 1.57%) (P  0.05).The confocal microscopic images showed wider laser spot spacing in group A than group B. The incidence of RG was significantly correlated with age and grouping (P laser with original flap cut parameter settings could increase the incidence of RG. The narrower grating size and lower pulse energy could ameliorate this side effect.

  1. Simulation of ablation and plume dynamics under femtosecond double-pulse laser irradiation of aluminum: Comparison of atomistic and continual approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokin, Vladimir B.; Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E., E-mail: povar@ihed.ras; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • We model double-pulse laser ablation of aluminum using microscopic and macroscopic approaches. • Both methods show decrease in depth of crater with increasing delay between pulses. • Both methods reveal the plume temperature growth with the increasing delay. • Good agreement between results is a step towards the development of combined model. - Abstract: We elaborated two numerical methods, two-temperature hydrodynamics and hybrid two-temperature molecular dynamics, which take into account basic mechanisms of a metal target response to ultrashort laser irradiation. The model used for the description of the electronic subsystem is identical for both approaches, while the ionic part is defined by an equation of state in hydrodynamics and by an interatomic potential in molecular dynamics. Since the phase diagram of the equation of state and corresponding potential match reasonably well, the dynamics of laser ablation obtained by both methods is quite similar. This correspondence can be considered as a first step towards the development of a self-consistent combined model. Two important processes are highlighted in simulations of double-pulse ablation: (1) the crater depth decrease as a result of recoil flux formation in the nascent plume when the delay between the pulses increases; (2) the plume reheating by the second pulse that gives rise to two- three-fold growth of the electron temperature with the delay varying from 0 to 200 ps.

  2. Photoemission using femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Fischer, J.

    1991-10-01

    Successful operation of short wavelength FEL requires an electron bunch of current >100 A and normalized emittance < 1 mm-mrad. Recent experiments show that RF guns with photocathodes as the electron source may be the ideal candidate for achieving these parameters. To reduce the emittance growth due to space charge and RF dynamics effects, the gun may have to operate at high field gradient (hence at high RF frequency) and a spot size small compared to the aperture. This may necessitate the laser pulse duration to be in the subpicosecond regime to reduce the energy spread. We will present the behavior of metal photocathodes upon irradiation with femtosecond laser beams, comparison of linear and nonlinear photoemission, and scalability to high currents. Theoretical estimate of the intrinsic emittance at the photocathode in the presence of the anomalous heating of the electrons, and the tolerance on the surface roughness of the cathode material will be discussed

  3. Laser ablation of microparticles for nanostructure generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waraich, Palneet Singh; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2011-01-01

    The process of laser ablation of microparticles has been shown to generate nanoparticles from microparticles; but the generation of nanoparticle networks from microparticles has never been reported before. We report a unique approach for the generation of nanoparticle networks through ablation of microparticles. Using this approach, two samples containing microparticles of lead oxide (Pb 3 O 4 ) and nickel oxide (NiO), respectively, were ablated under ambient conditions using a femtosecond laser operating in the MHz repetition rate regime. Nanoparticle networks with particle diameter ranging from 60 to 90 nm were obtained by ablation of microparticles without use of any specialized equipment, catalysts or external stimulants. The formation of finer nanoparticle networks has been explained by considering the low pressure region created by the shockwave, causing rapid condensation of microparticles into finer nanoparticles. A comparison between the nanostructures generated by ablating microparticle and those by ablating bulk substrate was carried out; and a considerable reduction in size and narrowed size distribution was observed. Our nanostructure fabrication technique will be a unique process for nanoparticle network generation from a vast array of materials.

  4. Development of a high power femtosecond laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Neethling, PH

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Laser Research Institute and the CSIR National Laser Centre are developing a high power femtosecond laser system in a joint project with a phased approach. The laser system consists of an fs oscillator and a regenerative amplifier. An OPCPA...

  5. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-01-01

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications

  6. Femtosecond laser generated gold nanoparticles and their plasmonic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Rupali; Navas, M. P.; Soni, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    The pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium is now commonly used to generate stable colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) in absence of any chemical additives or stabilizer with diverse applications. In this paper, we report generation of gold NPs (Au NPs) by ultra-short laser pulses. Femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (λ = 800 nm) has been used to ablate a gold target in pure de-ionized water to produce gold colloids with smallsize distribution. The average size of the particles can be further controlled by subjecting to laser-induced post-irradiation providing a versatile physical method of size-selected gold nanoparticles. The optical extinction and morphological dimensions were investigated with UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy measurements, respectively. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is employed to calculate localized surface plasmon (LSPR) wavelength and the near-field generated by Au NPs and their hybrids.

  7. Single-phase {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} thin films prepared on Si wafer by femtosecond laser ablation and its photoluminescence at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Peixiang [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)]. E-mail: lupeixiang@mail.hust.edu.cn; Zhou Youhua [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China) and Physics and Information School, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China)]. E-mail: yhzhou@jhun.edu.cn; Zheng Qiguang [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang Guang [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology and Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2006-02-06

    Single-phase {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} thin films were prepared on Si(100) and Si(111) wafers by using femtosecond laser deposition with a FeSi{sub 2} alloy target for the first time. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field scanning electron microscopy (FSEM), scanning probe microscopy (SPM), electron backscattered diffraction pattern (EBSD), and Fourier-transform Raman infrared spectroscopy (FTRIS) were used to characterize the structure, composition, and properties of the {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}/Si films. The orientation of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} grains was found to depend on the orientation of the Si substrates, and photoluminescence at wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m was observed from the single-phase {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}/Si thin film at room temperature (20 {sup o}C)

  8. Study on the effect of ambient gas on nanostructure formation on metal surfaces during femtosecond laser ablation for fabrication of low-reflective surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smausz, Tomi, E-mail: tomi@physx.u-szeged.hu [MTA-SZTE Research Group on Photoacoustic Spectroscopy, University of Szeged, 6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Csizmadia, Tamás [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Attosecond Light Pulse Source, ELI-Hu Nkft, H-6720 Szeged, Dugonics ter 13 (Hungary); Tápai, Csaba; Kopniczky, Judit [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Oszkó, Albert [Department of Physical Chemistry and Material Science, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Aradi vértanuk tere 1 (Hungary); Ehrhardt, Martin; Lorenz, Pierre; Zimmer, Klaus; Prager, Andrea [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung e.V., Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hopp, Béla [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Metal surfaces were irradiated with femtosecond laser in different gas environments. • The reflectivity, morphology and chemical composition of the surfaces were studied. • Darkening was influenced by chemical and physical interaction of the plume and gas. • Molecular mass of the applied gas had an impact on the nanostructure formation. • For some of the used metals the oxide formation affected the reflective properties. - Abstract: Nanostructure formation on bulk metals (silver, gold, copper and titanium) by femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser irradiation (775 nm, 150 fs) is studied aiming the production of low-reflectivity surfaces and the better understanding of the development process. The experiments were performed in nitrogen, air, oxygen and helium environments at atmospheric pressure. The samples were irradiated with fluences in the 0.1–2 J/cm{sup 2} range and an average pulse number of 100 falling over a given area. The reflectivity of the treated surfaces was determined by a microspectrometer in the 450–800 nm range and their morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The gas ambience influenced the results via two effects: formation processes and the chemically-induced modifications of the nanostructures. In case of He the nanoparticle aggregates–otherwise generally present–are predominantly missing, which leads to a lower darkening efficiency. The presence of oxygen enhances the darkening effect for copper mostly at lower fluences, while causes a slow increase in reflectivity in the case of titanium (in case of pure oxygen) in the high fluence range. The surface morphology in case of nitrogen and air were quite similar probably due to their close molecular mass values.

  9. Selective growth of gallium nitride nanowires by femtosecond laser patterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, D.K.T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Hong, M.H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore)], E-mail: HONG_Minghui@dsi.a-star.edu.sg; Tan, L.S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Zhou, Y. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Chen, G.X. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2008-01-31

    We report on gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires grown using pulsed laser ablation, adopting the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism. The GaN nanowires are obtained based on the principle that a catalyst is required to initiate the nanowires growth. Locations of the GaN nanowires are patterned using femtosecond laser and focused ion beam. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to characterize the nanowires. This patterning of GaN nanowires will enable selective growth of nanowires and bottom-up assembly of integrated electronic and photonic devices.

  10. Selective growth of gallium nitride nanowires by femtosecond laser patterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, D.K.T.; Hong, M.H.; Tan, L.S.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, G.X.

    2008-01-01

    We report on gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires grown using pulsed laser ablation, adopting the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism. The GaN nanowires are obtained based on the principle that a catalyst is required to initiate the nanowires growth. Locations of the GaN nanowires are patterned using femtosecond laser and focused ion beam. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to characterize the nanowires. This patterning of GaN nanowires will enable selective growth of nanowires and bottom-up assembly of integrated electronic and photonic devices

  11. Controllable superhydrophobic aluminum surfaces with tunable adhesion fabricated by femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuxin; Wang, Cong; Dong, Xinran; Yin, Kai; Zhang, Fan; Xie, Zheng; Chu, Dongkai; Duan, Ji'an

    2018-06-01

    In this study, a facile and detailed strategy to fabricate superhydrophobic aluminum surfaces with controllable adhesion by femtosecond laser ablation is presented. The influences of key femtosecond laser processing parameters including the scanning speed, laser power and interval on the wetting properties of the laser-ablated surfaces are investigated. It is demonstrated that the adhesion between water and superhydrophobic surface can be effectively tuned from extremely low adhesion to high adhesion by adjusting laser processing parameters. At the same time, the mechanism is discussed for the changes of the wetting behaviors of the laser-ablated surfaces. These superhydrophobic surfaces with tunable adhesion have many potential applications, such as self-cleaning surface, oil-water separation, anti-icing surface and liquid transportation.

  12. Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions is made possible through the use of pulse-shaping techniques coupled to a learning algorithm feedback loop – teaching the laser pulse to control the chemical reaction. This can result in controllable...

  13. Near-field-optical-microscopy studies of micro-modifications caused by femtosecond laser irradiation in lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamela, J.; Jaque, D.; Rodenas, A.; Jaque, F.; Torchia, G.A.; Vazquez, J.R.; Mendez, C.; Roso, L.

    2008-01-01

    Near-field-optical-microscopy has been used to study the micro-modifications caused by femtosecond laser pulses focused at the surface and in the volume of lithium niobate crystals. We have found experimental evidence of the existence, close to femtosecond ablation craters, of periodic modifications in the surface reflectivity. In addition, the potential application of near-field-optical microscopy for the spatial location of permanent modifications caused by femtosecond pulses focused inside lithium niobate crystals has been also demonstrated. (orig.)

  14. Use of the Femtosecond Lasers in Ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszkowska Anna M

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser (FSL is an infrared laser with a wavelength of 1053 nm. FS laser works producing photodisruption or photoionization of the optically transparent tissue such as cornea. Currently FS lasers have a wide range of applications in ophthalmic surgery. They are used above all in corneal surgery in refractive procedures and keratoplasty, and recently in cataract surgery. The use of the FSL in corneal refractive surgery includes LASIK flap creation, astigmatic keratotomy, Femtosecond Lenticule Extraction (FLEx, Small Incision Lenticule Extraction (SMILE and channels creation for implantation of the intrastromal corneal rings. As to the corneal grafting, the FS lasers are used in laser-assisted anterior and posterior lamellar keratoplasty and customized trephination in the penetrating keratoplasty. FS Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery (FLACS includes capsulorrhexis and nuclear fragmentation that enhance safety and efficacy of the procedure.

  15. Use of the Femtosecond Lasers in Ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowska, Anna M.; Urso, Mario; Signorino, Alberto; Aragona, Pasquale

    2018-01-01

    Femtosecond laser (FSL) is an infrared laser with a wavelength of 1053 nm. FS laser works producing photodisruption or photoionization of the optically transparent tissue such as cornea. Currently FS lasers have a wide range of applications in ophthalmic surgery. They are used above all in corneal surgery in refractive procedures and keratoplasty, and recently in cataract surgery. The use of the FSL in corneal refractive surgery includes LASIK flap creation, astigmatic keratotomy, Femtosecond Lenticule Extraction (FLEx), Small Incision Lenticule Extraction (SMILE) and channels creation for implantation of the intrastromal corneal rings. As to the corneal grafting, the FS lasers are used in laser-assisted anterior and posterior lamellar keratoplasty and customized trephination in the penetrating keratoplasty. FS Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery (FLACS) includes capsulorrhexis and nuclear fragmentation that enhance safety and efficacy of the procedure.

  16. Femtosecond laser interaction with protection materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.; Krueger, J.; Hertwig, A.; Fiedler, A.; Kautek, W

    2003-03-15

    Textile, aluminium and polyethylene used as components in laser protection curtains were investigated with respect to their ablation behaviour. Employing 33-fs pulses (800 nm wavelength, 1 kHz repetition rate), ex situ geometrical measurements of the ablation cavities and in situ acoustic investigations with a microphone were performed to determine the ablation thresholds in the single- and multi-pulse cases. The acoustical method proved advantageous for complex surface morphologies and/or single laser pulse interactions. Incubation phenomena can be observed for all the materials studied. Technically relevant multi-pulse ablation thresholds are presented and are compared with the single-pulse (1-on-1) irradiation.

  17. Femtosecond lasers for microsurgery of cornea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartapetov, Sergei K; Khudyakov, D V; Lapshin, Konstantin E; Obidin, Aleksei Z; Shcherbakov, Ivan A

    2012-01-01

    The review of femtosecond laser installations for medical applications is given and a new femtosecond ophthalmologic system for creation of a flap of corneal tissue during the LASIK operation is described. An all-fibre femtosecond laser emitting ∼400-fs pulses at 1067 nm is used. The pulse repetition rate can vary from 200 kHz up to 1 MHz. The output energy of the femtosecond system does not exceed 1 μJ. A specially developed objective with small spherical and chromatic aberrations is applied to focus laser radiation to an area of an eye cornea. The size of the focusing spot does not exceed 3 μm. To process the required area, scanning by a laser beam is applied with a speed no less than 5 m s -1 . At a stage of preliminary tests of the system, the Κ8 glass, organic PMMA glass and specially prepared agarose gels are used as a phantom of an eye. The femtosecond system is successfully clinically tested on a plenty of eyes of a pig and on several human eyes. The duration of the procedure of creation of a corneal flap does not exceed 20 s.

  18. Femtosecond lasers for microsurgery of cornea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartapetov, Sergei K; Khudyakov, D V; Lapshin, Konstantin E; Obidin, Aleksei Z; Shcherbakov, Ivan A

    2012-03-31

    The review of femtosecond laser installations for medical applications is given and a new femtosecond ophthalmologic system for creation of a flap of corneal tissue during the LASIK operation is described. An all-fibre femtosecond laser emitting {approx}400-fs pulses at 1067 nm is used. The pulse repetition rate can vary from 200 kHz up to 1 MHz. The output energy of the femtosecond system does not exceed 1 {mu}J. A specially developed objective with small spherical and chromatic aberrations is applied to focus laser radiation to an area of an eye cornea. The size of the focusing spot does not exceed 3 {mu}m. To process the required area, scanning by a laser beam is applied with a speed no less than 5 m s{sup -1}. At a stage of preliminary tests of the system, the {Kappa}8 glass, organic PMMA glass and specially prepared agarose gels are used as a phantom of an eye. The femtosecond system is successfully clinically tested on a plenty of eyes of a pig and on several human eyes. The duration of the procedure of creation of a corneal flap does not exceed 20 s.

  19. Laser ablation of polymer coatings allows for electromagnetic field enhancement mapping around nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Subdiffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy...

  20. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets of standard reference materials using femtosecond (150fs) and nanosecond (4ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the collected particles revealed that there are more and larger agglomerations of particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation. In contrast to the earlier findings for metal alloy samples, no correlation between the concentration of major elements and the median particle size was found. When the current data on glass were compared with the metal alloy data, there were clear differences in terms of particle size, crater depth, heat affected zone, and ICP-MS response. For example, glass particles were larger than metal alloy particles, the craters in glass were less deep than craters in metal alloys, and damage to the sample was less pronounced in glass compared to metal alloys samples. The femtosecond laser generated more intense ICP-MS signals compared to nanosecond laser ablation for both types of samples, although glass sample behavior was more similar between ns and fs-laser ablation than for metals alloys.

  1. Progress in Cherenkov femtosecond fiber lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Svane, Ask Sebastian; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    systems are highlighted—dependent on the realization scheme, the Cherenkov lasers can generate the femtosecond output tunable across the entire visible and even the UV range, and for certain designs more than 40% conversion efficiency from the pump to Cherenkov signal can be achieved. The femtosecond......We review the recent developments in the field of ultrafast Cherenkov fiber lasers. Two essential properties of such laser systems—broad wavelength tunability and high efficiency of Cherenkov radiation wavelength conversion are discussed. The exceptional performance of the Cherenkov fiber laser...... Cherenkov laser with all-fiber architecture is presented and discussed. Operating in the visible range, it delivers 100–200 fs wavelength-tunable pulses with multimilliwatt output power and exceptionally low noise figure an order of magnitude lower than the traditional wavelength tunable supercontinuumbased...

  2. Fresnel Lenses fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining on Polymer 1D Photonic Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guduru Surya S.K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of micro Fresnel lenses by femtosecond laser surface ablation on polymer 1D photonic crystals. This device is designed to focus the transmitted wavelength of the photonic crystal and filter the wavelengths corresponding to the photonic band gap region. Integration of such devices in a wavelength selective light harvesting and filtering microchip can be achieved.

  3. Nanosecond and femtosecond ablation of La0.6Ca0.4CoO3: a comparison between plume dynamics and composition of the films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Papadopoulou, E.; Anglos, D.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 were grown by pulsed laser ablation with nanosecond and femtosecond pulses. The films deposited with femtosecond pulses (248 nm, 500 fs pulse duration) exhibit a higher surface roughness and deficiency in the cobalt content compared to the films deposited with nanosec......Thin films of La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 were grown by pulsed laser ablation with nanosecond and femtosecond pulses. The films deposited with femtosecond pulses (248 nm, 500 fs pulse duration) exhibit a higher surface roughness and deficiency in the cobalt content compared to the films deposited...... and in a background pressure of 60 Pa of oxygen. The ns-induced plume in vacuum exhibits a spherical shape, while for femtosecond ablation the plume is more elongated along the expansion direction, but with similar velocities for ns and fs laser ablation. In the case of ablation in the background gas similar...

  4. Femtosecond laser processing of photovoltaic and transparent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sanghoon

    The photovoltaic semiconducting and transparent dielectric materials are of high interest in current industry. Femtosecond laser processing can be an effective technique to fabricate such materials since non-linear photochemical mechanisms predominantly occur. In this series of studies, femtosecond (fs) laser processing techniques that include laser drilling on Si wafer, laser scribing on CIGS thin film, laser ablation on Lithium Niobate (LN) crystal, and fabrication of 3D structures in fused silica were studied. The fs laser drilling on Si wafer was performed to fabricate via holes for wrap-through PV devices. For reduction of the number of shots in fs laser drilling process, self-action of laser light in the air was initiated. To understand physical phenomena during laser drilling, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), emission, and shadowgraph images were studied. The result indicated the presence of two mechanisms that include fabrication by self-guided beam and wall-guided beam. Based on our study, we could fabricate ~16 micrometer circular-shaped via holes with ~200 laser pulses on 160-170 micrometer thick c- and mc-Si wafer. For the fs laser scribing on ink jet printed CIGS thin film solar cell, the effect of various parameters that include pulse accumulation, wavelength, pulse energy, and overlapping were elucidated. In our processing regime, the effect of wavelength could be diminished due to compensation between beam size, pulse accumulation, energy fluence, and the absorption coefficient. On the other hand, for high PRF fs laser processing, pulse accumulation effect cannot be ignored, while it can be negligible in low PRF fs laser processing. The result indicated the presence of a critical energy fluence for initiating delamination of CIGS layer. To avoid delamination and fabricate fine isolation lines, the overlapping method can be applied. With this method, ~1 micrometer width isolation lines were fabricated. The fs laser ablation on LN wafer was studied

  5. Femtosecond laser pulse written Volume Bragg Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser pulses can be applied for structuring a wide range of ransparent materials. Here we want to show how to use this ability to realize Volume-Bragg-Gratings in various- mainly non-photosensitive - glasses. We will further present the characteristics of the realized gratings and a few elected applications that have been realized.

  6. Laser-Induced Damage with Femtosecond Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Kyle R. P.

    The strong electric fields of focused femtosecond laser pulses lead to non-equilibrium dynamics in materials, which, beyond a threshold intensity, causes laser-induced damage (LID). Such a strongly non-linear and non-perturbative process renders important LID observables like fluence and intensity thresholds and damage morphology (crater) extremely difficult to predict quantitatively. However, femtosecond LID carries a high degree of precision, which has been exploited in various micro/nano-machining and surface engineering applications, such as human eye surgery and super-hydrophobic surfaces. This dissertation presents an array of experimental studies which have measured the damage behavior of various materials under femtosecond irradiation. Precision experiments were performed to produce extreme spatio-temporal confinement of the femtosecond laser-solid damage interaction on monocrystalline Cu, which made possible the first successful direct-benchmarking of LID simulation with realistic damage craters. A technique was developed to produce laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) in a single pulse (typically a multi-pulse phenomenon), and was used to perform a pump-probe study which revealed asynchronous LIPSS formation on copper. Combined with 1-D calculations, this new experimental result suggests more drastic electron heating than expected. Few-cycle pulses were used to study the LID performance and morphology of commercial ultra-broadband optics, which had not been systematically studied before. With extensive surface analysis, various morphologies were observed, including LIPSS, swelling (blisters), simple craters, and even ring-shaped structures, which varied depending on the coating design, number of pulses, and air/vacuum test environment. Mechanisms leading to these morphologies are discussed, many of which are ultrafast in nature. The applied damage behavior of multi-layer dielectric mirrors was measured and compared between long pulse (150 ps

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma-assisted femtosecond laser engraving of aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, Christoph; Gimpel, Thomas; Tasche, Daniel; Koch née Hoffmeister, Jennifer; Brückner, Stephan; Flachenecker, Günter; Wieneke, Stephan; Schade, Wolfgang; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2018-05-01

    In this contribution, we report on the impact of direct dielectric barrier discharge argon plasma at atmospheric pressure on femtosecond laser engraving of aluminium. It is shown that the assisting plasma strongly affects the surface geometry and formation of spikes of both laser-engraved single lines and patterns of adjacent lines with an appropriate overlap. Further, it was observed that the overall ablation depth is significantly increased in case of large-scale patterning whereas no notable differences in ablation depth are found for single lines. Several possible mechanisms and underlying effects of this behaviour are suggested. The increase in ablation depth is supposed to be due to a plasma-induced removal of debris particles from the cutting point via charging and oxidation as supported by EDX analysis of the re-solidified debris. Furthermore, the impact of a higher degree of surface wrinkling as well as direct interactions of plasma species with the aluminium surface on the ablation process are discussed.

  8. Femtosecond laser additive manufacturing of YSZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Bai, Shuang [PolarOnyx, Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) is investigated using femtosecond (fs) fiber lasers. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. High-density (>99%) YSZ part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained. Microstructure features of fabricated specimens were studied with SEM, EDX, the measured micro hardness is achieved as high as 18.84 GPa. (orig.)

  9. Proton radiography using highpower femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Il

    2010-08-01

    A femtosecond laser emits pulses whose width is between few and few hundreds femtoseconds (10 -15 s). The production mechanism of the high energy protons generated by the femtosecond laser is not clear so far, but the technologies have been improving. The applications using the generated protons are the proton therapy, proton radiography, nuclear physics, security inspection, and so on. Especially in the radiography, the laser-generated protons are very useful to obtain high quality images of thin objects, because protons are able to penetrate an object following an almost straight path and give a depth distribution information of various elements in a subject. Since the laser-driven protons require lower cost and smaller facility than accelerator-based protons, the radiography using laser-driven protons have been of interest. In this research, we have performed the radiography experiments by using protons generated by the 100 TW titanium sapphire femtosecond laser facility of Advanced Photonics Research Institute (APRI) of Gwangju Institute of Science Technology (GIST). A CR-39 Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) has been used as radiography screen. The radiography digital images have been obtained by using an optical microscope and a CCD camera. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) has been derived from analyzing the obtained images, and the spatial resolution of the images have been evaluated. And, we have performed the radiography experiments of monoenergetic proton from the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator of Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM). We have obtained and compared the radiography images from other proton production methods which are the laser and the accelerator, respectively. And also, we have found out the optimized chemical etching condition, in order to improve the spatial resolution of the radiography images. Finally, the evaluated maximum spatial resolution of the images are 2.09 μm

  10. Effects of femtosecond laser radiation on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogov, P Yu; Bespalov, V G

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model of linear and nonlinear processes is presented occurring under the influence of femtosecond laser radiation on the skin. There was held an analysis and the numerical solution of an equation system describing the dynamics of the electron and phonon subsystems were received. The results can be used to determine the maximum permissible levels of energy generated by femtosecond laser systems and the establishment of Russian laser safety standards for femtosecond laser systems. (paper)

  11. Surface modification of UHMWPE with infrared femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Pradas, J.M., E-mail: jmfernandez@ub.edu [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Naranjo-Leon, S.; Morenza, J.L.; Serra, P. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene surface was modified with femtosecond laser pulses at 1027 nm wavelength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface roughness is increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ablation efficiency is maximum for 6 {mu}J pulses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiated surfaces remain almost chemically unaltered. - Abstract: Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a polymer with mechanical and corrosion properties, which make it appropriate for using in biomedical devices such as hip and knee prostheses. The surface morphology and chemistry of UHMWPE influence its biocompatibility. A laser with wavelength at 1027 nm delivering 450 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 1 kHz is used to modify the surface of UHMWPE samples with 0.45 {mu}m root mean square surface roughness. Micrometric resolution is achieved with the use of a focusing lens of 0.25 NA and pulse energies of few microjoules. The study focuses in the influence of different pulse energies and pulse overlaps on the laser-induced surface roughness and ablation yield. Confocal microscopy is used to characterize changes in the morphology of the irradiated surfaces, and their chemical structure is analyzed by attenuated total reflectance infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The roughness increases as the pulse energy increases until it reaches a maximum. The ablation yield increases with the pulse energy and pulse overlap. However, the ablation yield per pulse is lower for higher pulse overlap. Pulses of 6 {mu}J have the highest ablation efficiency. Infrared and Raman spectra of samples irradiated with low energy pulses are similar to those of the pristine sample. However, some C=C and C=O bonds can be detected after irradiation with the highest pulse energies.

  12. Compact laser-diode-based femtosecond sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C T A; Cataluna, M A; Lagatsky, A A; Rafailov, E U; Agate, M B; Leburn, C G; Sibbett, W

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of compact femtosecond laser systems that are capable of being directly pumped by laser diodes or are based directly on laser diodes. The paper demonstrates the latest results in a highly efficient vibronic based gain medium and a diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser is reported that has a wall plug efficiency >14%. A Cr 4+ :YAG oscillator is described that generates transform-limited pulses of 81 fs duration at a pulse repetition frequency of >4 GHz. The development of Cr 3+ :LiSAF lasers that can be operated using power supplies based on batteries is briefly discussed. We also present a summary of work being carried out on the generation of fs-pulses from laser diodes and discuss the important issues in this area. Finally, we outline results obtained on the generation of pulses as short as 550 fs directly from a two-section quantum dot laser without any external pulse compression

  13. Femtosecond-laser assisted cell reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond-laser pulses can assist to transfect cells by creating transient holes in the cell membrane, thus making them temporarily permeable for extraneous genetic material. This procedure offers the advantage of being completely "virus free" since no viruses are used for the delivery and integration of gene factors into the host genome and, thereby, avoiding serious side effects which so far prevent clinical application. Unfortunately, focusing of the laser radiation onto individual cell membranes is quite elaborate and time consuming. Regarding these obstacles, we briefly review two optical setups for fast, efficient and high throughput laser-assisted cell transfection based on femtosecond laser pulse excitation. The first setup aims at assisting the transfection of adherent cells. It comprises of a modified laser-scanning microscope with beamshaping optics as well as home-made software to automate the detection, targeting and laser-irradiation process. The second setup aims at laser-assisted transfection of non-adherent cells in suspension which move in a continuous flow through the laser focus region. The setup allows to address a large number of cells, however, with much lower transfection efficiency than the individual-cell targeting approach.

  14. Characteristics and Applications of Spatiotemporally Focused Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenrui Jing

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing (SSTF of femtosecond laser pulses gives rise to strong suppression of nonlinear self-focusing during the propagation of the femtosecond laser beam. In this paper, we begin with an introduction of the principle of SSTF, followed by a review of our recent experimental results on the characterization and application of the spatiotemporally focused pulses for femtosecond laser micromachining. Finally, we summarize all of the results and give a future perspective of this technique.

  15. Elaboration of submicron structures on PEEK polymer by femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouti, S.; Beaugiraud, B.; Salvia, M.; Mauclair, C.; Pascale-Hamri, A.; Benayoun, S.; Valette, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We compare PEEK polymer under two crystalline forms: semi-crystalline and amorphous. • We assess topographical modifications of surface morphologies after femtosecond laser irradiation. • At low laser energy regime, there is an influence of the crystallinity rate on topographical features of surface morphologies. • At high laser energy regime, the contribution of the crystallinity tends to disappear. - Abstract: In this work, laser parameters initiating the emergence of periodic structures, so-called ripples on poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK) surfaces, are investigated. PEEK was used in its semi-crystalline and amorphous forms. Polymer surfaces were treated locally by performing a matrix of laser impacts to highlight the influence of the crystallinity in ultrashort laser interaction. Different surface morphologies or ripples were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and optical interferometry. A map of the presence of these different morphologies according to the laser fluence and the number of pulses was established. Analysis by optical interferometry was carried out and led to the calculations of ablation efficiency. Some significant differences were demonstrated between amorphous and semi-crystalline surfaces. This work revealed topographical information on the local behavior of the irradiated material. Finally, the crystallinity rate of polymer surface seems to be a determinant factor for the periodic nanostructured appearance

  16. Elaboration of submicron structures on PEEK polymer by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammouti, S., E-mail: sabrina.hammouti@ec-lyon.fr [LTDS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Beaugiraud, B.; Salvia, M. [LTDS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Mauclair, C. [LaHC, Université Jean Monnet, 18 rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); MANUTECH-USD, 20 rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Pascale-Hamri, A. [MANUTECH-USD, 20 rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Benayoun, S. [LTDS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Valette, S. [LTDS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); MANUTECH-USD, 20 rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • We compare PEEK polymer under two crystalline forms: semi-crystalline and amorphous. • We assess topographical modifications of surface morphologies after femtosecond laser irradiation. • At low laser energy regime, there is an influence of the crystallinity rate on topographical features of surface morphologies. • At high laser energy regime, the contribution of the crystallinity tends to disappear. - Abstract: In this work, laser parameters initiating the emergence of periodic structures, so-called ripples on poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK) surfaces, are investigated. PEEK was used in its semi-crystalline and amorphous forms. Polymer surfaces were treated locally by performing a matrix of laser impacts to highlight the influence of the crystallinity in ultrashort laser interaction. Different surface morphologies or ripples were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and optical interferometry. A map of the presence of these different morphologies according to the laser fluence and the number of pulses was established. Analysis by optical interferometry was carried out and led to the calculations of ablation efficiency. Some significant differences were demonstrated between amorphous and semi-crystalline surfaces. This work revealed topographical information on the local behavior of the irradiated material. Finally, the crystallinity rate of polymer surface seems to be a determinant factor for the periodic nanostructured appearance.

  17. Microsized structures assisted nanostructure formation on ZnSe wafer by femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shutong; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2014-01-01

    Micro/nano patterning of ZnSe wafer is demonstrated by femtosecond laser irradiation through a diffracting pinhole. The irradiation results obtained at fluences above the ablation threshold are characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microsized structure with low spatial frequency has a good agreement with Fresnel diffraction theory. Laser induced periodic surface structures and laser-induced periodic curvelet surface structures with high spatial frequency have been found on the surfaces of microsized structures, such as spikes and valleys. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the valley and the incident laser pulse

  18. Femtosecond laser induced tunable surface transformations on (111) Si aided by square grids diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei, E-mail: lixiaowei@bit.edu.cn; Liu, Yang [Laser Micro/Nano-Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    We report an extra freedom to modulate the femtosecond laser energy distribution to control the surface ablated structures through a copper-grid mask. Due to the reduced deposited pulse energy by changing the scanning speed or the pulse fluence, a sequential evolution of three distinctly different surface patterns with periodic distributions is formed, namely, striped ripple lines, ripple microdots, and surface modification. By changing the scanning speed, the number of the multiple dots in a lattice can be modulated. Moreover, by exploring the ablation process through the copper grid mask, it shows an abnormal enhanced ablation effect with strong dependence of the diffraction-aided fs laser ablated surface structures on polarization direction. The sensitivity shows a quasi-cosinusoid-function with a periodicity of π/2. Particularly, the connection process of striped ripple lines manifests a preferential formation direction with the laser polarization.

  19. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  20. Femtosecond laser surface structuring of molybdenum thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Biophotonics Lab: National Laser Centre Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano, Itala (Italy); Sechoghela, P.; Mongwaketsi, N. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN)–CNR, Piazza Leanardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Color change of the molybdenum thin film from shinny to violet–yellowish color after laser irradiation at various laser powers. • Formation of the molybdenum dioxide coating after laser exposure, as confirmed by the X-ray diffraction spectrometry. • Selective solar absorbing nature of the laser exposed films. • Study of the binding energies is presented in this contribution using the XPS spectrometry. - Abstract: This contribution reports on the femtosecond surface structuring of molybdenum thin coatings deposited by electron beam evaporation onto Corning glass substrates. The 1-D type periodic grating lines created by such an ablation showed that the widths of the shallow grooves followed a logarithmic dependence with the laser energy incident on the molybdenum film. The electronic valence “x” of the created oxide surface layer MoO{sub x} was found to be incident laser power dependent via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations. Such a photo-induced MoO{sub x}–Mo nanocomposite exhibited effective selective solar absorption in the UV–vis–IR spectral range.

  1. Visualization of femtosecond laser-induced stress anisotropy in amorphous and crystalline materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillen Ben

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, micro manufacturing with femtosecond lasers has received considerable attention as an efficient technique for producing three-dimensional devices, combining multiple functionalities in a single monolithic substrate. In this manufacturing process, stress-anisotropy resulting from non-ablative laser exposure can have both positive and negative effects on the process out-come. In this work, we present a simple method for visualizing stress anisotropy, combining highly symmetric laser-written patterns with polarization microscopy, as a tool for identifying the various anisotropic contributions to the laser fabrication process.

  2. Recent advances in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Jie Chu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perfect vision and fewer complications is our goal in cataract surgery, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery hold the promise. Applications of femtosecond laser technology for capsulotomy, nuclear fragmentation and corneal incision in cataract surgery bring a new level of accuracy, reproducibility and predictability over the current cataract surgery. The femtosecond laser produces capsulotomies that are more precise, accurate, reproducible, and stronger than those created with the conventional manual technique, and further helps maintain proper positioning of the IOL. Femtosecond laser in nuclear fragmentation lead to a lower effective phacoemulsification time, and the corneal incision is more stable. But currently there are some complications and a clear learning curve associated with the use of femtosecond lasers for cataract surgery. The long-term safety and visual outcomes still need further investigation.

  3. Thin film femtosecond laser damage competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Christopher J.; Ristau, Detlev; Turowski, Marcus; Blaschke, Holger

    2009-10-01

    In order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors, a damage competition was started at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state of the art of high laser resistance coatings since they are tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. In 2009 a high reflector coating was selected at a wavelength of 786 nm at normal incidence at a pulse length of 180 femtoseconds. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials and layer count, and spectral results will also be shared.

  4. Femtosecond laser machining for characterization of local mechanical properties of biomaterials: a case study on wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Severin; Pfeifenberger, Manuel J.; Hohenwarter, Anton; Pippan, Reinhard

    2017-12-01

    The standard preparation technique for micro-sized samples is focused ion beam milling, most frequently using Ga+ ions. The main drawbacks are the required processing time and the possibility and risks of ion implantation. In contrast, ultrashort pulsed laser ablation can process any type of material with ideally negligible damage to the surrounding volume and provides 4 to 6 orders of magnitude higher ablation rates than the ion beam technique. In this work, a femtosecond laser was used to prepare wood samples from spruce for mechanical testing at the micrometre level. After optimization of the different laser parameters, tensile and compressive specimens were produced from microtomed radial-tangential and longitudinal-tangential sections. Additionally, laser-processed samples were exposed to an electron beam prior to testing to study possible beam damage. The specimens originating from these different preparation conditions were mechanically tested. Advantages and limitations of the femtosecond laser preparation technique and the deformation and fracture behaviour of the samples are discussed. The results prove that femtosecond laser processing is a fast and precise preparation technique, which enables the fabrication of pristine biological samples with dimensions at the microscale.

  5. Colorizing metals with femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo Chunlei

    2008-01-01

    For centuries, it had been the dream of alchemists to turn inexpensive metals into gold. Certainly, it is not enough from an alchemist's point of view to transfer only the appearance of a metal to gold. However, the possibility of rendering a certain metal to a completely different color without coating can be very interesting in its own right. In this work, we demonstrate a femtosecond laser processing technique that allows us to create a variety of colors on a metal that ultimately leads us to control its optical properties from UV to terahertz

  6. Femtosecond laser studies of ultrafast intramolecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions by observing, directly in time, the dynamics of fundamental chemical processes. In this work femtosecond laser pulses are used to initiate chemical processes and follow the progress of these processes in time. The authors are currently studying ultrafast internal conversion and subsequent intramolecular relaxation in unsaturated hydrocarbons. In addition, the authors are developing nonlinear optical techniques to prepare and monitor the time evolution of specific vibrational motions in ground electronic state molecules.

  7. Robust Non-Wetting PTFE Surfaces by Femtosecond Laser Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nature shows many examples of surfaces with extraordinary wettability, which can often be associated with particular air-trapping surface patterns. Here, robust non-wetting surfaces have been created by femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. The laser-created surface structure resembles a forest of entangled fibers, which support structural superhydrophobicity even when the surface chemistry is changed by gold coating. SEM analysis showed that the degree of entanglement of hairs and the depth of the forest pattern correlates positively with accumulated laser fluence and can thus be influenced by altering various laser process parameters. The resulting fibrous surfaces exhibit a tremendous decrease in wettability compared to smooth PTFE surfaces; droplets impacting the virgin or gold coated PTFE forest do not wet the surface but bounce off. Exploratory bioadhesion experiments showed that the surfaces are truly air-trapping and do not support cell adhesion. Therewith, the created surfaces successfully mimic biological surfaces such as insect wings with robust anti-wetting behavior and potential for antiadhesive applications. In addition, the fabrication can be carried out in one process step, and our results clearly show the insensitivity of the resulting non-wetting behavior to variations in the process parameters, both of which make it a strong candidate for industrial applications.

  8. Robust non-wetting PTFE surfaces by femtosecond laser machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Lehr, Jorge; Danielczak, Lisa; Leask, Richard; Kietzig, Anne-Marie

    2014-08-08

    Nature shows many examples of surfaces with extraordinary wettability,which can often be associated with particular air-trapping surface patterns. Here,robust non-wetting surfaces have been created by femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The laser-created surface structure resembles a forest of entangled fibers, which support structural superhydrophobicity even when the surface chemistry is changed by gold coating. SEM analysis showed that the degree of entanglement of hairs and the depth of the forest pattern correlates positively with accumulated laser fluence and can thus be influenced by altering various laser process parameters. The resulting fibrous surfaces exhibit a tremendous decrease in wettability compared to smooth PTFE surfaces; droplets impacting the virgin or gold coated PTFE forest do not wet the surface but bounce off. Exploratory bioadhesion experiments showed that the surfaces are truly air-trapping and do not support cell adhesion. Therewith, the created surfaces successfully mimic biological surfaces such as insect wings with robust anti-wetting behavior and potential for antiadhesive applications. In addition, the fabrication can be carried out in one process step, and our results clearly show the insensitivity of the resulting non-wetting behavior to variations in the process parameters,both of which make it a strong candidate for industrial applications.

  9. Advances in laser ablation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Lowndes, D.H.; Chrisey, D.B.; Fogarassy, E.; Narayan, J.

    1998-01-01

    The symposium, Advances in Laser Ablation of Materials, was held at the 1998 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco, California. The papers in this symposium illustrate the advances in pulsed laser ablation for a wide variety of applications involving semiconductors, superconductors, metals, ceramics, and polymers. In particular, advances in the deposition of oxides and related materials are featured. Papers dealing with both fundamentals and the applications of laser ablation are presented. Topical areas include: fundamentals of ablation and growth; in situ diagnostics and nanoscale synthesis advances in laser ablation techniques; laser surface processing; pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric, magnetic, superconducting and optoelectronic thin films; and pulsed laser deposition of carbon-based and polymeric materials. Sixty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  10. Monolithic optofluidic ring resonator lasers created by femtosecond laser nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrahalim, Hengky; Chen, Qiushu; Said, Ali A; Dugan, Mark; Fan, Xudong

    2015-05-21

    We designed, fabricated, and characterized a monolithically integrated optofluidic ring resonator laser that is mechanically, thermally, and chemically robust. The entire device, including the ring resonator channel and sample delivery microfluidics, was created in a block of fused-silica glass using a 3-dimensional femtosecond laser writing process. The gain medium, composed of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dissolved in quinoline, was flowed through the ring resonator. Lasing was achieved at a pump threshold of approximately 15 μJ mm(-2). Detailed analysis shows that the Q-factor of the optofluidic ring resonator is 3.3 × 10(4), which is limited by both solvent absorption and scattering loss. In particular, a Q-factor resulting from the scattering loss can be as high as 4.2 × 10(4), suggesting the feasibility of using a femtosecond laser to create high quality optical cavities.

  11. Multi-image mosaic with SIFT and vision measurement for microscale structures processed by femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-Bin; Tu, Paul; Wu, Chen; Chen, Lei; Feng, Ding

    2018-01-01

    In femtosecond laser processing, the field of view of each image frame of the microscale structure is extremely small. In order to obtain the morphology of the whole microstructure, a multi-image mosaic with partially overlapped regions is required. In the present work, the SIFT algorithm for mosaic images was analyzed theoretically, and by using multiple images of a microgroove structure processed by femtosecond laser, a stitched image of the whole groove structure could be studied experimentally and realized. The object of our research concerned a silicon wafer with a microgroove structure ablated by femtosecond laser. First, we obtained microgrooves at a width of 380 μm at different depths. Second, based on the gray image of the microgroove, a multi-image mosaic with slot width and slot depth was realized. In order to improve the image contrast between the target and the background, and taking the slot depth image as an example, a multi-image mosaic was then realized using pseudo color enhancement. Third, in order to measure the structural size of the microgroove with the image, a known width streak ablated by femtosecond laser at 20 mW was used as a calibration sample. Through edge detection, corner extraction, and image correction for the streak images, we calculated the pixel width of the streak image and found the measurement ratio constant Kw in the width direction, and then obtained the proportional relationship between a pixel and a micrometer. Finally, circular spot marks ablated by femtosecond laser at 2 mW and 15 mW were used as test images, and proving that the value Kw was correct, the measurement ratio constant Kh in the height direction was obtained, and the image measurements for a microgroove of 380 × 117 μm was realized based on a measurement ratio constant Kw and Kh. The research and experimental results show that the image mosaic, image calibration, and geometric image parameter measurements for the microstructural image ablated by

  12. Tunable femtosecond lasers with low pump thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppo, Karen

    The work in this thesis is concerned with the development of tunable, femtosecond laser systems, exhibiting low pump threshold powers. The main motive for this work was the development of a low threshold, self-modelocked Ti:Al2O3 laser in order to replace the conventional large-frame argon-ion pump laser with a more compact and efficient all-solid-state alternative. Results are also presented for an all-solid-state, self-modelocked Cr:LiSAF laser, however most of this work is concerned with self-modelocked Ti:Al2O3 laser systems. In chapter 2, the operation of a regeneratively-initiated, and a hard-aperture self- modelocked Ti:Al2O3 laser, pumped by an argon-ion laser, is discussed. Continuous- wave oscillation thresholds as low as 160mW have been demonstrated, along with self-modelocked threshold powers as low as 500mW. The measurement and suppression of phase noise on modelocked lasers is discussed in chapter 3. This is followed by a comparison of the phase noise characteristics of the regeneratively-initiated, and hard-aperture self-modelocked Ti:Al2O3 lasers. The use of a synchronously-operating, high resolution electron-optical streak camera in the evaluation of timing jitter is also presented. In chapter 4, the construction and self-modelocked operation of an all-solid-state Ti:Al2O3 laser is described. The all-solid-state alternative to the conventional argon-ion pump laser was a continuous-wave, intracavity-frequency doubled, diode-laser pumped Nd:YLF ring laser. At a total diode-laser pump power of 10W, this minilaser was capable of producing a single frequency output of 1W, at 523.5nm in a TEM00 beam. The remainder of this thesis looks at the operation of a self-modelocked Ti:Al2O3 laser generating ultrashort pulses at wavelengths as long as 1053nm. The motive for this work was the development of an all-solid-state, self- modelocked Ti:Al2O3 laser operating at 1053nm, for use as a master oscillator in a Nd:glass power chain.

  13. Optical reprogramming with ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans G.; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    The use of sub-15 femtosecond laser pulses in stem cell research is explored with particular emphasis on the optical reprogramming of somatic cells. The reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be evoked through the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Conventional approaches utilize retro/lenti-viruses to deliver genes/transcription factors as well as to facilitate the integration of transcription factors into that of the host genome. However, the use of viruses may result in insertional mutations caused by the random integration of genes and as a result, this may limit the use within clinical applications due to the risk of the formation of cancer. In this study, a new approach is demonstrated in realizing non-viral reprogramming through the use of ultrashort laser pulses, to introduce transcription factors into the cell so as to generate iPS cells.

  14. Femtosecond laser refractive surgery: small-incision lenticule extraction vs. femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimmy K; Chuck, Roy S; Park, Choul Yong

    2015-07-01

    Small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) is a novel technique devised to correct refractive errors. SMILE circumvents excimer laser photoablation of cornea, as the stromal lenticule cut by femtosecond laser is removed manually. Smaller incisions and preservation of anterior corneal biomechanical strength have been suggested as some of the advantages of SMILE over femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK (FS-LASIK). In this review, we compared previous published results of SMILE and FS-LASIK. The advantage, efficacy and safety of SMILE are compared with FS-LASIK. SMILE achieved similar efficacy, predictability and safety as FS-LASIK. Greater preservations of corneal biomechanical strength and corneal nerves were observed in SMILE when compared with LASIK or PRK. Additionally, the incidence of postoperative dry eye syndrome was found to be less problematic in SMILE than in FS-LASIK. SMILE is a promising new surgery for refractive error correction. Prospective and retrospective studies of SMILE have shown that results of SMILE are similar to FS-LASIK. With advances in femtosecond laser technology, SMILE may gain greater acceptance in the future.

  15. Femtosecond laser 3D micromachining for microfluidic and optofluidic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sugioka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers opened up new avenue in materials processing due to its unique features of ultrashort pulse width and extremely high peak intensity. One of the most important features of femtosecond laser processing is that strong absorption can be induced even by materials which are transparent to the femtosecond laser beam due to nonlinear multiphoton absorption. The multiphoton absorption allows us to perform not only surface but also three-dimensionally internal microfabrication of transparent materials such as glass. This capability makes it possible to directly fabricate three-dimensi

  16. Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Cohen, Timothy; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the newest results of our experimental study of specific impulses and coupling coefficients achieved by double-pulsed ablation of graphite, aluminum, copper and lead targets

  17. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Nathala, Chandra Sekher; Ajami, Ali Asghar; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm-2 was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  18. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Nathala, Chandra Sekher [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Ajami, Ali Asghar [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Physics, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm{sup −2} was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  19. Fiber laser-microscope system for femtosecond photodisruption of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavaş, Seydi; Erdogan, Mutlu; Gürel, Kutan; Ilday, F Ömer; Eldeniz, Y Burak; Tazebay, Uygar H

    2012-03-01

    We report on the development of a ultrafast fiber laser-microscope system for femtosecond photodisruption of biological targets. A mode-locked Yb-fiber laser oscillator generates few-nJ pulses at 32.7 MHz repetition rate, amplified up to ∼125 nJ at 1030 nm. Following dechirping in a grating compressor, ∼240 fs-long pulses are delivered to the sample through a diffraction-limited microscope, which allows real-time imaging and control. The laser can generate arbitrary pulse patterns, formed by two acousto-optic modulators (AOM) controlled by a custom-developed field-programmable gate array (FPGA) controller. This capability opens the route to fine optimization of the ablation processes and management of thermal effects. Sample position, exposure time and imaging are all computerized. The capability of the system to perform femtosecond photodisruption is demonstrated through experiments on tissue and individual cells.

  20. Electron emission from a double-layer metal under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuchang; Li, Suyu; Jiang, Yuanfei; Chen, Anmin, E-mail: amchen@jlu.edu.cn; Ding, Dajun; Jin, Mingxing, E-mail: mxjin@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we theoretically investigate electron emission during femtosecond laser ablation of single-layer metal (copper) and double-layer structures. The double-layer structure is composed of a surface layer (copper) and a substrate layer (gold or chromium). The calculated results indicate that the double-layer structure brings a change to the electron emission from the copper surface. Compared with the ablation of a single-layer, a double-layer structure may be helpful to decrease the relaxation time of the electron temperature, and optimize the electron emission by diminishing the tailing phenomenon under the same absorbed laser fluence. With the increase of the absorbed laser fluence, the effect of optimization becomes significant. This study provides a way to optimize the electron emission which can be beneficial to generate laser induced ultrafast electron pulse sources.

  1. Investigation of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solid targets by measuring the ablation-generated momentum using a torsion pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Wang, Wentao; Zhu, Xiaonong; Liu, Jiansheng; Xu, Kuanhong; Huang, Peng; Zhao, Jiefeng; Li, Ruxin; Wang, Mingwei

    2011-04-25

    50 fs - 12 ps laser pulses are employed to ablate aluminum, copper, iron, and graphite targets. The ablation-generated momentum is measured with a torsion pendulum. Corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphic measurements show that the ablation process at the optimal laser fluence achieving the maximal momentum is primarily dominated by the photomechanical mechanism. When laser pulses with specific laser fluence are used and the pulse duration is tuned from 50 fs to 12 ps, the generated momentum firstly increases and then remains almost constant, which could be attributed to the change of the ablation mechanism involved from atomization to phase explosion. The investigation of the ablation-generated momentum also reveals a nonlinear momentum-energy conversion scaling law, namely, as the pulse energy increases, the momentum obtained by the target increases nonlinearly. This may be caused by the effective reduction of the dissipated energy into the surrounding of the ablation zone as the pulse energy increases, which indicates that for femtosecond laser the dissipated energy into the surrounding target is still significant.

  2. Rescue of Primary Incomplete Microkeratome Flap with Secondary Femtosecond Laser Flap in LASIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Razgulyaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK retreatments with a previous unsuccessful mechanical microkeratome-assisted surgery, some surgical protocols have been described as feasible, such as relifting of the flap or the creation of a new flap and even the change to a surface ablation procedure (photorefractive keratectomy (PRK. This case shows the use of femtosecond technology for the creation of a secondary flap to perform LASIK in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap obtained with a mechanical microkeratome. As we were unable to characterize the interface of the first partial lamellar cut, a thick flap was planned and created using a femtosecond laser platform. As the primary cut was very thick in the nasal quadrant, a piece of loose corneal tissue appeared during flap lifting which was fitted in its position and not removed. Despite this condition and considering the regularity of the new femtosecond laser cut, the treatment was uneventful. This case report shows the relevance of a detailed corneal analysis with an advanced imaging technique before performing a secondary flap in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap. The femtosecond laser technology seems to be an excellent tool to manage such cases successfully.

  3. Femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty for advanced keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yathish Shivanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To assess the efficacy and advantages of femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty (FLEK over conventional penetrating keratoplasty (PKP in advanced keratoconus. Materials and Methods: Detailed review of literature of published randomized controlled trials of operative techniques in PKP and FLEK. Results: Fifteen studies were identified, analyzed, and compared with our outcome. FLEK was found to have better outcome in view of better and earlier stabilization uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, and better refractive outcomes with low astigmatism as compared with conventional PKP. Wound healing also was noticed to be earlier, enabling early suture removal in FLEK. Conclusions: Studies relating to FLEK have shown better results than conventional PKP, however further studies are needed to assess the safety and intraoperative complications of the procedure.

  4. Multi-Parameter Measurement in Unseeded Flows using Femtosecond Lasers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our approach is to use new turn-key femtosecond laser technology along with new high-speed CMOS camera technology to build a multi-parameter measurement system based...

  5. Femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent solid materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, D.Z.; Sharafudeen, K.N.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    solved, especially concerning the interaction of strong, ultra-short electromagnetic pulses with matter, and also because potential advanced technologies will emerge due to the impressive capability of the intense femtosecond laser to create new material structures and hence functionalities. When......The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials is a topic that has caused great interest of scientists over the past two decades. It will continue to be a fascinating field in the coming years. This is because many challenging fundamental problems have not been......–matter interaction, and fabricate various integrated micro-devices. In recent years we have witnessed exciting development in understanding and applying femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent materials. The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials relies on non...

  6. Innovative applications of femtosecond laser induced self-organized nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka; Sakakura, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    The nanostructure induced by the direct-writing of femtosecond-laser pulses can open a new opportunity to develop avant-garde devices such as a 5D optical storage, polarization imaging sensor, thermoelectric conversion elements. (author)

  7. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M

    2014-01-01

    laser parameters with tissue effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to a miniaturized 2,940 nm AFXL, spot size 225 µm, density 5%, power levels 1.15-2.22 W, pulse durations 50-225 microseconds, pulse repetition rates 100-500 Hz, and 2, 20, or 50 stacked pulses, resulting in pulse......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... 190 to 347 µm. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse stacking with a small, low power 2,940 nm AFXL created reproducible shallow to deep micropores, and influenced micropore configuration. Mathematical modeling established relations between laser settings and micropore dimensions, which assists in choosing laser...

  8. Structural changes in femtosecond laser modified regions inside fused silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juodkazis, Saulius; Kohara, Shinji; Ohishi, Yasuo; Hirao, Norihisa; Vailionis, Arturas; Mizeikis, Vygantas; Saito, Akira; Rode, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    Structural characterization of photomodified microvolumes formed by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside silica glass was carried out using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The observed distinct separation between the O–O and Si–Si pair correlation peaks can be interpreted as a phase separation induced by microexplosions at the focal volume. The mechanisms of structural transitions induced by femtosecond laser pulses inside dielectrics are discussed

  9. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...... of the laser ablated plasma plume propagation in a background gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved....

  10. High aspect ratio nanoholes in glass generated by femtosecond laser pulses with picosecond intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sanghoon; Choi, Jiyeon; Noh, Jiwhan; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2018-02-01

    Because of its potential uses, high aspect ratio nanostructures have been interested for last few decades. In order to generate nanostructures, various techniques have been attempted. Femtosecond laser ablation is one of techniques for generating nanostructures inside a transparent material. For generating nanostructures by femtosecond laser ablation, previous studies have been attempted beam shaping such as Bessel beam and temporal tailored beam. Both methods suppress electron excitation at near surface and initiate interference of photons at certain depth. Recent researches indicate that shape of nanostructures is related with temporal change of electron density and number of self-trapped excitons. In this study, we try to use the temporal change of electron density induced by femtosecond laser pulse for generating high aspect ratio nanoholes. In order to reveal the effect of temporal change of electron density, secondary pulses are irradiated from 100 to 1000 ps after the irradiation of first pulse. Our result shows that diameter of nanoholes is increasing and depth of nanoholes is decreasing as pulse to pulse interval is getting longer. With manipulating of pulse to pulse interval, we could generate high aspect ratio nanoholes with diameter of 250-350 nm and depth of 4∼6 μm inside a glass.

  11. [Results of residual ametropia correction using CIRCLE technology after femtosecond laser SMILE surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, O A; Rebrikov, S V; Ovchinnikov, A I; Stepanov, A A; Takhchidi, Kh P

    to evaluate functional results of reoperation performed according to the CIRCLE technology and using the VisuMax femtosecond laser and MEL-80 excimer laser in cases of regression of the refractive effect after SMILE surgery. We studied a group of post-SMILE patients. In those, who showed regression of the refractive effect at 1 year, reoperation was performed according to the CIRCLE technology and using the VisuMax femtosecond laser. The corneal flap was separated from the stromal bed and turned aside. Excimer laser ablation of the stromal bed was performed with the MEL 80 machine. The corneal flap was then placed back and rinsed from both sides. Uncorrected (UCVA) and corrected (BCVA) visual acuity as well as spherical equivalent (SE) were estimated before reoperation, on day 1, and at 1 month. After reoperation, BCVA and UCVA improved. Patient refraction became close to emmetropia. Specifically, UCVA was 0.23±0.18 at baseline (i.e. 1 year after SMILE) and 0.93±0.11 after the CIRCLE procedure (pstatistically significant - from 0.95±0.1 to 0.93±0.11 (p>0.05). Reoperation performed according to the CIRCLE technology and using the VisuMax femtosecond laser and MEL-80 excimer laser provides an increase in visual acuity in case of post-SMILE regression of the refractive effect.

  12. First-principles electron dynamics control simulation of diamond under femtosecond laser pulse train irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cong; Jiang Lan; Wang Feng; Li Xin; Yuan Yanping; Xiao Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Lu Yongfeng

    2012-01-01

    A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional is applied to simulate the nonlinear electron-photon interactions during shaped femtosecond laser pulse train ablation of diamond. Effects of the key pulse train parameters such as the pulse separation, spatial/temporal pulse energy distribution and pulse number per train on the electron excitation and energy absorption are discussed. The calculations show that photon-electron interactions and transient localized electron dynamics can be controlled including photon absorption, electron excitation, electron density, and free electron distribution by the ultrafast laser pulse train. (paper)

  13. Monolithic Yb-fiber femtosecond laser using photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate, both experimentally and theoretically, an environmentally stable monolithic all-PM modelocked femtosecond Yb-fiber laser, with laser output pulse compressed in a spliced-on low-loss hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Our laser provides direct fiber-end delivery of 4 nJ pulses...

  14. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  15. TEM investigations of laser ablated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliegel, D.; Dundas, S.; Kosler, J.; Klementova, M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry suffers from fractionation effects hindering a non matrix matched calibration strategy. Different reasons for elemental fractionation that are related to the laser ablation, the transport and the vaporization in the plasma are discussed. One major question to be addressed linked to the vaporization yield in the ICP is in which of mineralogical phase the different ablated particle sizes enter the plasma. This contribution will investigate particles generated by a 213 nm laser from different samples such as minerals and alloys with respect to their chemical and phase compositions using high resolution TEM. (author)

  16. Characterization of Tin/Ethylene Glycol Solar Nanofluids Synthesized by Femtosecond Laser Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Mendieta, Rafael; Mondragón, Rosa; Puerto-Belda, Verónica; Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Lancis, Jesús; Juliá, J Enrique; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys

    2017-05-05

    Solar energy is available over wide geographical areas and its harnessing is becoming an essential tool to satisfy the ever-increasing demand for energy with minimal environmental impact. Solar nanofluids are a novel solar receiver concept for efficient harvesting of solar radiation based on volumetric absorption of directly irradiated nanoparticles in a heat transfer fluid. Herein, the fabrication of a solar nanofluid by pulsed laser ablation in liquids was explored. This study was conducted with the ablation of bulk tin immersed in ethylene glycol with a femtosecond laser. Laser irradiation promotes the formation of tin nanoparticles that are collected in the ethylene glycol as colloids, creating the solar nanofluid. The ability to trap incoming electromagnetic radiation, thermal conductivity, and the stability of the solar nanofluid in comparison with conventional synthesis methods is enhanced. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Infrared laser damage thresholds in corneal tissue phantoms using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretsky, Adam R.; Clary, Joseph E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast lasers have become a fixture in many biomedical, industrial, telecommunications, and defense applications in recent years. These sources are capable of generating extremely high peak power that can cause laser-induced tissue breakdown through the formation of a plasma upon exposure. Despite the increasing prevalence of such lasers, current safety standards (ANSI Z136.1-2014) do not include maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values for the cornea with pulse durations less than one nanosecond. This study was designed to measure damage thresholds in corneal tissue phantoms in the near-infrared and mid-infrared to identify the wavelength dependence of laser damage thresholds from 1200-2500 nm. A high-energy regenerative amplifier and optical parametric amplifier outputting 100 femtosecond pulses with pulse energies up to 2 mJ were used to perform exposures and determine damage thresholds in transparent collagen gel tissue phantoms. Three-dimensional imaging, primarily optical coherence tomography, was used to evaluate tissue phantoms following exposure to determine ablation characteristics at the surface and within the bulk material. The determination of laser damage thresholds in the near-IR and mid-IR for ultrafast lasers will help to guide safety standards and establish the appropriate MPE levels for exposure sensitive ocular tissue such as the cornea. These data will help promote the safe use of ultrafast lasers for a wide range of applications.

  18. Preliminary observation of refractive cataract surgery assisted by femtosecond laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the differences of visual acuity and corneal astigmatism postoperatively between conventional refractive cataract surgery and that assisted by femtosecond laser.METHODS:Sixty patients(60 eyeswith age-related cataract and cornea astigmatism were divided into femtosecond group and conventional group randomly or voluntarily. The flat shaft, steep shaft and diopter of corneal astigmatism in patients in femtosecond group were inputted into the online vector calculators to get the location and width of the incision. Then femtosecond laser was used to make corneal releasing incision, the main and auxiliary incision. Phacoemulsification and aspheric multifocal intraocular lens implantation were undergone. Patients in conventional group received full-thickness relaxing incision by cornea paracentesis knife at the steepest meridian axis during phacoemulsification. Then aspheric multifocal intraocular lenses were implanted. Uncorrected distance visual acuity(UCDVA, uncorrected near visual acuity(UCNVAand cornea astigmatism were observed at 1d,1wk and 1mo postoperative. RESULTS:UCVA of patients in both groups was improved after the surgeries. UCDVA and UCNVA of femtosecond group were higher than those of conventional group, while the cornea astigmatism of femtosecond group was lower than that of conventional group.CONCLUSION:Refractile cataract surgery assisted by femtosecond laser canoffer better visual quality than conventional refractive cataract surgery because of lower cornea astigmatism and better visual acuity.

  19. Femtosecond laser written waveguides deep inside silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, I; Tokel, O; Pavlova, S; Kadan, V; Makey, G; Turnali, A; Yavuz, Ö; Ilday, F Ö

    2017-08-01

    Photonic devices that can guide, transfer, or modulate light are highly desired in electronics and integrated silicon (Si) photonics. Here, we demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the creation of optical waveguides deep inside Si using femtosecond pulses at a central wavelength of 1.5 μm. To this end, we use 350 fs long, 2 μJ pulses with a repetition rate of 250 kHz from an Er-doped fiber laser, which we focused inside Si to create permanent modifications of the crystal. The position of the beam is accurately controlled with pump-probe imaging during fabrication. Waveguides that were 5.5 mm in length and 20 μm in diameter were created by scanning the focal position along the beam propagation axis. The fabricated waveguides were characterized with a continuous-wave laser operating at 1.5 μm. The refractive index change inside the waveguide was measured with optical shadowgraphy, yielding a value of 6×10 -4 , and by direct light coupling and far-field imaging, yielding a value of 3.5×10 -4 . The formation mechanism of the modification is discussed.

  20. Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    b; 52.25.-b; 52.70.-m. 1. Introduction. Pulsed laser ablation of a solid sample generates a dense plasma emission in the shape of ... The multichannel analyser plate of the ICCD was gated for as less as 4 ns using ... to explain the atomic collision processes [4]. .... Within duration of laser pulse, there occurs laser-solid interac-.

  1. Ultra-fast movies of thin-film laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke, Matthias; Rapp, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P.

    2012-11-01

    Ultra-short-pulse laser irradiation of thin molybdenum films from the glass substrate side initiates an intact Mo disk lift off free from thermal effects. For the investigation of the underlying physical effects, ultra-fast pump-probe microscopy is used to produce stop-motion movies of the single-pulse ablation process, initiated by a 660-fs laser pulse. The ultra-fast dynamics in the femtosecond and picosecond ranges are captured by stroboscopic illumination of the sample with an optically delayed probe pulse of 510-fs duration. The nanosecond and microsecond delay ranges of the probe pulse are covered by an electronically triggered 600-ps laser. Thus, the setup enables an observation of general laser ablation processes from the femtosecond delay range up to the final state. A comparison of time- and space-resolved observations of film and glass substrate side irradiation of a 470-nm molybdenum layer reveals the driving mechanisms of the Mo disk lift off initiated by glass-side irradiation. Observations suggest that a phase explosion generates a liquid-gas mixture in the molybdenum/glass interface about 10 ps after the impact of the pump laser pulse. Then, a shock wave and gas expansion cause the molybdenum layer to bulge, while the enclosed liquid-gas mixture cools and condenses at delay times in the 100-ps range. The bulging continues for approximately 20 ns, when an intact Mo disk shears and lifts off at a velocity of above 70 m/s. As a result, the remaining hole is free from thermal effects.

  2. Selective Laser Ablation and Melting, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project Advratech will develop a new additive manufacturing (AM) process called Selective Laser Ablation and Melting (SLAM). The key innovation in this...

  3. Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue Using Pulsed CO2 Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashishin, Yuichi; Sano, Shu; Nakayama, Takeyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Laser scalpels are currently used as a form of laser treatment. However, their ablation mechanism has not been clarified because laser excision of biological tissue occurs over a short time scale. Biological tissue ablation generates sound (laser-induced sound). This study seeks to clarify the ablation mechanism. The state of the gelatin ablation was determined using a high-speed video camera and the power reduction of a He-Ne laser beam. The aim of this study was to clarify the laser ablation mechanism by observing laser excision using the high-speed video camera and monitoring the power reduction of the He-Ne laser beam. We simulated laser excision of a biological tissue by irradiating gelatin (10 wt%) with radiation from a pulsed CO 2 laser (wavelength: 10.6 μm; pulse width: 80 ns). In addition, a microphone was used to measure the laser-induced sound. The first pulse caused ablation particles to be emitted in all directions; these particles were subsequently damped so that they formed a mushroom cloud. Furthermore, water was initially evaporated by laser irradiation and then tissue was ejected.

  4. Chemically assisted laser ablation ICP mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takafumi

    2003-01-15

    A new laser ablation technique combined with a chemical evaporation reaction has been developed for elemental ratio analysis of solid samples using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS). Using a chemically assisted laser ablation (CIA) technique developed in this study, analytical repeatability of the elemental ratio measurement was successively improved. To evaluate the reliability of the CLA-ICPMS technique, Pb/U isotopic ratios were determined for zircon samples that have previously been analyzed by other techniques. Conventional laser ablation for Pb/U shows a serious elemental fractionation during ablation mainly due to the large difference in elemental volatility between Pb and U. In the case of Pb/U ratio measurement, a Freon R-134a gas (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) was introduced into the laser cell as a fluorination reactant. The Freon gas introduced into the laser cell reacts with the ablated sample U, and refractory U compounds are converted to a volatile U fluoride compound (UF6) under the high-temperature condition at the ablation site. This avoids the redeposition of U around the ablation pits. Although not all the U is reacted with Freon, formation of volatile UF compounds improves the transmission efficiency of U. Typical precision of the 206Pb/238U ratio measurement is 3-5% (2sigma) for NIST SRM 610 and Nancy 91500 zircon standard, and the U-Pb age data obtained here show good agreement within analytical uncertainties with the previously reported values. Since the observed Pb/U ratio for solid samples is relatively insensitive to laser power and ablation time, optimization of ablation conditions or acquisition parameters no longer needs to be performed on a sample-to-sample basis.

  5. Femtosecond laser irradiation-induced infrared absorption on silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The near-infrared (NIR absorption below band gap energy of crystalline silicon is significantly increased after the silicon is irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses at a simple experimental condition. The absorption increase in the NIR range primarily depends on the femtosecond laser pulse energy, pulse number, and pulse duration. The Raman spectroscopy analysis shows that after the laser irradiation, the silicon surface consists of silicon nanostructure and amorphous silicon. The femtosecond laser irradiation leads to the formation of a composite of nanocrystalline, amorphous, and the crystal silicon substrate surface with microstructures. The composite has an optical absorption enhancement at visible wavelengths as well as at NIR wavelength. The composite may be useful for an NIR detector, for example, for gas sensing because of its large surface area.

  6. INTERACTION OF FEMTOSECOND LASER RADIATION WITH SKIN: MATHEMATICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Yu. Rogov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of human skin response to the impact of femtosecond laser radiation were researched. The Monte–Carlo method was used for estimation of the radiation penetration depth into the skin cover. We used prevalent wavelength equal to 800 nm (for Ti: sapphire laser femtosecond systems. A mathematical model of heat transfer process was introduced based on the analytical solution of the system of equations describing the dynamics of the electron and phonon subsystems. An experiment was carried out to determine the threshold energy of biological tissue injury (chicken skin was used as a test object. The value of electronic subsystem relaxation time was determined from the experiment and is in keeping with literature data. The results of this work can be used to assess the maximum permissible exposure of laser radiation of different lengths that cause the damage of biological tissues, as well as for the formation of safe operation standards for femtosecond laser systems.

  7. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery: technology and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Timothy V; Lawless, Michael; Chan, Colin Ck; Jacobs, Mark; Ng, David; Bali, Shveta J; Hodge, Chris; Sutton, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    The recent introduction of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has generated much interest among ophthalmologists around the world. Laser cataract surgery integrates high-resolution anterior segment imaging systems with a femtosecond laser, allowing key steps of the procedure, including the primary and side-port corneal incisions, the anterior capsulotomy and fragmentation of the lens nucleus, to be performed with computer-guided laser precision. There is emerging evidence of reduced phacoemulsification time, better wound architecture and a more stable refractive result with femtosecond cataract surgery, as well as reports documenting an initial learning curve. This article will review the current state of technology and discuss our clinical experience. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  8. Lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, Mahmoud Hanafy [Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Bugayev, Aleksey [Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is used to probe the lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony thin film. The temporal hierarchies of the intensity and position of diffraction orders are monitored. The femtosecond laser excitation of antimony film was found to lead to initial compression after the laser pulse, which gives way to tension vibrating at new equilibrium displacement. A damped harmonic oscillator model, in which the hot electron-blast force contributes to the driving force of oscillations in lattice spacing, is used to interpret the data. The electron–phonon energy-exchange rate and the electronic Grüneisen parameter were obtained.

  9. Robust authentication through stochastic femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haisu; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a reliable authentication method by femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces. The stochastic nonlinear laser fabrication nature results in unique authentication robust properties. This work provides a simple and viable solution for practical applications in product authentication, while also opens the way for incorporating such elements in transparent media and coupling those in integrated optical circuits.

  10. Spectroscopic analysis of femtosecond laser-induced gas breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, J.; Bruneau, S.; Sentis, M.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma generated by the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse with gas has been analyzed using time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy. The laser beam has been focused with a microscope objective into different gases (air, Ar, He) at pressures ranging from 10 2 to 10 5 Pa. From the analysis of spectral line emission from ions and neutral atoms, the plasma parameters and the plasma composition have been determined as a function of time and space. Furthermore, the generation of fast electrons and/or VUV radiation by the femtosecond laser interaction with the gas was brought to the fore. From the time- and space-evolution of the plasma parameters, a rough estimation of initial values of electron density and refraction index in the focal volume has been performed. These results are compared to analysis of the laser beam transmitted by the plasma. The latter show that only a small fraction of the laser energy is absorbed by the plasma while the spatial distribution of the transmitted laser beam is strongly perturbed by the plasma, which acts like a defocusing lens. However, in ambient helium, the plasma defocusing is weak due to the high ionization potential of helium. The understanding of femtosecond laser-induced gas breakdown is useful for process optimization in femtosecond laser applications like micromachining or surface microanalysis, etc

  11. Robust authentication through stochastic femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haisu [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Heraklion 71110 (Greece); Tzortzakis, Stelios, E-mail: stzortz@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Heraklion 71110 (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Science Program, Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar)

    2016-05-23

    We demonstrate a reliable authentication method by femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces. The stochastic nonlinear laser fabrication nature results in unique authentication robust properties. This work provides a simple and viable solution for practical applications in product authentication, while also opens the way for incorporating such elements in transparent media and coupling those in integrated optical circuits.

  12. Femtosecond Laser Structuring in Optical Fiber and Transparent Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Peter R.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser processing is optimized for writing optical circuits, optical resonators, and microfluidic devices inside the cladding of single-mode optical fiber that couple efficiently with the fiber core waveguide. The laser processes open new directions towards Labon-a-Fiber.

  13. Femtosecond laser-induced concentric ring microstructures on Zr-based metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Fengxu; Yang Jianjun; Xiaonong Zhu; Liang Chunyong; Wang Hongshui

    2010-01-01

    Surface morphological evolution of Zr-based metallic glass ablated by femtosecond lasers is investigated in atmosphere condition. Three types of permanent ring structures with micro-level spacing are observed for different laser shots and fluences. In the case of low laser fluences, the generation of annular patterns with nonthermal features is observed on the rippled structure with the subwavelength scale, and the ring spacing shows a decrease tendency from the center to the margin. While in the case of high laser fluences, the concentric rings formation within the laser spot is found to have evident molten traces and display the increasing ring spacing along the radial direction. Moreover, when the laser shots accumulation becomes large, the above two types of ring microstructures begin to develop into the common ablation craters. Analysis and discussion suggests that the stress-induced condensation of ablation vapors and the frozen thermocapillary waves on the molten surfaces should be responsible for the formation of two different types of concentric ring structures, respectively. Eventually, a processing window for each resulting surface microstructure type is obtained experimentally and indicates the possibility to control the morphological transitions among different types.

  14. Femtosecond Laser-Induced Formation of Wurtzite Phase ZnSe Nanoparticles in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan I Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an effective method to prepare wurtzite phase ZnSe nanoparticles from zincblende ZnSe single crystal using femtosecond pulse laser ablation. The fabricated ZnSe nanoparticles are in spherical shape and uncontaminated while synthesized under ambient environment. By controlling the laser fluences, the average size of ZnSe nanoparticles can be varied from ~16 nm to ~22 nm in diameter. In Raman spectra, the surface phonon mode becomes dominant in the smaller average particle size with uniform size distribution. The interesting phase transition from the zinc blende structure of ZnSe single crystal to wurtzite structure of ZnSe nanoparticles may have been induced by the ultrahigh ablation pressure at the local area due to the sudden injection of high energy leading to solid-solid transition.

  15. A plasma model combined with an improved two-temperature equation for ultrafast laser ablation of dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Lan; Tsai, H.-L.

    2008-01-01

    It remains a big challenge to theoretically predict the material removal mechanism in femtosecond laser ablation. To bypass this unresolved problem, many calculations of femtosecond laser ablation of nonmetals have been based on the free electron density distribution without the actual consideration of the phase change mechanism. However, this widely used key assumption needs further theoretical and experimental confirmation. By combining the plasma model and improved two-temperature model developed by the authors, this study focuses on investigating ablation threshold fluence, depth, and shape during femtosecond laser ablation of dielectrics through nonthermal processes (the Coulomb explosion and electrostatic ablation). The predicted ablation depths and shapes in fused silica, by using (1) the plasma model only and (2) the plasma model plus the two-temperature equation, are both in agreement with published experimental data. The widely used assumptions for threshold fluence, ablation depth, and shape in the plasma model based on free electron density are validated by the comparison study and experimental data

  16. Enhancement of peak intensity in a filament core with spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Bin; Chu Wei; Li Guihua; Zhang Haisu; Ni Jielei [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao Hui; Liu Weiwei [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin, 300071 (China); Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Photonics and Laser (COPL) and Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that the peak intensity in the filament core, which is inherently limited by the intensity clamping effect during femtosecond laser filamentation, can be significantly enhanced using spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses. In addition, the filament length obtained by spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses is {approx}25 times shorter than that obtained by a conventional focusing scheme, resulting in improved high spatial resolution.

  17. Femtosecond pulse laser-induced self-organized nanostructures on the surface of ZnO crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Minjian; Guo Guanglei; Yang Junyi; Ma Ninghua; Ye Guo; Ma Hongliang; Guo Xiaodong; Li Ruxin

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports self-organized nanostructures observed on the surface of ZnO crystal after irradiation by a focused beam of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser with a repetition rate of 250 kHz. For a linearly polarized femtosecond laser, the periodic nanograting structure on the ablation crater surface was promoted. The period of self-organization structures is about 180 nm. The grating orientation is adjusted by the laser polarization direction. A long range Bragg-like grating is formed by moving the sample at a speed of 10 μm/s. For a circularly polarized laser beam, uniform spherical nanoparticles were formed as a result of Coulomb explosion during the interaction of near-infrared laser with ZnO crystal

  18. Metal-like self-organization of periodic nanostructures on silicon and silicon carbide under femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemini, Laura; Hashida, Masaki; Shimizu, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji; Limpouch, Jiri; Mocek, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Periodic structures were generated on Si and SiC surfaces by irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses. Self-organized structures with spatial periodicity of approximately 600 nm appear on silicon and silicon carbide in the laser fluence range just above the ablation threshold and upon irradiation with a large number of pulses. As in the case of metals, the dependence of the spatial periodicity on laser fluence can be explained by the parametric decay of laser light into surface plasma waves. The results show that the proposed model might be universally applicable to any solid state material

  19. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  20. Narrow titanium oxide nanowires induced by femtosecond laser pulses on a titanium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui; Li, Xian-Feng [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, School of Information and Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Cheng-Yun [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tie, Shao-Long [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Lan, Sheng, E-mail: slan@scnu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, School of Information and Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Titanium oxide nanowires with a feature width as narrow as ∼20 nm were induced on a titanium surface by using femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm. • An evolution of the surface structure from a high spatial frequency laser-induced periodic structure parallel to the laser polarization to a low spatial frequency one perpendicular to the laser polarization was observed with increasing irradiation pulse number. • The formation of the titanium oxide nanowires was confirmed by the energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements and the evolution of the surface structure was successfully interpreted by using the efficacy factor theory. - Abstract: The evolution of the nanostructure induced on a titanium (Ti) surface with increasing irradiation pulse number by using a 400-nm femtosecond laser was examined by using scanning electron microscopy. High spatial frequency periodic structures of TiO{sub 2} parallel to the laser polarization were initially observed because of the laser-induced oxidation of the Ti surface and the larger efficacy factor of TiO{sub 2} in this direction. Periodically aligned TiO{sub 2} nanowires with featured width as small as 20 nm were obtained. With increasing pulse number, however, low spatial frequency periodic structures of Ti perpendicular to the laser polarization became dominant because Ti possesses a larger efficacy factor in this direction. The competition between the high- and low-spatial frequency periodic structures is in good agreement with the prediction of the efficacy factor theory and it should also be observed in the femtosecond laser ablation of other metals which are easily oxidized in air.

  1. Three-Dimensional Glass Monolithic Micro-Flexure Fabricated by Femtosecond Laser Exposure and Chemical Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Tielen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Flexures are components of micro-mechanisms efficiently replacing classical multi-part joints found at the macroscale. So far, flexures have been limited to two-dimensional planar designs due to the lack of a suitable three-dimensional micromanufacturing process. Here we demonstrate and characterize a high-strength transparent monolithic three-dimensional flexural component fabricated out of fused silica using non-ablative femtosecond laser processing combined with chemical etching. As an illustration of the potential use of this flexure, we propose a design of a Hoecken linkage entirely made with three-dimensional cross-spring pivot hinges.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of shock wave and spallation phenomena in metal foils irradiated by femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Demaske, Brian; Inogamov, Nail; Oleynik, Ivan

    2010-03-01

    Femtosecond laser irradiation of metals is an effective technique to create a high-pressure frontal layer of 100-200 nm thickness. The associated ablation and spallation phenomena can be studied in the laser pump-probe experiments. We present results of a large-scale MD simulation of ablation and spallation dynamics developing in 1,2,3μm thick Al and Au foils irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse. Atomic-scale mechanisms of laser energy deposition, transition from pressure wave to shock, reflection of the shock from the rear-side of the foil, and the nucleation of cracks in the reflected tensile wave, having a very high strain rate, were all studied. To achieve a realistic description of the complex phenomena induced by strong compression and rarefaction waves, we developed new embedded atom potentials for Al and Au based on cold pressure curves. MD simulations revealed the complex interplay between spallation and ablation processes: dynamics of spallation depends on the pressure profile formed in the ablated zone at the early stage of laser energy absorption. It is shown that the essential information such as material properties at high strain rate and spall strength can be extracted from the simulated rear-side surface velocity as a function of time.

  3. Femtosecond laser three-dimensional micro- and nanofabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugioka, Koji, E-mail: ksugioka@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Cheng, Ya, E-mail: ya.cheng@siom.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-12-15

    The rapid development of the femtosecond laser has revolutionized materials processing due to its unique characteristics of ultrashort pulse width and extremely high peak intensity. The short pulse width suppresses the formation of a heat-affected zone, which is vital for ultrahigh precision fabrication, whereas the high peak intensity allows nonlinear interactions such as multiphoton absorption and tunneling ionization to be induced in transparent materials, which provides versatility in terms of the materials that can be processed. More interestingly, irradiation with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside transparent materials makes three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nanofabrication available due to efficient confinement of the nonlinear interactions within the focal volume. Additive manufacturing (stereolithography) based on multiphoton absorption (two-photon polymerization) enables the fabrication of 3D polymer micro- and nanostructures for photonic devices, micro- and nanomachines, and microfluidic devices, and has applications for biomedical and tissue engineering. Subtractive manufacturing based on internal modification and fabrication can realize the direct fabrication of 3D microfluidics, micromechanics, microelectronics, and photonic microcomponents in glass. These microcomponents can be easily integrated in a single glass microchip by a simple procedure using a femtosecond laser to realize more functional microdevices, such as optofluidics and integrated photonic microdevices. The highly localized multiphoton absorption of a tightly focused femtosecond laser in glass can also induce strong absorption only at the interface of two closely stacked glass substrates. Consequently, glass bonding can be performed based on fusion welding with femtosecond laser irradiation, which provides the potential for applications in electronics, optics, microelectromechanical systems, medical devices, microfluidic devices, and small satellites. This review paper

  4. Programmable femtosecond laser pulses in the ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, M.; Feurer, T.; Sauerbrey, R.; Lucza, T.; Szabo, G.

    2001-01-01

    Using a combination of a zero-dispersion compressor and spectrally compensated sum-frequency generation, we have produced amplitude-modulated femtosecond pulses in the UV at 200 nm. [copyright] 2001 Optical Society of America

  5. Characterization and modulation of femtosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorrer, Christophe

    1999-01-01

    This work brings some solutions to the characterization and control of femtosecond laser pulses. Spectral interferometry has been extensively studied; whereas this is a rather old technique, it has found new specific applications to short pulses. Several important points concerning the experimental implementation of this technique are treated. Sources of errors have been tracked and simple solutions have been found to enhance its reliability. A recently demonstrated technique for the complete characterization of short pulses has been used to characterize short pulses from Chirped Pulse Amplification Systems. This transposition of shearing interferometry to the optical frequency domain, known as Spectral Phase Interferometry for Direct Electric-field Reconstruction (SPlDER), is conceptually very interesting: for example, the inversion from the experimental data to the electric field to be characterized is completely algebraic. A reliable tool for the characterization and optimization of Chirped pulse amplification systems has been built on this principle. This is the first single-shot real-time characterization implementation of this technique. An improvement of the method has also allowed the first single-shot real-time characterization of a short pulse using a single mono-dimensional integrative detector and an algebraic inversion of the experimental data. The control of these pulses is also of prior interest. Through a collaboration with Thomson CSF-LCR, the demonstration of the use of an optically addressed light valve at the Fourier plane of a zero-dispersion line for spectral phase modulation has been made. This device allows a high-resolution control of the spectral phase of a short pulse. It is a well-adapted tool for the correction of the residual spectral phase, at the output of Chirped Pulse Amplification systems and the temporal synthesis of shaped pulses for specific experiments. (author) [fr

  6. Control of the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 superalloy by femtosecond laser beam cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J.; Ye, Y.; Sun, Z. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Liu, L., E-mail: liulei@tsinghua.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Zou, G., E-mail: sunzhg@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • Effects of processing parameters on the kerf size in Inconel 738 are investigated. • Defocus is a key parameter affecting the kerf width due to the intensity clamping. • The internal surface microstructures with different scanning speed are presented. • The material removal mechanism contains normal vaporization and phase explosion. • Oxidation mechanism is attributed to the trapping effect of the dangling bonds. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser beam cutting is becoming widely used to meet demands for increasing accuracy in micro-machining. In this paper, the effects of processing parameters in femtosecond laser beam cutting on the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 have been investigated. The defocus, pulse width and scanning speed were selected to study the controllability of the cutting process. Adjusting and matching the processing parameters was a basic enhancement method to acquire well defined kerf size and the high-quality ablation of microstructures, which has contributed to the intensity clamping effect. The morphology and chemical compositions of these microstructures on the cut surface have been characterized by a scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Additionally, the material removal mechanism and oxidation mechanism on the Inconel 738 cut surface have also been discussed on the basis of the femtosecond laser induced normal vaporization or phase explosion, and trapping effect of the dangling bonds.

  7. Femtosecond Synchronization of Laser Systems for the LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, John; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang; Staples, John; Wilcox, Russell; Arthur, John; Frisch, Josef; White, William

    2012-01-01

    The scientific potential of femtosecond x-ray pulses at linac-driven free-electron lasers such as the Linac Coherent Light Source is tremendous. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments require a measure of the relative arrival time of each x-ray pulse with respect to the experimental pump laser. An optical timing system based on stabilized fiber links has been developed for the LCLS to provide this synchronization. Preliminary results show synchronization of the installed stabilized links at the sub-20-femtosecond level. We present details of the implementation at LCLS and potential for future development.

  8. Bombyx mori silk protein films microprocessing with a nanosecond ultraviolet laser and a femtosecond laser workstation: theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazare, S.; Sionkowska, A.; Zaborowicz, M.; Planecka, A.; Lopez, J.; Dijoux, M.; Louména, C.; Hernandez, M.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Laser microprocessing of several biopolymers from renewable resources is studied. Three proteinic materials were either extracted from the extracellular matrix like Silk Fibroin/Sericin and collagen, or coming from a commercial source like gelatin. All can find future applications in biomedical experimentation, in particular for cell scaffolding. Films of ˜hundred of microns thick were made by aqueous solution drying and laser irradiation. Attention is paid to the properties making them processable with two laser sources: the ultraviolet and nanosecond (ns) KrF (248 nm) excimer and the infrared and femtosecond (fs) Yb:KGW laser. The UV radiation is absorbed in a one-photon resonant process to yield ablation and the surface foaming characteristics of a laser-induced pressure wave. To the contrary, resonant absorption of the IR photons of the fs laser is not possible and does not take place. However, the high field of the intense I>˜1012 W/cm2 femtosecond laser pulse ionizes the film by the multiphoton absorption followed by the electron impact mechanism, yielding a dense plasma capable to further absorb the incident radiation of the end of the pulse. The theoretical model of this absorption is described in detail, and used to discuss the presented experimental effects (cutting, ablation and foaming) of the fs laser. The ultraviolet laser was used to perform simultaneous multiple spots experiments in which energetic foaming yields melt ejection and filament spinning. Airborne nanosize filaments "horizontally suspended by both ends" (0.25 μm diameter and 10 μm length) of silk biopolymer were observed upon irradiation with large fluences.

  9. Photodisruption in biological tissues using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan

    Transparent materials do not ordinarily absorb visible or near-infrared light. However, the intensity of a tightly focused femtosecond laser pulse is great enough that nonlinear absorption of the laser energy takes place in transparent materials, leading to optical breakdown and permanent material modification. Because the absorption process is nonlinear, absorption and material modification are confined to the extremely small focal volume. Optical breakdown in transparent or semi-transparent biological tissues depends on intensity rather than energy. As a result, focused femtosecond pulses induce optical breakdown with significantly less pulse energy than is required with longer pulses. The use of femtosecond pulses therefore minimizes the amount of energy deposited into the targeted region of the sample, minimizing mechanical and thermal effects that lead to collateral damage in adjacent tissues. We demonstrate photodisruptive surgery in animal skin tissue and single cells using 100-fs laser pulses. In mouse skin, we create surface incisions and subsurface cavities with much less collateral damage to the surrounding tissue than is produced with picosecond pulses. Using pulses with only a few nanojoules of energy obtained from an unamplified femtosecond oscillator, we destroy single mitochondria in live cells without affecting cell viability, providing insights into the structure of the mitochondrial network. An apparatus is constructed to perform subcellular surgery and multiphoton 3D laser scanning imaging simultaneously with a single laser and objective lens.

  10. Laser ablation studies in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Edric; Forbes, A.; Turner, G. R.; Michaelis, Max M.

    2000-08-01

    With the launch of the South African National Laser Centre, new programs will need to be defined. Medical, environmental and industrial laser applications must obviously take top priority -- as opposed to the uranium isotope separation and military applications of the past. We argue however, that a small effort in laser ablation for space propulsion is justifiable, since a few very large CO2 lasers are available and since two tentative propulsion experiments have already been conducted in South Africa. We attempt to give LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) an equatorial and a Southern dimension.

  11. Dynamic behaviors of laser ablated Si particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyanagi, T.; Murakami, K.; Miyashita, A.; Yoda, O.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of laser-ablated Si particles produced by laser ablation have been investigated by time-and-space resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy in a time scale ranging from 0 ns to 120 ns with a time resolution of 10 ns. Neutral and charged particles are observed through all X-ray absorption spectra. Assignments of transitions from 2s and 2p initial states to higher Rydberg states of Si atom and ions are achieved, and we experimentally determine the L II,III absorption edges of neutral Si atom (Si 0 ) and Si + , Si 2+ , Si 3+ and Si 4+ ions. The main ablated particles are found to be Si atom and Si ions in the initial stage of 0 ns to 120 ns. The relative amounts depend strongly on times and laser energy densities. We find that the spatial distributions of particles produced by laser ablation are changed with supersonic helium gas bombardment, but no cluster formation takes place. This suggests that a higher-density region of helium gas is formed at the top of the plume of ablated particles, and free expansion of particles is restrained by this helium cloud, and that it takes more than 120 ns to form Si clusters. (author)

  12. Filament-induced remote surface ablation for long range laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohwetter, Ph.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Woeste, L.; Ackermann, R.; Mejean, G.; Salmon, E.; Kasparian, J.; Yu, J.; Wolf, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate laser induced ablation and plasma line emission from a metallic target at distances up to 180 m from the laser, using filaments (self-guided propagation structures ∼ 100 μm in diameter and ∼ 5 x 10 13 W/cm 2 in intensity) appearing as femtosecond and terawatt laser pulses propagating in air. The remarkable property of filaments to propagate over a long distance independently of the diffraction limit opens the frontier to long range operation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We call this special configuration of remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy 'remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy'. Our results show main features of filament-induced ablation on the surface of a metallic sample and associated plasma emission. Our experimental data allow us to estimate requirements for the detection system needed for kilometer-range remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiment

  13. Generation of nanoparticles of bronze and brass by laser ablation in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhov, I.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A., E-mail: Shafeev@kapella.gpi.ru [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Sygletou, M. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology—Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, Vassilika Vouton, GR-711 10, Heraklion (Greece); Stratakis, E.; Fotakis, C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology—Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece)

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles of brass and bronze are generated by ablation of corresponding bulk targets in liquid ethanol. The experiments were performed using three pulsed lasers with different pulse duration: ytterbium fiber laser (80 ns), a Neodymium:YAG laser (10 ps), and femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (200 fs). The generated nanoparticles (NPs) are characterized by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Raman scattering, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The size of generated NPs lies in the range 10–25 nm depending on the laser source. The X-ray diffractometry reveals the change of phase composition of brass NPs compared to the initial target in case of ablation with 80 ns laser source, while with 10 ps laser pulses this effect is less pronounced. Brass NPs generated with pico- and femtosecond laser radiation show the plasmon resonance in the vicinity of 560 nm and no plasmon peak for NPs generated with longer laser pulses. Raman analysis shows the presence of Cu{sub 2}O in generated NPs. The stability of generated NPs of both brass and bronze to oxidation is compared to that of Cu NPs generated in similar experimental conditions.

  14. Surface texturing of sialon ceramic by femtosecond pulsed laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, Lerato C

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AlONSi(sub3)N(sub4) ceramic using the Ti: Sapphire Femtosecond laser system was investigated. Parametric analysis was conducted using surface drilling, unidirectional and cross-hatching machining procedures performed on the substrate at a varied power...

  15. Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelet, Yohann; Houard, Aurélien; Arantchouk, Leonid; Forestier, Benjamin; Liu, Yi; Prade, Bernard; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2012-04-01

    A Tesla coil generator was designed to produce high voltage pulses oscillating at 100 kHz synchronisable with a nanosecond temporal jitter. Using this compact high voltage generator, we demonstrate reproducible meter long discharges in air at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Triggering and guiding of the discharges are performed in air by femtosecond laser filaments.

  16. Investigations on femtosecond laser modified micro-textured surface with anti-friction property on bearing steel GCr15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijun; Ding, Ye; Cheng, Bai; He, Jiangtao; Wang, Genwang; Wang, Yang

    2018-03-01

    This work puts forward femtosecond laser modification of micro-textured surface on bearing steel GCr15 in order to reduce frictional wear and enhance load capacity during its application. Multi pulses femtosecond laser ablation experiments are established for the confirmation of laser spot radius as well as single pulse threshold fluence and pulse incubation coefficient of bulk material. Analytical models are set up in combination with hydrodynamics lubrication theory. Corresponding simulations are carried out on to explore influences of surface and cross sectional morphology of textures on hydrodynamics lubrication effect based on Navier-Stokes (N-S) equation. Technological experiments focus on the impacts of femtosecond laser machining variables, like scanning times, scanning velocity, pulse frequency and scanning gap on morphology of grooves as well as realization of optimized textures proposed by simulations, mechanisms of which are analyzed from multiple perspectives. Results of unidirectional rotating friction tests suggest that spherical texture with depth-to-width ratio of 0.2 can significantly improve tribological properties at low loading and velocity condition comparing with un-textured and other textured surfaces, which also verifies the accuracy of simulations and feasibility of femtosecond laser in modification of micro-textured surface.

  17. Femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of silicon and germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reenaas, Turid Worren [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Lee, Yen Sian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chowdhury, Fatema Rezwana; Gupta, Manisha; Tsui, Ying Yin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Tou, Teck Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Ling [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kok, Soon Yie [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan, E-mail: seongshan@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Ge and Si were deposited by fs and ns laser at room temperature and at vacuum. • Ion of 10{sup 4} ms{sup −1} and 30–200 eV was obtained for ns ablation for Ge and Si. • Highly energetic ions of 10{sup 5} ms{sup −1} with 2–7 KeV were produced in fs laser ablation. • Nanocrystalline Si and Ge were deposited by using fs laser. • Nanoparticles < 10 nm haven been obtained by fs laser. - Abstract: 150 fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulsed laser deposition of Si and Ge were compared to a nanosecond KrF laser (25 ns). The ablation thresholds for ns lasers were about 2.5 J cm{sup −2} for Si and 2.1 J cm{sup −2} for Ge. The values were about 5–10 times lower when fs laser were used. The power densities were 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup −2} for ns but 10{sup 12} W cm{sup −2} for fs. By using an ion probe, the ions emission at different fluence were measured where the emitting ions achieving the velocity in the range of 7–40 km s{sup −1} and kinetic energy in the range of 30–200 eV for ns laser. The ion produced by fs laser was measured to be highly energetic, 90–200 km s{sup −1}, 2–10 KeV. Two ion peaks were detected above specific laser fluence for both ns and fs laser ablation. Under fs laser ablation, the films were dominated by nano-sized crystalline particles, drastically different from nanosecond pulsed laser deposition where amorphous films were obtained. The ions characteristics and effects of pulse length on the properties of the deposited films were discussed.

  18. Fullerene-reduced graphene oxide composites obtained by ultrashort laser ablation of fullerite in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bonis, A., E-mail: angela.debonis@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100, Potenza (Italy); Curcio, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100, Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A. [CNR-ISM, U.O.S. Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, 85050, Tito Scalo (PZ) (Italy); Rau, J.V. [CNR-ISM, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133, Rome (Italy); Galasso, A.; Teghil, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100, Potenza (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser ablation of a fullerite target in water performed by an ultra-short laser source has been reported. • The formation of reduced graphene oxide has been described considering the laser ablation in liquid mechanism. • Fullerene-reduced graphene oxide composite, in the form of self assembled microtubes, has been described. - Abstract: The laser ablation in liquid of carbon-based solid targets is of particular interest thanks to the possibility of obtaining different carbon allotropes by varying the experimental parameters employed. The ablation of a fullerite target in water using a frequency-doubled Nd:glass laser source with a pulse duration of 250 fs and a frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz is presented. The obtained products have been characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies and by X-ray photoelectron and micro-Raman spectroscopies. During the femtosecond laser ablation, the collapse of fullerene cages has been considered with the consequent formation of graphene oxide (GO) and its successive hydrogenation. The process of self-assembling in microtube structures of the formed reduced graphene oxide-fullerene composites has then been reported.

  19. Time-resolved study of femtosecond laser induced micro-modifications inside transparent brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Domke, M.; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-03-01

    Laser processing of optically transparent or semi-transparent, brittle materials is finding wide use in various manufacturing sectors. For example, in consumer electronic devices such as smartphones or tablets, cover glass needs to be cut precisely in various shapes. The unique advantage of material processing with femtosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition in nearly all types of solid materials. When an ultra-short laser pulse is focused inside glass, only the localized region in the neighborhood of the focal volume absorbs laser energy by nonlinear optical absorption. Therefore, the processing volume is strongly defined, while the rest of the target stays unaffected. Thus ultra-short pulse lasers allow cutting of the chemically strengthened glasses such as Corning Gorilla glass without cracking. Non-ablative cutting of transparent, brittle materials, using the newly developed femtosecond process ClearShapeTM from Spectra-Physics, is based on producing a micron-sized material modification track with well-defined geometry inside. The key point for development of the process is to understand the induced modification by a single femtosecond laser shot. In this paper, pump-probe microscopy techniques have been applied to study the defect formation inside of transparent materials, namely soda-lime glass samples, on a time scale between one nanosecond to several tens of microseconds. The observed effects include acoustic wave propagation as well as mechanical stress formation in the bulk of the glass. Besides better understanding of underlying physical mechanisms, our experimental observations have enabled us to find optimal process parameters for the glass cutting application and lead to better quality and speed for the ClearShapeTM process.

  20. Formation of organic layer on femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumaru, Naoki, E-mail: yasuma@fukui-nct.ac.jp [National Institute of Technology, Fukui College, Sabae, Fukui 916-8507 (Japan); Sentoku, Eisuke [National Institute of Technology, Fukui College, Sabae, Fukui 916-8507 (Japan); Kiuchi, Junsuke [Eyetec Co., Ltd., Sabae, Fukui 916-0016 (Japan)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Surface analyses of two types of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on titanium were conducted. • The parallel-oriented ultrafine LIPSS showed the almost same roughness and chemical states as the non-irradiated Ti surface. • The well-known perpendicular-oriented LIPSS were typically covered with an organic layer similar to a cellulose derivative. - Abstract: Two types of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formed on titanium by femtosecond (fs) laser pulses (λ = 800 nm, τ = 180 fs, ν = 1 kHz) in air were investigated experimentally. At a laser fluence F above the ablation threshold, LIPSS with a minimum mean spacing of D < λ⁄2 were observed perpendicular to the laser polarization direction. In contrast, for F slightly below than the ablation threshold, ultrafine LIPSS with a minimum value of D < λ/10 were formed parallel to the polarization direction. The surface roughness of the parallel-oriented LIPSS was almost the same as that of the non-irradiated surface, unlike the high roughness of the perpendicular-oriented LIPSS. In addition, although the surface state of the parallel-oriented LIPSS was the same as that of the non-irradiated surface, the perpendicular-oriented LIPSS were covered with an organic thin film similar to a cellulose derivative that cannot be easily formed by conventional chemical synthesis. The results of these surface analyses indicate that these two types of LIPSS are formed through different mechanisms. This fs-laser processing technique may become a new technology for the artificial synthesis of cellulose derivatives.

  1. Excimer laser ablation of the cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, George H.; Ediger, Marwood N.; Weiblinger, Richard P.

    1995-03-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet laser ablation is being extensively investigated clinically to reshape the optical surface of the eye and correct vision defects. Current knowledge of the laser/tissue interaction and the present state of the clinical evaluation are reviewed. In addition, the principal findings of internal Food and Drug Administration research are described in some detail, including a risk assessment of the laser-induced-fluorescence and measurement of the nonlinear optical properties of cornea during the intense UV irradiation. Finally, a survey is presented of the alternative laser technologies being explored for this ophthalmic application.

  2. Femtosecond laser-matter interaction theory, experiments and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gamaly, Eugene G

    2011-01-01

    Basics of Ultra-Short Laser-Solid InteractionsSubtle Atomic Motion Preceding a Phase Transition: Birth, Life and Death of PhononsUltra-Fast Disordering by fs-Lasers: Superheating Prior to Entropy CatastropheAblation of SolidsUltra-Short Laser-Matter Interaction Confined Inside a Bulk of Transparent SolidApplications of Ultra-Short Laser-Matter InteractionsConclusion Remarks.

  3. Regularly arranged indium islands on glass/molybdenum substrates upon femtosecond laser and physical vapor deposition processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringleb, F.; Eylers, K.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T., E-mail: torsten.boeck@ikz-berlin.de [Leibniz-Institute for Crystal Growth, Max-Born-Straße 2, Berlin 12489 (Germany); Symietz, C.; Bonse, J.; Andree, S.; Krüger, J. [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, Berlin 12205 (Germany); Heidmann, B.; Schmid, M. [Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimalle 14, Berlin 14195 (Germany); Nanooptical Concepts for PV, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, Berlin 14109 (Germany); Lux-Steiner, M. [Nanooptical Concepts for PV, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, Berlin 14109 (Germany); Heterogeneous Material Systems, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, Berlin 14109 (Germany)

    2016-03-14

    A bottom-up approach is presented for the production of arrays of indium islands on a molybdenum layer on glass, which can serve as micro-sized precursors for indium compounds such as copper-indium-gallium-diselenide used in photovoltaics. Femtosecond laser ablation of glass and a subsequent deposition of a molybdenum film or direct laser processing of the molybdenum film both allow the preferential nucleation and growth of indium islands at the predefined locations in a following indium-based physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. A proper choice of laser and deposition parameters ensures the controlled growth of indium islands exclusively at the laser ablated spots. Based on a statistical analysis, these results are compared to the non-structured molybdenum surface, leading to randomly grown indium islands after PVD.

  4. Picosecond laser ablation of porcine sclera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góra, Wojciech S.; Harvey, Eleanor M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Parson, Simon H.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Lasers have been shown to be successful in certain medical procedures and they have been identified as potentially making a major contribution to the development of minimally invasive procedures. However, the uptake is not as widespread and there is scope for many other applications where laser devices may offer a significant advantage in comparison to the traditional surgical tools. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential of using a picosecond laser for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy. Experiments were carried out on porcine scleral samples due to the comparable properties to human tissue. Samples were prepared with a 5mm diameter trephine and were stored in lactated Ringer's solution. After laser machining, the samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, then dried and investigated under SEM. The laser used in the experiments is an industrial picosecond TRUMPF TruMicro laser operating at a wavelength of 1030nm, pulse length of 6ps, repetition rate of 1 kHz and a focused spot diameter of 30μm. The laser beam was scanned across the samples with the use of a galvanometer scan head and various ablation patterns were investigated. Processing parameters (pulse energy, spot and line separation) which allow for the most efficient laser ablation of scleral tissue without introducing any collateral damage were investigated. The potential to create various shapes, such as linear incisions, square cavities and circular cavities was demonstrated.

  5. Micromachining of semiconductor by femtosecond laser for integrated circuit defect analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbwax, M.; Sarnet, T.; Hermann, J.; Delaporte, Ph.; Sentis, M.; Fares, L.; Haller, G.

    2007-01-01

    The latest International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) has highlighted the detection and analysis of defects in Integrated Circuits (IC) as a major challenge faced by the semiconductor industry. Advanced tools used today for defect cross sectioning include dual beams (focused ion- and electron-beam technologies) with resolution down to the sub-Angstrom level. However ion milling an IC with a FIB is time consuming because of the need to open wide cavities in front of the cross-sections that need to be analyzed. Therefore the use of a femtosecond laser as a tool for direct material removal is discussed in this paper. Experiments were performed on IC structures to reveal the different layers of fabrication: selective or total ablation can occur depending on the laser energy density, without delamination of the layers. Different laser irradiation conditions like pressure (air, vacuum), polarization, beam shaping, and scanning parameters have been used to produce different types of cavities. The femtosecond laser engraving of silicon-based structures could be useful for cross-sectioning devices but also for other applications like direct-write lithography, photomask repair, maskless implantation or reverse engineering/restructuring

  6. Micromachining of semiconductor by femtosecond laser for integrated circuit defect analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbwax, M. [Laboratoire LP3 CNRS UMR 6182, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Case 917, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France); Sarnet, T. [Laboratoire LP3 CNRS UMR 6182, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Case 917, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France)], E-mail: sarnet@lp3.univ-mrs.fr; Hermann, J.; Delaporte, Ph.; Sentis, M. [Laboratoire LP3 CNRS UMR 6182, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Case 917, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France); Fares, L.; Haller, G. [STMicroelectronics, 190 Avenue Celestin Coq, ZI, 13106 Rousset Cedex (France)

    2007-12-15

    The latest International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) has highlighted the detection and analysis of defects in Integrated Circuits (IC) as a major challenge faced by the semiconductor industry. Advanced tools used today for defect cross sectioning include dual beams (focused ion- and electron-beam technologies) with resolution down to the sub-Angstrom level. However ion milling an IC with a FIB is time consuming because of the need to open wide cavities in front of the cross-sections that need to be analyzed. Therefore the use of a femtosecond laser as a tool for direct material removal is discussed in this paper. Experiments were performed on IC structures to reveal the different layers of fabrication: selective or total ablation can occur depending on the laser energy density, without delamination of the layers. Different laser irradiation conditions like pressure (air, vacuum), polarization, beam shaping, and scanning parameters have been used to produce different types of cavities. The femtosecond laser engraving of silicon-based structures could be useful for cross-sectioning devices but also for other applications like direct-write lithography, photomask repair, maskless implantation or reverse engineering/restructuring.

  7. Atmospheric pressure imaging mass spectrometry of drugs with various ablating lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshkunov, K A; Alimpiev, S S; Pento, A V; Grechnikov, A A; Nikifirov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric detection efficiency of organic species (tofisopam and verapamil) was measured by means of the laser ablation of dried solution drops containing known amount of the analyte. Ablated molecules were ionized by an atmospheric pressure laser plasma cell and then introduced in the TOF mass-spectrometer. The spot was formed by dripping 2 μl of solution on the stainless steel substrate and consequent drying. Then it was scanned by an intense ablating beam of various lasers (CO 2 , Nd:YAG and femtosecond fiber laser) until the spot was completely eroded during the non-stop MS-analysis of ablated material. The sensitivity was defined as the ratio of the total ion current integral of the relevant mass peaks to the amount of molecules in the spot. All the tested lasers are suitable for the ablation and subsequent MS-detection of organic species in dried solution spots given enough power deposition is provided. The measured sensitivity values reach 0.1 ions/fg of tested analytes

  8. [Advantages and disadvantages of femtosecond laser assisted LASIK and SMILE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F J; Sun, M S

    2018-01-11

    With the development of excimer laser and femtosecond laser equipment, application of diversified and customized surgical decision in modern corneal refractive surgery has been an inevitable trend. However, how to make a personalized decision with an accurate surgical design to achieve better visual quality becomes the main focus in clinical applications. Small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond assisted laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK) have been commonly acknowledged as the mainstream of corneal refractive surgery for ametropia correction nowadays. Both methods have been verified by clinical practice for many years. This article compares and elaborates the different characteristics with advantages and disadvantages of the two methods so as to provide some reasonable treatment options for refractive surgery. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2018, 54: 7-10) .

  9. Testing of a femtosecond pulse laser in outer space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Jang, Heesuk; Han, Seongheum; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Kyung-In; Lim, Chul-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    We report a test operation of an Er-doped fibre femtosecond laser which was conducted for the first time in outer space. The fibre-based ultrashort pulse laser payload was designed to meet space-use requirements, undergone through ground qualification tests and finally launched into a low-earth orbit early in 2013. Test results obtained during a one-year mission lifetime confirmed stable mode-locking all the way through although the radiation induced attenuation (RIA) in the Er-doped gain fibre caused an 8.6% reduction in the output power. This successful test operation would help facilitate diverse scientific and technological applications of femtosecond lasers in space and earth atmosphere in the near future. PMID:24875665

  10. Simultaneous time-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements of dielectrics excited with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Haahr-Lillevang, L.; Siegel, J.; Balling, P.; Guizard, S.; Solis, J.

    2017-06-01

    Simultaneous time-and-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements over a temporal span of 300 ps have been performed in fused silica and sapphire samples excited with 800 nm, 120 fs laser pulses at energies slightly and well above the ablation threshold. The experimental results have been simulated in the frame of a multiple-rate equation model including light propagation. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the reflectivity and the interferometric measurements at 400 nm clearly shows that the two techniques interrogate different material volumes during the course of the process. While the former is sensitive to the evolution of the plasma density in a very thin ablating layer at the surface, the second yields an averaged plasma density over a larger volume. It is shown that self-trapped excitons do not appreciably contribute to carrier relaxation in fused silica at fluences above the ablation threshold, most likely due to Coulomb screening effects at large excited carrier densities. For both materials, at fluences well above the ablation threshold, the maximum measured plasma reflectivity shows a saturation behavior consistent with a scattering rate proportional to the plasma density in this fluence regime. Moreover, for both materials and for pulse energies above the ablation threshold and delays in the few tens of picoseconds range, a simultaneous "low reflectivity" and "low transmission" behavior is observed. Although this behavior has been identified in the past as a signature of femtosecond laser-induced ablation, its origin is alternatively discussed in terms of the optical properties of a material undergoing strong isochoric heating, before having time to substantially expand or exchange energy with the surrounding media.

  11. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-01-01

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  12. Femtosecond laser-induced cross-periodic structures on a crystalline silicon surface under low pulse number irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xu; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei; Han, Weina; Liu, Yang; Wang, Andong; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    A cross-patterned surface periodic structure in femtosecond laser processing of crystalline silicon was revealed under a relatively low shots (4 energy slightly higher than the ablation threshold. The experimental results indicated that the cross-pattern was composed of mutually orthogonal periodic structures (ripples). Ripples with a direction perpendicular to laser polarization (R⊥) spread in the whole laser-modified region, with the periodicity around 780 nm which was close to the central wavelength of the laser. Other ripples with a direction parallel to laser polarization (R‖) were found to be distributed between two of the adjacent ripples R⊥, with a periodicity about the sub-wavelength of the irradiated laser, 390 nm. The geometrical morphology of two mutually orthogonal ripples under static femtosecond laser irradiation could be continuously rotated as the polarization directions changed, but the periodicity remained almost unchanged. The underlying physical mechanism was revealed by numerical simulations based on the finite element method. It was found that the incubation effect with multiple shots, together with the redistributed electric field after initial ablation, plays a crucial role in the generation of the cross-patterned periodic surface structures.

  13. Porcine cadaver iris model for iris heating during corneal surgery with a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Jiang; Yan, Ying; Juhasz, Tibor; Kurtz, Ron

    2015-03-01

    Multiple femtosecond lasers have now been cleared for use for ophthalmic surgery, including for creation of corneal flaps in LASIK surgery. Preliminary study indicated that during typical surgical use, laser energy may pass beyond the cornea with potential effects on the iris. As a model for laser exposure of the iris during femtosecond corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature rise in porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by the femtosecond laser. Additionally, ex-vivo iris heating due to femtosecond laser irradiation was measured with an infrared thermal camera (Fluke corp. Everett, WA) as a validation of the simulation.

  14. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...... ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...

  15. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...... of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...

  16. Direct welding of glass and metal by 1  kHz femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua

    2015-10-20

    In the welding process between similar or dissimilar materials, inserting an intermediate layer and pressure assistance are usually thought to be necessary. In this paper, the direct welding between alumina-silicate glass and metal (aluminum, copper, and steel), under exposure from 1 kHz femtosecond laser pulses without any auxiliary processes, is demonstrated. The micron/nanometer-sized metal particles induced by laser ablation were considered to act as the adhesive in the welding process. The welding parameters were optimized by varying the pulse energy and the translation velocity of the sample. The shear joining strength characterized by a shear force testing equipment was as high as 2.34 MPa. This direct bonding technology has potential for applications in medical devices, sensors, and photovoltaic devices.

  17. Femtosecond laser modification of an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes intercalated with Fe phase nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labunov, Vladimir; Prudnikava, Alena; Bushuk, Serguei; Filatov, Serguei; Shulitski, Boris; Tay, Beng Kang; Shaman, Yury; Basaev, Alexander

    2013-09-03

    Femtosecond lasers (FSL) are playing an increasingly important role in materials research, characterization, and modification. Due to an extremely short pulse width, interactions of FSL irradiation with solid surfaces attract special interest, and a number of unusual phenomena resulted in the formation of new materials are expected. Here, we report on a new nanostructure observed after the interaction of FSL irradiation with arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) intercalated with iron phase catalyst nanoparticles. It was revealed that the FSL laser ablation transforms the topmost layer of CNT array into iron phase nanospheres (40 to 680 nm in diameter) located at the tip of the CNT bundles of conical shape. Besides, the smaller nanospheres (10 to 30 nm in diameter) are found to be beaded at the sides of these bundles. Some of the larger nanospheres are encapsulated into carbon shells, which sometime are found to contain CNTs. The mechanism of creation of such nanostructures is proposed.

  18. Analysis of chirality by femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Philipp; Urbasch, Gunter; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2012-09-01

    Recent progress in the field of chirality analysis employing laser ionization mass spectrometry is reviewed. Emphasis is given to femtosecond (fs) laser ionization work from the author's group. We begin by reviewing fundamental aspects of determining circular dichroism (CD) in fs-laser ionization mass spectrometry (fs-LIMS) discussing an example from the literature (resonant fs-LIMS of 3-methylcyclopentanone). Second, we present new data indicating CD in non-resonant fs-LIMS of propylene oxide. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. Opto-injection into single living cells by femtosecond near-infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng

    This dissertation presents a novel technique to deliver membrane impermeable molecules into single living cells with the assistance of femtosecond (fs) near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. This approach merges ultrafast laser technology with key biological, biomedical, and medical applications, such as gene transfection, gene therapy and drug delivery. This technique promises several major advantages, namely, very high transfection efficiency, high cell survival rate (≈100%) and fully preserved cell viabilities. It is also a promising method to deliver molecules into cells that are difficult or even completely resistant to established physical methods, such as microinjection by glass pipettes, electroporation, and biolistics. In this work, the system for fs NIR opto-injection was designed and built. Successful fs NIR opto-injection has been performed on several cell systems including single mammalian cells (bovine aortic endothelial cells), marine animal eggs (Spisula solidissima oocytes), and human cancer cells (fibrosarcoma HT1080) cultured in a tissue-like environment. The connections between laser parameters and cell responses were explored through further experiments and in-depth analyses, especially the relationship between dye uptake rate and incident laser intensity, and the relationship between pore size created on cell membranes and incident laser intensity. Dye uptake rate of the target cells was observed to depend on incident laser intensity. Pore size was found dependent on incident laser intensity. The conclusion was made that laser-induced breakdown and plasma-induced ablation in cell membrane are the physical principles that govern the process of fs NIR opto-injection.

  20. Laser ablation comparison by picosecond pulses train and nanosecond pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Filippov, M. N.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of laser ablation by a train of picosecond pulses and nanosecond pulses revealed a difference in laser craters, ablation thresholds, plasma sizes and spectral line intensities. Laser ablation with a train of picosecond pulses resulted in improved crater quality while ablated mass decreased up to 30%. A reduction in laser plasma dimensions for picosecond train ablation was observed while the intensity of atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was greater by a factor of 2-4 indicating an improved excitation and atomization in the plasma.

  1. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mazur, Eric [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  2. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael; Mazur, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  3. Femtosecond laser-induced microstructures on Ti substrates for reduced cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, J.; Plamadeala, C.; Muck, M.; Armbruster, O.; Baumgartner, W.; Weth, A.; Steinwender, C.; Blessberger, H.; Kellermair, J.; Kirner, S. V.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J.; Guntner, A. S.; Hassel, A. W.

    2017-12-01

    Miniaturized pacemakers with a surface consisting of a Ti alloy may have to be removed after several years from their implantation site in the heart and shall, therefore, not be completely overgrown by cells or tissue. A method to avoid this may be to create at the surface by laser-ablation self-organized sharp conical spikes, which provide too little surface for cells (i.e., fibroblasts) to grow on. For this purpose, Ti-alloy substrates were irradiated in the air by 790 nm Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulses at fluences above the ablation threshold. The laser irradiation resulted in pronounced microstructure formation with hierarchical surface morphologies. Murine fibroblasts were seeded onto the laser-patterned surface and the coverage by cells was evaluated after 3-21 days of cultivation by means of scanning electron microscopy. Compared to flat surfaces, the cell density on the microstructures was significantly lower, the coverage was incomplete, and the cells had a clearly different morphology. The best results regarding suppression of cell growth were obtained on spike structures which were additionally electrochemically oxidized under acidic conditions. Cell cultivation with additional shear stress could reduce further the number of adherent cells.

  4. Realignment process of actin stress fibers in single living cells studied by focused femtosecond laser irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Yasukuni, Ryohei; Spitz, Jean-Alexis; Meallet-Renault, Rachel; Negishi, Takayuki; Tada, Takuji; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Asahi, Tsuyoshi; Shukunami, Chisa; Hiraki, Yuji; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional dissection of a single actin stress fiber in a living cell was performed based on multi-photon absorption of a focused femtosecond laser pulse. The realignment process of an actin stress fiber was investigated after its direct cutting by a single-shot femtosecond laser pulse irradiation by high-speed transmission and fluorescence imaging methods. It was confirmed that mechanical force led by the femtosecond laser cutting propagates to entire cell through the cytockelton in a...

  5. Effects of Femtosecond Terawatt Laser Pulses on Materials Similar to Porcine Skin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumru, Semih S; Noojin, Gary D; Rockwell, Benjamin A

    2004-01-01

    As the laser technology advances and the availability of high power femtosecond pulsed laser systems increase, the urgency to have damage thresholds and ED50 data on these new laser systems becomes...

  6. Optical cell cleaning with NIR femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond laser microscopes have been used as both micro and nanosurgery tools. The optical knock-out of undesired cells in multiplex cell clusters shall be further reported on in this study. Femtosecond laser-induced cell death is beneficial due to the reduced collateral side effects and therefore can be used to selectively destroy target cells within monolayers, as well as within 3D tissues, all the while preserving cells of interest. This is an important characteristic for the application in stem cell research and cancer treatment. Non-precise damage compromises the viability of neighboring cells by inducing side effects such as stress to the cells surrounding the target due to the changes in the microenvironment, resulting from both the laser and laser-exposed cells. In this study, optimum laser parameters for optical cleaning by isolating single cells and cell colonies are exploited through the use of automated software control. Physiological equilibrium and cellular responses to the laser induced damages are also investigated. Cell death dependence on laser focus, determination and selectivity of intensity/dosage, controllable damage and cell recovery mechanisms are discussed.

  7. On interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with cluster targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skobelev, I.Yu.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Magunov, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    The clusters heating through the femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically and experimentally studied. Both the process of the cluster target formation and results of the cluster plasma experimental studies through the emission X-ray spectroscopy methods are considered. The numerical model of clusters formation in the supersonic gaseous jet is proposed. It is shown that detailed studies on the two-phase gas-dynamic processes in the nozzle, forming the jet, make it possible to obtain spatial distributions of all cluster parameters, necessary for correct calculations of the clusters. The simple physical model of the plasma formation through the femtosecond laser method is proposed. It is shown that comparison of the observed X-ray spectra with the results of the detailed ion kinetics calculations, make it possible to determine the basic parameters of the formed plasma [ru

  8. Beam wandering of femtosecond laser filament in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Zeng, Tao; Lin, Lie; Liu, Weiwei

    2015-10-05

    The spatial wandering of a femtosecond laser filament caused by the filament heating effect in air has been studied. An empirical formula has also been derived from the classical Karman turbulence model, which determines quantitatively the displacement of the beam center as a function of the propagation distance and the effective turbulence structure constant. After fitting the experimental data with this formula, the effective turbulence structure constant has been estimated for a single filament generated in laboratory environment. With this result, one may be able to estimate quantitatively the displacement of a filament over long distance propagation and interpret the practical performance of the experiments assisted by femtosecond laser filamentation, such as remote air lasing, pulse compression, high order harmonic generation (HHG), etc.

  9. Ultraviolet-laser ablation of skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, R.J.; Linsker, R.; Wynne, J.J.; Torres, A.; Geronemus, R.G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors report on the use of pulsed ultraviolet-laser irradiation at 193 nm from an argon-fluoride laser and at 248 nm from a krypton-fluoride laser to ablate skin. In vitro, both wavelengths performed comparably, removing tissue precisely and cleanly, and leaving minimal thermal damage to the surrounding tissue. In vivo, the 193-nm laser radiation failed to remove tissue after bleeding began. The 248-nm radiation, however, continued to remove tissue despite bleeding and left a clean incision with only minimal thermal damage. The krypton-fluoride excimer laser beam at 248 nm, which should be deliverable through a quartz optical fiber, has great potential as a surgical instrument.

  10. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan Joe Saetveit

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 (micro)g L -1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 (micro)L injection in a physiological saline matrix

  11. Modeling CO2 Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO 2 laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO 2 laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  12. Conical Double Frequency Emission by Femtosecond Laser Pulses from DKDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi-Peng, Zhang; Hong-Bing, Jiang; Shan-Chun, Tang; Qi-Huang, Gong

    2009-01-01

    Conical double frequency emission is investigated by femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 800 nm in a DKDP crystal. It is demonstrated that the sum frequency of incident wave and its scattering wave accounts for the conical double frequency emission. The gaps on the conical rings are observed and they are very sensitive to the propagation direction, and thus could be used to detect the small angle deviation of surface direction. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  13. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  14. Fiber inline Michelson interferometer fabricated by a femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wei, Tao; Han, Qun; Wang, Hanzheng; Huang, Jie; Jiang, Lan; Xiao, Hai

    2012-11-01

    A fiber inline Michelson interferometer was fabricated by micromachining a step structure at the tip of a single-mode optical fiber using a femtosecond laser. The step structure splits the fiber core into two reflection paths and produces an interference signal. A fringe visibility of 18 dB was achieved. Temperature sensing up to 1000°C was demonstrated using the fabricated assembly-free device.

  15. Influence of femtosecond laser produced nanostructures on biofilm growth on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperlein, Nadja; Menzel, Friederike; Schwibbert, Karin; Koter, Robert; Bonse, Jörn; Sameith, Janin; Krüger, Jörg; Toepel, Jörg

    2017-10-01

    Biofilm formation poses high risks in multiple industrial and medical settings. However, the robust nature of biofilms makes them also attractive for industrial applications where cell biocatalysts are increasingly in use. Since tailoring material properties that affect bacterial growth or its inhibition is gaining attention, here we focus on the effects of femtosecond laser produced nanostructures on bacterial adhesion. Large area periodic surface structures were generated on steel surfaces using 30-fs laser pulses at 790 nm wavelength. Two types of steel exhibiting a different corrosion resistance were used, i.e., a plain structural steel (corrodible) and a stainless steel (resistant to corrosion). Homogeneous fields of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were realized utilizing laser fluences close to the ablation threshold while scanning the sample under the focused laser beam in a multi-pulse regime. The nanostructures were characterized with optical and scanning electron microscopy. For each type of steel, more than ten identical samples were laser-processed. Subsequently, the samples were subjected to microbial adhesion tests. Bacteria of different shape and adhesion behavior (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) were exposed to laser structures and to polished reference surfaces. Our results indicate that E. coli preferentially avoids adhesion to the LIPSS-covered areas, whereas S. aureus favors these areas for colonization.

  16. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  17. Chalcogen doping of silicon via intense femtosecond-laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehy, Michael A.; Tull, Brian R.; Friend, Cynthia M.; Mazur, Eric

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that doping silicon with sulfur via femtosecond-laser irradiation leads to near-unity absorption of radiation from ultraviolet wavelengths to below band gap short-wave infrared wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate that doping silicon with two other group VI elements (chalcogens), selenium and tellurium, also leads to near-unity broadband absorption. A powder of the chalcogen dopant is spread on the silicon substrate and irradiated with femtosecond-laser pulses. We examine and compare the resulting morphology, optical properties, and chemical composition for each chalcogen-doped substrate before and after thermal annealing. Thermal annealing reduces the absorption of below band gap radiation by an amount that correlates with the diffusivity of the chalcogen dopant used to make the sample. We propose a mechanism for the absorption of below band gap radiation based on defects in the lattice brought about by the femtosecond-laser irradiation and the presence of a supersaturated concentration of chalcogen dopant atoms. The selenium and tellurium doped samples show particular promise for use in infrared photodetectors as they retain most of their infrared absorptance even after thermal annealing-a necessary step in many semiconductor device manufacturing processes

  18. Cutting and machining energetic materials with a femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeske, Frank; Benterou, Jerry; Lee, Ronald; Roos, Edward [Energetic Materials Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2003-04-01

    A femtosecond (fs) laser has been used as a tool for solving many problems involving access, machining, disassembly, inspection and avoidance of undesirable hazardous waste streams in systems containing energetic materials. Because of the unique properties of the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with matter, the femtosecond laser can be used to safely cut these energetic materials in a precise manner without creating an unacceptable waste stream. Many types of secondary high explosives (HE) and propellants have been cut with the laser for a variety of applications ranging from disassembly of aging conventional weapons (demilitarization), inspection of energetic components of aging systems to creating unique shapes of HE for purposes of initiation and detonation physics studies. Hundreds of samples of energetic materials have been cut with the fs laser without ignition and, in most cases, without changing the surface morphology of the cut surfaces. The laser has also been useful in cutting nonenergetic components in close proximity to energetic materials. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Design of a femtosecond laser assisted tomographic atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gault, B.; Vurpillot, F.; Vella, A.; Gilbert, M.; Menand, A.; Blavette, D.; Deconihout, B.

    2006-01-01

    A tomographic atom probe (TAP) in which the atoms are field evaporated by means of femtosecond laser pulses has been designed. It is shown that the field evaporation is assisted by the laser field enhanced by the subwavelength dimensions of the specimen without any significant heating of the specimen. In addition, as compared with the conventional TAP, due to the very short duration of laser pulses, no spread in the energy of emitted ions is observed, leading to a very high mass resolution in a straight TAP in a wide angle configuration. At last, laser pulses can be used to bring the intense electric field required for the field evaporation on poor conductive materials such as intrinsic Si at low temperature. In this article, the performance of the laser TAP is described and illustrated through the investigation of metals, oxides, and silicon materials

  20. Inertial effects in laser-driven ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrach, R.J.; Szeoke, A.; Howard, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    The gasdynamic partial differential equations (PDE's) governing the motion of an ablatively accelerated target (rocket) contain an inertial force term that arises from acceleration of the reference frame in which the PDE's are written. We give a simple, intuitive description of this effect, and estimate its magnitude and parametric dependences by means of approximate analytical formulas inferred from our computer hydrocode calculations. Often this inertial term is negligible, but for problems in the areas of laser fusion and laser equation of state studies we find that it can substantially reduce the attainable hydrodynamic efficiency of acceleration and implosion

  1. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.E.; Bodla, R.; Eiden, G.C.; Nogar, N.S.; Smith, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    Resonant laser ablation (RLA) typically relies on irradiation of a sample in a mass spectrometer with modest intensity laser pulses tuned to a one or two photon resonant transition in the analyte of interest. This paper shows that RLA is well suited for highly sensitive analyses of complex samples. The examples actually studied are trace components in rhenium and technetium in nickel. The authors also studied the 2+1 multiphoton ionization spectrum of iron-56 detected by RLA of Re containing 70 ppm iron. Two-photon transition rates for Fe transitions were calculated perturbatively and found to agree semi-quantitatively with experimentally observed intensities. 17 refs., 3 figs

  2. Ablation of polymers by ultraviolet pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezini, A.; Benharrats, N.

    1993-08-01

    The surface modifications of different polymers treated by far UV-Excimer laser (λ = 193mn, 248, 308nm) are analysed by X-Ray Photoelectrons Spectroscopy. The main feature observed depends strongly on the absorption coefficients. For the high absorbing polymers such (PVC, PS, PI,...) the mechanism of the UV-Excimer Laser interaction appears to be governed by an ablative photodecomposition process (APD) with an APD threshold. In the other limit, i.e. low absorbing polymer the interaction leads to a photothermal process. (author). 51 refs, 24 figs, 7 tabs

  3. Laser Ablation Increases PEM/Catalyst Interfacial Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay; Yalisove, Steve

    2009-01-01

    An investigational method of improving the performance of a fuel cell that contains a polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) is based on the concept of roughening the surface of the PEM, prior to deposition of a thin layer of catalyst, in order to increase the PEM/catalyst interfacial area and thereby increase the degree of utilization of the catalyst. The roughening is done by means of laser ablation under carefully controlled conditions. Next, the roughened membrane surface is coated with the thin layer of catalyst (which is typically platinum), then sandwiched between two electrode/catalyst structures to form a membrane/ele c t - rode assembly. The feasibility of the roughening technique was demonstrated in experiments in which proton-conducting membranes made of a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, protonconducting polymer were ablated by use of femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that when proper combinations of the pulse intensity, pulse-repetition rate, and number of repetitions was chosen, the initially flat, smooth membrane surfaces became roughened to such an extent as to be converted to networks of nodules interconnected by filaments (see Figure 1). In further experiments, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed on a pristine (smooth) membrane and on two laser-roughened membranes after the membranes were coated with platinum on both sides. Some preliminary EIS data were interpreted as showing that notwithstanding the potential for laser-induced damage, the bulk conductivities of the membranes were not diminished in the roughening process. Other preliminary EIS data (see Figure 2) were interpreted as signifying that the surface areas of the laser-roughened membranes were significantly greater than those of the smooth membrane. Moreover, elemental analyses showed that the sulfur-containing molecular groups necessary for proton conduction remained intact, even near the laser-roughened surfaces. These preliminary results can be taken

  4. Recolonization of laser-ablated bacterial biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Kanavillil; Obika, Hideki; Utsumi, Akihiro; Toshihiko, Ooie; Yano, Tetsuo

    2004-01-20

    The recolonization of laser-ablated bacterial monoculture biofilm was studied in the laboratory by using a flow-cytometer system. The marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora was used to develop biofilms on titanium coupons. Upon exposure to a low-power pulsed irradiation from an Nd:YAG laser, the coupons with biofilm were significantly reduced both in terms of total viable count (TVC) and area cover. The energy density used for a pulse of 5 ns was 0.1 J/cm(2) and the durations of irradiation exposure were 5 and 10 min. When placed in a flow of dilute ZoBell marine broth medium (10%) the laser-destructed bacterial film in a flow-cytometer showed significant recovery over a period of time. The flow of medium was regulated at 3.2 ml/min. The increase in area cover and TVC, however, was significantly less than that observed for nonirradiated control (t-test, Precolonization compared to control was thought be due to the lethal and sublethal impacts of laser irradiation on bacteria. This observation thus provided data on the online recolonization speed of biofilm, which is important when considering pulsed laser irradiation as an ablating technique of biofilm formation and removal in natural systems. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Holes generation in glass using large spot femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Yuval; Kotler, Zvi; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate high-throughput, symmetrical, holes generation in fused silica glass using a large spot size, femtosecond IR-laser irradiation which modifies the glass properties and yields an enhanced chemical etching rate. The process relies on a balanced interplay between the nonlinear Kerr effect and multiphoton absorption in the glass which translates into symmetrical glass modification and increased etching rate. The use of a large laser spot size makes it possible to process thick glasses at high speeds over a large area. We have demonstrated such fabricated holes with an aspect ratio of 1:10 in a 1 mm thick glass samples.

  6. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Balling, Peter; Frislev, Martin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report an approach to modeling the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and dielectric materials. The model includes the excitation of carriers by the laser through strongfield excitation, collisional excitation, and absorption in the plasma consisting of conduction-band electrons formed...

  7. Post-processing of 3D-printed parts using femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingareev, Ilya; Gehlich, Nils; Bonhoff, Tobias; Meiners, Wilhelm; Kelbassa, Ingomar; Biermann, Tim; Richardson, Martin C.

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, is a near-net shape manufacturing approach, delivering part geometry that can be considerably affected by various process conditions, heat-induced distortions, solidified melt droplets, partially fused powders, and surface modifications induced by the manufacturing tool motion and processing strategy. High-repetition rate femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation was utilized to improve surface quality of metal parts manufactured by laser additive techniques. Different laser scanning approaches were utilized to increase the ablation efficiency and to reduce the surface roughness while preserving the initial part geometry. We studied post-processing of 3D-shaped parts made of Nickel- and Titanium-base alloys by utilizing Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) as additive manufacturing techniques. Process parameters such as the pulse energy, the number of layers and their spatial separation were varied. Surface processing in several layers was necessary to remove the excessive material, such as individual powder particles, and to reduce the average surface roughness from asdeposited 22-45 μm to a few microns. Due to the ultrafast laser-processing regime and the small heat-affected zone induced in materials, this novel integrated manufacturing approach can be used to post-process parts made of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials, and to attain complex designed shapes with micrometer precision.

  8. New photonuclear methods based on femtosecond lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.A.; Shulyapov, S.A.; Savel'ev, A.B.; Uryupina, D.S.; Volkov, R.V.; Rusakov, A.V.; Turinge, A.A.; Dzhilkibaev, R.M.; Nedorezov, V.G.; Brantov, A.V.; Bychenkov, V.Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Results of X-ray diagnostics of plasma created on the surface of matter by laser pulse with an intensity of 2.5 · 10 18 W/cm 2 are presented in the paper. Comparison of experimental data with the results of numerical simulation of laser-plasma interaction is made taking into account the response functions of the detector. Examples of possible nuclear tasks realizable with the use of laser plasma as a source of charged particles and X rays are given

  9. Laser ablative nanostructuring of Au in liquid ambience in continuous wave illumination regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherik, A. O.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Ryabchikov, Y. V.; Al-Kattan, A.; Kabashin, A. V.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) attract particular attention because of their unique size-dependent chemical, physicochemical and optical properties and, hence, their potential applications in catalysis, nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and medicine. In particular, laser-produced colloidal nanoparticles are not only biocompatible, but also reveal unique chemical properties. Different laser systems can be used for synthesis of these colloids, varying from continuous wave (CW) to ultra-short femtosecond lasers. The choice of an optimum laser system is still a challenge in application development. To bring more light at this issue, we investigate an influence of laser parameters on nanoparticle formation from a gold target immersed in deionized water. First, an optical diagnostics of laser-induced hydrodynamic processes taking place near the gold surface is performed. Then, gold nanoparticle colloids with average particle sizes smaller than 10 nm and a very narrow dispersion are shown to be formed by CW laser ablation. The obtained results are compared with the ones obtained by using the second harmonics and with previous results obtained by using femtosecond laser systems.

  10. Improvement of the surface finish obtained by laser ablation with a Nd: YAG laser on pre-ablated tool steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available . In recent years, these lasers have been used in other fields, such as laser ablation of small tools for plastics injection moulding. Laser ablation is a technology that is investigated as a method to improve the surface finish in tool steel. Different...

  11. Synchronisation of a femtosecond laser and a Q-switched laser to within 50 ps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katin, E V; Lozhkarev, V V; Palashov, O V; Khazanov, E A

    2003-01-01

    A Nd:YLF laser emitting 2-ns pulses synchronised with a femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser is built. The pulse duration and synchronisation are ensured by two Pockels cells, in which voltage pulses are synchronised with the femtosecond laser by fast emitter-coupled logic elements. One of the Pockels cells ensures Q-switching, while the other cuts a short pulse from a 15-ns Q-switched pulse. The experimental results show that the two-step scheme proposed for synchronisation of a Q-switched laser and a passively mode-locked laser provides quite simple and reliable synchronisation of these lasers with a jitter of a few tens of picoseconds. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  12. Wettability modification of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) fibers by femtosecond laser irradiation in different gas atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Lingna; Chen Jian; Farson, Dave F.; Lannutti, John J.; Rokhlin, Stan I.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of femtosecond laser irradiation in air and in O 2 and CF 4 gas flows on the wettability of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) fiber tissue scaffolds was studied. Laser power, focus spot size, raster scan spacing and gas atmosphere were varied in experiments. SEM imaging showed the average fiber diameter and surface porosity sizes were both altered by ablation. The micro-scale surface roughness measured by scanning laser profilometry was found to have a non-monotonic relationship to the surface wettability measured by the contact angle of sessile water droplets. In contrast, surface water contact angle continuously decreased with increased oxygen atomic percentage and oxygen-containing group fraction as measured by XPS. Further, the oxygen content was larger for more extensively ablated fiber surfaces, regardless of whether the increased ablation was caused by high laser power, smaller scanning space or smaller defocusing distance. Of the three gas atmospheres, O 2 gas flow was the most favorable environment for increasing surface oxidization, resulting in the largest water contact angle decrease for given laser power. For CF 4 gas flow, the least oxidization occurred, and the magnitude of water contact angle decrease was smallest for treatment at a given laser power.

  13. Melt front propagation in dielectrics upon femtosecond laser irradiation: Formation dynamics of a heat-affected layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario, E-mail: mario@io.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan, E-mail: mario@io.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-25

    Several studies in dielectrics have reported the presence of a thin heat-affected layer underneath the ablation crater produced by femtosecond laser irradiation. In this work, we present a time-resolved microscopy technique that is capable of monitoring the formation dynamics of this layer and apply it to the study of a phosphate glass exposed to single pulses below the ablation threshold. A few nanoseconds after laser excitation, a melt front interface can be detected, which propagates into the bulk, gradually slowing down its speed. By means of image analysis combined with optical modeling, we are able to determine the temporal evolution of the layer thickness and its refractive index. Initially, a strong transient decrease in the refractive index is observed, which partially recovers afterwards. The layer resolidifies after approximately 1 μs after excitation, featuring a maximum thickness of several hundreds of nanometers.

  14. Melt front propagation in dielectrics upon femtosecond laser irradiation: Formation dynamics of a heat-affected layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Several studies in dielectrics have reported the presence of a thin heat-affected layer underneath the ablation crater produced by femtosecond laser irradiation. In this work, we present a time-resolved microscopy technique that is capable of monitoring the formation dynamics of this layer and apply it to the study of a phosphate glass exposed to single pulses below the ablation threshold. A few nanoseconds after laser excitation, a melt front interface can be detected, which propagates into the bulk, gradually slowing down its speed. By means of image analysis combined with optical modeling, we are able to determine the temporal evolution of the layer thickness and its refractive index. Initially, a strong transient decrease in the refractive index is observed, which partially recovers afterwards. The layer resolidifies after approximately 1 μs after excitation, featuring a maximum thickness of several hundreds of nanometers.

  15. Magnetic phases in Pt/Co/Pt films induced by single and multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisielewski, J., E-mail: jankis@uwb.edu.pl; Kurant, Z.; Sveklo, I.; Tekielak, M.; Maziewski, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Białystok, Ciołkowskiego 1L, 15-245 Białystok (Poland); Wawro, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-05-21

    Ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt trilayers with initial in-plane magnetization were irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. In this way, an irreversible structural modification was introduced, which resulted in the creation of numerous pulse fluence-dependent magnetic phases. This was particularly true with the out-of-plane magnetization state, which exhibited a submicrometer domain structure. This effect was studied in a broad range of pulse fluences up to the point of ablation of the metallic films. In addition to this single-pulse experiment, multiple exposure spots were also investigated, which exhibited an extended area of out-of-plane magnetization phases and a decreased damage threshold. Using a double exposure with partially overlapped spots, a two-dimensional diagram of the magnetic phases as a function of the two energy densities was built, which showed a strong inequality between the first and second incoming pulses.

  16. Magnetic phases in Pt/Co/Pt films induced by single and multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisielewski, J.; Kurant, Z.; Sveklo, I.; Tekielak, M.; Maziewski, A.; Wawro, A.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt trilayers with initial in-plane magnetization were irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. In this way, an irreversible structural modification was introduced, which resulted in the creation of numerous pulse fluence-dependent magnetic phases. This was particularly true with the out-of-plane magnetization state, which exhibited a submicrometer domain structure. This effect was studied in a broad range of pulse fluences up to the point of ablation of the metallic films. In addition to this single-pulse experiment, multiple exposure spots were also investigated, which exhibited an extended area of out-of-plane magnetization phases and a decreased damage threshold. Using a double exposure with partially overlapped spots, a two-dimensional diagram of the magnetic phases as a function of the two energy densities was built, which showed a strong inequality between the first and second incoming pulses.

  17. Bilateral Iris Atrophy after the Femtosecond Assisted Laser In Situ Keratomileusis Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Olcay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report an unknown complication of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK surgery. Case Presentation. A 28-year-old female presented with photophobia and glare to our eye service. She stated in her medical history that she had undergone femtosecond assisted LASIK surgery in both eyes 15 months ago and her symptoms started just after this surgery. On admission, her best-corrected visual acuity was 10/10 in both eyes. She had mydriatic pupils with no direct light reflex. Examination of the anterior segment revealed bilateral iris atrophy projecting within the LASIK ablation zone and a transillumination defect was remarkable on the slit lamp examination. Conclusion. We hypothesized that this condition may have been caused by the abnormally increased IOP that resulted in ischemia in the iris vascular plexus during the suction process of surgery.

  18. U-shaped micro-groove fiber based on femtosecond laser processing for humidity sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Gui; Ma, Li-li; Su, Fu-fang; Shi, Meng

    2018-05-01

    A novel optical fiber sensor with a U-shaped micro-groove structure ablated by femtosecond laser on single-mode fiber for measuring air relative humidity (RH) is reported in this paper. In order to improve the accuracy of sensor, a graphene oxide (GO)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composite film is coated on the surface of micro-groove structure. In the U-shaped micro-groove structure, the remaining core and micro-cavity in the micro-groove make up two major optical propagation paths, forming a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). The sensor has a good linear response within the RH range of 30%—85%, and the maximum sensitivity can reach 0.638 1 nm/%RH. The effect of temperature on the overall performance of the humidity sensor is also investigated. As a new type of all-fiber device, the sensor shows excellent sensitivity and stability.

  19. Laser parameters, focusing optics, and side effects in femtosecond laser corneal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamann, Karsten; Nuzzo, Valeria; Peyrot, Donald A.; Deloison, Florent; Savoldelli, Michèle; Legeais, Jean-Marc

    2008-02-01

    Nowadays, femtosecond lasers are routinely used in refractive eye surgery. Until recently, commercialised clinical systems were exclusively based on ytterbium or neodymium-doped solid state lasers emitting sub-picosecond pulses at a wavelength of about 1 μm and repetition rates of a few 10 kHz. These systems use pulse energies in the μJ range and focussing optics of NA = 0.3 to 0.5. Recent developments have provided a variety of alternative and equally viable approaches: systems are now available using nJ pulses at high numerical apertures and MHz repetition rates - an approach so far only used for femtosecond cell surgery - and fibre laser technology is now being used for femtosecond laser corneal surgery. Recent research has also provided more insight in side effects occurring in present systems: self focusing phenomena and so far unexplained periodical structures have been observed even at high numerical apertures (NA >> 0.5) and moderate pulse energies. The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with strongly scattering tissue has been studied in view of extending the application of femtosecond lasers to keratoplasty for opaque corneas and to glaucoma surgery. The use of new laser wavelengths and adaptive optics has been proposed. Despite the reputation of femtosecond surgical systems for their precision, repeatability and the absence of secondary effects or complications, a closer examination reveals the presence of subtle phenomena which merit further investigation. We present three of these phenomena: the influence of optical aberration on the quality of the incision, the occurrence of filamentation effects, and the deposit of microscopic glass fragments when performing penetrating incisions.

  20. Impact of solvent mixture on iron nanoparticles generated by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakif, M.; Prymak, O.; Slota, M.; Heintze, E.; Gurevich, E. L.; Esen, C.; Bogani, L.; Epple, M.; Ostendorf, A.

    2014-03-01

    The present work reveals the structural and magnetic properties of iron oxide (FexOy) nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by femtosecond laser ablation. The FexOy-NPs were produced in solutions consisting of different ratios of water and acetone. Laser ablation in water yields agglomerates and that in acetone yields chain structures whereas that in water/acetone show a mixture of both. We observe significant fabrication dependent properties such as different crystallinities and magnetic behaviors. The structural characterization shows a change from iron (Fe) to a FexOy state of the NPs which depends on the solution composition. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy measurements exhibit a broad particle size distribution in all samples but with significant differences in the mean sizes. Using magnetic measurements we show that nanoparticles fabricated in pure acetone have lower coercive fields which come along with a smaller mean particle size and therefore increasing superparamagnetic behavior.

  1. Investigation of diffractive optical element femtosecond laser machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabrol, Grégoire R., E-mail: g.chabrol@ecam-strasbourg.eu [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Ciceron, Adline [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Twardowski, Patrice; Pfeiffer, Pierre [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Télécom Physique Strasbourg – Pôle API – 300 Bd Sébastien Brant – CS 10413, Illkirch Graffenstaden F 67400 (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • A method for rapid manufacturing of optical diffractive element in BK7 is proposed. • A binary grating in BK7 was successfully machined by femtosecond laser pulses. • Process relying on nonlinear absorption in the dielectric due to photoionization. • The binary grating was analysed by SEM and interferometric microscopy. • Simulations by Fourier modal method supported the measured diffractive efficiency. - Abstract: This paper presents an explorative study on the machining of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in transparent materials using a femtosecond laser source. A simple form of DOE, a binary phase grating with a period of 20.85 μm (σ = 0.5 μm), a groove depth and width of 0.7 μm (σ = 0.2 μm) and 8.8 μm (σ = 0.5 μm) respectively, was successfully machined in BK7. The topographic characteristics were measured by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The processing was carried out on high precision stages with an ultrafast fibre laser (350 fs) emitting a 343 nm pulse focused onto the sample with a stationary microscope objective. A diffracted efficiency of 27%, obtained with a spectro goniometer, was corroborated by the theoretical results obtained by the Fourier modal method (FMM), taking into account the measured topographic values. These encouraging results demonstrate that high-speed femtosecond laser manufacturing of DOE in bulk glasses can be achieved, opening the way to rapid prototyping of multi-layered-DOEs.

  2. Initial evaluation of a femtosecond laser system in cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, John S M; Chen, Ivan N; Chan, Wai-Man; Ng, Jack C M; Chan, Vincent K C; Law, Antony K P

    2014-01-01

    To report the early experience and complications during cataract surgery with a noncontact femtosecond laser system. Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. Retrospective case series. All patients had anterior capsulotomy or combined anterior capsulotomy and lens fragmentation using a noncontact femtosecond laser system (Lensar) before phacoemulsification. Chart and video reviews were performed retrospectively to determine the intraoperative complication rate. Risk factors associated with the complications were also analyzed. One hundred seventy eyes were included. Free-floating capsule buttons were found in 151 eyes (88.8%). No suction break occurred in any case. Radial anterior capsule tears occurred in 9 eyes (5.3%); they did not extend to the equator or posterior capsule. One eye (0.6%) had a posterior capsule tear. No capsular block syndrome developed, and no nuclei were dropped during irrigation/aspiration (I/A). Anterior capsule tags and miosis occurred in 4 eyes (2.4%) and 17 eyes (10.0%), respectively. Different severities of subconjunctival hemorrhages developed in 71 (43.8%) of 162 eyes after the laser procedure. The mean surgical time from the beginning to the end of suction was 6.72 minutes ± 4.57 (SD) (range 2 to 28 minutes). Cataract surgery with the noncontact femtosecond laser system was safe. No eye lost vision because of complications. Caution should be taken during phacoemulsification and I/A to avoid radial anterior capsule tears and posterior capsule tears. Copyright © 2013 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spectrum diagnoses of laser plasma in 'ablation mode' laser propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ling; Tang Zhiping; Tong Huifeng; Su Maogen; Xue Simin

    2007-01-01

    The propellant materials (LY12 aluminium, No.45 steel, H62 brass, graphite, polyvinyl chloride, polyoxymethylene) in laser propulsion are ablated by a Nd: YAG laser (1.06 μm, 10 ns). The space-resolved and the power density-depended emission spectrums of aluminum and copper plasma are recorded and analyzed. Under the local thermo equilibrium assumption, the electronic temperature and density as well as the average intensity of ionization from the relative intensity of characteristic spectrum for aluminum are obtained. Their dependence on laser power-density and spatial variation are also investigated. The ablation imagines (the ejected plumes) of the six materials in vacuum are obtained and discussed by using a B shutter camera. (authors)

  4. Greater vertical spot spacing to improve femtosecond laser capsulotomy quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Tim; Joachim, Stephanie C; Noristani, Rozina; Scott, Wendell; Dick, H Burkhard

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of adapted capsulotomy laser settings on the cutting quality in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. Ruhr-University Eye Clinic, Bochum, Germany. Prospective randomized case series. Eyes were treated with 1 of 2 laser settings. In Group 1, the regular standard settings were used (incisional depth 600 μm, pulse energy 4 μJ, horizontal spot spacing 5 μm, vertical spot spacing 10 μm, treatment time 1.2 seconds). In Group 2, vertical spot spacing was increased to 15 μm and the treatment time was 1.0 seconds. Light microscopy was used to evaluate the cut quality of the capsule edge. The size and number of tags (misplaced laser spots, which form a second cut of the capsule with high tear risk) were evaluated in a blinded manner. Groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The study comprised 100 eyes (50 eyes in each group). Cataract surgery was successfully completed in all eyes, and no anterior capsule tear occurred during the treatment. Histologically, significant fewer tags were observed with the new capsulotomy laser setting. The mean score for the number and size of free tags was significantly lower in this group than with the standard settings (P laser settings improved cut quality and reduced the number of tags. The modification has the potential to reduce the risk for radial capsule tears in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. With the new settings, no tags and no capsule tears were observed under the operating microscope in any eye. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of pressure rise on cw laser ablation of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCarpentier, Gerald L.; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.

    1991-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to identify mechanisms responsible for the initiation of continuous wave (cw) laser ablation of tissue and investigate the role of pressure in the ablation process. Porcine aorta samples were irradiated in a chamber pressurized from 1 X 10-4 to 12 atmospheres absolute pressure. Acrylic and Zn-Se windows in the experimental pressure chamber allowed video and infrared cameras to simultaneously record mechanical and thermal events associated with cw argon laser ablation of these samples. Video and thermal images of tissue slabs documented the explosive nature of cw laser ablation of soft biological media and revealed similar ablation threshold temperatures and ablation onset times under different environmental pressures; however, more violent initiation explosions with decreasing environmental pressures were observed. These results suggest that ablation initiates with thermal alterations in the mechanical strength of the tissue and proceeds with an explosion induced by the presence superheated liquid within the tissue.

  6. Aluminum alloy nanosecond vs femtosecond laser marking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Technical University “Gheorghe Asachi” of Iasi, No. ... molten material. One can identify local melting of circular shape, subsequently solidified with partial superimposing of molten alloy. The laser writing presents a ... Abbott–Firestone curve (Abbott and Firestone 1933), which.

  7. Micro/nanostructures formation by femtosecond laser surface processing on amorphous and polycrystalline Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Edwin, E-mail: edwin.peng@huskers.unl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Tsubaki, Alfred; Zuhlke, Craig A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Wang, Meiyu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Bell, Ryan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Lucis, Michael J. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Anderson, Troy P.; Alexander, Dennis R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Gogos, George; Shield, Jeffrey E. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Femtosecond laser processing of glass-forming Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} produce surface structures. • Cross sectioning, imaging, & TEM sample preparation with dual-beam SEM. • Low laser fluence surface structures’ form by ablation. • High laserfluence surface structures form by ablation and fluid flow. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser surface processing is a technology that can be used to functionalize many surfaces, imparting specialized properties such as increased broadband optical absorption or superhydrophilicity/superhydrophobicity. In this study, two unique classes of surface structures, below surface growth (BSG) and above surface growth (ASG) mounds, were formed by femtosecond laser surface processing on amorphous and polycrystalline Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} with two different grain sizes. Cross sectional imaging of these mounds revealed thermal evidence of the unique formation processes for each class of surface structure. BSG mounds formed on all three substrates using the same laser parameters had similar surface morphology. The microstructures in the mounds were unaltered compared with the substrate before laser processing, suggesting their formation was dominated by preferential valley ablation. ASG mounds had similar morphology when formed on the polycrystalline Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} substrates with 100 nm and 2 μm grain size. However, the ASG mounds had significantly wider diameter and higher peak-to-valley heights when the substrate was amorphous Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40}. Hydrodynamic melting was primarily responsible for ASG mound formation. On amorphous Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} substrates, the ASG mounds are most likely larger due to lower thermal diffusivity. There was clear difference in growth mechanism of femtosecond laser processed BSG and ASG mounds, and grain size does not appear to be a factor.

  8. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Valcavi, Roberto [Endocrinology Division and Thyroid Disease Center, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Pacella, Claudio M. [Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology Department, Ospedale Regina Apostolorum, Albano Laziale-Rome (IT); Rhim, Hyun Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Dong Kyu [Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation.

  9. Temporal dependence of the enhancement of material removal in femtosecond-nanosecond dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffidi, Jon; Pearman, William; Carter, J. Chance; Colston, Bill W. Jr.; Angel, S. Michael

    2004-01-01

    Despite the large neutral atomic and ionic emission enhancements that have been noted in collinear and orthogonal dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, the source or sources of these significant signal and signal-to-noise ratio improvements have yet to be explained. In the research reported herein, the combination of a femtosecond preablative air spark and a nanosecond ablative pulse yields eightfold and tenfold material removal improvement for brass and aluminum, respectively, but neutral atomic emission is enhanced by only a factor of 3-4. Additionally, temporal correlation between enhancement of material removal and of atomic emission is quite poor, suggesting that the atomic-emission enhancements noted in the femtosecond-nanosecond pulse configuration result in large part from some source other than simple improvement in material removal

  10. Obtention of Ti nanoparticles by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz E, J.R.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Santiago, P.; Ascencio, J.

    2002-01-01

    The obtention of Ti nanoparticles around 5-30 nm diameter through the laser ablation technique is reported. The formation of nanoparticles is carried out in He atmosphere to different pressures, placing directly in Si substrates (100) and in Cu grids. The results show that the work pressure is an important parameter that allows to control the nanoparticles size. Also the plasma characterization results are presented where the Ti II is the predominant specie with an average kinetic energy of 1824 eV. (Author)

  11. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift space (vacuum and in channel-guided laser wakefields. Analytical solutions were found for the transverse coordinate of an electron and for the bunch envelope in the wakefield in the case of arbitrary change in the energy. Our results show strong bunch dynamics already on a millimeter scale propagation distance both in plasma and in vacuum. When the bunch propagates in vacuum, its transverse sizes grow considerably; the same is observed for the normalized bunch emittance that worsens the focusability of the bunch. A scheme of two-stage laser wakefield accelerator with small drift space between the stages is proposed. It is found that fast longitudinal betatron phase mixing occurs in a femtosecond bunch when it propagates along the wakefield axis. When bunch propagates off axis, strong bunch decoherence and fast emittance degradation due to the finite bunch length was observed.

  12. Factors Influencing Intraocular Pressure Changes after Laser In Situ Keratomileusis with Flaps Created by Femtosecond Laser or Mechanical Microkeratome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Yin Lin

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to describe factors that influence the measured intraocular pressure (IOP change and to develop a predictive model after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK with a femtosecond (FS laser or a microkeratome (MK. We retrospectively reviewed preoperative, intraoperative, and 12-month postoperative medical records in 2485 eyes of 1309 patients who underwent LASIK with an FS laser or an MK for myopia and myopic astigmatism. Data were extracted, such as preoperative age, sex, IOP, manifest spherical equivalent (MSE, central corneal keratometry (CCK, central corneal thickness (CCT, and intended flap thickness and postoperative IOP (postIOP at 1, 6 and 12 months. Linear mixed model (LMM and multivariate linear regression (MLR method were used for data analysis. In both models, the preoperative CCT and ablation depth had significant effects on predicting IOP changes in the FS and MK groups. The intended flap thickness was a significant predictor only in the FS laser group (P < .0001 in both models. In the FS group, LMM and MLR could respectively explain 47.00% and 18.91% of the variation of postoperative IOP underestimation (R2 = 0.47 and R(2 = 0.1891. In the MK group, LMM and MLR could explain 37.79% and 19.13% of the variation of IOP underestimation (R(2 = 0.3779 and 0.1913 respectively. The best-fit model for prediction of IOP changes was the LMM in LASIK with an FS laser.

  13. Femtosecond few-cycle mid-infrared laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xing

    The few-cycle pulses of mid-infrared (mid-IR, wavelength 2-10 microns) have attracted increasing attention owing to their great potentials for high order harmonic generation, time-resolved spectroscopy, precision of cutting and biomedical science.In this thesis, mid-IR frequency conversion.......2 - 5.5 μm with only one fixed pump wavelength, a feature absent in Kerr media. Finally, we experimentally observe supercontinuum generation spanning 1.5 octaves, generated in a 10 mm long silicon-rich nitride waveguide pumped by 100 pJ femtosecond pulses from an erbium fiber laser. The waveguide has...

  14. Femtosecond laser fabrication of microspike-arrays on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tomokazu; Yanai, Masato; Ohmura, Etsuji; Nomura, Yasumitsu; Miyamoto, Isamu; Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2005-01-01

    Microspike-arrays were fabricated by irradiating a femtosecond laser on a tungsten surface through a mask opening in air. The natural logarithms of the calculated intensity distributions diffracted at the edge of the mask opening were qualitatively consistent with the experimental results of the shape and arrays of microspikes fabricated. The shape and the array of microspikes depend on the intensity distribution diffracted at the edge of the mask opening. This microspike-array has the potential to be used as a source of micro emitter tips

  15. Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery and implantable miniature telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randal Pham

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions and importance: To our knowledge and confirmed by the manufacturer of the implantable miniature telescope this is the first case ever reported of a patient who has undergone femtosecond laser cataract surgery with corneal astigmatism correction and implantation of the implantable miniature telescope. This is also the first case report of the preoperative use of microperimetry and visual electrophysiology to evaluate a patient's postoperative potential visual acuity. The success of the procedure illustrated the importance of meticulous preoperative planning, the combined use of state-of-the-art technologies and the seamless teamwork in order to achieve the best clinical outcome for patients who undergo implantation of the implantable miniature telescope.

  16. Pulse radiolysis based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with double-pulse injection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinfeng; Kondoh, Takafumi; Kozawa, Takahiro; Yoshida, Youichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2006-01-01

    A new pulse radiolysis system based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with oblique double-pulse injection was developed for studying ultrafast chemical kinetics and primary processes of radiation chemistry. The time resolution of 5.2 ps was obtained by measuring transient absorption kinetics of hydrated electrons in water. The optical density of hydrated electrons was measured as a function of the electron charge. The data indicate that the double-laser-pulse injection technique was a powerful tool for observing the transient absorptions with a good signal to noise ratio in pulse radiolysis

  17. A thermal model for nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to simulate the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum, a novel model was presented for the target ablation and plume expansion. The simulation of the target ablation was based on one-dimensional heat conduction, taking into account temperature dependent material properties, phase transition, dielectric transition and phase explosion. While the simulation of the plume expansion was based on one-dimensional gas-dynamical equation, taking into account ionization, plume absorption and shielding. By coupling the calculations of the target ablation and plume expansion, the characteristics of the target and plume were obtained. And the calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental data, in terms of ablation threshold and depth within the fluence range of the tested laser. Subsequently, investigations were carried out to analyze the mechanisms of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation. The calculated results showed that the maximum surface temperature remained at about 90% of the critical temperature (0.9Tc due to phase explosion. Moreover, the plume shielding has significant effects on the laser ablation, and the plume shielding proportion increase as the laser fluence increasing. The ambient pressure belows 100 Pa is more suitable for laser ablation, which can obtained larger ablation depth.

  18. Formation of x-ray Newton’s rings from nano-scale spallation shells of metals in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Nishikino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial stages of the femtosecond (fs laser ablation process of gold, platinum, and tungsten were observed by single-shot soft x-ray imaging technique. The formation and evolution of soft x-ray Newton’s rings (NRs were found for the first time. The soft x-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer; they originate from the metal surface at pump energy fluence of around 1 J/cm2 and work as a flying soft x-ray beam splitter.

  19. [Crystalline lens photodisruption using femtosecond laser: experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatoux, O; Touboul, D; Buestel, C; Balcou, P; Colin, J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the interactions during femtosecond (fs) laser photodisruption in ex vivo porcine crystalline lenses and to study the parameters for laser interaction optimization. An experimental femtosecond laser was used. The laser characteristics were: 1030 nm wavelength; pulse duration, 400 fs; and numerical aperture, 0.13. Specific software was created to custom and monitor any type of photoablation pattern for treatment purposes. Porcine crystalline lenses were placed in an open sky holder filled with physiological liquid (BSS) covered by a glass plate. A numerical camera was associated with metrological software in order to magnify and quantify the results. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on some samples to identify the microscopic plasma interactions with the lens. The optimization of parameters was investigated in terms of the optical breakdown threshold, the sizing of interactions, and the best pattern for alignments. More than 150 crystalline lenses of freshly enucleated pigs were treated. The optical breakdown threshold (OBT) was defined as the minimal energy level per pulse necessary to observe a physical interaction. In our study, the OBT varied according to the following parameters: the crystalline lens itself, varying from 4.2 to 7.6 μJ (mean, 5.1 μJ), and the depth of laser focus, varying up to 1 μJ, increasing in the depth of the tissue. Analyzing the distance between impacts, we observed that the closer the impacts were the less power was needed to create a clear well-drawn defect pattern (lines), i.e., with a 4-μJ optimized OBT, when the impacts were placed every 2 μm for the x,y directions and 60 μm for the z direction. Coalescent bubbles created by plasma formation always disappeared in less than 24h. The nonthermal effect of plasma and the innocuousness on surrounding tissues were proven by the TEM results. The crystalline lens photodisruption by the femtosecond laser seems an innovative

  20. Guiding of laser pulses in plasma waveguides created by linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Lemos, N.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Albert, F.; Dias, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that plasma waveguides produced with ultra-short laser pulses (sub-picosecond) in gas jets are capable of guiding high intensity laser pulses. This scheme has the unique ability of guiding a high-intensity laser pulse in a plasma waveguide created by the same laser system in the very simple and stable experimental setup. A hot plasma column was created by a femtosecond class laser that expands into an on-axis parabolic low density profile suitable to act as a wav...

  1. Laser Ablation for Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Fong, Yuman

    2017-01-01

    Laser ablation (LA) is gaining acceptance for the treatment of tumors as an alternative to surgical resection. This paper reviews the use of lasers for ablative and surgical applications. Also reviewed are solutions aimed at improving LA outcomes: hyperthermal treatment planning tools and thermometric techniques during LA, used to guide the surgeon in the choice and adjustment of the optimal laser settings, and the potential use of nanoparticles to allow biologic selectivity of ablative treatments. Promising technical solutions and a better knowledge of laser-tissue interaction should allow LA to be used in a safe and effective manner as a cancer treatment. PMID:28613248

  2. Laser Ablation for Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Schena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation (LA is gaining acceptance for the treatment of tumors as an alternative to surgical resection. This paper reviews the use of lasers for ablative and surgical applications. Also reviewed are solutions aimed at improving LA outcomes: hyperthermal treatment planning tools and thermometric techniques during LA, used to guide the surgeon in the choice and adjustment of the optimal laser settings, and the potential use of nanoparticles to allow biologic selectivity of ablative treatments. Promising technical solutions and a better knowledge of laser-tissue interaction should allow LA to be used in a safe and effective manner as a cancer treatment.

  3. Investigating and understanding the effects of multiple femtosecond laser scans on the surface topography of stainless steel 304 and titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Edwin Jee Yang, E-mail: edwin.ling@mail.mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montréal, Québec, H3A 0C5 (Canada); Saïd, Julien, E-mail: julien.said@ecl2015.ec-lyon.fr [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montréal, Québec, H3A 0C5 (Canada); Brodusch, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.brodusch@mcgill.ca [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montréal, Québec, H3A 0C5 (Canada); Gauvin, Raynald, E-mail: raynald.gauvin@mcgill.ca [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montréal, Québec, H3A 0C5 (Canada); Servio, Phillip, E-mail: phillip.servio@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montréal, Québec, H3A 0C5 (Canada); Kietzig, Anne-Marie, E-mail: anne.kietzig@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montréal, Québec, H3A 0C5 (Canada)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Effect of multiple femtosecond laser scans on stainless steel. • Ellipsoidal cones, columnar and chaotic structures observed on irradiated surface. • Chemical, crystallographic, and topographical analyses of ellipsoidal cones. • Developed mechanism for formation and growth of ellipsoidal cones. - Abstract: The majority of studies performed on the formation of surface features by femtosecond laser radiation focuses on single scan procedures, i.e. manipulating the laser beam once over the target area to fabricate different surface topographies. In this work, the effect of scanning stainless steel 304 multiple times with femtosecond laser pulses is thoroughly investigated over a wide range of fluences. The resultant laser-induced surface topographies can be categorized into two different regimes. In the low fluence regime (F{sub Σline,max} < 130 J/cm{sup 2}), ellipsoidal cones (randomly distributed surface protrusions covered by several layers of nanoparticles) are formed. Based on chemical, crystallographic, and topographical analyses, we conclude that these ellipsoidal cones are composed of unablated steel whose conical geometry offers a significant degree of fluence reduction (35–52%). Therefore, the rest of the irradiated area is preferentially ablated at a higher rate than the ellipsoidal cones. The second, or high fluence regime (F{sub Σline,max} > 130 J/cm{sup 2}) consists of laser-induced surface patterns such as columnar and chaotic structures. Here, the surface topography showed little to no change even when the target was scanned repeatedly. This is in contrast to the ellipsoidal cones, which evolve and grow continuously as more laser passes are applied.

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced surface wettability modification of polystyrene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Wang, XinCai; Zheng, HongYu; Lam, YeeCheong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a simple method to create either a hydrophilic or hydrophobic surface. With femtosecond laser irradiation at different laser parameters, the water contact angle (WCA) on polystyrene's surface can be modified to either 12.7° or 156.2° from its original WCA of 88.2°. With properly spaced micro-pits created, the surface became hydrophilic probably due to the spread of the water droplets into the micro-pits. While with properly spaced micro-grooves created, the surface became rough and more hydrophobic. We investigated the effect of laser parameters on WCAs and analyzed the laser-treated surface roughness, profiles and chemical bonds by surface profilometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the laser-treated surface with low roughness, the polar (such as C—O, C=O, and O—C=O bonds) and non-polar (such as C—C or C—H bonds) groups were found to be responsible for the wettability changes. While for a rough surface, the surface roughness or the surface topography structure played a more significant role in the changes of the surface WCA. The mechanisms involved in the laser surface wettability modification process were discussed.

  5. Theoretical femtosecond physics atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2018-01-01

    This textbook extends from the basics of femtosecond physics all the way to some of the latest developments in the field. In this updated edition, the chapter on laser-driven atoms is augmented by the discussion of two-electron atoms interacting with strong and short laser pulses, as well as by a review of ATI rings and low energy structures in photo-electron spectra. In the chapter on laser-driven molecules a discussion of 2D infrared spectroscopy is incorporated. Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed lasers up to atomic field strengths on the order of 10^16 W/cm² are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. The presentation starts with a brief introduction to pulsed laser physics. The basis for the non-perturbative treatment of laser-matter interaction in the book is the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Its analytical as well as numerical solution are laid out in some detail. The light field is treated classically and different possi...

  6. Benign thyroid nodule unresponsive to radiofrequency ablation treated with laser ablation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Silvia; Balestra, Margherita; Vera, Lara; Giusti, Massimo

    2018-05-11

    Radiofrequency ablation and laser ablation are safe and effective techniques for reducing thyroid nodule volume, neck symptoms, and cosmetic complaints. Therapeutic success is defined as a nodule reduction > 50% between 6 and 12 months after the procedure, but a percentage of nodules inexplicably do not respond to thermal ablation. We describe the case of a young Caucasian woman with a solid benign thyroid nodule who refused surgery and who had undergone radiofrequency ablation in 2013. The nodule did not respond in terms of either volume reduction or improvement in neck symptoms. After 2 years, given the patient's continued refusal of thyroidectomy, we proposed laser ablation. The nodule displayed a significant volume reduction (- 50% from radiofrequency ablation baseline volume, - 57% from laser ablation baseline), and the patient reported a significant improvement in neck symptoms (from 6/10 to 1/10 on a visual analogue scale). We conjecture that some benign thyroid nodules may be intrinsically resistant to necrosis when one specific ablation technique is used, but may respond to another technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of the effect of performing a different percutaneous ablation technique in a nodule that does not respond to radiofrequency ablation.

  7. Influence of ablation wavelength and time on optical properties of laser ablated carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni, Hanna, M. Yusrul; Pambudi, A. A.; Murdaka, F. H.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dots, which are unique and applicable materials, have been produced using many techniques. In this work, we have fabricated carbon dots made of coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. The purpose of this work is to evaluate two ablation parameters, which are ablation wavelength and ablation time. We used pulsed laser from Nd:YAG laser with emit wavelength at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. We varied ablation time one hour and two hours. Photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence setup were used to study the optical properties of fabricated carbon dots. In general, fabricated carbon dots emit bluish green color emission upon excitation by blue laser. We found that carbon dots fabricated using 1064 nm laser produced the highest carbon dots emission among other samples. The peak wavelength of carbon dots emission is between 495 nm until 505 nm, which gives bluish green color emission. Two hours fabricated carbon dots gave four times higher emission than one hour fabricated carbon dot. More emission intensity of carbon dots means more carbon dots nanoparticles were fabricated during laser ablation process. In addition, we also measured electron dynamics of carbon dots using time-resolved photoluminescence. We found that sample with higher emission has longer electron decay time. Our finding gives optimum condition of carbon dots fabrication from coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. Moreover, fabricated carbon dots are non-toxic nanoparticles that can be applied for health, bio-tagging and medical applications.

  8. Complications of femtosecond laser corneal small incision lenticule extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Hong Lin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the safety and complications of femtosecond laser corneal small incision lenticule extraction(SMILEprocedure and discuss the prevention and treatment.METHODS: We retrospectively studied the complications of 403 patients(799 eyeswith myopia and myopic astigmatism treated by SMILE.RESULTS: All the patients underwent the operation successfully. Only 1 case(1 eyesuffered from dark spot and changed to femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK(FS-LASIK, 5 cases(5 eyes, 0.6%suffered from the suction loss, 11 cases(17 eyes, 2.1%developed opaque bubble layer. All patients gained perfect uncorrected visual acuity(UCVA(20/20. The best corrected visual acuity(BCVAdid not decrease after operations. The incidence of haze and diffuse lamellar keratitis was low(0.3% and 0.4%, respectivelyand no other complications were observed. There was 9 eyes in 6 patients(1.1%found regression of refraction at 6mo after surgery, while the UCVA of rest patients reached 1.0 at 3mo after surgery.CONCLUSION: The SMILE procedure has high safety for myopia and myopic astigmatism. Effective prevention and management of the complications is the key to achieve the satisfactory visual acuity.

  9. Femtosecond and Subfemtosecond X-Ray Pulses from a SASE Based Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emma, P

    2004-03-10

    We propose a novel method to generate femtosecond and sub-femtosecond photon pulses in a free electron laser by selectively spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam. Its merits are simplicity and ease of implementation. When the system is applied to the Linac Coherent Light Source, it can provide x-ray pulses the order of 1 femtosecond in duration containing about 1010 transversely coherent photons.

  10. Long distance measurement with a femtosecond laser based frequency comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, N.; Cui, M.; Zeitouny, M. G.; Urbach, H. P.; van den Berg, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in the field of ultra-short pulse lasers have led to the development of reliable sources of carrier envelope phase stabilized femtosecond pulses. The pulse train generated by such a source has a frequency spectrum that consists of discrete, regularly spaced lines known as a frequency comb. In this case both the frequency repetition and the carrier-envelope-offset frequency are referenced to a frequency standard, like an atomic clock. As a result the accuracy of the frequency standard is transferred to the optical domain, with the frequency comb as transfer oscillator. These unique properties allow the frequency comb to be applied as a versatile tool, not only for time and frequency metrology, but also in fundamental physics, high-precision spectroscopy, and laser noise characterization. The pulse-to-pulse phase relationship of the light emitted by the frequency comb has opened up new directions for long range highly accurate distance measurement.

  11. All-fiber femtosecond Cherenkov laser at visible wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Møller, Uffe Visbech

    2013-01-01

    -matching condition [1]. The resonant ultrafast wave conversion via the fiber-optic CR mechanism is instrumental for applications in biophotonics such as bio-imaging and microscopy [2]. In this work, we demonstrate a highly-stable all-fiber, fully monolithic CR system based on an Yb-fiber femtosecond laser, producing...... to be as low as -103 dBc/Hz. This is 2 orders of magnitudes lower noise as compared to spectrally-sliced supercontinuum, which is the current standard of ultrafast fiber-optic generation at visible wavelength. The layout of the laser system is shown in Fig. 1(a). The system consists of two parts: an all-fiber......Fiber-optic Cherenkov radiation (CR), also known as dispersive wave generation or non-solitonic radiation, is produced in small-core photonic crystal fibers (PCF) when a soliton perturbed by fiber higher-order dispersion co-propagates with a dispersive wave fulfilling a certain phase...

  12. Micro-hole drilling and cutting using femtosecond fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Liu, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Micro-hole drilling and cutting in ambient air are presented by using a femtosecond fiber laser. At first, the micro-hole drilling was investigated in both transparent (glasses) and nontransparent (metals and tissues) materials. The shape and morphology of the holes were characterized and evaluated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Debris-free micro-holes with good roundness and no thermal damage were demonstrated with the aspect ratio of 8∶1. Micro-hole drilling in hard and soft tissues with no crack or collateral thermal damage is also demonstrated. Then, trench micromachining and cutting were studied for different materials and the effect of the laser parameters on the trench properties was investigated. Straight and clean trench edges were obtained with no thermal damage.

  13. Simulation of condensed matter dynamics in strong femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, G.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrashort custom-tailored laser pulses can be employed to observe and control the motion of electrons in atoms and small molecules on the (sub-) femtosecond time scale. Very recently, efforts are underway to extend these concepts to solid matter. This monograph theoretically explores first applications of electron control by ultrashort laser pulses in three paradigmatic systems of solid-state density: a metal nano-structure (nanometric metal tip), a bulk dielectric (quartz glass), and the buckminsterfullerene molecule (C60) as arguably the smallest possible nano-particle. The electron motion is resolved on the atomic length and time scale by ab-initio simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory. Our quantum simulations are complemented by classical and semi-classical models elucidating the underlying mechanisms. We compare our results to experiments where already available and find good agreement. With increasing laser intensity, we find a transition from vertical photoexcitation to tunneling-like excitation. For nanostructures, that leads to temporally confined electron photoemission and thereby to quantum interferences in the energy spectra of emitted electrons. Similarly, tunneling can be induced between neighboring atoms inside an insulator. This provides a mechanism for ultrafast light-field controlled currents and modification of the optical properties of the solid, promising to eventually realize light-field electronic devices operating on the femtosecond time scale and nanometer length scale. Electron-electron interaction leads to near field enhancement and spatial localization of the non-linear response and is investigated both classically by solving the Maxwell equations near a nanostructure as well as quantum mechanically for the fullerene molecule. For the latter, we discuss scrutiny of the molecular near-field by the attosecond streaking technique. Our results demonstrate that ultrashort laser pulses can be employed to steer the

  14. High-resolution computer-generated reflection holograms with three-dimensional effects written directly on a silicon surface by a femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wædegaard, Kristian J; Balling, Peter

    2011-02-14

    An infrared femtosecond laser has been used to write computer-generated holograms directly on a silicon surface. The high resolution offered by short-pulse laser ablation is employed to write highly detailed holograms with resolution up to 111 kpixels/mm2. It is demonstrated how three-dimensional effects can be realized in computer-generated holograms. Three-dimensional effects are visualized as a relative motion between different parts of the holographic reconstruction, when the hologram is moved relative to the reconstructing laser beam. Potential security applications are briefly discussed.

  15. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  16. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baladi, Arash; Sarraf Mamoory, Rasoul

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  17. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baladi, Arash [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarraf Mamoory, Rasoul, E-mail: rsarrafm@modares.ac.ir [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  18. Laser-induced shockwave propagation from ablation in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xianzhong; Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Wen, S.-B.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of laser-induced shockwaves from ablation inside of cavities was determined from time-resolved shadowgraph images. The temperature and electron number density of the laser-induced plasma was determined from spectroscopic measurements. These properties were compared to those for laser ablation on the flat surface under the same energy and background gas condition. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the amount of energy and vaporized mass stored in the vapor plume based on these measurements

  19. Refining femtosecond laser induced periodical surface structures with liquid assist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, L.S.; Ng, E.Y.K.; Zheng, H.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► LIPSS on silicon wafer was made in air and in ethanol environment. ► Ethanol environment produce cleaner surface ripples. ► Ethanol environment decrease spatial wavelength of the LIPSS by 30%. ► More number of pulses produce smaller spatial wavelength in air. ► Number of pulses do not influence spatial wavelength in ethanol environment. - Abstract: Laser induced periodic surface structures were generated on silicon wafer using femtosecond laser. The medium used in this study is both air and ethanol. The laser process parameters such as wavelength, number of pulse, laser fluence were kept constant for both the mediums. The focus of the study is to analyze spatial wavelength. When generating surface structures with air as a medium and same process parameter of the laser, spatial wavelength results showed a 30% increase compared to ethanol. The cleanliness of the surface generated using ethanol showed considerably less debris than in air. The results observed from the above investigation showed that the medium plays a predominant role in the generation of surface structures.

  20. Laser writing of nanostructures on bulk Al via its ablation in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratakis, E; Zorba, V; Barberoglou, M; Fotakis, C; Shafeev, G A

    2009-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the formation of self-organized nanostructures (NSs) on a bulk Al target under its ablation in liquids-water and ethanol-with short laser pulses from 180 femtoseconds (fs) through 350 picoseconds (ps). NSs are characterized by atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The period of NSs does not depend on the laser wavelength used from 248 through 800 nm and is approximately 200 nm. NSs on Al show the characteristic absorption peak in the near UV which has been attributed to plasmon oscillation of electrons. The wings of this peak, extending to the visible, lead to a distinct yellow coloration of the processed Al surface. Ultrafast laser structuring of bulk aluminum in liquids may be potentially a promising technique for efficient production of nanosized aluminum.

  1. Random lasing of microporous surface of Cr2+:ZnSe crystal induced by femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xianheng; Feng, Guoying; Yao, Ke; Yi, Jiayu; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a random lasing emission based on microporous surface of Cr 2+ :ZnSe crystal prepared by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in high vacuum (below 5 × 10 −4 Pa). The scanning electron microscope results show that there are a mass of micropores with an average size of ∼13 μm and smaller ones with ∼1.2 μm on the surface of Cr 2+ :ZnSe crystal. The adjacent micropore spacing of the smaller micropores ranges from 1 μm to 5 μm. Under 1750 nm excitation of Nd:YAG (355 nm) pumped optical parametric oscillator, a random lasing emission with center wavelength of 2350 nm and laser-like threshold of 0.3 mJ/pulse is observed. The emission lifetime of 2350 nm laser reduces from 800 ns to 30 ns as the pump energy increases above threshold. The emission spectra and decay time of smooth surface, groove and microporous surface of Cr 2+ :ZnSe crystal are contrasted. The optional pump wavelength range is from 1500 nm to 1950 nm, which in accordance with the optical absorption property of Cr 2+ :ZnSe crystal. The peak position of excitation spectra is almost identical to the strongest absorption wavelength

  2. One-step femtosecond laser welding and internal machining of three glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hua; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, it demonstrated one-step femtosecond laser welding and internal machining of three fused silica substrates in the optical- and non-optical-contact regimes by focusing 1030-nm laser pulses at the middle of the second substrate. Focusing laser pulses within the second glass in optical-contact and non-optical-contact samples induces permanent internal structural modification, leading to the three glass substrates bonding together simultaneously. The bonding mechanism is based on the internal modification of glass, and this mechanism is different from that of ordinary glass welding at the interface. Welding-spot size is affected by not only the gap distance (ablation effect) and heat transmission, but also by gravity through examining the sizes of the welding spots on the four contact welding surfaces. The maximum bonding strength of the lower interface (56.2 MPa) in the optical-contact regime is more than double that (27.6 MPa) in the non-optical-contact regime.

  3. Laser ablation surface-enhanced Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Pablo S; Lombardi, John R; Leona, Marco

    2013-06-04

    Improved identification of trace organic compounds in complex matrixes is critical for a variety of fields such as material science, heritage science, and forensics. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopy technique that can attain single-molecule sensitivity and has been shown to complement mass spectrometry, but lacks widespread application without a robust method that utilizes the effect. We demonstrate a new, highly sensitive, and widely applicable approach to SERS analysis based on laser ablation in the presence of a tailored plasmonic substrate. We analyze several challenging compounds, including non-water-soluble pigments and dyed leather from an ancient Egyptian chariot, achieving sensitivity as high as 120 amol for a 1:1 signal-to-noise ratio and 5 μm spatial resolution. This represents orders of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution and sensitivity compared to those of other SERS approaches intended for widespread application, greatly increasing the applicability of SERS.

  4. Optical coherence tomography characterization of femtosecond laser manufactured microfluidic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pretto, Lucas Ramos; Samad, Ricardo Elgul; de Rossi, Wagner; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi

    2018-02-01

    Dimensional characterization of microfluidic circuits were performed using three-dimensional models constructed from OCT images of such circuits. Were fabricated microchannels on the same BK7 glass plate, under different laser ablation conditions and substrate displacement velocity in relation to laser beam. Were used the following combination of energy, from 30 μJ to 60 μJ and velocity from 588 mm/min to 1176 mm/min, at 1 kHz laser repetition rate and 40 fs of pulse duration (FWHM). For OCT imaging we used an OCP930SR (Thorlabs System Inc) with 930 nm central wavelength, 6 μm of lateral and axial resolution, and image of 500 x 512 pixel corresponding to 2.0 mm x 1.6 mm of lateral and axial scans respectively at 8 frames per second. We also characterized devices like, micropumps, microvalves and microreactors. It was possible register the micropumps and valves in action in real time. Using the OCT images analyses was possible to select the best combination of laser pulse energy and substrate velocity. All the devices were made in raster protocol, where laser beam pass through the same path in a controlled number of times, and with each iteration more material is removed and deeper the channels remain. We found a deformation at the edge of fabricated structures, due to velocity reduction of substrate in relation to laser beam, which causes more laser pulses superposition in these regions, and more material is ablated. The technique was thus evaluated as a potential tool to aid in the inspection of microchannels.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition to synthesize the bridge structure of artificial nacre: Comparison of nano- and femtosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaibari, Ammar A.; Molian, Pal

    2012-11-01

    Nature offers inspiration to new adaptive technologies that allow us to build amazing shapes and structures such as nacre using synthetic materials. Consequently, we have designed a pulsed laser ablation manufacturing process involving thin film deposition and micro-machining to create hard/soft layered "brick-bridge-mortar" nacre of AlMgB14 (hard phase) with Ti (soft phase). In this paper, we report pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to mimic brick and bridge structures of natural nacre in AlMgB14. Particulate formation inherent in PLD is exploited to develop the bridge structure. Mechanical behavior analysis of the AlMgB14/Ti system revealed that the brick is to be 250 nm thick, 9 μm lateral dimensions while the bridge (particle) is to have a diameter of 500 nm for a performance equivalent to natural nacre. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) pulsed lasers were employed for PLD in an iterative approach that involves varying pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and target-to-substrate distance to achieve the desired brick and bridge characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical profilometer were used to evaluate the film thickness, particle size and density, stoichiometry, and surface roughness of thin films. Results indicated that both ns-pulsed and fs-pulsed lasers produce the desired nacre features. However, each laser may be chosen for different reasons: fs-pulsed laser is preferred for much shorter deposition time, better stoichiometry, uniform-sized particles, and uniform film thickness, while ns-pulsed laser is favored for industrial acceptance, reliability, ease of handling, and low cost.

  6. Infra-red laser ablative micromachining of parylene-C on SiO2 substrates for rapid prototyping, high yield, human neuronal cell patterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raos, B J; Unsworth, C P; Costa, J L; Rohde, C A; Simpson, M C; Doyle, C S; Dickinson, M E; Bunting, A S; Murray, A F; Delivopoulos, E; Graham, E S

    2013-01-01

    Cell patterning commonly employs photolithographic methods for the micro fabrication of structures on silicon chips. These require expensive photo-mask development and complex photolithographic processing. Laser based patterning of cells has been studied in vitro and laser ablation of polymers is an active area of research promising high aspect ratios. This paper disseminates how 800 nm femtosecond infrared (IR) laser radiation can be successfully used to perform laser ablative micromachining of parylene-C on SiO 2 substrates for the patterning of human hNT astrocytes (derived from the human teratocarcinoma cell line (hNT)) whilst 248 nm nanosecond ultra-violet laser radiation produces photo-oxidization of the parylene-C and destroys cell patterning. In this work, we report the laser ablation methods used and the ablation characteristics of parylene-C for IR pulse fluences. Results follow that support the validity of using IR laser ablative micromachining for patterning human hNT astrocytes cells. We disseminate the variation in yield of patterned hNT astrocytes on parylene-C with laser pulse spacing, pulse number, pulse fluence and parylene-C strip width. The findings demonstrate how laser ablative micromachining of parylene-C on SiO 2 substrates can offer an accessible alternative for rapid prototyping, high yield cell patterning with broad application to multi-electrode arrays, cellular micro-arrays and microfluidics. (paper)

  7. Theoretical femtosecond physics atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers up to atomic field strengths on the order of 10^16 W/cm² are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. This book deals with the basics of femtosecond physics and goes up to the latest applications of new phenomena. The book presents an introduction to laser physics with mode-locking and pulsed laser operation. The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is discussed both analytically and numerically. The basis for the non-perturbative treatment of laser-matter interaction in the book is the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically, and different possible gauges are discussed. Physical phenonema, ranging from Rabi-oscillations in two-level systems to the ionization of atoms, the generation of high harmonics, the ionization and dissociation of molecules as well as the control of chemical reactions are pre...

  8. Optical spectroscopy using gas-phase femtosecond laser filamentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhner, Johanan; Levis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser filamentation occurs as a dynamic balance between the self-focusing and plasma defocusing of a laser pulse to produce ultrashort radiation as brief as a few optical cycles. This unique source has many properties that make it attractive as a nonlinear optical tool for spectroscopy, such as propagation at high intensities over extended distances, self-shortening, white-light generation, and the formation of an underdense plasma. The plasma channel that constitutes a single filament and whose position in space can be controlled by its input parameters can span meters-long distances, whereas multifilamentation of a laser beam can be sustained up to hundreds of meters in the atmosphere. In this review, we briefly summarize the current understanding and use of laser filaments for spectroscopic investigations of molecules. A theoretical framework of filamentation is presented, along with recent experimental evidence supporting the established understanding of filamentation. Investigations carried out on vibrational and rotational spectroscopy, filament-induced breakdown, fluorescence spectroscopy, and backward lasing are discussed.

  9. Laser ablation of tumors: current concepts and recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroszczynski, C.; Gaffke, G.; Gnauck, M.; Ricke, J.; Felix, R.; Puls, R.; Speck, U.; Hosten, N.; Oettle, H.; Hohenberger, P.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to present technical innovations and clinical results of percutaneous interventional laser ablation of tumors using new techniques. Methods. Laser ablation was performed in 182 patients (liver tumors: 131, non hepatic tumors - bone, lung, others: 51) after interdisciplinary consensus was obtained. The procedure was done using a combination of imaging modalities (CT/MRI, CT/US) or only closed high field MRI (1.5 T). All patients received an MRI-scan immediately after laser ablation. Results. In 90.9% of the patients with liver tumors, a complete ablation was achieved. Major events occurred in 5.4%. The technical success rate of laser ablation in non-hepatic tumors was high, clinical results differed depending on the treated organ. Conclusions. The treatment of tumors of the liver and other organs up to 5 cm by laser ablation was a safe procedure with a low rate of complications and side effects. Image guidance by MRI is advantageous for precise tumor visualization in all dimensions, therapy monitoring, and control of laser ablation results. (orig.) [de

  10. Percutaneous laser ablation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Enrico; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Claudio M

    2008-10-01

    Percutaneous image-guided procedures, largely based on thermal ablation, are at present under investigation for achieving a nonsurgical targeted cytoreduction in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. In several uncontrolled clinical trials and in two randomized clinical trials, laser ablation has demonstrated a good efficacy and safety for the shrinkage of benign cold thyroid nodules. In hyperfunctioning nodules, laser ablation induced a nearly 50% volume reduction with a variable frequency of normalization of thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Laser ablation has been tested for the palliative treatment of poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas, local recurrences or distant metastases. Laser ablation therapy is indicated for the shrinkage of benign cold nodules in patients with local pressure symptoms who are at high surgical risk. The treatment should be performed only by well trained operators and after a careful cytological evaluation. Laser ablation does not seem to be consistently effective in the long-term control of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and is not an alternative treatment to 131I therapy. Laser ablation may be considered for the cytoreduction of tumor tissue prior to external radiation therapy or chemotherapy of local or distant recurrences of thyroid malignancy that are not amenable to surgical or radioiodine treatment.

  11. Pulsed Tm:YAG laser ablation of knee joint tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Qiang; Vari, Sandor G.; Duffy, J. T.; Miller, J. M.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effect of a free-running 2.01 micron pulsed Tm:YAG laser on bovine knee joint tissues. Ablation rates of fresh fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone were measured in saline as a function of laser fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and fiber core size (400 and 600 microns). All tissues could be effectively ablated and the ablation rate increased linearly with the increasing fluence. Use of fibers of different core sizes, while maintaining constant energy fluence, did not result in significant difference in ablation rate. Histology analyses of the ablated tissue samples reveal average Tm:YAG radiation induced thermal damage (denatunalization) zones ranging between 130 and 540 microns, depending on the laser parameters and the tissue type.

  12. Nanoparticle fabrication of hydroxyapatite by laser ablation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musaev, O. R.; Wieliczka, D. M.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kruger, M. B.; Dusevich, V.

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic polycrystalline hydroxyapatite was ablated in water with 337 nm radiation from a UV nitrogen pulsed laser. According to transmission electron microscopy micrographs, the ablated particles were approximately spherical and had a size of ∼80 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that particles had the same structure as the original crystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the surface chemical composition was close to that of the original material. The characteristics of the ablated particles and estimations of the temperature rise of the hydroxyapatite surface under laser irradiation are consistent with the mechanism of explosive boiling being responsible for ablation. The experimental observations offer the basis for preparation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles by laser ablation in water

  13. Femtosecond envelope of the high-harmonic emission from ablation plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haessler, S; Gobert, O; Hergott, J-F; Lepetit, F; Perdrix, M; Carré, B; Salières, P; Bom, L B Elouga; Ozaki, T

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the temporal profile of the high-order harmonic emission from ablation plasma plumes using cross-correlations with the infrared (IR) laser beam provided by two-photon harmonic+IR ionization of rare gas atoms. We study both non-resonant plasmas (lead, gold and chrome) and resonant plasmas (indium and tin), i.e. plasmas presenting in the singly charged ions a strong radiative transition coinciding with a harmonic order. The cross-correlation traces are found to be very similar for all harmonic orders and all plasma targets. The recovered harmonic pulse durations are very similar to the driving laser, with a tendency towards being shorter, demonstrating that the emission is a directly laser-driven process even in the case of resonant harmonics. This provides a valuable input for theories describing resonant-harmonic emission and opens the perspective of a very high flux tabletop XUV source for applications. (paper)

  14. Visualization of femtosecond laser pulse-induced microincisions inside crystalline lens tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachs, Oliver; Schumacher, Silvia; Hovakimyan, Marine; Fromm, Michael; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Lubatschowski, Holger; Guthoff, Rudolf

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate a new method for visualizing femtosecond laser pulse-induced microincisions inside crystalline lens tissue. Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hannover, Germany. Lenses removed from porcine eyes were modified ex vivo by femtosecond laser pulses (wavelength 1040 nm, pulse duration 306 femtoseconds, pulse energy 1.0 to 2.5 microJ, repetition rate 100 kHz) to create defined planes at which lens fibers separate. The femtosecond laser pulses were delivered by a 3-dimension (3-D) scanning unit and transmitted by focusing optics (numerical aperture 0.18) into the lens tissue. Lens fiber orientation and femtosecond laser-induced microincisions were examined using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) based on a Rostock Cornea Module attached to a Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II. Optical sections were analyzed in 3-D using Amira software (version 4.1.1). Normal lens fibers showed a parallel pattern with diameters between 3 microm and 9 microm, depending on scanning location. Microincision visualization showed different cutting effects depending on pulse energy of the femtosecond laser. The effects ranged from altered tissue-scattering properties with all fibers intact to definite fiber separation by a wide gap. Pulse energies that were too high or overlapped too tightly produced an incomplete cutting plane due to extensive microbubble generation. The 3-D CLSM method permitted visualization and analysis of femtosecond laser pulse-induced microincisions inside crystalline lens tissue. Thus, 3-D CLSM may help optimize femtosecond laser-based procedures in the treatment of presbyopia.

  15. Polarization control of multi-photon absorption under intermediate femtosecond laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Wenjing; Liang Guo; Wu Ping; Liu Pei; Jia Tianqing; Sun Zhenrong; Zhang Shian

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that the femtosecond laser polarization modulation is a very simple and well-established method to control the multi-photon absorption process by the light–matter interaction. Previous studies mainly focused on the multi-photon absorption control in the weak field. In this paper, we further explore the polarization control behavior of multi-photon absorption process in the intermediate femtosecond laser field. In the weak femtosecond laser field, the second-order perturbation theory can well describe the non-resonant two-photon absorption process. However, the higher order nonlinear effect (e.g., four-photon absorption) can occur in the intermediate femtosecond laser field, and thus it is necessary to establish new theoretical model to describe the multi-photon absorption process, which includes the two-photon and four-photon transitions. Here, we construct a fourth-order perturbation theory to study the polarization control behavior of this multi-photon absorption under the intermediate femtosecond laser field excitation, and our theoretical results show that the two-photon and four-photon excitation pathways can induce a coherent interference, while the coherent interference is constructive or destructive that depends on the femtosecond laser center frequency. Moreover, the two-photon and four-photon transitions have the different polarization control efficiency, and the four-photon absorption can obtain the higher polarization control efficiency. Thus, the polarization control efficiency of the whole excitation process can be increased or decreased by properly designing the femtosecond laser field intensity and laser center frequency. These studies can provide a clear physical picture for understanding and controlling the multi-photon absorption process in the intermediate femtosecond laser field, and also can provide a theoretical guidance for the future experimental realization. (paper)

  16. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation

  17. Effect of liquid environment on the titanium surface modification by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Nisar, E-mail: chnisarali@gmail.com [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Faisalabad Campus, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia [Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Umm-i-Kalsoom [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Kala Shah Kaku Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Begum, Narjis [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Liquid assisted ablation effects on the titanium under varying number of laser pulses is investigated. • SEM analysis reveals the growth of various features like ripples, dendritic structures, pores, grains and craters. • Raman and XRD analyses shows the presence of TiO{sub 2} & TiH in both media whereas, TiC, TiCxOy are only identified in propanol. • Hardness of ablated Ti explored by Nano indentation is found to decrease with increasing number of pulses in both media. • Relationship between surface, structural and mechanical modifications is established. - Abstract: The effect of liquid environment (de-ionized water and propanol) on surface, structural and mechanical properties of femtosecond laser ablated titanium has been investigated. For this purpose, Ti: sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs, 1 kHz) has been employed, at a fluence of 3.6 J/cm{sup 2} in ambient environments of de-ionized water, and propanol for various number of laser pulses i.e. 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000. The surface features, chemical composition, structural analysis and mechanical properties of irradiated targets have been evaluated by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X -ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy and Nano-hardness tester. Various features like dendritic structures, globules, porous granular morphology, cones, crater, circular ripples and thermal stress cracking are observed at the ablated area after irradiation. These features are instigated by various thermal and chemical phenomena induced by laser heating at the solid–liquid interface. Decrease in nano-hardness observed in both ambient environments is attributable to the formation of hydrides after irradiation in both media.

  18. Human cadaver retina model for retinal heating during corneal surgery with a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Yun, Jin; Zhao, Tianzhuo; Yan, Ying; Kurtz, Ron M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers are widely used in everyday clinical procedures to perform minimally invasive corneal refractive surgery. The intralase femtosecond laser (AMO Corp. Santa Ana, CA) is a common example of such a laser. In the present study a numerical simulation was developed to quantify the temperature rise in the retina during femtosecond intracorneal surgery. Also, ex-vivo retinal heating due to laser irradiation was measured with an infrared thermal camera (Fluke Corp. Everett, WA) as a validation of the simulation. A computer simulation was developed using Comsol Multiphysics to calculate the temperature rise in the cadaver retina during femtosecond laser corneal surgery. The simulation showed a temperature rise of less than 0.3 degrees for realistic pulse energies for the various repetition rates. Human cadaver retinas were irradiated with a 150 kHz Intralase femtosecond laser and the temperature rise was measured withan infrared thermal camera. Thermal camera measurements are in agreement with the simulation. During routine femtosecond laser corneal surgery with normal clinical parameters, the temperature rise is well beneath the threshold for retina damage. The simulation predictions are in agreement with thermal measurements providing a level of experimental validation.

  19. Luminescence response of synthetic opal under femtosecond laser pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsov, M.V.; Bazhenov, V.Yu.; Dmitruk, I.N.; Kudryavtseva, A.D.; Tcherniega, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic opal is an artificial photonic metamaterial composed from spherical globules of amorphous silica (SiO 2 ) about 300 nm in diameter. We report, for the first time to our knowledge, the origin of a narrow luminescence spectral peak (4 nm HWHM) and optical second and third harmonic generation in synthetic opal samples under femtosecond laser excitation (800 nm) at liquid-nitrogen temperature. Stimulated-emission effects are discussed related to the possibility of nanocavity lasing at the condition of the first Mie resonance in a dielectric sphere. - Highlights: • Second harmonic generation in a synthetic opal (amorphous material composed from spherical SiO 2 globules) was observed. • Narrow luminescence peak which we assign to a Mie resonance in a globule was detected at liquid-nitrogen temperature

  20. Femtosecond versus nanosecond laser machining: comparison of induced stresses and structural changes in silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, M.S.; El-Ashry, M.A.; Dosser, L.R.; Hix, K.E.; Maguire, J.F.; Irwin, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    Laser micromachining has proven to be a very successful tool for precision machining and microfabrication with applications in microelectronics, MEMS, medical device, aerospace, biomedical, and defense applications. Femtosecond (FS) laser micromachining is usually thought to be of minimal heat-affected zone (HAZ) local to the micromachined feature. The assumption of reduced HAZ is attributed to the absence of direct coupling of the laser energy into the thermal modes of the material during irradiation. However, a substantial HAZ is thought to exist when machining with lasers having pulse durations in the nanosecond (NS) regime. In this paper, we compare the results of micromachining a single crystal silicon wafer using a 150-femtosecond and a 30-nanosecond lasers. Induced stress and amorphization of the silicon single crystal were monitored using micro-Raman spectroscopy as a function of the fluence and pulse duration of the incident laser. The onset of average induced stress occurs at lower fluence when machining with the femtosecond pulse laser. Induced stresses were found to maximize at fluence of 44 J cm -2 and 8 J cm -2 for nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed lasers, respectively. In both laser pulse regimes, a maximum induced stress is observed at which point the induced stress begins to decrease as the fluence is increased. The maximum induced stress was comparable at 2.0 GPa and 1.5 GPa for the two lasers. For the nanosecond pulse laser, the induced amorphization reached a plateau of approximately 20% for fluence exceeding 22 J cm -2 . For the femtosecond pulse laser, however, induced amorphization was approximately 17% independent of the laser fluence within the experimental range. These two values can be considered nominally the same within experimental error. For femtosecond laser machining, some effect of the laser polarization on the amount of induced stress and amorphization was also observed

  1. Laser tattoo removal with preceding ablative fractional treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencič, Boris; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-06-01

    A combined laser tattoo removal treatment, first the ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) with an Er:YAG laser and then the q-switched (QSW) Nd:YAG laser treatment, was studied. Experiments show that significantly higher fluences can be used for the same tissue damage levels.

  2. Photo-transfection of mouse embryonic stem cells with plasmid DNA using femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thobakgale, Lebogang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is about the photo-transfection of mouse embryonic stem cells with plasmid DNA using femtosecond laser pulses. It outlines the background on embryonic stem cells (ES) and phototransfection....

  3. Femtosecond Laser Desorption of Thin Polymer Films from a Dielectric Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercadier L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We desorb polymer films from fused silica with a femtosecond laser and characterize the results by atomic force microscopy. Our study as a function of beam geometry and energy reveals two ways of achieving spatially controlled nanodesorption.

  4. Femtosecond laser processing of active and passive devices for bio-MEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellouard, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond laser processing of glass has been proven to be an efficient tool for fabricating waveguides and microchannels. Here we show that monolithic integration in bio-Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems can be pushed forward by introducing additional functionalities.

  5. Selective deactivation of M13 bacteriophage in E. Coli using femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molukanele, P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Potential for the selective deactivation of viruses while leaving the sensitive material such as the host cell unharmed was studied using a femtosecond laser system, and preliminary results are reported....

  6. Suitable photo-resists for two-photon polymerization using femtosecond fiber lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Rajamanickam, V.P.; Ferrara, L.; Toma, A.; Proietti Zaccaria, R.; Das, G.; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Liberale, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    We present suitable materials with good optical and mechanical properties, simple processing, efficient and optimized for two-photon polymerization (TPP) with femtosecond fiber lasers. We selected readily available acrylic monomer Bisphenol A

  7. Phototransfection of mammalian cells using femtosecond laser pulses: optimization and applicability to stem cell differentiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available phototransfection. Extending previous studies, we show that femtosecond lasers can be used to phototransfect a range of different cell lines, and specifically that this novel technology can also transfect mouse embryonic stem cell colonies with 25% efficiency...

  8. Use of laser ablation in nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier; Damerval, Frederique

    2012-09-01

    The development and the use of clean decontamination process appear to be one of the main priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. This is especially due to the fact of wastes minimization which is one of the principal commitments. One answer would be to use a photonic process such as the LASER process. The principle of this process is based on the absorption, by the contaminant, of the photon's energy. This energy then will propagate into the material and create some mechanical waves responsible of the interfaces embrittlement and de-cohesion. As we can see, this process so called LASER ablation does not use any chemicals and allows us to avoid any production of liquid waste. Since now a couple of years, the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA group (BE/CL) investigates this new decontamination technology. Many tests have been done in inactive conditions on various simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides firstly in order to estimate its efficiency but also to fully qualify it. After that, we decided to move on hot tests to fully validate this new process and to show its interest for the nuclear industry. Those hot tests have been done on two kinds of contaminated material (on tank pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and on metallic pieces covered with grease). Some information such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. (authors)

  9. Tactile Sensing From Laser-Ablated Metallized PET Films

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel sensor patch developed from commercial polyethylene terephthalate films metallized with aluminum on one side. The aluminum was ablated with laser to form interdigitated

  10. Micro Sampling System for Highly Radioactive Specimen by Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sun Ho; Ha, Yeong Keong; Han, Ki Chul; Park, Yang Soon; Jee, Kwang Yong; Kim, Won Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Shielded laser ablation system composed of laser system, image analyser, XYZ translator with motion controller, ablation chamber, manipulator and various optics was designed. Nd:YAG laser which can be tunable from 1064 nm to 266 nm was selected as light source. CCD camera(< x 200) was chosen to analyze a crater less than 50 un in diameter. XYZ translator was composed of three linear stage which can travel 50 w with a minimum movement of 1 {mu}m and motion controller. Before the performance test, each part of system was optically aligned. To perform the ablation test, the specimen was ablated by 50 {mu}m interval and observed by image analyser The shape of crater was almost round, indicating laser beam has homogeneous energy distribution. The resolution and magnification of image system were compatible with the design.

  11. Laser ablation studies of Deposited Silver Colloids Active in SERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Porte, R.T.; Moreno, D.S.; Striano, M.C.; Munnoz, M.M.; Garcia-Ramos, J.V.; Cortes, S.S.; Koudoumas, E.

    2002-01-01

    Laser ablation of deposited silver colloids, active in SERS, is carried out at three different laser wavelengths (KrF, XeCl and Nd:YAG at λ = 248, 308 and 532 nm respectively). Emission form excited neutral Ag and Na atoms, present in the ablation plume, is detected with spectral and temporal resolution. The expansion velocity of Ag in the plume is estimated in ∼1x104m s-1, Low-fluence laser ablation of the colloids yields ionized species that are analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. Na+ and Agn+(n≤3) are observed. Composition of the mass spectra and widths of the mass peaks are found to be dependent on laser wavelength, suggesting that the dominant ablation mechanisms are different at the different wavelenghts.

  12. Comparative study of femtosecond and nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, Luke A.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.; Cremers, David A.; Jones, C. Randy; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We present spectra of depleted uranium metal from laser plasmas generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and femtosecond Ti:sapphire (800 nm) laser pulses. The latter pulses produce short-lived and relatively cool plasmas in comparison to the longer pulses, and the spectra of neutral uranium atoms appear immediately after excitation. Evidence for nonequilibrium excitation with femtosecond pulses is found in the dependence of spectral line intensities on the pulse chirp.

  13. Fabrication of a reinforced polymer microstructure using femtosecond laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alubaidy, M; Venkatakrishnan, K; Tan, B

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for the formation of microfeatures with reinforced polymer using femtosecond laser material processing. The femtosecond laser was used for the generation of a three-dimensional interweaved nanofiber and the construction of microfeatures, such as microchannels and voxels, through two-photon polymerization of a nanofiber-dispersed polymer resin. This new method has the potential of direct fabrication of reinforced micro/nanostructures.

  14. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between the thresholds and the laser parameters. Besides the ablated mass areal density, which fits the experimental data quite well, the ablation temperature, pyrolysis rate, and product components are also discussed for a better understanding of the ablation mechanism of POM.

  15. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  16. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  17. Spatially resolved nanostructural transformation in graphite under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, A., E-mail: aurelian.marcu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Avotina, L. [Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda 4, LV 1010 Riga (Latvia); Porosnicu, C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Marin, A. [Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, 202 Splaiul Independentei 060021, Bucharest (Romania); Grigorescu, C.E.A. [National Institute R& D for Optoelectronics INOE 2000, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Ursescu, D. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Lungu, M. [National Institute of Materials Physics Atomistilor Str., 105 bis, 077125, Magurele (Romania); Demitri, N. [Hard X-ray Beamline and Structural Biology, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14 - km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza TS Italy (Italy); Lungu, C.P. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polycrystalline graphite was irradiated with a high power fs (IR) laser. • Presence of a diamond peak was detected by synchrotron XRD. • XPS and Raman showed in-depth sp{sup 3}% increase at tens of nm below the surface. • sp{sup 3}% is increasing with laser power density but it is independent of photon absorption rate. • Graphite crystallite size locally increase at tens of nanometers below the irradiated spots. - Abstract: A polycrystalline graphite target was irradiated using infrared (800 nm) femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses of different energies. Increase of sp{sup 3} bonds percentage and possible diamond crystal formation were investigated ‘in-depth’ and on the irradiated surfaces. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction pattern have shown the presence of a diamond peak in one of the irradiated zones while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations have shown an increasing tendency of the sp{sup 3} percent in the low power irradiated areas and similarly ‘in the depth’ of the higher power irradiated zones. Multiple wavelength Micro-Raman investigations have confirmed this trend along with an ‘in-depth’ (but not on the surface) increase of the crystallite size. Based on the wavelength dependent photon absorption into graphite, the observed effects are correlated with high density photon per atom and attributed to the melting and recrystallization processes taking place tens of nanometers below the target surface.

  18. Spatially resolved nanostructural transformation in graphite under femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Porosnicu, C.; Marin, A.; Grigorescu, C.E.A.; Ursescu, D.; Lungu, M.; Demitri, N.; Lungu, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polycrystalline graphite was irradiated with a high power fs (IR) laser. • Presence of a diamond peak was detected by synchrotron XRD. • XPS and Raman showed in-depth sp 3 % increase at tens of nm below the surface. • sp 3 % is increasing with laser power density but it is independent of photon absorption rate. • Graphite crystallite size locally increase at tens of nanometers below the irradiated spots. - Abstract: A polycrystalline graphite target was irradiated using infrared (800 nm) femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses of different energies. Increase of sp 3 bonds percentage and possible diamond crystal formation were investigated ‘in-depth’ and on the irradiated surfaces. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction pattern have shown the presence of a diamond peak in one of the irradiated zones while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations have shown an increasing tendency of the sp 3 percent in the low power irradiated areas and similarly ‘in the depth’ of the higher power irradiated zones. Multiple wavelength Micro-Raman investigations have confirmed this trend along with an ‘in-depth’ (but not on the surface) increase of the crystallite size. Based on the wavelength dependent photon absorption into graphite, the observed effects are correlated with high density photon per atom and attributed to the melting and recrystallization processes taking place tens of nanometers below the target surface.

  19. Biomimetic surface structuring using cylindrical vector femtosecond laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoulas, Evangelos; Manousaki, Alexandra; Fotakis, Costas; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    We report on a new, single-step and scalable method to fabricate highly ordered, multi-directional and complex surface structures that mimic the unique morphological features of certain species found in nature. Biomimetic surface structuring was realized by exploiting the unique and versatile angular profile and the electric field symmetry of cylindrical vector (CV) femtosecond (fs) laser beams. It is shown that, highly controllable, periodic structures exhibiting sizes at nano-, micro- and dual- micro/nano scales can be directly written on Ni upon line and large area scanning with radial and azimuthal polarization beams. Depending on the irradiation conditions, new complex multi-directional nanostructures, inspired by the Shark’s skin morphology, as well as superhydrophobic dual-scale structures mimicking the Lotus’ leaf water repellent properties can be attained. It is concluded that the versatility and features variations of structures formed is by far superior to those obtained via laser processing with linearly polarized beams. More important, by exploiting the capabilities offered by fs CV fields, the present technique can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional structures. We believe that our approach provides a new concept in laser materials processing, which can be further exploited for expanding the breadth and novelty of applications.

  20. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilios Alexiades; David Autrique

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu) target in a helium (He) background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model th...

  1. A higher-order-mode fiber delivery for Ti:Sapphire femtosecond lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kim Giessmann; Le, Tuan; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars Erik

    2010-01-01

    We report the first higher-order-mode fiber with anomalous dispersion at 800nm and demonstrate its potential in femtosecond pulse delivery for Ti:Sapphire femtosecond lasers. We obtain 125fs pulses after propagating a distance of 3.6 meters in solid-silica fiber. The pulses could be further...... compressed in a quartz rod to nearly chirp-free 110fs pulses. Femtosecond pulse delivery is achieved by launching the laser output directly into the delivery fiber without any pre-chirping of the input pulse. The demonstrated pulse delivery scheme suggests scaling to >20meters for pulse delivery in harsh...

  2. Analysis on incidence and management of complications after femtosecond laser-assisted small incision lenticule extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Hong Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the safety and postoperative complications of femtosecond laser-assisted small incision lenticule extraction(SMILE. METHODS: Retrospective case series. A total of 1127 patients(2 236 eyeswho were treated with SMILE for myopia or myopia astigmatism between June 2016 and May 2017 were enrolled in this study. Eyes that developed postoperative complications were noted and identified. The incidence, risk factors, management and prognosis were analyzed. The follow-up was 6mo.RESULTS: The rate of postoperative complications was 8.05%, included diffuse lamellar keratitis(3.31%, delayed visual acuity(2.59%, minor interface residue(0.63%, and ghost images(1.52%. These complications had an impact on best corrected visual acuity(BCVAat 3mo in only 1 eye with decentered ablation and was re-treated with topography-guided laser-assisted subepithelial keratomileusis(LASEK. Good visual outcomes were achieved in all eyes finally. CONCLUSION: Although few eyes suffered postoperative complications, SMILE is an acceptable safe surgery. Careful surgical skill, appropriate surgical parameter, and rational postoperative medication can decrease the risk of complication.

  3. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  4. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 μm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  5. Magnetic field effects on ultrafast lattice compression dynamics of Si(111) crystal when excited by linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Koji; Odaka, Hideho; Ono, Kimitoshi; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2007-03-01

    Time-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements of Si (111) single crystal are performed when excited by linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulses (780 nm, 260 fs, negatively-chirped, 1 kHz) under a magnetic field (0.47 T). Laser fluence on the sample surface is 40 mJ/cm^2, which is enough lower than the ablation threshold at 200 mJ/cm^2. Probing X-ray pulses of iron characteristic X-ray lines at 0.193604 and 0.193998 nm are generated by focusing femtosecond laser pulses onto audio-cassette tapes in air. Linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulse irradiation onto Si(111) crystal surface induces transient lattice compression in the picosecond time range, which is confirmed by transient angle shift of X-ray diffraction to higher angles. Little difference of compression dynamics is observed when the laser polarization is changed from p to s-pol. without a magnetic field. On the other hand, under a magnetic field, the lattice compression dynamics changes when the laser is p-polarized which is vertical to the magnetic field vector. These results may be assigned to photo-carrier formation and energy-band distortion.

  6. Femtosecond laser inscribed cladding waveguide lasers in Nd:LiYF4 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Ling; Huang, Ze-Ping; Ye, Yong-Kai; Wang, Hai-Long

    2018-06-01

    Depressed circular cladding, buried waveguides were fabricated in Nd:LiYF4 crystals with an ultrafast Yb-doped fiber master-oscillator power amplifier laser. Waveguides were optimized by varying the laser writing conditions, such as pulse energy, focus depth, femtosecond laser polarization and scanning velocity. Under optical pump at 799 nm, cladding waveguides showed continuous-wave laser oscillation at 1047 nm. Single- and multi-transverse modes waveguide laser were realized by varying the waveguide diameter. The maximum output power in the 40 μm waveguide is ∼195 mW with a slope efficiency of 34.3%. The waveguide lasers with hexagonal and cubic cladding geometry were also realized.

  7. Femtosecond laser-induced decomposition in triazenepolymer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, J.; Wiggins, S.M.; Solis, J.; Lippert, T.; Sturm, H.

    2005-01-01

    The damage induced by ultrashort, 130 fs, near-infrared, 800 nm, Ti:sapphire laser pulses in 1 μm thick triazenepolymer films on glass substrates has been investigated. Real-time reflectivity measurements with a ps-resolution streak camera and a ns-resolution photodiode set-up have been performed to study in situ the structural transformation dynamics upon single-pulse excitation with laser fluences above the threshold of permanent damage. Scanning force microscopy has been used to probe ex situ the corresponding surface topography of the ablated spots. Modulated lateral force microscopy (M-LFM) has been applied to observe alterations of the local friction properties within and around the irradiated areas

  8. Pulse laser ablation at water-air interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    We studied a new pulse laser ablation phenomenon on a liquid surface layer, which is caused by the difference between the refractive indices of the two materials involved. The present study was motivated by our previous study, which showed that laser ablation can occur at the interface between a transparent material and a gas or liquid medium when the laser pulse is focused through the transparent material. In this case, the ablation threshold fluence is reduced remarkably. In the present study, experiments were conducted in water and air in order to confirm this phenomenon for a combination of two fluid media with different refractive indices. This phenomenon was observed in detail by pulse laser shadowgraphy. A high-resolution film was used to record the phenomenon with a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 10-ns duration as a light source. The laser ablation phenomenon on the liquid surface layer caused by a focused Nd:YAG laser pulse with 1064-nm wavelength was found to be followed by the splashing of the liquid surface, inducing a liquid jet with many ligaments. The liquid jet extension velocity was around 1000 m/s in a typical case. The liquid jet decelerated drastically due to rapid atomization at the tips of the ligaments. The liquid jet phenomenon was found to depend on the pulse laser parameters such as the laser fluence on the liquid surface, laser energy, and laser beam pattern. The threshold laser fluence for the generation of a liquid jet was 20 J/cm2. By increasing the incident laser energy with a fixed laser fluence, the laser focused area increased, which eventually led to an increase in the size of the plasma column. The larger the laser energy, the larger the jet size and the longer the temporal behavior. The laser beam pattern was found to have significant effects on the liquid jet’s velocity, shape, and history.

  9. Morphological Observations of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Adhesion to a Nanoperiodic-Structured Titanium Surface Patterned Using Femtosecond Laser Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Kei; Aoki, Shun; Shimomura, Kazunori; Sugita, Norihiko; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Norimasa; Fujie, Hiromichi

    2012-12-01

    It is known that the adhesive and anisotropic properties of cell-derived biomaterials are affected by micro- or nanoscale structures processed on culture surfaces. In the present study, the femtosecond laser processing technique was used to scan a laser beam at an intensity of approximately the ablation threshold level on a titanium surface for nanoscale processing. Microscopy observation revealed that the processed titanium exhibited a periodic-patterned groove structure at the surface; the width and depth of the groove were 292 ±50 and 99 ±31 nm, respectively, and the periodic pitch of the groove was 501 ±100 nm. Human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on the surface at a cell density of 3.0×103 cells/cm2 after 4 cell passages. For comparison, the cells were also cultured on a nonprocessed titanium surface under the condition identical to that of the processed surface. Results revealed that the duration for cell attachment to the surface was markedly reduced on the processed titanium as compared with the nonprocessed titanium. Moreover, on the processed titanium, cell extension area significantly increased while cell orientation was aligned along the direction of the periodic grooves. These results suggest that the femtosecond laser processing improves the adhesive and anisotropic properties of cells by producing the nanoperiodic structure on titanium culture surfaces.

  10. Photofragmentation of colloidal solutions of gold nanoparticles under femtosecond laser pulses in IR and visible ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, P A; Zayarnyi, D A; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V; Rudenko, A A; Saraeva, I N; Yurovskikh, V I; Lednev, V N; Pershin, S M

    2015-01-01

    The specific features of photofragmentation of sols of gold nanoparticles under focused femtosecond laser pulses in IR (1030 nm) and visible (515 nm) ranges is experimentally investigated. A high photofragmentation efficiency of nanoparticles in the waist of a pulsed laser beam in the visible range (at moderate radiation scattering) is demonstrated; this efficiency is related to the excitation of plasmon resonance in nanoparticles on the blue shoulder of its spectrum, in contrast to the regime of very weak photofragmentation in an IR-laser field of comparable intensity. Possible mechanisms of femtosecond laser photofragmentation of gold nanoparticles are discussed. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  11. Efficacy of femtosecond lasers for application of acupuncture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Mika; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Hatano, Naoya; Sugano, Aki; Ito, Akihiko; Takaoka, Yutaka

    2017-12-01

    Acupuncture treatment utilizes the stimulation of metal acupuncture needles that are manually inserted into a living body. In the last decades, laser light has been used as an alternative to needles to stimulate acupuncture points. We previously reported suppression of myostatin (Mstn) gene expression in skeletal muscle by means of femtosecond laser (FL) irradiation, after electroacupuncture, in which acupuncture needles are stimulated with a low-frequency microcurrent. The purpose of the study here was to investigate the efficacy of FL irradiation in mouse skeletal muscle with regard to protein synthesis. After irradiation of the hindlimbs, we first analyzed Mstn gene expression and Mstn protein level in the skeletal muscle. We then evaluated phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K). The results showed that FL irradiation significantly reduced the amount of Mstn protein and enhanced the phosphorylation of p70S6K in of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. We suggest that FL irradiation activated the protein synthetic pathway in the skeletal muscle. In conclusion, we determined that FL irradiation can serve as an alternative for acupuncture needles and has the potential of being a new non-invasive acupuncture treatment of skeletal muscle.

  12. Generation of nanoclusters by ultrafast laser ablation of Al: Molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Phillips, Mark C.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Dressman, Phillip; Miloshevsky, Gennady

    2017-11-01

    The laser ablation of materials induced by an ultrashort femtosecond pulse is a complex phenomenon, which depends on both the material properties and the properties of the laser pulse. The unique capability of a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and Momentum Scaling Model (MSM) methods is developed and applied to a large atomic system for studying the process of ultrafast laser-material interactions, behavior of matter in a highly non-equilibrium state, material disintegration, and formation of nanoparticles (NPs). Laser pulses with several fluences in the range from 500 J/m2 to 5000 J/m2 interacting with a large system of aluminum atoms are simulated. The response of Al material to the laser energy deposition is investigated within the finite-size laser spot. It is found that the shape of the plasma plume is dynamically changing during an expansion process. At several tens of picoseconds it can be characterized as a long hollow ellipsoid surrounded by atomized and nano-clustered particles. The time evolution of NP clusters in the plume is investigated. The collisions between the single Al atoms and generated NPs and fragmentation of large NPs determine the fractions of different-size NP clusters in the plume. The MD-MSM simulations show that laser fluence greatly affects the size distribution of NPs, their polar angles, magnitude and direction vectors of NP velocities. These results and predictions are supported by the experimental data and previous MD simulations.

  13. Formation of periodic mesoscale structures arranged in a circular symmetry at the silicon surface exposed to radiation of a single femtosecond laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romashevskiy, S.A., E-mail: sa.romashevskiy@gmail.com [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya st. 13, Bd. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Ashitkov, S.I.; Ovchinnikov, A.V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya st. 13, Bd. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Kondratenko, P.S. [Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Bol' shaya Tul' skaya st. 53, Moscow 115191 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutskiy per., Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Agranat, M.B. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya st. 13, Bd. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Single pulse irradiation of silicon gave rise to the periodic mesoscale structures. • The number of the periodic structures depends on the incident laser fluence. • The theory of periodically modulated absorption of laser energy is proposed. - Abstract: The periodic mesoscale structures arranged in a circular symmetry were found at the silicon surface exposed to radiation of the single femtosecond laser pulse with a Gaussian intensity profile in the ambient air conditions. These peculiar structures have the appearance of the protrusions of ∼10 nm height and of ∼600 nm width (at a FWHM) separately located inside the ablated region with a period of the incident laser wavelength. It was found that their position at the surface corresponds to the specified laser intensity slightly above the ablation threshold. The number of the formed periodic structures varies with the fluence of the incident laser pulse and in our experiments it was found to have changed from one to eleven. We suppose that formation of these mesoscale structures is caused by heating of a microscale volume to the strongly defined temperature. The theoretical model was proposed to explain the obtained data. It assumes that the interference of incident laser radiation with laser-induced surface electromagnetic waves results in generation of periodic distribution of electron temperature. Thus formation of the periodic structures at the specified laser intensity is attributed to periodically modulated absorption of laser energy at a focal laser spot.

  14. Diffraction efficiency enhancement of femtosecond laser-engraved diffraction gratings due to CO2 laser polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hun-Kook; Jung, Deok; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Tak; Kim, Jin-Tae; Ahsan, Shamim

    2014-01-01

    This research demonstrates laser-assisted fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in fused-silica glass samples. Initially, femtosecond laser pulses are used to engrave diffraction gratings on the glass surfaces. Then, these micro-patterned glass samples undergo CO 2 laser polishing process. unpolished diffraction gratings encoded in the glass samples show an overall diffraction efficiency of 18.1%. diffraction gratings imprinted on the glass samples and then polished four times by using a CO 2 laser beam attain a diffraction efficiency of 32.7%. We also investigate the diffraction patterns of the diffraction gratings encoded on fused-silica glass surfaces. The proposed CO 2 laser polishing technique shows great potential in patterning high-efficiency diffraction gratings on the surfaces of various transparent materials.

  15. Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation: afterthoughts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, H. A. Martino; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Physicists and medical doctors "speak" different languages. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a good example in which technology is essential to guide the doctor to the final result: optimal treatment. However, for the doctor, it is by far insufficient just to turn on the knobs of the laser. He

  16. Laser ablation/ionization studies in a glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, K.R.; Harrison, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The pin cathode glow discharge is used in the laboratory as an atomization/ionization source for a variety of applications, including solids mass spectrometry. Coupled with a tunable dye laser, the glow discharge may also serve as an atom reservoir for resonance ionization mass spectrometry in which the laser ionizes the discharge sputtered atoms. By tightly focusing the laser onto solid samples, various ablation effects may also be investigated. The laser may be used to generate an ionized plasma which may be directly analyzed by mass spectrometry. Alternatively, the ablated neutral atoms may be used in post-ablation excitation/ionization processes, in this case the glow discharge. The results of these investigations are the basis of this paper

  17. Inhibition of Escherichia coli respiratory enzymes by short visible femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chieh-Han; Hsu, Yung-Yuan; Lin, Kung-Hsuan; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Kuan, Yung-Shu

    2014-01-01

    A visible femtosecond laser is shown to be capable of selectively inactivating a wide spectrum of microorganisms in a wavelength and pulse width dependent manner. However, the mechanism of how a visible femtosecond laser affects the viability of different microorganisms is still elusive. In this paper, the cellular surface properties, membrane integrity and metabolic rate of Escherichia coli (E. coli) irradiated by a visible femtosecond laser (λ = 415 nm, pulse width = 100 fs) with different exposure times were investigated. Our results showed that femtosecond laser treatment for 60 min led to cytoplasmic leakage, protein aggregation and alternation of the physical properties of the E. coli cell membrane. In comparison, a 10 min exposure of bacteria to femtosecond laser irradiation induced an immediate reduction of 75% in the glucose-dependent respiratory rate, while the cytoplasmic leakage was not detected. Results from enzymatic assays showed that oxidases and dehydrogenases involved in the E. coli respiratory chain exhibited divergent susceptibility after laser irradiation. This early commencement of respiratory inhibition after a short irradiation is presumed to have a dominant effect on the early stage of bacteria inactivation. (paper)

  18. Development of a new picosecond pulse radiolysis system by using a femtosecond laser synchronized with a picosecond linac. A step to femtosecond pulse radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Tamotsu; Miki, Miyako; Seki, Shu; Okuda, Shuichi; Honda, Yoshihide; Kimura, Norio; Tagawa, Seiichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research; Ushida, Kiminori

    1997-03-01

    A new picosecond pulse radiolysis system by using a Ti sapphire femtosecond laser synchronized with a 20 ps electron pulse from the 38 MeV L-band linac has been developed for the research of the ultra fast reactions in primary processes of radiation chemistry. The timing jitter in the synchronization of the laser pulse with the electron pulse is less than several picosecond. The technique can be used in the next femtosecond pulse radiolysis. (author)

  19. Photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Van Phuc, Nguyen; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) over 20 years. Recently, application of high laser power up to 200 W was often reported to swiftly remove a large amount of prostatic tissue. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue vaporization with low laser power. Chicken breast tissue was selected as a target tissue due to minimal optical absorption at the visible wavelength. Four biocompatible photoactive dyes, including amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532 nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm(2) . Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-Vis spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2 ± 0.2 µm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. High aspect ratios up to 7.1 ± 0.4 entailed saturation behavior in the tissue ablation injected with AR and BD, possibly resulting from plume shielding and increased scattering due to coagulation. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33% reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. Due to

  20. Femtosecond laser-induced phase transformations in amorphous Cu{sub 77}Ni{sub 6}Sn{sub 10}P{sub 7} alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Zou, G.; Wu, A.; Bai, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, L., E-mail: liulei@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, N. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhou, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2015-01-14

    In this study, the femtosecond laser-induced crystallization of CuNiSnP amorphous ribbons was investigated by utilizing an amplified Ti:sapphire laser system. X-ray diffraction and scanning electronic microscope were applied to examine the phase and morphology changes of the amorphous ribbons. Micromachining without crystallization, surface patterning, and selective crystallization were successfully achieved by changing laser parameters. Obvious crystallization occurred under the condition that the laser fluence was smaller than the ablation threshold, indicating that the structural evolution of the material depends strongly on the laser parameters. Back cooling method was used to inhibit heat accumulation; a reversible transformation between the disordered amorphous and crystalline phases can be achieved by using this method.

  1. A Comparison of Different Operating Systems for Femtosecond Lasers in Cataract Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B M; Williams, G P; Tan, A; Mehta, J S

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of femtosecond lasers is potentially a major shift in the way we approach cataract surgery. The development of increasingly sophisticated intraocular lenses (IOLs), coupled with heightened patient expectation of high quality postsurgical visual outcomes, has generated the need for a more precise, highly reproducible and standardized method to carry out cataract operations. As femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) becomes more commonplace in surgical centers, further evaluation of the potential risks and benefits needs to be established, particularly in the medium/long term effects. Healthcare administrators will also have to weigh and balance out the financial costs of these lasers relative to the advantages they put forth. In this review, we provide an operational overview of three of five femtosecond laser platforms that are currently commercially available: the Catalys (USA), the Victus (USA), and the LDV Z8 (Switzerland).

  2. Femtosecond laser inscribed cladding waveguides in Nd:YAG ceramics: fabrication, fluorescence imaging and laser performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongliang; Jia, Yuechen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2012-08-13

    We report on the fabrication of depressed cladding waveguide lasers in Nd:YAG (neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet, Nd:Y3Al5O12) ceramics microstructured by femtosecond laser pulses. Full control over the confined light spatial distribution is demonstrated by the fabrication of high contrast waveguides with hexagonal, circular and trapezoidal configurations. The confocal fluorescence measurements of the waveguides reveal that the original luminescence features of Nd3+ ions are well-preserved in the waveguide regions. Under optical pump at 808 nm, cladding waveguides showed continuous wave efficient laser oscillation. The maximum output power obtained at 1064.5 nm is ~181 mW with a slope efficiency as high as 44%, which suggests that the fabricated Nd:YAG ceramic waveguides are promising candidates for efficient integrated laser sources.

  3. Femtosecond Laser--Pumped Source of Entangled Photons for Quantum Cryptography Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, D.; Donaldson, W.; Sobolewski, R.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental setup for generation of entangled-photon pairs via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, based on the femtosecond-pulsed laser. Our entangled-photon source utilizes a 76-MHz-repetition-rate, 100-fs-pulse-width, mode-locked, ultrafast femtosecond laser, which can produce, on average, more photon pairs than a cw laser of an equal pump power. The resulting entangled pairs are counted by a pair of high-quantum-efficiency, single-photon, silicon avalanche photodiodes. Our apparatus s intended as an efficient source/receiver system for the quantum communications and quantum cryptography applications

  4. Plasma channels during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse with wavefront astigmatism in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dergachev, A A; Kandidov, V P; Shlenov, S A [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ionin, A A; Mokrousova, D V; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Shustikova, A P [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    We have demonstrated experimentally and numerically the possibility of controlling parameters of plasma channels formed during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse by introducing astigmatism in the laser beam wavefront. It is found that weak astigmatism increases the length of the plasma channel in comparison with the case of aberration-free focusing and that strong astigmatism can cause splitting of the plasma channel into two channels located one after another on the filament axis. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  5. High strength fused silica flexures manufactured by femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellouard, Yves; Said, Ali A.; Dugan, Mark; Bado, Philippe

    2009-02-01

    Flexures are mechanical elements used in micro- and precision-engineering to precisely guide the motion of micro-parts. They consist of slender bodies that deform elastically upon the application of a force. Although counter-intuitive at first, fused silica is an attractive material for flexure. Pending that the machining process does not introduce surface flaws that would lead to catastrophic failure, the material has a theoretically high ultimate tensile strength of several GPa. We report on high-aspect ratio fused silica flexures manufactured by femtosecond laser combined with chemical etching. Notch-hinges with thickness as small as twenty microns and aspect ratios comparable to aspect ratios obtained by Deep- Reactive-Ion-Etching (DRIE) were fabricated and tested under different loading conditions. Multiple fracture tests were performed for various loading conditions and the cracks morphologies were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The manufactured elements show outstanding mechanical properties with flexural strengths largely exceeding those obtained with other technologies and materials. Fused silica flexures offer a mean to combine integrated optics with micro-mechanics in a single monolithic substrate. Waveguides and mechanical elements can be combined in a monolithic devices opening new opportunities for integrated opto-mechatronics devices.

  6. Femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyin, Alexey A.; Golik, Sergey S.

    2013-01-01

    The composition of the line and band spectra of the plasma induced by a femtosecond laser pulse on the surface of sea water is determined. The temporal behaviors of the intensity of the continuum and the Ca II, Mg II and Na I lines are investigated. It is shown that the time dependence of the intensity of the Na I line is described by a monoexponential function. The characteristic decay times of the line intensities of Mg II and Na I were used to estimate the three-body recombination times. Using these values, we estimate the electron number density and the feasibility of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) criterion. A method involving excitation rate constants is proposed for the comparison of detection limits. For a plasma generated on a liquid surface, the following relation among detection limits will be obtained: LOD(Na) 2 were recorded. • Recombination determines characteristic decay time of line intensity. • Three-body recombination time was used to estimate electron density. • Excitation rate constants allow to determine relation of detection limits

  7. Langmuir probe study of plasma expansion in pulsed laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Langmuir probes were used to monitor the asymptotic expansion of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of a silver target in a vacuum. The measured angular and temporal distributions of the ion flux and electron temperature were found to be in good agreement with the self-similar isentropic...... and adiabatic solution of the gas dynamics equations describing the expansion. The value of the adiabatic index gamma was about 1.25, consistent with the ablation plume being a low temperature plasma....

  8. Ablation from metals induced by visible and UV laser irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    The deposition rate of laser-ablated silver has been determined for fluences between 0.5 and 15 J/cm2 at the wavelengths 532 and 355 nm for a beam spot area of around 0.01 cm2. The ablated metal was collected on a quartz crystal microbalance. The rate at 5 J/cm2 was about 4 × 1013 Ag/cm2 per pulse...

  9. Cartilage ablation studies using mid-IR free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jong-In; Peavy, George M.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2005-04-01

    The ablation rate of articular cartilage and fibrocartilage (meniscus), were quantified to examine wavelength and tissue-composition dependence of ablation efficiency for selected mid-infrared wavelengths. The wavelengths tested were 2.9 um (water dominant absorption), 6.1 (protein and water absorption) and 6.45 um (protein dominant absorption) generated by the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Vanderbilt University. The measurement of tissue mass removal using a microbalance during laser ablation was conducted to determine the ablation rates of cartilage. The technique can be accurate over methods such as profilometer and histology sectioning where tissue surface and the crater morphology may be affected by tissue processing. The ablation efficiency was found to be dependent upon the wavelength. Both articular cartilage and meniscus (fibrocartilage) ablations at 6.1 um were more efficient than those at the other wavelengths evaluated. We observed the lowest ablation efficiency of both types of cartilage with the 6.45 um wavelength, possibly due to the reduction in water absorption at this wavelength in comparison to the other wavelengths that were evaluated.

  10. Femtosecond laser control of chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions is made possible through the use of pulse-shaping techniques coupled to a learning algorithm feedback loop – teaching the laser pulse to control the chemical reaction. This can result in controllable...

  11. Profitability analysis of a femtosecond laser system for cataract surgery using a fuzzy logic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigueros, José Antonio; Piñero, David P; Ismail, Mahmoud M

    2016-01-01

    To define the financial and management conditions required to introduce a femtosecond laser system for cataract surgery in a clinic using a fuzzy logic approach. In the simulation performed in the current study, the costs associated to the acquisition and use of a commercially available femtosecond laser platform for cataract surgery (VICTUS, TECHNOLAS Perfect Vision GmbH, Bausch & Lomb, Munich, Germany) during a period of 5y were considered. A sensitivity analysis was performed considering such costs and the countable amortization of the system during this 5y period. Furthermore, a fuzzy logic analysis was used to obtain an estimation of the money income associated to each femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (G). According to the sensitivity analysis, the femtosecond laser system under evaluation can be profitable if 1400 cataract surgeries are performed per year and if each surgery can be invoiced more than $500. In contrast, the fuzzy logic analysis confirmed that the patient had to pay more per surgery, between $661.8 and $667.4 per surgery, without considering the cost of the intraocular lens (IOL). A profitability of femtosecond laser systems for cataract surgery can be obtained after a detailed financial analysis, especially in those centers with large volumes of patients. The cost of the surgery for patients should be adapted to the real flow of patients with the ability of paying a reasonable range of cost.

  12. Influence of laser ablation parameters on trueness of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaculovič, T.; Warchilová, T.; Čadková, Z.; Száková, J.; Tlustoš, P.; Otruba, V.; Kanický, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser ablation conditions vs. quality of LA-ICP-MS imaging (resolution, detection). • Increase in laser spot size improves detection limit, while deteriorates resolution. • Decrease in scan speed improves resolution but prolongs time of analysis. • Compromise spot size and scan speed meet required quality of imaging. • Metal-enriched/depleted zones in tapeworm sections were resolved by LA-ICP-MS. - Abstract: Influence of laser ablation conditions on limit of detection, spatial resolution and time of analysis was studied for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) applied to elemental mapping. Laser repetition rate and laser fluence were investigated in tapeworm thin section to attain optimum ablation rate, yielding appropriately low detection limit which complies with elemental contents in the tissue. Effect of combinations of laser spot size and scan speed on relative broadening (Δw rel ) of image of the ablated pattern (line) was investigated with the aim to quantify the trueness of imaging. Ink lines printed on paper were employed for the study of influence of spot size and scan speed on limit of detection, relative broadening of elemental image and duration of elemental mapping. An uneven distribution of copper in a printed line (coffee stain effect) was observed. The Δw rel is strongly reduced (down to 2%) at low scan speed (10 μm s −1 ) and laser spot diameter of 10 μm but resulting in unacceptably long time of mapping (up to 3000 min). Finally, tapeworm thin-section elemental maps (4 mm × 5 mm) were obtained at the laser spot diameter of 65 μm and the scan speed of 65 μm s −1 within 100 min. A dissimilar lateral distribution of Pb was observed in comparison with that of Cu or Zn due to different pathways of element uptake

  13. Influence of laser ablation parameters on trueness of imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaculovič, T.; Warchilová, T. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); CEITEC, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, Brno 62500 (Czech Republic); Čadková, Z.; Száková, J.; Tlustoš, P. [Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, Praha 16521 (Czech Republic); Otruba, V. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); Kanický, V., E-mail: viktork@chemi.muni.cz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); CEITEC, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, Brno 62500 (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Laser ablation conditions vs. quality of LA-ICP-MS imaging (resolution, detection). • Increase in laser spot size improves detection limit, while deteriorates resolution. • Decrease in scan speed improves resolution but prolongs time of analysis. • Compromise spot size and scan speed meet required quality of imaging. • Metal-enriched/depleted zones in tapeworm sections were resolved by LA-ICP-MS. - Abstract: Influence of laser ablation conditions on limit of detection, spatial resolution and time of analysis was studied for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) applied to elemental mapping. Laser repetition rate and laser fluence were investigated in tapeworm thin section to attain optimum ablation rate, yielding appropriately low detection limit which complies with elemental contents in the tissue. Effect of combinations of laser spot size and scan speed on relative broadening (Δw{sub rel}) of image of the ablated pattern (line) was investigated with the aim to quantify the trueness of imaging. Ink lines printed on paper were employed for the study of influence of spot size and scan speed on limit of detection, relative broadening of elemental image and duration of elemental mapping. An uneven distribution of copper in a printed line (coffee stain effect) was observed. The Δw{sub rel} is strongly reduced (down to 2%) at low scan speed (10 μm s{sup −1}) and laser spot diameter of 10 μm but resulting in unacceptably long time of mapping (up to 3000 min). Finally, tapeworm thin-section elemental maps (4 mm × 5 mm) were obtained at the laser spot diameter of 65 μm and the scan speed of 65 μm s{sup −1} within 100 min. A dissimilar lateral distribution of Pb was observed in comparison with that of Cu or Zn due to different pathways of element uptake.

  14. Effect analysis of material properties of picosecond laser ablation for ABS/PVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y. H.; Ho, C. Y.; Chiou, Y. J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper analytically investigates the picosecond laser ablation of ABS/PVC. Laser-pulsed ablation is a wellestablished tool for polymer. However the ablation mechanism of laser processing for polymer has not been thoroughly understood yet. This study utilized a thermal transport model to analyze the relationship between the ablation rate and laser fluences. This model considered the energy balance at the decomposition interface and Arrhenius law as the ablation mechanisms. The calculated variation of the ablation rate with the logarithm of the laser fluence agrees with the measured data. It is also validated in this work that the variation of the ablation rate with the logarithm of the laser fluence obeys Beer's law for low laser fluences. The effects of material properties and processing parameters on the ablation depth per pulse are also discussed for picosecond laser processing of ABS/PVC.

  15. Comparison of corneal sensation between small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK for myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meiyan; Zhou, Zimei; Shen, Yang; Knorz, Michael C; Gong, Lan; Zhou, Xingtao

    2014-02-01

    To compare the impact on corneal sensation after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK (femto-LASIK) in patients with myopia. In this prospective, nonrandomized comparative study, 71 subjects were enrolled. Thirty-eight eyes of 38 patients underwent SMILE and 33 eyes of 33 patients underwent femto-LASIK. Corneal sensation was tested with Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometry in five corneal areas preoperatively and at 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Comparison of corneal sensation was performed for the SMILE and femto-LASIK groups. Additionally, the correlations were evaluated between the postoperative corneal sensation, preoperative spherical equivalent, and ablation depth. All tested areas within the cap or flap demonstrated corneal hypoesthesia immediately after both surgeries. SMILE-treated eyes showed less compromised corneal sensation than femto-LASIK-treated eyes at all postoperative visits in the central, inferior, nasal, and temporal areas at the 1-week and 1-month visits. In the SMILE group, the inferior, nasal, and temporal quadrants recovered faster than other areas. In the femto-LASIK group, the sensation over the flap did not recover to preoperative levels by postoperative 6 months. There was no correlation between postoperative corneal sensation, preoperative spherical equivalent, and ablation depth in both groups. The impairment of corneal sensation was less significant in the SMILE group than in the femto-LASIK group and was independent of preoperative spherical equivalent or ablation depth. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Infrared Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for Fingermark Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Camp, Eden E.; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2017-09-01

    Infrared laser ablation coupled to vacuum capture was employed to collect material from fingermarks deposited on surfaces of different porosity and roughness. Laser ablation at 3 μm was performed in reflection mode with subsequent capture of the ejecta with a filter connected to vacuum. Ablation and capture of standards from fingermarks was demonstrated on glass, plastic, aluminum, and cardboard surfaces. Using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), it was possible to detect caffeine after spiking with amounts as low as 1 ng. MALDI detection of condom lubricants and detection of antibacterial peptides from an antiseptic cream was demonstrated. Detection of explosives from fingermarks left on plastic surfaces as well as from direct deposition on the same surface using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was shown. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Laser assisted bioprinting using a femtosecond laser with and without a gold transductive layer: a parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrus, H.; Chassagne, B.; Catros, S.; Artiges, C.; Devillard, R.; Petit, S.; Deloison, F.; Fricain, J. C.; Guillemot, F.; Kling, R.

    2016-03-01

    Experimental results of femtosecond Laser Assisted Bioprinting (LAB) are reported on. Two set-up, used to print different model bioinks and keratinocytes cells line HaCaT, were studied: first one was using a femtosecond laser with low pulse energy and an absorbing gold layer, whereas the second one used high pulse energy enabling the removal of the absorbing layer. Printed drop diameter and resulting height of the bioink jet are then quantified as a function of the LAB parameters such as laser energy, focus spot location or numerical aperture.

  18. [Alternatives to femtosecond laser technology: subnanosecond UV pulse and ring foci for creation of LASIK flaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, A; Freidank, S; Linz, N

    2014-06-01

    In refractive corneal surgery femtosecond (fs) lasers are used for creating LASIK flaps, dissecting lenticules and for astigmatism correction by limbal incisions. Femtosecond laser systems are complex and expensive and cutting precision is compromised by the large focal length associated with the commonly used infrared (IR) wavelengths. Based on investigations of the cutting dynamics, novel approaches for corneal dissection using ultraviolet A (UVA) picosecond (ps) pulses and ring foci from vortex beams are presented. Laser-induced bubble formation in corneal stroma was investigated by high-speed photography at 1-50 million frames/s. Using Gaussian and vortex beams of UVA pulses with durations between 200 and 850 ps the laser energy needed for easy removal of flaps created in porcine corneas was determined and the quality of the cuts by scanning electron microscopy was documented. Cutting parameters for 850 ps are reported also for rabbit eyes. The UV-induced and mechanical stress were evaluated for Gaussian and vortex beams. The results show that UVA picosecond lasers provide better cutting precision than IR femtosecond lasers, with similar processing times. Cutting energy decreases by >50 % when the laser pulse duration is reduced to 200 ps. Vortex beams produce a short, donut-shaped focus allowing efficient and precise dissection along the corneal lamellae which results in a dramatic reduction of the absorbed energy needed for cutting and of mechanical side effects as well as in less bubble formation in the cutting plane. A combination of novel approaches for corneal dissection provides the option to replace femtosecond lasers by compact UVA microchip laser technology. Ring foci are also of interest for femtosecond laser surgery, especially for improved lenticule excision.

  19. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging using a femtosecond UV laser and a VUV free-electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, S. Y.; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Fuji, Takao; Nishizawa, Kiyoshi; Horio, Takuya; Mizuno, Tomoya; Kohguchi, Hiroshi; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Kimura, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    A time-resolved photoelectron imaging using a femtosecond ultraviolet (UV) laser and a vacuum UV freeelectron laser is presented. Ultrafast internal conversion and intersystem crossing in pyrazine in a supersonic molecular beam were clearly observed in the time profiles of photoioinzation intensity and time-dependent photoelectron images.

  20. Laser ablation of dental calculus at 400 nm using a Ti:sapphire laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, Joshua E.; Seka, Wolf; Rechmann, Peter

    2009-02-01

    A Nd:YAG laser-pumped, frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is used for selective ablation of calculus. The laser provides calculus removal. This is in stark contrast with tightly focused Gaussian beams that are energetically inefficient and lead to irreproducible results. Calculus is well ablated at high fluences >=2J/cm2 stalling occurs below this fluence because of photobleaching. Healthy hard tissue is not removed at fluences <=3 J/cm2.

  1. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Alexiades

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu target in a helium (He background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model that connects the thermodynamics and underlying kinetics of this challenging phase change problem in a self-consistent way.

  2. Modulation of dry tribological property of stainless steel by femtosecond laser surface texturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Zhao, Quanzhong; Wang, Chengwei; Zhang, Yang

    2015-06-01

    We reported on the modification of tribological properties of stainless steel by femtosecond laser surface microstructuring. Regular arranged micro-grooved textures with different spacing were produced on the AISI 304L steel surfaces by an 800-nm femtosecond laser. The tribological properties of smooth surface and textured surface were investigated by carrying out reciprocating ball-on-flat tests against Al2O3 ceramic balls under dry friction. Results show that the spacing of micro-grooves had a significant impact on friction coefficient of textured surfaces. Furthermore, the wear behaviors of smooth and textured surface were also investigated. Femtosecond laser surface texturing had a marked potential for modulating friction and wear properties if the micro-grooves were distributed in an appropriate manner.

  3. A stabilized optical frequency comb based on an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chuanqing; Wu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunbo; Xing, Shuai

    2018-03-01

    An optical frequency comb based on a 250 MHz home-made Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser is presented in this paper. The Er-doped fiber laser has a ring cavity and operates mode-locked in femtosecond regime with the technique of nonlinear polarization rotation. The pulse duration is 118 fs and the spectral width is 30 nm. A part of the femtosecond laser is amplified in Er-doped fiber amplifier before propagating through a piece of highly nonlinear fiber for expanding the spectrum. The carrier-envelope offset frequency of the comb which has a signal-to-noise ratio more than 35 dB is extracted by means of f-2f beating. It demonstrates that both carrier-envelope offset frequency and repetition frequency keep phase locked to a Rubidium atomic clock simultaneously for 2 hours. The frequency stabilized fiber combs will be increasingly applied in optical metrology, attosecond pulse generation, and absolute distance measurement.

  4. Laser in situ keratomileusis enhancements with the Ziemer FEMTO LDV femtosecond laser following previous LASIK treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Juhani; Huhtala, Anne; Mäkinen, Petri; Uusitalo, Hannu

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the accuracy, predictability, and safety outcomes of LASIK enhancements performed with the FEMTO LDV femtosecond laser (Ziemer Ophthalmic Systems, Port, Switzerland) and the Allegretto Wave Concerto 500 Hz excimer laser (Wavelight AG, Erlangen, Germany), following previous LASIK treatments. FEMTO LDV was used for flap creation in 85 previously LASIK-treated eyes of 62 patients. The intended flap thickness was 90 μm in 81 eyes and 140 μm in 4 eyes. The size of the suction ring was 9.0 mm in 72 eyes and 9.5 mm in 13 eyes. Flap dimensions were measured and correlated to preoperative characteristics. With the intended flap thickness of 90 μm in previously LASIK-treated eyes, the actual flap thickness was 90.2 ± 6.6 μm (range 80-122), and the flap diameter was 9.2 ± 0.2 mm (range 8.7-9.9). The mean hinge length was 4.0 ± 0.2 mm (range 3.0-4.8). Flap thickness correlated positively with patient age and hinge length. Complications were reported in 12 eyes (14.1 %). Most of the complications were very mild, and none of them prevented further refractive laser treatment. One eye lost two Snellen lines of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity. Femtosecond LASIK enhancement is warranted only in rare cases. Surgical experience is needed and special caution must be practiced. For cases of a primary free cap, femtosecond LASIK is not recommended.

  5. Image-converter diagnostics of laser and laser plasma in pico-femtosecond region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelev, M.Ya.

    1979-01-01

    In the present communication we would like to outline some new trends in development of pico-femtosecond image-converter diagnostics for laser and laser plasma research on the basis of the recent works done in P.N.Lebedev Physical Institute. The discussion of the following subjects will be included: new generation of picosecond image-converter tubes (ICT), pulsed control circuitry, late prototype of picosecond image-converter cameras (ICC), test installation consisting of Nd: glass and YAG lasers for production the ultra-short pulses and sinusoidally modulated radiation, methods and techniques for image tube and camera dynamic measurements in IR, visible and X-ray spectral regions. Also discussed are the image processing technique for pictures taken with picosecond ICC in order to correct the geometrical distortions, enhance pictures quality and evaluate parameters of the input signals through their recorded images. (author)

  6. A fully automated microfluidic femtosecond laser axotomy platform for nerve regeneration studies in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Sertan Kutal; Guo, Samuel X; Ghorashian, Navid; Everett, W Neil; Jarrell, Travis; Kottek, Aubri; Bovik, Alan C; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser nanosurgery has been widely accepted as an axonal injury model, enabling nerve regeneration studies in the small model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. To overcome the time limitations of manual worm handling techniques, automation and new immobilization technologies must be adopted to improve throughput in these studies. While new microfluidic immobilization techniques have been developed that promise to reduce the time required for axotomies, there is a need for automated procedures to minimize the required amount of human intervention and accelerate the axotomy processes crucial for high-throughput. Here, we report a fully automated microfluidic platform for performing laser axotomies of fluorescently tagged neurons in living Caenorhabditis elegans. The presented automation process reduces the time required to perform axotomies within individual worms to ∼17 s/worm, at least one order of magnitude faster than manual approaches. The full automation is achieved with a unique chip design and an operation sequence that is fully computer controlled and synchronized with efficient and accurate image processing algorithms. The microfluidic device includes a T-shaped architecture and three-dimensional microfluidic interconnects to serially transport, position, and immobilize worms. The image processing algorithms can identify and precisely position axons targeted for ablation. There were no statistically significant differences observed in reconnection probabilities between axotomies carried out with the automated system and those performed manually with anesthetics. The overall success rate of automated axotomies was 67.4±3.2% of the cases (236/350) at an average processing rate of 17.0±2.4 s. This fully automated platform establishes a promising methodology for prospective genome-wide screening of nerve regeneration in C. elegans in a truly high-throughput manner.

  7. Fabrication of Biomimetic Fog-Collecting Superhydrophilic-Superhydrophobic Surface Micropatterns Using Femtosecond Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostal, Elisabeth; Stroj, Sandra; Kasemann, Stephan; Matylitsky, Victor; Domke, Matthias

    2018-03-06

    The exciting functionalities of natural superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces served as inspiration for a variety of biomimetic designs. In particular, the combination of both extreme wetting states to micropatterns opens up interesting applications, as the example of the fog-collecting Namib Desert beetle shows. In this paper, the beetle's elytra were mimicked by a novel three-step fabrication method to increase the fog-collection efficiency of glasses. In the first step, a double-hierarchical surface structure was generated on Pyrex wafers using femtosecond laser structuring, which amplified the intrinsic wetting property of the surface and made it superhydrophilic (water contact angle 150°). In the last step, the Teflon-like coating was selectively removed by fs-laser ablation to uncover superhydrophilic spots below the superhydrophobic surface, following the example of the Namib Desert beetle's fog-collecting elytra. To investigate the influence on the fog-collection behavior, (super)hydrophilic, (super)hydrophobic, and low and high contrast wetting patterns were fabricated on glass wafers using selected combinations of these three processing steps and were exposed to fog in an artificial nebulizer setup. This experiment revealed that high-contrast wetting patterns collected the highest amount of fog and enhanced the fog-collection efficiency by nearly 60% compared to pristine Pyrex glass. The comparison of the fog-collection behavior of the six samples showed that the superior fog-collection efficiency of surface patterns with extreme wetting contrast is due to the combination of water attraction and water repellency: the superhydrophilic spots act as drop accumulation areas, whereas the surrounding superhydrophobic areas allow a fast water transportation caused by gravity. The presented method enables a fast and flexible surface functionalization of a broad range of materials including transparent substrates, which offers exciting possibilities for

  8. Observation of the initial stage of the laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Ohyanagi, Takasumi; Murakami, Kouichi.

    1994-01-01

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using Laser Plasma X-ray (LPX) as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20 J/cm 2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibits several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak of 1s → 2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C 0 ), C - , C + and C 2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C 0 is stronger as the probing position is closer to the sample surface and its intensity decreases rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C 2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speed of highly charged ions are faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions are emitted from the sample surface even after laser irradiation. The spatial distribution of the laser ablated particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume is depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  9. Comparative study of the dissociative ionization of 1,1,1-trichloroethane using nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available , but different fragmentation patterns. A general trend is that when using femtosecond laser pulses for ionization, the parent molecular ion is observed but not for nanosecond laser ionization. There is also a fundamental interest in laser...-molecule interactions at the high intensities available from femtosecond lasers [12,13]. These papers describe the multiphoton ionization mechanisms termed ladder climbing and ladder switching, which explain the presence of parent molecular ion in ultrashort pulse...

  10. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  11. Power dependent filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse in air by focusing with an axicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Zeng, Tao; Liu, Weiwei; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Siwen

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, femtosecond laser filament generation by focusing the laser pulse with an axicon in air is studied at different input laser powers both experimentally and numerically. It is found that the length of the filament increases almost linearly with the input laser power. Moreover, the laser intensity inside the filament starts to saturate at a power much higher than the critical power of self-focusing for a Gaussian beam. We have also observed the laser pulse self-compression during nonlinear propagation. The shortest pulse duration could be obtained at the center of the effective focal region produced by the axicon. (paper)

  12. Ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene using a continuous CO2 laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstopyatov, E M

    2005-01-01

    The ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is studied using a continuous CO 2 laser beam of 30-50 W at a mean intensity of 0.05-50 MW m -2 . The ablation products and changes in the target layer are examined using infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The main experiments were conducted with an unfocused beam of intensity 0.9-1.2 MW m -2 . The radiation-polymer interaction characteristics were found to change appreciably as the ablation conditions are approached. Within the polymer layer, light scattering diminishes and true resonant light absorption increases. Two distinct polymer components, which differ primarily in their resistance to CO 2 laser radiation, were found to exist under ablation conditions. The less stable component depolymerizes intensively, while the more resistant component is blown up into fibres by intense gas flow. The reasons behind this behaviour are discussed. Preliminary gamma irradiation of PTFE is found to have a significant influence on the laser ablation process

  13. Cascaded quadratic soliton compression of high-power femtosecond fiber lasers in Lithium Niobate crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Moses, Jeffrey; Wise, Frank W.

    2008-01-01

    The output of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser is typically 300 fs with a wavelength around $\\lambda=1030-1060$ nm. Our numerical simulations show that cascaded quadratic soliton compression in bulk LiNbO$_3$ can compress such pulses to below 100 fs.......The output of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser is typically 300 fs with a wavelength around $\\lambda=1030-1060$ nm. Our numerical simulations show that cascaded quadratic soliton compression in bulk LiNbO$_3$ can compress such pulses to below 100 fs....

  14. Stressed waveguides with tubular depressed-cladding inscribed in phosphate glasses by femtosecond hollow laser beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xuewen; Bai, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Stoian, Razvan; Hui, Rongqing; Cheng, Guanghua

    2012-08-01

    We report on the single-step fabrication of stressed optical waveguides with tubular depressed-refractive-index cladding in phosphate glasses by the use of focused femtosecond hollow laser beams. Tubelike low index regions appear under direct exposure due to material rarefaction following expansion. Strained compacted zones emerged in domains neighboring the tubular track of lower refractive index, and waveguiding occurs mainly within the tube core fabricated by the engineered femtosecond laser beam. The refractive index profile of the optical waveguide was reconstructed from the measured transmitted near-field intensity.

  15. Femtosecond laser writing of a flat-top interleaver via cascaded Mach-Zehnder interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jason C; Li, Chengbo; Herman, Peter R; Qian, Li

    2012-07-30

    A flat-top interleaver consisting of cascaded Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs) was fabricated in bulk glass by femtosecond laser direct writing. Spectral contrast ratios of greater than 15 dB were demonstrated over a 30 nm bandwidth for 3 nm channel spacing. The observed spectral response agreed well with a standard transfer matrix model generated from responses of individual optical components, demonstrating the possibility for multi-component optical design as well as sufficient process accuracy and fabrication consistency for femtosecond laser writing of advanced optical circuits in three dimensions.

  16. Astrocyte-to-neuron signaling in response to photostimulation with a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Liu, Xiuli; Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2010-08-01

    Conventional stimulation techniques used in studies of astrocyte-to-neuron signaling are invasive or dependent on additional electrical devices or chemicals. Here, we applied photostimulation with a femtosecond laser to selectively stimulate astrocytes in the hippocampal neural network, and the neuronal responses were examined. The results showed that, after photostimulation, cell-specific astrocyte-to-neuron signaling was triggered; sometimes the neuronal responses were even synchronous. Since photostimulation with a femtosecond laser is noninvasive, agent-free, and highly precise, this method has been proved to be efficient in activating astrocytes for investigations of astrocytic functions in neural networks.

  17. UV waveguides light fabricated in fluoropolymer CYTOP by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Yasutaka; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2010-01-18

    We have fabricated optical waveguides inside the UV-transparent polymer, CYTOP, by femtosecond laser direct writing for propagating UV light in biochip applications. Femtosecond laser irradiation is estimated to increase the refractive index of CYTOP by 1.7 x 10(-3) due to partial bond breaking in CYTOP. The waveguide in CYTOP has propagation losses of 0.49, 0.77, and 0.91 dB/cm at wavelengths of 632.8, 355, and 266 nm, respectively.

  18. Selective Deactivation of M13 Bacteriophage in E. Coli using Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molukanele, P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deactivation of M13 Bacteriophage in E. Coli using Femtosecond Laser Pulses P. Molukanele 1, 3, A. Du Plessis 1, T. Roberts 1, L. Botha 1, M. Khati 2,3, W. Campos 2, 3 1CSIR National Laser Centre, Femtosecond Science group, Pretoria, South Africa 2CSIR... that is about 1 ?m long and 5-6 nm in diameter. Its host Escherichia coli (E.coli), is approximately 2-6 ?m long and 1-1.5 ?m in diameter, see figure 1 below. Figure 1: Schematic representations of M13 bacteriophage and its host E.coli...

  19. Characterization of superconducting thin films deposited by laser ablation. Caracterisation de films minces supraconducteurs deposes par ablation laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentis, M; Delaporte, P [I.M.F.M., 13 - Marseille (FR); Gerri, M; Marine, W [Aix-Marseille-2 Univ., 13-Marseille (FR). Centre Universitaire de Luminy

    1991-05-01

    Thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} are deposited by laser ablation on MgO and YSZ substrates. Deposits by infrared (I.R.) Nd: YAG are non stoechiometric. The films having the best superconductor qualities are deposited by ablation with an excimer U.V. laser ({lambda} = 308 nm). These films are epitaxiated with the c axis perpendicular to the substrate. The film quality depends on the substrate temperature, oxygen pressure and cooling speed.

  20. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated

  1. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  2. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  3. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T

    2007-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained

  4. Optical wave microphone measurement during laser ablation of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsugi, Fumiaki, E-mail: mitsugi@cs.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Ide, Ryota; Ikegami, Tomoaki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Nakamiya, Toshiyuki; Sonoda, Yoshito [Graduate School of Industrial Engineering, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, 862-8652 (Japan)

    2012-10-30

    Pulsed laser irradiation is used for surface treatment of a solid and ablation for particle formation in gas, liquid or supercritical phase media. When a pulsed laser is used to irradiate a solid, spatial refractive index variations (including photothermal expansion, shockwaves and particles) occur, which vary depending on the energy density of the pulsed laser. We focused on this phenomenon and applied an unique method for detection of refractive index variation using an optical wave microphone based on Fraunhofer diffraction. In this research, we analyzed the waveforms and frequencies of refractive index variations caused by pulsed laser irradiation of silicon in air and measured with an optical wave microphone.

  5. Corneal tissue interactions of a new 345 nm ultraviolet femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Christian M; Petsch, Corinna; Klenke, Jörg; Skerl, Katrin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Kruse, Friedrich E; Seiler, Theo; Menzel-Severing, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    To assess the suitability of a new 345 nm ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond laser for refractive surgery. Department of Ophthalmology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. Experimental study. Twenty-five porcine corneas were used for stromal flap or lamellar bed creation (stromal depth, 150 μm) and 15 rabbit corneas for lamellar bed creation near the endothelium. Ultraviolet femtosecond laser cutting-line morphology, gas formation, and keratocyte death rate were evaluated using light and electron microscopy and compared with a standard infrared (IR) femtosecond laser. Endothelial cell survival was examined after application of a laser cut near the endothelium. Flaps created by the UV laser were lifted easily. Gas formation was reduced 4.2-fold compared with the IR laser (P = .001). The keratocyte death rate near the interface was almost doubled; however, the death zone was confined to a region within 38 μm ± 10 (SD) along the cutting line. Histologically and ultrastructurally, a distinct and continuous cutting line was not found after UV femtosecond laser application if flap lifting was omitted and standard energy parameters were used. Instead, a regular pattern of vertical striations, presumably representing self-focusing induced regions of optical tissue breakdown, were identified. Lamellar bed creation with standard energy parameters 50 μm from the endothelium rendered the endothelial cells intact and viable. The new 345 nm femtosecond laser is a candidate for pending in vivo trials and future high-precision flap creation, intrastromal lenticule extraction, and ultrathin Descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty. Mr. Klenke and Ms. Skerl were paid employees of Wavelight GmbH when the study was performed. Dr. Seiler is a scientific consultant to Wavelight GmbH. No other author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Femtosecond Nonlinearities in Indium Gallium Arsenic Phosphide Diode Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Katherine Lavin

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers are receiving increasing attention for possible applications to broadband optical communication and switching systems. In this thesis we report the results of an extensive experimental study of the ultrafast gain and refractive index nonlinearities in 1.5 μm InGaAsP laser diode amplifiers. The temporal resolution afforded by the femtosecond optical pulses used in these experiments allows us to study carrier interactions with other carriers as well as carrier interactions with the lattice. The 100-200 fs optical pulses used in the pump -probe experiments are generated by an Additive Pulse Modelocked color center laser. The measured group velocity dispersion in the diodes ranged from -0.6 to -0.95 mu m^{-1 }. Differences in the group velocity for TE - and TM-polarized pulses suggested that cross-polarized pump-probe pulses walk off from each other in the diode. This walk-off can diminish the time resolution of some experiments. A novel heterodyne pump-probe technique was developed to distinguish collinear, copolarized, pump and probe pulses that were nominally at the same wavelength. Comparing cross-polarized and copolarized pump-probe results yielded new information about the physical mechanisms responsible for nonlinear gain in the diodes. We observed a gain compression across the entire bandwidth of the diode, associated with carrier heating. The hot carrier distribution cooled back to the lattice temperature with a 0.6 to 1.0 ps time constant, depending on the device structure. In addition, we observed a 0.1 to 0.25 ps delay in onset of carrier heating. Large gain compression due to two photon absorption was also observed. A small portion of the nonlinear gain is attributed to spectral hole burning. Pulsewidth-dependent output saturation energies were explained by a rate equation model that included the effect of carrier heating. Measurements of pump-induced probe phase changes revealed index nonlinearities due to delayed carrier

  7. Angular distributions and total yield of laser ablated silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Nordskov, A.; Schou, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    The angular distribution of laser ablated silver has been measured in situ with a newly constructed setup with an array of microbalances. The distribution is strongly peaked in the forward direction corresponding to cospθ, where p varies between 5 and 9 for laser fluences from 2 to 7 J/cm2 at 355...... nm for a beam spot of 0.015 cm2. The total deposited yield is of the order 1015 Ag-atoms per pulse....

  8. Dynamics of laser ablation at the early stage during and after ultrashort pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilnitsky, D K; Zhakhovsky, V V; Migdal, K P; Inogamov, N A; Khokhlov, V A; Petrov, Yu V

    2016-01-01

    Study of material flow in two-temperature states is needed for a fundamental understanding the physics of femtosecond laser ablation. To explore phenomena at a very early stage of laser action on a metallic target our in-house two-temperature hydrodynamics code is used here. The early stage covers duration of laser pulse with next first few picoseconds. We draw attention to the difference in behavior at this stage between the cases: (i) of an ultrathin film (thickness of order of skin depth d skin or less), (ii) thin films (thickness of a film is 4-7 of d skin for gold), and (iii) bulk targets (more than 10 d skin for gold). We demonstrate that these differences follow from a competition among conductive cooling of laser excited electrons in a skin layer, electron-ion coupling, and hydrodynamics of unloading caused by excess of pressure of excited free electrons. Conductive cooling of the skin needs a heat sink, which is performed by the cold material outside the skin. Such sink is unavailable in the ultrathin films. (paper)

  9. Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation: Afterthoughts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.M. Neumann (Martino); M.J.C. van Gemert (Martin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPhysicists and medical doctors "speak" different languages. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a good example in which technology is essential to guide the doctor to the final result: optimal treatment. However, for the doctor, it is by far insufficient just to turn on the knobs of the

  10. Online Monitoring of Nanoparticles Formed during Nanosecond Laser Ablation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, H.; Holá, M.; Vojtíšek-Lomb, M.; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 125, NOV 1 (2016), s. 52-60 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : laser ablation * fast mobility particle sizer * inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.241, year: 2016

  11. Absorption Enhanced Liquid Ablation with TEA CO2 Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sterling, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    ... that strongly absorbs radiation in the 8-11 m wavelength interval. A TEA CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 m), 300 ns pulse width and 8 J pulse energy, was used for ablation of water diluted NaBF4 contained in a conical aluminum nozzle...

  12. Femtosecond Cr:LiSAF and Cr:LiCAF lasers pumped by tapered diode lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbas, Umit; Schmalz, Michael; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Petrich, Gale S; Kolodziejski, Leslie A; Fujimoto, James G; Kärtner, Franz X; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2011-10-10

    We report compact, low-cost and efficient Cr:Colquiriite lasers that are pumped by high brightness tapered laser diodes. The tapered laser diodes provided 1 to 1.2 W of output power around 675 nm, at an electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency of about 30%. Using a single tapered diode laser as the pump source, we have demonstrated output powers of 500 mW and 410 mW together with slope efficiencies of 47% and 41% from continuous wave (cw) Cr:LiSAF and Cr:LiCAF lasers, respectively. In cw mode-locked operation, sub-100-fs pulse trains with average power between 200 mW and 250 mW were obtained at repetition rates around 100 MHz. Upon pumping the Cr:Colquiriite lasers with two tapered laser diodes (one from each side of the crystal), we have observed scaling of cw powers to 850 mW in Cr:LiSAF and to 650 mW in Cr:LiCAF. From the double side pumped Cr:LiCAF laser, we have also obtained ~220 fs long pulses with 5.4 nJ of pulse energy at 77 MHz repetition rate. These are the highest energy levels reported from Cr:Colquiriite so far at these repetition rates. Our findings indicate that tapered diodes in the red spectral region are likely to become the standard pump source for Cr:Colquiriite lasers in the near future. Moreover, the simplified pumping scheme might facilitate efficient commercialization of Cr:Colquiriite systems, bearing the potential to significantly boost applications of cw and femtosecond lasers in this spectral region (750-1000 nm).

  13. Experimental investigation on the spiral trepanning of K24 superalloy with femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maolu; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Yang

    2018-05-01

    Film cooling holes are crucial for improving the performance of the aviation engine. In the paper, the processing of the film cooling holes on K24 superalloy by femtosecond laser is investigated. By comparing the three different drilling methods, the spiral trepanning method is chosen, and all the drilling experiments are carried out in this way. The experimental results show that the drilling of femtosecond laser pulses has distinct merits against that of the traditional long pulse laser, which can realize the "cold" processing with less recasting layer and less crack. The influence of each process parameter on roundness and taper, which are the important parameters to measure the quality of holes, is analyzed in detail, and the method to decrease it is proposed. To further reduce the recasting layer, the processing quality of the inner wall of the micro hole is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS), the mechanism of the femtosecond laser interaction with K24 superalloy is further revealed. The investigation to the film hole machining by femtosecond laser has important practical significance.

  14. Superhydrophobic/superoleophilic magnetic elastomers by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milionis, Athanasios, E-mail: am2vy@virginia.edu [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Fragouli, Despina; Brandi, Fernando; Liakos, Ioannis; Barroso, Suset [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Athanassiou, Athanassia, E-mail: athanassia.athanassiou@iit.it [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets. • Laser irradiation of the nanocomposites induces chemical and structural changes to the surface. • The laser-patterned surfaces exhibit superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. • The particle contribution in altering the surface and bulk properties of the material is studied. - Abstract: We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets with superhydrophobic and supeoleophilic surfaces generated by laser ablation. Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer free-standing films, loaded homogeneously with 2% wt. carbon coated iron nanoparticles, were ablated by UV (248 nm), nanosecond laser pulses. The laser irradiation induces chemical and structural changes (both in micro- and nano-scale) to the surfaces of the nanocomposites rendering them superhydrophobic. The use of nanoparticles increases the UV light absorption efficiency of the nanocomposite samples, and thus facilitates the ablation process, since the number of pulses and the laser fluence required are greatly reduced compared to the bare polymer. Additionally the magnetic nanoparticles enhance significantly the superhydrophobic and oleophilic properties of the PDMS sheets, and provide to PDMS magnetic properties making possible its actuation by a weak external magnetic field. These nanocomposite elastomers can be considered for applications requiring magnetic MEMS for the controlled separation of liquids.

  15. Monolithic Highly Stable Yb-Doped Femtosecond Fiber Lasers for Applications in Practical Biophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2012-01-01

    in the development of all-fiber nonlinear-optical laser control schemes, which resulted in the demonstration of highly stable monolithic, i.e., not containing any free-space elements, lasers with direct fiber-end delivery of femtosecond pulses. This paper provides an overview of the progress in the development...... of such all-fiber mode-locked lasers based on Yb-fiber as gain medium, operating at the wavelength around 1 $\\mu$m, and delivering femtosecond pulses reaching tens of nanojoules of energy.......Operational and environmental stability of ultrafast laser systems is critical for their applications in practical biophotonics. Mode-locked fiber lasers show great promise in applications such as supercontinuum sources or multiphoton microscopy systems. Recently, substantial progress has been made...

  16. Femtosecond all-polarization-maintaining fiber laser operating at 1028 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, R.K.; Andersen, T.V.; Leick, Lasse

    2008-01-01

    We present an effective solution for an all-polarization-maintaining modelocked femtosecond fiber laser operating at the central wavelength of 1028 nm. The laser is based on an Yb-doped active fiber. Modelocking is enabled by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror, and the central wavelength i...... is enforced by a fiber Bragg grating. The laser is self-starting and demonstrates excellent stability gainst Q-switching. Pulse energies reach 13 nJ at 34 MHz repetition rate. External compression leads to near transform-limited pulses of 140 fs.......We present an effective solution for an all-polarization-maintaining modelocked femtosecond fiber laser operating at the central wavelength of 1028 nm. The laser is based on an Yb-doped active fiber. Modelocking is enabled by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror, and the central wavelength...

  17. Synchronized femtosecond laser pulse switching system based nano-patterning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Ik-Bu; Choi, Hun-Kook; Yoo, Dongyoon; Noh, Young-Chul; Sung, Jae-Hee; Lee, Seong-Ku; Ahsan, Md. Shamim; Lee, Ho

    2017-07-01

    This paper demonstrates the design and development of a synchronized femtosecond laser pulse switching system and its applications in nano-patterning of transparent materials. Due to synchronization, we are able to control the location of each irradiated laser pulse in any kind of substrate. The control over the scanning speed and scanning step of the laser beam enables us to pattern periodic micro/nano-metric holes, voids, and/or lines in various materials. Using the synchronized laser system, we pattern synchronized nano-holes on the surface of and inside various transparent materials including fused silica glass and polymethyl methacrylate to replicate any image or pattern on the surface of or inside (transparent) materials. We also investigate the application areas of the proposed synchronized femtosecond laser pulse switching system in a diverse field of science and technology, especially in optical memory, color marking, and synchronized micro/nano-scale patterning of materials.

  18. X-ray emission from stainless steel foils irradiated by femtosecond petawatt laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhimova, M. A.; Faenov, A. Ya; Pikuz, T. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Pikuz, S. A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, S.; Dover, N. P.; Kondo, Ko; Ogura, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Esirkepov, T.; Bulanov, S. V.; Andreev, A.; Kando, M.; Zhidkov, A.; Nishitani, K.; Miyahara, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kodama, R.; Kondo, K.

    2018-01-01

    We report about nonlinear growth of x-ray emission intensity emitted from plasma generated by femtosecond petawatt laser pulses irradiating stainless steel foils. X-ray emission intensity increases as ˜ I 4.5 with laser intensity I on a target. High spectrally resolved x-ray emission from front and rear surfaces of 5 μm thickness stainless steel targets were obtained at the wavelength range 1.7-2.1 Å, for the first time in experiments at femtosecond petawatt laser facility J-KAREN-P. Total intensity of front x-ray spectra three times dominates to rear side spectra for maximum laser intensity I ≈ 3.2×1021 W/cm2. Growth of x-ray emission is mostly determined by contribution of bremsstrahlung radiation that allowed estimating bulk electron plasma temperature for various magnitude of laser intensity on target.

  19. UV and IR laser induced ablation of Al2O3/SiN:H and a-Si:H/SiN:H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schutz-Kuchly T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental work on laser induced ablation of thin Al2O3(20 nm/SiN:H (70 nm and a-Si:H (20 nm/SiN:H (70 nm stacks acting, respectively, as p-type and n-type silicon surface passivation layers is reported. Results obtained using two different laser sources are compared. The stacks are efficiently removed using a femtosecond infra-red laser (1030 nm wavelength, 300 fs pulse duration but the underlying silicon surface is highly damaged in a ripple-like pattern. This collateral effect is almost completely avoided using a nanosecond ultra-violet laser (248 nm wavelength, 50 ns pulse duration, however a-Si:H flakes and Al2O3 lace remain after ablation process.

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Linear and Nonlinear Photonic Devices in Fused Silica by Femtosecond Laser Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jason Clement

    Femtosecond laser processing is a flexible, three-dimensional (3D) fabrication technique used to make integrated low-loss photonic devices in fused silica. My work expanded the suite of available optical devices through the design and optimization of linear optical components such as low-loss (70-nm spectral window. My work further complemented femtosecond laser processing with the development of nonlinear device capabilities. While thermal poling is a well known process, significant challenges had restricted the development of nonlinear devices in fused silica. The laser writing process would erase the induced nonlinearity (erasing) while a written waveguide core acted as a barrier to the thermal poling process (blocking). Using second harmonic (SH) microscopy, the effectiveness of thermal poling on laser-written waveguides was systematically analyzed leading to the technique of "double poling", which effectively overcomes the two challenges of erasing and blocking. In this new process the substrate is poled before and after waveguide writing to restore the induced nonlinearity within the vicinity of the waveguide to enable effective poling for inducing a second-order nonlinearity (SON) in fused silica. A new flexible, femtosecond laser based erasure process was also developed to enable quasi-phase matching and to form arbitrarily chirped gratings. Following this result, second harmonic generation (SHG) in a quasiphase-matched (QPM) femtosecond laser written waveguide device was demonstrated. SHG in a chirped QPM structure was also demonstrated to illustrate the flexibility of the femtosecond laser writing technique. These are the first demonstration of frequency doubling in an all-femtosecond-laser-written structure. A maximum SHG conversion efficiency of 1.3 +/- 0.1x10 -11/W-cm-2 was achieved for the fundamental wavelength of 1552.8 nm with a phase-matching bandwidth of 4.4 nm for a 10.0-mm-long waveguide. For a shorter sample, an effective SON of chi(2) = 0

  1. Impact of the Femtosecond Laser in Line with the Femtosecond Laser-Assisted Cataract Surgery (FLACS) on the Anterior Chamber Characteristics in Comparison to the Manual Phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlitzsch, Milena; Torun, Necip; Pahlitzsch, Marie Luise; Klamann, Matthias K J; Gonnermann, Johannes; Bertelmann, Eckart; Pahlitzsch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    To assess the alterations of the anterior chamber conditions including laser flare photometry after femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) compared to the manual phacoemulsification. Data of n=70 FLACS (mean age 67.2 ± 8.9 years) and n=40 manual phacoemulsification (mean age 69.5 ± 9.6 years) were analyzed. The procedures were performed by LenSx Alcon, USA, and Alcon Infiniti Vision System, USA. The following parameters were recorded: laser flare photometry (Kowa FM 700, Japan), anterior chamber (AC) depth, AC volume, AC angle (Pentacam, Oculus Inc., Germany), lens density, pupil diameter, endothelial cell count and pachymetry. The analysis was performed preoperatively, immediately after femtosecond laser procedure and one day postoperatively. Between FLACS and the phaco control group, there was a significant difference in the AC depth (p=0.023, 3.77 mm vs. 4.05 mm) one day postoperatively. The AC angle (p=0.016) showed a significant difference immediately after the femto laser treatment. The central and thinnest pachymetry and endothelial cell count did not show a significant difference between the two study cohorts (p=0.165, p=0.291, p=0.979). The phaco cohort (n=40) demonstrated a non-statistically significant difference in the flare photometry of 15.80 photons/ms one postoperative day compared to the FLACS group 26.62 photons/ms (p=0.322). In this study population, no evidence for an additive damage caused by the use of the femtosecond laser was demonstrated. Furthermore, no increase in the central and thinnest corneal thickness and no increased endothelial cell loss was demonstrated by the laser energy.

  2. Achieving few-femtosecond time-sorting at hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, M.; Coffee, R.; Bionta, M. R.; Chollet, M.; French, D.; Zhu, D.; Fritz, D. M.; Lemke, H. T.; Medvedev, N.; Ziaja, B.; Toleikis, S.; Cammarata, M.

    2013-03-01

    Recently, few-femtosecond pulses have become available at hard X-ray free-electron lasers. Coupled with the available sub-10 fs optical pulses, investigations into few-femtosecond dynamics are not far off. However, achieving sufficient synchronization between optical lasers and X-ray pulses continues to be challenging. We report a `measure-and-sort' approach, which achieves sub-10 fs root-mean-squared (r.m.s.) error measurement at hard X-ray FELs, far beyond the 100-200 fs r.m.s. jitter limitations. This timing diagnostic, now routinely available at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is based on ultrafast free-carrier generation in optically transparent materials. Correlation between two independent measurements enables unambiguous demonstration of ~6 fs r.m.s. error in reporting the optical/X-ray delay, with single shot error suggesting the possibility of reaching few-femtosecond resolution.

  3. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Jalmuzna, W.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmüser, P.; Schulz, S.; Szewinski, J.; Winter, A.; Zemella, J.

    2010-04-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  4. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-01-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  5. Direct writing of sub-wavelength ripples on silicon using femtosecond laser at high repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Changxin; Li, Xiaohong; Liu, Kaijun; Zhu, Min; Qiu, Rong; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The NSRs and DSRs are obtained on silicon surface. • With increasing direct writing speed, the NSRs suddenly changes and becomes the DSRs. • We develop a Sipe–Drude interference theory by considering the thermal excitation. - Abstract: The near sub-wavelength and deep sub-wavelength ripples on monocrystalline silicon were formed in air by using linearly polarized and high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses (f = 76 MHz, λ = 800 nm, τ = 50 fs). The effects of laser pulse energy, direct writing speed and laser polarization on silicon surface morphology are studied. When the laser pulse energy is 2 nJ/pulse and the direct writing speed varies from 10 to 25 mm/s, the near sub-wavelength ripples (NSRs) with orientation perpendicular to the laser polarization are generated. While the direct writing speed reaches 30 mm/s, the direction of the obtained deep sub-wavelength ripples (DSRs) suddenly changes and becomes parallel to the laser polarization, rarely reported so far for femtosecond laser irradiation of silicon. Meanwhile, we extend the Sipe–Drude interference theory by considering the thermal excitation, and numerically calculate the efficacy factor for silicon irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses. The revised Sipe–Drude interference theoretical results show good agreement with the periods and orientations of sub-wavelength ripples.

  6. Tubular depressed cladding waveguide laser realized in Yb: YAG by direct inscription of femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Wenlong; Zhang, Wenfu; Liu, Xin; Liu, Shuang; Cheng, Guanghua; Stoian, Razvan

    2015-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of tubular depressed cladding waveguides in single crystalline Yb:YAG by the direct femtosecond laser writing technique. Full control over the confined light spatial distribution is demonstrated by the photoinscription of high index contrast waveguides with tubular configuration. Under optical pumping, highly efficient laser oscillation in depressed cladding waveguide at 1030 nm is demonstrated. The maximum output power obtained is 68 mW with a slope efficiency of 35% for an outcoupling transmission of 50%. A slope efficiency as high as 44% is realized when the coupling output ratio is 91% and a low lasing threshold of 70 mW is achieved with the output coupling mirror of 10%. (paper)

  7. Femtosecond versus picosecond laser pulses for film-free laser bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Stephane; Kérourédan, Olivia; Devillard, Raphael; Cormier, Eric

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the properties of microjets in the context of film-free laser induced forward transfer in the femtosecond and picosecond regimes. The influence of the pulse duration (ranging from 0.4 to 12 ps) and the energy (ranging from 6 to 12 μJ) is systematically studied on the height, diameter, speed, volume, and shape of the jets. The 400 fs pulses generate thin and stable jets compatible with bioprinting, while 14 ps pulses generate more unstable jets. A pulse duration around 8 ps seems, therefore, to be an interesting trade-off to cover many bio-applications of microjets generated by lasers.

  8. A plasma microlens for ultrashort high power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzir, Yiftach; Eisenmann, Shmuel; Ferber, Yair; Zigler, Arie; Hubbard, Richard F.

    2009-07-01

    We present a technique for generation of miniature plasma lens system that can be used for focusing and collimating a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. The plasma lens was created by a nanosecond laser, which ablated a capillary entrance. The spatial configuration of the ablated plasma focused a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. This configuration offers versatility in the plasma lens small f-number for extremely tight focusing of high power lasers with no damage threshold restrictions of regular optical components.

  9. A plasma microlens for ultrashort high power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzir, Yiftach; Eisenmann, Shmuel; Ferber, Yair; Zigler, Arie; Hubbard, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique for generation of miniature plasma lens system that can be used for focusing and collimating a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. The plasma lens was created by a nanosecond laser, which ablated a capillary entrance. The spatial configuration of the ablated plasma focused a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. This configuration offers versatility in the plasma lens small f-number for extremely tight focusing of high power lasers with no damage threshold restrictions of regular optical components.

  10. Comparison of the femtosecond laser and mechanical microkeratome for flap cutting in LASIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Kun Xia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare refractive results, higher-order aberrations (HOAs, contrast sensitivity and dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK performed with a femtosecond laser versus a mechanical microkeratome for myopia and astigmatism.METHODS: In this prospective, non-randomized study, 120 eyes with myopia received a LASIK surgery with the VisuMax femtosecond laser for flap cutting, and 120 eyes received a conventional LASIK surgery with a mechanical microkeratome. Flap thickness, visual acuity, manifest refraction, contrast sensitivity function (CSF curves, HOAs and dry-eye were measured at 1wk; 1, 3, 6mo after surgery.RESULTS:At 6mo postoperatively, the mean central flap thickness in femtosecond laser procedure was 113.05±5.89 µm (attempted thickness 110 µm, and 148.36±21.24 µm (attempted thickness 140 µm in mechanical microkeratome procedure. An uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA of 4.9 or better was obtained in more than 98% of eyes treated by both methods, a gain in logMAR lines of corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA occurred in more than 70% of eyes treated by both methods, and no eye lost ≥1 lines of CDVA in both groups. The difference of the mean UDVA and CDVA between two groups at any time post-surgery were not statistically significant (P>0.05. The postoperative changes of spherical equivalent occurred markedly during the first month in both groups. The total root mean square values of HOAs and spherical aberrations in the femtosecond treated eyes were markedly less than those in the microkeratome treated eyes during 6mo visit after surgery (P<0.01. The CSF values of the femtosecond treated eyes were also higher than those of the microkeratome treated eyes at all space frequency (P<0.01. The mean ocular surface disease index scores in both groups were increased at 1wk, and recovered to preoperative level at 1mo after surgery. The mean tear breakup time (TBUT of the femtosecond treated eyes were markedly

  11. Comparison of the femtosecond laser and mechanical microkeratome for flap cutting in LASIK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li-Kun; Yu, Jie; Chai, Guang-Rui; Wang, Dang; Li, Yang

    2015-01-01

    To compare refractive results, higher-order aberrations (HOAs), contrast sensitivity and dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) performed with a femtosecond laser versus a mechanical microkeratome for myopia and astigmatism. In this prospective, non-randomized study, 120 eyes with myopia received a LASIK surgery with the VisuMax femtosecond laser for flap cutting, and 120 eyes received a conventional LASIK surgery with a mechanical microkeratome. Flap thickness, visual acuity, manifest refraction, contrast sensitivity function (CSF) curves, HOAs and dry-eye were measured at 1wk; 1, 3, 6mo after surgery. At 6mo postoperatively, the mean central flap thickness in femtosecond laser procedure was 113.05±5.89 µm (attempted thickness 110 µm), and 148.36±21.24 µm (attempted thickness 140 µm) in mechanical microkeratome procedure. An uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) of 4.9 or better was obtained in more than 98% of eyes treated by both methods, a gain in logMAR lines of corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) occurred in more than 70% of eyes treated by both methods, and no eye lost ≥1 lines of CDVA in both groups. The difference of the mean UDVA and CDVA between two groups at any time post-surgery were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The postoperative changes of spherical equivalent occurred markedly during the first month in both groups. The total root mean square values of HOAs and spherical aberrations in the femtosecond treated eyes were markedly less than those in the microkeratome treated eyes during 6mo visit after surgery (P<0.01). The CSF values of the femtosecond treated eyes were also higher than those of the microkeratome treated eyes at all space frequency (P<0.01). The mean ocular surface disease index scores in both groups were increased at 1wk, and recovered to preoperative level at 1mo after surgery. The mean tear breakup time (TBUT) of the femtosecond treated eyes were markedly longer than those of the microkeratome

  12. Ablation of Liquids for Laser Propulsion With TEA CO2 Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V; Larson, C. W; Mead, Jr., Franklin B

    2005-01-01

    .... A Transversely Excited at Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser operated at 10.6 um, 300 ns pulse width, and 9 J pulse energy was used to ablate liquids contained in various aluminum and glass vessels...

  13. Ablation of Liquids for Laser Propulsion with TEA CO2 Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V; Larson, C. W; Mead, Jr, Franklin B

    2005-01-01

    .... A Transversely Excited at Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser operated at 10.6 micro-m, 300 ns pulse width, and 9 J pulse energy was used to ablate liquids contained in various aluminum and glass vessels...

  14. Irradiation of amorphous Ta{sub 42}Si{sub 13}N{sub 45} film with a femtosecond laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, V. [University of Bern, Institute of Applied Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern (Switzerland); Meier, M. [University of Bern, Institute of Applied Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Theodore, N.D. [Freescale Semiconductor Inc., Tempe, AZ (United States); Marble, D.K. [Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX (United States); Nicolet, M.A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Films of 260 nm thickness, with atomic composition Ta{sub 42}Si{sub 13}N{sub 45}, on 4'' silicon wafers, have been irradiated in air with single laser pulses of 200 femtoseconds duration and 800 nm wave length. As sputter-deposited, the films are structurally amorphous. A laterally truncated Gaussian beam with a near-uniform fluence of {proportional_to}0.6 J/cm{sup 2} incident normally on such a film ablates 23 nm of the film. Cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs show that the surface of the remaining film is smooth and flat on a long-range scale, but contains densely distributed sharp nanoprotrusions that sometimes surpass the height of the original surface. Dark field micrographs of the remaining material show no nanograins. Neither does glancing angle X-ray diffraction with a beam illuminating many diffraction spots. By all evidence, the remaining film remains amorphous after the pulsed femtosecond irradiation. The same single pulse, but with an enhanced and slightly peaked fluence profile, creates a spot with flat peripheral terraces whose lateral extents shrink with depth, as scanning electron and atomic force micrographs revealed. Comparison of the various figures suggests that the sharp nanoprotrusions result from an ejection of material by brittle fraction and spallation, not from ablation by direct beam-solid interaction. Conditions under which spallation should dominate over ablation are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Development and characterization of femtosecond laser driven soft x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettaibi, I.

    2005-06-01

    Coherent soft x-ray sources have an important potential for scientific, medical and industrial applications. The development of high intensity laser systems allowed the realization of new coherent and fast soft x-ray sources like high order harmonic generation and soft x-ray lasers. These sources are compact, cheaper than traditional sources such as synchrotrons, and are thus interesting. This thesis presents the study of a new soft x-ray laser pumped by a femto-second laser beam working at 10 Hz. The circularly polarized ultra intense laser is longitudinally focused in a cell filled with xenon or krypton, to obtain the amplification of two lasing lines at 41.8 nm and 32.8 nm in Pd-like xenon and Ni-like krypton respectively. We carry out an experimental and numerical study of the source to understand the importance of different parameters such as the laser intensity and polarization, the gas pressure and the cell length. We have also spatially and temporally characterized the soft x-ray laser beam. To compensate the refraction of the driving laser we have investigated guiding techniques consisting in creating a plasma channel by electric discharge or using the multiple reflections of the driving laser on the internal walls of the dielectric tubes of sapphire or glass. A spectacular improvement of the source performances has been observed in both cases. Finally, we present a preliminary study on a different x-ray scheme: the inner shell photo pumping of neutral atoms. We have developed an optical system, which should create the appropriate conditions for the realisation of short wavelength x-ray amplifier. (author)

  16. 308-nm excimer laser ablation of human cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodoehl, John A.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1993-07-01

    The XeCl excimer laser was investigated as an ablating tool for human fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Quantitative measurements were made of tissue ablation rates as a function of fluence in meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage. A force of 1.47 Newtons was applied to an 800 micrometers fiber with the laser delivering a range of fluences (40 to 190 mj/mm2) firing at a frequency of 5 Hz. To assess the effect of repetition rate on ablation rate, a set of measurements was made at a constant fluence of 60 mj/mm2, with the repetition rate varying from 10 to 40 Hz. Histologic and morphometric analysis was performed using light microscopy. The results of these studies revealed that the ablation rate was directly proportional to fluence over the range tested. Fibrocartilage was ablated at a rate 2.56 times faster than hyaline cartilage at the maximum fluence tested. Repetition rate had no effect on the penetration per pulse. Adjacent tissue damage was noted to be minimal (10 - 70 micrometers ).

  17. Percutaneous laser ablation of unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacella, Claudio M. [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)], E-mail: claudiomaurizio.pacella@fastwebnet.it; Stasi, Roberto; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Sara; Graziano, Filomena Maria; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical benefits of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) in patients with unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Patients and methods: Four patients with hepatic metastases from ACC and a Cushing's syndrome underwent ultrasound-guided PLA. In one case the procedure was performed also on the primary tumor. Results: After three sessions of PLA, the primary tumor of 15 cm was ablated by 75%. After 1-4 (median 1) sessions of PLA, five liver metastases ranging from 2 to 5 cm were completely ablated, while the sixth tumor of 12 cm was ablated by 75%. There were no major complications. Treatment resulted in an improvement of performance status and a reduction of the daily dosage of mitotane in all patients. The three patients with liver metastases presented a marked decrease of 24-h urine cortisol levels, an improved control of hypertension and a mean weight loss of 2.8 kg. After a median follow-up after PLA of 27.0 months (range, 9-48 months), two patients have died of tumor progression, while two other patients remain alive and free of disease. Conclusions: Percutaneous laser ablation is a feasible, safe and well tolerated procedure for the palliative treatment of unresectable primary and metastatic ACC. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of PLA on survival.

  18. Percutaneous laser ablation of unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacella, Claudio M.; Stasi, Roberto; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Sara; Graziano, Filomena Maria; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical benefits of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) in patients with unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Patients and methods: Four patients with hepatic metastases from ACC and a Cushing's syndrome underwent ultrasound-guided PLA. In one case the procedure was performed also on the primary tumor. Results: After three sessions of PLA, the primary tumor of 15 cm was ablated by 75%. After 1-4 (median 1) sessions of PLA, five liver metastases ranging from 2 to 5 cm were completely ablated, while the sixth tumor of 12 cm was ablated by 75%. There were no major complications. Treatment resulted in an improvement of performance status and a reduction of the daily dosage of mitotane in all patients. The three patients with liver metastases presented a marked decrease of 24-h urine cortisol levels, an improved control of hypertension and a mean weight loss of 2.8 kg. After a median follow-up after PLA of 27.0 months (range, 9-48 months), two patients have died of tumor progression, while two other patients remain alive and free of disease. Conclusions: Percutaneous laser ablation is a feasible, safe and well tolerated procedure for the palliative treatment of unresectable primary and metastatic ACC. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of PLA on survival

  19. Characterization and evaluation of femtosecond laser-induced sub-micron periodic structures generated on titanium to improve osseointegration of implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bryan E. J.; Exir, Hourieh; Weck, Arnaud; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2018-05-01

    Reproducible and controllable methods of modifying titanium surfaces for dental and orthopaedic applications are of interest to prevent poor implant outcomes by improving osseointegration. This study made use of a femtosecond laser to generate laser-induced periodic surface structures with periodicities of 300, 620 and 760 nm on titanium substrates. The reproducible rippled patterns showed consistent submicron scale roughness and relatively hydrophobic surfaces as measured by atomic force microscopy and contact angle, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy identified a thicker oxide layer on ablated surfaces compared to controls. In vitro testing was conducted using osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells. Cell metabolism on the laser-ablated surfaces was comparable to controls and alkaline phosphatase activity was notably increased at late time points for the 620 and 760 nm surfaces compared to controls. Cells showed a more elongated shape on laser-ablated surfaces compared to controls and showed perpendicular alignment to the periodic structures. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of generating submicron features on an implant material with the ability to influence cell response and improve implant outcomes.

  20. Numerical analysis of laser ablation and damage in glass with multiple picosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Russ, Simone; Hartmann, Claudia; Siebert, Christof; Zhu, Jianqiang; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-04-08

    This study presents a novel numerical model for laser ablation and laser damage in glass including beam propagation and nonlinear absorption of multiple incident ultrashort laser pulses. The laser ablation and damage in the glass cutting process with a picosecond pulsed laser was studied. The numerical results were in good agreement with our experimental observations, thereby revealing the damage mechanism induced by laser ablation. Beam propagation effects such as interference, diffraction and refraction, play a major role in the evolution of the crater structure and the damage region. There are three different damage regions, a thin layer and two different kinds of spikes. Moreover, the electronic damage mechanism was verified and distinguished from heat modification using the experimental results with different pulse spatial overlaps.